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Sample records for c-terminal globular domain

  1. Modular organization of proteins containing C1q-like globular domain.

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    Kishore, U; Reid, K B

    1999-05-01

    The first step in the activation of the classical pathway of complement cascade by immune complexes involves the binding of the six globular heads of C1q to the Fc regions of immunoglobulin G (IgG) or immunoglobulin M (IgM). The globular heads of C1q are located C-terminal to the six triple-helical stalks present in the molecule, each head is considered to be composed of the C-terminal halves (3 x 135 residues) of one A-, one B- and one C-chain. It is not known if the C-terminal globular regions, present in each of the three types of chains, are independently folded modules (with each chain having distinct binding properties towards immunoglobulins) or whether the different binding functions of C1q are dependent upon a globular structure which relies on contributions from all three chains. Recent reports of recombinant production and characterisation of soluble globular head regions of all the three chains indicate that the globular regions of C1q may adopt a modular organization, i.e., each globular head of C1q may be composed of three, structurally and functionally, independent domains, thus retaining multivalency in the form of a heterotrimer. Modules of the same type as the C1q C-terminal module are also found in a variety of noncomplement proteins that include the C-terminal regions of the human type VIII and type X collagens, precerebellin, the chipmunk hibernation proteins, the human endothelial cell protein, multimerin, the serum protein, Acrp-30 which is secreted from mouse adipocytes, and the sunfish inner-ear specific structural protein. The C1q molecule is the only one of these proteins for which, to date, a function has been ascribed to the module. The existence of a shared structural region between C1q and certain collagens may suggest an evolutionarily common ancestral precursor. Various structural and biochemical data suggest that these modules may be responsible for multimerisation through patches of aromatic residues within them.

  2. Conformational and functional analysis of the C-terminal globular head of the reovirus cell attachment protein.

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    Duncan, R; Horne, D; Strong, J E; Leone, G; Pon, R T; Yeung, M C; Lee, P W

    1991-06-01

    We have been investigating structure-function relationships in the reovirus cell attachment protein sigma 1 using various deletion mutants and protease analysis. In the present study, a series of deletion mutants were constructed which lacked 90, 44, 30, 12, or 4 amino acids from the C-terminus of the 455-amino acid-long reovirus type 3 (T3) sigma 1 protein. The full-length and truncated sigma 1 proteins were expressed in an in vitro transcription/translation system and assayed for L cell binding activity. It was found that the removal of as few as four amino acids from the C-terminus drastically affected the cell binding function of the sigma 1 protein. The C-terminal-truncated proteins were further characterized using trypsin, chymotrypsin, and monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Our results indicated that the C-terminal portions of the mutant proteins were misfolded, leading to a loss in cell binding function. The N-terminal fibrous tail of the proteins was unaffected by the deletions as was sigma 1 oligomerization, further illustrating the discrete structural and functional roles of the N- and C-terminal domains of sigma 1. In an attempt to identify smaller, functional peptides, full-length sigma 1 expressed in vitro was digested with trypsin and subsequently with chymotrypsin under various conditions. The results clearly demonstrated the highly stable nature of the C-terminal globular head of sigma 1, even when separated from the N-terminal fibrous tail. We concluded that: (1) the C-terminal globular head of sigma 1 exists as a compact, protease-resistant oligomeric structure; (2) an intact C-terminus is required for proper head folding and generation of the conformationally dependent cell binding domain.

  3. Human diploid fibroblasts have receptors for the globular domain of C1Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordin, S.; Page, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors showed that mass cultures of fibroblasts grown from gingival explants in DB medium with 10% human serum are enriched in a phenotype that binds C1q with an affinity much higher than the rest of the population. Because of potential biologic importance of C1q receptors, the authors studied whether the interaction between C1q and this phenotype was mediated by the globular or collagenous domains of the molecule. Globular fragments were prepared by digesting C1q with collagenase, and collagenous fragments obtained after pepsin treatment. C1q binding on cells in suspension was determined by reaction with 125 I-C1q as reported. Competition experiments were performed under conditions in which intact 125 I-C1q binding saturated all available receptors. The results showed that collagenous fragments inhibited 20% of the 125 I-C1q binding to high affinity receptors, whereas inhibition by globular fragments was 70%. Unlabeled intact C1q and collagen type 1 were used as controls, and inhibited 92% and 17% of C1q binding, respectively. These studies show that C1q interacts with the fibroblast phenotype expressing high affinity receptors through its globular domain. The authors suggest that at sites of trauma, native C1 may bind to the surface of these cells via the globular domain of C1q, and that this unique phenotype may play an important role in tissue repair

  4. BtcA, A class IA type III chaperone, interacts with the BteA N-terminal domain through a globular/non-globular mechanism.

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    Chen Guttman

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of "whooping cough" disease, utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver a 69 kDa cytotoxic effector protein, BteA, directly into the host cells. As with other T3SS effectors, prior to its secretion BteA binds BtcA, a 13.9 kDa protein predicted to act as a T3SS class IA chaperone. While this interaction had been characterized for such effector-chaperone pairs in other pathogens, it has yet to be fully investigated in Bordetella. Here we provide the first biochemical proof that BtcA is indeed a class IA chaperone, responsible for the binding of BteA's N-terminal domain. We bring forth extensive evidence that BtcA binds its substrate effector through a dual-interface binding mechanism comprising of non-globular and bi-globular interactions at a moderate micromolar level binding affinity. We demonstrate that the non-globular interactions involve the first 31 N-terminal residues of BteA287 and their removal leads to destabilization of the effector-chaperone complex and lower binding affinities to BtcA. These findings represent an important first step towards a molecular understanding of BteA secretion and cell entry.

  5. Crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the RAP74 subunit of human transcription factor IIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Katsuhiko; De Angelis, Jacqueline; Roeder, Robert G.; Burley, Stephen K. (Rockefeller)

    2012-12-13

    The x-ray structure of a C-terminal fragment of the RAP74 subunit of human transcription factor (TF) IIF has been determined at 1.02-{angstrom} resolution. The {alpha}/{beta} structure is strikingly similar to the globular domain of linker histone H5 and the DNA-binding domain of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3{gamma} (HNF-3{gamma}), making it a winged-helix protein. The surface electrostatic properties of this compact domain differ significantly from those of bona fide winged-helix transcription factors (HNF-3{gamma} and RFX1) and from the winged-helix domains found within the RAP30 subunit of TFIIF and the {beta} subunit of TFIIE. RAP74 has been shown to interact with the TFIIF-associated C-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1, and a putative phosphatase binding site has been identified within the RAP74 winged-helix domain.

  6. Structure of bacteriophage T4 fibritin: a segmented coiled coil and the role of the C-terminal domain.

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    Tao, Y; Strelkov, S V; Mesyanzhinov, V V; Rossmann, M G

    1997-06-15

    Oligomeric coiled-coil motifs are found in numerous protein structures; among them is fibritin, a structural protein of bacteriophage T4, which belongs to a class of chaperones that catalyze a specific phage-assembly process. Fibritin promotes the assembly of the long tail fibers and their subsequent attachment to the tail baseplate; it is also a sensing device that controls the retraction of the long tail fibers in adverse environments and, thus, prevents infection. The structure of fibritin had been predicted from sequence and biochemical analyses to be mainly a triple-helical coiled coil. The determination of its structure at atomic resolution was expected to give insights into the assembly process and biological function of fibritin, and the properties of modified coiled-coil structures in general. The three-dimensional structure of fibritin E, a deletion mutant of wild-type fibritin, was determined to 2.2 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. Three identical subunits of 119 amino acid residues form a trimeric parallel coiled-coil domain and a small globular C-terminal domain about a crystallographic threefold axis. The coiled-coil domain is divided into three segments that are separated by insertion loops. The C-terminal domain, which consists of 30 residues from each subunit, contains a beta-propeller-like structure with a hydrophobic interior. The residues within the C-terminal domain make extensive hydrophobic and some polar intersubunit interactions. This is consistent with the C-terminal domain being important for the correct assembly of fibritin, as shown earlier by mutational studies. Tight interactions between the C-terminal residues of adjacent subunits counteract the latent instability that is suggested by the structural properties of the coiled-coil segments. Trimerization is likely to begin with the formation of the C-terminal domain which subsequently initiates the assembly of the coiled coil. The interplay between the stabilizing effect of the C-terminal

  7. Structural insights into the globular tails of the human type v myosins Myo5a, Myo5b, And Myo5c.

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    Hana Velvarska

    Full Text Available Vertebrate type V myosins (MyoV Myo5a, Myo5b, and Myo5c mediate transport of several different cargoes. All MyoV paralogs bind to cargo complexes mainly by their C-terminal globular domains. In absence of cargo, the globular domain of Myo5a inhibits its motor domain. Here, we report low-resolution SAXS models for the globular domains from human Myo5a, Myo5b, and Myo5c, which suggest very similar overall shapes of all three paralogs. We determined the crystal structures of globular domains from Myo5a and Myo5b, and provide a homology model for human Myo5c. When we docked the Myo5a crystal structure into a previously published electron microscopy density of the autoinhibited full-length Myo5a, only one domain orientation resulted in a good fit. This structural arrangement suggests the participation of additional region of the globular domain in autoinhibition. Quantification of the interaction of the Myo5a globular domain with its motor complex revealed a tight binding with dissociation half-life in the order of minutes, suggesting a rather slow transition between the active and inactive states.

  8. N-Terminal Domains in Two-Domain Proteins Are Biased to Be Shorter and Predicted to Fold Faster Than Their C-Terminal Counterparts

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    Etai Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational analysis of proteomes in all kingdoms of life reveals a strong tendency for N-terminal domains in two-domain proteins to have shorter sequences than their neighboring C-terminal domains. Given that folding rates are affected by chain length, we asked whether the tendency for N-terminal domains to be shorter than their neighboring C-terminal domains reflects selection for faster-folding N-terminal domains. Calculations of absolute contact order, another predictor of folding rate, provide additional evidence that N-terminal domains tend to fold faster than their neighboring C-terminal domains. A possible explanation for this bias, which is more pronounced in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, is that faster folding of N-terminal domains reduces the risk for protein aggregation during folding by preventing formation of nonnative interdomain interactions. This explanation is supported by our finding that two-domain proteins with a shorter N-terminal domain are much more abundant than those with a shorter C-terminal domain.

  9. Individual globular domains and domain unfolding visualized in overstretched titin molecules with atomic force microscopy.

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    Zsolt Mártonfalvi

    Full Text Available Titin is a giant elastomeric protein responsible for the generation of passive muscle force. Mechanical force unfolds titin's globular domains, but the exact structure of the overstretched titin molecule is not known. Here we analyzed, by using high-resolution atomic force microscopy, the structure of titin molecules overstretched with receding meniscus. The axial contour of the molecules was interrupted by topographical gaps with a mean width of 27.7 nm that corresponds well to the length of an unfolded globular (immunoglobulin and fibronectin domain. The wide gap-width distribution suggests, however, that additional mechanisms such as partial domain unfolding and the unfolding of neighboring domain multimers may also be present. In the folded regions we resolved globules with an average spacing of 5.9 nm, which is consistent with a titin chain composed globular domains with extended interdomain linker regions. Topographical analysis allowed us to allocate the most distal unfolded titin region to the kinase domain, suggesting that this domain systematically unfolds when the molecule is exposed to overstretching forces. The observations support the prediction that upon the action of stretching forces the N-terminal ß-sheet of the titin kinase unfolds, thus exposing the enzyme's ATP-binding site and hence contributing to the molecule's mechanosensory function.

  10. Properties of catalase-peroxidase lacking its C-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Ruletha D.; Cook, Carma O.; Goodwin, Douglas C.

    2004-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases have a two-domain structure. The N-terminal domain contains the bifunctional active site, but the function of the C-terminal domain is unknown. We produced catalase-peroxidase containing only its N-terminal domain (KatG Nterm ). Removal of the C-terminal domain did not result in unexpected changes in secondary structure as evaluated by CD, but KatG Nterm had neither catalase nor peroxidase activity. Partial recovery of both activities was achieved by incubating KatG Nterm with the separately expressed and isolated KatG C-terminal domain. Spectroscopic measurements revealed a shift in heme environment from a mixture of high-spin species (wtKatG) to exclusively hexacoordinate, low-spin (KatG Nterm ). Moreover, a >1000-fold lower k on for CN - binding was observed for KatG Nterm . EPR spectra for KatG Nterm and the results of site-specific substitution of active site histidines suggested that the distal histidine was the sixth ligand. Thus, one important role for the C-terminal domain may be to support the architecture of the active site, preventing heme ligation by this catalytically essential residue

  11. C-terminal domains of bacterial proteases: structure, function and the biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Wu, C; Liu, D; Yang, X; Wu, R; Zhang, J; Ma, C; He, H

    2017-01-01

    C-terminal domains widely exist in the C-terminal region of multidomain proteases. As a β-sandwich domain in multidomain protease, the C-terminal domain plays an important role in proteolysis including regulation of the secretory process, anchoring and swelling the substrate molecule, presenting as an inhibitor for the preprotease and adapting the protein structural flexibility and stability. In this review, the diversity, structural characteristics and biological function of C-terminal protease domains are described. Furthermore, the application prospects of C-terminal domains, including polycystic kidney disease, prepeptidase C-terminal and collagen-binding domain, in the area of medicine and biological artificial materials are also discussed. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Molecular architecture of the nucleoprotein C-terminal domain from the Ebola and Marburg viruses.

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    Baker, Laura E; Ellena, Jeffrey F; Handing, Katarzyna B; Derewenda, Urszula; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Engel, Daniel A; Derewenda, Zygmunt S

    2016-01-01

    The Filoviridae family of negative-sense, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses is comprised of two species of Marburgvirus (MARV and RAVV) and five species of Ebolavirus, i.e. Zaire (EBOV), Reston (RESTV), Sudan (SUDV), Taï Forest (TAFV) and Bundibugyo (BDBV). In each of these viruses the ssRNA encodes seven distinct proteins. One of them, the nucleoprotein (NP), is the most abundant viral protein in the infected cell and within the viral nucleocapsid. It is tightly associated with the viral RNA in the nucleocapsid, and during the lifecycle of the virus is essential for transcription, RNA replication, genome packaging and nucleocapsid assembly prior to membrane encapsulation. The structure of the unique C-terminal globular domain of the NP from EBOV has recently been determined and shown to be structurally unrelated to any other known protein [Dziubańska et al. (2014), Acta Cryst. D70, 2420-2429]. In this paper, a study of the C-terminal domains from the NP from the remaining four species of Ebolavirus, as well as from the MARV strain of Marburgvirus, is reported. As expected, the crystal structures of the BDBV and TAFV proteins show high structural similarity to that from EBOV, while the MARV protein behaves like a molten globule with a core residual structure that is significantly different from that of the EBOV protein.

  13. Inactivation of Mechanically Activated Piezo1 Ion Channels Is Determined by the C-Terminal Extracellular Domain and the Inner Pore Helix

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    Jason Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezo proteins form mechanically activated ion channels that are responsible for our sense of light touch, proprioception, and vascular blood flow. Upon activation by mechanical stimuli, Piezo channels rapidly inactivate in a voltage-dependent manner through an unknown mechanism. Inactivation of Piezo channels is physiologically important, as it modulates overall mechanical sensitivity, gives rise to frequency filtering of repetitive mechanical stimuli, and is itself the target of numerous human disease-related channelopathies that are not well understood mechanistically. Here, we identify the globular C-terminal extracellular domain as a structure that is sufficient to confer the time course of inactivation and a single positively charged lysine residue at the adjacent inner pore helix as being required for its voltage dependence. Our results are consistent with a mechanism for inactivation that is mediated through voltage-dependent conformations of the inner pore helix and allosteric coupling with the C-terminal extracellular domain.

  14. The impact of the human DNA topoisomerase II C-terminal domain on activity.

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    Emma L Meczes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Type II DNA topoisomerases (topos are essential enzymes needed for the resolution of topological problems that occur during DNA metabolic processes. Topos carry out an ATP-dependent strand passage reaction whereby one double helix is passed through a transient break in another. Humans have two topoII isoforms, alpha and beta, which while enzymatically similar are differentially expressed and regulated, and are thought to have different cellular roles. The C-terminal domain (CTD of the enzyme has the most diversity, and has been implicated in regulation. We sought to investigate the impact of the CTD domain on activity.We have investigated the role of the human topoII C-terminal domain by creating constructs encoding C-terminally truncated recombinant topoIIalpha and beta and topoIIalpha+beta-tail and topoIIbeta+alpha-tail chimeric proteins. We then investigated function in vivo in a yeast system, and in vitro in activity assays. We find that the C-terminal domain of human topoII isoforms is needed for in vivo function of the enzyme, but not needed for cleavage activity. C-terminally truncated enzymes had similar strand passage activity to full length enzymes, but the presence of the opposite C-terminal domain had a large effect, with the topoIIalpha-CTD increasing activity, and the topoIIbeta-CTD decreasing activity.In vivo complementation data show that the topoIIalpha C-terminal domain is needed for growth, but the topoIIbeta isoform is able to support low levels of growth without a C-terminal domain. This may indicate that topoIIbeta has an additional localisation signal. In vitro data suggest that, while the lack of any C-terminal domain has little effect on activity, the presence of either the topoIIalpha or beta C-terminal domain can affect strand passage activity. Data indicates that the topoIIbeta-CTD may be a negative regulator. This is the first report of in vitro data with chimeric human topoIIs.

  15. Structures of the Gasdermin D C-Terminal Domains Reveal Mechanisms of Autoinhibition.

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    Liu, Zhonghua; Wang, Chuanping; Rathkey, Joseph K; Yang, Jie; Dubyak, George R; Abbott, Derek W; Xiao, Tsan Sam

    2018-05-01

    Pyroptosis is an inflammatory form of programmed cell death that plays important roles in immune protection against infections and in inflammatory disorders. Gasdermin D (GSDMD) is an executor of pyroptosis upon cleavage by caspases-1/4/5/11 following canonical and noncanonical inflammasome activation. GSDMD N-terminal domain assembles membrane pores to induce cytolysis, whereas its C-terminal domain inhibits cell death through intramolecular association with the N domain. The molecular mechanisms of autoinhibition for GSDMD are poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structures of the human and murine GSDMD C-terminal domains, which differ from those of the full-length murine GSDMA3 and the human GSDMB C-terminal domain. Mutations of GSDMD C-domain residues predicted to locate at its interface with the N-domain enhanced pyroptosis. Our results suggest that GSDMDs may employ a distinct mode of intramolecular domain interaction and autoinhibition, which may be relevant to its unique role in pyroptosis downstream of inflammasome activation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemical Shift Assignments of the C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain-3 EH Domain*

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    Caplan, Steve; Sorgen, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    The C-terminal Eps15 homology (EH) domain 3 (EHD3) belongs to a eukaryotic family of endocytic regulatory proteins and is involved in the recycling of various receptors from the early endosome to the endocytic recycling compartment or in retrograde transport from the endosomes to the Golgi. EH domains are highly conserved in the EHD family and function as protein-protein interaction units that bind to Asn-Pro-Phe (NPF) motif-containing proteins. The EH domain of EHD1 was the first C-terminal EH domain from the EHD family to be solved by NMR. The differences observed between this domain and proteins with N-terminal EH domains helped describe a mechanism for the differential binding of NPF-containing proteins. Here, structural studies were expanded to include the EHD3 EH domain. While the EHD1 and EHD3 EH domains are highly homologous, they have different protein partners. A comparison of these structures will help determine the selectivity in protein binding between the EHD family members and lead to a better understanding of their unique roles in endocytic regulation. PMID:23754701

  17. Structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AhrC bound to its corepressor l-arginine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, James A.; Baumberg, Simon; Stockley, Peter G.; Phillips, Simon E. V.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain hexameric core of AhrC, with bound corepressor (l-arginine), has been solved at 1.95 Å resolution. Binding of l-arginine results in a rotation between the two trimers of the hexamer, leading to the activation of the DNA-binding state. The arginine repressor/activator protein (AhrC) from Bacillus subtilis belongs to a large family of multifunctional transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of bacterial arginine metabolism. AhrC interacts with operator sites in the promoters of arginine biosynthetic and catabolic operons, acting as a transcriptional repressor at biosynthetic sites and an activator of transcription at catabolic sites. AhrC is a hexamer of identical subunits, each having two domains. The C-terminal domains form the core of the protein and are involved in oligomerization and l-arginine binding. The N-terminal domains lie on the outside of the compact core and play a role in binding to 18 bp DNA operators called ARG boxes. The C-terminal domain of AhrC has been expressed, purified and characterized, and also crystallized as a hexamer with the bound corepressor l-arginine. Here, the crystal structure refined to 1.95 Å is presented

  18. The C-terminal domain of the Bloom syndrome DNA helicase is essential for genomic stability

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    Noonan James P

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is a rare cancer-prone disorder in which the cells of affected persons have a high frequency of somatic mutation and genomic instability. Bloom syndrome cells have a distinctive high frequency of sister chromatid exchange and quadriradial formation. BLM, the protein altered in BS, is a member of the RecQ DNA helicase family, whose members share an average of 40% identity in the helicase domain and have divergent N-terminal and C-terminal flanking regions of variable lengths. The BLM DNA helicase has been shown to localize to the ND10 (nuclear domain 10 or PML (promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, where it associates with TOPIIIα, and to the nucleolus. Results This report demonstrates that the N-terminal domain of BLM is responsible for localization of the protein to the nuclear bodies, while the C-terminal domain directs the protein to the nucleolus. Deletions of the N-terminal domain of BLM have little effect on sister chromatid exchange frequency and chromosome stability as compared to helicase and C-terminal mutations which can increase SCE frequency and chromosome abnormalities. Conclusion The helicase activity and the C-terminal domain of BLM are critical for maintaining genomic stability as measured by the sister chromatid exchange assay. The localization of BLM into the nucleolus by the C-terminal domain appears to be more important to genomic stability than localization in the nuclear bodies.

  19. Structure discrimination for the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli trigger factor in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yong; Bhabha, Gira; Kroon, Gerard; Landes, Mindy; Dyson, H. Jane

    2008-01-01

    NMR measurements can give important information on solution structure, without the necessity for a full-scale solution structure determination. The C-terminal protein binding domain of the ribosome-associated chaperone protein trigger factor is composed of non-contiguous parts of the polypeptide chain, with an interpolated prolyl isomerase domain. A construct of the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli trigger factor containing residues 113-149 and 247-432, joined by a Gly-Ser-Gly-Ser linker, is well folded and gives excellent NMR spectra in solution. We have used NMR measurements on this construct, and on a longer construct that includes the prolyl isomerase domain, to distinguish between two possible structures for the C-terminal domain of trigger factor, and to assess the behavior of the trigger factor C-terminal domain in solution. Two X-ray crystal structures, of intact trigger factor from E. coli (Ferbitz et al., Nature 431:590-596, 2004), and of a truncated trigger factor from Vibrio cholerae (Ludlam et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:13436-13441, 2004) showed significant differences in the structure of the C-terminal domain, such that the two structures could not be superimposed. We show using NMR chemical shifts and long range nuclear Overhauser effects that the secondary and tertiary structure of the E. coli C-terminal domain in solution is consistent with the crystal structure of the E. coli trigger factor and not with the V. cholerae protein. Given the similarity of the amino acid sequences of the E. coli and V. cholerae proteins, it appears likely that the structure of the V. cholerae protein has been distorted as a result of truncation of a 44-amino acid segment at the C-terminus. Analysis of residual dipolar coupling measurements shows that the overall topology of the solution structure is completely inconsistent with both structures. Dynamics analysis of the C-terminal domain using T 1 , T 2 and heteronuclear NOE parameters show that the protein is

  20. Structural requirement of carboxyl-terminal globular domains of laminin alpha 3 chain for promotion of rapid cell adhesion and migration by laminin-5.

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    Hirosaki, T; Mizushima, H; Tsubota, Y; Moriyama, K; Miyazaki, K

    2000-07-21

    The basement membrane protein laminin-5, a heterotrimer of laminin alpha3, beta3, and gamma2 chains, potently promotes cellular adhesion and motility. It has been supposed that the carboxyl-terminal globular region of the alpha3 chain consisting of five distinct domains (G1 to G5) is important for its interaction with integrins. To clarify the function of each G domain, we transfected cDNAs for the full-length (wild type (WT)) and five deletion derivatives (DeltaGs) of the alpha3 chain into human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080, which expressed and secreted the laminin beta3 and gamma2 chains but not the alpha3 chain. The transfectants with the alpha3 chain cDNAs lacking G5 (DeltaG(5)), G4-5 (DeltaG(4-5)), G3-5 (DeltaG(3-5)), and G2-5 (DeltaG(2-5)) secreted laminin-5 variants at levels comparable to that with WT cDNA. However, the transfectant with the cDNA without any G domains (DeltaG(1-5)) secreted little laminin-5, suggesting that the G domains are essential for the efficient assembly and secretion of the heterotrimer alpha3beta3gamma2. The transfectants with WT, DeltaG(5), and DeltaG(4-5) cDNAs survived in serum-free medium longer than those with DeltaG(3-5), DeltaG(2-5), and DeltaG(1-5) cDNAs. The transfectants with WT, DeltaG(5), and DeltaG(4-5) cDNAs secreted apparently the same size of laminin-5, which lacked G4 and G5 due to proteolytic cleavage between G3 and G4, and these laminin-5 forms potently promoted integrin alpha(3)beta(1)-dependent cell adhesion and migration. However, the laminin-5 forms of DeltaG(3-5) and DeltaG(2-5) hardly promoted the cell adhesion and motility. These findings demonstrate that the G3 domain, but not the G4 and G5 domains, of the alpha3 chain is essential for the potent promotion of cell adhesion and motility by laminin-5.

  1. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Öberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, ΔN-hH1.4, were compared. ► Both histones bind to chromatin, however, ΔN-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. ► Interaction of ΔN-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. ► N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain (ΔN-hH1.4). The ΔN-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that ΔN-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  2. A non-catalytic N-terminal domain negatively influences the nucleotide exchange activity of translation elongation factor 1Bα.

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    Trosiuk, Tetiana V; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bα (eEF1Bα) is a functional homolog of the bacterial factor EF-Ts, and is a component of the macromolecular eEF1B complex. eEF1Bα functions as a catalyst of guanine nucleotide exchange on translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα is necessary and sufficient for its catalytic activity, whereas the N-terminal domain interacts with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bγ (eEF1Bγ) to form a tight complex. However, eEF1Bγ has been shown to enhance the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα attributed to the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may in some way influence the guanine nucleotide exchange process. We have shown that full-length recombinant eEF1Bα and its truncated forms are non-globular proteins with elongated shapes. Truncation of the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα, which is dispensable for catalytic activity, resulted in acceleration of the rate of guanine nucleotide exchange on eEF1A compared to full-length eEF1Bα. A similar effect on the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα was observed after its interaction with eEF1Bγ. We suggest that the non-catalytic N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may interfere with eEF1A binding to the C-terminal catalytic domain, resulting in a decrease in the overall rate of the guanine nucleotide exchange reaction. Formation of a tight complex between the eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bα N-terminal domains abolishes this inhibitory effect. © 2015 FEBS.

  3. Roles of N- and C-terminal domains in the ligand-binding properties of cytoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, Shumpei; Tsujino, Hirofumi; Yamashita, Taku; Torii, Ryo; Sawai, Hitomi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Oohora, Koji; Hayashi, Takashi; Uno, Tadayuki

    2018-02-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a member of the hexacoordinated globin protein family and is expressed ubiquitously in rat and human tissues. Although Cygb is reportedly upregulated under hypoxic conditions both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a physiological function to protect cells under hypoxic/ischemic conditions by scavenging reactive oxygen species or by signal transduction, the mechanisms associated with this function have not been fully elucidated. Recent studies comparing Cygbs among several species suggest that mammalian Cygbs show a distinctly longer C-terminal domain potentially involved in unique physiological functions. In this study, we prepared human Cygb mutants (ΔC, ΔN, and ΔNC) with either one or both terminal domains truncated and investigated the enzymatic functions and structural features by spectroscopic methods. Evaluation of the superoxide-scavenging activity between Cygb variants showed that the ΔC and ΔNC mutants exhibited slightly higher activity involving superoxide scavenging as compared with wild-type Cygb. Subsequent experiments involving ligand titration, flash photolysis, and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies suggested that the truncation of the C- and N-terminal domains resulted in less effective to dissociation constants and binding rates for carbon monoxide, respectively. Furthermore, structural stability was assessed by guanidine hydrochloride and revealed that the C-terminal domain might play a vital role in improving structure, whereas the N-terminal domain did not exert a similar effect. These findings indicated that long terminal domains could be important not only in regulating enzymatic activity but also for structural stability, and that the domains might be relevant to other hypothesized physiological functions for Cygb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S., E-mail: bchss@biochem.iisc.ernet.in

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  5. Human surfactant protein D: SP-D contains a C-type lectin carbohydrate recognition domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, K; Grosso, L; Zhang, V; Chang, D; Persson, A; Longmore, W; Cai, G Z; Crouch, E

    1991-10-01

    Lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) shows calcium-dependent binding to specific saccharides, and is similar in domain structure to certain members of the calcium-dependent (C-type) lectin family. Using a degenerate oligomeric probe corresponding to a conserved peptide sequence derived from the amino-terminus of the putative carbohydrate binding domain of rat and bovine SP-D, we screened a human lung cDNA library and isolated a 1.4-kb cDNA for the human protein. The relationship of the cDNA to SP-D was established by several techniques including amino-terminal microsequencing of SP-D-derived peptides, and immunoprecipitation of translation products of transcribed mRNA with monospecific antibodies to SP-D. In addition, antibodies to a synthetic peptide derived from a predicted unique epitope within the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D specifically reacted with SP-D. DNA sequencing demonstrated a noncollagenous carboxy-terminal domain that is highly homologous with the carboxy-terminal globular domain of previously described C-type lectins. This domain contains all of the so-called "invariant residues," including four conserved cysteine residues, and shows high homology with the mannose-binding subfamily of C-type lectins. Sequencing also demonstrated an amino-terminal collagenous domain that contains an uninterrupted sequence of 59 Gly-X-Y triplets and that also contains the only identified consensus for asparagine-linked oligosaccharides. The studies demonstrate that SP-D is a member of the C-type lectin family, and confirm predicted structural similarities to conglutinin, SP-D, and the serum mannose binding proteins.

  6. Interdependence of the rad50 hook and globular domain functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Marcel; Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Tous, Cristina; Aguilera, Andrés; Krężel, Artur; Petrini, John H J

    2015-02-05

    Rad50 contains a conserved Zn(2+) coordination domain (the Rad50 hook) that functions as a homodimerization interface. Hook ablation phenocopies Rad50 deficiency in all respects. Here, we focused on rad50 mutations flanking the Zn(2+)-coordinating hook cysteines. These mutants impaired hook-mediated dimerization, but recombination between sister chromatids was largely unaffected. This may reflect that cohesin-mediated sister chromatid interactions are sufficient for double-strand break repair. However, Mre11 complex functions specified by the globular domain, including Tel1 (ATM) activation, nonhomologous end joining, and DNA double-strand break end resection were affected, suggesting that dimerization exerts a broad influence on Mre11 complex function. These phenotypes were suppressed by mutations within the coiled-coil and globular ATPase domains, suggesting a model in which conformational changes in the hook and globular domains are transmitted via the extended coils of Rad50. We propose that transmission of spatial information in this manner underlies the regulation of Mre11 complex functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Docking Studies of Binding of Ethambutol to the C-Terminal Domain of the Arabinosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Salgado-Moran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The binding of ethambutol to the C-terminal domain of the arabinosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was studied. The analysis was performed using an in silico approach in order to find out, by docking calculations and energy descriptors, the conformer of Ethambutol that forms the most stable complex with the C-terminal domain of arabinosyltransferase. The complex shows that location of the Ethambutol coincides with the cocrystallization ligand position and that amino acid residues ASH1051, ASN740, ASP1052, and ARG1055 should be critical in the binding of Ethambutol to C-terminal domain EmbC.

  8. Discovery of new molecular entities able to strongly interfere with Hsp90 C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Stefania; Russo, Alessandra; Chini, Maria G; Vaccaro, Maria C; Potenza, Marianna; Vassallo, Antonio; Riccio, Raffaele; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Bruno, Ines

    2018-01-26

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an ATP dependent molecular chaperone deeply involved in the complex network of cellular signaling governing some key functions, such as cell proliferation and survival, invasion and angiogenesis. Over the past years the N-terminal protein domain has been fully investigated as attractive strategy against cancer, but despite the many efforts lavished in the field, none of the N-terminal binders (termed "classical inhibitors"), currently in clinical trials, have yet successfully reached the market, because of the detrimental heat shock response (HSR) that showed to induce; thus, recently, the selective inhibition of Hsp90 C-terminal domain has powerfully emerged as a more promising alternative strategy for anti-cancer therapy, not eliciting this cell rescue cascade. However, the structural complexity of the target protein and, mostly, the lack of a co-crystal structure of C-terminal domain-ligand, essential to drive the identification of new hits, represent the largest hurdles in the development of new selective C-terminal inhibitors. Continuing our investigations on the identification of new anticancer drug candidates, by using an orthogonal screening approach, here we describe two new potent C-terminal inhibitors able to induce cancer cell death and a considerable down-regulation of Hsp90 client oncoproteins, without triggering the undesired heat shock response.

  9. Structure of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase α subunit C-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara-González, Samuel; Birktoft, Jens J.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of the dimethyllysine derivative of the E. coli RNA polymerase α subunit C-terminal domain is reported at 2.0 Å resolution. The α subunit C-terminal domain (αCTD) of RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a key element in transcription activation in Escherichia coli, possessing determinants responsible for the interaction of RNAP with DNA and with transcription factors. Here, the crystal structure of E. coli αCTD (α subunit residues 245–329) determined to 2.0 Å resolution is reported. Crystals were obtained after reductive methylation of the recombinantly expressed domain. The crystals belonged to space group P2 1 and possessed both pseudo-translational symmetry and pseudo-merohedral twinning. The refined coordinate model (R factor = 0.193, R free = 0.236) has improved geometry compared with prior lower resolution determinations of the αCTD structure [Jeon et al. (1995 ▶), Science, 270, 1495–1497; Benoff et al. (2002 ▶), Science, 297, 1562–1566]. An extensive dimerization interface formed primarily by N- and C-terminal residues is also observed. The new coordinates will facilitate the improved modeling of αCTD-containing multi-component complexes visualized at lower resolution using X-ray crystallography and electron-microscopy reconstruction

  10. Co-expression of the C-terminal domain of Yersinia enterocolitica ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 1. Co-expression of the C-terminal domain of Yersinia enterocolitica invasin enhances the efficacy of classical swine-fever-vectored vaccine based on human adenovirus. Helin Li Pengbo Ning Zhi Lin Wulong Liang Kai Kang Lei He Yanming Zhang. Articles Volume ...

  11. Acetylation within the N- and C-Terminal Domains of Src Regulates Distinct Roles of STAT3-Mediated Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Lihan; Lee, Hank W; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Zhao, Ting C; Hao, Yimei; Gao, Jinsong; Yang, Chunzhang; Mehta, Gautam U; Zhuang, Zhengping; Zhang, Xiaoren; Hu, Guohong; Chin, Y Eugene

    2018-06-01

    Posttranslational modifications of mammalian c-Src N-terminal and C-terminal domains regulate distinct functions. Myristoylation of G 2 controls its cell membrane association and phosphorylation of Y419/Y527 controls its activation or inactivation, respectively. We provide evidence that Src-cell membrane association-dissociation and catalytic activation-inactivation are both regulated by acetylation. In EGF-treated cells, CREB binding protein (CBP) acetylates an N-terminal lysine cluster (K5, K7, and K9) of c-Src to promote dissociation from the cell membrane. CBP also acetylates the C-terminal K401, K423, and K427 of c-Src to activate intrinsic kinase activity for STAT3 recruitment and activation. N-terminal domain phosphorylation (Y14, Y45, and Y68) of STAT3 by c-Src activates transcriptionally active dimers of STAT3. Moreover, acetyl-Src translocates into nuclei, where it forms the Src-STAT3 enhanceosome for gene regulation and cancer cell proliferation. Thus, c-Src acetylation in the N-terminal and C-terminal domains play distinct roles in Src activity and regulation. Significance: CBP-mediated acetylation of lysine clusters in both the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of c-Src provides additional levels of control over STAT3 transcriptional activity. Cancer Res; 78(11); 2825-38. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Expression, purification, and functional analysis of the C-terminal domain of Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Rose A; Souza, Emanuel M; Geoffrey Yates, M; Steffens, M Berenice R; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S

    2003-02-01

    The Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA protein is responsible for nif gene expression. The C-terminal domain of the H. seropedicae NifA protein, fused to a His-Tag sequence (His-Tag-C-terminal), was over-expressed and purified by metal-affinity chromatography to yield a highly purified and active protein. Band-shift assays showed that the NifA His-Tag-C-terminal bound specifically to the H. seropedicae nifB promoter region in vitro. In vivo analysis showed that this protein inhibited the Central + C-terminal domains of NifA protein from activating the nifH promoter of K. pneumoniae in Escherichia coli, indicating that the protein must be bound to the NifA-binding site (UAS site) at the nifH promoter region to activate transcription. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  13. Structural mapping of the coiled-coil domain of a bacterial condensin and comparative analyses across all domains of life suggest conserved features of SMC proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Vincent M; Stanage, Tyler H; Mims, Alexandra; Norden, Ian S; Oakley, Martha G

    2015-06-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins form the cores of multisubunit complexes that are required for the segregation and global organization of chromosomes in all domains of life. These proteins share a common domain structure in which N- and C- terminal regions pack against one another to form a globular ATPase domain. This "head" domain is connected to a central, globular, "hinge" or dimerization domain by a long, antiparallel coiled coil. To date, most efforts for structural characterization of SMC proteins have focused on the globular domains. Recently, however, we developed a method to map interstrand interactions in the 50-nm coiled-coil domain of MukB, the divergent SMC protein found in γ-proteobacteria. Here, we apply that technique to map the structure of the Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) coiled-coil domain. We find that, in contrast to the relatively complicated coiled-coil domain of MukB, the BsSMC domain is nearly continuous, with only two detectable coiled-coil interruptions. Near the middle of the domain is a break in coiled-coil structure in which there are three more residues on the C-terminal strand than on the N-terminal strand. Close to the head domain, there is a second break with a significantly longer insertion on the same strand. These results provide an experience base that allows an informed interpretation of the output of coiled-coil prediction algorithms for this family of proteins. A comparison of such predictions suggests that these coiled-coil deviations are highly conserved across SMC types in a wide variety of organisms, including humans. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Expression, refolding and crystallizations of the Grb2-like (GADS) C-terminal SH3 domain complexed with a SLP-76 motif peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faravelli, Alessandro; Dimasi, Nazzareno

    2005-01-01

    Several crystals of the Grb2-like C-terminal SH3 domain in complex with a motif peptide from the SLP-76 protein were obtained and characterized. The Grb2-like adaptor protein GADS is composed of an N-terminal SH3 domain, an SH2 domain, a proline-rich region and a C-terminal SH3 domain. GADS interacts through its C-terminal SH3 domain with the adaptor protein SLP-76, thus recruiting this protein and other associated molecules to the linker for activation of T-cell (LAT) protein. The DNA encoding the C-terminal SH3 domain of GADS (GADS-cSH3) was assembled synthetically using a recursive PCR technique and the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, refolded and purified. Several crystals of this domain in complex with the SLP-76 peptide were obtained and characterized

  15. Functional interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains of murine leukemia virus surface envelope protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.-W.; Roth, Monica J.

    2003-01-01

    A series of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with chimeric envelope proteins (Env) was generated to map functional interactions between the N- and the C-terminal domains of surface proteins (SU). All these chimeras have the 4070A amphotropic receptor-binding region flanked by various lengths of Moloney ecotropic N- and C-terminal Env. A charged residue, E49 (E16 on the mature protein), was identified at the N-terminals of Moloney MuLV SU that is important for the interaction with the C-terminal domain of the SU. The region that interacts with E49 was localized between junction 4 (R265 of M-MuLV Env) and junction 6 (L374 of M-MuLV Env) of SU. Sequencing the viable chimeric Env virus populations identified residues within the SU protein that improved the replication kinetics of the input chimeric Env viruses. Mutations in the C-domain of SU (G387E/R, L435I, L442P) were found to improve chimera IV4, which displayed a delayed onset of replication. The replication of AE6, containing a chimeric junction in the SU C-terminus, was improved by mutations in the N-domain (N40H, E80K), the proline-rich region (Q252R), or the transmembrane protein (L538N). Altogether, these observations provide insights into the structural elements required for Env function

  16. NMR assignments of SPOC domain of the human transcriptional corepressor SHARP in complex with a C-terminal SMRT peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Suzuka; Kanaba, Teppei; Ito, Yutaka; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-10-01

    The transcriptional corepressor SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein (SHARP) recruits histone deacetylases. Human SHARP protein is thought to function in processes involving steroid hormone responses and the Notch signaling pathway. SHARP consists of RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region and the spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain in the C-terminal region. It is known that the SPOC domain binds the LSD motif in the C-terminal tail of corepressors silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptor (SMRT)/nuclear receptor corepressor (NcoR). We are interested in delineating the mechanism by which the SPOC domain recognizes the LSD motif of the C-terminal tail of SMRT/NcoR. To this end, we are investigating the tertiary structure of the SPOC/SMRT peptide using NMR. Herein, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the SPOC domain in complex with a SMRT peptide, which contributes towards a structural understanding of the SPOC/SMRT peptide and its molecular recognition.

  17. Structural Basis for Toughness and Flexibility in the C-terminal Passenger Domain of an Acinetobacter Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koiwai, Kotaro; Hartmann, Marcus D.; Linke, Dirk; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) on the cell surface of Gram-negative pathogens mediate bacterial adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix proteins. However, AtaA, a TAA in the nonpathogenic Acinetobacter sp. strain Tol 5, shows nonspecific high adhesiveness to abiotic material surfaces as well as to biotic surfaces. It consists of a passenger domain secreted by the C-terminal transmembrane anchor domain (TM), and the passenger domain contains an N-terminal head, N-terminal stalk, C-terminal head (Chead), and C-terminal stalk (Cstalk). The Chead-Cstalk-TM fragment, which is conserved in many Acinetobacter TAAs, has by itself the head-stalk-anchor architecture of a complete TAA. Here, we show the crystal structure of the Chead-Cstalk fragment, AtaA_C-terminal passenger domain (CPSD), providing the first view of several conserved TAA domains. The YadA-like head (Ylhead) of the fragment is capped by a unique structure (headCap), composed of three β-hairpins and a connector motif; it also contains a head insert motif (HIM1) before its last inner β-strand. The headCap, Ylhead, and HIM1 integrally form a stable Chead structure. Some of the major domains of the CPSD fragment are inherently flexible and provide bending sites for the fiber between segments whose toughness is ensured by topological chain exchange and hydrophobic core formation inside the trimer. Thus, although adherence assays using in-frame deletion mutants revealed that the characteristic adhesive sites of AtaA reside in its N-terminal part, the flexibility and toughness of the CPSD part provide the resilience that enables the adhesive properties of the full-length fiber across a wide range of conditions. PMID:26698633

  18. Solution structure and DNA-binding properties of the C-terminal domain of UvrC from E.coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.; Folkers, G.E.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Boelens, R.; Wechselberger, R.W.; Niztayev, A.; Kaptein, R.

    2002-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of the UvrC protein (UvrC CTD) is essential for 5' incision in the prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair process. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the UvrC CTD using heteronuclear NMR techniques. The structure shows two helix±hairpin±helix (HhH) motifs

  19. Untangling spider silk evolution with spidroin terminal domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garb Jessica E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spidroins are a unique family of large, structural proteins that make up the bulk of spider silk fibers. Due to the highly variable nature of their repetitive sequences, spidroin evolutionary relationships have principally been determined from their non-repetitive carboxy (C-terminal domains, though they offer limited character data. The few known spidroin amino (N-terminal domains have been difficult to obtain, but potentially contain critical phylogenetic information for reconstructing the diversification of spider silks. Here we used silk gland expression data (ESTs from highly divergent species to evaluate the functional significance and phylogenetic utility of spidroin N-terminal domains. Results We report 11 additional spidroin N-termini found by sequencing ~1,900 silk gland cDNAs from nine spider species that shared a common ancestor > 240 million years ago. In contrast to their hyper-variable repetitive regions, spidroin N-terminal domains have retained striking similarities in sequence identity, predicted secondary structure, and hydrophobicity. Through separate and combined phylogenetic analyses of N-terminal domains and their corresponding C-termini, we find that combined analysis produces the most resolved trees and that N-termini contribute more support and less conflict than the C-termini. These analyses show that paralogs largely group by silk gland type, except for the major ampullate spidroins. Moreover, spidroin structural motifs associated with superior tensile strength arose early in the history of this gene family, whereas a motif conferring greater extensibility convergently evolved in two distantly related paralogs. Conclusions A non-repetitive N-terminal domain appears to be a universal attribute of spidroin proteins, likely retained from the origin of spider silk production. Since this time, spidroin N-termini have maintained several features, consistent with this domain playing a key role in silk

  20. Solution structure of the N-terminal domain of a replication restart primosome factor, PriC, in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Takahiko; Abe, Yoshito; Katayama, Tsutomu; Ueda, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    In eubacterial organisms, the oriC-independent primosome plays an essential role in replication restart after the dissociation of the replication DNA-protein complex by DNA damage. PriC is a key protein component in the replication restart primosome. Our recent study suggested that PriC is divided into two domains: an N-terminal and a C-terminal domain. In the present study, we determined the solution structure of the N-terminal domain, whose structure and function have remained unknown until now. The revealed structure was composed of three helices and one extended loop. We also observed chemical shift changes in the heteronuclear NMR spectrum and oligomerization in the presence of ssDNA. These abilities may contribute to the PriC-ssDNA complex, which is important for the replication restart primosome. PMID:23868391

  1. Distinctive functions of Syk N-terminal and C-terminal SH2 domains in the signaling cascade elicited by oxidative stress in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J; Takano, T; Hermann, P; Gao, S; Han, W; Noda, C; Yanagi, S; Yamamura, H

    2000-05-01

    Syk plays a crucial role in the transduction of oxidative stress signaling. In this paper, we investigated the roles of Src homology 2 (SH2) domains of Syk in oxidative stress signaling, using Syk-negative DT40 cells expressing the N- or C-terminal SH2 domain mutant [mSH2(N) or mSH2(C)] of Syk. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk in cells expressing mSH2(N) Syk after H(2)O(2) treatment was higher than that in cells expressing wild-type Syk or mSH2(C) Syk. The tyrosine phosphorylation of wild-type Syk and mSH2(C) Syk, but not that of mSH2(N), was sensitive to PP2, a specific inhibitor of Src-family protein-tyrosine kinase. In oxidative stress, the C-terminal SH2 domain of Syk was demonstrated to be required for induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins, phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma2 phosphorylation, inositol 1,4, 5-triphosphate (IP(3)) generation, Ca(2)(+) release from intracellular stores, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation. In contrast, in mSH2(N) Syk-expressing cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins including PLC-gamma2 was markedly induced in oxidative stress. The enhanced phosphorylation of mSH2(N) Syk and PLC-gamma2, however, did not link to Ca(2)(+) mobilization from intracellular pools and IP(3) generation. Thus, the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of Syk possess distinctive functions in oxidative stress signaling.

  2. Structure of the Reston ebolavirus VP30 C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Matthew C; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Raymond, Amy; Grice, Rena; Barnes, Steve; Moen, Spencer; Lorimer, Don; Edwards, Thomas E; Myler, Peter J; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-04-01

    The ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever. Essential to the ebolavirus life cycle is the protein VP30, which serves as a transcriptional cofactor. Here, the crystal structure of the C-terminal, NP-binding domain of VP30 from Reston ebolavirus is presented. Reston VP30 and Ebola VP30 both form homodimers, but the dimeric interfaces are rotated relative to each other, suggesting subtle inherent differences or flexibility in the dimeric interface.

  3. C-terminal region of MAP7 domain containing protein 3 (MAP7D3 promotes microtubule polymerization by binding at the C-terminal tail of tubulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Yadav

    Full Text Available MAP7 domain containing protein 3 (MAP7D3, a newly identified microtubule associated protein, has been shown to promote microtubule assembly and stability. Its microtubule binding region has been reported to consist of two coiled coil motifs located at the N-terminus. It possesses a MAP7 domain near the C-terminus and belongs to the microtubule associated protein 7 (MAP7 family. The MAP7 domain of MAP7 protein has been shown to bind to kinesin-1; however, the role of MAP7 domain in MAP7D3 remains unknown. Based on the bioinformatics analysis of MAP7D3, we hypothesized that the MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 may have microtubule binding activity. Indeed, we found that MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 bound to microtubules as well as enhanced the assembly of microtubules in vitro. Interestingly, a longer fragment MDCT that contained the MAP7 domain (MD with the C-terminal tail (CT of the protein promoted microtubule polymerization to a greater extent than MD and CT individually. MDCT stabilized microtubules against dilution induced disassembly. MDCT bound to reconstituted microtubules with an apparent dissociation constant of 3.0 ± 0.5 µM. An immunostaining experiment showed that MDCT localized along the length of the preassembled microtubules. Competition experiments with tau indicated that MDCT shares its binding site on microtubules with tau. Further, we present evidence indicating that MDCT binds to the C-terminal tail of tubulin. In addition, MDCT could bind to tubulin in HeLa cell extract. Here, we report a microtubule binding region in the C-terminal region of MAP7D3 that may have a role in regulating microtubule assembly dynamics.

  4. Structure of the C-terminal domain of lettuce necrotic yellows virus phosphoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Nicolas; Ribeiro, Euripedes A; Leyrat, Cédric; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Jamin, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) is a prototype of the plant-adapted cytorhabdoviruses. Through a meta-prediction of disorder, we localized a folded C-terminal domain in the amino acid sequence of its phosphoprotein. This domain consists of an autonomous folding unit that is monomeric in solution. Its structure, solved by X-ray crystallography, reveals a lollipop-shaped structure comprising five helices. The structure is different from that of the corresponding domains of other Rhabdoviridae, Filoviridae, and Paramyxovirinae; only the overall topology of the polypeptide chain seems to be conserved, suggesting that this domain evolved under weak selective pressure and varied in size by the acquisition or loss of functional modules.

  5. Structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor C-terminal domains in contact with interacting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eEnz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs regulate intracellular signal pathways that control several physiological tasks, including neuronal excitability, learning and memory. This is achieved by the formation of synaptic signal complexes, in which mGluRs assemble with functionally related proteins such as enzymes, scaffolds and cytoskeletal anchor proteins. Thus, mGluR associated proteins actively participate in the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Importantly, dysfunction of mGluRs and interacting proteins may lead to impaired signal transduction and finally result in neurological disorders, e.g. night blindness, addiction, epilepsy, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson´s disease. In contrast to solved crystal structures of extracellular N-terminal domains of some mGluR types, only a few studies analyzed the conformation of intracellular receptor domains. Intracellular C-termini of most mGluR types are subject to alternative splicing and can be further modified by phosphorylation and SUMOylation. In this way, diverse interaction sites for intracellular proteins that bind to and regulate the glutamate receptors are generated. Indeed, most of the known mGluR binding partners interact with the receptors´ C-terminal domains. Within the last years, different laboratories analyzed the structure of these domains and described the geometry of the contact surface between mGluR C-termini and interacting proteins. Here, I will review recent progress in the structure characterization of mGluR C-termini and provide an up-to-date summary of the geometry of these domains in contact with binding partners.

  6. Mutant Mice Lacking the p53 C-Terminal Domain Model Telomere Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simeonova, I.; Jaber, S.; Draskovic, I.; Bardot, B.; Fang, M.; Bouarich-Bourimi, R.; Lejour, V.; Charbonnier, L.; Soudais, C.; Bourdon, J.C.; Huerre, M.; Londono-Vallejo, A.; Toledo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in p53, although frequent in human cancers, have not been implicated in telomere-related syndromes. Here, we show that homozygous mutant mice expressing p53(Delta31), a p53 lacking the C-terminal domain, exhibit increased p53 activity and suffer from aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis,

  7. Structure of the C-Terminal Domain of Lettuce Necrotic Yellows Virus Phosphoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Nicolas; Ribeiro, Euripedes A.; Leyrat, Cédric; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Ruigrok, Rob W. H.

    2013-01-01

    Lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) is a prototype of the plant-adapted cytorhabdoviruses. Through a meta-prediction of disorder, we localized a folded C-terminal domain in the amino acid sequence of its phosphoprotein. This domain consists of an autonomous folding unit that is monomeric in solution. Its structure, solved by X-ray crystallography, reveals a lollipop-shaped structure comprising five helices. The structure is different from that of the corresponding domains of other Rhabdoviridae, Filoviridae, and Paramyxovirinae; only the overall topology of the polypeptide chain seems to be conserved, suggesting that this domain evolved under weak selective pressure and varied in size by the acquisition or loss of functional modules. PMID:23785215

  8. Biochemical Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis RnhC (MSMEG_4305), a Bifunctional Enzyme Composed of Autonomous N-Terminal Type I RNase H and C-Terminal Acid Phosphatase Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-08-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis encodes several DNA repair polymerases that are adept at incorporating ribonucleotides, which raises questions about how ribonucleotides in DNA are sensed and removed. RNase H enzymes, of which M. smegmatis encodes four, are strong candidates for a surveillance role. Here, we interrogate the biochemical activity and nucleic acid substrate specificity of M. smegmatis RnhC, a bifunctional RNase H and acid phosphatase. We report that (i) the RnhC nuclease is stringently specific for RNA:DNA hybrid duplexes; (ii) RnhC does not selectively recognize and cleave DNA-RNA or RNA-DNA junctions in duplex nucleic acid; (iii) RnhC cannot incise an embedded monoribonucleotide or diribonucleotide in duplex DNA; (iv) RnhC can incise tracts of 4 or more ribonucleotides embedded in duplex DNA, leaving two or more residual ribonucleotides at the cleaved 3'-OH end and at least one or two ribonucleotides on the 5'-PO4 end; (v) the RNase H activity is inherent in an autonomous 140-amino-acid (aa) N-terminal domain of RnhC; and (vi) the C-terminal 211-aa domain of RnhC is an autonomous acid phosphatase. The cleavage specificity of RnhC is clearly distinct from that of Escherichia coli RNase H2, which selectively incises at an RNA-DNA junction. Thus, we classify RnhC as a type I RNase H. The properties of RnhC are consistent with a role in Okazaki fragment RNA primer removal or in surveillance of oligoribonucleotide tracts embedded in DNA but not in excision repair of single misincorporated ribonucleotides. RNase H enzymes help cleanse the genome of ribonucleotides that are present either as ribotracts (e.g., RNA primers) or as single ribonucleotides embedded in duplex DNA. Mycobacterium smegmatis encodes four RNase H proteins, including RnhC, which is characterized in this study. The nucleic acid substrate and cleavage site specificities of RnhC are consistent with a role in initiating the removal of ribotracts but not in single-ribonucleotide surveillance. RnhC

  9. Natural monomeric form of fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase lacks the C-terminal tetramerization domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Ashima; Hur, Regina S; Luo, Chunyuan; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2003-12-30

    Acetylcholinesterase isolated from fetal bovine serum (FBS AChE) was previously characterized as a globular tetrameric form. Analysis of purified preparations of FBS AChE by gel permeation chromatography revealed the presence of a stable, catalytically active, monomeric form of this enzyme. The two forms could be distinguished from each other based on their molecular weight, hydrodynamic properties, kinetic properties, thermal stability, and the type of glycans they carry. No differences between the two forms were observed for the binding of classical inhibitors such as edrophonium and propidium or inhibitors that are current or potential drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease such as (-) huperzine A and E2020; tacrine inhibited the monomeric form 2-3-fold more potently than the tetrameric form. Sequencing of peptides obtained from an in-gel tryptic digest of the monomer and tetramer by tandem mass spectrometry indicated that the tetramer consists of 583 amino acid residues corresponding to the mature form of the enzyme, whereas the monomer consists of 543-547 amino acid residues. The subunit molecular weight of the protein component of the monomer (major species) was determined to be 59 414 Da and that of the tetramer as 64 239 Da. The N-terminal of the monomer and the tetramer was Glu, suggesting that the monomer is not a result of truncation at the N-terminal. The only differences detected were at the C-terminus. The tetramer yielded the expected C-terminus, CSDL, whereas the C-terminus of the monomer yielded a mixture of peptides, of which LLSATDTLD was the most abundant. These results suggest that monomeric FBS AChE is trimmed at the C-terminus, and the results are consistent with the involvement of C-terminal amino acids in the assembly of monomers into tetramers.

  10. Structure of the C-terminal domain of nsp4 from feline coronavirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolaridis, Ioannis; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Panjikar, Santosh; Snijder, Eric J.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Berglind, Hanna; Nordlund, Pär; Coutard, Bruno; Tucker, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of nonstructural protein 4 from feline coronavirus has been determined and analyzed. Coronaviruses are a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses that includes important pathogens of humans and other animals. The large coronavirus genome (26–31 kb) encodes 15–16 nonstructural proteins (nsps) that are derived from two replicase polyproteins by autoproteolytic processing. The nsps assemble into the viral replication–transcription complex and nsp3, nsp4 and nsp6 are believed to anchor this enzyme complex to modified intracellular membranes. The largest part of the coronavirus nsp4 subunit is hydrophobic and is predicted to be embedded in the membranes. In this report, a conserved C-terminal domain (∼100 amino-acid residues) has been delineated that is predicted to face the cytoplasm and has been isolated as a soluble domain using library-based construct screening. A prototypical crystal structure at 2.8 Å resolution was obtained using nsp4 from feline coronavirus. Unmodified and SeMet-substituted proteins were crystallized under similar conditions, resulting in tetragonal crystals that belonged to space group P4 3 . The phase problem was initially solved by single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS), followed by molecular replacement using a SIRAS-derived composite model. The structure consists of a single domain with a predominantly α-helical content displaying a unique fold that could be engaged in protein–protein interactions

  11. Structure of the C-terminal domain of nsp4 from feline coronavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolaridis, Ioannis; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Panjikar, Santosh [EMBL Hamburg Outstation, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Snijder, Eric J.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E. [Molecular Virology Laboratory, Department of Medical Microbiology, Center of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Berglind, Hanna; Nordlund, Pär [Division of Biophysics, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Scheeles väg 2, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Coutard, Bruno [Laboratoire Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, UMR 6098, AFMB-CNRS-ESIL, Case 925, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille (France); Tucker, Paul A., E-mail: tucker@embl-hamburg.de [EMBL Hamburg Outstation, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-08-01

    The structure of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of nonstructural protein 4 from feline coronavirus has been determined and analyzed. Coronaviruses are a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses that includes important pathogens of humans and other animals. The large coronavirus genome (26–31 kb) encodes 15–16 nonstructural proteins (nsps) that are derived from two replicase polyproteins by autoproteolytic processing. The nsps assemble into the viral replication–transcription complex and nsp3, nsp4 and nsp6 are believed to anchor this enzyme complex to modified intracellular membranes. The largest part of the coronavirus nsp4 subunit is hydrophobic and is predicted to be embedded in the membranes. In this report, a conserved C-terminal domain (∼100 amino-acid residues) has been delineated that is predicted to face the cytoplasm and has been isolated as a soluble domain using library-based construct screening. A prototypical crystal structure at 2.8 Å resolution was obtained using nsp4 from feline coronavirus. Unmodified and SeMet-substituted proteins were crystallized under similar conditions, resulting in tetragonal crystals that belonged to space group P4{sub 3}. The phase problem was initially solved by single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS), followed by molecular replacement using a SIRAS-derived composite model. The structure consists of a single domain with a predominantly α-helical content displaying a unique fold that could be engaged in protein–protein interactions.

  12. Mode of inhibition of HIV-1 Integrase by a C-terminal domain-specific monoclonal antibody*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkel George

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To further our understanding of the structure and function of HIV-1 integrase (IN we developed and characterized a library of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against this protein. One of these antibodies, mAb33, which is specific for the C-terminal domain, was found to inhibit HIV-1 IN processing activity in vitro; a corresponding Fv fragment was able to inhibit HIV-1 integration in vivo. Our subsequent studies, using heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, identified six solvent accessible residues on the surface of the C-terminal domain that were immobilized upon binding of the antibody, which were proposed to comprise the epitope. Here we test this hypothesis by measuring the affinity of mAb33 to HIV-1 proteins that contain Ala substitutions in each of these positions. To gain additional insight into the mode of inhibition we also measured the DNA binding capacity and enzymatic activities of the Ala substituted proteins. Results We found that Ala substitution of any one of five of the putative epitope residues, F223, R224, Y226, I267, and I268, caused a decrease in the affinity of the mAb33 for HIV-1 IN, confirming the prediction from NMR data. Although IN derivatives with Ala substitutions in or near the mAb33 epitope exhibited decreased enzymatic activity, none of the epitope substitutions compromised DNA binding to full length HIV-1 IN, as measured by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Two of these derivatives, IN (I276A and IN (I267A/I268A, exhibited both increased DNA binding affinity and uncharacteristic dissociation kinetics; these proteins also exhibited non-specific nuclease activity. Results from these investigations are discussed in the context of current models for how the C-terminal domain interacts with substrate DNA. Conclusion It is unlikely that inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by mAb33 is caused by direct interaction with residues that are essential for substrate binding. Rather

  13. The C-Terminal RpoN Domain of sigma54 Forms an unpredictedHelix-Turn-Helix Motif Similar to domains of sigma70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucleff, Michaeleen; Malak, Lawrence T.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-11-01

    The ''{delta}'' subunit of prokaryotic RNA-polymerase allows gene-specific transcription initiation. Two {sigma} families have been identified, {sigma}{sup 70} and {sigma}{sup 54}, which use distinct mechanisms to initiate transcription and share no detectable sequence homology. Although the {sigma}{sup 70}-type factors have been well characterized structurally by x-ray crystallography, no high-resolution structural information is available for the {sigma}{sup 54}-type factors. Here we present the NMR derived structure of the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} from Aquifex aeolicus. This domain (Thr323 to Gly389), which contains the highly conserved RpoN box sequence, consists of a poorly structured N-terminal tail followed by a three-helix bundle, which is surprisingly similar to domains of the {sigma}{sup 70}-type proteins. Residues of the RpoN box, which have previously been shown to be critical for DNA binding, form the second helix of an unpredicted helix-turn-helix motif. This structure's homology with other DNA binding proteins, combined with previous biochemical data, suggest how the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} binds to DNA.

  14. Gating of human ClC-2 chloride channels and regulation by carboxy-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Olivares, Jennie; Alekov, Alexi; Boroumand, Mohammad Reza; Begemann, Birgit; Hidalgo, Patricia; Fahlke, Christoph

    2008-11-15

    Eukaryotic ClC channels are dimeric proteins with each subunit forming an individual protopore. Single protopores are gated by a fast gate, whereas the slow gate is assumed to control both protopores through a cooperative movement of the two carboxy-terminal domains. We here study the role of the carboxy-terminal domain in modulating fast and slow gating of human ClC-2 channels, a ubiquitously expressed ClC-type chloride channel involved in transepithelial solute transport and in neuronal chloride homeostasis. Partial truncation of the carboxy-terminus abolishes function of ClC-2 by locking the channel in a closed position. However, unlike other isoforms, its complete removal preserves function of ClC-2. ClC-2 channels without the carboxy-terminus exhibit fast and slow gates that activate and deactivate significantly faster than in WT channels. In contrast to the prevalent view, a single carboxy-terminus suffices for normal slow gating, whereas both domains regulate fast gating of individual protopores. Our findings demonstrate that the carboxy-terminus is not strictly required for slow gating and that the cooperative gating resides in other regions of the channel protein. ClC-2 is expressed in neurons and believed to open at negative potentials and increased internal chloride concentrations after intense synaptic activity. We propose that the function of the ClC-2 carboxy-terminus is to slow down the time course of channel activation in order to stabilize neuronal excitability.

  15. Requirement for the E1 Helicase C-Terminal Domain in Papillomavirus DNA Replication In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergvall, Monika; Gagnon, David; Titolo, Steve; Lehoux, Michaël; D'Abramo, Claudia M; Melendy, Thomas; Archambault, Jacques

    2016-01-06

    The papillomavirus (PV) E1 helicase contains a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD), located next to its ATP-binding site, whose function in vivo is still poorly understood. The CTD is comprised of an alpha helix followed by an acidic region (AR) and a C-terminal extension termed the C-tail. Recent biochemical studies on bovine papillomavirus 1 (BPV1) E1 showed that the AR and C-tail regulate the oligomerization of the protein into a double hexamer at the origin. In this study, we assessed the importance of the CTD of human papillomavirus 11 (HPV11) E1 in vivo, using a cell-based DNA replication assay. Our results indicate that combined deletion of the AR and C-tail drastically reduces DNA replication, by 85%, and that further truncation into the alpha-helical region compromises the structural integrity of the E1 helicase domain and its interaction with E2. Surprisingly, removal of the C-tail alone or mutation of highly conserved residues within the domain still allows significant levels of DNA replication (55%). This is in contrast to the absolute requirement for the C-tail reported for BPV1 E1 in vitro and confirmed here in vivo. Characterization of chimeric proteins in which the AR and C-tail from HPV11 E1 were replaced by those of BPV1 indicated that while the function of the AR is transferable, that of the C-tail is not. Collectively, these findings define the contribution of the three CTD subdomains to the DNA replication activity of E1 in vivo and suggest that the function of the C-tail has evolved in a PV type-specific manner. While much is known about hexameric DNA helicases from superfamily 3, the papillomavirus E1 helicase contains a unique C-terminal domain (CTD) adjacent to its ATP-binding site. We show here that this CTD is important for the DNA replication activity of HPV11 E1 in vivo and that it can be divided into three functional subdomains that roughly correspond to the three conserved regions of the CTD: an alpha helix, needed for the structural

  16. Requirement for the E1 Helicase C-Terminal Domain in Papillomavirus DNA Replication In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergvall, Monika; Gagnon, David; Titolo, Steve; Lehoux, Michaël; D'Abramo, Claudia M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The papillomavirus (PV) E1 helicase contains a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD), located next to its ATP-binding site, whose function in vivo is still poorly understood. The CTD is comprised of an alpha helix followed by an acidic region (AR) and a C-terminal extension termed the C-tail. Recent biochemical studies on bovine papillomavirus 1 (BPV1) E1 showed that the AR and C-tail regulate the oligomerization of the protein into a double hexamer at the origin. In this study, we assessed the importance of the CTD of human papillomavirus 11 (HPV11) E1 in vivo, using a cell-based DNA replication assay. Our results indicate that combined deletion of the AR and C-tail drastically reduces DNA replication, by 85%, and that further truncation into the alpha-helical region compromises the structural integrity of the E1 helicase domain and its interaction with E2. Surprisingly, removal of the C-tail alone or mutation of highly conserved residues within the domain still allows significant levels of DNA replication (55%). This is in contrast to the absolute requirement for the C-tail reported for BPV1 E1 in vitro and confirmed here in vivo. Characterization of chimeric proteins in which the AR and C-tail from HPV11 E1 were replaced by those of BPV1 indicated that while the function of the AR is transferable, that of the C-tail is not. Collectively, these findings define the contribution of the three CTD subdomains to the DNA replication activity of E1 in vivo and suggest that the function of the C-tail has evolved in a PV type-specific manner. IMPORTANCE While much is known about hexameric DNA helicases from superfamily 3, the papillomavirus E1 helicase contains a unique C-terminal domain (CTD) adjacent to its ATP-binding site. We show here that this CTD is important for the DNA replication activity of HPV11 E1 in vivo and that it can be divided into three functional subdomains that roughly correspond to the three conserved regions of the CTD: an alpha helix, needed

  17. Formation of highly stable chimeric trimers by fusion of an adenovirus fiber shaft fragment with the foldon domain of bacteriophage t4 fibritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; Forge, Vincent; Goeltz, Pierrette; Mitraki, Anna

    2004-03-05

    The folding of beta-structured, fibrous proteins is a largely unexplored area. A class of such proteins is used by viruses as adhesins, and recent studies revealed novel beta-structured motifs for them. We have been studying the folding and assembly of adenovirus fibers that consist of a globular C-terminal domain, a central fibrous shaft, and an N-terminal part that attaches to the viral capsid. The globular C-terminal, or "head" domain, has been postulated to be necessary for the trimerization of the fiber and might act as a registration signal that directs its correct folding and assembly. In this work, we replaced the head of the fiber by the trimerization domain of the bacteriophage T4 fibritin, termed "foldon." Two chimeric proteins, comprising the foldon domain connected at the C-terminal end of four fiber shaft repeats with or without the use of a natural linker sequence, fold into highly stable, SDS-resistant trimers. The structural signatures of the chimeric proteins as seen by CD and infrared spectroscopy are reported. The results suggest that the foldon domain can successfully replace the fiber head domain in ensuring correct trimerization of the shaft sequences. Biological implications and implications for engineering highly stable, beta-structured nanorods are discussed.

  18. Identification of the C-terminal domain of Daxx acts as a potential regulator of intracellular cholesterol synthesis in HepG2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shaowei; Wen, Juan; Qiu, Fei; Yin, Yufang; Xu, Guina; Li, Tianping; Nie, Juan; Xiong, Guozuo; Zhang, Caiping; Liao, Duangfang; Chen, Jianxiong; Tuo, Qinhui

    2016-01-01

    Daxx is a highly conserved nuclear transcriptional factor, which has been implicated in many nuclear processes including transcription and cell cycle regulation. Our previous study demonstrated Daxx also plays a role in regulation of intracellular cholesterol content. Daxx contains several domains that are essential for interaction with a growing number of proteins. To delineate the underlying mechanism of hypocholesterolemic activity of Daxx, we constructed a set of plasmids which can be used to overexpress different fragments of Daxx and transfected to HepG2 cells. We found that the C- terminal region Daxx626–740 clearly reduced intracellular cholesterol levels and inhibited the expression of SREBPs and SCAP. In GST pull-down experiments and Double immunofluorescence assays, Daxx626–740 was demonstrated to bind directly to androgen receptor (AR). Our findings suggest that the interaction of Daxx626-740 and AR abolishes the AR-mediated activation of SCAP/SREBPs pathway, which suppresses the de novo cholesterol synthesis. Thus, C-terminal domain of Daxx acts as a potential regulator of intracellular cholesterol content in HepG2 cells. - Highlights: • Daxx C-terminal domain reduces cholesterol levels. • Daxx C-terminal domain binds directly to AR. • The interaction of Daxx C-terminal domain and AR suppresses cholesterol synthesis.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the C-terminal domain of outer membrane protein A from enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Jiang; Ji, Xiaowei; Qi, Jianxun; Ma, Ying; Mao, Xuhu; Zou, Quanming

    2010-01-01

    In this study, recombinant OmpAC from EHEC was purified and crystallized and a diffraction data set was collected to 2.7 Å resolution. Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) plays multiple roles in bacterial physiology and pathogenesis, such as mediation of bacterial conjunction, maintenance of cell shape, induction of adhesion of EHEC to host cells etc. Better understanding of the functions of OmpA will help in the control of EHEC infections. OmpA is composed of two domains: the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain is a β-barrel structure and embeds in the outer membrane of the bacterium. The structure and function of the C-terminal domain of OmpA (OmpAC) remain elusive. In this study, recombinant OmpAC from EHEC was purified and crystallized and a diffraction data set was collected to 2.7 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group I4 1 32, with unit-cell parameter a = 158.99 Å. The Matthews coefficient and solvent content were calculated to be 2.55 Å 3 Da −1 and 51.77%, respectively, for two molecules in the asymmetric unit

  20. Activation of PI3K/Akt signaling by n-terminal SH2 domain mutants of the p85α regulatory subunit of PI3K is enhanced by deletion of its c-terminal SH2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bianca T; Jücker, Manfred

    2012-10-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is frequently activated in human cancer cells due to gain of function mutations in the catalytic (p110) and the regulatory (p85) subunits. The regulatory subunit consists of an SH3 domain and two SH2 domains. An oncogenic form of p85α named p65 lacking the c-terminal SH2 domain (cSH2) has been cloned from an irradiation-induced murine thymic lymphoma and transgenic mice expressing p65 in T lymphocytes develop a lymphoproliferative disorder. We have recently detected a c-terminal truncated form of p85α named p76α in a human lymphoma cell line lacking most of the cSH2 domain due to a frame shift mutation. Here, we report that the deletion of the cSH2 domain enhances the activating effects of the n-terminal SH2 domain (nSH2) mutants K379E and R340E on the PI3K/Akt pathway and micro tumor formation in a focus assay. Further analysis revealed that this transforming effect is mediated by activation of the catalytic PI3K isoform p110α and downstream signaling through mTOR. Our data further support a mechanistic model in which mutations of the cSH2 domain of p85α can abrogate its negative regulatory function on PI3K activity via the nSH2 domain of p85α. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of the C-terminal domain of Rv3262 (FbiB) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehan, Aisyah M.; Bashiri, Ghader; Paterson, Neil G.; Baker, Edward N.; Squire, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of FbiB, a bifunctional protein that is essential for the biosynthesis of cofactor F 420 in M. tuberculosis, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and were suitable for structure determination. During cofactor F 420 biosynthesis, the enzyme F 420 -γ-glutamyl ligase (FbiB) catalyzes the addition of γ-linked l-glutamate residues to form polyglutamylated F 420 derivatives. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Rv3262 (FbiB) consists of two domains: an N-terminal domain from the F 420 ligase superfamily and a C-terminal domain with sequence similarity to nitro-FMN reductase superfamily proteins. To characterize the role of the C-terminal domain of FbiB in polyglutamyl ligation, it has been purified and crystallized in an apo form. The crystals diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution using a synchrotron source and belonged to the tetragonal space group P4 1 2 1 2 (or P4 3 2 1 2), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 136.6, c = 101.7 Å, α = β = γ = 90°

  2. Sequential unfolding of the two-domain protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome c(4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Højmark; Jensen, Thomas Jon; Nørgaard, Allan

    2002-01-01

    F stutzeri cytochrome c. is a di-haem protein, composed of two globular domains each with His-Met coordinated haem. and a hydrogen bond network between the domains. The domain foldings are highly symmetric but with specific differences including structural differences of ligand coordination, and ...

  3. Solution structure and dynamics of C-terminal regulatory domain of Vibrio vulnificus extracellular metalloprotease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Kim, Heeyoun [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung Eun [Department of Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Sup, E-mail: jsplee@mail.chosun.ac.kr [Department of Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Weontae, E-mail: wlee@spin.yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have determined solution structures of vEP C-terminal regulatory domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 has a compact {beta}-barrel structure with eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution structure of vEP C-ter100 shares its molecular topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residues in the {beta}3 region of vEP C-ter100 might be important in putative ligand/receptor binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron ion. -- Abstract: An extracellular metalloprotease (vEP) secreted by Vibrio vulnificus ATCC29307 is a 45-kDa proteolytic enzyme that has prothrombin activation and fibrinolytic activities during bacterial infection. The action of vEP could result in clotting that could serve to protect the bacteria from the host defense machinery. Very recently, we showed that the C-terminal propeptide (C-ter100), which is unique to vEP, is involved in regulation of vEP activity. To understand the structural basis of this function of vEP C-ter100, we have determined the solution structure and backbone dynamics using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solution structure shows that vEP C-ter100 is composed of eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands with a unique fold that has a compact {beta}-barrel formation which stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding networks. Protein dynamics shows that the overall structure, including loops, is very rigid and stabilized. By structural database analysis, we found that vEP C-ter100 shares its topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase, despite low sequence homology between the two domains. Fluorescence assay reveals that vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron (Fe{sup 3+}). These findings suggest that vEP protease might recruit substrate molecules, such as collagen, by binding at C-ter100 and that vEP participates

  4. Animal-specific C-terminal domain links myeloblastosis oncoprotein (Myb) to an ancient repressor complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrejka, Laura; Wen, Hong; Ashton, Jonathan; Grant, Megan; Iori, Kevin; Wang, Amy; Manak, J. Robert; Lipsick, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Myb oncoprotein and E2F-Rb tumor suppressor protein families are present within the same highly conserved multiprotein transcriptional repressor complex, named either as Myb and synthetic multivuval class B (Myb-MuvB) or as Drosophila Rb E2F and Myb-interacting proteins (dREAM). We now report that the animal-specific C terminus of Drosophila Myb but not the more highly conserved N-terminal DNA-binding domain is necessary and sufficient for (i) adult viability, (ii) proper localization to chromosomes in vivo, (iii) regulation of gene expression in vivo, and (iv) interaction with the highly conserved core of the MuvB/dREAM transcriptional repressor complex. In addition, we have identified a conserved peptide motif that is required for this interaction. Our results imply that an ancient function of Myb in regulating G2/M genes in both plants and animals appears to have been transferred from the DNA-binding domain to the animal-specific C-terminal domain. Increased expression of B-MYB/MYBL2, the human ortholog of Drosophila Myb, correlates with poor prognosis in human patients with breast cancer. Therefore, our results imply that the specific interaction of the C terminus of Myb with the MuvB/dREAM core complex may provide an attractive target for the development of cancer therapeutics. PMID:21969598

  5. Confirming the Revised C-Terminal Domain of the MscL Crystal Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Joshua A.; Elmore, Donald E.; Clayton, Daniel; Xiong, Li; Lester, Henry A.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the C-terminal domain of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) has generated significant controversy. As a result, several structures have been proposed for this region: the original crystal structure (1MSL) of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis homolog (Tb), a model of the Escherichia coli homolog, and, most recently, a revised crystal structure of Tb-MscL (2OAR). To understand which of these structures represents a physiological conformation, we measured the ...

  6. The BARD1 C-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Polyadenylation Factor CstF-50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Ross A.; Lee, Megan S.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Williams, R. Scott; Tainer, John A.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-07-13

    The BARD1 N-terminal RING domain binds BRCA1 while the BARD1 C-terminal ankyrin and tandem BRCT repeat domains bind CstF-50 to modulate mRNA processing and RNAP II stability in response to DNA damage. Here we characterize the BARD1 structural biochemistry responsible for CstF- 50 binding. The crystal structure of the BARD1 BRCT domain uncovers a degenerate phosphopeptide binding pocket lacking the key arginine required for phosphopeptide interactions in other BRCT proteins.Small angle X-ray scattering together with limited proteolysis results indicates that ankyrin and BRCT domains are linked by a flexible tether and do not adopt a fixed orientation relative to one another. Protein pull-down experiments utilizing a series of purified BARD1 deletion mutants indicate that interactions between the CstF-50 WD-40 domain and BARD1 involve the ankyrin-BRCT linker but do not require ankyrin or BRCT domains. The structural plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker helps to explain the regulated assembly of different protein BARD1 complexes with distinct functions in DNA damage signaling including BARD1-dependent induction of apoptosis plus p53 stabilization and interactions. BARD1 architecture and plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker are suitable to allow the BARD1 C-terminus to act as a hub with multiple binding sites to integrate diverse DNA damage signals directly to RNA polymerase.

  7. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) nucleocapsid protein C-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Xiaohang; Ma, Yanlin; Li, Xuemei

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of mouse hepatitis virus nucleocapsid protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal belonged to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, c = 50.8 Å, and diffracted to 2.20 Å resolution. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) belongs to the group II coronaviruses. The virus produces nine genes encoding 11 proteins that could be recognized as structural proteins and nonstructural proteins and are crucial for viral RNA synthesis. The nucleocapsid (N) protein, one of the structural proteins, interacts with the 30.4 kb virus genomic RNA to form the helical nucleocapsid and associates with the membrane glycoprotein via its C-terminus to stabilize virion assembly. Here, the expression and crystallization of the MHV nucleocapsid protein C-terminal domain are reported. The crystals diffracted to 2.20 Å resolution and belonged to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, c = 50.8 Å. Assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 43.0% (V M = 2.16 Å 3 Da −1 )

  8. Conformational effects of a common codon 751 polymorphism on the C-terminal domain of the xeroderma pigmentosum D protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Regina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The xeroderma pigmentosum D (XPD protein is a DNA helicase involved in the repair of DNA damage, including nucleotide excision repair (NER and transcription-coupled repair (TCR. The C-terminal domain of XPD has been implicated in interactions with other components of the TFIIH complex, and it is also the site of a common genetic polymorphism in XPD at amino acid residue 751 (Lys->Gln. Some evidence suggests that this polymorphism may alter DNA repair capacity and increase cancer risk. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these effects could be attributable to conformational changes in XPD induced by the polymorphism. Materials and Methods: Molecular dynamics techniques were used to predict the structure of the wild-type and polymorphic forms of the C-terminal domain of XPD and differences in structure produced by the polymorphic substitution were determined. Results: The results indicate that, although the general configuration of both proteins is similar, the substitution produces a significant conformational change immediately N-terminal to the site of the polymorphism. Conclusion: These results provide support for the hypothesis that this polymorphism in XPD could affect DNA repair capability, and hence cancer risk, by altering the structure of the C-terminal domain.

  9. Downstream signaling mechanism of the C-terminal activation domain of transcriptional coactivator CoCoA

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong Hoon; Yang, Catherine K.; Stallcup, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    The coiled-coil coactivator (CoCoA) is a transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors and enhances nuclear receptor function by the interaction with the bHLH-PAS domain (AD3) of p160 coactivators. The C-terminal activation domain (AD) of CoCoA possesses strong transactivation activity and is required for the coactivator function of CoCoA with nuclear receptors. To understand how CoCoA AD transmits its activating signal to the transcription machinery, we defined specific subregions, amino...

  10. The carboxy-terminal domain of Dictyostelium C-module-binding factor is an independent gene regulatory entity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Lucas

    Full Text Available The C-module-binding factor (CbfA is a multidomain protein that belongs to the family of jumonji-type (JmjC transcription regulators. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, CbfA regulates gene expression during the unicellular growth phase and multicellular development. CbfA and a related D. discoideum CbfA-like protein, CbfB, share a paralogous domain arrangement that includes the JmjC domain, presumably a chromatin-remodeling activity, and two zinc finger-like (ZF motifs. On the other hand, the CbfA and CbfB proteins have completely different carboxy-terminal domains, suggesting that the plasticity of such domains may have contributed to the adaptation of the CbfA-like transcription factors to the rapid genome evolution in the dictyostelid clade. To support this hypothesis we performed DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR measurements and found that CbfA regulates at least 160 genes during the vegetative growth of D. discoideum cells. Functional annotation of these genes revealed that CbfA predominantly controls the expression of gene products involved in housekeeping functions, such as carbohydrate, purine nucleoside/nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism. The CbfA protein displays two different mechanisms of gene regulation. The expression of one set of CbfA-dependent genes requires at least the JmjC/ZF domain of the CbfA protein and thus may depend on chromatin modulation. Regulation of the larger group of genes, however, does not depend on the entire CbfA protein and requires only the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA (CbfA-CTD. An AT-hook motif located in CbfA-CTD, which is known to mediate DNA binding to A+T-rich sequences in vitro, contributed to CbfA-CTD-dependent gene regulatory functions in vivo.

  11. The C-terminal domain of Rac1 contains two motifs that control targeting and signaling specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hennik, Paula B.; ten Klooster, Jean Paul; Halstead, Jon R.; Voermans, Carlijn; Anthony, Eloise C.; Divecha, Nullin; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2003-01-01

    Rho-like GTPases control a wide range of cellular functions such as integrin- and cadherin-mediated adhesion, cell motility, and gene expression. The hypervariable C-terminal domain of these GTPases has been implicated in membrane association and effector binding. We found that cell-permeable

  12. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the mouse brain cytosolic long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serek, Robert; Forwood, Jade K.; Hume, David A.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2006-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of the mouse long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase has been expressed in bacteria and crystallized by vapour diffusion. The crystals diffract to 2.4 Å resolution. The mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase, the enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of acyl-CoAs to free fatty acids, contains two fused 4HBT (4-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA thioesterase) motifs. The C-terminal domain of the mouse long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase (Acot7) has been expressed in bacteria and crystallized. The crystals were obtained by vapour diffusion using PEG 2000 MME as precipitant at pH 7.0 and 290 K. The crystals have the symmetry of space group R32 (unit-cell parameters a = b = 136.83, c = 99.82 Å, γ = 120°). Two molecules are expected in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.4 Å resolution using the laboratory X-ray source and are suitable for crystal structure determination

  13. Three-dimensional structure of a Streptomyces sviceus GNAT acetyltransferase with similarity to the C-terminal domain of the human GH84 O-GlcNAcase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yuan; Roth, Christian; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Davies, Gideon J.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of a bacterial acetyltransferase with 27% sequence identity to the C-terminal domain of human O-GlcNAcase has been solved at 1.5 Å resolution. This S. sviceus protein is compared with known GCN5-related acetyltransferases, adding to the diversity observed in this superfamily. The mammalian O-GlcNAc hydrolysing enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is a multi-domain protein with glycoside hydrolase activity in the N-terminus and with a C-terminal domain that has low sequence similarity to known acetyltransferases, prompting speculation, albeit controversial, that the C-terminal domain may function as a histone acetyltransferase (HAT). There are currently scarce data available regarding the structure and function of this C-terminal region. Here, a bacterial homologue of the human OGA C-terminal domain, an acetyltransferase protein (accession No. ZP-05014886) from Streptomyces sviceus (SsAT), was cloned and its crystal structure was solved to high resolution. The structure reveals a conserved protein core that has considerable structural homology to the acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) binding site of GCN5-related acetyltransferases (GNATs). Calorimetric data further confirm that SsAT is indeed able to bind AcCoA in solution with micromolar affinity. Detailed structural analysis provided insight into the binding of AcCoA. An acceptor-binding cavity was identified, indicating that the physiological substrate of SsAT may be a small molecule. Consistent with recently published work, the SsAT structure further questions a HAT function for the human OGA domain

  14. Three-dimensional structure of a Streptomyces sviceus GNAT acetyltransferase with similarity to the C-terminal domain of the human GH84 O-GlcNAcase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yuan [Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Roth, Christian; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Davies, Gideon J., E-mail: gideon.davies@york.ac.uk [The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of a bacterial acetyltransferase with 27% sequence identity to the C-terminal domain of human O-GlcNAcase has been solved at 1.5 Å resolution. This S. sviceus protein is compared with known GCN5-related acetyltransferases, adding to the diversity observed in this superfamily. The mammalian O-GlcNAc hydrolysing enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is a multi-domain protein with glycoside hydrolase activity in the N-terminus and with a C-terminal domain that has low sequence similarity to known acetyltransferases, prompting speculation, albeit controversial, that the C-terminal domain may function as a histone acetyltransferase (HAT). There are currently scarce data available regarding the structure and function of this C-terminal region. Here, a bacterial homologue of the human OGA C-terminal domain, an acetyltransferase protein (accession No. ZP-05014886) from Streptomyces sviceus (SsAT), was cloned and its crystal structure was solved to high resolution. The structure reveals a conserved protein core that has considerable structural homology to the acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) binding site of GCN5-related acetyltransferases (GNATs). Calorimetric data further confirm that SsAT is indeed able to bind AcCoA in solution with micromolar affinity. Detailed structural analysis provided insight into the binding of AcCoA. An acceptor-binding cavity was identified, indicating that the physiological substrate of SsAT may be a small molecule. Consistent with recently published work, the SsAT structure further questions a HAT function for the human OGA domain.

  15. A novel PKD2L1 C-terminal domain critical for trimerization and channel function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wang; Hussein, Shaimaa; Yang, JungWoo; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Hernandez-Anzaldo, Samuel; Fernandez-Patron, Carlos; Cao, Ying; Zeng, Hongbo; Tang, Jingfeng; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2015-03-30

    As a transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily member, polycystic kidney disease 2-like-1 (PKD2L1) is also called TRPP3 and has similar membrane topology as voltage-gated cation channels. PKD2L1 is involved in hedgehog signaling, intestinal development, and sour tasting. PKD2L1 and PKD1L3 form heterotetramers with 3:1 stoichiometry. C-terminal coiled-coil-2 (CC2) domain (G699-W743) of PKD2L1 was reported to be important for its trimerization but independent studies showed that CC2 does not affect PKD2L1 channel function. It thus remains unclear how PKD2L1 proteins oligomerize into a functional channel. By SDS-PAGE, blue native PAGE and mutagenesis we here identified a novel C-terminal domain called C1 (K575-T622) involved in stronger homotrimerization than the non-overlapping CC2, and found that the PKD2L1 N-terminus is critical for dimerization. By electrophysiology and Xenopus oocyte expression, we found that C1, but not CC2, is critical for PKD2L1 channel function. Our co-immunoprecipitation and dynamic light scattering experiments further supported involvement of C1 in trimerization. Further, C1 acted as a blocking peptide that inhibits PKD2L1 trimerization as well as PKD2L1 and PKD2L1/PKD1L3 channel function. Thus, our study identified C1 as the first PKD2L1 domain essential for both PKD2L1 trimerization and channel function, and suggest that PKD2L1 and PKD2L1/PKD1L3 channels share the PKD2L1 trimerization process.

  16. Cloning and expression of adiponectin and its globular domain, and measurement of the biological activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Yu-Jian; Zhang, Hui-Tang; Yang, Sheng-Li; Gong, Yi

    2003-11-01

    3T3-L1-adipocytes produce the adipocyte complement related protein of 30 kD (ACRP30), which is exclusively expressed in differentiated adipocytes. Decreased expression of ACRP30 correlates with insulin resistance in mouse models of altered insulin sensitivity. Adiponectin, the human homologue of ACRP30, circulates in human plasma at high levels. Plasma adiponectin levels have been reported to be decreased in some insulin-resistant states, such as obesity and type II diabetes mellitus. Here, full-length adiponectin and its C-terminal globular head domain (gAdiponectin) were expressed in Escherichia coli and gAdiponectin was used to immunize a rabbit to obtain polyclonal antiserum with titer of 10,000. Adiponectin was detected in human plasma with the use of gAdiponectin anti-serum by Western blot analysis, which was also detected by gACRP30 anti-serum. Injection in alloxan-treated rats with purified recombinant fusion adiponectin or gAdiponectin transiently abolished hyperglycemia. So adiponectin and gAdiponectin might have activity as a glucose lowering agent and potentially as a therapeutic for metabolic disease. All these results suggested that the recombinant protein had biological activity, and provided a useful tool in further studies.

  17. Transfer of C-terminal residues of human apolipoprotein A-I to insect apolipophorin III creates a two-domain chimeric protein with enhanced lipid binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, James V C; Ellena, Rachel A; Tran, Jesse J; Beck, Wendy H J; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Weers, Paul M M

    2017-08-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is an insect apolipoprotein (18kDa) that comprises a single five-helix bundle domain. In contrast, human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is a 28kDa two-domain protein: an α-helical N-terminal domain (residues 1-189) and a less structured C-terminal domain (residues 190-243). To better understand the apolipoprotein domain organization, a novel chimeric protein was engineered by attaching residues 179 to 243 of apoA-I to the C-terminal end of apoLp-III. The apoLp-III/apoA-I chimera was successfully expressed and purified in E. coli. Western blot analysis and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of the C-terminal domain of apoA-I within the chimera. While parent apoLp-III did not self-associate, the chimera formed oligomers similar to apoA-I. The chimera displayed a lower α-helical content, but the stability remained similar compared to apoLp-III, consistent with the addition of a less structured domain. The chimera was able to solubilize phospholipid vesicles at a significantly higher rate compared to apoLp-III, approaching that of apoA-I. The chimera was more effective in protecting phospholipase C-treated low density lipoprotein from aggregation compared to apoLp-III. In addition, binding interaction of the chimera with phosphatidylglycerol vesicles and lipopolysaccharides was considerably improved compared to apoLp-III. Thus, addition of the C-terminal domain of apoA-I to apoLp-III created a two-domain protein, with self-association, lipid and lipopolysaccharide binding properties similar to apoA-I. The apoA-I like behavior of the chimera indicate that these properties are independent from residues residing in the N-terminal domain of apoA-I, and that they can be transferred from apoA-I to apoLp-III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Solution structure of the C-terminal X domain of the measles virus phosphoprotein and interaction with the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gely, Stéphane; Lowry, David F; Bernard, Cédric; Jensen, Malene R; Blackledge, Martin; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Darbon, Hervé; Daughdrill, Gary; Longhi, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    In this report, the solution structure of the nucleocapsid-binding domain of the measles virus phosphoprotein (XD, aa 459-507) is described. A dynamic description of the interaction between XD and the disordered C-terminal domain of the nucleocapsid protein, (N(TAIL), aa 401-525), is also presented. XD is an all alpha protein consisting of a three-helix bundle with an up-down-up arrangement of the helices. The solution structure of XD is very similar to the crystal structures of both the free and bound form of XD. One exception is the presence of a highly dynamic loop encompassing XD residues 489-491, which is involved in the embedding of the alpha-helical XD-binding region of N(TAIL). Secondary chemical shift values for full-length N(TAIL) were used to define the precise boundaries of a transient helical segment that coincides with the XD-binding domain, thus shedding light on the pre-recognition state of N(TAIL). Titration experiments with unlabeled XD showed that the transient alpha-helical conformation of N(TAIL) is stabilized upon binding. Lineshape analysis of NMR resonances revealed that residues 483-506 of N(TAIL) are in intermediate exchange with XD, while the 475-482 and 507-525 regions are in fast exchange. The N(TAIL) resonance behavior in the titration experiments is consistent with a complex binding model with more than two states.

  19. Synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB is essential for high-affinity binding, DNA supercoiling and inhibition of RecA-promoted strand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharadamma, N; Khan, Krishnendu; Kumar, Sandeep; Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Hasnain, Seyed E; Muniyappa, K

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of DNA architectural proteins containing two functional domains derived from two different architectural proteins is an interesting emerging research theme in the field of nucleoid structure and function. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB, unlike Escherichia coli HU, is a two-domain protein that, in the N-terminal region, shows broad sequence homology with bacterial HU. The long C-terminal extension, on the other hand, contains seven PAKK/KAAK motifs, which are characteristic of the histone H1/H5 family of proteins. In this article, we describe several aspects of HupB function, in comparison with its truncated derivatives lacking either the C-terminus or N-terminus. We found that HupB binds a variety of DNA repair and replication intermediates with K(d) values in the nanomolar range. By contrast, the N-terminal fragment of M. tuberculosis HupB (HupB(MtbN)) showed diminished DNA-binding activity, with K(d) values in the micromolar range, and the C-terminal domain was completely devoid of DNA-binding activity. Unlike HupB(MtbN) , HupB was able to constrain DNA in negative supercoils and introduce negative superhelical turns into relaxed DNA. Similarly, HupB exerted a robust inhibitory effect on DNA strand exchange promoted by cognate and noncognate RecA proteins, whereas HupB(MtbN), even at a 50-fold molar excess, had no inhibitory effect. Considered together, these results suggest that synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of HupB is essential for its DNA-binding ability, and to modulate the topological features of DNA, which has implications for processes such as DNA compaction, gene regulation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  20. Characterization of Runella slithyformis HD-Pnk, a bifunctional DNA/RNA end-healing enzyme composed of an N-terminal 2',3' -phosphoesterase HD domain and a C-terminal 5' -OH polynucleotide kinase domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Annum; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-11-28

    5' and 3' end healing are key steps in nucleic acid break repair in which 5' -OH ends are phosphorylated by a polynucleotide kinase and 3' -PO 4 or 2',3' -cyclic-PO 4 ends are hydrolyzed by a phosphoesterase to generate the 5' -PO 4 and 3' -OH termini required for sealing by classic polynucleotide ligases. End healing and sealing enzymes are present in diverse bacterial taxa, often organized as modular units within a single multifunctional polypeptide or as subunits of a repair complex. Here we identify and characterize Runella slithyformis HD-Pnk as a novel bifunctional end-healing enzyme composed of an N-terminal 2',3' -phosphoesterase HD domain and a C-terminal 5' -OH polynucleotide kinase P-loop domain. HD-Pnk phosphorylates 5' -OH polynucleotides (9-mers or longer) in the presence of magnesium and any NTP donor. HD-Pnk dephosphorylates RNA 2',3' -cyclic phosphate, RNA 3' -phosphate, RNA 2' -phosphate, and DNA 3' -phosphate ends in the presence of a transition metal cofactor, which can be nickel, copper or cobalt. HD-Pnkp homologs are present in genera from eleven bacterial phyla and are often encoded in an operon with a putative ATP-dependent polynucleotide ligase. The present study provides insights to the diversity of nucleic acid repair strategies via the characterization of Runella slithyformis HD-Pnkp as the exemplar of a novel clade of dual 5' and 3' end-healing enzymes that phosphorylate 5' -OH termini and dephosphorylate 2',3' -cyclic-PO 4 , 3' -PO 4 , and 2' -PO 4 ends. The distinctive feature of HD-Pnk is its domain composition: a fusion of an N-terminal HD phosphohydrolase module to a C-terminal P-loop polynucleotide kinase module. Homologs of Runella HD-Pnk with the same domain composition, domain order, and similar polypeptide size are distributed widely among genera from eleven bacterial phyla. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  2. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the addiction antidote CcdA in complex with its toxin CcdB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buts, Lieven; De Jonge, Natalie; Loris, Remy; Wyns, Lode; Dao-Thi, Minh-Hoa

    2005-01-01

    The CcdA C-terminal domain was crystallized in complex with CcdB in two crystal forms that diffract to beyond 2.0 Å resolution. CcdA and CcdB are the antidote and toxin of the ccd addiction module of Escherichia coli plasmid F. The CcdA C-terminal domain (CcdA C36 ; 36 amino acids) was crystallized in complex with CcdB (dimer of 2 × 101 amino acids) in three different crystal forms, two of which diffract to high resolution. Form II belongs to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 37.6, b = 60.5, c = 83.8 Å and diffracts to 1.8 Å resolution. Form III belongs to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 41.0, b = 37.9, c = 69.6 Å, β = 96.9°, and diffracts to 1.9 Å resolution

  3. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  4. Edades relativas de cúmulos globulares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Bertolami, M.; Forte, J. C.

    El trabajo de Rossemberg et al (1999), estudia las edades relativas de cúmulos globulares galácticos mediante el análisis de ciertos parámetros morfológicos de los diagramas color-magnitud de dichos cúmulos. Este trabajo se centra en tres puntos: analizar la consistencia de los resultados obtenidos por Rossemberg et al (1999) al emplear observaciones en el sistema fotométrico de Washington, más precisamente, las magnitudes C y T1 en lugar de las magnitudes V e I utilizadas por dichos autores. De la existencia de colores integrados, metalicidad y edad (relativa) para 21 de los cúmulos utilizados en dicho trabajo, se analiza la consistencia de estos resultados con las dependencias de color integrado como función de la edad y la metalicidad que se desprenden de los modelos teóricos de luz integrada por Worthey (1994), Schulz (2002) y Lee et al (2002). Por último se lleva a cabo una breve comparación de la morfología de los diagramas color-magnitud de los cúmulos globulares y de las isocronas utilizadas, a fin de intentar identificar algunas de las posibles causas de las diferencias observadas en los incisos anteriores.

  5. High-resolution crystal structure reveals a HEPN domain at the C-terminal region of S. cerevisiae RNA endonuclease Swt1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Shuxia; Zhou, Ke; Wang, Wenjia; Gao, Zengqiang; Dong, Yuhui; Liu, Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 was determined at 2.3 Å. • Structure of the CT domain was identified as HEPN domain superfamily member. • Low-resolution envelope of Swt1 full-length in solution was analyzed by SAXS. • The middle and CT domains gave good fit to SAXS structural model. - Abstract: Swt1 is an RNA endonuclease that plays an important role in quality control of nuclear messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in eukaryotes; however, its structural details remain to be elucidated. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which shares common characteristics of higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide binding (HEPN) domain superfamily. To study in detail the full-length protein structure, we analyzed the low-resolution architecture of Swt1 in solution using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. Both the CT domain and middle domain exhibited a good fit upon superimposing onto the molecular envelope of Swt1. Our study provides the necessary structural information for detailed analysis of the functional role of Swt1, and its importance in the process of nuclear mRNP surveillance

  6. The pH-sensitive structure of the C-terminal domain of voltage-gated proton channel and the thermodynamic characteristics of Zn{sup 2+} binding to this domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qing; Li, Chuanyong; Li, Shu Jie, E-mail: shujieli@nankai.edu.cn

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • The α-helical content of the C-terminus is decreased with a pH increase. • The thermostability of the C-terminus is decreased with a pH increase. • Zn{sup 2+} binds to His{sup 244} and His{sup 266} residues within the C-terminal domain. • The binding of Zn{sup 2+} to His{sup 244} residue is an endothermic heat reaction. • The binding of Zn{sup 2+} to His{sup 266} residue is an exothermic heat reaction. - Abstract: The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is strongly sensitive to Zn{sup 2+}. The H{sup +} conduction is decreased at a high concentration of Zn{sup 2+} and Hv1 channel closing is slowed by the internal application of Zn{sup 2+}. Although the recent studies demonstrated that Zn{sup 2+} interacts with the intracellular C-terminal domain, the binding sites and details of the interaction remain unknown. Here, we studied the pH-dependent structural stability of the intracellular C-terminal domain of human Hv1 and showed that Zn{sup 2+} binds to His{sup 244} and His{sup 266} residues. The thermodynamics signature of Zn{sup 2+} binding to the two sites was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding of Zn{sup 2+} to His{sup 244} (mutant H266A) and His{sup 266} (mutant H244A) were an endothermic heat reaction and an exothermic heat reaction, respectively.

  7. Combining biophysical methods to analyze the disulfide bond in SH2 domain of C-terminal Src kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongsheng; Cowburn, David

    2016-01-01

    The Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain is a structurally conserved protein domain that typically binds to a phosphorylated tyrosine in a peptide motif from the target protein. The SH2 domain of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) contains a single disulfide bond, which is unusual for most SH2 domains. Although the global motion of SH2 domain regulates Csk function, little is known about the relationship between the disulfide bond and binding of the ligand. In this study, we combined X-ray crystallography, solution NMR, and other biophysical methods to reveal the interaction network in Csk. Denaturation studies have shown that disulfide bond contributes significantly to the stability of SH2 domain, and crystal structures of the oxidized and C122S mutant showed minor conformational changes. We further investigated the binding of SH2 domain to a phosphorylated peptide from Csk-binding protein upon reduction and oxidation using both NMR and fluorescence approaches. This work employed NMR, X-ray cryptography, and other biophysical methods to study a disulfide bond in Csk SH2 domain. In addition, this work provides in-depth understanding of the structural dynamics of Csk SH2 domain.

  8. Hepatitis C virus NS4B carboxy terminal domain is a membrane binding domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaan Willy JM

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV induces membrane rearrangements during replication. All HCV proteins are associated to membranes, pointing out the importance of membranes for HCV. Non structural protein 4B (NS4B has been reported to induce cellular membrane alterations like the membranous web. Four transmembrane segments in the middle of the protein anchor NS4B to membranes. An amphipatic helix at the amino-terminus attaches to membranes as well. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD of NS4B is highly conserved in Hepaciviruses, though its function remains unknown. Results A cytosolic localization is predicted for the NS4B-CTD. However, using membrane floatation assays and immunofluorescence, we now show targeting of the NS4B-CTD to membranes. Furthermore, a profile-profile search, with an HCV NS4B-CTD multiple sequence alignment, indicates sequence similarity to the membrane binding domain of prokaryotic D-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH. The crystal structure of E. coli d-LDH suggests that the region similar to NS4B-CTD is located in the membrane binding domain (MBD of d-LDH, implying analogy in membrane association. Targeting of d-LDH to membranes occurs via electrostatic interactions of positive residues on the outside of the protein with negative head groups of lipids. To verify that anchorage of d-LDH MBD and NS4B-CTD is analogous, NS4B-CTD mutants were designed to disrupt these electrostatic interactions. Membrane association was confirmed by swopping the membrane contacting helix of d-LDH with the corresponding domain of the 4B-CTD. Furthermore, the functionality of these residues was tested in the HCV replicon system. Conclusion Together these data show that NS4B-CTD is associated to membranes, similar to the prokaryotic d-LDH MBD, and is important for replication.

  9. Keratin 8 phosphorylation in vitro by cAMP-dependent protein kinase occurs within the amino- and carboxyl-terminal end domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, S; Tokui, T; Yano, T; Inagaki, M

    1996-04-05

    We reported earlier that phosphorylation in vitro of keratin filaments reconstituted from rat type I keratin 18 and type II keratin 8 by cAPM-dependent protein kinase induces disassembly of the keratin filament structure. Keratin 8 rather than keratin 18 was the major target of the kinase. We have now identified the sites on rat keratin 8 for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Sequential analysis of the purified phosphoropeptides, together with the known primary sequence, revealed that four major sites, Ser-12, Ser-23, Ser-36, and Ser-50, and three minor sites, Ser-8, Ser-33, Ser-42, are located in the amino-terminal head domain, while three minor sites, Ser-416, Ser-423 and Ser-425 locate in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain.

  10. Adenovirus fibre shaft sequences fold into the native triple beta-spiral fold when N-terminally fused to the bacteriophage T4 fibritin foldon trimerisation motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; Teixeira, Susana; Belrhali, Hassan; Forsyth, V Trevor; Mitraki, Anna; van Raaij, Mark J

    2004-09-03

    Adenovirus fibres are trimeric proteins that consist of a globular C-terminal domain, a central fibrous shaft and an N-terminal part that attaches to the viral capsid. In the presence of the globular C-terminal domain, which is necessary for correct trimerisation, the shaft segment adopts a triple beta-spiral conformation. We have replaced the head of the fibre by the trimerisation domain of the bacteriophage T4 fibritin, the foldon. Two different fusion constructs were made and crystallised, one with an eight amino acid residue linker and one with a linker of only two residues. X-ray crystallographic studies of both fusion proteins shows that residues 319-391 of the adenovirus type 2 fibre shaft fold into a triple beta-spiral fold indistinguishable from the native structure, although this is now resolved at a higher resolution of 1.9 A. The foldon residues 458-483 also adopt their natural structure. The intervening linkers are not well ordered in the crystal structures. This work shows that the shaft sequences retain their capacity to fold into their native beta-spiral fibrous fold when fused to a foreign C-terminal trimerisation motif. It provides a structural basis to artificially trimerise longer adenovirus shaft segments and segments from other trimeric beta-structured fibre proteins. Such artificial fibrous constructs, amenable to crystallisation and solution studies, can offer tractable model systems for the study of beta-fibrous structure. They can also prove useful for gene therapy and fibre engineering applications.

  11. Abl N-terminal cap stabilization of SH3 domain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shugui; Dumitrescu, Teodora Pene; Smithgall, Thomas E; Engen, John R

    2008-05-27

    Crystal structures and other biochemical data indicate that the N-terminal cap (NCap) region of the Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) is important for maintaining the downregulated conformation of the kinase domain. The exact contributions that the NCap makes in stabilizing the various intramolecular interactions within c-Abl are less clear. While the NCap appears to be important for locking the SH3 and SH2 domains to the back of the kinase domain, there may be other more subtle elements of regulation. Hydrogen exchange (HX) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to determine if the NCap contributes to intramolecular interactions involving the Abl SH3 domain. Under physiological conditions, the Abl SH3 domain underwent partial unfolding and its unfolding half-life was slowed during binding to the SH2 kinase linker, providing a unique assay for testing NCap-induced stabilization of the SH3 domain in various constructs. The results showed that the NCap stabilizes the dynamics of the SH3 domain in certain constructs but does not increase the relative affinity of the SH3 domain for the native SH2 kinase linker. The stabilization effect was absent in constructs of just the NCap and SH3 but was obvious when the SH2 domain and the SH2 kinase linker were present. These results suggest that interactions between the NCap and the SH3 domain can contribute to c-Abl stabilization in constructs that contain at least the SH2 domain, an effect that may partially compensate for the absence of the negative regulatory C-terminal tail found in the related Src family of kinases.

  12. Abl N-terminal Cap stabilization of SH3 domain dynamics†

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shugui; Dumitrescu, Teodora Pene; Smithgall, Thomas E.; Engen, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Crystal structures and other biochemical data indicate that the N-terminal cap (NCap) region of the Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) is important for maintaining the downregulated conformation of the kinase domain. The exact contributions that NCap makes in stabilizing the various intramolecular interactions within c-Abl are less clear. While the NCap appears important for locking the SH3/SH2 domains to the back of the kinase domain, there may be other more subtle elements of regulation. Hydro...

  13. Insights into PG-binding, conformational change, and dimerization of the OmpA C-terminal domains from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Borrelia burgdorferi: Characterization of OmpA C-Terminal Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Wu, Ruiying [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Cuff, Marianne [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Fan, Yao [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Bigelow, Lance [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Jedrzejczak, Robert P. [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Adkins, Joshua N. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Cort, John R. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Babnigg, Gyorgy [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Joachimiak, Andrzej [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439

    2017-06-19

    S. Typhimurium can induce both humoral and cell-mediated responses when establishing itself in the host. These responses are primarily stimulated against the lipopolysaccharide and major outer membrane (OM) proteins of the bacterium. OmpA is one of these major OM proteins. It comprises a N-terminal eight-stranded -barrel membrane domain and a C-terminal so-called OmpA C-terminal domain (OmpACTD). The OmpACTD and its homologs are believed to bind to peptidoglycan (PG) within the periplasm, maintaining bacterial osmotic homeostasis and modulating the permeability and integrity of the outer membrane. Here we present the structures of two forms of the OmpACTD of S. Typhimurium (STOmpACTD) and one structure of the less-studied OmpACTD of Borrelia burgdorferi (BbOmpACTD). In the open form of STOmpACTD, an aspartic acid residue from a long 2-3 loop points into the binding pocket, suggesting that an anion group such as a carboxylate group from PG is favored at the binding site. In the closed form of STOmpACTD and in the structure of BbOmpACTD, a sulfate group from the crystallization buffer is tightly bound at the equivalent site. The differences between the closed and open forms of STOmpACTD, suggest a large conformational change that includes an extension of 3 helix by ordering a part of 2-3 loop. We suggest that the sulfate anion observed in these structures mimics the carboxylate group of PG when bound to STOmpACTD. In addition, the binding of PG or a ligand mimic may enhance dimerization of STOmpACTD, or possibly that of full length STOmpA.

  14. PTEN C-Terminal Deletion Causes Genomic Instability and Tumor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Sun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor PTEN controls genomic stability and inhibits tumorigenesis. The N-terminal phosphatase domain of PTEN antagonizes the PI3K/AKT pathway, but its C-terminal function is less defined. Here, we describe a knockin mouse model of a nonsense mutation that results in the deletion of the entire Pten C-terminal region, referred to as PtenΔC. Mice heterozygous for PtenΔC develop multiple spontaneous tumors, including cancers and B cell lymphoma. Heterozygous deletion of the Pten C-terminal domain also causes genomic instability and common fragile site rearrangement. We found that Pten C-terminal disruption induces p53 and its downstream targets. Simultaneous depletion of p53 promotes metastasis without influencing the initiation of tumors, suggesting that p53 mainly suppresses tumor progression. Our data highlight the essential role of the PTEN C terminus in the maintenance of genomic stability and suppression of tumorigenesis.

  15. Highly acidic C-terminal domain of pp32 is required for the interaction with histone chaperone, TAF-Ibeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Seon; Oh, Sang-Min; Kim, Sung-Mi; Lee, Dong-Seok; Seo, Sang-Beom

    2006-12-01

    We have previously reported that INHAT (inhibitor of acetyltransferases) complex subunits, TAF (template activating factor)-Ialpha, TAF-Ibeta and pp32 can inhibit histone acetylation and HAT (histone acetyltransferase)-dependent transcription by binding to histones. Evidences are accumulating that INHAT complex subunits have important regulatory roles in various cellular activities such as replication, transcription, and apoptosis etc. However, how these subunits interact each other remains largely unknown. Using immunoprecipitation (IP) and protein-protein interaction assays with TAF-Ibeta and pp32 deletion mutant proteins, we identify INHAT complex subunits, TAF-Ibeta and pp32 interaction requires highly acidic C-terminal domain of pp32. We also show that the interaction between the INHAT complex subunits is stronger in the presence of histones. In this study, we report that the synergistic inhibition of HAT-mediated transcription by TAF-Ibeta and pp32 is dependent on the highly acidic C-terminal domain of pp32.

  16. Peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane protein Mep45 of rumen anaerobe Selenomonas ruminantium forms a non-specific diffusion pore via its C-terminal transmembrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Seiji; Hayashi, Kanako; Tochigi, Saeko; Kusano, Tomonobu; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    The major outer membrane protein Mep45 of Selenomonas ruminantium, an anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium, comprises two distinct domains: the N-terminal S-layer homologous (SLH) domain that protrudes into the periplasm and binds to peptidoglycan, and the remaining C-terminal transmembrane domain, whose function has been unknown. Here, we solubilized and purified Mep45 and characterized its function using proteoliposomes reconstituted with Mep45. We found that Mep45 forms a nonspecific diffusion channel via its C-terminal region. The channel was permeable to solutes smaller than a molecular weight of roughly 600, and the estimated pore radius was 0.58 nm. Truncation of the SLH domain did not affect the channel property. On the basis of the fact that Mep45 is the most abundant outer membrane protein in S. ruminantium, we conclude that Mep45 serves as a main pathway through which small solutes diffuse across the outer membrane of this bacterium.

  17. The structure of the Myo4p globular tail and its function in ASH1 mRNA localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuck, Alexander; Fetka, Ingrid; Brewer, Daniel N; Hüls, Daniela; Munson, Mary; Jansen, Ralf-Peter; Niessing, Dierk

    2010-05-03

    Type V myosin (MyoV)-dependent transport of cargo is an essential process in eukaryotes. Studies on yeast and vertebrate MyoV showed that their globular tails mediate binding to the cargo complexes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MyoV motor Myo4p interacts with She3p to localize asymmetric synthesis of HO 1 (ASH1) mRNA into the bud of dividing cells. A recent study showed that localization of GFP-MS2-tethered ASH1 particles does not require the Myo4p globular tail, challenging the supposed role of this domain. We assessed ASH1 mRNA and Myo4p distribution more directly and found that their localization is impaired in cells expressing globular tail-lacking Myo4p. In vitro studies further show that the globular tail together with a more N-terminal linker region is required for efficient She3p binding. We also determined the x-ray structure of the Myo4p globular tail and identify a conserved surface patch important for She3p binding. The structure shows pronounced similarities to membrane-tethering complexes and indicates that Myo4p may not undergo auto-inhibition of its motor domain.

  18. 3.3 Å structure of Niemann–Pick C1 protein reveals insights into the function of the C-terminal luminal domain in cholesterol transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaochun; Lu, Feiran; Trinh, Michael N.; Schmiege, Philip; Seemann, Joachim; Wang, Jiawei; Blobel, Günter

    2017-08-07

    Niemann–Pick C1 (NPC1) and NPC2 proteins are indispensable for the export of LDL-derived cholesterol from late endosomes. Mutations in these proteins result in Niemann–Pick type C disease, a lysosomal storage disease. Despite recent reports of the NPC1 structure depicting its overall architecture, the function of its C-terminal luminal domain (CTD) remains poorly understood even though 45% of NPC disease-causing mutations are in this domain. Here, we report a crystal structure at 3.3 Å resolution of NPC1* (residues 314–1,278), which—in contrast to previous lower resolution structures—features the entire CTD well resolved. Notably, all eight cysteines of the CTD form four disulfide bonds, one of which (C909–C914) enforces a specific loop that in turn mediates an interaction with a loop of the N-terminal domain (NTD). Importantly, this loop and its interaction with the NTD were not observed in any previous structures due to the lower resolution. Our mutagenesis experiments highlight the physiological relevance of the CTD–NTD interaction, which might function to keep the NTD in the proper orientation for receiving cholesterol from NPC2. Additionally, this structure allows us to more precisely map all of the disease-causing mutations, allowing future molecular insights into the pathogenesis of NPC disease.

  19. Characterization of Runella slithyformis HD-Pnk, a Bifunctional DNA/RNA End-Healing Enzyme Composed of an N-Terminal 2′,3′-Phosphoesterase HD Domain and a C-Terminal 5′-OH Polynucleotide Kinase Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Annum

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT 5′- and 3′-end-healing reactions are key steps in nucleic acid break repair in which 5′-OH ends are phosphorylated by a polynucleotide kinase (Pnk) and 3′-PO4 or 2′,3′-cyclic-PO4 ends are hydrolyzed by a phosphoesterase to generate the 5′-PO4 and 3′-OH termini required for sealing by classic polynucleotide ligases. End-healing and sealing enzymes are present in diverse bacterial taxa, often organized as modular units within a single multifunctional polypeptide or as subunits of a repair complex. Here we identify and characterize Runella slithyformis HD-Pnk as a novel bifunctional end-healing enzyme composed of an N-terminal 2′,3′-phosphoesterase HD domain and a C-terminal 5′-OH polynucleotide kinase P-loop domain. HD-Pnk phosphorylates 5′-OH polynucleotides (9-mers or longer) in the presence of magnesium and any nucleoside triphosphate donor. HD-Pnk dephosphorylates RNA 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate, RNA 3′-phosphate, RNA 2′-phosphate, and DNA 3′-phosphate ends in the presence of a transition metal cofactor, which can be nickel, copper, or cobalt. HD-Pnk homologs are present in genera from 11 bacterial phyla and are often encoded in an operon with a putative ATP-dependent polynucleotide ligase. IMPORTANCE The present study provides insights regarding the diversity of nucleic acid repair strategies via the characterization of Runella slithyformis HD-Pnk as the exemplar of a novel clade of dual 5′- and 3′-end-healing enzymes that phosphorylate 5′-OH termini and dephosphorylate 2′,3′-cyclic-PO4, 3′-PO4, and 2′-PO4 ends. The distinctive feature of HD-Pnk is its domain composition, i.e., a fusion of an N-terminal HD phosphohydrolase module and a C-terminal P-loop polynucleotide kinase module. Homologs of Runella HD-Pnk with the same domain composition, same domain order, and similar polypeptide sizes are distributed widely among genera from 11 bacterial phyla. PMID:27895092

  20. Assessment of the PrPc Amino-Terminal Domain in Prion Species Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Kristen A; Henderson, Davin M; Mathiason, Candace K; Hoover, Edward A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle are prion diseases that are caused by the same protein-misfolding mechanism, but they appear to pose different risks to humans. We are interested in understanding the differences between the species barriers of CWD and BSE. We used real-time, quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) to model the central molecular event in prion disease, the templated misfolding of the normal prion protein, PrP c , to a pathogenic, amyloid isoform, scrapie prion protein, PrP Sc We examined the role of the PrP c amino-terminal domain (N-terminal domain [NTD], amino acids [aa] 23 to 90) in cross-species conversion by comparing the conversion efficiency of various prion seeds in either full-length (aa 23 to 231) or truncated (aa 90 to 231) PrP c We demonstrate that the presence of white-tailed deer and bovine NTDs hindered seeded conversion of PrP c , but human and bank vole NTDs did the opposite. Additionally, full-length human and bank vole PrP c s were more likely to be converted to amyloid by CWD prions than were their truncated forms. A chimera with replacement of the human NTD by the bovine NTD resembled human PrP c The requirement for an NTD, but not for the specific human sequence, suggests that the NTD interacts with other regions of the human PrP c to increase promiscuity. These data contribute to the evidence that, in addition to primary sequence, prion species barriers are controlled by interactions of the substrate NTD with the rest of the substrate PrP c molecule. We demonstrate that the amino-terminal domain of the normal prion protein, PrP c , hinders seeded conversion of bovine and white-tailed deer PrP c s to the prion forms, but it facilitates conversion of the human and bank vole PrP c s to the prion forms. Additionally, we demonstrate that the amino-terminal domain of human and bank vole PrP c s requires interaction with the rest of the molecule to facilitate conversion by CWD

  1. Contribution of trimeric autotransporter C-terminal domains of oligomeric coiled-coil adhesin (Oca) family members YadA, UspA1, EibA, and Hia to translocation of the YadA passenger domain and virulence of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Nikolaus; Tiller, Maximilian; Anding, Gisela; Roggenkamp, Andreas; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2008-07-01

    The Oca family is a novel class of autotransporter-adhesins with highest structural similarity in their C-terminal transmembrane region, which supposedly builds a beta-barrel pore in the outer membrane (OM). The prototype of the Oca family is YadA, an adhesin of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. YadA forms a homotrimeric lollipop-like structure on the bacterial surface. The C-terminal regions of three YadA monomers form a barrel in the OM and translocate the trimeric N-terminal passenger domain, consisting of stalk, neck, and head region to the exterior. To elucidate the structural and functional role of the C-terminal translocator domain (TLD) and to assess its promiscuous capability with respect to transport of related passenger domains, we constructed chimeric YadA proteins, which consist of the N-terminal YadA passenger domain and C-terminal TLDs of Oca family members UspA1 (Moraxella catarrhalis), EibA (Escherichia coli), and Hia (Haemophilus influenzae). These constructs were expressed in Y. enterocolitica and compared for OM localization, surface exposure, oligomerization, adhesion properties, serum resistance, and mouse virulence. We demonstrate that all chimeric YadA proteins translocated the YadA passenger domain across the OM. Y. enterocolitica strains producing YadA chimeras or wild-type YadA showed comparable binding to collagen and epithelial cells. However, strains producing YadA chimeras were attenuated in serum resistance and mouse virulence. These results demonstrate for the first time that TLDs of Oca proteins of different origin are efficient translocators of the YadA passenger domain and that the cognate TLD of YadA is essential for bacterial survival in human serum and mouse virulence.

  2. Trazando la materia oscura con cúmulos globulares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, J. C.

    Se describe la estrategia adoptada para mapear la distribución de materia oscura y bariónica en galaxias elípticas cuyos cúmulos globulares están siendo observados con los telescopios VLT y Gemini. Se ejemplifican los resultados con los datos obtenidos en el cúmulo de Fornax.

  3. Transient intermediates are populated in the folding pathways of single-domain two-state folding protein L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Hiranmay; Reddy, Govardhan

    2018-04-01

    Small single-domain globular proteins, which are believed to be dominantly two-state folders, played an important role in elucidating various aspects of the protein folding mechanism. However, recent single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments [H. Y. Aviram et al. J. Chem. Phys. 148, 123303 (2018)] on a single-domain two-state folding protein L showed evidence for the population of an intermediate state and it was suggested that in this state, a β-hairpin present near the C-terminal of the native protein state is unfolded. We performed molecular dynamics simulations using a coarse-grained self-organized-polymer model with side chains to study the folding pathways of protein L. In agreement with the experiments, an intermediate is populated in the simulation folding pathways where the C-terminal β-hairpin detaches from the rest of the protein structure. The lifetime of this intermediate structure increased with the decrease in temperature. In low temperature conditions, we also observed a second intermediate state, which is globular with a significant fraction of the native-like tertiary contacts satisfying the features of a dry molten globule.

  4. UV laser-induced histone-DNA crosslinking proceeds via the N-terminal tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovski, V.; Dimitrov, S.; Angelov, D.; Keskinova, E.; Pashev, I.

    1990-01-01

    The covalent crosslinking of histones to DNA by UV laser irradiation is accomplished solely via the N-terminal part of the molecule. Irradiated isolated calfthymus nuclei are treated with clostripain. The crosslinked protein-DNA complexes are isolated and the presence of each core histone analyzed by dot-immunoassay using antibodies, specific to the central globular domain of the respective histone. The reaction is negative for all core histones i.e. the globular domain is absent. It means that this domain has not been crosslinked to DNA and, once cleaved by clostripain, it has been stripped from DNA during the centrigugation in CsCl. This peculiar property of the crosslinked procedure makes it particularly useful in addressing some yet unanswered questions concerning histone-DNA interactions, such as the interaction of the N-terminal tails with linker DNA, the effect of the transient postsynthetic histone acetylation on its interaction with DNA, etc. These questions are now under study. 1 fig., 6 refs

  5. Single amino acids in the carboxyl terminal domain of aquaporin-1 contribute to cGMP-dependent ion channel activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yool Andrea J

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aquaporin-1 (AQP1 functions as an osmotic water channel and a gated cation channel. Activation of the AQP1 ion conductance by intracellular cGMP was hypothesized to involve the carboxyl (C- terminus, based on amino acid sequence alignments with cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels and cGMP-selective phosphodiesterases. Results Voltage clamp analyses of human AQP1 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated that the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 3–14 mM activated the ionic conductance response in a dose-dependent manner. Block of soluble guanylate cyclase prevented the response. Enzyme immunoassays confirmed a linear dose-dependent relationship between SNP and the resulting intracellular cGMP levels (up to 1700 fmol cGMP /oocyte at 14 mM SNP. Results here are the first to show that the efficacy of ion channel activation is decreased by mutations of AQP1 at conserved residues in the C-terminal domain (aspartate D237 and lysine K243. Conclusions These data support the idea that the limited amino acid sequence similarities found between three diverse classes of cGMP-binding proteins are significant to the function of AQP1 as a cGMP-gated ion channel, and provide direct evidence for the involvement of the AQP1 C-terminal domain in cGMP-mediated ion channel activation.

  6. A C-terminal PDZ domain-binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    believed to bind synaptic scaffolding proteins, but its functional significance is uncertain. Here we demonstrate that two different dopamine transporter knock-in mice with disrupted PDZ-binding motifs (dopamine transporter-AAA and dopamine transporter+Ala) are characterized by dramatic loss of dopamine......The dopamine transporter mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling dopamine transporter levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. The dopamine transporters contain a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain-binding sequence...... transporter expression in the striatum, causing hyperlocomotion and attenuated response to amphetamine. In cultured dopaminergic neurons and striatal slices from dopamine transporter-AAA mice, we find markedly reduced dopamine transporter surface levels and evidence for enhanced constitutive internalization...

  7. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74 kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RT_C_t_e_r) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RT_C_t_e_r. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. - Highlights: • The C-terminal domain of TuYV-RT is required for long-distance movement. • CIPK7 from Arabidopsis interacts with RT_C_t_e_r in yeast and in plants. • CIPK7 overexpression increases virus titer locally but not virus systemic movement. • CIPK7 localizes to plasmodesmata. • CIPK7 could be a defense protein regulating virus export.

  8. Distal loop flexibility of a regulatory domain modulates dynamics and activity of C-terminal SRC kinase (csk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulyman Barkho

    Full Text Available The Src family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs regulate numerous aspects of cell growth and differentiation and are under the principal control of the C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk. Csk and SFKs share a modular design with the kinase domain downstream of the N-terminal SH2 and SH3 domains that regulate catalytic function and membrane localization. While the function of interfacial segments in these multidomain kinases are well-investigated, little is known about how surface sites and long-range, allosteric coupling control protein dynamics and catalytic function. The SH2 domain of Csk is an essential component for the down-regulation of all SFKs. A unique feature of the SH2 domain of Csk is the tight turn in place of the canonical CD loop in a surface site far removed from kinase domain interactions. In this study, we used a combination of experimental and computational methods to probe the importance of this difference by constructing a Csk variant with a longer SH2 CD loop to mimic the flexibility found in homologous kinase SH2 domains. Our results indicate that while the fold and function of the isolated domain and the full-length kinase are not affected by loop elongation, native protein dynamics that are essential for efficient catalysis are perturbed. We also identify key motifs and routes through which the distal SH2 site might influence catalysis at the active site. This study underscores the sensitivity of intramolecular signaling and catalysis to native protein dynamics that arise from modest changes in allosteric regions while providing a potential strategy to alter intrinsic activity and signaling modulation.

  9. The drug-binding activity of the multidrug-responding transcriptional regulator BmrR resides in its C-terminal domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Markham, P N; Ahmed, M; Neyfakh, A A

    1996-01-01

    Rhodamine and tetraphenylphosphonium, the substrates of the Bacillus subtilis multidrug efflux transporter Bmr, induce the expression of Bmr through direct interaction with its transcriptional activator BmrR. Here we show that the C-terminal domain of BmrR, expressed individually, binds both these compounds and therefore can be used as a model for molecular analysis of the phenomenon of multidrug recognition.

  10. Growth hormone receptor C-terminal domains required for growth hormone-induced intracellular free Ca2+ oscillations and gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Bouchelouche, P; Allevato, G

    1995-01-01

    of varying frequency and amplitude. GH-induced transcription of the serine protease inhibitor 2.1 gene required the same C-terminal 52-amino acid domain of the receptor as for Ca2+ signaling. Mutation of the four proline residues in the conserved box 1 region of the GHR, which is responsible for binding...

  11. The C-terminal extension of human RTEL1, mutated in Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome, contains harmonin-N-like domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Guilhem; Revy, Patrick; Schertzer, Michael; Londono-Vallejo, Arturo; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have recently shown that germline mutations in RTEL1, an essential DNA helicase involved in telomere regulation and DNA repair, cause Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS), a severe form of dyskeratosis congenita. Using original new softwares, facilitating the delineation of the different domains of the protein and the identification of remote relationships for orphan domains, we outline here that the C-terminal extension of RTEL1, downstream of its catalytic domain and including several HHS-associated mutations, contains a yet unidentified tandem of harmonin-N-like domains, which may serve as a hub for partner interaction. This finding highlights the potential critical role of this region for the function of RTEL1 and gives insights into the impact that the identified mutations would have on the structure and function of these domains. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Intracellular Cleavage of the Cx43 C-Terminal Domain by Matrix-Metalloproteases: A Novel Contributor to Inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke De Bock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The coordination of tissue function is mediated by gap junctions (GJs that enable direct cell-cell transfer of metabolic and electric signals. GJs are formed by connexin (Cx proteins of which Cx43 is most widespread in the human body. Beyond its role in direct intercellular communication, Cx43 also forms nonjunctional hemichannels (HCs in the plasma membrane that mediate the release of paracrine signaling molecules in the extracellular environment. Both HC and GJ channel function are regulated by protein-protein interactions and posttranslational modifications that predominantly take place in the C-terminal domain of Cx43. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs are a major group of zinc-dependent proteases, known to regulate not only extracellular matrix remodeling, but also processing of intracellular proteins. Together with Cx43 channels, both GJs and HCs, MMPs contribute to acute inflammation and a small number of studies reports on an MMP-Cx43 link. Here, we build further on these reports and present a novel hypothesis that describes proteolytic cleavage of the Cx43 C-terminal domain by MMPs and explores possibilities of how such cleavage events may affect Cx43 channel function. Finally, we set out how aberrant channel function resulting from cleavage can contribute to the acute inflammatory response during tissue injury.

  13. C-terminal β9-strand of the cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain stabilizes activated states of Kv11.1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available Kv11.1 potassium channels are important for regulation of the normal rhythm of the heartbeat. Reduced activity of Kv11.1 channels causes long QT syndrome type 2, a disorder that increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest. Kv11.1 channels are members of the KCNH subfamily of voltage-gated K(+ channels. However, they also share many similarities with the cyclic nucleotide gated ion channel family, including having a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology (cNBH domain. Kv11.1 channels, however, are not directly regulated by cyclic nucleotides. Recently, crystal structures of the cNBH domain from mEAG and zELK channels, both members of the KCNH family of voltage-gated potassium channels, revealed that a C-terminal β9-strand in the cNBH domain occupied the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding site thereby precluding binding of cyclic nucleotides. Here we show that mutations to residues in the β9-strand affect the stability of the open state relative to the closed state of Kv11.1 channels. We also show that disrupting the structure of the β9-strand reduces the stability of the inactivated state relative to the open state. Clinical mutations located in this β9-strand result in reduced trafficking efficiency, which suggests that binding of the C-terminal β9-strand to the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding pocket is also important for assembly and trafficking of Kv11.1 channels.

  14. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France); Chapuis, Sophie [Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, Laboratoire propre du CNRS conventionné avec l’Université de Strasbourg, 12 rue du Général Zimmer, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France); Revers, Frédéric [INRA, Université de Bordeaux, UMR 1332 de Biologie du Fruit et Pathologie, 33882 Villenave d’Ornon (France); Ziegler-Graff, Véronique [Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, Laboratoire propre du CNRS conventionné avec l’Université de Strasbourg, 12 rue du Général Zimmer, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Brault, Véronique, E-mail: veronique.brault@colmar.inra.fr [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France)

    2015-12-15

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74 kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. - Highlights: • The C-terminal domain of TuYV-RT is required for long-distance movement. • CIPK7 from Arabidopsis interacts with RT{sub Cter} in yeast and in plants. • CIPK7 overexpression increases virus titer locally but not virus systemic movement. • CIPK7 localizes to plasmodesmata. • CIPK7 could be a defense protein regulating virus export.

  15. C0 and C1 N-terminal Ig domains of myosin binding protein C exert different effects on thin filament activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha P; Belknap, Betty; Van Sciver, Robert E; White, Howard D; Galkin, Vitold E

    2016-02-09

    Mutations in genes encoding myosin, the molecular motor that powers cardiac muscle contraction, and its accessory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C), are the two most common causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recent studies established that the N-terminal domains (NTDs) of cMyBP-C (e.g., C0, C1, M, and C2) can bind to and activate or inhibit the thin filament (TF). However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which NTDs modulate interaction of myosin with the TF remains unknown and the contribution of each individual NTD to TF activation/inhibition is unclear. Here we used an integrated structure-function approach using cryoelectron microscopy, biochemical kinetics, and force measurements to reveal how the first two Ig-like domains of cMyPB-C (C0 and C1) interact with the TF. Results demonstrate that despite being structural homologs, C0 and C1 exhibit different patterns of binding on the surface of F-actin. Importantly, C1 but not C0 binds in a position to activate the TF by shifting tropomyosin (Tm) to the "open" structural state. We further show that C1 directly interacts with Tm and traps Tm in the open position on the surface of F-actin. Both C0 and C1 compete with myosin subfragment 1 for binding to F-actin and effectively inhibit actomyosin interactions when present at high ratios of NTDs to F-actin. Finally, we show that in contracting sarcomeres, the activating effect of C1 is apparent only once low levels of Ca(2+) have been achieved. We suggest that Ca(2+) modulates the interaction of cMyBP-C with the TF in the sarcomere.

  16. The Structure of the RNA m5C Methyltransferase YebU from Escherichia coli Reveals a C-terminal RNA-recruiting PUA Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallberg, B. Martin; Ericsson, Ulrika B.; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2006-01-01

    potential that differ from other RNA-MTase structures, suggesting that YebU interacts with its RNA target in a different manner. Docking of YebU onto the 30 S subunit indicates that the PUA and MTase domains make several contacts with 16 S rRNA as well as with the ribosomal protein S12. The ribosomal...... protein interactions would explain why the assembled 30 S subunit, and not naked 16 S rRNA, is the preferred substrate for YebU....... by X-ray crystallography, and we present a molecular model for how YebU specifically recognizes, binds and methylates its ribosomal substrate. The YebU protein has an N-terminal SAM-binding catalytic domain with structural similarity to the equivalent domains in several other m(5)C RNA MTases including...

  17. In vitro and in vivo mapping of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus coat protein C-terminal dimerization domain by bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Frederic; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A; Pallás, Vicente

    2006-06-01

    Interactions between viral proteins are critical for virus viability. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation (BiFC) technique determines protein interactions in real-time under almost normal physiological conditions. The coat protein (CP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus is required for multiple functions in its replication cycle. In this study, the region involved in CP dimerization has been mapped by BiFC in both bacteria and plant tissue. Full-length and C-terminal deleted forms of the CP gene were fused in-frame to the N- and C-terminal fragments of the yellow fluorescent protein. The BiFC analysis showed that a domain located between residues 9 and 27 from the C-end plays a critical role in dimerization. The importance of this C-terminal region in dimer formation and the applicability of the BiFC technique to analyse viral protein interactions are discussed.

  18. Structural investigation of a C-terminal EphA2 receptor mutant: Does mutation affect the structure and interaction properties of the Sam domain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Costantini, Susan; Di Natale, Concetta; Pirone, Luciano; Guariniello, Stefano; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Marasco, Daniela; Pedone, Emilia M; Leone, Marilisa

    2017-09-01

    Ephrin A2 receptor (EphA2) plays a key role in cancer, it is up-regulated in several types of tumors and the process of ligand-induced receptor endocytosis, followed by degradation, is considered as a potential path to diminish tumor malignancy. Protein modulators of this mechanism are recruited at the cytosolic Sterile alpha motif (Sam) domain of EphA2 (EphA2-Sam) through heterotypic Sam-Sam associations. These interactions engage the C-terminal helix of EphA2 and close loop regions (the so called End Helix side). In addition, several studies report on destabilizing mutations in EphA2 related to cataract formation and located in/or close to the Sam domain. Herein, we analyzed from a structural point of view, one of these mutants characterized by the insertion of a novel 39 residue long polypeptide at the C-terminus of EphA2-Sam. A 3D structural model was built by computational methods and revealed partial disorder in the acquired C-terminal tail and a few residues participating in an α-helix and two short β-strands. We investigated by CD and NMR studies the conformational properties in solution of two peptides encompassing the whole C-terminal tail and its predicted helical region, respectively. NMR binding experiments demonstrated that these peptides do not interact relevantly with either EphA2-Sam or its interactor Ship2-Sam. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further indicated that the EphA2 mutant could be represented only through a conformational ensemble and that the C-terminal tail should not largely wrap the EphA2-Sam End-Helix interface and affect binding to other Sam domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The binding of TIA-1 to RNA C-rich sequences is driven by its C-terminal RRM domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Gunzburg, Menachem J; Sivakumaran, Andrew; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Angulo, Jesús; Persson, Cecilia; Gorospe, Myriam; Karlsson, B Göran; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2014-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a key DNA/RNA binding protein that regulates translation by sequestering target mRNAs in stress granules (SG) in response to stress conditions. TIA-1 possesses three RNA recognition motifs (RRM) along with a glutamine-rich domain, with the central domains (RRM2 and RRM3) acting as RNA binding platforms. While the RRM2 domain, which displays high affinity for U-rich RNA sequences, is primarily responsible for interaction with RNA, the contribution of RRM3 to bind RNA as well as the target RNA sequences that it binds preferentially are still unknown. Here we combined nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques to elucidate the sequence specificity of TIA-1 RRM3. With a novel approach using saturation transfer difference NMR (STD-NMR) to quantify protein-nucleic acids interactions, we demonstrate that isolated RRM3 binds to both C- and U-rich stretches with micromolar affinity. In combination with RRM2 and in the context of full-length TIA-1, RRM3 significantly enhanced the binding to RNA, particularly to cytosine-rich RNA oligos, as assessed by biotinylated RNA pull-down analysis. Our findings provide new insight into the role of RRM3 in regulating TIA-1 binding to C-rich stretches, that are abundant at the 5' TOPs (5' terminal oligopyrimidine tracts) of mRNAs whose translation is repressed under stress situations.

  20. Stereochemical determinants of C-terminal specificity in PDZ peptide-binding domains: a novel contribution of the carboxylate-binding loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amacher, Jeanine F; Cushing, Patrick R; Bahl, Christopher D; Beck, Tobias; Madden, Dean R

    2013-02-15

    PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) binding domains often serve as cellular traffic engineers, controlling the localization and activity of a wide variety of binding partners. As a result, they play important roles in both physiological and pathological processes. However, PDZ binding specificities overlap, allowing multiple PDZ proteins to mediate distinct effects on shared binding partners. For example, several PDZ domains bind the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an epithelial ion channel mutated in CF. Among these binding partners, the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL) facilitates post-maturational degradation of the channel and is thus a potential therapeutic target. Using iterative optimization, we previously developed a selective CAL inhibitor peptide (iCAL36). Here, we investigate the stereochemical basis of iCAL36 specificity. The crystal structure of iCAL36 in complex with the CAL PDZ domain reveals stereochemical interactions distributed along the peptide-binding cleft, despite the apparent degeneracy of the CAL binding motif. A critical selectivity determinant that distinguishes CAL from other CFTR-binding PDZ domains is the accommodation of an isoleucine residue at the C-terminal position (P(0)), a characteristic shared with the Tax-interacting protein-1. Comparison of the structures of these two PDZ domains in complex with ligands containing P(0) Leu or Ile residues reveals two distinct modes of accommodation for β-branched C-terminal side chains. Access to each mode is controlled by distinct residues in the carboxylate-binding loop. These studies provide new insights into the primary sequence determinants of binding motifs, which in turn control the scope and evolution of PDZ interactomes.

  1. Contribution of the C-terminal region within the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase to yeast lethality, chromatin binding and viral replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belhumeur Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 integrase (IN is a key viral enzymatic molecule required for the integration of the viral cDNA into the genome. Additionally, HIV-1 IN has been shown to play important roles in several other steps during the viral life cycle, including reverse transcription, nuclear import and chromatin targeting. Interestingly, previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of HIV-1 IN induces the lethal phenotype in some strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses of the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN in order to delineate the critical amino acid(s and/or motif(s required for the induction of the lethal phenotype in the yeast strain HP16, and to further elucidate the molecular mechanism which causes this phenotype. Results Our study identified three HIV-1 IN mutants, V165A, A179P and KR186,7AA, located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of IN that do not induce the lethal phenotype in yeast. Chromatin binding assays in yeast and mammalian cells demonstrated that these IN mutants were impaired for the ability to bind chromatin. Additionally, we determined that while these IN mutants failed to interact with LEDGF/p75, they retained the ability to bind Integrase interactor 1. Furthermore, we observed that VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 containing these IN mutants was unable to replicate in the C8166 T cell line and this defect was partially rescued by complementation with the catalytically inactive D64E IN mutant. Conclusion Overall, this study demonstrates that three mutations located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN inhibit the IN-induced lethal phenotype in yeast by inhibiting the binding of IN to the host chromatin. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN is important for binding to host chromatin and is crucial for both viral replication and the promotion of

  2. Membrane binding properties of EBV gp110 C-terminal domain; evidences for structural transition in the membrane environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Jean; Seo, Min-Duk; Lee, Suk Kyeong; Lee, Bong Jin

    2008-01-01

    Gp110 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) mainly localizes on nuclear/ER membranes and plays a role in the assembly of EBV nucleocapsid. The C-terminal tail domain (gp110 CTD) is essential for the function of gp110 and the nuclear/ER membranes localization of gp110 is ruled by its C-terminal unique nuclear localization signal (NLS), consecutive four arginines. In the present study, the structural properties of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics were investigated using CD, size-exclusion chromatography, and NMR, to elucidate the effect of membrane environment on the structural transition and to compare the structural feature of the protein in the solution state with that of the membrane-bound form. CD and NMR analysis showed that gp110 CTD in a buffer solution appears to adopt a stable folding intermediate which lacks compactness, and a highly helical structure is formed only in membrane environments. The helical content of gp110 CTD was significantly affected by the negative charge as well as the size of membrane mimics. Based on the elution profiles of the size-exclusion chromatography, we found that gp110 CTD intrinsically forms a trimer, revealing that a trimerization region may exist in the C-terminal domain of gp110 like the ectodomain of gp110. The mutation of NLS (RRRR) to RTTR does not affect the overall structure of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics, while the helical propensity in a buffer solution was slightly different between the wild-type and the mutant proteins. This result suggests that not only the helicity induced in membrane environment but also the local structure around NLS may be related to trafficking to the nuclear membrane. More detailed structural difference between the wild-type and the mutant in membrane environment was examined using synthetic two peptides including the wild-type NLS and the mutant NLS

  3. Novel Structure and Unexpected RNA-Binding Ability of the C-Terminal Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Tegument Protein UL21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metrick, Claire M.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E. (Tufts-MED)

    2016-04-06

    Proteins forming the tegument layers of herpesviral virions mediate many essential processes in the viral replication cycle, yet few have been characterized in detail. UL21 is one such multifunctional tegument protein and is conserved among alphaherpesviruses. While UL21 has been implicated in many processes in viral replication, ranging from nuclear egress to virion morphogenesis to cell-cell spread, its precise roles remain unclear. Here we report the 2.7-Å crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL21 (UL21C), which has a unique α-helical fold resembling a dragonfly. Analysis of evolutionary conservation patterns and surface electrostatics pinpointed four regions of potential functional importance on the surface of UL21C to be pursued by mutagenesis. In combination with the previously determined structure of the N-terminal domain of UL21, the structure of UL21C provides a 3-dimensional framework for targeted exploration of the multiple roles of UL21 in the replication and pathogenesis of alphaherpesviruses. Additionally, we describe an unanticipated ability of UL21 to bind RNA, which may hint at a yet unexplored function.

    IMPORTANCEDue to the limited genomic coding capacity of viruses, viral proteins are often multifunctional, which makes them attractive antiviral targets. Such multifunctionality, however, complicates their study, which often involves constructing and characterizing null mutant viruses. Systematic exploration of these multifunctional proteins requires detailed road maps in the form of 3-dimensional structures. In this work, we determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of UL21, a multifunctional tegument protein that is conserved among alphaherpesviruses. Structural analysis pinpointed surface areas of potential functional importance that provide a starting point for mutagenesis. In addition, the unexpected RNA-binding ability of UL21 may expand its functional repertoire

  4. Factor H C-Terminal Domains Are Critical for Regulation of Platelet/Granulocyte Aggregate Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Z. Blatt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Platelet/granulocyte aggregates (PGAs increase thromboinflammation in the vasculature, and PGA formation is tightly controlled by the complement alternative pathway (AP negative regulator, Factor H (FH. Mutations in FH are associated with the prothrombotic disease atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, yet it is unknown whether increased PGA formation contributes to the thrombosis seen in patients with aHUS. Here, flow cytometry assays were used to evaluate the effects of aHUS-related mutations on FH regulation of PGA formation and characterize the mechanism. Utilizing recombinant fragments of FH spanning the entire length of the protein, we mapped the regions of FH most critical for limiting AP activity on the surface of isolated human platelets and neutrophils, as well as the regions most critical for regulating PGA formation in human whole blood stimulated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP. FH domains 19–20 were the most critical for limiting AP activity on platelets, neutrophils, and at the platelet/granulocyte interface. The role of FH in PGA formation was attributed to its ability to regulate AP-mediated C5a generation. AHUS-related mutations in domains 19–20 caused differential effects on control of PGA formation and AP activity on platelets and neutrophils. Our data indicate FH C-terminal domains are key for regulating PGA formation, thus increased FH protection may have a beneficial impact on diseases characterized by increased PGA formation, such as cardiovascular disease. Additionally, aHUS-related mutations in domains 19–20 have varying effects on control of TRAP-mediated PGA formation, suggesting that some, but not all, aHUS-related mutations may cause increased PGA formation that contributes to excessive thrombosis in patients with aHUS.

  5. Extensive de novo solid-state NMR assignments of the 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habenstein, Birgit [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Wasmer, Christian [Harvard Medical School (United States); Bousset, Luc; Sourigues, Yannick [UPR 3082 CNRS, Laboratoire d' Enzymologie et Biochimie Structurales (France); Schuetz, Anne [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Loquet, Antoine [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Melki, Ronald, E-mail: melki@lebs.cnrs-gif.fr [UPR 3082 CNRS, Laboratoire d' Enzymologie et Biochimie Structurales (France); Boeckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France)

    2011-11-15

    We present the de novo resonance assignments for the crystalline 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion using an optimized set of five 3D solid-state NMR spectra. We obtained, using a single uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeled protein sample, sequential chemical-shift information for 74% of the N, C{alpha}, C{beta} triples, and for 80% of further side-chain resonances for these spin systems. We describe the procedures and protocols devised, and discuss possibilities and limitations of the assignment of this largest protein assigned today by solid-state NMR, and for which no solution-state NMR shifts were available. A comparison of the NMR chemical shifts with crystallographic data reveals that regions with high crystallographic B-factors are particularly difficult to assign. While the secondary structure elements derived from the chemical shift data correspond mainly to those present in the X-ray crystal structure, we detect an additional helical element and structural variability in the protein crystal, most probably originating from the different molecules in the asymmetric unit, with the observation of doubled resonances in several parts, including entire stretches, of the protein. Our results provide the point of departure towards an atomic-resolution structural analysis of the C-terminal Ure2p domain in the context of the full-length prion fibrils.

  6. Purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the C-terminal protease domain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Andrew T.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2006-01-01

    The C-terminal protease domain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nsP2 has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and successfully crystallized. Native crystals diffract to beyond 2.5 Å resolution and isomorphous heavy-atom derivatives suitable for phase analysis have been identified. The C-terminal region of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nsP2 is responsible for proteolytic processing of the VEEV polyprotein replication complex. This action regulates the activity of the replication complex and is essential for viral replication, thus making nsP2 a very attractive target for development of VEEV therapeutics. The 338-amino-acid C-terminal region of VEEV nsP2 has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals diffract to beyond 2.5 Å resolution and belong to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 . Isomorphous heavy-atom derivatives suitable for phase analysis have been obtained and work on building a complete structural model is under way

  7. Purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the C-terminal protease domain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Andrew T.; Watowich, Stanley J., E-mail: watowich@xray.utmb.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)

    2006-06-01

    The C-terminal protease domain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nsP2 has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and successfully crystallized. Native crystals diffract to beyond 2.5 Å resolution and isomorphous heavy-atom derivatives suitable for phase analysis have been identified. The C-terminal region of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nsP2 is responsible for proteolytic processing of the VEEV polyprotein replication complex. This action regulates the activity of the replication complex and is essential for viral replication, thus making nsP2 a very attractive target for development of VEEV therapeutics. The 338-amino-acid C-terminal region of VEEV nsP2 has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals diffract to beyond 2.5 Å resolution and belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Isomorphous heavy-atom derivatives suitable for phase analysis have been obtained and work on building a complete structural model is under way.

  8. Interaction between the C-terminal domains of measles virus nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein: a tight complex implying one binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocquel, David; Habchi, Johnny; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Doizy, Anthony; Oglesbee, Michael; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-10-01

    The intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (N(TAIL) ) of the measles virus (MeV) nucleoprotein undergoes α-helical folding upon binding to the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the phosphoprotein. The N(TAIL) region involved in binding coupled to folding has been mapped to a conserved region (Box2) encompassing residues 489-506. In the previous studies published in this journal, we obtained experimental evidence supporting a K(D) for the N(TAIL) -XD binding reaction in the nM range and also showed that an additional N(TAIL) region (Box3, aa 517-525) plays a role in binding to XD. In striking contrast with these data, studies published in this journal by Kingston and coworkers pointed out a much less stable complex (K(D) in the μM range) and supported lack of involvement of Box3 in complex formation. The objective of this study was to critically re-evaluate the role of Box3 in N(TAIL) -XD binding. Since our previous studies relied on N(TAIL) -truncated forms possessing an irrelevant Flag sequence appended at their C-terminus, we, herein, generated an N(TAIL) devoid of Box3 and any additional C-terminal residues, as well as a form encompassing only residues 482-525. We then used isothermal titration calorimetry to characterize the binding reactions between XD and these N(TAIL) forms. Results effectively argue for the presence of a single XD-binding site located within Box2, in agreement with the results by Kingston et al., while providing clear experimental support for a high-affinity complex. Altogether, the present data provide mechanistic insights into the replicative machinery of MeV and clarify a hitherto highly debated point. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  9. The C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T4 terminase docks on the prohead portal clip region during DNA packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Aparna Banerjee; Ray, Krishanu; Thomas, Julie A.; Black, Lindsay W.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage ATP-based packaging motors translocate DNA into a pre-formed prohead through a dodecameric portal ring channel to high density. We investigated portal–terminase docking interactions at specifically localized residues within a terminase-interaction region (aa279–316) in the phage T4 portal protein gp20 equated to the clip domain of the SPP1 portal crystal structure by 3D modeling. Within this region, three residues allowed A to C mutations whereas three others did not, consistent with informatics analyses showing the tolerated residues are not strongly conserved evolutionarily. About 7.5 nm was calculated by FCS-FRET studies employing maleimide Alexa488 dye labeled A316C proheads and gp17 CT-ReAsH supporting previous work docking the C-terminal end of the T4 terminase (gp17) closer to the N-terminal GFP-labeled portal (gp20) than the N-terminal end of the terminase. Such a terminase–portal orientation fits better to a proposed “DNA crunching” compression packaging motor and to portal determined DNA headful cutting. PMID:24074593

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the W2 domain of Drosophila melanogaster eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5C domain-containing protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Hong; Liu, Huihui; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the carboxy-terminal domain of D. melanogaster eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5C domain-containing protein are reported. The Drosophila melanogaster eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5C domain-containing protein (ECP) is composed of two independently folded domains which belong to the basic leucine-zipper and W2 domain-containing protein (BZW) family. Based on the sequence similarity between the C-terminal W2 domain of ECP and some eukaryotic translation initiation factors (such as eIF2B∊, eIF4γ, eIF5 etc.), ECP has been speculated to participate in the translation initiation process. Structural information on the C-terminal W2 domain of ECP would be helpful in understanding the specific cellular function of this protein. Here, the W2 domain of ECP was expressed and crystallized. Crystals grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method diffracted to 2.70 Å resolution and belonged to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 81.05, c = 57.44 Å. The Matthews coefficient suggested that there was one molecule per asymmetric unit in the crystal

  11. The C-terminal domain of TRPV4 is essential for plasma membrane localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel; Müller, Margarethe; Leuner, Kristina; Jendrach, Marina

    2008-02-01

    Many members of the TRP superfamily oligomerize in the ER before trafficking to the plasma membrane. For membrane localization of the non-selective cation channel TRPV4 specific domains in the N-terminus are required, but the role of the C-terminus in the oligomerization and trafficking process has been not determined until now. Therefore, the localization of recombinant TRPV4 in two cell models was analyzed: HaCaT keratinocytes that express TRPV4 endogenously were compared to CHO cells that are devoid of endogenous TRPV4. When deletions were introduced in the C-terminal domain three states of TRPV4 localization were defined: a truncated TRPV4 protein of 855 amino acids was exported to the plasma membrane like the full-length channel (871 aa) and was also functional. Mutants with a length of 828 to 844 amino acids remained in the ER of CHO cells, but in HaCaT cells plasma membrane localization was partially rescued by oligomerization with endogenous TRPV4. This was confirmed by coexpression of recombinant full-length TRPV4 together with these deletion mutants, which resulted in an almost complete plasma membrane localization of both proteins and significant FRET in the plasma membrane and the ER. All deletions upstream of amino acid 828 resulted in total ER retention that could not rescued by coexpression with the full-length protein. However, these deletion mutants did not impair export of full-length TRPV4, implying that no oligomerization took place. These data indicate that the C-terminus of TRPV4 is required for oligomerization, which takes place in the ER and precedes plasma membrane trafficking.

  12. Conservation and divergence of C-terminal domain structure in the retinoblastoma protein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liban, Tyler J.; Medina, Edgar M.; Tripathi, Sarvind; Sengupta, Satyaki; Henry, R. William; Buchler, Nicolas E.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (Duke); (MSU)

    2017-04-24

    The retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and the homologous pocket proteins p107 and p130 negatively regulate cell proliferation by binding and inhibiting members of the E2F transcription factor family. The structural features that distinguish Rb from other pocket proteins have been unclear but are critical for understanding their functional diversity and determining why Rb has unique tumor suppressor activities. We describe here important differences in how the Rb and p107 C-terminal domains (CTDs) associate with the coiled-coil and marked-box domains (CMs) of E2Fs. We find that although CTD–CM binding is conserved across protein families, Rb and p107 CTDs show clear preferences for different E2Fs. A crystal structure of the p107 CTD bound to E2F5 and its dimer partner DP1 reveals the molecular basis for pocket protein–E2F binding specificity and how cyclin-dependent kinases differentially regulate pocket proteins through CTD phosphorylation. Our structural and biochemical data together with phylogenetic analyses of Rb and E2F proteins support the conclusion that Rb evolved specific structural motifs that confer its unique capacity to bind with high affinity those E2Fs that are the most potent activators of the cell cycle.

  13. Domain swapping reveals that the N-terminal domain of the sensor kinase KdpD in Escherichia coli is important for signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lippert Marie-Luise

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The KdpD/KdpE two-component system of Escherichia coli regulates expression of the kdpFABC operon encoding the high affinity K+ transport system KdpFABC. The input domain of KdpD comprises a domain that belongs to the family of universal stress proteins (Usp. It has been previously demonstrated that UspC binds to this domain, resulting in KdpD/KdpE scaffolding under salt stress. However the mechanistic significance of this domain for signaling remains unclear. Here, we employed a "domain swapping" approach to replace the KdpD-Usp domain with four homologous domains or with the six soluble Usp proteins of E. coli. Results Full response to salt stress was only achieved with a chimera that contains UspC, probably due to unaffected scaffolding of the KdpD/KdpE signaling cascade by soluble UspC. Unexpectedly, chimeras containing either UspF or UspG not only prevented kdpFABC expression under salt stress but also under K+ limiting conditions, although these hybrid proteins exhibited kinase and phosphotransferase activities in vitro. These are the first KdpD derivatives that do not respond to K+ limitation due to alterations in the N-terminal domain. Analysis of the KdpD-Usp tertiary structure revealed that this domain has a net positively charged surface, while UspF and UspG are characterized by net negative surface charges. Conclusion The Usp domain within KdpD not only functions as a binding surface for the scaffold UspC, but it is also important for KdpD signaling. We propose that KdpD sensing/signaling involves alterations of electrostatic interactions between the large N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic domains.

  14. The C-terminal domain of the Arabidopsis AtMBD7 protein confers strong chromatin binding activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemach, Assaf; Paul, Laju K.; Stambolsky, Perry; Efroni, Idan; Rotter, Varda; Grafi, Gideon

    2009-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MBD7 (AtMBD7) - a naturally occurring poly MBD protein - was previously found to be functional in binding methylated-CpG dinucleotides in vitro and localized to highly methylated chromocenters in vivo. Furthermore, AtMBD7 has significantly lower mobility within the nucleus conferred by cooperative activity of its three MBD motifs. Here we show that besides the MBD motifs, AtMBD7 possesses a strong chromatin binding domain located at its C-terminus designated sticky-C (StkC). Mutational analysis showed that a glutamic acid residue near the C-terminus is essential though not sufficient for the StkC function. Further analysis demonstrated that this motif can render nuclear proteins highly immobile both in plant and animal cells, without affecting their native subnuclear localization. Thus, the C-terminal, StkC motif plays an important role in fastening AtMBD7 to its chromosomal, CpG-methylated sites. It may be possible to utilize this motif for fastening nuclear proteins to their chromosomal sites both in plant and animal cells for research and gene therapy applications.

  15. Novel human mutation and CRISPR/Cas genome-edited mice reveal the importance of C-terminal domain of MSX1 in tooth and palate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Silvia Naomi; Yasue, Akihiro; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Naruto, Takuya; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Oyadomari, Seiichi; Noji, Sumihare; Imoto, Issei; Tanaka, Eiji

    2016-12-05

    Several mutations, located mainly in the MSX1 homeodomain, have been identified in non-syndromic tooth agenesis predominantly affecting premolars and third molars. We identified a novel frameshift mutation of the highly conserved C-terminal domain of MSX1, known as Msx homology domain 6 (MH6), in a Japanese family with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. To investigate the importance of MH6 in tooth development, Msx1 was targeted in mice with CRISPR/Cas system. Although heterozygous MH6 disruption did not alter craniofacial development, homozygous mice exhibited agenesis of lower incisors with or without cleft palate at E16.5. In addition, agenesis of the upper third molars and the lower second and third molars were observed in 4-week-old mutant mice. Although the upper second molars were present, they were abnormally small. These results suggest that the C-terminal domain of MSX1 is important for tooth and palate development, and demonstrate that that CRISPR/Cas system can be used as a tool to assess causality of human disorders in vivo and to study the importance of conserved domains in genes.

  16. The Lectin Domain of the Polypeptide GalNAc Transferase Family of Glycosyltransferases (ppGalNAc Ts) Acts as a Switch Directing Glycopeptide Substrate Glycosylation in an N- or C-terminal Direction, Further Controlling Mucin Type O-Glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerken, Thomas A; Revoredo, Leslie; Thome, Joseph J C

    2013-01-01

    and specificity that differ between transferase isoforms. For example, ppGalNAc T1, T2, and T14 prefer C-terminally placed GalNAc-O-Thr, whereas ppGalNAc T3 and T6 prefer N-terminally placed GalNAc-O-Thr. Several transferase isoforms, ppGalNAc T5, T13, and T16, display equally enhanced N- or C-terminal activities...... relative to the nonglycosylated control peptides. This N- and/or C-terminal selectivity is presumably due to weak glycopeptide binding to the lectin domain, whose orientation relative to the catalytic domain is dynamic and isoform-dependent. Such N- or C-terminal glycopeptide selectivity provides...

  17. Extensive de novo solid-state NMR assignments of the 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habenstein, Birgit; Wasmer, Christian; Bousset, Luc; Sourigues, Yannick; Schütz, Anne; Loquet, Antoine; Meier, Beat H.; Melki, Ronald; Böckmann, Anja

    2011-01-01

    We present the de novo resonance assignments for the crystalline 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion using an optimized set of five 3D solid-state NMR spectra. We obtained, using a single uniformly 13 C, 15 N labeled protein sample, sequential chemical-shift information for 74% of the N, Cα, Cβ triples, and for 80% of further side-chain resonances for these spin systems. We describe the procedures and protocols devised, and discuss possibilities and limitations of the assignment of this largest protein assigned today by solid-state NMR, and for which no solution-state NMR shifts were available. A comparison of the NMR chemical shifts with crystallographic data reveals that regions with high crystallographic B-factors are particularly difficult to assign. While the secondary structure elements derived from the chemical shift data correspond mainly to those present in the X-ray crystal structure, we detect an additional helical element and structural variability in the protein crystal, most probably originating from the different molecules in the asymmetric unit, with the observation of doubled resonances in several parts, including entire stretches, of the protein. Our results provide the point of departure towards an atomic-resolution structural analysis of the C-terminal Ure2p domain in the context of the full-length prion fibrils.

  18. The Contributions of the Amino and Carboxy Terminal Domains of Flightin to the Biomechanical Properties of Drosophila Flight Muscle Thick Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasek, Nathan S; Nyland, Lori R; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2016-04-27

    Flightin is a myosin binding protein present in Pancrustacea. In Drosophila, flightin is expressed in the indirect flight muscles (IFM), where it is required for the flexural rigidity, structural integrity, and length determination of thick filaments. Comparison of flightin sequences from multiple Drosophila species revealed a tripartite organization indicative of three functional domains subject to different evolutionary constraints. We use atomic force microscopy to investigate the functional roles of the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain that show different patterns of sequence conservation. Thick filaments containing a C-terminal domain truncated flightin (fln(ΔC44)) are significantly shorter (2.68 ± 0.06 μm; p thick filaments containing a full length flightin (fln⁺; 3.21 ± 0.05 μm) and thick filaments containing an N-terminal domain truncated flightin (fln(ΔN62); 3.21 ± 0.06 μm). Persistence length was significantly reduced in fln(ΔN62) (418 ± 72 μm; p thick filament bending propensity. Our results indicate that the flightin amino and carboxy terminal domains make distinct contributions to thick filament biomechanics. We propose these distinct roles arise from the interplay between natural selection and sexual selection given IFM's dual role in flight and courtship behaviors.

  19. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    Basement membranes contain several proteoglycans, and those bearing heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans such as perlecan and agrin usually predominate. Most mammalian basement membranes also contain chondroitin sulfate, and a core protein, bamacan, has been partially characterized. We have now....... The protein sequence has low overall homology, apart from very small NH2- and COOH-terminal motifs. At the junctions between the distal globular domains and the coiled-coil regions lie glycosylation sites, with up to three N-linked oligosaccharides and probably three chondroitin chains. Three other Ser...

  20. Insights into PG-binding, conformational change, and dimerization of the OmpA C-terminal domains from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Borrelia burgdorferi: Characterization of OmpA C-Terminal Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Wu, Ruiying [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Cuff, Marianne [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Fan, Yao [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Bigelow, Lance [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Jedrzejczak, Robert P. [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Adkins, Joshua N. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Cort, John R. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Babnigg, Gyorgy [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Joachimiak, Andrzej [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439

    2017-06-19

    S. Typhimurium can induce both humoral and cell-mediated responses when establishing itself in the host. These responses are primarily stimulated against the lipopolysaccharide and major outer membrane (OM) proteins. OmpA is one of these major OM proteins. It comprises a N-terminal eight-stranded b-barrel trans membrane domain and a C-terminal domain (OmpACTD). The OmpACTD and its homologs are believed to bind to peptidoglycan (PG) within the periplasm, maintaining bacterial osmotic homeostasis and modulating the permeability and integrity of the OM. Here we present the first crystal structures of the OmpACTD from two pathogens: S. Typhimurium (STOmpACTD) in open and closed forms and causative agent of Lyme Disease Borrelia burgdorferi (BbOmpACTD), in closed form. In the open form of STOmpACTD, an aspartic acid residue from a long b2-a3 loop points into the binding pocket, suggesting that an anion group such as a carboxylate group from PG is favored at the binding site. In the closed form of STOmpACTD and in the structure of BbOmpACTD, a sulfate group from the crystallization buffer is tightly bound at the binding site. The differences between the closed and open forms of STOmpACTD, suggest a large conformational change that includes an extension of a3 helix by ordering a part of b2-a3 loop. We propose that the sulfate anion observed in these structures mimics the carboxylate group of PG when bound to STOmpACTD suggesting PG-anchoring mechanism. In addition, the binding of PG or a ligand mimic may enhance dimerization of STOmpACTD, or possibly that of full length STOmpA.

  1. Unique players in the BMP pathway: Small C-terminal domain phosphatases dephosphorylate Smad1 to attenuate BMP signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knockaert, Marie; Sapkota, Gopal; Alarcón, Claudio; Massagué, Joan; Brivanlou, Ali H.

    2006-01-01

    Smad transcription factors are key signal transducers for the TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of cytokines and morphogens. C-terminal serine phosphorylation by TGF-β and BMP membrane receptors drives Smads into the nucleus as transcriptional regulators. Dephosphorylation and recycling of activated Smads is an integral part of this process, which is critical for agonist sensing by the cell. However, the nuclear phosphatases involved have remained unknown. Here we provide functional, biochemical, and embryological evidence identifying the SCP (small C-terminal domain phosphatase) family of nuclear phosphatases as mediators of Smad1 dephosphorylation in the BMP signaling pathway in vertebrates. Xenopus SCP2/Os4 inhibits BMP activity in the presumptive ectoderm and leads to neuralization. In Xenopus embryos, SCP2/Os4 and human SCP1, 2, and 3 cause selective dephosphorylation of Smad1 compared with Smad2, inhibiting BMP- and Smad1-dependent transcription and leading to the induction of the secondary dorsal axis. In human cells, RNAi-mediated depletion of SCP1 and SCP2 increases the extent and duration of Smad1 phosphorylation in response to BMP, the transcriptional action of Smad1, and the strength of endogenous BMP gene responses. The present identification of the SCP family as Smad C-terminal phosphatases sheds light on the events that attenuate Smad signaling and reveals unexpected links to the essential phosphatases that control RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes. PMID:16882717

  2. A novel disulfide bond in the SH2 Domain of the C-terminal Src kinase controls catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jamie E; Whitford, Paul C; Shaffer, Jennifer; Onuchic, Jose N; Adams, Joseph A; Jennings, Patricia A

    2007-02-02

    The SH2 domain of the C-terminal Src kinase [Csk] contains a unique disulfide bond that is not present in other known SH2 domains. To investigate whether this unusual disulfide bond serves a novel function, the effects of disulfide bond formation on catalytic activity of the full-length protein and on the structure of the SH2 domain were investigated. The kinase activity of full-length Csk decreases by an order of magnitude upon formation of the disulfide bond in the distal SH2 domain. NMR spectra of the fully oxidized and fully reduced SH2 domains exhibit similar chemical shift patterns and are indicative of similar, well-defined tertiary structures. The solvent-accessible disulfide bond in the isolated SH2 domain is highly stable and far from the small lobe of the kinase domain. However, reduction of this bond results in chemical shift changes of resonances that map to a cluster of residues that extend from the disulfide bond across the molecule to a surface that is in direct contact with the small lobe of the kinase domain in the intact molecule. Normal mode analyses and molecular dynamics calculations suggest that disulfide bond formation has large effects on residues within the kinase domain, most notably within the active-site cleft. Overall, the data indicate that reversible cross-linking of two cysteine residues in the SH2 domain greatly impacts catalytic function and interdomain communication in Csk.

  3. N-terminal and C-terminal heparin-binding domain polypeptides derived from fibronectin reduce adhesion and invasion of liver cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Nan-Hong; Chen, Yan-Lin; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Li, Xiu-Jin; Wu, Yong; Zou, Qi-Lian; Chen, Yuan-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is known to be a large multifunction glycoprotein with binding sites for many substances, including N-terminal and C-terminal heparin-binding domains. We investigated the effects of highly purified rhFNHN29 and rhFNHC36 polypeptides originally cloned from the two heparin-binding domains on the adhesion and invasion of highly metastatic human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (MHCC97H) and analyzed the underlying mechanism involved. The MHCC97H cells that adhered to FN in the presence of various concentrations of rhFNHN29 and rhFNHC36 polypeptides were stained with crystal violet and measured, and the effects of rhFNHN29 and rhFNHC36 on the invasion of the MHCC97H cells were then detected using the Matrigel invasion assay as well as a lung-metastasis mouse model. The expression level of integrins and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphotyrosyl protein was examined by Western blot, and the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) was analyzed by gelatin zymography and the electrophoretic mobility band-shift assay (EMSA), respectively. Both of the polypeptides rhFNHN29 and rhFNHC36 inhibited adhesion and invasion of MHCC97H cells; however, rhFNHC36 exhibited inhibition at a lower dose than rhFNHN29. These inhibitory effects were mediated by integrin αvβ3 and reversed by a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor. Polypeptides rhFNHN29 and rhFNHC36 abrogated the tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK) and activation of activator protein 1 (AP-1), resulting in the decrease of integrin αv, β3 and β1 expression as well as the reduction of MMP-9 activity. Polypeptides rhFNHN29 and rhFNHC36 could potentially be applicable to human liver cancer as anti-adhesive and anti-invasive agents

  4. Solution structure of the c-terminal dimerization domain of SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein solved by the SAIL-NMR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Chang, Chung-ke; Ikeya, Teppei; Güntert, Peter; Chang, Yuan-hsiang; Hsu, Yen-lan; Huang, Tai-huang; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2008-07-18

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid protein (NP) contains a potential RNA-binding region in its N-terminal portion and also serves as a dimerization domain by forming a homodimer with a molecular mass of 28 kDa. So far, the structure determination of the SARS-CoV NP CTD in solution has been impeded by the poor quality of NMR spectra, especially for aromatic resonances. We have recently developed the stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) method to overcome the size problem of NMR structure determination by utilizing a protein exclusively composed of stereo- and regio-specifically isotope-labeled amino acids. Here, we employed the SAIL method to determine the high-quality solution structure of the SARS-CoV NP CTD by NMR. The SAIL protein yielded less crowded and better resolved spectra than uniform (13)C and (15)N labeling, and enabled the homodimeric solution structure of this protein to be determined. The NMR structure is almost identical with the previously solved crystal structure, except for a disordered putative RNA-binding domain at the N-terminus. Studies of the chemical shift perturbations caused by the binding of single-stranded DNA and mutational analyses have identified the disordered region at the N-termini as the prime site for nucleic acid binding. In addition, residues in the beta-sheet region also showed significant perturbations. Mapping of the locations of these residues onto the helical model observed in the crystal revealed that these two regions are parts of the interior lining of the positively charged helical groove, supporting the hypothesis that the helical oligomer may form in solution.

  5. Mutant Mice Lacking the p53 C-Terminal Domain Model Telomere Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Simeonova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in p53, although frequent in human cancers, have not been implicated in telomere-related syndromes. Here, we show that homozygous mutant mice expressing p53Δ31, a p53 lacking the C-terminal domain, exhibit increased p53 activity and suffer from aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis, hallmarks of syndromes caused by short telomeres. Indeed, p53Δ31/Δ31 mice had short telomeres and other phenotypic traits associated with the telomere disease dyskeratosis congenita and its severe variant the Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome. Heterozygous p53+/Δ31 mice were only mildly affected, but decreased levels of Mdm4, a negative regulator of p53, led to a dramatic aggravation of their symptoms. Importantly, several genes involved in telomere metabolism were downregulated in p53Δ31/Δ31 cells, including Dyskerin, Rtel1, and Tinf2, which are mutated in dyskeratosis congenita, and Terf1, which is implicated in aplastic anemia. Together, these data reveal that a truncating mutation can activate p53 and that p53 plays a major role in the regulation of telomere metabolism.

  6. Dimeric structure of the N-terminal domain of PriB protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis solved ab initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebschner, Dorothee [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Brzezinski, Krzysztof [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Bialystok, 15-399 Bialystok (Poland); Dauter, Miroslawa [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Nowak, Marta; Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [Gdansk University of Technology, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium T. tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure has been solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. PriB is one of the components of the bacterial primosome, which catalyzes the reactivation of stalled replication forks at sites of DNA damage. The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure was solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. The protein chain, which encompasses the first 104 residues of the full 220-residue protein, adopts the characteristic oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) structure consisting of a five-stranded β-barrel filled with hydrophobic residues and equipped with four loops extending from the barrel. In the crystal two protomers dimerize, forming a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The structure of the N-terminal OB domain of T. tengcongensis shows significant differences compared with mesophile PriBs. While in all other known structures of PriB a dimer is formed by two identical OB domains in separate chains, TtePriB contains two consecutive OB domains in one chain. However, sequence comparison of both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of TtePriB suggests that they have analogous structures and that the natural protein possesses a structure similar to a dimer of two N-terminal domains.

  7. The proapoptotic activity of C-terminal domain of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF is separated from its N-terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YONG ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF is a mitochondrial flavoprotein that mediates both NADH-oxidizing and caspase-independent apoptosis. Further, the proapoptotic activity of AIF is located in the C-terminus of AIF, although the precise minimum sequence responsible for apoptosis induction remains to be investigated. In the present study, we generated two truncated AIFs, AIFΔ1-480-FLAG, which is a FLAG-tagged C-terminal peptide comprising amino acids from 481 to 613, and AIF360-480 containing amino acids from 360 to 480 of AIF. We used confocal microscopy to demonstrate that both the truncated proteins are expressed and located in the cytoplasm of transfected cells. AIFΔ1-480 but not AIF360-480 induces apoptosis in transfected cells. We also found that the expression of AIFΔ1-480 could initiate the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. The suppression of caspase-9 via siRNA blocked the proapoptotic activity of AIFΔ1-480. Therefore, AIFΔ 1-480 is sufficient for inducing caspase-9-dependent apoptotic signaling, probably by promoting the release of cytochrome c. At last, we generated a chimeric immuno-AIFΔ 1-480 protein, which comprised an HER2 antibody, a Pseudomonas exotoxin A translocation domain and AIFΔ 1-480. Human Jurkat cells transfected with the immuno-AIFΔl-480 gene could express and secrete the chimeric protein, which selectively recognize and kill HER2-overexpressing tumor cells. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of the immuno-AIFΔl-480 gene as a novel approach to treating HER2-overexpressing cancers.

  8. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  9. Structure and function of the C-terminal domain of MrpA in the Bacillus subtilis Mrp-antiporter complex--the evolutionary progenitor of the long horizontal helix in complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virzintiene, Egle; Moparthi, Vamsi K; Al-Eryani, Yusra; Shumbe, Leonard; Górecki, Kamil; Hägerhäll, Cecilia

    2013-10-11

    MrpA and MrpD are homologous to NuoL, NuoM and NuoN in complex I over the first 14 transmembrane helices. In this work, the C-terminal domain of MrpA, outside this conserved area, was investigated. The transmembrane orientation was found to correspond to that of NuoJ in complex I. We have previously demonstrated that the subunit NuoK is homologous to MrpC. The function of the MrpA C-terminus was tested by expression in a previously used Bacillus subtilis model system. At neutral pH, the truncated MrpA still worked, but at pH 8.4, where Mrp-complex formation is needed for function, the C-terminal domain of MrpA was absolutely required. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure of the EMMPRIN N-terminal domain 1: Dimerization via [beta]-strand swapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jinquan; Teplyakov, Alexey; Obmolova, Galina; Malia, Thomas; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Beil, Eric; Baker, Audrey; Swencki-Underwood, Bethany; Zhao, Yonghong; Sprenkle, Justin; Dixon, Ken; Sweet, Raymond; Gilliland, Gary L.; (Centocor)

    2010-09-27

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), also known as Hab18G, CD147, Basigin, M6, and neurothelin, is a membrane glycoprotein expressed on the surface of various cell types and many cancer cells. EMMPRIN stimulates adjacent fibroblasts and tumor cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases and plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, spermatogensis and fertilization, cell-cell adhesion and communication, and other biological processes (reviewed in Ref. 1 and references therein). It was demonstrated that the EMMPRIN extracellular domain (ECD), which structurally belongs to the IgG superfamily, can form homo-oligomers in a cis dependent manner and the N-terminal domain 1 (residues 22-101) was necessary and sufficient to mediate this interaction. The crystal structure of the ECD of recombinant human EMMPRIN (Hab18G/CD147) expressed in E. coli was reported at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution (Yu et al. 2008). The construct consists of residues 22-205 of the mature protein and has both an N-terminal IgC2 domain (ND1, residues 22-101) and a C-terminal IgC2 domain (ND2, residues 107-205). The two domains are joined by a five amino acid residue linker that constitutes a flexible hinge between the two domains. The crystal form has four copies of the molecule in the asymmetric unit, each of which has a different inter-domain angle that varies from 121{sup o} to 144{sup o}. The two domains each have a conserved disulfide bridge and both are comprised of two {beta}-sheets formed by strands EBA and GFCC, and DEBA and AGFCC for ND1 and ND2, respectively. Based on the crystal packing in this structure, the authors proposed that lateral packing between the two IgG domains of EMMPRIN ECD represents a potential mechanism for cell adhesion. Here we report the 2.0-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of EMMPRIN ECD (ND1) expressed in mammalian cells. The overall structure of the domain is very similar to that in the full length

  11. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison A Williams

    Full Text Available Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X, a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80 and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the C-terminal domain of the human spliceosomal DExD/H-box protein hPrp22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudlinzki, Denis; Nagel, Christian; Ficner, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The cloning, purification and crystallization of the C-terminal domain of human hPrp22 are reported. This communication also contains data for the preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis. The Homo sapiens DExD/H-box protein hPrp22 is a crucial component of the eukaryotic pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Within the splicing cycle, it is involved in the ligation of exons and generation of the lariat and it additionally catalyzes the release of mature mRNA from the spliceosomal U5 snRNP. The yeast homologue of this protein, yPrp22, shows ATP-dependent RNA-helicase activity and is capable of unwinding RNA/RNA duplex molecules. A truncated construct coding for residues 950–1183 of human Prp22, comprising the structurally and functionally uncharacterized C-terminal domain, was cloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector. The protein was subsequently overproduced, purified and crystallized. The crystals obtained diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution, belonged to the tetragonal space group P4 1 2 1 2 or P4 3 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 78.2, c = 88.4 Å, and contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit

  13. The C'-terminal interaction domain of the thyroid hormone receptor confers the ability of the DNA site to dictate positive or negative transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, J.M.; Glass, C.K.; Adler, S.; Nelson, C.A.; Rosenfeld, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms responsible for positive and negative transcriptional control, the authors have utilized two types of promoters that are diffferentially regulated by thyroid hormone (T 3 ) receptors. Promoters containing the palindromic T 3 response element TCAGGTCA TGACCTGA are positively regulated by the T 3 receptor after the administration of T 3 , whereas otherwise identical promoters containing the estrogen response element TCAGGTCA CTG TGACCTGA can be regulated negatively; converse effects are observed with the estrogen receptor. They describe evidence that the transcriptional inhibitory effects of the T 3 or estrogen receptors on the estrogen or T 3 response elements, respectively, are imposed by amino acid sequences in the C'-terminal region that colocalize with dimerization and hormone-binding domains and that these sequences can transfer inhibitory functions to other classes of transcription factors. Removal of the C'-terminal dimerization and hormone-binding domains of either the αT 3 or estrogen receptors permits each receptor to act constitutively to enhance transcription on both T 3 and estrogen response elements. It is, therefore, suggested that protein-protein interactions between receptor C' termini limit the subset of DNA binding sites on which transcriptional activation occurs

  14. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodri M L Morgan

    Full Text Available Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation, R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE of TOMM20.

  15. Identification and biochemical analysis of Slac2-c/MyRIP as a Rab27A-, myosin Va/VIIa-, and actin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Taruho S; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2005-01-01

    Slac2-c/MyRIP is a specific Rab27A-binding protein that contains an N-terminal synaptotagmin-like protein (Slp) homology domain (SHD, a newly identified GTP-Rab27A-binding motif), but in contrast to the Slp family proteins, it lacks C-terminal tandem C2 domains. In vitro Slac2-c simultaneously directly interacts with both Rab27A and an actin-based motor protein, myosin Va, via its N-terminal SHD and middle region, respectively, consistent with the fact that the overall structure of Slac2-c is similar to that of Slac2-a/melanophilin, a linker protein between Rab27A and myosin Va in the melanosome transport in melanocytes. Unlike Slac2-a, however, the middle region of Slac2-c interacts with two types of myosins, myosin Va and myosin VIIa. In addition, the most C-terminal part of both Slac2-a and Slac2-c functions as an actin-binding domain: it directly interacts with globular and fibrous actin in vitro, and the actin-binding domain of Slac2-a and Slac2-c colocalizes with actin filaments when it is expressed in living cells (i.e., PC12 cells and mouse melanocytes). In this chapter we describe the methods that have been used to analyze the protein-protein interactions of Slac2-c, specifically with Rab27A, myosin Va/VIIa, and actin.

  16. Compaction and binding properties of the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of Henipavirus nucleoprotein as unveiled by deletion studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocquel, David; Habchi, Johnny; Gruet, Antoine; Blangy, Stéphanie; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Henipaviruses are recently emerged severe human pathogens within the Paramyxoviridae family. Their genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N) within a helical nucleocapsid that recruits the polymerase complex via the phosphoprotein (P). We have previously shown that in Henipaviruses the N protein possesses an intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain, N(TAIL), which undergoes α-helical induced folding in the presence of the C-terminal domain (P(XD)) of the P protein. Using computational approaches, we previously identified within N(TAIL) four putative molecular recognition elements (MoREs) with different structural propensities, and proposed a structural model for the N(TAIL)-P(XD) complex where the MoRE encompassing residues 473-493 adopt an α-helical conformation at the P(XD) surface. In this work, for each N(TAIL) protein, we designed four deletion constructs bearing different combinations of the predicted MoREs. Following purification of the N(TAIL) truncated proteins from the soluble fraction of E. coli, we characterized them in terms of their conformational, spectroscopic and binding properties. These studies provided direct experimental evidence for the structural state of the four predicted MoREs, and showed that two of them have clear α-helical propensities, with the one spanning residues 473-493 being strictly required for binding to P(XD). We also showed that Henipavirus N(TAIL) and P(XD) form heterologous complexes, indicating that the P(XD) binding regions are functionally interchangeable between the two viruses. By combining spectroscopic and conformational analyses, we showed that the content in regular secondary structure is not a major determinant of protein compaction.

  17. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, David J.; Dayeh, Daniel M.; Fredrickson, Saul W.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5′-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphatelyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or a 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated −1 or −2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of −2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of −1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase

  18. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RTCter) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RTCter. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. N-terminal truncation enables crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of the FedF bacterial adhesin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Kerpel, Maia; Van Molle, Inge [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Brys, Lea [Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri; Bouckaert, Julie, E-mail: bouckaej@vub.ac.be [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-12-01

    The N-terminal receptor-binding domain of the FedF adhesin from enterotoxigenic E. coli has been crystallized. This required the deletion of its first 14 residues, which are also cleaved off naturally. FedF is the two-domain tip adhesin of F18 fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Bacterial adherence, mediated by the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of FedF to carbohydrate receptors on intestinal microvilli, causes diarrhoea and oedema disease in newly weaned piglets and induces the secretion of Shiga toxins. A truncate containing only the receptor-binding domain of FedF was found to be further cleaved at its N-terminus. Reconstruction of this N-terminal truncate rendered FedF amenable to crystallization, resulting in crystals with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a = 36.20, b = 74.64, c = 99.03 Å that diffracted to beyond 2 Å resolution. The binding specificity of FedF was screened for on a glycan array, exposing 264 glycoconjugates, to identify specific receptors for cocrystallization with FedF.

  20. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling studies of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the human mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurashima-Ito, Kaori [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Ikeya, Teppei [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), (Japan); Senbongi, Hiroshi [Mitochondrial Diseases Group, MRC Dunn Human NutritionUnit (United Kingdom); Tochio, Hidehito [International Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Supramolecular Biology, Yokohama City University, Molecular Biophysics Laboratory (Japan); Mikawa, Tsutomu [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Shibata, Takehiko [RIKEN, Shibata Distinguished Senior Scientist Laboratory (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan)], E-mail: ito-yutaka@center.tmu.ac.jp

    2006-05-15

    Human ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 6 (ABCB6) is a mitochondrial ABC transporter, and presumably contributes to iron homeostasis. Aimed at understanding the structural basis for the conformational changes accompanying the substrate-transportation cycle, we have studied the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of ABCB6 (ABCB6-C) in both the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling. A non-linear sampling scheme was utilised for indirectly acquired {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N dimensions of all 3D triple-resonance NMR experiments, in order to overcome the instability and the low solubility of ABCB6-C. The backbone resonances for approximately 25% of non-proline residues, which are mostly distributed around the functionally important loops and in the Helical domain, were not observed for nucleotide-free form of ABCB6-C. From the pH, temperature and magnetic field strength dependencies of the resonance intensities, we concluded that this incompleteness in the assignments is mainly due to the exchange between multiple conformations at an intermediate rate on the NMR timescale. These localised conformational dynamics remained in ADP-bound ABCB6-C except for the loops responsible for adenine base and {alpha}/{beta}-phosphate binding. These results revealed that the localised dynamic cooperativity, which was recently proposed for a prokaryotic ABC MJ1267, also exists in a higher eukaryotic ABC, and is presumably shared by all members of the ABC family. Since the Helical domain is the putative interface to the transmembrane domain, this cooperativity may explain the coupled functions between domains in the substrate-transportation cycle.

  1. The C-terminal domains of NF-H and NF-M subunits maintain axonal neurofilament content by blocking turnover of the stationary neurofilament network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala V Rao

    Full Text Available Newly synthesized neurofilaments or protofilaments are incorporated into a highly stable stationary cytoskeleton network as they are transported along axons. Although the heavily phosphorylated carboxyl-terminal tail domains of the heavy and medium neurofilament (NF subunits have been proposed to contribute to this process and particularly to stability of this structure, their function is still obscure. Here we show in NF-H/M tail deletion [NF-(H/M(tailΔ] mice that the deletion of both of these domains selectively lowers NF levels 3-6 fold along optic axons without altering either rates of subunit synthesis or the rate of slow axonal transport of NF. Pulse labeling studies carried out over 90 days revealed a significantly faster rate of disappearance of NF from the stationary NF network of optic axons in NF-(H/M(tailΔ mice. Faster NF disappearance was accompanied by elevated levels of NF-L proteolytic fragments in NF-(H/M(tailΔ axons. We conclude that NF-H and NF-M C-terminal domains do not normally regulate NF transport rates as previously proposed, but instead increase the proteolytic resistance of NF, thereby stabilizing the stationary neurofilament cytoskeleton along axons.

  2. Polycystin-1 C-terminal Cleavage Is Modulated by Polycystin-2 Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuccio, Claudia A.; Chapin, Hannah C.; Cai, Yiqiang; Mistry, Kavita; Chauvet, Veronique; Somlo, Stefan; Caplan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding polycystin-1 (PC-1) and polycystin-2 (PC-2). PC-1 cleavage releases its cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (CTT), which enters the nucleus. To determine whether PC-1 CTT cleavage is influenced by PC-2, a quantitative cleavage assay was utilized, in which the DNA binding and activation domains of Gal4 and VP16, respectively, were appended to PC-1 downstream of its CTT domain (PKDgalvp). Cells cotransfected with the resultant PKDgalvp fusion protein and PC-2 showed an increase in luciferase activity and in CTT expression, indicating that the C-terminal tail of PC-1 is cleaved and enters the nucleus. To assess whether CTT cleavage depends upon Ca2+ signaling, cells transfected with PKDgalvp alone or together with PC-2 were incubated with several agents that alter intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. PC-2 enhancement of luciferase activity was not altered by any of these treatments. Using a series of PC-2 C-terminal truncated mutations, we identified a portion of the PC-2 protein that is required to stimulate PC-1 CTT accumulation. These data demonstrate that release of the CTT from PC-1 is influenced and stabilized by PC-2. This effect is independent of Ca2+ but is regulated by sequences contained within the PC-2 C-terminal tail, suggesting a mechanism through which PC-1 and PC-2 may modulate a novel signaling pathway. PMID:19491093

  3. Immunochemical and autoantigenic properties of the globular domain of basement membrane collagen (type IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Mark, H; Oberbäumer, I; Timpl, R; Kemler, R; Wick, G

    1985-02-01

    Polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against the globular domain NC1 of collagen IV from human placenta and a mouse tumor react with conformational antigenic determinants present on the NC1 hexamers and also with the three major subunits obtained after dissociation. The antibodies recognized unique structures within basement membranes and showed a broad tissue reactivity but only limited species cross-reactivity. Using these antibodies, it was possible to detect small amounts of collagen IV antigens from cell cultures and in serum. Monoclonal rat antibodies against mouse NC1 revealed a similar reaction potential. Autoantibodies could be produced in mice against mouse NC1 which react with kidney and lung basement membranes in a pathological manner, mimicking Goodpasture syndrome.

  4. Natural triple beta-stranded fibrous folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitraki, Anna; Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; Van Raaij, Mark J

    2006-01-01

    A distinctive family of beta-structured folds has recently been described for fibrous proteins from viruses. Virus fibers are usually involved in specific host-cell recognition. They are asymmetric homotrimeric proteins consisting of an N-terminal virus-binding tail, a central shaft or stalk domain, and a C-terminal globular receptor-binding domain. Often they are entirely or nearly entirely composed of beta-structure. Apart from their biological relevance and possible gene therapy applications, their shape, stability, and rigidity suggest they may be useful as blueprints for biomechanical design. Folding and unfolding studies suggest their globular C-terminal domain may fold first, followed by a "zipping-up" of the shaft domains. The C-terminal domains appear to be important for registration because peptides corresponding to shaft domains alone aggregate into nonnative fibers and/or amyloid structures. C-terminal domains can be exchanged between different fibers and the resulting chimeric proteins are useful as a way to solve structures of unknown parts of the shaft domains. The following natural triple beta-stranded fibrous folds have been discovered by X-ray crystallography: the triple beta-spiral, triple beta-helix, and T4 short tail fiber fold. All have a central longitudinal hydrophobic core and extensive intermonomer polar and nonpolar interactions. Now that a reasonable body of structural and folding knowledge has been assembled about these fibrous proteins, the next challenge and opportunity is to start using this information in medical and industrial applications such as gene therapy and nanotechnology.

  5. Regulation of plant plasma membrane H+- and Ca2+-ATPases by terminal domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lone; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years, major progress has been made to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of P-type plasma membrane H(+)-and Ca(2+)-ATPases. Even though a number of regulatory proteins have been identified, many pieces are still lacking in order to understand the complete regulatory...... mechanisms of these pumps. In plant plasma membrane H(+)- and Ca(2+)-ATPases, autoinhibitory domains are situated in the C- and N-terminal domains, respectively. A model for a common mechanism of autoinhibition is discussed....

  6. Cross-protective immunity to Leishmania amazonensis is mediated by CD4+ and CD8+-epitopes of Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase terminal domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirlei eNico

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Nucleoside hydrolase of Leishmania donovani (NH36 is a phylogenetic marker of high homology among Leishmania parasites. In mice and dog vaccination NH36 induces a CD4+ T cell-driven protective response against Leishmania chagasi infection directed against its C-terminal domain (F3. The C-terminal and N-terminal domain vaccines also decreased the footpad lesion caused by Leishmania amazonensis. We studied the basis of the crossed immune response using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin for mice prophylaxis against L. amazonensis. The F1 (amino acids 1-103 and F3 peptide (amino acids 199-314 vaccines enhanced the IgG and IgG2a anti-NH36 antibodies to similar levels. The F3 vaccine induced the strongest DTH response, the highest proportions of NH36-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after challenge and the highest expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α. The F1 vaccine, on the other hand, induced a weaker but significant DTH response and a mild enhancement of IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. The in vivo depletion with anti-CD4 or CD8 monoclonal antibodies disclosed that cross-protection against L. amazonensis infection was mediated by a CD4+ T cell response directed against the C-terminal domain (75% of reduction of the size of footpad lesion followed by a CD8+ T cell response against the N-terminal domain of NH36 (57% of reduction of footpad lesions. Both vaccines were capable of inducing long-term cross-immunity. The amino acid sequence of NH36 showed 93% identity to the sequence of the NH A34480 of L. amazonensis which also showed the presence of completely conserved predicted epitopes for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in F1 domain, and of CD4+ epitopes differing in a single amino acid, in F1 and F3 domains. The identification of the C-terminal and N-terminal domains as the targets of the immune response to NH36 in the model of L. amazonesis infection represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine

  7. Distribución en gran escala de los cúmulos globulares en Fornax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, P. G.

    Para analizar los cúmulos globulares azules y rojos de NGC 1399 asociados con NGC 1399 en particular, o si los cúmulos azules representaban un sistema asociado con el cúmulo de Fornax en general, se obtuvieron imágenes CCD de gran formato con el telescopio de 4m del CTIO, en las bandas C y T1. Se describe el método empleado y lo encontrado.

  8. Regulation of abiotic stress signalling by Arabidopsis C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 requires interaction with a k-homology domain-containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sil Jeong

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN (CTD PHOSPHATASE-LIKE 1 (CPL1 regulates plant transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals. Unlike typical CTD phosphatases, CPL1 contains two double-stranded (ds RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs at its C-terminus. Some dsRBMs can bind to dsRNA and/or other proteins, but the function of the CPL1 dsRBMs has remained obscure. Here, we report identification of REGULATOR OF CBF GENE EXPRESSION 3 (RCF3 as a CPL1-interacting protein. RCF3 co-purified with tandem-affinity-tagged CPL1 from cultured Arabidopsis cells and contains multiple K-homology (KH domains, which were predicted to be important for binding to single-stranded DNA/RNA. Yeast two-hybrid, luciferase complementation imaging, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses established that CPL1 and RCF3 strongly associate in vivo, an interaction mediated by the dsRBM1 of CPL1 and the KH3/KH4 domains of RCF3. Mapping of functional regions of CPL1 indicated that CPL1 in vivo function requires the dsRBM1, catalytic activity, and nuclear targeting of CPL1. Gene expression profiles of rcf3 and cpl1 mutants were similar during iron deficiency, but were distinct during the cold response. These results suggest that tethering CPL1 to RCF3 via dsRBM1 is part of the mechanism that confers specificity to CPL1-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  9. Swapping the N- and C-terminal domains of human apolipoprotein E3 and AI reveals insights into their structure/activity relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Lek

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein (apo E3 and apoAI are exchangeable apolipoproteins that play a dominant role in regulating plasma lipoprotein metabolism. ApoE3 (299 residues is composed of an N-terminal (NT domain bearing a 4-helix bundle and a C-terminal (CT domain bearing a series of amphipathic α-helices. ApoAI (243 residues also comprises a highly helical NT domain and a less structured CT tail. The objective of this study was to understand their structural and functional role by generating domain swapped chimeras: apoE3-NT/apoAI-CT and apoAI-NT/apoE-CT. The bacterially overexpressed chimeras were purified by affinity chromatography and their identity confirmed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. Their α-helical content was comparable to that of the parent proteins. ApoE3-NT/apoAI-CT retained the denaturation profile of apoE3 NT domain, with apoAI CT tail eliciting a relatively unstructured state; its lipid binding ability improved dramatically compared to apoE3 indicative of a significant role of apoAI CT tail in lipid binding interaction. The LDL receptor interaction and ability to promote ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux of apoE3-NT/apoAI-CT was comparable to that of apoE3. In contrast, apoAI-NT/apoE-CT elicited an unfolding pattern and lipid binding ability that were similar to that of apoAI. As expected, DMPC/apoAI-NT/apoE-CT discoidal particles did not elicit LDLr binding ability, and promoted SR-B1 mediated cellular uptake of lipids to a limited extent. However, apoAI-NT/apoE-CT displayed an enhanced ability to promote cholesterol efflux compared to apoAI, indicative of a significant role for apoE CT domain in mediating this function. Together, these results indicate that the functional attributes of apoAI and apoE3 can be conferred on each other and that NT-CT domain interactions significantly modulate their structure and function.

  10. Roles of the C-terminal domains of human dihydrodiol dehydrogenase isoforms in the binding of substrates and modulators: probing with chimaeric enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, K; Hara, A; Deyashiki, Y; Iwasa, H; Kume, T; Ishikura, S; Shiraishi, H; Katagiri, Y

    1998-01-01

    Human liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DD; EC 1.3.1.20) exists in isoforms (DD1, DD2 and DD4) composed of 323 amino acids. DD1 and DD2 share 98% amino acid sequence identity, but show lower identities (approx. 83%) with DD4, in which a marked difference is seen in the C-terminal ten amino acids. DD4 exhibits unique catalytic properties, such as the ability to oxidize both (R)- and (S)-alicyclic alcohols equally, high dehydrogenase activity for bile acids, potent inhibition by steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and activation by sulphobromophthalein and clofibric acid derivatives. In this study, we have prepared chimaeric enzymes, in which we exchanged the C-terminal 39 residues between the two enzymes. Compared with DD1, CDD1-4 (DD1 with the C-terminal sequence of DD4) had increased kcat/Km values for 3alpha-hydroxy-5beta-androstanes and bile acids of 3-9-fold and decreased values for the other substrates by 5-100-fold. It also became highly sensitive to DD4 inhibitors such as phenolphthalein and hexoestrol. Another chimaeric enzyme, CDD4-1 (DD4 with the C-terminal sequence of DD1), showed the same (S)-stereospecificity for the alicyclic alcohols as DD1, had decreased kcat/Km values for bile acids with 7beta- or 12alpha-hydroxy groups by more than 120-fold and was resistant to inhibition by betamethasone. In addition, the activation effects of sulphobromophthalein and bezafibrate decreased or disappeared for CDD4-1. The recombinant DD4 with the His314-->Pro (the corresponding residue of DD1) mutation showed intermediate changes in the properties between those of wild-type DD4 and CDD4-1. The results indicate that the binding of substrates, inhibitors and activators to the enzymes is controlled by residues in their C-terminal domains; multiple residues co-ordinately act as determinants for substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity. PMID:9820821

  11. PrP N-terminal domain triggers PrPSc-like aggregation of Dpl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlich, Paul; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Lemaire-Vieille, Catherine; Curt, Aurelie; Andrieu, Jean-Pierre; Schoehn, Guy; Jamin, Marc; Gagnon, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative disorders thought to be transmitted by self-perpetuating conformational conversion of a neuronal membrane glycoprotein (PrP C , for 'cellular prion protein') into an abnormal state (PrP Sc , for 'scrapie prion protein'). Doppel (Dpl) is a protein that shares significant biochemical and structural homology with PrP C . In contrast to its homologue PrP C , Dpl is unable to participate in prion disease progression or to achieve an abnormal PrP Sc -like state. We have constructed a chimeric mouse protein, composed of the N-terminal domain of PrP C (residues 23-125) and the C-terminal part of Dpl (residues 58-157). This chimeric protein displays PrP-like biochemical and structural features; when incubated in presence of NaCl, the α-helical monomer forms soluble β-sheet-rich oligomers which acquire partial resistance to pepsin proteolysis in vitro, as do PrP oligomers. Moreover, the presence of aggregates akin to protofibrils is observed in soluble oligomeric species by electron microscopy

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of cD Galaxies and Their Globular Cluster Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán, Andrés; Côté, Patrick; West, Michael J.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Minniti, Dante; Rejkuba, Marina

    2004-01-01

    We have used WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to obtain F450W and F814W images of four cD galaxies (NGC 541 in Abell 194, NGC 2832 in Abell 779, NGC 4839 in Abell 1656, and NGC 7768 in Abell 2666) in the range 5400 km s-1cluster (GC) systems reveals no anomalies in terms of specific frequencies, metallicity gradients, average metallicities, or the metallicity offset between the globular clusters and the host galaxy. We show that the latter offset appears roughly constant at Δ[Fe/H]~0.8 dex for early-type galaxies spanning a luminosity range of roughly 4 orders of magnitude. We combine the globular cluster metallicity distributions with an empirical technique described in a series of earlier papers to investigate the form of the protogalactic mass spectrum in these cD galaxies. We find that the observed GC metallicity distributions are consistent with those expected if cD galaxies form through the cannibalism of numerous galaxies and protogalactic fragments that formed their stars and globular clusters before capture and disruption. However, the properties of their GC systems suggest that dynamical friction is not the primary mechanism by which these galaxies are assembled. We argue that cD's instead form rapidly, via hierarchical merging, prior to cluster virialization. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555 Based in part on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, for VLT program 68.D-0130(A).

  13. Activation of the plasma membrane Na/H antiporter salt-overly-sensitive 1 (SOS1) by phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory C-terminal domain

    KAUST Repository

    Quintero, Francisco J.; Martí nez-Atienza, Juliana; Villalta, Irene; Jiang, Xingyu; Kim, Woeyeon; Ali, Zhair; Fujii, Hiroaki; Mendoza, Imelda; Yun, Daejin; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Pardo, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The plasma membrane sodium/proton exchanger Salt-Overly-Sensitive 1 (SOS1) is a critical salt tolerance determinant in plants. The SOS2-SOS3 calcium-dependent protein kinase complex upregulates SOS1 activity, but the mechanistic details of this crucial event remain unresolved. Here we show that SOS1 is maintained in a resting state by a C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain that is the target of SOS2-SOS3. The auto-inhibitory domain interacts intramolecularly with an adjacent domain of SOS1 that is essential for activity. SOS1 is relieved from auto-inhibition upon phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory domain by SOS2-SOS3. Mutation of the SOS2 phosphorylation and recognition site impeded the activation of SOS1 in vivo and in vitro. Additional amino acid residues critically important for SOS1 activity and regulation were identified in a genetic screen for hypermorphic alleles.

  14. Activation of the plasma membrane Na/H antiporter salt-overly-sensitive 1 (SOS1) by phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory C-terminal domain

    KAUST Repository

    Quintero, Francisco J.

    2011-01-24

    The plasma membrane sodium/proton exchanger Salt-Overly-Sensitive 1 (SOS1) is a critical salt tolerance determinant in plants. The SOS2-SOS3 calcium-dependent protein kinase complex upregulates SOS1 activity, but the mechanistic details of this crucial event remain unresolved. Here we show that SOS1 is maintained in a resting state by a C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain that is the target of SOS2-SOS3. The auto-inhibitory domain interacts intramolecularly with an adjacent domain of SOS1 that is essential for activity. SOS1 is relieved from auto-inhibition upon phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory domain by SOS2-SOS3. Mutation of the SOS2 phosphorylation and recognition site impeded the activation of SOS1 in vivo and in vitro. Additional amino acid residues critically important for SOS1 activity and regulation were identified in a genetic screen for hypermorphic alleles.

  15. Insights into the Structure of Dimeric RNA Helicase CsdA and Indispensable Role of Its C-Terminal Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling; Wang, Lijun; Peng, Junhui; Li, Fudong; Wu, Lijie; Zhang, Beibei; Lv, Mengqi; Zhang, Jiahai; Gong, Qingguo; Zhang, Rongguang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wu, Jihui; Tang, Yajun; Shi, Yunyu

    2017-12-05

    CsdA has been proposed to be essential for the biogenesis of ribosome and gene regulation after cold shock. However, the structure of CsdA and the function of its long C-terminal regions are still unclear. Here, we solved all of the domain structures of CsdA and found two previously uncharacterized auxiliary domains: a dimerization domain (DD) and an RNA-binding domain (RBD). Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments helped to track the conformational flexibilities of the helicase core domains and C-terminal regions. Biochemical assays revealed that DD is indispensable for stabilizing the CsdA dimeric structure. We also demonstrate for the first time that CsdA functions as a stable dimer at low temperature. The C-terminal regions are critical for RNA binding and efficient enzymatic activities. CsdA_RBD could specifically bind to the regions with a preference for single-stranded G-rich RNA, which may help to bring the helicase core to unwind the adjacent duplex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Funk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary

  17. Arabidopsis Microtubule-Associated Protein MAP65-3 Cross-Links Antiparallel Microtubules toward Their Plus Ends in the Phragmoplast via Its Distinct C-Terminal Microtubule Binding Domain[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chin-Min Kimmy; Lee, Yuh-Ru Julie; Kiyama, Lindsay D.; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P.; Liu, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Plant cytokinesis is brought about by the phragmoplast, which contains an antiparallel microtubule (MT) array. The MT-associated protein MAP65-3 acts as an MT-bundling factor that specifically cross-links antiparallel MTs near their plus ends. MAP65 family proteins contain an N-terminal dimerization domain and C-terminal MT interaction domain. Compared with other MAP65 isoforms, MAP65-3 contains an extended C terminus. A MT binding site was discovered in the region between amino acids 496 and 588 and found to be essential for the organization of phragmoplast MTs. The frequent cytokinetic failure caused by loss of MAP65-3 was not rescued by ectopic expression of MAP65-1 under the control of the MAP65-3 promoter, indicating nonoverlapping functions between the two isoforms. In the presence of MAP65-3, however, ectopic MAP65-1 appeared in the phragmoplast midline. We show that MAP65-1 could acquire the function of MAP65-3 when the C terminus of MAP65-3, which contains the MT binding site, was grafted to it. Our results also show that MAP65-1 and MAP65-3 may share redundant functions in MT stabilization. Such a stabilization effect was likely brought about by MT binding and bundling. We conclude that MAP65-3 contains a distinct C-terminal MT binding site with a specific role in cross-linking antiparallel MTs toward their plus ends in the phragmoplast. PMID:22570443

  18. Molecular dissection of the C-terminal regulatory domain of the plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase AHA2: Mapping of residues that when altered give rise to an activated enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, K.B.; Venema, K.; Jah, T.

    1999-01-01

    in an extension of the C-terminus unique to plant H+-ATPases, Alteration of residues in both regions led to increased binding of yeast 14-3-3 protein to the plasma membrane of transformed cells. Taken together, our data suggest that modification of residues in two regions of the C-terminal regulatory domain......The plasma membrane H+-ATPase is a proton pump belonging to the P-type ATPase superfamily and is important for nutrient acquisition in plants, The H+-ATPase is controlled by an autoinhibitory C-terminal regulatory domain and is activated by 14-3-3 proteins which bind to this part of the enzyme......+-ATPase. The enzymes were characterized by their ability to promote growth in acidic conditions and to promote H+ extrusion from intact cells, both of which are measures of plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity, and were also characterized with respect to kinetic properties such as affinity for H+ and ATP. Residues...

  19. Differential subcellular localization of insulin receptor substrates depends on C-terminal regions and importin β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabuta, Tomohiro; Take, Kazumi; Kabuta, Chihana; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrates (IRSs) play essential roles in signal transduction of insulin and insulin-like growth factors. Previously, we showed that IRS-3 is localized to the nucleus as well as the cytosol, while IRS-1 and 2 are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. In the present study, we found that importin β directly interacts with IRS-3 and is able to mediate nuclear transport of IRS-3. Importin β interacted with the pleckstrin homology domain, the phosphotyrosine binding domain and the C-terminal region of IRS-3; indeed all of these fragments exhibited predominant nuclear localization. By contrast, almost no interaction of importin β with IRS-1 and -2 was observed, and their C-terminal regions displayed discrete spotty images in the cytosol. In addition, using chimeric proteins between IRS-1 and IRS-3, we revealed that the C-terminal regions are the main determinants of the differing subcellular localizations of IRS-1 and IRS-3.

  20. An overlapping region between the two terminal folding units of the outer surface protein A (OspA) controls its folding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makabe, Koki; Nakamura, Takashi; Dhar, Debanjan; Ikura, Teikichi; Koide, Shohei; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2018-04-27

    Although many naturally occurring proteins consist of multiple domains, most studies on protein folding to date deal with single-domain proteins or isolated domains of multi-domain proteins. Studies of multi-domain protein folding are required for further advancing our understanding of protein folding mechanisms. Borrelia outer surface protein A (OspA) is a β-rich two-domain protein, in which two globular domains are connected by a rigid and stable single-layer β-sheet. Thus, OspA is particularly suited as a model system for studying the interplays of domains in protein folding. Here, we studied the equilibria and kinetics of the urea-induced folding-unfolding reactions of OspA probed with tryptophan fluorescence and ultraviolet circular dichroism. Global analysis of the experimental data revealed compelling lines of evidence for accumulation of an on-pathway intermediate during kinetic refolding and for the identity between the kinetic intermediate and a previously described equilibrium unfolding intermediate. The results suggest that the intermediate has the fully native structure in the N-terminal domain and the single layer β-sheet, with the C-terminal domain still unfolded. The observation of the productive on-pathway folding intermediate clearly indicates substantial interactions between the two domains mediated by the single-layer β-sheet. We propose that a rigid and stable intervening region between two domains creates an overlap between two folding units and can energetically couple their folding reactions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. C-Terminal Substitution of HBV Core Proteins with Those from DHBV Reveals That Arginine-Rich 167RRRSQSPRR175 Domain Is Critical for HBV Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyeung; Shin, Bo-Hye; Park, Gil-Soon; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the contributions of carboxyl-terminal nucleic acid binding domain of HBV core (C) protein for hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, chimeric HBV C proteins were generated by substituting varying lengths of the carboxyl-terminus of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) C protein for the corresponding regions of HBV C protein. All chimeric C proteins formed core particles. A chimeric C protein with 221–262 amino acids of DHBV C protein, in place of 146–185 amino acids of the HBV C protein, supported HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) encapsidation and DNA synthesis: 40% amino acid sequence identity or 45% homology in the nucleic-acid binding domain of HBV C protein was sufficient for pgRNA encapsidation and DNA synthesis, although we predominantly detected spliced DNA. A chimeric C protein with 221–241 and 251–262 amino acids of DHBV C, in place of HBV C 146–166 and 176–185 amino acids, respectively, could rescue full-length DNA synthesis. However, a reciprocal C chimera with 242–250 of DHBV C (242RAGSPLPRS 250) introduced in place of 167–175 of HBV C (167RRRSQSPRR 175) significantly decreased pgRNA encapsidation and DNA synthesis, and full-length DNA was not detected, demonstrating that the arginine-rich 167RRRSQSPRR175 domain may be critical for efficient viral replication. Five amino acids differing between viral species (underlined above) were tested for replication rescue; R169 and R175 were found to be important. PMID:22911745

  2. EH domain of EHD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieken, Fabien; Jovic, Marko; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve, E-mail: scaplan@unmc.edu; Sorgen, Paul L. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Eppley Cancer Center (United States)], E-mail: psorgen@unmc.edu

    2007-12-15

    EHD1 is a member of the mammalian C-terminal Eps15 homology domain (EH) containing protein family, and regulates the recycling of various receptors from the endocytic recycling compartment to the plasma membrane. The EH domain of EHD1 binds to proteins containing either an Asn-Pro-Phe or Asp-Pro-Phe motif, and plays an important role in the subcellular localization and function of EHD1. Thus far, the structures of five N-terminal EH domains from other proteins have been solved, but to date, the structure of the EH domains from the four C-terminal EHD family paralogs remains unknown. In this study, we have assigned the 133 C-terminal residues of EHD1, which includes the EH domain, and solved its solution structure. While the overall structure resembles that of the second of the three N-terminal Eps15 EH domains, potentially significant differences in surface charge and the structure of the tripeptide-binding pocket are discussed.

  3. EH domain of EHD1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieken, Fabien; Jovic, Marko; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve; Sorgen, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    EHD1 is a member of the mammalian C-terminal Eps15 homology domain (EH) containing protein family, and regulates the recycling of various receptors from the endocytic recycling compartment to the plasma membrane. The EH domain of EHD1 binds to proteins containing either an Asn-Pro-Phe or Asp-Pro-Phe motif, and plays an important role in the subcellular localization and function of EHD1. Thus far, the structures of five N-terminal EH domains from other proteins have been solved, but to date, the structure of the EH domains from the four C-terminal EHD family paralogs remains unknown. In this study, we have assigned the 133 C-terminal residues of EHD1, which includes the EH domain, and solved its solution structure. While the overall structure resembles that of the second of the three N-terminal Eps15 EH domains, potentially significant differences in surface charge and the structure of the tripeptide-binding pocket are discussed

  4. Structure and function of C-terminal catalytic region of pasteurella multocida toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitadokoro, Kengo; Kamitami, Shigeki; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is one of virulence factors responsible for the pathogenesis in some Pasteurellosis. We determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal region of PMT (C-PMT), which carries an intracellularly active moiety. The overall structure of C-PMT displays three different domains designated C1, C2 and C3. We found in the C3 domain the Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad that is organized only when the Cys is released from a disulfide bond. The steric alignment of the triad corresponded well to that of papain or other enzymes carrying the Cys-His-Asp triad. Our results demonstrate that PMT is an enzymatic toxin carrying the cysteine-protease like catalytic triad, which is organized only under reducing conditions. (author)

  5. Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain A59 and Blocking Antireceptor Monoclonal Antibody Bind to the N-Terminal Domain of Cellular Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dveksler, Gabriela S.; Pensiero, Michael N.; Dieffenbach, Carl W.; Cardellichio, Christine B.; Basile, Alexis A.; Elia, Patrick E.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    1993-03-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) strain A59 uses as cellular receptors members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family in the immunoglobulin superfamily. Recombinant receptor proteins with deletions of whole or partial immunoglobulin domains were used to identify the regions of receptor glycoprotein recognized by virus and by antireceptor monoclonal antibody CC1, which blocks infection of murine cells. Monoclonal antibody CC1 and MHV-A59 virions bound only to recombinant proteins containing the entire first domain of MHV receptor. To determine which of the proteins could serve as functional virus receptors, receptor-negative hamster cells were transfected with recombinant deletion clones and then challenged with MHV-A59 virions. Receptor activity required the entire N-terminal domain with either the second or the fourth domain and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Recombinant proteins lacking the first domain or its C-terminal portion did not serve as viral receptors. Thus, like other virus receptors in the immunoglobulin superfamily, including CD4, poliovirus receptor, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, the N-terminal domain of MHV receptor is recognized by the virus and the blocking monoclonal antibody.

  6. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng; Chen, Tao; Qin, Tao; Ding, Feng; Wang, Zhenyu; Chen, Hao; Xiong, Liming

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  7. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2016-02-18

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  8. Interactions between globular proteins and F-actin in isotonic saline solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, S; Minton, A P

    1991-10-05

    Solutions of each of three different globular proteins (cytochrome c, chromophorically labeled serum albumin, and chromophorically labeled aldolase), mixed with another unlabeled globular protein or with fibrous actin, were prepared in pH 8.0 Tris-HCl buffer containing 0.15 M NaCl. Each solution was centrifuged at low speed, at 5 degrees C, until unassociated globular protein in solution achieved sedimentation equilibrium. Individual absorbance gradients of both macrosolutes in the mixtures subsequent to centrifugation were obtained via optical scans of the centrifuge tubes at two wavelengths. The gradients of each macrosolute in mixtures of two globular proteins revealed no association of globular proteins under the conditions of these experiments, but perturbation of the gradients of serum albumin, aldolase, and cytochrome c in the presence of F-actin indicated association of all three globular proteins with F-actin. Perturbation of actin gradients in the presence of serum albumin and aldolase suggested partial depolymerization of the F-actin by the globular protein. Analysis of the data with a simple phenomenological model relating free globular protein, bound globular protein, and total actin concentration provided estimates of the respective equilibrium constants for association of serum albumin and aldolase with F-actin, under the conditions of these experiments, of the order of 0.1 microM-1.

  9. The N-terminal domain of the repressor of Staphylococcus aureus phage Φ11 possesses an unusual dimerization ability and DNA binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Biswas

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors.

  10. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T., E-mail: d.huang@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  11. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T.

    2016-01-01

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding

  12. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of the two C-terminal domains of the bifunctional cellulase ctCel9D-Cel44A from Clostridium thermocellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmudin, Shabir; Guerreiro, Catarina I. P. D.; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Romão, Maria J. C.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Prates, José A. M.

    2005-01-01

    The two C-terminal domains of the cellulase ctCel9D-Cel44A from C. thermocellum cellulosome have been crystallized in tetragonal space group P4 3 2 1 2 and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.1 and 2.8 Å from native and seleno-l-methionine-derivative crystals, respectively. Clostridium thermocellum produces a highly organized multi-enzyme complex of cellulases and hemicellulases for the hydrolysis of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, which is termed the cellulosome. The bifunctional multi-modular cellulase ctCel9D-Cel44A is one of the largest components of the C. thermocellum cellulosome. The enzyme contains two internal catalytic domains belonging to glycoside hydrolase families 9 and 44. The C-terminus of this cellulase, comprising a polycystic kidney-disease module (PKD) and a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM44), has been crystallized. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4 3 2 1 2, containing a single molecule in the asymmetric unit. Native and seleno-l-methionine-derivative crystals diffracted to 2.1 and 2.8 Å, respectively

  13. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 3C binds to the N-terminal (NTD) and beta trefoil domains (BTD) of RBP/CSL; Only the NTD interaction is essential for lymphoblastoid cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderwood, Michael A.; Lee, Sungwook; Holthaus, Amy M.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Kieff, Elliott; Johannsen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Association of EBV nuclear proteins EBNA2, EBNA3A and EBNA3C with RBP/CSL, is essential for lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) proliferation. Conserved residues in the EBNA3 homology domain, required for RBP/CSL interaction, lack the WΦP motif that mediates EBNA2 and Notch binding to the RBP/CSL beta-trefoil domain (BTD). We map RBP/CSL interacting residues within EBNA3A(aa128-204) and EBNA3C(aa211-233). The EBNA3A results are consistent with an earlier report (aa125-222), but the EBNA3C domain is unexpectedly small and includes a 'WTP' sequence. This EBNA3C WTP motif confers RBP/CSL binding in vitro, in yeast, and in mammalian cells. Further, an EBNA3C WTP → STP(W227S) mutation impaired BTD binding whereas EBNA3 homology domain mutations disrupted RBP/CSL N-terminal domain (NTD) binding. WTP was not essential for EBNA3C repression of EBNA2 in reporter assays or for maintenance of LCL growth. Our results indicate that EBNA3 proteins interact with multiple RBP/CSL domains, but only NTD interactions are required for LCL growth.

  14. Three-dimensional structure of N-terminal domain of DnaB helicase and helicase-primase interactions in Helicobacter pylori.

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    Tara Kashav

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Replication initiation is a crucial step in genome duplication and homohexameric DnaB helicase plays a central role in the replication initiation process by unwinding the duplex DNA and interacting with several other proteins during the process of replication. N-terminal domain of DnaB is critical for helicase activity and for DnaG primase interactions. We present here the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD of H. pylori DnaB (HpDnaB helicase at 2.2 A resolution and compare the structural differences among helicases and correlate with the functional differences. The structural details of NTD suggest that the linker region between NTD and C-terminal helicase domain plays a vital role in accurate assembly of NTD dimers. The sequence analysis of the linker regions from several helicases reveals that they should form four helix bundles. We also report the characterization of H. pylori DnaG primase and study the helicase-primase interactions, where HpDnaG primase stimulates DNA unwinding activity of HpDnaB suggesting presence of helicase-primase cohort at the replication fork. The protein-protein interaction study of C-terminal domain of primase and different deletion constructs of helicase suggests that linker is essential for proper conformation of NTD to interact strongly with HpDnaG. The surface charge distribution on the primase binding surface of NTDs of various helicases suggests that DnaB-DnaG interaction and stability of the complex is most probably charge dependent. Structure of the linker and helicase-primase interactions indicate that HpDnaB differs greatly from E.coli DnaB despite both belong to gram negative bacteria.

  15. Characterization of niphatenones that inhibit androgen receptor N-terminal domain.

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    Carmen A Banuelos

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy causes a temporary reduction in tumor burden in patients with advanced prostate cancer. Unfortunately the malignancy will return to form lethal castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CRPC. The androgen receptor (AR remains transcriptionally active in CRPC in spite of castrate levels of androgens in the blood. AR transcriptional activity resides in its N-terminal domain (NTD. Possible mechanisms of continued AR transcriptional activity may include, at least in part, expression of constitutively active splice variants of AR that lack the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD. Current therapies that target the AR LBD, would not be effective against these AR variants. Currently no drugs are clinically available that target the AR NTD which should be effective against these AR variants as well as full-length AR. Niphatenones were originally isolated and identified in active extracts from Niphates digitalis marine sponge. Here we begin to characterize the mechanism of niphatenones in blocking AR transcriptional activity. Both enantiomers had similar IC50 values of 6 µM for inhibiting the full-length AR in a functional transcriptional assay. However, (S-niphatenone had significantly better activity against the AR NTD compared to (R-niphatenone. Consistent with niphatenones binding to and inhibiting transactivation of AR NTD, niphatenones inhibited AR splice variant. Niphatenone did not affect the transcriptional activity of the related progesterone receptor, but slightly decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR activity and covalently bound to GR activation function-1 (AF-1 region. Niphatenone blocked N/C interactions of AR without altering either AR protein levels or its intracellular localization in response to androgen. Alkylation with glutathione suggests that niphatenones are not a feasible scaffold for further drug development.

  16. Cúmulos globulares como trazadores de bimodalidad estelar en galaxias cD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, J. C.

    Se muestra que tanto la forma de los perfiles de brillo como de color observados en dos galaxias arquetípicas de tipo cD (NGC 1399 y NGC 4486) son compatibles con la presencia de poblaciones estelares bi-modales que comparten la misma distribución espacial y composición química de las familias dominantes de cúmulos globulares asociadas con ellas. El modelo resultante también predice una variación de la frecuencia específica de los cúmulos como función del radio galactocéntrico. Se discute este resultado en el contexto de una variedad de escenarios astrofísicos que intentan describir la formación de galaxias cD.

  17. Phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of Aquaporin-4 is required for Golgi transition in primary cultured astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadohira, Ikuko; Abe, Yoichiro; Nuriya, Mutsuo; Sano, Kazumi; Tsuji, Shoji; Arimitsu, Takeshi; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Yasui, Masato

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is expressed in the perivascular and subpial astrocytes end-feet in mammalian brain, and plays a critical component of an integrated water and potassium homeostasis. Here we examine whether AQP4 is phosphorylated in primary cultured mouse astrocytes. Astrocytes were metabolically labeled with [ 32 P]phosphoric acid, then AQP4 was immunoprecipitated with anti-AQP4 antibody. We observed that AQP4 was constitutively phosphorylated, which is reduced by treatment with protein kinase CK2 inhibitors. To elucidate the phosphorylation of AQP4 by CK2, myc-tagged wild-type or mutant AQP4 was transiently transfected in primary cultured astrocytes. Substitution of Ala residues for four putative CK2 phosphorylation sites in the C terminus abolished the phosphorylation of AQP4. Immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that the quadruple mutant was localized in the Golgi apparatus. These observations indicate that the C-terminal domain of AQP4 is constitutively phosphorylated at least in part by protein kinase CK2 and it is required for Golgi transition.

  18. The multidrug resistance IncA/C transferable plasmid encodes a novel domain-swapped dimeric protein-disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Neyer, Simon; Schembri, Mark A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-01-31

    The multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C conjugative plasmids disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinically relevant enteric bacteria. A plasmid-encoded disulfide isomerase is associated with conjugation. Sequence analysis of several IncA/C plasmids and IncA/C-related integrative and conjugative elements (ICE) from commensal and pathogenic bacteria identified a conserved DsbC/DsbG homolog (DsbP). The crystal structure of DsbP reveals an N-terminal domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A DsbP homodimer is formed through domain swapping of two DsbP N-terminal domains. The catalytic domain incorporates a thioredoxin-fold with characteristic CXXC and cis-Pro motifs. Overall, the structure and redox properties of DsbP diverge from the Escherichia coli DsbC and DsbG disulfide isomerases. Specifically, the V-shaped dimer of DsbP is inverted compared with EcDsbC and EcDsbG. In addition, the redox potential of DsbP (-161 mV) is more reducing than EcDsbC (-130 mV) and EcDsbG (-126 mV). Other catalytic properties of DsbP more closely resemble those of EcDsbG than EcDsbC. These catalytic differences are in part a consequence of the unusual active site motif of DsbP (CAVC); substitution to the EcDsbC-like (CGYC) motif converts the catalytic properties to those of EcDsbC. Structural comparison of the 12 independent subunit structures of DsbP that we determined revealed that conformational changes in the linker region contribute to mobility of the catalytic domain, providing mechanistic insight into DsbP function. In summary, our data reveal that the conserved plasmid-encoded DsbP protein is a bona fide disulfide isomerase and suggest that a dedicated oxidative folding enzyme is important for conjugative plasmid transfer.

  19. Low resolution solution structure of HAMLET and the importance of its alpha-domains in tumoricidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C S James; Rydstrom, Anna; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is the first member in a new family of protein-lipid complexes with broad tumoricidal activity. Elucidating the molecular structure and the domains crucial for HAMLET formation is fundamental for understanding its tumoricidal function. Here we present the low-resolution solution structure of the complex of oleic acid bound HAMLET, derived from small angle X-ray scattering data. HAMLET shows a two-domain conformation with a large globular domain and an extended part of about 2.22 nm in length and 1.29 nm width. The structure has been superimposed into the related crystallographic structure of human α-lactalbumin, revealing that the major part of α-lactalbumin accommodates well in the shape of HAMLET. However, the C-terminal residues from L105 to L123 of the crystal structure of the human α-lactalbumin do not fit well into the HAMLET structure, resulting in an extended conformation in HAMLET, proposed to be required to form the tumoricidal active HAMLET complex with oleic acid. Consistent with this low resolution structure, we identified biologically active peptide epitopes in the globular as well as the extended domains of HAMLET. Peptides covering the alpha1 and alpha2 domains of the protein triggered rapid ion fluxes in the presence of sodium oleate and were internalized by tumor cells, causing rapid and sustained changes in cell morphology. The alpha peptide-oleate bound forms also triggered tumor cell death with comparable efficiency as HAMLET. In addition, shorter peptides corresponding to those domains are biologically active. These findings provide novel insights into the structural prerequisites for the dramatic effects of HAMLET on tumor cells.

  20. Structures of three members of Pfam PF02663 (FmdE) implicated in microbial methanogenesis reveal a conserved α+β core domain and an auxiliary C-terminal treble-clef zinc finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelrod, Herbert L.; Das, Debanu; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The first structures from the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663) reveal that some members of this family form tightly intertwined dimers consisting of two domains (N-terminal α+β core and C-terminal zinc-finger domains), whereas others contain only the core domain. The presence of the zinc-finger domain suggests that some members of this family may perform functions associated with transcriptional regulation, protein–protein interaction, RNA binding or metal-ion sensing. Examination of the genomic context for members of the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663), such as the protein encoded by the fmdE gene from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, indicates that 13 of them are co-transcribed with genes encoding subunits of molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.99.5), an enzyme that is involved in microbial methane production. Here, the first crystal structures from PF02663 are described, representing two bacterial and one archaeal species: B8FYU2-DESHY from the anaerobic dehalogenating bacterium Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2, Q2LQ23-SYNAS from the syntrophic bacterium Syntrophus aciditrophicus SB and Q9HJ63-THEAC from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. Two of these proteins, Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS, contain two domains: an N-terminal thioredoxin-like α+β core domain (NTD) consisting of a five-stranded, mixed β-sheet flanked by several α-helices and a C-terminal zinc-finger domain (CTD). B8FYU2-DESHY, on the other hand, is composed solely of the NTD. The CTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS is best characterized as a treble-clef zinc finger. Two significant structural differences between Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS involve their metal binding. First, zinc is bound to the putative active site on the NTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC, but is absent from the NTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS. Second, whereas the structure of the CTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS shows four Cys side chains within coordination distance of the Zn atom, the structure

  1. 1-Oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol stimulates 5-lipoxygenase activity via a putative (phospho)lipid binding site within the N-terminal C2-like domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnig, Christina; Albert, Dana; Fischer, Lutz; Hörnig, Michael; Rådmark, Olof; Steinhilber, Dieter; Werz, Oliver

    2005-07-22

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalysis is positively regulated by Ca2+ ions and phospholipids that both act via the N-terminal C2-like domain of 5-LO. Previously, we have shown that 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (OAG) functions as an agonist for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in stimulating 5-LO product formation. Here we have demonstrated that OAG directly stimulates 5-LO catalysis in vitro. In the absence of Ca2+ (chelated using EDTA), OAG strongly and concentration-dependently stimulated crude 5-LO in 100,000 x g supernatants as well as purified 5-LO enzyme from PMNL. Also, the monoglyceride 1-O-oleyl-rac-glycerol and 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol were effective, whereas various phospholipids did not stimulate 5-LO. However, in the presence of Ca2+, OAG caused no stimulation of 5-LO. Also, phospholipids or cellular membranes abolished the effects of OAG. As found previously for Ca2+, OAG renders 5-LO activity resistant against inhibition by glutathione peroxidase activity, and this effect of OAG is reversed by phospholipids. Intriguingly, a 5-LO mutant lacking tryptophan residues (Trp-13, -75, and -102) important for the binding of the 5-LO C2-like domain to phospholipids was not stimulated by OAG. We conclude that OAG directly stimulates 5-LO by acting at a phospholipid binding site located within the C2-like domain.

  2. Structural plasticity of the N-terminal capping helix of the TPR domain of kinesin light chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Quyen Nguyen

    Full Text Available Kinesin1 plays a major role in neuronal transport by recruiting many different cargos through its kinesin light chain (KLC. Various structurally unrelated cargos interact with the conserved tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain of KLC. The N-terminal capping helix of the TPR domain exhibits an atypical sequence and structural features that may contribute to the versatility of the TPR domain to bind different cargos. We determined crystal structures of the TPR domain of both KLC1 and KLC2 encompassing the N-terminal capping helix and show that this helix exhibits two distinct and defined orientations relative to the rest of the TPR domain. Such a difference in orientation gives rise, at the N-terminal part of the groove, to the formation of one hydrophobic pocket, as well as to electrostatic variations at the groove surface. We present a comprehensive structural analysis of available KLC1/2-TPR domain structures that highlights that ligand binding into the groove can be specific of one or the other N-terminal capping helix orientations. Further, structural analysis reveals that the N-terminal capping helix is always involved in crystal packing contacts, especially in a TPR1:TPR1' contact which highlights its propensity to be a protein-protein interaction site. Together, these results underline that the structural plasticity of the N-terminal capping helix might represent a structural determinant for TPR domain structural versatility in cargo binding.

  3. Rare RNF213 variants in the C-terminal region encompassing the RING-finger domain are associated with moyamoya angiopathy in Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guey, Stéphanie; Kraemer, Markus; Hervé, Dominique; Ludwig, Thomas; Kossorotoff, Manoëlle; Bergametti, Françoise; Schwitalla, Jan Claudius; Choi, Simone; Broseus, Lucile; Callebaut, Isabelle; Genin, Emmanuelle; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2017-08-01

    Moyamoya angiopathy (MMA) is a cerebral angiopathy affecting the terminal part of internal carotid arteries. Its prevalence is 10 times higher in Japan and Korea than in Europe. In East Asian countries, moyamoya is strongly associated to the R4810K variant in the RNF213 gene that encodes for a protein containing a RING-finger and two AAA+ domains. This variant has never been detected in Caucasian MMA patients, but several rare RNF213 variants have been reported in Caucasian cases. Using a collapsing test based on exome data from 68 European MMA probands and 573 ethnically matched controls, we showed a significant association between rare missense RNF213 variants and MMA in European patients (odds ratio (OR)=2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI)=(1.19-4.11), P=0.01). Variants specific to cases had higher pathogenicity predictive scores (median of 24.2 in cases versus 9.4 in controls, P=0.029) and preferentially clustered in a C-terminal hotspot encompassing the RING-finger domain of RNF213 (P<10 -3 ). This association was even stronger when restricting the analysis to childhood-onset and familial cases (OR=4.54, 95% CI=(1.80-11.34), P=1.1 × 10 -3 ). All clinically affected relatives who were genotyped were carriers. However, the need for additional factors to develop MMA is strongly suggested by the fact that only 25% of mutation carrier relatives were clinically affected.

  4. Domain activities of PapC usher reveal the mechanism of action of an Escherichia coli molecular machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkan, Ender; Ford, Bradley A; Pinkner, Jerome S; Dodson, Karen W; Henderson, Nadine S; Thanassi, David G; Waksman, Gabriel; Hultgren, Scott J

    2012-06-12

    P pili are prototypical chaperone-usher pathway-assembled pili used by Gram-negative bacteria to adhere to host tissues. The PapC usher contains five functional domains: a transmembrane β-barrel, a β-sandwich Plug, an N-terminal (periplasmic) domain (NTD), and two C-terminal (periplasmic) domains, CTD1 and CTD2. Here, we delineated usher domain interactions between themselves and with chaperone-subunit complexes and showed that overexpression of individual usher domains inhibits pilus assembly. Prior work revealed that the Plug domain occludes the pore of the transmembrane domain of a solitary usher, but the chaperone-adhesin-bound usher has its Plug displaced from the pore, adjacent to the NTD. We demonstrate an interaction between the NTD and Plug domains that suggests a biophysical basis for usher gating. Furthermore, we found that the NTD exhibits high-affinity binding to the chaperone-adhesin (PapDG) complex and low-affinity binding to the major tip subunit PapE (PapDE). We also demonstrate that CTD2 binds with lower affinity to all tested chaperone-subunit complexes except for the chaperone-terminator subunit (PapDH) and has a catalytic role in dissociating the NTD-PapDG complex, suggesting an interplay between recruitment to the NTD and transfer to CTD2 during pilus initiation. The Plug domain and the NTD-Plug complex bound all of the chaperone-subunit complexes tested including PapDH, suggesting that the Plug actively recruits chaperone-subunit complexes to the usher and is the sole recruiter of PapDH. Overall, our studies reveal the cooperative, active roles played by periplasmic domains of the usher to initiate, grow, and terminate a prototypical chaperone-usher pathway pilus.

  5. Identification of a New Interaction Mode between the Src Homology 2 Domain of C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk) and Csk-binding Protein/Phosphoprotein Associated with Glycosphingolipid Microdomains♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Akagi, Ken-ichi; Oneyama, Chitose; Tanaka, Masakazu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Kanou, Takashi; Lee, Young-Ho; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okada, Masato; Ikegami, Takahisa

    2013-01-01

    Proteins with Src homology 2 (SH2) domains play major roles in tyrosine kinase signaling. Structures of many SH2 domains have been studied, and the regions involved in their interactions with ligands have been elucidated. However, these analyses have been performed using short peptides consisting of phosphotyrosine followed by a few amino acids, which are described as the canonical recognition sites. Here, we report the solution structure of the SH2 domain of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) in complex with a longer phosphopeptide from the Csk-binding protein (Cbp). This structure, together with biochemical experiments, revealed the existence of a novel binding region in addition to the canonical phosphotyrosine 314-binding site of Cbp. Mutational analysis of this second region in cells showed that both canonical and novel binding sites are required for tumor suppression through the Cbp-Csk interaction. Furthermore, the data indicate an allosteric connection between Cbp binding and Csk activation that arises from residues in the βB/βC loop of the SH2 domain. PMID:23548896

  6. Structural consequences of disease-causing mutations in the ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L (ADD) domain of the chromatin-associated protein ATRX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentaro, Anthony; Yang, Ji-Chun; Chapman, Lynda; Kowalczyk, Monika S; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R; Neuhaus, David; Rhodes, Daniela

    2007-07-17

    The chromatin-associated protein ATRX was originally identified because mutations in the ATRX gene cause a severe form of syndromal X-linked mental retardation associated with alpha-thalassemia. Half of all of the disease-associated missense mutations cluster in a cysteine-rich region in the N terminus of ATRX. This region was named the ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L (ADD) domain, based on sequence homology with a family of DNA methyltransferases. Here, we report the solution structure of the ADD domain of ATRX, which consists of an N-terminal GATA-like zinc finger, a plant homeodomain finger, and a long C-terminal alpha-helix that pack together to form a single globular domain. Interestingly, the alpha-helix of the GATA-like finger is exposed and highly basic, suggesting a DNA-binding function for ATRX. The disease-causing mutations fall into two groups: the majority affect buried residues and hence affect the structural integrity of the ADD domain; another group affects a cluster of surface residues, and these are likely to perturb a potential protein interaction site. The effects of individual point mutations on the folding state and stability of the ADD domain correlate well with the levels of mutant ATRX protein in patients, providing insights into the molecular pathophysiology of ATR-X syndrome.

  7. Molecular determinants of interactions between the N-terminal domain and the transmembrane core that modulate hERG K+ channel gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernández-Trillo

    Full Text Available A conserved eag domain in the cytoplasmic amino terminus of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG potassium channel is critical for its slow deactivation gating. Introduction of gene fragments encoding the eag domain are able to restore normal deactivation properties of channels from which most of the amino terminus has been deleted, and also those lacking exclusively the eag domain or carrying a single point mutation in the initial residues of the N-terminus. Deactivation slowing in the presence of the recombinant domain is not observed with channels carrying a specific Y542C point mutation in the S4-S5 linker. On the other hand, mutations in some initial positions of the recombinant fragment also impair its ability to restore normal deactivation. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET analysis of fluorophore-tagged proteins under total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF conditions revealed a substantial level of FRET between the introduced N-terminal eag fragments and the eag domain-deleted channels expressed at the membrane, but not between the recombinant eag domain and full-length channels with an intact amino terminus. The FRET signals were also minimized when the recombinant eag fragments carried single point mutations in the initial portion of their amino end, and when Y542C mutated channels were used. These data suggest that the restoration of normal deactivation gating by the N-terminal recombinant eag fragment is an intrinsic effect of this domain directed by the interaction of its N-terminal segment with the gating machinery, likely at the level of the S4-S5 linker.

  8. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of the two C-terminal domains of the bifunctional cellulase ctCel9D-Cel44A from Clostridium thermocellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najmudin, Shabir [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, FCT-UNL, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Guerreiro, Catarina I. P. D.; Ferreira, Luís M. A. [CIISA - Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisboa (Portugal); Romão, Maria J. C. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, FCT-UNL, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Prates, José A. M., E-mail: japrates@fmv.utl.pt [CIISA - Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisboa (Portugal); REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, FCT-UNL, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2005-12-01

    The two C-terminal domains of the cellulase ctCel9D-Cel44A from C. thermocellum cellulosome have been crystallized in tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.1 and 2.8 Å from native and seleno-l-methionine-derivative crystals, respectively. Clostridium thermocellum produces a highly organized multi-enzyme complex of cellulases and hemicellulases for the hydrolysis of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, which is termed the cellulosome. The bifunctional multi-modular cellulase ctCel9D-Cel44A is one of the largest components of the C. thermocellum cellulosome. The enzyme contains two internal catalytic domains belonging to glycoside hydrolase families 9 and 44. The C-terminus of this cellulase, comprising a polycystic kidney-disease module (PKD) and a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM44), has been crystallized. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, containing a single molecule in the asymmetric unit. Native and seleno-l-methionine-derivative crystals diffracted to 2.1 and 2.8 Å, respectively.

  9. The disordered C-terminal domain of human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 contributes to its stability via intramolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Hegde, Pavana M; Holthauzen, Luis Marcelo F; Li, Jing; Oezguen, Numan; Hilser, Vincent J; Tainer, John A; Mitra, Sankar

    2013-07-10

    NEIL1 [Nei (endonuclease VIII)-like protein 1], one of the five mammalian DNA glycosylases that excise oxidized DNA base lesions in the human genome to initiate base excision repair, contains an intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (CTD; ~100 residues), not conserved in its Escherichia coli prototype Nei. Although dispensable for NEIL1's lesion excision and AP lyase activities, this segment is required for efficient in vivo enzymatic activity and may provide an interaction interface for many of NEIL1's interactions with other base excision repair proteins. Here, we show that the CTD interacts with the folded domain in native NEIL1 containing 389 residues. The CTD is poised for local folding in an ordered structure that is induced in the purified fragment by osmolytes. Furthermore, deletion of the disordered tail lacking both Tyr and Trp residues causes a red shift in NEIL1's intrinsic Trp-specific fluorescence, indicating a more solvent-exposed environment for the Trp residues in the truncated protein, which also exhibits reduced stability compared to the native enzyme. These observations are consistent with stabilization of the native NEIL1 structure via intramolecular, mostly electrostatic, interactions that were disrupted by mutating a positively charged (Lys-rich) cluster of residues (amino acids 355-360) near the C-terminus. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis confirms the flexibility and dynamic nature of NEIL1's CTD, a feature that may be critical to providing specificity for NEIL1's multiple, functional interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure of the DNA-bound BRCA1 C-terminal region from human replication factor C p140 and model of the protein-DNA complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, M.; AB, E.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Siegal, G.

    2010-01-01

    BRCA1 C-terminal domain (BRCT)-containing proteins are found widely throughout the animal and bacteria kingdoms where they are exclusively involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA metabolism. Whereas most BRCT domains are involved in protein-protein interactions, a small subset has bona fide DNA

  11. The N- and C-terminal carbohydrate recognition domains of Haemonchus contortus galectin bind to distinct receptors of goat PBMC and contribute differently to its immunomodulatory functions in host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, MingMin; Tian, XiaoWei; Yang, XinChao; Yuan, Cheng; Ehsan, Muhammad; Liu, XinChao; Yan, RuoFeng; Xu, LiXin; Song, XiaoKai; Li, XiangRui

    2017-09-05

    Hco-gal-m is a tandem-repeat galectin isolated from the adult worm of Haemonchus contortus. A growing body of studies have demonstrated that Hco-gal-m could exert its immunomodulatory effects on host peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to facilitate the immune evasion. Our previous work revealed that C-terminal and N-terminal carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) of Hco-gal-m had different sugar binding abilities. However, whether different domains of Hco-gal-m account differently for its multiple immunomodulatory functions in the host-parasite interaction remains to be elucidated. We found that the N-terminal CRD of Hco-gal-m (MNh) and the C-terminal CRD (MCh) could bind to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells by distinct receptors: transmembrane protein 63A (TMEM63A) was a binding receptor of MNh, while transmembrane protein 147 (TMEM147) was a binding receptor of MCh. In addition, MCh was much more potent than MNh in inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis, while MNh was much more effective in inhibiting NO production. Moreover, MNh could suppress the transcription of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), but MCh not. Our data suggested that these two CRDs of Hco-gal-m bind to distinct receptors and contributed differently to its ability to downregulate host immune response. These results will improve our understanding of galectins from parasitic nematodes contributing to the mechanism of parasitic immune evasion and continue to illustrate the diverse range of biological activities attributable to the galectin family.

  12. Functional analysis of the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and BRICHOS domain of GKN1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung Hwan; Choi, Yoo Jin; Choi, Won Suk; Nam, Suk Woo; Lee, Jung Young; Park, Won Sang, E-mail: wonsang@catholic.ac.kr

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •NH{sub 2}-terminal and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 inhibited tumor cell growth. •NH{sub 2}-terminal and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 regulated cell cycle. •NH{sub 2}-terminal and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 inhibited epigenetic regulators. -- Abstract: Gastrokine 1 (GKN1) protects the gastric antral mucosa and promotes healing by facilitating restitution and proliferation after injury. GKN1 is down-regulated in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells and loss of GKN1 expression is tightly associated with gastric carcinogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms as a tumor suppressor are largely unknown. Presently, the hydrophobic region and BRICHOS domain of GKN1, pGKN1{sup D13N}, pGKN1{sup Δ68–199}, and pGKN1{sup Δ1–67,165–199} were shown to suppress gastric cancer cell growth and recapitulate GKN1 functions. As well, the hydrophobic region and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 had a synergistic anti-cancer effect with 5-FU on tumor cell growth, implying that the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 are sufficient for tumor suppression, thereby suggesting a therapeutic intervention for gastric cancer. Also, its domain inducing endogenous miR-185 directly targeted the epigenetic effectors DNMT1 and EZH2 in gastric cancer cells. Our results suggest that the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 are sufficient for its tumor suppressor activities.

  13. The SHOCT domain: a widespread domain under-represented in model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Y Eberhardt

    Full Text Available We have identified a new protein domain, which we have named the SHOCT domain (Short C-terminal domain. This domain is widespread in bacteria with over a thousand examples. But we found it is missing from the most commonly studied model organisms, despite being present in closely related species. It's predominantly C-terminal location, co-occurrence with numerous other domains and short size is reminiscent of the Gram-positive anchor motif, however it is present in a much wider range of species. We suggest several hypotheses about the function of SHOCT, including oligomerisation and nucleic acid binding. Our initial experiments do not support its role as an oligomerisation domain.

  14. Cloning and characterization of the complementary DNA for the B chain of normal human serum C1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, K B; Bentley, D R; Wood, K J

    1984-09-06

    Normal human C1q is a serum glycoprotein of 460 kDa containing 18 polypeptide chains (6A, 6B, 6C) each 226 amino acids long and each containing an N-terminal collagen-like domain and a C-terminal globular domain. Two unusual forms of C1q have been described: a genetically defective form, which has a molecular mass of approximately 160 kDa and is found in the sera of homozygotes for the defect who show a marked susceptibility to immune complex related disease; a fibroblast form, shown to be synthesized and secreted, in vitro, with a molecular mass of about 800 kDa and with chains approximately 16 kDa greater than those of normal C1q. A higher than normal molecular mass form of C1q has also been described in human colostrum and a form of C1q has been claimed to represent one of the types of Fc receptor on guinea-pig macrophages. To initiate studies, at the genomic level, on these various forms of C1q, and to investigate the possible relation between the C1q genes and the procollagen genes, the complementary DNA corresponding to the B chain of normal C1q has been cloned and characterized.

  15. The N-terminal domains of Vps3 and Vps8 are critical for localization and function of the CORVET tethering complex on endosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Epp

    Full Text Available Endosomal biogenesis depends on multiple fusion and fission events. For fusion, the heterohexameric CORVET complex as an effector of the endosomal Rab5/Vps21 GTPase has a central function in the initial tethering event. Here, we show that the CORVET-specific Vps3 and Vps8 subunits, which interact with Rab5/Vps21, require their N-terminal domains for localization and function. Surprisingly, CORVET may lack either one of the two N-terminal domains, but not both, to promote protein sorting via the endosome. The dually truncated complex mislocalizes to the cytosol and is impaired in endocytic protein sorting, but not in assembly. Furthermore, the endosomal localization can be rescued by overexpression of Vps21 or one of the truncated CORVET subunits, even though CORVET assembly is not impaired by loss of the N-terminal domains or in strains lacking all endosomal Rab5s and Ypt7. We thus conclude that CORVET requires only its C-terminal domains for assembly and has beyond its putative β-propeller domains additional binding sites for endosomes, which could be important to bind Vps21 and other endosome-specific factors for efficient endosome tethering.

  16. Structures of BIR domains from human NAIP and cIAP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Maria Dolores; Moche, Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Welin, Martin; Trésaugues, Lionel; Johansson, Ida; Nilsson, Martina; Nordlund, Pär; Nyman, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structures of the human NAIP BIR2 and cIAP2 BIR3 domains have been determined. Both BIR domains harbors an amino-terminal tetrapeptide in its peptide-binding groove. The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family of proteins contains key modulators of apoptosis and inflammation that interact with caspases through baculovirus IAP-repeat (BIR) domains. Overexpression of IAP proteins frequently occurs in cancer cells, thus counteracting the activated apoptotic program. The IAP proteins have therefore emerged as promising targets for cancer therapy. In this work, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the first structures of BIR domains from human NAIP and cIAP2. Both structures harbour an N-terminal tetrapeptide in the conserved peptide-binding groove. The structures reveal that these two proteins bind the tetrapeptides in a similar mode as do other BIR domains. Detailed interactions are described for the P1′–P4′ side chains of the peptide, providing a structural basis for peptide-specific recognition. An arginine side chain in the P3′ position reveals favourable interactions with its hydrophobic moiety in the binding pocket, while hydrophobic residues in the P2′ and P4′ pockets make similar interactions to those seen in other BIR domain–peptide complexes. The structures also reveal how a serine in the P1′ position is accommodated in the binding pockets of NAIP and cIAP2. In addition to shedding light on the specificity determinants of these two proteins, the structures should now also provide a framework for future structure-based work targeting these proteins

  17. The cartilage-derived, C-type lectin (CLECSF1): structure of the gene and chromosomal location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neame, P J; Tapp, H; Grimm, D R

    1999-09-03

    Cartilage is a tissue that is primarily extracellular matrix, the bulk of which consists of proteoglycan aggregates constrained within a collagen framework. Candidate components that organize the extracellular assembly of the matrix consist of collagens, proteoglycans and multimeric glycoproteins. We describe the human gene structure of a potential organizing factor, a cartilage-derived member of the C-type lectin superfamily (CLECSF1; C-type lectin superfamily) related to the serum protein, tetranectin. We show by Northern analysis that this protein is restricted to cartilage and locate the gene on chromosome 16q23. We have characterized 10.9 kb of sequence upstream of the first exon. Similarly to human tetranectin, there are three exons. The residues that are conserved between CLECSF1 and tetranectin suggest that the cartilage-derived protein forms a trimeric structure similar to that of tetranectin, with three N-terminal alpha-helical domains aggregating through hydrophobic faces. The globular, C-terminal domain that has been shown to bind carbohydrate in some members of the family and plasminogen in tetranectin, is likely to have a similar overall structure to that of tetranectin.

  18. Overexpression and Purification of C-terminal Fragment of the Passenger Domain of Hap Protein from Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in a Highly Optimized Escherichia coli Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaee, Akram; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Moosavi, Seyed Fazllolah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Memarnejadian, Arash; Pouriayevali, Mohammad Hassan; Yavari, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Background Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common cause of respiratory tract disease and initiates infection by colonization in nasopharynx. The Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) Hap adhesin is an auto transporter protein that promotes initial interaction with human epithelial cells. Hap protein contains a 110 kDa internal passenger domain called “HapS” and a 45 kDa C-terminal translocator domain called “Hapβ”. Hap adhesive activity has been recently reported to be connected to its Cell Binding Domain (CBD) which resides within the 311 C-terminal residues of the internal passenger domain of the protein. Furthermore, immunization with this CBD protein has been shown to prevent bacterial nasopharynx colonization in animal models. Methods To provide enough amounts of pure HapS protein for vaccine studies, we sought to develop a highly optimized system to overexpress and purify the protein in large quantities. To this end, pET24a-cbd plasmid harboring cbd sequence from NTHi ATCC49766 was constructed and its expression was optimized by testing various expression parameters such as growth media, induction temperature, IPTG inducer concentration, induction stage and duration. SDS-PAGE and Western-blotting were used for protein analysis and confirmation and eventually the expressed protein was easily purified via immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) using Ni-NTA columns. Results The highest expression level of target protein was achieved when CBD expressing E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells were grown at 37°C in 2xTY medium with 1.0 mM IPTG at mid-log phase (OD600 nm equal to 0.6) for 5 hrs. Amino acid sequence alignment of expressed CBD protein with 3 previously published CBD amino acid sequences were more than %97 identical and antigenicity plot analysis further revealed 9 antigenic domains which appeared to be well conserved among different analyzed CBD sequences. Conclusion Due to the presence of high similarity among CBD from NTHi ATCC

  19. Two distinct binding modes define the interaction of Brox with the C-terminal tails of CHMP5 and CHMP4B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ruiling; Dussupt, Vincent; Jiang, Jiansheng; Sette, Paola; Rudd, Victoria; Chuenchor, Watchalee; Bello, Nana F; Bouamr, Fadila; Xiao, Tsan Sam

    2012-05-09

    Interactions of the CHMP protein carboxyl terminal tails with effector proteins play important roles in retroviral budding, cytokinesis, and multivesicular body biogenesis. Here we demonstrate that hydrophobic residues at the CHMP4B C-terminal amphipathic α helix bind a concave surface of Brox, a mammalian paralog of Alix. Unexpectedly, CHMP5 was also found to bind Brox and specifically recruit endogenous Brox to detergent-resistant membrane fractions through its C-terminal 20 residues. Instead of an α helix, the CHMP5 C-terminal tail adopts a tandem β-hairpin structure that binds Brox at the same site as CHMP4B. Additional Brox:CHMP5 interface is furnished by a unique CHMP5 hydrophobic pocket engaging the Brox residue Y348 that is not conserved among the Bro1 domains. Our studies thus unveil a β-hairpin conformation of the CHMP5 protein C-terminal tail, and provide insights into the overlapping but distinct binding profiles of ESCRT-III and the Bro1 domain proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of Tb3+- and melittin-binding with the C-terminal domain of centrin in Euplotes octocarinatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yaqin; Diao Xiuling; Yan Jun; Feng Yanan; Wang Zhijun; Liang Aihua; Yang Binsheng

    2012-01-01

    Centrin is a low molecular mass (20 KDa) protein that belongs to the EF-hand superfamily. In this work, the interaction between the Tb 3+ -saturated C-terminal domain of Euplotes octocarinatus centrin (Tb 2 -C-EoCen) and 2-p-toluidinylnaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) was investigated using difference UV–vis spectra and the fluorescence spectra methods. In 100 mM N-2-hydroxy-ethylpiperazine-N-2-ethanesulfonic acid (Hepes) at pH 7.4, with the addition of Tb 2 -C-EoCen, four new peaks were observed at 265 nm, 278 nm, 317 nm and 360 nm by absorptivity compared with blank solution of TNS. At the same time, the reaction could be measured by fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence emission of TNS was shifted from 480 nm to 445 nm in the presence of Tb 2 -C-EoCen. Meanwhile, its fluorescence intensity was increased markedly. The 1:1 stoichiometric ratio of C-EoCen to TNS was confirmed by fluorescence titration curves. The conditional binding constants of TNS with C-EoCen and Tb 2 -C-EoCen were calculated to be log K (C-EoCen-TNS) =5.32±0.04 M −1 and log K (Tb2-C-EoCen-TNS) =5.58±0.12 M −1 , respectively. In addition, the protein of Tb 2 -C-EoCen binding with melittin was also studied. Based on the fluorescence titration curves, the 1:1 stoichiometric ratio of Tb 2 -C-EoCen to melittin was confirmed. And the conditional binding constant of C-EoCen with melittin was calculated to be log Ka′=6.79±0.17 M −1 . - Highlights: ► Tb 3+ induced conformational changes of protein C-EoCen from closed state to open state. ► Conformational changes resulted in the exposure of hydrophobic surfaces on C-EoCen. ► Tb 2 -C-EoCen may bind with target peptide melittin.

  1. C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Adachi, Noritaka; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Chromatin binding of XRCC4 is dependent on the presence of DNA ligase IV. •C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV alone can recruit itself and XRCC4 to chromatin. •Two BRCT domains of DNA ligase IV are essential for the chromatin binding of XRCC4. -- Abstract: DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ

  2. Role of the ERC motif in the proximal part of the second intracellular loop and the C-terminal domain of the human prostaglandin F2alpha receptor (hFP-R) in G-protein coupling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, Andrea; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Püschel, Gerhard P

    2005-05-15

    The human FP-R (F2alpha prostaglandin receptor) is a Gq-coupled heptahelical ectoreceptor, which is of significant medical interest, since it is a potential target for the treatment of glaucoma and preterm labour. On agonist exposure, it mediates an increase in intracellular inositol phosphate formation. Little is known about the structures that govern the agonist-dependent receptor activation. In other prostanoid receptors, the C-terminal domain has been inferred in the control of agonist-dependent receptor activation. A DRY motif at the beginning of the second intracellular loop is highly conserved throughout the G-protein-coupled receptor family and appears to be crucial for controlling agonist-dependent receptor activation. It is replaced by an ERC motif in the FP-R and no evidence for the relevance of this motif in ligand-dependent activation of prostanoid receptors has been provided so far. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the potential role of the C-terminal domain and the ERC motif in agonist-controlled intracellular signalling in FP-R mutants generated by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that substitution of the acidic Glu(132) in the ERC motif by a threonine residue led to full constitutive activation, whereas truncation of the receptor's C-terminal domain led to partial constitutive activation of all three intracellular signal pathways that had previously been shown to be activated by the FP-R, i.e. inositol trisphosphate formation, focal adhesion kinase activation and T-cell factor signalling. Inositol trisphosphate formation and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation were further enhanced by ligand binding in cells expressing the truncation mutant but not the E132T (Glu132-->Thr) mutant. Thus C-terminal truncation appeared to result in a receptor with partial constitutive activation, whereas substitution of Glu132 by threonine apparently resulted in a receptor with full constitutive activity.

  3. DNA double strand break repair is enhanced by P53 following induction by DNA damage and is dependent on the C-terminal domain of P53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Tang; Powell, Simon N.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor gene p53 can mediate cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Accumulating evidence suggests that it may also directly or indirectly influence the DNA repair machinery. In the present study, we investigated whether p53, induced by DNA damage, could enhance the rejoining of double-strand DNA breaks. Materials and Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) were made by restriction enzyme digestion of a plasmid, between a promoter and a 'reporter' gene: luciferase (LUC) or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). Linear or circular plasmid DNA (LUC or CAT) was co-transfected with circular β-Gal plasmid (to normalize for uptake) into mouse embryonic fibroblasts genetically matched to be (+/+) or (-/-) for p53. Their ability to rejoin linearized plasmid was measured by the luciferase or CAT activity detected in rescued plasmids. The activity detected in cells transfected with linear plasmid was scored relative to the activity detected in cells transfected with circular plasmid. Results: Ionizing radiation (IR, 2 Gy) enhanced the dsb repair activity in wild type p53 cells; however, p53 null cells lose this effect, indicating that the enhancement of dsb repair was p53-dependent. REF cells with dominant-negative mutant p53 showed a similar induction compared with the parental REF cells with wild-type p53. This ala-143 mutant p53 prevents cell cycle arrest and transactivation of p21 WAF1/cip1) following IR, indicating that the p53-dependent enhancement of DNA repair is distinct from transactivation. Immortalized murine embryonic fibroblasts, 10(1)VasK1 cells, which express p53 cDNA encoding a temperature-sensitive mutant in the DNA sequence specific binding domain (ala135 to val135) with an alternatively spliced C-terminal domain (ASp53: amino-acids 360-381) and, 10(1)Val5 cells, which express the normal spliced p53 (NSp53) with the same temperature-sensitive mutant were compared. It was found that 10(1)VasK1 cells showed no DNA

  4. Globular clusters - Fads and fallacies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The types of globular clusters observed in the Milky Way Galaxy are described together with their known characteristics, with special attention given to correcting the erroneous statements made earlier about globular clusters. Among these are the following statements: the Galaxy is surrounded by many hundreds of globular clusters; all globular clusters are located toward the Galactic center, all globular clusters are metal poor and move about the Galaxy in highly elliptical paths; all globular clusters contain RR Lyrae-type variable stars, and the RR Lyrae stars found outside of globulars have come from cluster dissolution or ejection; all of the stars in a given cluster were born at the same time and have the same chemical composition; X-ray globulars are powered by central black holes; and the luminosity functions for globular clusters are well defined and well determined. Consideration is given to the fact that globular clusters in the Magellanic Clouds differ from those in the Milky Way by their age distribution and that the globulars of the SMC differ from those of the LMC

  5. Evolutionary Divergence of the C-terminal Domain of Complexin Accounts for Functional Disparities between Vertebrate and Invertebrate Complexins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel T. Wragg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Complexin is a critical presynaptic protein that regulates both spontaneous and calcium-triggered neurotransmitter release in all synapses. Although the SNARE-binding central helix of complexin is highly conserved and required for all known complexin functions, the remainder of the protein has profoundly diverged across the animal kingdom. Striking disparities in complexin inhibitory activity are observed between vertebrate and invertebrate complexins but little is known about the source of these differences or their relevance to the underlying mechanism of complexin regulation. We found that mouse complexin 1 (mCpx1 failed to inhibit neurotransmitter secretion in Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions lacking the worm complexin 1 (CPX-1. This lack of inhibition stemmed from differences in the C-terminal domain (CTD of mCpx1. Previous studies revealed that the CTD selectively binds to highly curved membranes and directs complexin to synaptic vesicles. Although mouse and worm complexin have similar lipid binding affinity, their last few amino acids differ in both hydrophobicity and in lipid binding conformation, and these differences strongly impacted CPX-1 inhibitory function. Moreover, function was not maintained if a critical amphipathic helix in the worm CPX-1 CTD was replaced with the corresponding mCpx1 amphipathic helix. Invertebrate complexins generally shared more C-terminal similarity with vertebrate complexin 3 and 4 isoforms, and the amphipathic region of mouse complexin 3 significantly restored inhibitory function to worm CPX-1. We hypothesize that the CTD of complexin is essential in conferring an inhibitory function to complexin, and that this inhibitory activity has been attenuated in the vertebrate complexin 1 and 2 isoforms. Thus, evolutionary changes in the complexin CTD differentially shape its synaptic role across phylogeny.

  6. Hexa-histidin tag position influences disulfide structure but not binding behavior of in vitro folded N-terminal domain of rat corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2a

    OpenAIRE

    Klose, Jana; Wendt, Norbert; Kubald, Sybille; Krause, Eberhard; Fechner, Klaus; Beyermann, Michael; Bienert, Michael; Rudolph, Rainer; Rothemund, Sven

    2004-01-01

    The oxidative folding, particularly the arrangement of disulfide bonds of recombinant extracellular N-terminal domains of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2a bearing five cysteines (C2 to C6), was investigated. Depending on the position of a His-tag, two types of disulfide patterns were found. In the case of an N-terminal His-tag, the disulfide bonds C2–C3 and C4–C6 were found, leaving C5 free, whereas the C-terminal position of the His-tag led to the disulfide pattern C2–C5 a...

  7. The death effector domains of caspase-8 induce terminal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa Mielgo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation and senescence programs of metazoans play key roles in regulating normal development and preventing aberrant cell proliferation, such as cancer. These programs are intimately associated with both the mitotic and apoptotic pathways. Caspase-8 is an apical apoptotic initiator that has recently been appreciated to coordinate non-apoptotic roles in the cell. Most of these functions are attributed to the catalytic domain, however, the amino-terminal death effector domains (DEDs, which belong to the death domain superfamily of proteins, can also play key roles during development. Here we describe a novel role for caspase-8 DEDs in regulating cell differentiation and senescence. Caspase-8 DEDs accumulate during terminal differentiation and senescence of epithelial, endothelial and myeloid cells; genetic deletion or shRNA suppression of caspase-8 disrupts cell differentiation, while re-expression of DEDs rescues this phenotype. Among caspase-8 deficient neuroblastoma cells, DED expression attenuated tumor growth in vivo and proliferation in vitro via disruption of mitosis and cytokinesis, resulting in upregulation of p53 and induction of differentiation markers. These events occur independent of caspase-8 catalytic activity, but require a critical lysine (K156 in a microtubule-binding motif in the second DED domain. The results demonstrate a new function for the DEDs of caspase-8, and describe an unexpected mechanism that contributes to cell differentiation and senescence.

  8. The C-type lectin of the aggrecan G3 domain activates complement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Melin Fürst

    Full Text Available Excessive complement activation contributes to joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis during which cartilage proteins are fragmented and released into the synovial fluid. Some of these proteins and fragments activate complement, which may sustain inflammation. The G3 domain of large cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan interacts with other extracellular matrix proteins, fibulins and tenascins, via its C-type lectin domain (CLD and has important functions in matrix organization. Fragments containing G3 domain are released during normal aggrecan turnover, but increasingly so in disease. We now show that the aggrecan CLD part of the G3 domain activates the classical and to a lesser extent the alternative pathway of complement, via binding of C1q and C3, respectively. The complement control protein (CCP domain adjacent to the CLD showed no effect on complement initiation. The binding of C1q to G3 depended on ionic interactions and was decreased in D2267N mutant G3. However, the observed complement activation was attenuated due to binding of complement inhibitor factor H to CLD and CCP domains. This was most apparent at the level of deposition of terminal complement components. Taken together our observations indicate aggrecan CLD as one factor involved in the sustained inflammation of the joint.

  9. Cross-communication between Gi and Gs in a G-protein-coupled receptor heterotetramer guided by a receptor C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Cordomí, Arnau; Brugarolas, Marc; Moreno, Estefanía; Aguinaga, David; Pérez-Benito, Laura; Ferre, Sergi; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Pardo, Leonardo; McCormick, Peter J; Franco, Rafael

    2018-02-28

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromeric complexes have distinct properties from homomeric GPCRs, giving rise to new receptor functionalities. Adenosine receptors (A 1 R or A 2A R) can form A 1 R-A 2A R heteromers (A 1 -A 2A Het), and their activation leads to canonical G-protein-dependent (adenylate cyclase mediated) and -independent (β-arrestin mediated) signaling. Adenosine has different affinities for A 1 R and A 2A R, allowing the heteromeric receptor to detect its concentration by integrating the downstream G i - and G s -dependent signals. cAMP accumulation and β-arrestin recruitment assays have shown that, within the complex, activation of A 2A R impedes signaling via A 1 R. We examined the mechanism by which A 1 -A 2A Het integrates G i - and G s -dependent signals. A 1 R blockade by A 2A R in the A 1 -A 2A Het is not observed in the absence of A 2A R activation by agonists, in the absence of the C-terminal domain of A 2A R, or in the presence of synthetic peptides that disrupt the heteromer interface of A 1 -A 2A Het, indicating that signaling mediated by A 1 R and A 2A R is controlled by both G i and G s proteins. We identified a new mechanism of signal transduction that implies a cross-communication between G i and G s proteins guided by the C-terminal tail of the A 2A R. This mechanism provides the molecular basis for the operation of the A 1 -A 2A Het as an adenosine concentration-sensing device that modulates the signals originating at both A 1 R and A 2A R.

  10. C-terminal sequences of hsp70 and hsp90 as non-specific anchors for tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Andrew J; Russell, Lance C; Chinkers, Michael

    2009-10-12

    Steroid-hormone-receptor maturation is a multi-step process that involves several TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) proteins that bind to the maturation complex via the C-termini of hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) and hsp90 (heat-shock protein 90). We produced a random T7 peptide library to investigate the roles played by the C-termini of the two heat-shock proteins in the TPR-hsp interactions. Surprisingly, phages with the MEEVD sequence, found at the C-terminus of hsp90, were not recovered from our biopanning experiments. However, two groups of phages were isolated that bound relatively tightly to HsPP5 (Homo sapiens protein phosphatase 5) TPR. Multiple copies of phages with a C-terminal sequence of LFG were isolated. These phages bound specifically to the TPR domain of HsPP5, although mutation studies produced no evidence that they bound to the domain's hsp90-binding groove. However, the most abundant family obtained in the initial screen had an aspartate residue at the C-terminus. Two members of this family with a C-terminal sequence of VD appeared to bind with approximately the same affinity as the hsp90 C-12 control. A second generation pseudo-random phage library produced a large number of phages with an LD C-terminus. These sequences acted as hsp70 analogues and had relatively low affinities for hsp90-specific TPR domains. Unfortunately, we failed to identify residues near hsp90's C-terminus that impart binding specificity to individual hsp90-TPR interactions. The results suggest that the C-terminal sequences of hsp70 and hsp90 act primarily as non-specific anchors for TPR proteins.

  11. The C-terminal SH2 domain of p85 accounts for the high affinity and specificity of the binding of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to phosphorylated platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippel, A; Escobedo, J A; Fantl, W J; Williams, L T

    1992-01-01

    Upon stimulation by its ligand, the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor associates with the 85-kDa subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase. The 85-kDa protein (p85) contains two Src homology 2 (SH2) domains and one SH3 domain. To define the part of p85 that interacts with the PDGF receptor, a series of truncated p85 mutants was analyzed for association with immobilized PDGF receptor in vitro. We found that a fragment of p85 that contains a single Src homology domain, the C-terminal SH2 domain (SH2-C), was sufficient for directing the high-affinity interaction with the receptor. Half-maximal binding of SH2-C to the receptor was observed at an SH2-C concentration of 0.06 nM. SH2-C, like full-length p85, was able to distinguish between wild-type PDGF receptor and a mutant receptor lacking the PI 3-kinase binding site. An excess of SH2-C blocked binding of full-length p85 and PI 3-kinase to the receptor but did not interfere with the binding of two other SH2-containing proteins, phospholipase C-gamma and GTPase-activating protein. These results demonstrate that a region of p85 containing a single SH2 domain accounts both for the high affinity and specificity of binding of PI 3-kinase to the PDGF receptor. Images PMID:1312663

  12. The core of Ure2p prion fibrils is formed by the N-terminal segment in a parallel cross-β structure: evidence from solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryndushkin, Dmitry S; Wickner, Reed B; Tycko, Robert

    2011-06-03

    Intracellular fibril formation by Ure2p produces the non-Mendelian genetic element [URE3] in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, making Ure2p a prion protein. We show that solid-state NMR spectra of full-length Ure2p fibrils, seeded with infectious prions from a specific [URE3] strain and labeled with uniformly (15)N-(13)C-enriched Ile, include strong, sharp signals from Ile residues in the globular C-terminal domain (CTD) with both helical and nonhelical (13)C chemical shifts. Treatment with proteinase K eliminates these CTD signals, leaving only nonhelical signals from the Gln-rich and Asn-rich N-terminal segment, which are also observed in the solid-state NMR spectra of Ile-labeled fibrils formed by residues 1-89 of Ure2p. Thus, the N-terminal segment, or "prion domain" (PD), forms the fibril core, while CTD units are located outside the core. We additionally show that, after proteinase K treatment, Ile-labeled Ure2p fibrils formed without prion seeding exhibit a broader set of solid-state NMR signals than do prion-seeded fibrils, consistent with the idea that structural variations within the PD core account for prion strains. Measurements of (13)C-(13)C magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among (13)C-labeled Ile carbonyl sites in full-length Ure2p fibrils support an in-register parallel β-sheet structure for the PD core of Ure2p fibrils. Finally, we show that a model in which CTD units are attached rigidly to the parallel β-sheet core is consistent with steric constraints. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Epimerization-free C-terminal peptide activation, elongation and cyclization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popović, S.

    2015-01-01

    C-terminal peptide activation and cyclization reactions are generally accompanied with epimerization (partial loss of C‐terminal stereointegrity). Therefore, the focus of this thesis was to develop epimerization-free methods for C-terminal peptide activation to enable C-terminal peptide elongation

  14. Globular clusters, old and young

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samus', N.N.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of similarity of and difference in the globular and scattered star clusters is considered. Star clusters in astronomy are related either to globular or to scattered ones according to the structure of Hertzsprung-Russell diagram constructed for star clusters, but not according to the appearance. The qlobular clusters in the Galaxy are composed of giants and subgiants, which testifies to the old age of the globular clusters. The Globular clusters in the Magellanic clouds are classified into ''red'' ones - similar to the globular clusters of the Galaxy, and ''blue'' ones - similar to them in appearance but differing extremely by the star composition and so by the age. The old star clusters are suggested to be called globular ones, while another name (''populous'', for example) is suggested to be used for other clusters similar to globular ones only in appearance

  15. The central globular domain of the nucleocapsid protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is critical for virion structure and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, M; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L

    1995-03-01

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a 72-amino-acid peptide containing two CCHC-type zinc fingers linked by a short basic sequence, 29RAPRKKG35, which is conserved in HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus. The complete three-dimensional structure of NCp7 has been determined by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (N. Morellet, H. de Rocquigny, Y. Mely, N. Jullian, H. Demene, M. Ottmann, D. Gerard, J. L. Darlix, M. C. Fournié-Zaluski, and B. P. Roques, J. Mol. Biol. 235:287-301, 1994) and revealed a central globular domain where the two zinc fingers are brought in close proximity by the RAPRKKG linker. To examine the role of this globular structure and more precisely of the RAPRKKG linker in virion structure and infectivity, we generated HIV-1 DNA mutants in the RAPRKK sequence of NCp7 and analyzed the mutant virions produced by transfected cells. Mutations that probably alter the structure of NCp7 structure led to the formation of very poorly infectious virus (A30P) or noninfectious virus (P31L and R32G). In addition, the P31L mutant did not contain detectable amounts of reverse transcriptase and had an immature core morphology, as determined by electron microscopy. On the other hand, mutations changing the basic nature of NCp7 had poor effect. R29S had a wild-type phenotype, and the replacement of 32RKK34 by SSS (S3 mutant) resulted in a decrease by no more than 100-fold of the virus titer. These results clearly show that the RAPRKKG linker contains residues that are critical for virion structure and infectivity.

  16. Dual N- and C-terminal helices are required for endoplasmic reticulum and lipid droplet association of alcohol acetyltransferases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyun-Liang Lin

    Full Text Available In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae two alcohol acetyltransferases (AATases, Atf1 and Atf2, condense short chain alcohols with acetyl-CoA to produce volatile acetate esters. Such esters are, in large part, responsible for the distinctive flavors and aromas of fermented beverages including beer, wine, and sake. Atf1 and Atf2 localize to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Atf1 is known to localize to lipid droplets (LDs. The mechanism and function of these localizations are unknown. Here, we investigate potential mechanisms of Atf1 and Atf2 membrane association. Segments of the N- and C-terminal domains of Atf1 (residues 24-41 and 508-525, respectively are predicted to be amphipathic helices. Truncations of these helices revealed that the terminal domains are essential for ER and LD association. Moreover, mutations of the basic or hydrophobic residues in the N-terminal helix and hydrophobic residues in the C-terminal helix disrupted ER association and subsequent sorting from the ER to LDs. Similar amphipathic helices are found at both ends of Atf2, enabling ER and LD association. As was the case with Atf1, mutations to the N- and C-terminal helices of Atf2 prevented membrane association. Sequence comparison of the AATases from Saccharomyces, non-Saccharomyces yeast (K. lactis and P. anomala and fruits species (C. melo and S. lycopersicum showed that only AATases from Saccharomyces evolved terminal amphipathic helices. Heterologous expression of these orthologs in S. cerevisiae revealed that the absence of terminal amphipathic helices eliminates LD association. Combined, the results of this study suggest a common mechanism of membrane association for AATases via dual N- and C-terminal amphipathic helices.

  17. Globular Clusters - Guides to Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Richtler, Tom; Joint ESO-FONDAP Workshop on Globular Clusters

    2009-01-01

    The principal question of whether and how globular clusters can contribute to a better understanding of galaxy formation and evolution is perhaps the main driving force behind the overall endeavour of studying globular cluster systems. Naturally, this splits up into many individual problems. The objective of the Joint ESO-FONDAP Workshop on Globular Clusters - Guides to Galaxies was to bring together researchers, both observational and theoretical, to present and discuss the most recent results. Topics covered in these proceedings are: internal dynamics of globular clusters and interaction with host galaxies (tidal tails, evolution of cluster masses), accretion of globular clusters, detailed descriptions of nearby cluster systems, ultracompact dwarfs, formations of massive clusters in mergers and elsewhere, the ACS Virgo survey, galaxy formation and globular clusters, dynamics and kinematics of globular cluster systems and dark matter-related problems. With its wide coverage of the topic, this book constitute...

  18. The EspF N-Terminal of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933w Imparts Stronger Toxicity Effects on HT-29 Cells than the C-Terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Du, Yanli; Hua, Ying; Fu, Muqing; Niu, Cong; Zhang, Bao; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Qiwei; Wan, Chengsong

    2017-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 EspF is an important multifunctional protein that destroys the tight junctions of intestinal epithelial cells and promotes host cell apoptosis. However, its molecular mechanism remains elusive. We knocked out the espF sequence (747 bp, Δ espF ), N-terminal sequence (219 bp, Δ espF N ), and C-terminal sequence (528 bp, Δ espF C ) separately using the pKD46-mediated λ Red homologous recombination system. Then, we built the corresponding complementation strains, namely, Δ espF/pespF , Δ espF N /pespF N , and Δ espF C /pespF C by overlap PCR, which were used in infecting HT-29 cells and BALB/C mice. The level of reactive oxygen species, cell apoptosis, mitochondrial trans-membrane potential, inflammatory factors, transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), and animal mortality were evaluated by DCFH-DA, double staining of Annexin V-FITC/PI, JC-1 staining, ELISA kit, and a mouse assay. The wild-type (WT), Δ espF , Δ espF/pespF , Δ espF C , Δ espF C /pespF C , Δ espF N , and Δ espF N /pespF N groups exhibited apoptotic rates of 68.3, 27.9, 64.9, 65.7, 73.4, 41.3, and 35.3% respectively, and mean TNF-α expression levels of 428 pg/mL, 342, 466, 446, 381, 383, and 374 pg/mL, respectively. In addition, the apoptotic rates and TNF-α levels of the WT, Δ espF/pespF , and Δ espF C were significantly higher than that of Δ espF , Δ espF N , Δ espF C /pespF C , and Δ espF N /pespF N group ( p < 0.05). The N-terminal of EspF resulted in an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, TNF-α secretion, ROS generation, mitochondria apoptosis, and pathogenicity in BalB/c mice. In conclusion, the N-terminal domain of the Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 EspF more strongly promotes apoptosis and inflammation than the C-terminal domain.

  19. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  20. Akt kinase C-terminal modifications control activation loop dephosphorylation and enhance insulin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tung O; Zhang, Jin; Tiegs, Brian C; Blumhof, Brian; Yan, Linda; Keny, Nikhil; Penny, Morgan; Li, Xue; Pascal, John M; Armen, Roger S; Rodeck, Ulrich; Penn, Raymond B

    2015-10-01

    The Akt protein kinase, also known as protein kinase B, plays key roles in insulin receptor signalling and regulates cell growth, survival and metabolism. Recently, we described a mechanism to enhance Akt phosphorylation that restricts access of cellular phosphatases to the Akt activation loop (Thr(308) in Akt1 or protein kinase B isoform alpha) in an ATP-dependent manner. In the present paper, we describe a distinct mechanism to control Thr(308) dephosphorylation and thus Akt deactivation that depends on intramolecular interactions of Akt C-terminal sequences with its kinase domain. Modifications of amino acids surrounding the Akt1 C-terminal mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) phosphorylation site (Ser(473)) increased phosphatase resistance of the phosphorylated activation loop (pThr(308)) and amplified Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, the phosphatase-resistant Akt was refractory to ceramide-dependent dephosphorylation and amplified insulin-dependent Thr(308) phosphorylation in a regulated fashion. Collectively, these results suggest that the Akt C-terminal hydrophobic groove is a target for the development of agents that enhance Akt phosphorylation by insulin. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  1. Conformational analysis of isolated domains of Helicobacter pylori CagA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda P Woon

    Full Text Available The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori is associated with increased virulence and gastric cancer risk. CagA is translocated into the host cell by a H. pylori type IV secretion system via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Translocated CagA interacts with numerous host factors, altering a variety of host signalling pathways. The recently determined crystal structure of C-terminally-truncated CagA indicated the presence of two domains: the smaller, flexible N-terminal domain and the larger, middle domain. In this study, we have investigated the conformation, oligomeric state and stability of the N-terminal, middle and glutamate-proline-isoleucine-tyrosine-alanine (EPIYA-repeats domains. All three domains are monomeric, suggesting that the multimerisation of CagA observed in infected cells is likely to be mediated not by CagA itself but by its interacting partners. The middle and the C-terminal domains, but not the N-terminal domain, are capable of refolding spontaneously upon heat denaturation, lending support to the hypothesis that unfolded CagA is threaded C-terminus first through the type IV secretion channel with its N-terminal domain, which likely requires interactions with other domains to refold, being threaded last. Our findings also revealed that the C-terminal EPIYA-repeats domain of CagA exists in an intrinsically disordered premolten globule state with regions in PPII conformation--a feature that is shared by many scaffold proteins that bind multiple protein components of signalling pathways. Taken together, these results provide a deeper understanding of the physicochemical properties of CagA that underpin its complex cellular and oncogenic functions.

  2. Storage of the complement components C4, C3, and C 3-activator in the human liver as PAS-negative globular hyaline bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, W; Riedel, H; Trautmann, B; Justus, J; Hiemann, D

    1982-01-01

    Liver biopsies of a 58-year-old clinically healthy patient with a hepatomegaly and intracisternal PAS-negative globular hyaline bodies were immunofluorescent-optically examined for the content of the complement components C 1 q, C 4, C 9, C 1-inactivator, C 3-activator. Further examinations were performed for fibrinogen, IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE, L-chain (type chi and lambda), alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1-fetoprotein, alpha 1- and alpha 2-glycoprotein, cholinesterase, ceruloplasmin, myoglobin, hemopexin, HBsAg and HBsAg. Th inclusion bodies reacted with antisera against the complement components C 4, C 3 and C 3-activator, as also identified by double immunofluorescence. Probably this is a disturbance of the protein metabolism of the liver cell with abnormal complement storage in the presence of normal total complement and normal complement components in the serum.

  3. Identification of a tetrameric assembly domain in the C terminus of heat-activated TRPV1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Shuang; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei

    2011-04-29

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as cellular sensors are thought to function as tetramers. Yet, the molecular determinants governing channel multimerization remain largely elusive. Here we report the identification of a segment comprising 21 amino acids (residues 752-772 of mouse TRPV1) after the known TRP-like domain in the channel C terminus that functions as a tetrameric assembly domain (TAD). Purified recombinant C-terminal proteins of TRPV1-4, but not the N terminus, mediated the protein-protein interaction in an in vitro pulldown assay. Western blot analysis combined with electrophysiology and calcium imaging demonstrated that TAD exerted a robust dominant-negative effect on wild-type TRPV1. When fused with the membrane-tethered peptide Gap43, the TAD blocked the formation of stable homomultimers. Calcium imaging and current recordings showed that deletion of the TAD in a poreless TRPV1 mutant subunit suppressed its dominant-negative phenotype, confirming the involvement of the TAD in assembly of functional channels. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal TAD in TRPV1 channels functions as a domain that is conserved among TRPV1-4 and mediates a direct subunit-subunit interaction for tetrameric assembly.

  4. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin L Rowe

    Full Text Available Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5 which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS, the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES. However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2, and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P

  5. Contribution of the C-terminal tri-lysine regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase for efficient reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowke Keith R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to mediating the integration process, HIV-1 integrase (IN has also been implicated in different steps during viral life cycle including reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import. Although the karyophilic property of HIV-1 IN has been well demonstrated using a variety of experimental approaches, the definition of domain(s and/or motif(s within the protein that mediate viral DNA nuclear import and its mechanism are still disputed and controversial. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses to investigate the contribution of different regions in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN to protein nuclear localization as well as their effects on virus infection. Results Our analysis showed that replacing lysine residues in two highly conserved tri-lysine regions, which are located within previously described Region C (235WKGPAKLLWKGEGAVV and sequence Q (211KELQKQITK in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN, impaired protein nuclear accumulation, while mutations for RK263,4 had no significant effect. Analysis of their effects on viral infection in a VSV-G pseudotyped RT/IN trans-complemented HIV-1 single cycle replication system revealed that all three C-terminal mutant viruses (KK215,9AA, KK240,4AE and RK263,4AA exhibited more severe defect of induction of β-Gal positive cells and luciferase activity than an IN class 1 mutant D64E in HeLa-CD4-CCR5-β-Gal cells, and in dividing as well as non-dividing C8166 T cells, suggesting that some viral defects are occurring prior to viral integration. Furthermore, by analyzing viral DNA synthesis and the nucleus-associated viral DNA level, the results clearly showed that, although all three C-terminal mutants inhibited viral reverse transcription to different extents, the KK240,4AE mutant exhibited most profound effect on this step, whereas KK215,9AA significantly impaired viral DNA nuclear import. In addition, our analysis could not detect viral DNA integration in each C-terminal

  6. Structures of class A macrophage scavenger receptors. Electron microscopic study of flexible, multidomain, fibrous proteins and determination of the disulfide bond pattern of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, D; Chatterton, J E; Schwartz, K; Slayter, H; Krieger, M

    1996-10-25

    Structures of secreted forms of the human type I and II class A macrophage scavenger receptors were studied using biochemical and biophysical methods. Proteolytic analysis was used to determine the intramolecular disulfide bonds in the type I-specific scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain: Cys2-Cys7, Cys3-Cys8, and Cys5-Cys6. This pattern is likely to be shared by the highly homologous domains in the many other members of the SRCR domain superfamily. Electron microscopy using rotary shadowing and negative staining showed that the type I and II receptors are extended molecules whose contour lengths are approximately 440 A. They comprised two adjacent fibrous segments, an alpha-helical coiled-coil ( approximately 230 A, including a contribution from the N-terminal spacer domain) and a collagenous triple helix ( approximately 210 A). The type I molecules also contained a C-terminal globular structure ( approximately 58 x 76 A) composed of three SRCR domains. The fibrous domains were joined by an extremely flexible hinge. The angle between these domains varied from 0 to 180 degrees and depended on the conditions of sample preparation. Unexpectedly, at physiologic pH, the prevalent angle seen using rotary shadowing was 0 degrees , resulting in a structure that is significantly more compact than previously suggested. The apparent juxtaposition of the fibrous domains at neutral pH provides a framework for future structure-function studies of these unusual multiligand receptors.

  7. Structure of the USP15 N-terminal domains: a β-hairpin mediates close association between the DUSP and UBL domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Stephen; Besong, Tabot M D; Emsley, Jonas; Scott, David J; Dreveny, Ingrid

    2011-09-20

    Ubiquitin specific protease 15 (USP15) functions in COP9 signalosome mediated regulation of protein degradation and cellular signaling through catalyzing the ubiquitin deconjugation reaction of a discrete number of substrates. It influences the stability of adenomatous polyposis coli, IκBα, caspase-3, and the human papillomavirus type 16 E6. USP15 forms a subfamily with USP4 and USP11 related through a shared presence of N-terminal "domain present in ubiquitin specific proteases" (DUSP) and "ubiquitin-like" (UBL) domains (DU subfamily). Here we report the 1.5 Å resolution crystal structure of the human USP15 N-terminal domains revealing a 80 Å elongated arrangement with the DU domains aligned in tandem. This architecture is generated through formation of a defined interface that is dominated by an intervening β-hairpin structure (DU finger) that engages in an intricate hydrogen-bonding network between the domains. The UBL domain is closely related to ubiquitin among β-grasp folds but is characterized by the presence of longer loop regions and different surface characteristics, indicating that this domain is unlikely to act as ubiquitin mimic. Comparison with the related murine USP4 DUSP-UBL crystal structure reveals that the main DU interdomain contacts are conserved. Analytical ultracentrifugation, small-angle X-ray scattering, and gel filtration experiments revealed that USP15 DU is monomeric in solution. Our data provide a framework to advance study of the structure and function of the DU subfamily. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Structure and inhibition analysis of the mouse SAD-B C-terminal fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui; Wu, Jing-Xiang; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The SAD (synapses of amphids defective) kinases, including SAD-A and SAD-B, play important roles in the regulation of neuronal development, cell cycle, and energy metabolism. Our recent study of mouse SAD-A identified a unique autoinhibitory sequence (AIS), which binds at the junction of the kinase domain (KD) and the ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain and exerts autoregulation in cooperation with UBA. Here, we report the crystal structure of the mouse SAD-B C-terminal fragment including the AIS and the kinase-associated domain 1 (KA1) at 2.8 Å resolution. The KA1 domain is structurally conserved, while the isolated AIS sequence is highly flexible and solvent-accessible. Our biochemical studies indicated that the SAD-B AIS exerts the same autoinhibitory role as that in SAD-A. We believe that the flexible isolated AIS sequence is readily available for interaction with KD-UBA and thus inhibits SAD-B activity.

  9. Crystal Structure of Marburg Virus VP40 Reveals a Broad, Basic Patch for Matrix Assembly and a Requirement of the N-Terminal Domain for Immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Shun-Ichiro; Noda, Takeshi; Wijesinghe, Kaveesha J; Halfmann, Peter; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Abelson, Dafna M; Armbrust, Tammy; Stahelin, Robert V; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2016-02-15

    Marburg virus (MARV), a member of the filovirus family, causes severe hemorrhagic fever with up to 90% lethality. MARV matrix protein VP40 is essential for assembly and release of newly copied viruses and also suppresses immune signaling in the infected cell. Here we report the crystal structure of MARV VP40. We found that MARV VP40 forms a dimer in solution, mediated by N-terminal domains, and that formation of this dimer is essential for budding of virus-like particles. We also found the N-terminal domain to be necessary and sufficient for immune antagonism. The C-terminal domains of MARV VP40 are dispensable for immunosuppression but are required for virus assembly. The C-terminal domains are only 16% identical to those of Ebola virus, differ in structure from those of Ebola virus, and form a distinct broad and flat cationic surface that likely interacts with the cell membrane during virus assembly. Marburg virus, a cousin of Ebola virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever, with up to 90% lethality seen in recent outbreaks. Molecular structures and visual images of the proteins of Marburg virus are essential for the development of antiviral drugs. One key protein in the Marburg virus life cycle is VP40, which both assembles the virus and suppresses the immune system. Here we provide the molecular structure of Marburg virus VP40, illustrate differences from VP40 of Ebola virus, and reveal surfaces by which Marburg VP40 assembles progeny and suppresses immune function. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. The N-terminal domain of Slack determines the formation and trafficking of Slick/Slack heteromeric sodium-activated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haijun; Kronengold, Jack; Yan, Yangyang; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Brown, Maile R; Ma, Liqun; Ferreira, Gonzalo; Yang, Youshan; Bhattacharjee, Arin; Sigworth, Fred J; Salkoff, Larry; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2009-04-29

    Potassium channels activated by intracellular Na(+) ions (K(Na)) play several distinct roles in regulating the firing patterns of neurons, and, at the single channel level, their properties are quite diverse. Two known genes, Slick and Slack, encode K(Na) channels. We have now found that Slick and Slack subunits coassemble to form heteromeric channels that differ from the homomers in their unitary conductance, kinetic behavior, subcellular localization, and response to activation of protein kinase C. Heteromer formation requires the N-terminal domain of Slack-B, one of the alternative splice variants of the Slack channel. This cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Slack-B also facilitates the localization of heteromeric K(Na) channels to the plasma membrane. Immunocytochemical studies indicate that Slick and Slack-B subunits are coexpressed in many central neurons. Our findings provide a molecular explanation for some of the diversity in reported properties of neuronal K(Na) channels.

  11. Small angle X-ray scattering study of calreticulin reveals conformational plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Katrine Nørgaard; Larsen, Nanna; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2008-01-01

    . The data from the calreticulin monomer reveal the shape of calreticulin in solution: The previously structurally un-described C-terminal is seen as a globular domain, and the P-domain beta-hairpin extends from the N-domain in a spiral like conformation. In the calreticulin solution dimer, the N-, C-, and P......-domains are easily identified, and the P-domain is in an extended conformation connecting to the second calreticulin molecule. The SAXS solution data enables the construction of a medium-resolution model of calreticulin. In the light of the unresolved chaperone mechanism of calreticulin and calnexin, we discuss...

  12. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong (Harvard-Med); (UAH); (Maastricht); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  13. A 48 kDa collagen-binding phosphoprotein isolated from bovine aortic endothelial cells interacts with the collagenous domain, but not the globular domain, of collagen type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Madri, J A

    1990-01-15

    We have identified collagen-binding proteins in detergent extracts of metabolically labelled bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) by collagen type IV-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The major collagen type IV-binding protein identified by SDS/PAGE had a molecular mass of 48 kDa, which we term the 'collagen-binding 48 kDa protein' (CB48). The pI of CB48 was 8.0-8.3 in a two-dimensional gel system, running non-equilibrium pH gel electrophoresis in the first dimension and SDS/PAGE in the second dimension. Under these conditions CB48 separated into two major (a and b) and one minor isoform (c); a was the most basic of the three isoforms. Two-dimensional chymotryptic peptide maps derived from each individual isoform were virtually identical. The charge differences between the isoforms were due in part to differential H3(32)PO4 incorporation by the protein. CB48 bound to intact collagen type IV and the collagenous region of collagen type IV, but not to the globular NC1 domain. Cell-surface labelling and indirect immunofluorescence experiments localized the bulk of CB48 intracellularly in the endoplasmic reticulum Golgi region, with a minor population of molecules on the cell surface. A specific rabbit polyclonal anti-CB48 serum did not inhibit the attachment or spreading of BAEC to collagen type IV in an 'in vitro' adhesion assay, suggesting that the cell-surface population of CB48 is not involved in BAEC adhesion. We conclude that CB48 is a collagen-binding phosphoprotein that interacts with the collagenous domain of collagen type IV and may be involved in intracellular transport of collagen molecules.

  14. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter ∼200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  15. Insights into amyloid-like aggregation of H2 region of the C-terminal domain of nucleophosmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Anna; Diaferia, Carlo; La Manna, Sara; Giannini, Cinzia; Sibillano, Teresa; Accardo, Antonella; Morelli, Giancarlo; Novellino, Ettore; Marasco, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) is a multifunctional protein involved in a variety of biological processes including the pathogenesis of several human malignancies and is the most frequently mutated gene in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). To deepen the role of protein regions in its biological activities, lately we reported on the structural behavior of dissected C-terminal domain (CTD) helical fragments. Unexpectedly the H2 (residues 264-277) and H3 AML-mutated regions showed a remarkable tendency to form amyloid-like assemblies with fibrillar morphology and β-sheet structure that resulted as toxic when exposed to human neuroblastoma cells. More recently NPM1 was found to be highly expressed and toxic in neurons of mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD). Here we investigate the role of each residue in the β-strand aggregation process of H2 region of NPM1 by performing a systematic alanine scan of its sequence and structural and kinetic analyses of aggregation of derived peptides by means of Circular Dichorism (CD) and Thioflavin T (Th-T) assay. These solution state investigations pointed out the crucial role exerted by the basic amyloidogenic stretch of H2 (264-271) and to shed light on the initial and main interactions involved in fibril formation we performed studies on fibrils deriving from the related Ala peptides through the analysis of fibrils with birefringence of polarized optical microscopy and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). This analysis suggested that the presence of branched Ile 269 conferred preferential packing patterns that, instead, appeared geometrically hampered by the aromatic side-chain of Phe 268 . Present investigations could be useful to deepen the knowledge of AML molecular mechanisms and the role of cytoplasmatic aggregates of NPM1c+. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Crystallization of the C-terminal head domain of the avian adenovirus CELO long fibre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardado Calvo, Pablo [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L. [Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Langlois, Patrick [Agence Francaise de Securité Sanitaire des Aliments, Unité Génétique Virale et Biosecurité, Site Les Croix, BP 53, F-22440 Ploufragan (France); Raaij, Mark J. van, E-mail: vanraaij@usc.es [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-05-01

    Avian adenovirus long-fibre head trimers were expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 216.5, b = 59.2, c = 57.5 Å, β = 101.3°). A complete highly redundant data set was collected to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K using a rotating-anode X-ray source. Avian adenovirus CELO contains two different fibres: fibre 1, the long fibre, and fibre 2, the short fibre. The short fibre is responsible for binding to an unknown avian receptor and is essential for infection of birds. The long fibre is not essential, but is known to bind the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor protein. Both trimeric fibres are attached to the same penton base, of which each icosahedral virus contains 12 copies. The short fibre extends straight outwards, while the long fibre emerges at an angle. The carboxy-terminal amino acids 579–793 of the avian adenovirus long fibre have been expressed with an amino-terminal hexahistidine tag and the expressed trimeric protein has been purified by nickel-affinity chromatography and crystallized. Crystals were grown at low pH using PEG 10 000 as precipitant and belonged to space group C2. The crystals diffracted rotating-anode Cu Kα radiation to at least 1.9 Å resolution and a complete data set was collected from a single crystal to 2.2 Å resolution. Unit-cell parameters were a = 216.5, b = 59.2, c = 57.5 Å, β = 101.3°, suggesting one trimer per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of 46%. The long fibre head does not have significant sequence homology to any other protein of known structure and molecular-replacement attempts with known fibre-head structures were unsuccessful. However, a map calculated using SIRAS phasing shows a clear trimer with a shape similar to known adenovirus fibre-head structures. Structure solution is in progress.

  17. The recombinant globular head domain of the measles virus hemagglutinin protein as a subunit vaccine against measles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanova, Liubov M; Eng, Nelson F; Satkunarajah, Malathy; Mutwiri, George K; Rini, James M; Zakhartchouk, Alexander N

    2012-04-26

    Despite the availability of live attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines, a large number of measles-associated deaths occur among infants in developing countries. The development of a measles subunit vaccine may circumvent the limitations associated with the current live attenuated vaccines and eventually contribute to global measles eradication. Therefore, the goal of this study was to test the feasibility of producing the recombinant globular head domain of the MV hemagglutinin (H) protein by stably transfected human cells and to examine the ability of this recombinant protein to elicit MV-specific immune responses. The recombinant protein was purified from the culture supernatant of stably transfected HEK293T cells secreting a tagged version of the protein. Two subcutaneous immunizations with the purified recombinant protein alone resulted in the production of MV-specific serum IgG and neutralizing antibodies in mice. Formulation of the protein with adjuvants (polyphosphazene or alum) further enhanced the humoral immune response and in addition resulted in the induction of cell-mediated immunity as measured by the production of MV H-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin 5 (IL-5) by in vitro re-stimulated splenocytes. Furthermore, the inclusion of polyphosphazene into the vaccine formulation induced a mixed Th1/Th2-type immune response. In addition, the purified recombinant protein retained its immunogenicity even after storage at 37°C for 2 weeks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fine-tuning of protein domain boundary by minimizing potential coiled coil regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaya, Naoko; Goda, Natsuko; Unzai, Satoru; Fujiwara, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Tomii, Kentaro; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2007-01-01

    Structural determination of individual protein domains isolated from multidomain proteins is a common approach in the post-genomic era. Novel and thus uncharacterized domains liberated from intact proteins often self-associate due to incorrectly defined domain boundaries. Self-association results in missing signals, poor signal dispersion and a low signal-to-noise ratio in 1 H- 15 N HSQC spectra. We have found that a putative, non-canonical coiled coil region close to a domain boundary can cause transient hydrophobic self-association and monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution. Here we propose a rational method to predict putative coiled coil regions adjacent to the globular core domain using the program COILS. Except for the amino acid sequence, no preexisting knowledge concerning the domain is required. A small number of mutant proteins with a minimized coiled coil region have been rationally designed and tested. The engineered domains exhibit decreased self-association as assessed by 1 H- 15 N HSQC spectra with improved peak dispersion and sharper cross peaks. Two successful examples of isolating novel N-terminal domains from AAA-ATPases are demonstrated. Our method is useful for the experimental determination of domain boundaries suited for structural genomics studies

  19. Fine-tuning of protein domain boundary by minimizing potential coiled coil regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaya, Naoko; Goda, Natsuko; Unzai, Satoru; Fujiwara, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Tomii, Kentaro; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2007-01-01

    Structural determination of individual protein domains isolated from multidomain proteins is a common approach in the post-genomic era. Novel and thus uncharacterized domains liberated from intact proteins often self-associate due to incorrectly defined domain boundaries. Self-association results in missing signals, poor signal dispersion and a low signal-to-noise ratio in (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra. We have found that a putative, non-canonical coiled coil region close to a domain boundary can cause transient hydrophobic self-association and monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution. Here we propose a rational method to predict putative coiled coil regions adjacent to the globular core domain using the program COILS. Except for the amino acid sequence, no preexisting knowledge concerning the domain is required. A small number of mutant proteins with a minimized coiled coil region have been rationally designed and tested. The engineered domains exhibit decreased self-association as assessed by (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra with improved peak dispersion and sharper cross peaks. Two successful examples of isolating novel N-terminal domains from AAA-ATPases are demonstrated. Our method is useful for the experimental determination of domain boundaries suited for structural genomics studies.

  20. Identification of distinct SET/TAF-Ibeta domains required for core histone binding and quantitative characterisation of the interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karetsou, Zoe; Emmanouilidou, Anastasia; Sanidas, Ioannis; Liokatis, Stamatis; Nikolakaki, Eleni; Politou, Anastasia S; Papamarcaki, Thomais

    2009-04-09

    The assembly of nucleosomes to higher-order chromatin structures is finely tuned by the relative affinities of histones for chaperones and nucleosomal binding sites. The myeloid leukaemia protein SET/TAF-Ibeta belongs to the NAP1 family of histone chaperones and participates in several chromatin-based mechanisms, such as chromatin assembly, nucleosome reorganisation and transcriptional activation. To better understand the histone chaperone function of SET/TAF-Ibeta, we designed several SET/TAF-Ibeta truncations, examined their structural integrity by circular Dichroism and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively the histone binding properties of wild-type protein and mutant forms using GST-pull down experiments and fluorescence spectroscopy-based binding assays. Wild type SET/TAF-Ibeta binds to histones H2B and H3 with Kd values of 2.87 and 0.15 microM, respectively. The preferential binding of SET/TAF-Ibeta to histone H3 is mediated by its central region and the globular part of H3. On the contrary, the acidic C-terminal tail and the amino-terminal dimerisation domain of SET/TAF-Ibeta, as well as the H3 amino-terminal tail, are dispensable for this interaction. This type of analysis allowed us to assess the relative affinities of SET/TAF-Ibeta for different histones and identify the domains of the protein required for effective histone recognition. Our findings are consistent with recent structural studies of SET/TAF-Ibeta and can be valuable to understand the role of SET/TAF-Ibeta in chromatin function.

  1. Crystal structure studies of NADP{sup +} dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus exhibiting a novel terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.M. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Pampa, K.J. [Department of Studies in Microbiology, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Manjula, M. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Abdoh, M.M.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, An-Najah National University, Nablus, West Bank, Palestine (Country Unknown); Kunishima, Naoki [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Lokanath, N.K., E-mail: lokanath@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India)

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • We determined the structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase with citrate and cofactor. • The structure reveals a unique novel terminal domain involved in dimerization. • Clasp domain shows significant difference, and catalytic residues are conserved. • Oligomerization of the enzyme is quantized with subunit-subunit interactions. • Novel domain of this enzyme is classified as subfamily of the type IV. - Abstract: NADP{sup +} dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an enzyme catalyzing oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate into oxalosuccinate (intermediate) and finally the product α-ketoglutarate. The crystal structure of Thermus thermophilus isocitrate dehydrogenase (TtIDH) ternary complex with citrate and cofactor NADP{sup +} was determined using X-ray diffraction method to a resolution of 1.80 Å. The overall fold of this protein was resolved into large domain, small domain and a clasp domain. The monomeric structure reveals a novel terminal domain involved in dimerization, very unique and novel domain when compared to other IDH’s. And, small domain and clasp domain showing significant differences when compared to other IDH’s of the same sub-family. The structure of TtIDH reveals the absence of helix at the clasp domain, which is mainly involved in oligomerization in other IDH’s. Also, helices/beta sheets are absent in the small domain, when compared to other IDH’s of the same sub family. The overall TtIDH structure exhibits closed conformation with catalytic triad residues, Tyr144-Asp248-Lys191 are conserved. Oligomerization of the protein is quantized using interface area and subunit–subunit interactions between protomers. Overall, the TtIDH structure with novel terminal domain may be categorized as a first structure of subfamily of type IV.

  2. Directed evolution of the TALE N-terminal domain for recognition of all 5' bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Brian M; Mercer, Andrew C; Barbas, Carlos F

    2013-11-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can be designed to bind virtually any DNA sequence. General guidelines for design of TALE DNA-binding domains suggest that the 5'-most base of the DNA sequence bound by the TALE (the N0 base) should be a thymine. We quantified the N0 requirement by analysis of the activities of TALE transcription factors (TALE-TF), TALE recombinases (TALE-R) and TALE nucleases (TALENs) with each DNA base at this position. In the absence of a 5' T, we observed decreases in TALE activity up to >1000-fold in TALE-TF activity, up to 100-fold in TALE-R activity and up to 10-fold reduction in TALEN activity compared with target sequences containing a 5' T. To develop TALE architectures that recognize all possible N0 bases, we used structure-guided library design coupled with TALE-R activity selections to evolve novel TALE N-terminal domains to accommodate any N0 base. A G-selective domain and broadly reactive domains were isolated and characterized. The engineered TALE domains selected in the TALE-R format demonstrated modularity and were active in TALE-TF and TALEN architectures. Evolved N-terminal domains provide effective and unconstrained TALE-based targeting of any DNA sequence as TALE binding proteins and designer enzymes.

  3. Cdc15 Phosphorylates the C-terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II for Transcription during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Rastogi, Shivangi; Shukla, Harish; Asalam, Mohd; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2017-03-31

    In eukaryotes, the basal transcription in interphase is orchestrated through the regulation by kinases (Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1) and phosphatases (Ssu72, Rtr1, and Fcp1), which act through the post-translational modification of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The CTD comprises the repeated Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser motif with potential epigenetic modification sites. Despite the observation of transcription and periodic expression of genes during mitosis with entailing CTD phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, the associated CTD specific kinase(s) and its role in transcription remains unknown. Here we have identified Cdc15 as a potential kinase phosphorylating Ser-2 and Ser-5 of CTD for transcription during mitosis in the budding yeast. The phosphorylation of CTD by Cdc15 is independent of any prior Ser phosphorylation(s). The inactivation of Cdc15 causes reduction of global CTD phosphorylation during mitosis and affects the expression of genes whose transcript levels peak during mitosis. Cdc15 also influences the complete transcription of clb2 gene and phosphorylates Ser-5 at the promoter and Ser-2 toward the 3' end of the gene. The observation that Cdc15 could phosphorylate Ser-5, as well as Ser-2, during transcription in mitosis is in contrast to the phosphorylation marks put by the kinases in interphase (G 1 , S, and G 2 ), where Cdck7/Kin28 phosphorylates Ser-5 at promoter and Bur1/Ctk1 phosphorylates Ser-2 at the 3' end of the genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Molecular basis of the specific subcellular localization of the C2-like domain of 5-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Shilpa; Das, Sudipto; Funk, Colin D; Murray, Diana; Cho, Wonhwa

    2002-04-12

    The activation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) involves its calcium-dependent translocation to the nuclear envelope, where it catalyzes the two-step transformation of arachidonic acid into leukotriene A(4), leading to the synthesis of various leukotrienes. To understand the mechanism by which 5-LO is specifically targeted to the nuclear envelope, we studied the membrane binding properties of the amino-terminal domain of 5-LO, which has been proposed to have a C2 domain-like structure. The model building, electrostatic potential calculation, and in vitro membrane binding studies of the isolated C2-like domain of 5-LO and selected mutants show that this Ca(2+)-dependent domain selectively binds zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine, which is conferred by tryptophan residues (Trp(13), Trp(75), and Trp(102)) located in the putative Ca(2+)-binding loops. The spatiotemporal dynamics of the enhanced green fluorescence protein-tagged C2-like domain of 5-LO and mutants in living cells also show that the phosphatidylcholine selectivity of the C2-like domain accounts for the specific targeting of 5-LO to the nuclear envelope. Together, these results show that the C2-like domain of 5-LO is a genuine Ca(2+)-dependent membrane-targeting domain and that the subcellular localization of the domain is governed in large part by its membrane binding properties.

  5. Analysis of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein indicates the importance of the N-terminal domain for avirulence and RNA silencing suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ronde, Dryas; Pasquier, Adrien; Ying, Su; Butterbach, Patrick; Lohuis, Dick; Kormelink, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Recently, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) nonstructural protein NSs has been identified unambiguously as an avirulence (Avr) determinant for Tomato spotted wilt (Tsw)-based resistance. The observation that NSs from two natural resistance-breaking isolates had lost RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity and Avr suggested a link between the two functions. To test this, a large set of NSs mutants was generated by alanine substitutions in NSs from resistance-inducing wild-type strains (NSs(RI) ), amino acid reversions in NSs from resistance-breaking strains (NSs(RB)), domain deletions and swapping. Testing these mutants for their ability to suppress green fluorescent protein (GFP) silencing and to trigger a Tsw-mediated hypersensitive response (HR) revealed that the two functions can be separated. Changes in the N-terminal domain were found to be detrimental for both activities and indicated the importance of this domain, additionally supported by domain swapping between NSs(RI) and NSs(RB). Swapping domains between the closely related Tospovirus Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) NSs and TSWV NSs(RI) showed that Avr functionality could not simply be transferred between species. Although deletion of the C-terminal domain rendered NSs completely dysfunctional, only a few single-amino-acid mutations in the C-terminus affected both functions. Mutation of a GW/WG motif (position 17/18) rendered NSs completely dysfunctional for RSS and Avr activity, and indicated a putative interaction between NSs and Argonaute 1 (AGO1), and its importance in TSWV virulence and viral counter defence against RNA interference. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  6. Structural modeling of the N-terminal signal–receiving domain of IκBα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira eYazdi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB exerts essential roles in many biological processes including cell growth, apoptosis and innate and adaptive immunity. The NF-kB inhibitor (IκBα retains NF-κB in the cytoplasm and thus inhibits nuclear localization of NF-κB and its association with DNA. Recent protein crystal structures of the C-terminal part of IκBα in complex with NF-κB provided insights into the protein-protein interactions but could not reveal structural details about the N-terminal signal receiving domain (SRD. The SRD of IκBα contains a degron, formed following phosphorylation by IκB kinases (IKK. In current protein X-ray structures, however, the SRD is not resolved and assumed to be disordered. Here, we combined secondary structure annotation and domain threading followed by long molecular dynamics (MD simulations and showed that the SRD possesses well-defined secondary structure elements. We show that the SRD contains 3 additional stable α-helices supplementing the six ARDs present in crystallized IκBα. The IκBα/NF-κB protein-protein complex remained intact and stable during the entire simulations. Also in solution, free IκBα retains its structural integrity. Differences in structural topology and dynamics were observed by comparing the structures of NF-κB free and NF-κB bound IκBα-complex. This study paves the way for investigating the signaling properties of the SRD in the IκBα degron. A detailed atomic scale understanding of molecular mechanism of NF-κB activation, regulation and the protein-protein interactions may assist to design and develop novel chronic inflammation modulators.

  7. Dimerization of the docking/adaptor protein HEF1 via a carboxy-terminal helix-loop-helix domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, S F; Zhang, Y Z; Fashena, S J; Toby, G; Estojak, J; Golemis, E A

    1999-10-10

    HEF1, p130(Cas), and Efs define a family of multidomain docking proteins which plays a central coordinating role for tyrosine-kinase-based signaling related to cell adhesion. HEF1 function has been specifically implicated in signaling pathways important for cell adhesion and differentiation in lymphoid and epithelial cells. While the SH3 domains and SH2-binding site domains (substrate domains) of HEF1 family proteins are well characterized and binding partners known, to date the highly conserved carboxy-terminal domains of the three proteins have lacked functional definition. In this study, we have determined that the carboxy-terminal domain of HEF1 contains a divergent helix-loop-helix (HLH) motif. This motif mediates HEF1 homodimerization and HEF1 heterodimerization with a recognition specificity similar to that of the transcriptional regulatory HLH proteins Id2, E12, and E47. We had previously demonstrated that the HEF1 carboxy-terminus expressed as a separate domain in yeast reprograms cell division patterns, inducing constitutive pseudohyphal growth. Here we show that pseudohyphal induction by HEF1 requires an intact HLH, further supporting the idea that this motif has an effector activity for HEF1, and implying that HEF1 pseudohyphal activity derives in part from interactions with yeast helix-loop-helix proteins. These combined results provide initial insight into the mode of function of the HEF1 carboxy-terminal domain and suggest that the HEF1 protein may interact with cellular proteins which control differentiation. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. The conserved WW-domain binding sites in Dystroglycan C-terminus are essential but partially redundant for Dystroglycan function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yatsenko, A S; Kucherenko, M M; Pantoja, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dystroglycan (Dg) is a transmembrane protein that is a part of the Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC) which connects the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. The C-terminal end of Dg contains a number of putative SH3, SH2 and WW domain binding sites. The most C...

  9. The C-terminal domain of the bacterial SSB protein acts as a DNA maintenance hub at active chromosome replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated in vivo the role of the carboxy-terminal domain of the Bacillus subtilis Single-Stranded DNA Binding protein (SSB(Cter as a recruitment platform at active chromosomal forks for many proteins of the genome maintenance machineries. We probed this SSB(Cter interactome using GFP fusions and by Tap-tag and biochemical analysis. It includes at least 12 proteins. The interactome was previously shown to include PriA, RecG, and RecQ and extended in this study by addition of DnaE, SbcC, RarA, RecJ, RecO, XseA, Ung, YpbB, and YrrC. Targeting of YpbB to active forks appears to depend on RecS, a RecQ paralogue, with which it forms a stable complex. Most of these SSB partners are conserved in bacteria, while others, such as the essential DNA polymerase DnaE, YrrC, and the YpbB/RecS complex, appear to be specific to B. subtilis. SSB(Cter deletion has a moderate impact on B. subtilis cell growth. However, it markedly affects the efficiency of repair of damaged genomic DNA and arrested replication forks. ssbΔCter mutant cells appear deficient in RecA loading on ssDNA, explaining their inefficiency in triggering the SOS response upon exposure to genotoxic agents. Together, our findings show that the bacterial SSB(Cter acts as a DNA maintenance hub at active chromosomal forks that secures their propagation along the genome.

  10. Generation of the beta-amyloid peptide and the amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragment gamma are potentiated by FE65L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yang; Tesco, Giuseppina; Jeong, William J; Lindsley, Loren; Eckman, Elizabeth A; Eckman, Christopher B; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Guénette, Suzanne Y

    2003-12-19

    Members of the FE65 family of adaptor proteins, FE65, FE65L1, and FE65L2, bind the C-terminal region of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Overexpression of FE65 and FE65L1 was previously reported to increase the levels of alpha-secretase-derived APP (APPs alpha). Increased beta-amyloid (A beta) generation was also observed in cells showing the FE65-dependent increase in APPs alpha. To understand the mechanism for the observed increase in both A beta and APPs alpha given that alpha-secretase cleavage of a single APP molecule precludes A beta generation, we examined the effects of FE65L1 overexpression on APP C-terminal fragments (APP CTFs). Our data show that FE65L1 potentiates gamma-secretase processing of APP CTFs, including the amyloidogenic CTF C99, accounting for the ability of FE65L1 to increase generation of APP C-terminal domain and A beta 40. The FE65L1 modulation of these processing events requires binding of FE65L1 to APP and APP CTFs and is not because of a direct effect on gamma-secretase activity, because Notch intracellular domain generation is not altered by FE65L1. Furthermore, enhanced APP CTF processing can be detected in early endosome vesicles but not in endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi membranes, suggesting that the effects of FE65L1 occur at or near the plasma membrane. Finally, although FE65L1 increases APP C-terminal domain production, it does not mediate the APP-dependent transcriptional activation observed with FE65.

  11. C-terminal modulatory domain controls coupling of voltage-sensing to pore opening in Cav1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, Andreas; Ortner, Nadine; Striessnig, Jörg

    2014-04-01

    Activity of voltage-gated Cav1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels is required for proper hearing as well as sinoatrial node and brain function. This critically depends on their negative activation voltage range, which is further fine-tuned by alternative splicing. Shorter variants miss a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTM), which allows them to activate at even more negative potentials than C-terminally long-splice variants. It is at present unclear whether this is due to an increased voltage sensitivity of the Cav1.3 voltage-sensing domain, or an enhanced coupling of voltage-sensor conformational changes to the subsequent opening of the activation gate. We studied the voltage-dependence of voltage-sensor charge movement (QON-V) and of current activation (ICa-V) of the long (Cav1.3L) and a short Cav1.3 splice variant (Cav1.342A) expressed in tsA-201 cells using whole cell patch-clamp. Charge movement (QON) of Cav1.3L displayed a much steeper voltage-dependence and a more negative half-maximal activation voltage than Cav1.2 and Cav3.1. However, a significantly higher fraction of the total charge had to move for activation of Cav1.3 half-maximal conductance (Cav1.3: 68%; Cav1.2: 52%; Cav3.1: 22%). This indicated a weaker coupling of Cav1.3 voltage-sensor charge movement to pore opening. However, the coupling efficiency was strengthened in the absence of the CTM in Cav1.342A, thereby shifting ICa-V by 7.2 mV to potentials that were more negative without changing QON-V. We independently show that the presence of intracellular organic cations (such as n-methyl-D-glucamine) induces a pronounced negative shift of QON-V and a more negative activation of ICa-V of all three channels. These findings illustrate that the voltage sensors of Cav1.3 channels respond more sensitively to depolarization than those of Cav1.2 or Cav3.1. Weak coupling of voltage sensing to pore opening is enhanced in the absence of the CTM, allowing short Cav1.342A splice variants to activate at lower voltages

  12. The 18-kilodalton Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) contains a potential N-terminal dimerization site and a C-terminal nucleic acid-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Birkelund, S; Holm, A

    1996-01-01

    The Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) is a DNA-binding protein specific for the metabolically inactive chlamydial developmental form, the elementary body. Hc1 induces DNA condensation in Escherichia coli and is a strong inhibitor of transcription and translation. These effects may......-hydroxysuccinimide ester), purified recombinant Hc1 was found to form dimers. The dimerization site was located in the N-terminal part of Hc1 (Hc1(2-57)). Moreover, circular dichroism measurements indicated an overall alpha-helical structure of this region. By using limited proteolysis, Southwestern blotting, and gel...... retardation assays, Hc1(53-125) was shown to contain a domain capable of binding both DNA and RNA. Under the same conditions, Hc1(2-57) had no nucleic acid-binding activity. Electron microscopy of Hc1-DNA and Hc1(53-125)-DNA complexes revealed differences suggesting that the N-terminal part of Hc1 may affect...

  13. The roles of the RIIβ linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of the type IIβ protein kinase A: a small angle x-ray and neutron scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Donald K; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T; Taylor, Susan S

    2014-10-10

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. The PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1-280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. Our results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Evolutionary genomics of plant genes encoding N-terminal-TM-C2 domain proteins and the similar FAM62 genes and synaptotagmin genes of metazoans

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    Craxton Molly

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptotagmin genes are found in animal genomes and are known to function in the nervous system. Genes with a similar domain architecture as well as sequence similarity to synaptotagmin C2 domains have also been found in plant genomes. The plant genes share an additional region of sequence similarity with a group of animal genes named FAM62. FAM62 genes also have a similar domain architecture. Little is known about the functions of the plant genes and animal FAM62 genes. Indeed, many members of the large and diverse Syt gene family await functional characterization. Understanding the evolutionary relationships among these genes will help to realize the full implications of functional studies and lead to improved genome annotation. Results I collected and compared plant Syt-like sequences from the primary nucleotide sequence databases at NCBI. The collection comprises six groups of plant genes conserved in embryophytes: NTMC2Type1 to NTMC2Type6. I collected and compared metazoan FAM62 sequences and identified some similar sequences from other eukaryotic lineages. I found evidence of RNA editing and alternative splicing. I compared the intron patterns of Syt genes. I also compared Rabphilin and Doc2 genes. Conclusion Genes encoding proteins with N-terminal-transmembrane-C2 domain architectures resembling synaptotagmins, are widespread in eukaryotes. A collection of these genes is presented here. The collection provides a resource for studies of intron evolution. I have classified the collection into homologous gene families according to distinctive patterns of sequence conservation and intron position. The evolutionary histories of these gene families are traceable through the appearance of family members in different eukaryotic lineages. Assuming an intron-rich eukaryotic ancestor, the conserved intron patterns distinctive of individual gene families, indicate independent origins of Syt, FAM62 and NTMC2 genes. Resemblances

  15. Membrane Localization is Critical for Activation of the PICK1 BAR Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Kenneth L.; Eriksen, Jacob; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Han, Daniel S.; Niv, Masha Y.; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Henriksen, Ulla; Bhatia, Vikram K.; Stamou, Dimitrios; Sitte, Harald H.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik

    2008-01-01

    The PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domain protein, protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) contains a C-terminal Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain mediating recognition of curved membranes; however, the molecular mechanisms controlling the activity of this domain are poorly understood. In agreement with negative regulation of the BAR domain by the N-terminal PDZ domain, PICK1 distributed evenly in the cytoplasm, whereas truncation of the PDZ domain caused BAR domain-dependent redis...

  16. Functional interactions of the AF-2 activation domain core region of the human androgen receptor with the amino-terminal domain and with the transcriptional coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); P. Doesburg (Paul); K. Steketee (Karine); J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed a functional interaction between the amino-terminal domain and the carboxy-terminal, ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (AR). In the present study, the AR subdomains involved in

  17. The EspF N-Terminal of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933w Imparts Stronger Toxicity Effects on HT-29 Cells than the C-Terminal

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    Xiangyu Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 EspF is an important multifunctional protein that destroys the tight junctions of intestinal epithelial cells and promotes host cell apoptosis. However, its molecular mechanism remains elusive. We knocked out the espF sequence (747 bp, ΔespF, N-terminal sequence (219 bp, ΔespFN, and C-terminal sequence (528 bp, ΔespFC separately using the pKD46-mediated λ Red homologous recombination system. Then, we built the corresponding complementation strains, namely, ΔespF/pespF, ΔespFN/pespFN, and ΔespFC/pespFC by overlap PCR, which were used in infecting HT-29 cells and BALB/C mice. The level of reactive oxygen species, cell apoptosis, mitochondrial trans-membrane potential, inflammatory factors, transepithelial electrical resistance (TER, and animal mortality were evaluated by DCFH-DA, double staining of Annexin V-FITC/PI, JC-1 staining, ELISA kit, and a mouse assay. The wild-type (WT, ΔespF, ΔespF/pespF, ΔespFC, ΔespFC/pespFC, ΔespFN, and ΔespFN/pespFN groups exhibited apoptotic rates of 68.3, 27.9, 64.9, 65.7, 73.4, 41.3, and 35.3% respectively, and mean TNF-α expression levels of 428 pg/mL, 342, 466, 446, 381, 383, and 374 pg/mL, respectively. In addition, the apoptotic rates and TNF-α levels of the WT, ΔespF/pespF, and ΔespFC were significantly higher than that of ΔespF, ΔespFN, ΔespFC/pespFC, and ΔespFN/pespFN group (p < 0.05. The N-terminal of EspF resulted in an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, TNF-α secretion, ROS generation, mitochondria apoptosis, and pathogenicity in BalB/c mice. In conclusion, the N-terminal domain of the Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 EspF more strongly promotes apoptosis and inflammation than the C-terminal domain.

  18. GlyGly-CTERM and rhombosortase: a C-terminal protein processing signal in a many-to-one pairing with a rhomboid family intramembrane serine protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Haft

    Full Text Available The rhomboid family of serine proteases occurs in all domains of life. Its members contain at least six hydrophobic membrane-spanning helices, with an active site serine located deep within the hydrophobic interior of the plasma membrane. The model member GlpG from Escherichia coli is heavily studied through engineered mutant forms, varied model substrates, and multiple X-ray crystal studies, yet its relationship to endogenous substrates is not well understood. Here we describe an apparent membrane anchoring C-terminal homology domain that appears in numerous genera including Shewanella, Vibrio, Acinetobacter, and Ralstonia, but excluding Escherichia and Haemophilus. Individual genomes encode up to thirteen members, usually homologous to each other only in this C-terminal region. The domain's tripartite architecture consists of motif, transmembrane helix, and cluster of basic residues at the protein C-terminus, as also seen with the LPXTG recognition sequence for sortase A and the PEP-CTERM recognition sequence for exosortase. Partial Phylogenetic Profiling identifies a distinctive rhomboid-like protease subfamily almost perfectly co-distributed with this recognition sequence. This protease subfamily and its putative target domain are hereby renamed rhombosortase and GlyGly-CTERM, respectively. The protease and target are encoded by consecutive genes in most genomes with just a single target, but far apart otherwise. The signature motif of the Rhombo-CTERM domain, often SGGS, only partially resembles known cleavage sites of rhomboid protease family model substrates. Some protein families that have several members with C-terminal GlyGly-CTERM domains also have additional members with LPXTG or PEP-CTERM domains instead, suggesting there may be common themes to the post-translational processing of these proteins by three different membrane protein superfamilies.

  19. Surface targeting of the dopamine transporter involves discrete epitopes in the distal C terminus but does not require canonical PDZ domain interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerggaard, Christian; Fog, Jacob U; Hastrup, Hanne; Madsen, Kenneth; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Gether, Ulrik

    2004-08-04

    The human dopamine transporter (hDAT) contains a C-terminal type 2 PDZ (postsynaptic density 95/Discs large/zona occludens 1) domain-binding motif (LKV) known to interact with PDZ domain proteins such as PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1). As reported previously, we found that, after deletion of this motif, hDAT was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 and Neuro2A cells, suggesting that PDZ domain interactions might be critical for hDAT targeting. Nonetheless, substitution of LKV with SLL, the type 1 PDZ-binding sequence from the beta2-adrenergic receptor, did not disrupt plasma membrane targeting. Moreover, the addition of an alanine to the hDAT C terminus (+Ala), resulting in an LKVA termination sequence, or substitution of LKV with alanines (3xAla_618-620) prevented neither plasma membrane targeting nor targeting into sprouting neurites of differentiated N2A cells. The inability of +Ala and 3xAla_618-620 to bind PDZ domains was confirmed by lack of colocalization with PICK1 in cotransfected HEK293 cells and by the inability of corresponding C-terminal fusion proteins to pull down purified PICK1. Thus, although residues in the hDAT C terminus are indispensable for proper targeting, PDZ domain interactions are not required. By progressive substitutions with beta2-adrenergic receptor sequence, and by triple-alanine substitutions in the hDAT C terminus, we examined the importance of epitopes preceding the LKV motif. Substitution of RHW(615-617) with alanines caused retention of the transporter in the ER despite preserved ability of this mutant to bind PICK1. We propose dual roles of the hDAT C terminus: a role independent of PDZ interactions for ER export and surface targeting, and a not fully clarified role involving PDZ interactions with proteins such as PICK1.

  20. The extracellular protein factor Epf from Streptococcus pyogenes is a cell surface adhesin that binds to cells through an N-terminal domain containing a carbohydrate-binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Christian; Siemens, Nikolai; Oehmcke, Sonja; Radjainia, Mazdak; Law, Ruby H P; Whisstock, James C; Baker, Edward N; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2012-11-02

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an exclusively human pathogen. Streptococcal attachment to and entry into epithelial cells is a prerequisite for a successful infection of the human host and requires adhesins. Here, we demonstrate that the multidomain protein Epf from S. pyogenes serotype M49 is a streptococcal adhesin. An epf-deficient mutant showed significantly decreased adhesion to and internalization into human keratinocytes. Cell adhesion is mediated by the N-terminal domain of Epf (EpfN) and increased by the human plasma protein plasminogen. The crystal structure of EpfN, solved at 1.6 Å resolution, shows that it consists of two subdomains: a carbohydrate-binding module and a fibronectin type III domain. Both fold types commonly participate in ligand receptor and protein-protein interactions. EpfN is followed by 18 repeats of a domain classified as DUF1542 (domain of unknown function 1542) and a C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. The DUF1542 repeats are not involved in adhesion, but biophysical studies show they are predominantly α-helical and form a fiber-like stalk of tandem DUF1542 domains. Epf thus conforms with the widespread family of adhesins known as MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules), in which a cell wall-attached stalk enables long range interactions via its adhesive N-terminal domain.

  1. Observations of CO and OI in stars in globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallerstein, G.; Pilachowski, C.

    1978-01-01

    Since studies at classification dispersion and early analyses of high dispersion spectra have yielded little quantitative data on the abundances of C, N, and O in globular clusters the authors have been endeavoring to establish their abundances in stars in several clusters. The problem has been approached in two ways, by observing the 2.3 micron CO bands and the 6300 A [OI] line in individual stars in globular clusters. (Auth.)

  2. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Wewer, U M; Chung, A E

    1995-01-01

    of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF......Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from lambda genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization...

  3. The scavenger receptor SSc5D physically interacts with bacteria through the SRCR-containing N-terminal domain

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    Catarina Bessa-Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR family comprises a group of membrane-attached or secreted proteins that contain one or more modules/domains structurally similar to the membrane distal domain of type I macrophage scavenger receptor. Although no all-inclusive biological function has been ascribed to the SRCR family, some of these receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP of bacteria, fungi or other microbes. SSc5D is a recently described soluble SRCR receptor produced by monocytes/macrophages and T lymphocytes, consisting of an N-terminal portion which contains five SRCR modules, and a large C-terminal mucin-like domain. Towards establishing a global common role for SRCR domains, we interrogated whether the set of five SRCR domains of SSc5D displayed pattern recognition receptor (PRR properties. For that purpose, we have expressed in a mammalian expression system the N-terminal SRCR-containing moiety of SSC5D (N-SSc5D, thus excluding the mucin-like domain likely by nature to bind microorganisms, and tested the capacity of the SRCR functional groups to physically interact with bacteria. Using conventional protein-bacteria binding assays, we showed that N-SSc5D had a superior capacity to bind to E. coli strains RS218 and IHE3034 compared with that of the extracellular domains of the SRCR proteins CD5 and CD6 (sCD5 and sCD6, respectively, and similar E. coli-binding properties as Spα, a proven PRR of the SRCR family. We have further designed a more sensitive, real-time and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR-based assay, and examined the capacity of N-SSc5D, Spα, sCD5 and sCD6 to bind to different bacteria. We demonstrated that the N-SSc5D compares with Spα in the capacity to bind to E. coli and L. monocytogenes, and further that it can distinguish between pathogenic E. coli RS218 and IHE3034 strains and the non-pathogenic laboratory E. coli strain BL21(DE3. Our work thus advocates the

  4. REVIEW: Optics of globular photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.

    2007-05-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter ~200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported.

  5. Phosphatase Rtr1 Regulates Global Levels of Serine 5 RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation and Cotranscriptional Histone Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gerald O; Fox, Melanie J; Smith-Kinnaman, Whitney R; Gogol, Madelaine; Fleharty, Brian; Mosley, Amber L

    2016-09-01

    In eukaryotes, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1 contains a heptapeptide repeat sequence of (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7)n that undergoes reversible phosphorylation through the opposing action of kinases and phosphatases. Rtr1 is a conserved protein that colocalizes with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and has been shown to be important for the transition from elongation to termination during transcription by removing RNAPII CTD serine 5 phosphorylation (Ser5-P) at a selection of target genes. In this study, we show that Rtr1 is a global regulator of the CTD code with deletion of RTR1 causing genome-wide changes in Ser5-P CTD phosphorylation and cotranscriptional histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-resolution microarrays, we show that RTR1 deletion results in global changes in RNAPII Ser5-P levels on genes with different lengths and transcription rates consistent with its role as a CTD phosphatase. Although Ser5-P levels increase, the overall occupancy of RNAPII either decreases or stays the same in the absence of RTR1 Additionally, the loss of Rtr1 in vivo leads to increases in H3K36me3 levels genome-wide, while total histone H3 levels remain relatively constant within coding regions. Overall, these findings suggest that Rtr1 regulates H3K36me3 levels through changes in the number of binding sites for the histone methyltransferase Set2, thereby influencing both the CTD and histone codes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters

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    Matthew J. Benacquista

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10^4 – 10^6 stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker–Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  7. Protein kinase C activation decreases cell surface expression of the GLT-1 subtype of glutamate transporter. Requirement of a carboxyl-terminal domain and partial dependence on serine 486.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalandadze, Avtandil; Wu, Ying; Robinson, Michael B

    2002-11-29

    Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters are required for the clearance of extracellular glutamate and influence both physiological and pathological effects of this excitatory amino acid. In the present study, the effects of a protein kinase C (PKC) activator on the cell surface expression and activity of the GLT-1 subtype of glutamate transporter were examined in two model systems, primary co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes that endogenously express GLT-1 and C6 glioma cells transfected with GLT-1. In both systems, activation of PKC with phorbol ester caused a decrease in GLT-1 cell surface expression. This effect is opposite to the one observed for the EAAC1 subtype of glutamate transporter (Davis, K. E., Straff, D. J., Weinstein, E. A., Bannerman, P. G., Correale, D. M., Rothstein, J. D., and Robinson, M. B. (1998) J. Neurosci. 18, 2475-2485). Several recombinant chimeric proteins between GLT-1 and EAAC1 transporter subtypes were generated to identify domains required for the subtype-specific redistribution of GLT-1. We identified a carboxyl-terminal domain consisting of 43 amino acids (amino acids 475-517) that is required for PKC-induced GLT-1 redistribution. Mutation of a non-conserved serine residue at position 486 partially attenuated but did not completely abolish the PKC-dependent redistribution of GLT-1. Although we observed a phorbol ester-dependent incorporation of (32)P into immunoprecipitable GLT-1, mutation of serine 486 did not reduce this signal. We also found that chimeras containing the first 446 amino acids of GLT-1 were not functional unless amino acids 475-517 of GLT-1 were also present. These non-functional transporters were not as efficiently expressed on the cell surface and migrated to a smaller molecular weight, suggesting that a subtype-specific interaction is required for the formation of functional transporters. These studies demonstrate a novel effect of PKC on GLT-1 activity and define a unique carboxyl-terminal domain as an

  8. Photometric studies of globular clusters in the Andromeda Nebula. Luminosity function for old globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharov, A.S.; Lyutyj, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    The luminosity function for old globular clusters in M 31 is presented. The objects were selected according to their structural and photometric properties. At the usually accepted normal (Gaussian) distribution, the luminosity function is characterized by the following parameters: the mean magnitude, corrected for the extinction inside M 31, V-bar 0 =16 m ,38±0 m .08, and the absolute magnitude M-bar v =-8 m .29 assuming )m-M) v =23 m .67, standard deviation σ M v =1 m .16±0 m .08 and total object number N=300±17. Old globular clusters in M 31 are in the average about one magnitude more luminous then those in our Galaxy (M v ≅ -7 m .3). Intrinsic luminosity dispersions of globular clusters are nearly the same in both galaxies. Available data on globular clusters in the Local Group galaxies against the universality of globular luminosity function with identical parameters M v and σ M v

  9. Missense mutation in DISC1 C-terminal coiled-coil has GSK3β signaling and sex-dependent behavioral effects in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachtler, James; Elliott, Christina; Rodgers, R. John; Baillie, George S.; Clapcote, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a risk factor for schizophrenia and affective disorders. The full-length DISC1 protein consists of an N-terminal ‘head’ domain and a C-terminal tail domain that contains several predicted coiled-coils, structural motifs involved in protein-protein interactions. To probe the in vivo effects of missense mutation of DISC1’s C-terminal tail, we tested mice carrying mutation D453G within a predicted α-helical coiled-coil region. We report that, relative to wild-type littermates, female DISC1D453G mice exhibited novelty-induced hyperlocomotion, an anxiogenic profile in the elevated plus-maze and open field tests, and reduced social exploration of unfamiliar mice. Male DISC1D453G mice displayed a deficit in passive avoidance, while neither males nor females exhibited any impairment in startle reactivity or prepulse inhibition. Whole brain homogenates showed normal levels of DISC1 protein, but decreased binding of DISC1 to GSK3β, decreased phospho-inhibition of GSK3β at serine 9, and decreased levels of β-catenin in DISC1D453G mice of either sex. Interrupted GSK3β signaling may thus be part of the mechanism underlying the behavioral phenotype associated with D453G, in common with the previously described N-terminal domain mutations Q31L and L100P in mice, and the schizophrenia risk-conferring variant R264Q in humans. PMID:26728762

  10. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Brown, R. Lane; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn 2+ -bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn 2+ ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn 2+ binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels

  11. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro [Department of Applied Biochemistry, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Yamazaki, Yasuo [Department of Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588 (Japan); Brown, R. Lane [Neurological Science Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006 (United States); Fujimoto, Zui [Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Morita, Takashi, E-mail: tmorita@my-pharm.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588 (Japan); Mizuno, Hiroshi, E-mail: tmorita@my-pharm.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); VALWAY Technology Center, NEC Soft Ltd, Koto-ku, Tokyo 136-8627 (Japan); Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 6, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Department of Applied Biochemistry, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)

    2008-10-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn{sup 2+}-bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn{sup 2+} ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn{sup 2+} binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels.

  12. Structure of the lamin A/C R482W mutant responsible for dominant familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magracheva, Eugenia; Kozlov, Serguei; Stewart, Colin L.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Zdanov, Alexander; (NCI)

    2009-08-07

    Proteins of the A-type lamin family, which consists of two members, lamin A and lamin C, are the major components of a thin proteinaceous filamentous meshwork, the lamina, that underlies the inner nuclear membrane. A-type lamins have recently become the focus of extensive functional studies as a consequence of the linking of at least eight congenital diseases to mutations in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). This spectrum of pathologies, which mostly manifest themselves as dominant traits, includes muscle dystrophies, dilated cardiomyopathies, the premature aging syndrome Hutchinson-Guilford progeria and familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD). The crystal structure of the lamin A/C mutant R482W, a variant that causes FPLD, has been determined at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. A completely novel aggregation state of the C-terminal globular domain and the position of the mutated amino-acid residue suggest means by which the mutation may affect lamin A/C-protein and protein-DNA interactions.

  13. Multiple C-terminal tail Ca(2+)/CaMs regulate Ca(V)1.2 function but do not mediate channel dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Rumpf, Christine H; Van Petegem, Filip; Arant, Ryan J; Findeisen, Felix; Cooley, Elizabeth S; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Minor, Daniel L

    2010-12-01

    Interactions between voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(V)s) and calmodulin (CaM) modulate Ca(V) function. In this study, we report the structure of a Ca(2+)/CaM Ca(V)1.2 C-terminal tail complex that contains two PreIQ helices bridged by two Ca(2+)/CaMs and two Ca(2+)/CaM-IQ domain complexes. Sedimentation equilibrium experiments establish that the complex has a 2:1 Ca(2+)/CaM:C-terminal tail stoichiometry and does not form higher order assemblies. Moreover, subunit-counting experiments demonstrate that in live cell membranes Ca(V)1.2s are monomers. Thus, contrary to previous proposals, the crystallographic dimer lacks physiological relevance. Isothermal titration calorimetry and biochemical experiments show that the two Ca(2+)/CaMs in the complex have different properties. Ca(2+)/CaM bound to the PreIQ C-region is labile, whereas Ca(2+)/CaM bound to the IQ domain is not. Furthermore, neither of lobes of apo-CaM interacts strongly with the PreIQ domain. Electrophysiological studies indicate that the PreIQ C-region has a role in calcium-dependent facilitation. Together, the data show that two Ca(2+)/CaMs can bind the Ca(V)1.2 tail simultaneously and indicate a functional role for Ca(2+)/CaM at the C-region site.

  14. The rat IgGFcγBP and Muc2 C-terminal domains and TFF3 in two intestinal mucus layers bind together by covalent interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yu

    Full Text Available The secreted proteins from goblet cells compose the intestinal mucus. The aims of this study were to determine how they exist in two intestinal mucus layers.The intestinal mucosa was fixed with Carnoy solution and immunostained. Mucus from the loose layer, the firm layer was gently suctioned or scraped, respectively, lysed in SDS sample buffer with or without DTT, then subjected to the western blotting of rTFF3, rIgGFcγBP or rMuc2. The non-reduced or reduced soluble mucus samples in RIPA buffer were co-immunoprecipitated to investigate their possible interactions. Polyclonal antibodies for rTFF3, the rIgGFcγBP C-terminal domain and the rMuc2 C-terminal domain confirmed their localization in the mucus layer and in the mucus collected from the rat intestinal loose layer or firm layer in both western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments. A complex of rTFF3, which was approximately 250 kDa, and a monomer of 6 kDa were present in both layers of the intestinal mucus; rIgGFcγBP was present in the complex (250-280 kDa under non-reducing conditions, but shifted to 164 kDa under reducing conditions in both of the layers. rMuc2 was found mainly in a complex of 214-270 kDa under non-reducing conditions, but it shifted to 140 kDa under reducing conditions. The co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that binding occurs among rTFF3, rIgGFcγBP and rMuc2 in the RIPA buffer soluble intestinal mucus. Blocking the covalent interaction by 100 mM DTT in the RIPA buffer soluble intestinal mucus disassociated their binding.Rat goblet cell-secreted TFF3, IgGFcγBP and Muc2, existing in the two intestinal mucus layers, are bound together by covalent interactions in the soluble fraction of intestinal mucus and form heteropolymers to be one of the biochemical mechanisms of composing the net-like structure of mucus.

  15. Resolving Hot Spots in the C-Terminal Dimerization Domain that Determine the Stability of the Molecular Chaperone Hsp90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Sven; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz; Groth, Georg; Gohlke, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Human heat shock protein of 90 kDa (hHsp90) is a homodimer that has an essential role in facilitating malignant transformation at the molecular level. Inhibiting hHsp90 function is a validated approach for treating different types of tumors. Inhibiting the dimerization of hHsp90 via its C-terminal domain (CTD) should provide a novel way to therapeutically interfere with hHsp90 function. Here, we predicted hot spot residues that cluster in the CTD dimerization interface by a structural decomposition of the effective energy of binding computed by the MM-GBSA approach and confirmed these predictions using in silico alanine scanning with DrugScorePPI. Mutation of these residues to alanine caused a significant decrease in the melting temperature according to differential scanning fluorimetry experiments, indicating a reduced stability of the mutant hHsp90 complexes. Size exclusion chromatography and multi-angle light scattering studies demonstrate that the reduced stability of the mutant hHsp90 correlates with a lower complex stoichiometry due to the disruption of the dimerization interface. These results suggest that the identified hot spot residues can be used as a pharmacophoric template for identifying and designing small-molecule inhibitors of hHsp90 dimerization. PMID:24760083

  16. Identification of distinct SET/TAF-Iβ domains required for core histone binding and quantitative characterisation of the interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karetsou, Zoe; Emmanouilidou, Anastasia; Sanidas, Ioannis; Liokatis, Stamatis; Nikolakaki, Eleni; Politou, Anastasia S; Papamarcaki, Thomais

    2009-01-01

    Background The assembly of nucleosomes to higher-order chromatin structures is finely tuned by the relative affinities of histones for chaperones and nucleosomal binding sites. The myeloid leukaemia protein SET/TAF-Iβ belongs to the NAP1 family of histone chaperones and participates in several chromatin-based mechanisms, such as chromatin assembly, nucleosome reorganisation and transcriptional activation. To better understand the histone chaperone function of SET/TAF-Iβ, we designed several SET/TAF-Iβ truncations, examined their structural integrity by circular Dichroism and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively the histone binding properties of wild-type protein and mutant forms using GST-pull down experiments and fluorescence spectroscopy-based binding assays. Results Wild type SET/TAF-Iβ binds to histones H2B and H3 with Kd values of 2.87 and 0.15 μM, respectively. The preferential binding of SET/TAF-Iβ to histone H3 is mediated by its central region and the globular part of H3. On the contrary, the acidic C-terminal tail and the amino-terminal dimerisation domain of SET/TAF-Iβ, as well as the H3 amino-terminal tail, are dispensable for this interaction. Conclusion This type of analysis allowed us to assess the relative affinities of SET/TAF-Iβ for different histones and identify the domains of the protein required for effective histone recognition. Our findings are consistent with recent structural studies of SET/TAF-Iβ and can be valuable to understand the role of SET/TAF-Iβ in chromatin function. PMID:19358706

  17. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of Nostoc sp. C139A variant of the heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandropoulos, Ioannis I; Argyriou, Aikaterini I; Marousis, Kostas D; Topouzis, Stavros; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2016-10-01

    The H-NOX (Heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding) domain is conserved across eukaryotes and bacteria. In human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) the H-NOX domain functions as a sensor for the gaseous signaling agent nitric oxide (NO). sGC contains the heme-binding H-NOX domain at its N-terminus, which regulates the catalytic site contained within the C-terminal end of the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of GTP (guanosine 5'-triphosphate) to GMP (guanylyl monophosphate). Here, we present the backbone and side-chain assignments of the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances of the 183-residue H-NOX domain from Nostoc sp. through solution NMR.

  18. Conversion of functionally undefined homopentameric protein PbaA into a proteasome activator by mutational modification of its C-terminal segment conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Sikdar, Arunima; Kozai, Toshiya; Inoue, Rintaro; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Yagi, Hirokazu; Satoh, Tadashi; Kato, Koichi

    2018-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic analyses identified proteasome assembly chaperone-like proteins, PbaA and PbaB, in archaea. PbaB forms a homotetramer and functions as a proteasome activator, whereas PbaA does not interact with the proteasome despite the presence of an apparent C-terminal proteasome activation motif. We revealed that PbaA forms a homopentamer predominantly in the closed conformation with its C-terminal segments packed against the core domains, in contrast to the PbaB homotetramer with projecting C-terminal segments. This prompted us to create a novel proteasome activator based on a well-characterized structural framework. We constructed a panel of chimeric proteins comprising the homopentameric scaffold of PbaA and C-terminal segment of PbaB and subjected them to proteasome-activating assays as well as small-angle X-ray scattering and high-speed atomic force microscopy. The results indicated that the open conformation and consequent proteasome activation activity could be enhanced by replacement of the crystallographically disordered C-terminal segment of PbaA with the corresponding disordered segment of PbaB. Moreover, these effects can be produced just by incorporating two glutamate residues into the disordered C-terminal segment of PbaA, probably due to electrostatic repulsion among the negatively charged segments. Thus, we successfully endowed a functionally undefined protein with proteasome-activating activity by modifying its C-terminal segment. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. SARS-coronavirus spike S2 domain flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833 is important for activation of membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    The S2 domain of the coronavirus spike (S) protein is known to be responsible for mediating membrane fusion. In addition to a well-recognized cleavage site at the S1-S2 boundary, a second proteolytic cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). C-terminal to this S2 cleavage site is a conserved region flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833. Here, we investigated the importance of this well conserved region for SARS-CoV S-mediated fusion activation. We show that the residues between C822-C833 are well conserved across all coronaviruses. Mutagenic analysis of SARS-CoV S, combined with cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for the core-conserved residues C822, D830, L831, and C833. Based on available predictive models, we propose that the conserved domain flanked by cysteines 822 and 833 forms a loop structure that interacts with components of the SARS-CoV S trimer to control the activation of membrane fusion.

  20. Globular clusters and galaxy halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Bergh, S.

    1984-01-01

    Using semipartial correlation coefficients and bootstrap techniques, a study is made of the important features of globular clusters with respect to the total number of galaxy clusters and dependence of specific galaxy cluster on parent galaxy type, cluster radii, luminosity functions and cluster ellipticity. It is shown that the ellipticity of LMC clusters correlates significantly with cluster luminosity functions, but not with cluster age. The cluter luminosity value above which globulars are noticeably flattened may differ by a factor of about 100 from galaxy to galaxy. Both in the Galaxy and in M31 globulars with small core radii have a Gaussian distribution over luminosity, whereas clusters with large core radii do not. In the cluster systems surrounding the Galaxy, M31 and NGC 5128 the mean radii of globular clusters was found to increase with the distance from the nucleus. Central galaxies in rich clusters have much higher values for specific globular cluster frequency than do other cluster ellipticals, suggesting that such central galaxies must already have been different from normal ellipticals at the time they were formed

  1. Identification of the C-Terminal GH5 Domain from CbCel9B/Man5A as the First Glycoside Hydrolase with Thermal Activation Property from a Multimodular Bifunctional Enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Wang

    Full Text Available Caldicellulosiruptor bescii encodes at least six unique multimodular glycoside hydrolases crucial for plant cell wall polysaccharides degradation, with each having two catalytic domains separated by two to three carbohydrate binding modules. Among the six enzymes, three have one N- or C-terminal GH5 domain with identical amino acid sequences. Despite a few reports on some of these multimodular enzymes, little is known about how the conserved GH5 domains behave, which are believed to be important due to the gene duplication. We thus cloned a representative GH5 domain from the C-terminus of a multimodular protein, i.e. the bifunctional cellulase/mannanase CbCel9B/Man5A which has been reported, and expressed it in Escherichia coli. Without any appending CBMs, the recombinant CbMan5A was still able to hydrolyze a variety of mannan substrates with different backbone linkages or side-chain decorations. While CbMan5A displayed the same pH optimum as CbCel9B/Man5A, it had an increased optimal temperature (90°C and moreover, was activated by heating at 70°C and 80°C, a property not ever reported for the full-length protein. The turnover numbers of CbMan5A on mannan substrates were, however, lower than those of CbCel9B/Man5A. These data suggested that evolution of CbMan5A and the other domains into a single polypeptide is not a simple assembly; rather, the behavior of one module may be affected by the other ones in the full-length enzyme. The differential scanning calorimetry analysis further indicated that heating CbMan5A was not a simple transition state process. To the best knowledge of the authors, CbMan5A is the first glycoside hydrolase with thermal activation property identified from a multimodular bifunctional enzyme.

  2. Shaping Globular Clusters with Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    , single and binary star evolution, galactic tides, and multi-body encounters. From their grid of models with varying input parameters, the authors then determine which fit best to NGC 3201s final observational properties.Surface brightness profiles for all globular-cluster models at late times compared to observations of NGC 3201 (yellow circles). Blue lines represent models with few retained black holes; black lines represent models with many retained black holes. [Kremer et al. 2018]Retention MattersKremer and collaborators find that the models that best represent NGC 3201 all retain more than 200 black holes at the end of the simulation; models that lost too many black holes due to natal kicks did not match observations of NGC 3201 as well. The models with large numbers of retained black holes also harbored binaries just like the one recently detected in NGC 3201.Models that retain few black holes, on the other hand, may instead be good descriptions of so-called core-collapsed globular clusters observed in the Milky Way. The authors demonstrate that these clusters could contain black holes in binaries with stars known as blue stragglers, which may also be detectable with radial velocity techniques.Kremer and collaborators results suggest that globular clusters similar to NGC 3201 contain hundreds of invisible black holes waiting to be discovered, and they indicate some of the differences in cluster properties caused by hosting such a large population of black holes. We can hope that future observations and modeling will continue to illuminate the complicated relationship between globular clusters and the black holes that live in them.CitationKyle Kremer et al 2018 ApJL 855 L15. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aab26c

  3. Directed evolution of the TALE N-terminal domain for recognition of all 5′ bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Brian M.; Mercer, Andrew C.; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can be designed to bind virtually any DNA sequence. General guidelines for design of TALE DNA-binding domains suggest that the 5′-most base of the DNA sequence bound by the TALE (the N0 base) should be a thymine. We quantified the N0 requirement by analysis of the activities of TALE transcription factors (TALE-TF), TALE recombinases (TALE-R) and TALE nucleases (TALENs) with each DNA base at this position. In the absence of a 5′ T, we observed decreases in TALE activity up to >1000-fold in TALE-TF activity, up to 100-fold in TALE-R activity and up to 10-fold reduction in TALEN activity compared with target sequences containing a 5′ T. To develop TALE architectures that recognize all possible N0 bases, we used structure-guided library design coupled with TALE-R activity selections to evolve novel TALE N-terminal domains to accommodate any N0 base. A G-selective domain and broadly reactive domains were isolated and characterized. The engineered TALE domains selected in the TALE-R format demonstrated modularity and were active in TALE-TF and TALEN architectures. Evolved N-terminal domains provide effective and unconstrained TALE-based targeting of any DNA sequence as TALE binding proteins and designer enzymes. PMID:23980031

  4. Structures of BIR domains from human NAIP and cIAP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Maria Dolores; Moche, Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Welin, Martin; Trésaugues, Lionel; Johansson, Ida; Nilsson, Martina; Nordlund, Pär; Nyman, Tomas

    2009-11-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family of proteins contains key modulators of apoptosis and inflammation that interact with caspases through baculovirus IAP-repeat (BIR) domains. Overexpression of IAP proteins frequently occurs in cancer cells, thus counteracting the activated apoptotic program. The IAP proteins have therefore emerged as promising targets for cancer therapy. In this work, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the first structures of BIR domains from human NAIP and cIAP2. Both structures harbour an N-terminal tetrapeptide in the conserved peptide-binding groove. The structures reveal that these two proteins bind the tetrapeptides in a similar mode as do other BIR domains. Detailed interactions are described for the P1'-P4' side chains of the peptide, providing a structural basis for peptide-specific recognition. An arginine side chain in the P3' position reveals favourable interactions with its hydrophobic moiety in the binding pocket, while hydrophobic residues in the P2' and P4' pockets make similar interactions to those seen in other BIR domain-peptide complexes. The structures also reveal how a serine in the P1' position is accommodated in the binding pockets of NAIP and cIAP2. In addition to shedding light on the specificity determinants of these two proteins, the structures should now also provide a framework for future structure-based work targeting these proteins.

  5. Structure and catalytic regulatory function of ubiquitin specific protease 11 N-terminal and ubiquitin-like domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Stephen; Gratton, Hayley E; Cornaciu, Irina; Oberer, Monika; Scott, David J; Emsley, Jonas; Dreveny, Ingrid

    2014-05-13

    The ubiquitin specific protease 11 (USP11) is implicated in DNA repair, viral RNA replication, and TGFβ signaling. We report the first characterization of the USP11 domain architecture and its role in regulating the enzymatic activity. USP11 consists of an N-terminal "domain present in USPs" (DUSP) and "ubiquitin-like" (UBL) domain, together referred to as DU domains, and the catalytic domain harboring a second UBL domain. Crystal structures of the DU domains show a tandem arrangement with a shortened β-hairpin at the two-domain interface and altered surface characteristics compared to the homologues USP4 and USP15. A conserved VEVY motif is a signature feature at the two-domain interface that shapes a potential protein interaction site. Small angle X-ray scattering and gel filtration experiments are consistent with the USP11DU domains and full-length USP11 being monomeric. Unexpectedly, we reveal, through kinetic assays of a series of deletion mutants, that the catalytic activity of USP11 is not regulated through intramolecular autoinhibition or activation by the N-terminal DU or UBL domains. Moreover, ubiquitin chain cleavage assays with all eight linkages reveal a preference for Lys(63)-, Lys(6)-, Lys(33)-, and Lys(11)-linked chains over Lys(27)-, Lys(29)-, and Lys(48)-linked and linear chains consistent with USP11's function in DNA repair pathways that is mediated by the protease domain. Our data support a model whereby USP11 domains outside the catalytic core domain serve as protein interaction or trafficking modules rather than a direct regulatory function of the proteolytic activity. This highlights the diversity of USPs in substrate recognition and regulation of ubiquitin deconjugation.

  6. Insights into Substrate Specificity of NlpC/P60 Cell Wall Hydrolases Containing Bacterial SH3 Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-09-15

    ABSTRACT

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. These enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting of two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.

    IMPORTANCEPeptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural

  7. The Extracellular Protein Factor Epf from Streptococcus pyogenes Is a Cell Surface Adhesin That Binds to Cells through an N-terminal Domain Containing a Carbohydrate-binding Module*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Christian; Siemens, Nikolai; Oehmcke, Sonja; Radjainia, Mazdak; Law, Ruby H. P.; Whisstock, James C.; Baker, Edward N.; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an exclusively human pathogen. Streptococcal attachment to and entry into epithelial cells is a prerequisite for a successful infection of the human host and requires adhesins. Here, we demonstrate that the multidomain protein Epf from S. pyogenes serotype M49 is a streptococcal adhesin. An epf-deficient mutant showed significantly decreased adhesion to and internalization into human keratinocytes. Cell adhesion is mediated by the N-terminal domain of Epf (EpfN) and increased by the human plasma protein plasminogen. The crystal structure of EpfN, solved at 1.6 Å resolution, shows that it consists of two subdomains: a carbohydrate-binding module and a fibronectin type III domain. Both fold types commonly participate in ligand receptor and protein-protein interactions. EpfN is followed by 18 repeats of a domain classified as DUF1542 (domain of unknown function 1542) and a C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. The DUF1542 repeats are not involved in adhesion, but biophysical studies show they are predominantly α-helical and form a fiber-like stalk of tandem DUF1542 domains. Epf thus conforms with the widespread family of adhesins known as MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules), in which a cell wall-attached stalk enables long range interactions via its adhesive N-terminal domain. PMID:22977243

  8. Combined x-ray crystallography and computational modeling approach to investigate the Hsp90 C-terminal peptide binding to FKBP51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Moche, Martin; Winblad, Bengt; Pavlov, Pavel F

    2017-10-27

    FK506 binding protein of 51 kDa (FKBP51) is a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) co-chaperone involved in the regulation of steroid hormone receptors activity. It is known for its role in various regulatory pathways implicated in mood and stress-related disorders, cancer, obesity, Alzheimer's disease and corticosteroid resistant asthma. It consists of two FKBP12 like active peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase) domains (an active FK1 and inactive FK2 domain) and one tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain that mediates interaction with Hsp90 via its C-terminal MEEVD peptide. Here, we report a combined x-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics study to reveal the binding mechanism of Hsp90 MEEVD peptide to the TPR domain of FKBP51. The results demonstrated that the Hsp90 C-terminal peptide binds to the TPR domain of FKBP51 with the help of di-carboxylate clamp involving Lys272, Glu273, Lys352, Asn322, and Lys329 which are conserved throughout several di-carboxylate clamp TPR proteins. Interestingly, the results from molecular dynamics study are also in agreement to the complex structure where all the contacts between these two partners were consistent throughout the simulation period. In a nutshell, our findings provide new opportunity to engage this important protein-protein interaction target by small molecules designed by structure based drug design strategy.

  9. N- versus C-domain selectivity of catalytic inactivation of human angiotensin converting enzyme by lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C; Cowan, J A

    2013-12-27

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic angiotensin I converting enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates was tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of each domain of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and catalytic factors (double-filter effect).

  10. Involvement of the N-terminal unique domain of Chk tyrosine kinase in Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Yuji; Kawana, Akiko; Igarashi, Asae; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2006-01-01

    Chk tyrosine kinase phosphorylates Src-family kinases and suppresses their kinase activity. We recently showed that Chk localizes to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm and inhibits cell proliferation. In this study, we explored the role of the N-terminal unique domain of Chk in nuclear localization and Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus. In situ binding experiments showed that the N-terminal domain of Chk was associated with the nucleus and the nuclear matrix. The presence of the N-terminal domain of Chk led to a fourfold increase in cell population exhibiting Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus. Expression of Chk but not kinase-deficient Chk induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a variety of proteins ranging from 23 kDa to ∼200 kDa, especially in Triton X-100-insoluble fraction that included chromatin and the nuclear matrix. Intriguingly, in situ subnuclear fractionations revealed that Chk induced tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins that were associated with the nuclear matrix. These results suggest that various unidentified substrates of Chk, besides Src-family kinases, may be present in the nucleus. Thus, our findings indicate that the importance of the N-terminal domain to Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus, implicating that these nuclear tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins may contribute to inhibition of cell proliferation

  11. The phosphoCTD-interacting domain of Topoisomerase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhong; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih; Greenleaf, Arno L.

    2010-01-01

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Topoisomerase I has been shown to bind to RNA polymerase II, but the domain of RNAPII with which it interacts is not known. Using bacterially-expressed fusion proteins carrying all or half of the NTDs of Dm and human (Homo sapiens, Hs) Topo I, we demonstrate that the N-terminal half of each NTD binds directly to the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (phosphoCTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1. Thus, the amino terminal segment of metazoan Topo I (1-157 for Dm and 1-114 for Hs) contains a novel phosphoCTD-interacting domain that we designate the Topo I-Rpb1 interacting (TRI) domain. The long-known in vivo association of Topo I with active genes presumably can be attributed, wholly or in part, to the TRI domain-mediated binding of Topo I to the phosphoCTD of transcribing RNAPII.

  12. The phosphoCTD-interacting domain of Topoisomerase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jianhong; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih [Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Greenleaf, Arno L., E-mail: arno.greenleaf@duke.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2010-06-18

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Topoisomerase I has been shown to bind to RNA polymerase II, but the domain of RNAPII with which it interacts is not known. Using bacterially-expressed fusion proteins carrying all or half of the NTDs of Dm and human (Homo sapiens, Hs) Topo I, we demonstrate that the N-terminal half of each NTD binds directly to the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (phosphoCTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1. Thus, the amino terminal segment of metazoan Topo I (1-157 for Dm and 1-114 for Hs) contains a novel phosphoCTD-interacting domain that we designate the Topo I-Rpb1 interacting (TRI) domain. The long-known in vivo association of Topo I with active genes presumably can be attributed, wholly or in part, to the TRI domain-mediated binding of Topo I to the phosphoCTD of transcribing RNAPII.

  13. Human pro. cap alpha. 1)(I) collagen: cDNA sequence for the C-propeptide domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, J K; Raassina, M; Virta, A; Vuorio, E

    1988-01-11

    The authors have previously constructed a cDNA clone pHCAL1, covering most of the C-terminal propeptide domain of human pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen mRNA,by inserting a 678 bp EcoRI-XhoI fragment of cDNA into pBR322. Since the XhoI/SalI ligation prevented removal of the insert, they used the same strategy to obtain a similar clone in pUC8. RNA was isolated from fetal calvarial bones. The cDNA was digested with EcoRI and XhoI and fractionated on a 1 % agarose gel. Fragments of 650-700 bp were cloned in pUC8 at the polylinker site, which now permits easy removal of the insert. The new clone was named pHCAL1U since the RNA was isolated from another individual. The approach outlined is useful for studies on individual variation which is important to recognize when searching for disease-related mutations in type I collagen.

  14. Ribonucleocapsid Formation of SARS-COV Through Molecular Action of the N-Terminal Domain of N Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, K.S.; Joseph, J.S.; Subramanian, V.; Neuman, B.W.; Buchmeier, M.J.; Stevens, R.C.; Kuhn, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-12

    Conserved amongst all coronaviruses are four structural proteins, the matrix (M), small envelope (E) and spike (S) that are embedded in the viral membrane and the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), which exists in a ribonucleoprotein complex in their lumen. The N terminal domain of coronaviral N proteins (N-NTD) provides a scaffold for RNA binding while the C-terminal domain (N-CTD) mainly acts as oligomerization modules during assembly. The C-terminus of N protein anchors it to the viral membrane by associating with M protein. We characterized the structures of N-NTD from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in two crystal forms, at 1.17A (monoclinic) and 1.85 A (cubic) respectively, solved by molecular replacement using the homologous avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) structure. Flexible loops in the solution structure of SARS-CoV N-NTD are now shown to be well ordered around the beta-sheet core. The functionally important positively charged beta-hairpin protrudes out of the core and is oriented similar to that in the IBV N-NTD and is involved in crystal packing in the monoclinic form. In the cubic form, the monomers form trimeric units that stack in a helical array. Comparison of crystal packing of SARS-CoV and IBV N-NTDs suggest a common mode of RNA recognition, but probably associate differently in vivo during the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex. Electrostatic potential distribution on the surface of homology models of related coronaviral N-NTDs hints that they employ different modes of both RNA recognition as well as oligomeric assembly, perhaps explaining why their nucleocapsids have different morphologies.

  15. Structural and functional characterization of the recombinant death domain from death-associated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioletis, Evangelos; Dingley, Andrew J; Driscoll, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPk) is a calcium/calmodulin-regulated Ser/Thr-protein kinase that functions at an important point of integration for cell death signaling pathways. DAPk has a structurally unique multi-domain architecture, including a C-terminally positioned death domain (DD) that is a positive regulator of DAPk activity. In this study, recombinant DAPk-DD was observed to aggregate readily and could not be prepared in sufficient yield for structural analysis. However, DAPk-DD could be obtained as a soluble protein in the form of a translational fusion protein with the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G. In contrast to other DDs that adopt the canonical six amphipathic α-helices arranged in a compact fold, the DAPk-DD was found to possess surprisingly low regular secondary structure content and an absence of a stable globular fold, as determined by circular dichroism (CD), NMR spectroscopy and a temperature-dependent fluorescence assay. Furthermore, we measured the in vitro interaction between extracellular-regulated kinase-2 (ERK2) and various recombinant DAPk-DD constructs. Despite the low level of structural order, the recombinant DAPk-DD retained the ability to interact with ERK2 in a 1∶1 ratio with a K d in the low micromolar range. Only the full-length DAPk-DD could bind ERK2, indicating that the apparent 'D-motif' located in the putative sixth helix of DAPk-DD is not sufficient for ERK2 recognition. CD analysis revealed that binding of DAPk-DD to ERK2 is not accompanied by a significant change in secondary structure. Taken together our data argue that the DAPk-DD, when expressed in isolation, does not adopt a classical DD fold, yet in this state retains the capacity to interact with at least one of its binding partners. The lack of a stable globular structure for the DAPk-DD may reflect either that its folding would be supported by interactions absent in our experimental set-up, or a limitation in the structural bioinformatics

  16. Structural and dynamic properties of the C-terminal region of the Escherichia coli RNA chaperone Hfq: integrative experimental and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Bin; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Jiahai; Gong, Qingguo; Shi, Yunyu; Wu, Jihui; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2017-08-09

    In Escherichia coli, hexameric Hfq is an important RNA chaperone that facilitates small RNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. The Hfq monomer consists of an evolutionarily conserved Sm domain (residues 1-65) and a flexible C-terminal region (residues 66-102). It has been recognized that the existence of the C-terminal region is important for the function of Hfq, but its detailed structural and dynamic properties remain elusive due to its disordered nature. In this work, using integrative experimental techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering, as well as multi-scale computational simulations, new insights into the structure and dynamics of the C-terminal region in the context of the Hfq hexamer are provided. Although the C-terminal region is intrinsically disordered, some residues (83-86) are motionally restricted. The hexameric core may affect the secondary structure propensity of the C-terminal region, due to transient interactions between them. The residues at the rim and the proximal side of the core have significantly more transient contacts with the C-terminal region than those residues at the distal side, which may facilitate the function of the C-terminal region in the release of double-stranded RNAs and the cycling of small non-coding RNAs. Structure ensembles constructed by fitting the experimental data also support that the C-terminal region prefers to locate at the proximal side. From multi-scale simulations, we propose that the C-terminal region may play a dual role of steric effect (especially at the proximal side) and recruitment (at the both sides) in the binding process of RNA substrates. Interestingly, we have found that these motionally restricted residues may serve as important binding sites for the incoming RNAs that is probably driven by favorable electrostatic interactions. These integrative studies may aid in our understanding of the functional role of the C-terminal region of Hfq.

  17. N- vs. C-Domain Selectivity of Catalytic Inactivation of Human Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C.; Cowan, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates were tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of the M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and orientation factors (double-filter effect). PMID:24228790

  18. Heparan sulfate regulates fibrillin-1 N- and C-terminal interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cain, Stuart A; Baldwin, Andrew K; Mahalingam, Yashithra

    2008-01-01

    Fibrillin-1 N- and C-terminal heparin binding sites have been characterized. An unprocessed monomeric N-terminal fragment (PF1) induced a very high heparin binding response, indicating heparin-mediated multimerization. Using PF1 deletion and short fragments, a heparin binding site was localized w......-terminal interactions with heparin/heparan sulfate directly influence cell behavior, whereas C-terminal interactions with heparin/heparan sulfate regulate elastin deposition. These data highlight how heparin/heparan sulfate controls fibrillin-1 interactions....

  19. Human TRPA1 is intrinsically cold- and chemosensitive with and without its N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moparthi, Lavanya; Survery, Sabeen; Kreir, Mohamed; Simonsen, Charlotte; Kjellbom, Per; Högestätt, Edward D; Johanson, Urban; Zygmunt, Peter M

    2014-11-25

    We have purified and reconstituted human transient receptor potential (TRP) subtype A1 (hTRPA1) into lipid bilayers and recorded single-channel currents to understand its inherent thermo- and chemosensory properties as well as the role of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of the N terminus in channel behavior. We report that hTRPA1 with and without its N-terminal ARD (Δ1-688 hTRPA1) is intrinsically cold-sensitive, and thus, cold-sensing properties of hTRPA1 reside outside the N-terminal ARD. We show activation of hTRPA1 by the thiol oxidant 2-((biotinoyl)amino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSEA-biotin) and that electrophilic compounds activate hTRPA1 in the presence and absence of the N-terminal ARD. The nonelectrophilic compounds menthol and the cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabiorcol (C16) directly activate hTRPA1 at different sites independent of the N-terminal ARD. The TRPA1 antagonist HC030031 inhibited cold and chemical activation of hTRPA1 and Δ1-688 hTRPA1, supporting a direct interaction with hTRPA1 outside the N-terminal ARD. These findings show that hTRPA1 is an intrinsically cold- and chemosensitive ion channel. Thus, second messengers, including Ca(2+), or accessory proteins are not needed for hTRPA1 responses to cold or chemical activators. We suggest that conformational changes outside the N-terminal ARD by cold, electrophiles, and nonelectrophiles are important in hTRPA1 channel gating and that targeting chemical interaction sites outside the N-terminal ARD provides possibilities to fine tune TRPA1-based drug therapies (e.g., for treatment of pain associated with cold hypersensitivity and cardiovascular disease).

  20. Hydrophobic interaction between the SH2 domain and the kinase domain is required for the activation of Csk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Esa T; Gahmberg, Carl G

    2010-06-18

    The protein tyrosine kinase C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) is activated by the engagement of its Src homology (SH) 2 domain. However, the molecular mechanism required for this is not completely understood. The crystal structure of the active Csk indicates that Csk could be activated by contact between the SH2 domain and the beta3-alphaC loop in the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. To study the importance of this interaction for the SH2-domain-mediated activation of Csk, we mutated the amino acid residues forming the contacts between the SH2 domain and the beta3-alphaC loop. The mutation of the beta3-alphaC loop Ala228 to glycine and of the SH2 domain Tyr116, Tyr133, Leu138, and Leu149 to alanine resulted in the inability of the SH2 domain ligand to activate Csk. Furthermore, the overexpressed Csk mutants A228G, Y133A/Y116A, L138A, and L149A were unable to efficiently inactivate endogenous Src in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The results suggest that the SH2-domain-mediated activation of Csk is dependent on the binding of the beta3-alphaC loop Ala228 to the hydrophobic pocket formed by the side chains of Tyr116, Tyr133, Leu138, and Leu149 on the surface of the SH2 domain. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The DnaA N-terminal domain interacts with Hda to facilitate replicase clamp-mediated inactivation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'etsugu, Masayuki; Harada, Yuji; Keyamura, Kenji; Matsunaga, Chika; Kasho, Kazutoshi; Abe, Yoshito; Ueda, Tadashi; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2013-12-01

    DnaA activity for replication initiation of the Escherichia coli chromosome is negatively regulated by feedback from the DNA-loaded form of the replicase clamp. In this process, called RIDA (regulatory inactivation of DnaA), ATP-bound DnaA transiently assembles into a complex consisting of Hda and the DNA-clamp, which promotes inter-AAA+ domain association between Hda and DnaA and stimulates hydrolysis of DnaA-bound ATP, producing inactive ADP-DnaA. Using a truncated DnaA mutant, we previously demonstrated that the DnaA N-terminal domain is involved in RIDA. However, the precise role of the N-terminal domain in RIDA has remained largely unclear. Here, we used an in vitro reconstituted system to demonstrate that the Asn-44 residue in the N-terminal domain of DnaA is crucial for RIDA but not for replication initiation. Moreover, an assay termed PDAX (pull-down after cross-linking) revealed an unstable interaction between a DnaA-N44A mutant and Hda. In vivo, this mutant exhibited an increase in the cellular level of ATP-bound DnaA. These results establish a model in which interaction between DnaA Asn-44 and Hda stabilizes the association between the AAA+ domains of DnaA and Hda to facilitate DnaA-ATP hydrolysis during RIDA. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Upregulation of α7 Nicotinic Receptors by Acetylcholinesterase C-Terminal Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Cherie E.; Zimmermann, Martina; Greenfield, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) is well known as a potent calcium ionophore that, in the brain, has been implicated in excitotoxicity and hence in the underlying mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Previous research implied that the activity of this receptor may be modified by exposure to a peptide fragment derived from the C-terminal region of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. This investigation was undertaken to determine if the functional changes observed could be attributed to peptide binding interaction with the α7-nAChR, or peptide modulation of receptor expression. Methodology/Principal Findings This study provides evidence that two peptides derived from the C-terminus of acetylcholinesterase, not only selectively displace specific bungarotoxin binding at the α7-nAChR, but also alter receptor binding properties for its familiar ligands, including the alternative endogenous agonist choline. Of more long-term significance, these peptides also induce upregulation of α7-nAChR mRNA and protein expression, as well as enhancing receptor trafficking to the plasma membrane. Conclusions/Significance The results reported here demonstrate a hitherto unknown relationship between the α7-nAChR and the non-enzymatic functions of acetylcholinesterase, mediated independently by its C-terminal domain. Such an interaction may prove valuable as a pharmacological tool, prompting new approaches for understanding, and combating, the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:19287501

  3. The nature of the Syntaxin4 C-terminus affects Munc18c-supported SNARE assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Rehman

    Full Text Available Vesicular transport of cellular cargo requires targeted membrane fusion and formation of a SNARE protein complex that draws the two apposing fusing membranes together. Insulin-regulated delivery and fusion of glucose transporter-4 storage vesicles at the cell surface is dependent on two key proteins: the SNARE integral membrane protein Syntaxin4 (Sx4 and the soluble regulatory protein Munc18c. Many reported in vitro studies of Munc18c:Sx4 interactions and of SNARE complex formation have used soluble Sx4 constructs lacking the native transmembrane domain. As a consequence, the importance of the Sx4 C-terminal anchor remains poorly understood. Here we show that soluble C-terminally truncated Sx4 dissociates more rapidly from Munc18c than Sx4 where the C-terminal transmembrane domain is replaced with a T4-lysozyme fusion. We also show that Munc18c appears to inhibit SNARE complex formation when soluble C-terminally truncated Sx4 is used but does not inhibit SNARE complex formation when Sx4 is C-terminally anchored (by a C-terminal His-tag bound to resin, by a C-terminal T4L fusion or by the native C-terminal transmembrane domain in detergent micelles. We conclude that the C-terminus of Sx4 is critical for its interaction with Munc18c, and that the reported inhibitory role of Munc18c may be an artifact of experimental design. These results support the notion that a primary role of Munc18c is to support SNARE complex formation and membrane fusion.

  4. Structure of a double hexamer of the Pyrococcus furiosus minichromosome maintenance protein N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Martin; Enemark, Eric J.

    2016-06-22

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of thePyrococcus furiosusminichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein as a double hexamer is described. The MCM complex is a ring-shaped helicase that unwinds DNA at the replication fork of eukaryotes and archaea. Prior to replication initiation, the MCM complex assembles as an inactive double hexamer at specific sites of DNA. The presented structure is highly consistent with previous MCM double-hexamer structures and shows two MCM hexamers with a head-to-head interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain. Minor differences include a diminished head-to-head interaction and a slightly reduced inter-hexamer rotation.

  5. Characterization of the C-terminal ER membrane anchor of PTP1B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderie, Ines; Schulz, Irene; Schmid, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of cell function. In living cells PTP1B activity is restricted to the vicinity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by post-translational C-terminal attachment of PTP1B to the ER membrane network. In our study we investigated the membrane anchor of PTP1B by use of EGFP fusion proteins. We demonstrate that the membrane anchor of PTP1B cannot be narrowed down to a unique amino acid sequence with a defined start and stop point but rather is moveable within several amino acids. Removal of up to seven amino acids from the C-terminus, as well as exchange of single amino acids in the putative transmembrane sequence did not influence subcellular localization of PTP1B. With the method of bimolecular fluorescence complementation we could demonstrate dimerization of PTP1B in vivo. Homodimerization was, in contrast to other tail-anchored proteins, not dependent on the membrane anchor. Our data demonstrate that the C-terminal membrane anchor of PTP1B is formed by a combination of a single stretch transmembrane domain (TMD) followed by a tail. TMD and tail length are variable and there are no sequence-specific features. Our data for PTP1B are consistent with a concept that explains the ER membrane anchor of tail-anchored proteins as a physicochemical structure

  6. The C-Terminal Domain of Cernunnos/XLF Is Dispensable for DNA Repair In Vivo▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malivert, Laurent; Callebaut, Isabelle; Rivera-Munoz, Paola; Fischer, Alain; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Revy, Patrick; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The core nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair pathway is composed of seven factors: Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Artemis, XRCC4 (X4), DNA ligase IV (L4), and Cernunnos/XLF (Cernunnos). Although Cernunnos and X4 are structurally related and participate in the same complex together with L4, they have distinct functions during DNA repair. L4 relies on X4 but not on Cernunnos for its stability, and L4 is required for optimal interaction of Cernunnos with X4. We demonstrate here, using in vitro-generated Cernunnos mutants and a series of functional assays in vivo, that the C-terminal region of Cernunnos is dispensable for its activity during DNA repair. PMID:19103754

  7. La galaxia NGC 6876 y su sistema de cúmulos globulares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, A. I.; Bassino, L. P.; Caso, J. P.

    2017-10-01

    We present preliminary results of the deep photometric study of the elliptical galaxy NGC6876, located at the center of the Pavo group, and its globular cluster system. We use images obtained with the GMOS camera mounted on the Gemini South telescope, in the and bands, with the purpose of disentangling the evolutionary history of the galaxy on the basis of their characteristics.

  8. Pregalactic formation of globular clusters in cold dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faber, S.M.; Blumenthal, G.R.; Rosenblatt, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The pregalactic hypothesis for the formation of globular clusters is reconsidered in the light of Zinn's (1985) discovery of a two-component globular population in the Milky Way. For a cold dark matter spectrum, high-sigma fluctuations of 10 to the 5th - 10 to the 6th solar masses are assumed to be the progenitors of the spheroidal population of globular clusters. The mass fraction of globular clusters in galaxies then requires that perturbations above roughly 2.8 sigma survive as globulars, and their observed radii require baryonic collapse factors of order 10. Such an absolute density threshold for globular cluster formation achieves adequate fits to observed cluster radii and densities, the mass fraction of globulars versus Hubble type, the radial density profile of globulars within galaxies, and the globular luminosity function. However, a fixed density threshold criterion for cluster survival lacks convincing physical justification and does not by itself explain the homogeneous metallicities within clusters or the large metallicity variations from cluster to cluster and from galaxy to galaxy. 33 references

  9. Statistical interior properties of globular proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou-Ting, Jiang; Tai-Quan, Wu; Lin-Xi, Zhang; Ting-Ting, Sun

    2009-01-01

    The character of forming long-range contacts affects the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins deeply. As the different ability to form long-range contacts between 20 types of amino acids and 4 categories of globular proteins, the statistical properties are thoroughly discussed in this paper. Two parameters N C and N D are defined to confine the valid residues in detail. The relationship between hydrophobicity scales and valid residue percentage of each amino acid is given in the present work and the linear functions are shown in our statistical results. It is concluded that the hydrophobicity scale defined by chemical derivatives of the amino acids and nonpolar phase of large unilamellar vesicle membranes is the most effective technique to characterise the hydrophobic behavior of amino acid residues. Meanwhile, residue percentage P i and sequential residue length L i of a certain protein i are calculated under different conditions. The statistical results show that the average value of P i as well as L i of all-α proteins has a minimum among these 4 classes of globular proteins, indicating that all-α proteins are hardly capable of forming long-range contacts one by one along their linear amino acid sequences. All-β proteins have a higher tendency to construct long-range contacts along their primary sequences related to the secondary configurations, i.e. parallel and anti-parallel configurations of β sheets. The investigation of the interior properties of globular proteins give us the connection between the three-dimensional structure and its primary sequence data or secondary configurations, and help us to understand the structure of protein and its folding process well. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  10. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madauss, Kevin P. [Department of Computational and Structural Chemistry, GlaxoSmithKline Inc., Five Moore Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G. [Department of Biochemical Reagents and Assay Development, GlaxoSmithKline Inc., Five Moore Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Cowan, David J. [Department of Chemistry in the Center for Excellence in Metabolic Pathways Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline Inc., Five Moore Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Gottschalk, William K. [Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy and Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Miller, Aaron B. [Department of Computational and Structural Chemistry, GlaxoSmithKline Inc., Five Moore Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Short, Steven A. [Department of Biochemical Reagents and Assay Development, GlaxoSmithKline Inc., Five Moore Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Tran, Thuy B. [Department of Physiology, UNC School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27515 (United States); Williams, Shawn P., E-mail: shawn.p.williams@gsk.com [Department of Computational and Structural Chemistry, GlaxoSmithKline Inc., Five Moore Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    The use of biophysical assays permitted the identification of a specific human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain mutant that binds inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This mutant led to determination of the human ACC2 CT domain–CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed differences in the inhibitor conformation from the yeast protein complex that are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain–CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is comprised of three intertwined α-helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket.

  11. High-resolution NMR structures of the domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tho1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Julian O. B.; Allen, Mark D.; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Bycroft, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and the C-terminal RNA-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tho1 have been determined. THO is a multi-protein complex involved in the formation of messenger ribonuclear particles (mRNPs) by coupling transcription with mRNA processing and export. THO is thought to be formed from five subunits, Tho2p, Hpr1p, Tex1p, Mft1p and Thp2p, and recent work has determined a low-resolution structure of the complex [Poulsen et al. (2014 ▸), PLoS One, 9, e103470]. A number of additional proteins are thought to be involved in the formation of mRNP in yeast, including Tho1, which has been shown to bind RNA in vitro and is recruited to actively transcribed chromatin in vivo in a THO-complex and RNA-dependent manner. Tho1 is known to contain a SAP domain at the N-terminus, but the ability to suppress the expression defects of the hpr1Δ mutant of THO was shown to reside in the RNA-binding C-terminal region. In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and C-terminal RNA-binding domain have been determined

  12. High-resolution NMR structures of the domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tho1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Julian O. B.; Allen, Mark D.; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Bycroft, Mark, E-mail: mxb@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-23

    In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and the C-terminal RNA-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tho1 have been determined. THO is a multi-protein complex involved in the formation of messenger ribonuclear particles (mRNPs) by coupling transcription with mRNA processing and export. THO is thought to be formed from five subunits, Tho2p, Hpr1p, Tex1p, Mft1p and Thp2p, and recent work has determined a low-resolution structure of the complex [Poulsen et al. (2014 ▸), PLoS One, 9, e103470]. A number of additional proteins are thought to be involved in the formation of mRNP in yeast, including Tho1, which has been shown to bind RNA in vitro and is recruited to actively transcribed chromatin in vivo in a THO-complex and RNA-dependent manner. Tho1 is known to contain a SAP domain at the N-terminus, but the ability to suppress the expression defects of the hpr1Δ mutant of THO was shown to reside in the RNA-binding C-terminal region. In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and C-terminal RNA-binding domain have been determined.

  13. Structure–function relations in the NTPase domain of the antiviral tRNA ribotoxin Escherichia coli PrrC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meineke, Birthe; Shuman, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Breakage of tRNA by Escherichia coli anticodon nuclease PrrC (EcoPrrC) underlies a host antiviral response to phage T4 infection. Expression of EcoPrrC is cytocidal in yeast, signifying that PrrC ribotoxicity crosses phylogenetic domain boundaries. EcoPrrC consists of an N-terminal NTPase module that resembles ABC transporters and a C-terminal nuclease module that is sui generis. PrrC homologs are prevalent in many other bacteria. Here we report that Haemophilus influenzae PrrC is toxic in E. coli and yeast. To illuminate structure–activity relations, we conducted a new round of mutational analysis of EcoPrrC guided by primary structure conservation among toxic PrrC homologs. We indentify 17 candidate active site residues in the NTPase module that are essential for toxicity in yeast when EcoPrrC is expressed at high gene dosage. Their functions could be educed by integrating mutational data with the atomic structure of the transition-state complex of a homologous ABC protein.

  14. Structure-function relations in the NTPase domain of the antiviral tRNA ribotoxin Escherichia coli PrrC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meineke, Birthe; Shuman, Stewart, E-mail: s-shuman@ski.mskcc.org

    2012-06-05

    Breakage of tRNA by Escherichia coli anticodon nuclease PrrC (EcoPrrC) underlies a host antiviral response to phage T4 infection. Expression of EcoPrrC is cytocidal in yeast, signifying that PrrC ribotoxicity crosses phylogenetic domain boundaries. EcoPrrC consists of an N-terminal NTPase module that resembles ABC transporters and a C-terminal nuclease module that is sui generis. PrrC homologs are prevalent in many other bacteria. Here we report that Haemophilus influenzae PrrC is toxic in E. coli and yeast. To illuminate structure-activity relations, we conducted a new round of mutational analysis of EcoPrrC guided by primary structure conservation among toxic PrrC homologs. We indentify 17 candidate active site residues in the NTPase module that are essential for toxicity in yeast when EcoPrrC is expressed at high gene dosage. Their functions could be educed by integrating mutational data with the atomic structure of the transition-state complex of a homologous ABC protein.

  15. Fragment C Domain of Tetanus Toxin Mitigates Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity and Its Motor Consequences in Mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Mendieta L; Granado, Noelia; Aguilera, J.; Tizabi Y; Moratalla, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Background: The C-terminal domain of the heavy chain of tetanus toxin (Hc-TeTx) is a nontoxic peptide with demonstrated in vitro and in vivo neuroprotective effects against striatal dopaminergic damage induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and 6-hydoxydopamine, suggesting its possible therapeutic potential in Parkinson?s disease. Methamphetamine, a widely abused psychostimulant, has selective dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rodents, monkeys, and humans. This study was undertaken to determine w...

  16. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the N-terminal domain of nsp2 from avian infectious bronchitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Anqi; Wei, Lei; Zhao, Weiran; Xu, Yuanyuan; Rao, Zihe

    2009-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of nsp2 from avian infectious bronchitis virus has been purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution. Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a prototype of the group III coronaviruses and encodes 15 nonstructural proteins which make up the transcription/replication machinery. The nsp2 protein from IBV has a unique and novel sequence and has no experimentally confirmed function in replication, whereas it has been proposed to be crucial for early viral infection and may inhibit the early host immune response. The gene that encodes a double-mutant IBV nsp2 N-terminal domain (residues 9–393 of the polyprotein, with mutations Q132L and L270F) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein was subjected to crystallization trials. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6 2 or P6 4 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 114.2, c = 61.0 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Each asymmetric unit contained one molecule

  17. Functional Properties of a Newly Identified C-terminal Splice Variant of Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Gabriella; Gebhart, Mathias; Scharinger, Anja; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Busquet, Perrine; Poggiani, Chiara; Sartori, Simone; Mangoni, Matteo E.; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Herzig, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    An intramolecular interaction between a distal (DCRD) and a proximal regulatory domain (PCRD) within the C terminus of long Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels (Cav1.3L) is a major determinant of their voltage- and Ca2+-dependent gating kinetics. Removal of these regulatory domains by alternative splicing generates Cav1.342A channels that activate at a more negative voltage range and exhibit more pronounced Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Here we describe the discovery of a novel short splice variant (Cav1.343S) that is expressed at high levels in the brain but not in the heart. It lacks the DCRD but, in contrast to Cav1.342A, still contains PCRD. When expressed together with α2δ1 and β3 subunits in tsA-201 cells, Cav1.343S also activated at more negative voltages like Cav1.342A but Ca2+-dependent inactivation was less pronounced. Single channel recordings revealed much higher channel open probabilities for both short splice variants as compared with Cav1.3L. The presence of the proximal C terminus in Cav1.343S channels preserved their modulation by distal C terminus-containing Cav1.3- and Cav1.2-derived C-terminal peptides. Removal of the C-terminal modulation by alternative splicing also induced a faster decay of Ca2+ influx during electrical activities mimicking trains of neuronal action potentials. Our findings extend the spectrum of functionally diverse Cav1.3 L-type channels produced by tissue-specific alternative splicing. This diversity may help to fine tune Ca2+ channel signaling and, in the case of short variants lacking a functional C-terminal modulation, prevent excessive Ca2+ accumulation during burst firing in neurons. This may be especially important in neurons that are affected by Ca2+-induced neurodegenerative processes. PMID:21998310

  18. Globular Clusters for Faint Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    The origin of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) has posed a long-standing mystery for astronomers. New observations of several of these faint giants with the Hubble Space Telescope are now lending support to one theory.Faint-Galaxy MysteryHubble images of Dragonfly 44 (top) and DFX1 (bottom). The right panels show the data with greater contrast and extended objects masked. [van Dokkum et al. 2017]UDGs large, extremely faint spheroidal objects were first discovered in the Virgo galaxy cluster roughly three decades ago. Modern telescope capabilities have resulted in many more discoveries of similar faint galaxies in recent years, suggesting that they are a much more common phenomenon than we originally thought.Despite the many observations, UDGs still pose a number of unanswered questions. Chief among them: what are UDGs? Why are these objects the size of normal galaxies, yet so dim? There are two primary models that explain UDGs:UDGs were originally small galaxies, hence their low luminosity. Tidal interactions then puffed them up to the large size we observe today.UDGs are effectively failed galaxies. They formed the same way as normal galaxies of their large size, but something truncated their star formation early, preventing them from gaining the brightness that we would expect for galaxies of their size.Now a team of scientists led by Pieter van Dokkum (Yale University) has made some intriguing observations with Hubble that lend weight to one of these models.Globulars observed in 16 Coma-cluster UDGs by Hubble. The top right panel shows the galaxy identifications. The top left panel shows the derived number of globular clusters in each galaxy. [van Dokkum et al. 2017]Globulars GaloreVan Dokkum and collaborators imaged two UDGs with Hubble: Dragonfly 44 and DFX1, both located in the Coma galaxy cluster. These faint galaxies are both smooth and elongated, with no obvious irregular features, spiral arms, star-forming regions, or other indications of tidal interactions

  19. Natural variation of the amino-terminal glutamine-rich domain in Drosophila argonaute2 is not associated with developmental defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hain

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila argonaute2 (ago2 gene plays a major role in siRNA mediated RNA silencing pathways. Unlike mammalian Argonaute proteins, the Drosophila protein has an unusual amino-terminal domain made up largely of multiple copies of glutamine-rich repeats (GRRs. We report here that the ago2 locus produces an alternative transcript that encodes a putative short isoform without this amino-terminal domain. Several ago2 mutations previously reported to be null alleles only abolish expression of the long, GRR-containing isoform. Analysis of drop out (dop mutations had previously suggested that variations in GRR copy number result in defects in RNAi and embryonic development. However, we find that dop mutations genetically complement transcript-null alleles of ago2 and that ago2 alleles with variant GRR copy numbers support normal development. In addition, we show that the assembly of the central RNAi machinery, the RISC (RNA induced silencing complex, is unimpaired in embryos when GRR copy number is altered. In fact, we find that GRR copy number is highly variable in natural D. melanogaster populations as well as in laboratory strains. Finally, while many other insects share an extensive, glutamine-rich Ago2 amino-terminal domain, its primary sequence varies drastically between species. Our data indicate that GRR variation does not modulate an essential function of Ago2 and that the amino-terminal domain of Ago2 is subject to rapid evolution.

  20. Functional Independence and Interdependence of the Src Homology Domains of Phospholipase C-γ1 in B-Cell Receptor Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBell, Karen E.; Stoica, Bogdan A.; Verí, Maria-Concetta; Di Baldassarre, Angela; Miscia, Sebastiano; Graham, Laurie J.; Rellahan, Barbara L.; Ishiai, Masamichi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Bonvini, Ezio

    1999-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR)-induced activation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLCγ1) and PLCγ2 is crucial for B-cell function. While several signaling molecules have been implicated in PLCγ activation, the mechanism coupling PLCγ to the BCR remains undefined. The role of PLCγ1 SH2 and SH3 domains at different steps of BCR-induced PLCγ1 activation was examined by reconstitution in a PLCγ-negative B-cell line. PLCγ1 membrane translocation required a functional SH2 N-terminal [SH2(N)] domain, was decreased by mutation of the SH3 domain, but was unaffected by mutation of the SH2(C) domain. Tyrosine phosphorylation did not require the SH2(C) or SH3 domains but depended exclusively on a functional SH2(N) domain, which mediated the association of PLCγ1 with the adapter protein, BLNK. Forcing PLCγ1 to the membrane via a myristoylation signal did not bypass the SH2(N) domain requirement for phosphorylation, indicating that the phosphorylation mediated by this domain is not due to membrane anchoring alone. Mutation of the SH2(N) or the SH2(C) domain abrogated BCR-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and signaling events, while mutation of the SH3 domain partially decreased signaling. PLCγ1 SH domains, therefore, have interrelated but distinct roles in BCR-induced PLCγ1 activation. PMID:10523627

  1. Residues 240-250 in the C-terminus of the Pirh2 protein complement the function of the RING domain in self-ubiquitination of the Pirh2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Abou Zeinab

    Full Text Available Pirh2 is a p53 inducible gene that encodes a RING-H2 domain and is proposed to be a main regulator of p53 protein, thus fine tuning the DNA damage response. Pirh2 interacts physically with p53 and promotes its MDM2-independent ubiquitination and subsequent degradation as well as participates in an auto-regulatory feedback loop that controls p53 function. Pirh2 also self-ubiquitinates. Interestingly, Pirh2 is overexpressed in a wide range of human tumors. In this study, we investigated the domains and residues essential for Pirh2 self-ubiquitination. Deletions were made in each of the three major domains of Pirh2: the N-terminal domain (NTD, Ring domain (RING, and C-terminal domain (CTD. The effects of these deletions on Pirh2 self-ubiquitination were then assessed using in vitro ubiquitination assays. Our results demonstrate that the RING domain is essential, but not sufficient, for Pirh2 self-ubiquitination and that residues 240-250 of the C-terminal domain are also essential. Our results demonstrate that Pirh2 mediated p53 polyubiquitination occurs mainly through the K48 residue of ubiquitin in vitro. Our data further our understanding of the mechanism of Pirh2 self-ubiquitination and may help identify valuable therapeutic targets that play roles in reducing the effects of the overexpression of Pirh2, thus maximizing p53's response to DNA damage.

  2. The flexible C-terminal arm of the Lassa arenavirus Z-protein mediates interactions with multiple binding partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Eric R; Armen, Roger S; Mannan, Aristotle M; Brooks, Charles L

    2010-08-01

    The arenavirus genome encodes for a Z-protein, which contains a RING domain that coordinates two zinc ions, and has been identified as having several functional roles at various stages of the virus life cycle. Z-protein binds to multiple host proteins and has been directly implicated in the promotion of viral budding, repression of mRNA translation, and apoptosis of infected cells. Using homology models of the Z-protein from Lassa strain arenavirus, replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) was used to refine the structures, which were then subsequently clustered. Population-weighted ensembles of low-energy cluster representatives were predicted based upon optimal agreement of the chemical shifts computed with the SPARTA program with the experimental NMR chemical shifts. A member of the refined ensemble was identified to be a potential binder of budding factor Tsg101 based on its correspondence to the structure of the HIV-1 Gag late domain when bound to Tsg101. Members of these ensembles were docked against the crystal structure of human eIF4E translation initiation factor. Two plausible binding modes emerged based upon their agreement with experimental observation, favorable interaction energies and stability during MD trajectories. Mutations to Z are proposed that would either inhibit both binding mechanisms or selectively inhibit only one mode. The C-terminal domain conformation of the most populated member of the representative ensemble shielded protein-binding recognition motifs for Tsg101 and eIF4E and represents the most populated state free in solution. We propose that C-terminal flexibility is key for mediating the different functional states of the Z-protein. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a C-terminal fragment of the Epstein–Barr virus ZEBRA protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morand, Patrice [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Laboratoire de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, EA 2939, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Budayova-Spano, Monika [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Perrissin, Monique [Laboratoire de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, EA 2939, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Müller, Christoph W., E-mail: mueller@embl-grenoble.fr; Petosa, Carlo [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France)

    2006-03-01

    A C-terminal fragment of the Epstein–Barr virus lytic switch protein ZEBRA has been crystallized in complex with DNA. A C-terminal fragment of the Epstein–Barr virus immediate-early transcription factor ZEBRA has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The fragment behaves as a dimer in solution, consistent with the presence of a basic region leucine-zipper (bZIP) domain. Crystals of the fragment in complex with a DNA duplex were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 4000 and magnesium acetate as crystallization agents. Crystals diffract to better than 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation (λ = 0.976 Å). Crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 94.2, b = 26.5, c = 98.1 Å, β = 103.9°.

  4. Taming C-terminal peptides of Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin M for B-cell response: Implication in improved subclinical bovine mastitis diagnosis and protective efficacy in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmaja, Radhakrishnan Jayasree; Halami, Prakash Motiram

    2016-09-01

    Leukotoxin M/F'-PV (LukM/F'-PV) produced by bovine mastitis causing Staphylococcus aureus structurally comprises three domains, the β-sandwich, rim and stem domain. The rim and stem domains interacting with target cell membrane lipid rafts contributes to the virulent trait of the toxin. In the present study, two facts were hypothesized that neutralization of these domains will ebb LukM/F'-PV leukotoxicity. Secondly, the neutralizing antibodies can improve the leukotoxin detection sensitivity in bovine mastitis milk samples. The in silico mapping of S. aureus LukM C-termini comprising these domains predicted seven linear B-cell antigenic epitopes. The immune response of C-terminal truncated recombinant peptides rCtM19 (19 kDa; near carboxy-terminal) having four epitopes and rCtM15 (15 kDa; C-terminal) with three epitopes were evaluated for their diagnostic and neutralization potential. Anti-rCtM19 and anti-rCtM15 antibodies with enhanced immunogenicity had the most striking outcome in IgG-ELISA for detecting native determinants of leukotoxin. For the obtained ELISA values, ROC curve inferred a cut-off score of >0.102 OD405. The assay sensitivity in the range of 90-96% along with 100% specificity and AUC of 0.93-0.98 categorized subclinical and clinical from healthy bovine milk samples. As observed through in vitro neutralization and LDH assays, C-terminus specific antibodies (1:42 titer) deactivating leukotoxicity abolished LukM from interacting with lipid bilayer and LukF for forming pores on bovine neutrophil membrane. As a proof of concept, it was proved that peptide antibodies can be a more specific serodiagnostic and passive therapeutic molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The SUMO project I. A survey of multiple populations in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monelli, M.; Milone, A. P.; Stetson, P. B.; Marino, A. F.; Cassisi, S.; del Pino Molina, A.; Salaris, M.; Aparicio, A.; Asplund, M.; Grundahl, F.; Piotto, G.; Weiss, A.; Carrera, R.; Cebrián, M.; Murabito, S.; Pietrinferni, A.; Sbordone, L.

    2013-05-01

    We present a general overview and the first results of the SUMO project (a SUrvey of Multiple pOpulations in Globular Clusters). The objective of this survey is the study of multiple stellar populations in the largest sample of globular clusters homogeneously analysed to date. To this aim we obtained high signal-to-noise (S/N > 50) photometry for main sequence stars with mass down to ˜0.5 M⊙ in a large sample of clusters using both archival and proprietary U, B, V and I data from ground-based telescopes. In this paper, we focus on the occurrence of multiple stellar populations in 23 clusters. We define a new photometric index, cU, B, I = (U - B) - (B - I), which turns out to be very effective for identifying multiple sequences along the red giant branch (RGB). We found that in the V-cU, B, I diagram all clusters presented in this paper show broadened or multimodal RGBs, with the presence of two or more components. We found a direct connection with the chemical properties of different sequences, which display different abundances of light elements (O, Na, C, N and Al). The cU, B, I index is also a powerful tool for identifying distinct sequences of stars along the horizontal branch and, for the first time in the case of NGC 104 (47 Tuc), along the asymptotic giant branch. Our results demonstrate that (i) the presence of more than two stellar populations is a common feature amongst globular clusters, as already highlighted in previous work; (ii) multiple sequences with different chemical contents can be easily identified by using standard Johnson photometry obtained with ground-based facilities; (iii) in the study of globular cluster multiple stellar populations the cU, B, I index is an alternative to spectroscopy, and has the advantage of larger statistics.

  6. Globular, Sponge-like to Layer-like Morphological Transition in 1-n-Alkyl-3-methylimidazolium Octylsulfate Ionic Liquid Homologous Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Utkarsh; Shah, Jindal K

    2018-01-11

    Segregation of polar and nonpolar domains in ionic liquids for which either the cation or anion is responsible for inducing nonpolar domains is well understood. On the other hand, information regarding the nanoscale heterogeneities originating due to the presence of nonpolar content on both the ions is rudimentary at this point. The present contribution is aimed at addressing this question and focuses on a molecular dynamics simulation study to probe nanoscale structural and aggregation features of the 1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium [C n mim] octylsulfate [C 8 SO 4 ] ionic liquid homologous series (n = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12). The objective of this work is to determine the effect of increasing alkyl chain length in the cation on nonpolar domain formation, especially when the alkyl chain lengths from both the ions participate in defining such domains. The results indicate that all the ionic liquids form nonpolar domains, morphology of which gradually changes from globular, sponge-like to layer-like structure with increase in the cationic alkyl chain length. The length of the nonpolar domains calculated from the total structure factor for [C 10 mim][C 8 SO 4 ] is considerably higher than that reported for other imidazolium-based ionic liquid containing smaller anions. The structure factor for [C 12 mim][C 8 SO 4 ] ionic liquid contains multiple intermediate peaks separating the charge alternation peak and pre-peak, which points to nonpolar domains of varying lengths, an observation that remains to be validated. Analysis of the heterogeneous order parameters and orientational correlation functions of the alkyl chains further suggests an increase in the spatial heterogeneity and long-range order along the homologous series. The origin of rich diversity of structures obtained by introducing nonpolar content on both the ions is discussed.

  7. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-Hin T. Tam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs. Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  8. The E3 ubiquitin ligase protein associated with Myc (Pam) regulates mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in vivo through N- and C-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangyeul; Kim, Sun; Bahl, Samira; Li, Lin; Burande, Clara F; Smith, Nicole; James, Marianne; Beauchamp, Roberta L; Bhide, Pradeep; DiAntonio, Aaron; Ramesh, Vijaya

    2012-08-31

    Pam and its homologs (the PHR protein family) are large E3 ubiquitin ligases that function to regulate synapse formation and growth in mammals, zebrafish, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Phr1-deficient mouse models (Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan), with deletions in the N-terminal putative guanine exchange factor region and the C-terminal ubiquitin ligase region, respectively) exhibit axon guidance/outgrowth defects and striking defects of major axon tracts in the CNS. Our earlier studies identified Pam to be associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) proteins, ubiquitinating TSC2 and regulating mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Here, we examine the potential involvement of the TSC/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) signaling pathway in Phr1-deficient mouse models. We observed attenuation of mTORC1 signaling in the brains of both Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan) mouse models. Our results establish that Pam regulates TSC/mTOR signaling in vitro and in vivo through two distinct domains. To further address whether Pam regulates mTORC1 through two functionally independent domains, we undertook heterozygous mutant crossing between Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan) mice to generate a compound heterozygous model to determine whether these two domains can complement each other. mTORC1 signaling was not attenuated in the brains of double mutants (Phr1(Δ8,9/Mag)), confirming that Pam displays dual regulation of the mTORC1 pathway through two functional domains. Our results also suggest that although dysregulation of mTORC1 signaling may be responsible for the corpus callosum defects, other neurodevelopmental defects observed with Phr1 deficiency are independent of mTORC1 signaling. The ubiquitin ligase complex containing Pam-Fbxo45 likely targets additional synaptic and axonal proteins, which may explain the overlapping neurodevelopmental defects observed in Phr1 and Fbxo45 deficiency.

  9. 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of domain 5 of Dictyostelium discoideum gelation factor (ABP-120) in its native and 8M urea-denatured states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John; Dobson, Christopher M

    2009-06-01

    The gelation factor from Dictyostelium discoideum (ABP-120) is an actin binding protein consisting of six immunoglobulin (Ig) domains in the C-terminal rod domain. We have recently used the pair of domains 5 and 6 of ABP-120 as a model system for studying multi-domain nascent chain folding on the ribosome. Here we present the NMR assignments of domain 5 in its native and 8M urea-denatured states.

  10. Crystal structure of type I ryanodine receptor amino-terminal [beta]-trefoil domain reveals a disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador, Fernando J.; Liu, Shuang; Ishiyama, Noboru; Plevin, Michael J.; Wilson, Aaron; MacLennan, David H.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; (Toronto)

    2009-12-01

    Muscle contraction and relaxation is regulated by transient elevations of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+}. Ca{sup 2+} is released from stores in the lumen of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) to initiate formation of the Ca{sup 2+} transient by activation of a class of Ca{sup 2+} release channels referred to as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is pumped back into the SER lumen by Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases (SERCAs) to terminate the Ca{sup 2+} transient. Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are associated with 2 skeletal muscle disorders, malignant hyperthermia (MH), and central core disease (CCD). The evaluation of proposed mechanisms by which RyR1 mutations cause MH and CCD is hindered by the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal 210 residues of RyR1 (RyR{sub NTD}) at 2.5 {angstrom}. The RyR{sub NTD} structure is similar to that of the suppressor domain of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3Rsup), but lacks most of the long helix-turn-helix segment of the 'arm' domain in IP3Rsup. The N-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold, found in both RyR and IP{sub 3}R, is likely to play a critical role in regulatory mechanisms in this channel family. A disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop was identified between strands 8 and 9 in a highly basic region of RyR1. Biophysical studies showed that 3 MH-associated mutations (C36R, R164C, and R178C) do not adversely affect the global stability or fold of RyRNTD, supporting previously described mechanisms whereby mutations perturb protein-protein interactions.

  11. Functional insight into the C-terminal extension of halolysin SptA from haloarchaeon Natrinema sp. J7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisheng Xu

    Full Text Available Halolysin SptA from haloarchaeon Natrinema sp. J7 consists of a subtilisin-like catalytic domain and a C-terminal extension (CTE containing two cysteine residues. In this report, we have investigated the function of the CTE using recombinant enzymes expressed in Haloferax volcanii WFD11. Deletion of the CTE greatly reduced but did not abolish protease activity, which suggests that the CTE is not essential for enzyme folding. Mutational analysis suggests that residues Cys303 and Cys338 within the CTE form a disulfide bond that make this domain resistant to autocleavage and proteolysis under hypotonic conditions. Characterization of full-length and CTE-truncation enzymes indicates the CTE not only confers extra stability to the enzyme but also assists enzyme activity on protein substrates by facilitating binding at high salinities. Interestingly, homology modeling of the CTE yields a β-jelly roll-like structure similar to those seen in Claudin-binding domain of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (clostridial C-CPE and collagen binding domain (CBD, and the CTE also possesses collagen-binding activity, making it a potential candidate as an anchoring unit in drug delivery systems.

  12. Mutations in the C-terminal region affect subcellular localization of crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) GPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Gui, Lang; Chen, Zong-Yan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known as seven transmembrane domain receptors and consequently can mediate diverse biological functions via regulation of their subcellular localization. Crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) was recently isolated from infected fish with acute gill hemorrhage. CaHV GPCR of 349 amino acids (aa) was identified based on amino acid identity. A series of variants with truncation/deletion/substitution mutation in the C-terminal (aa 315-349) were constructed and expressed in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. The roles of three key C-terminal regions in subcellular localization of CaHV GPCR were determined. Lysine-315 (K-315) directed the aggregation of the protein preferentially at the nuclear side. Predicted N-myristoylation site (GGGWTR, aa 335-340) was responsible for punctate distribution in periplasm or throughout the cytoplasm. Predicted phosphorylation site (SSR, aa 327-329) and GGGWTR together determined the punctate distribution in cytoplasm. Detection of organelles localization by specific markers showed that the protein retaining K-315 colocalized with the Golgi apparatus. These experiments provided first evidence that different mutations of CaHV GPCR C-terminals have different affects on the subcellular localization of fish herpesvirus-encoded GPCRs. The study provided valuable information and new insights into the precise interactions between herpesvirus and fish cells, and could also provide useful targets for antiviral agents in aquaculture.

  13. Characterisation of a New Family of Carboxyl Esterases with an OsmC Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai-Britt V Jensen

    Full Text Available Proteins in the serine esterase family are widely distributed in bacterial phyla and display activity against a range of biologically produced and chemically synthesized esters. A serine esterase from the psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas arctica with a C-terminal OsmC-like domain was recently characterized; here we report on the identification and characterization of further putative esterases with OsmC-like domains constituting a new esterase family that is found in a variety of bacterial species from different environmental niches. All of these proteins contained the Ser-Asp-His motif common to serine esterases and a highly conserved pentapeptide nucleophilic elbow motif. We produced these proteins heterologously in Escherichia coli and demonstrated their activity against a range of esterase substrates. Two of the esterases characterized have activity of over two orders of magnitude higher than other members of the family, and are active over a wide temperature range. We determined the crystal structure of the esterase domain of the protein from Rhodothermus marinus and show that it conforms to the classical α/β hydrolase fold with an extended 'lid' region, which occludes the active site of the protein in the crystal. The expansion of characterized members of the esterase family and demonstration of activity over a wide-range of temperatures could be of use in biotechnological applications such as the pharmaceutical, detergent, bioremediation and dairy industries.

  14. NMR spectroscopic and bioinformatic analyses of the LTBP1 C-terminus reveal a highly dynamic domain organisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B Robertson

    Full Text Available Proteins from the LTBP/fibrillin family perform key structural and functional roles in connective tissues. LTBP1 forms the large latent complex with TGFβ and its propeptide LAP, and sequesters the latent growth factor to the extracellular matrix. Bioinformatics studies suggest the main structural features of the LTBP1 C-terminus are conserved through evolution. NMR studies were carried out on three overlapping C-terminal fragments of LTBP1, comprising four domains with characterised homologues, cbEGF14, TB3, EGF3 and cbEGF15, and three regions with no homology to known structures. The NMR data reveal that the four domains adopt canonical folds, but largely lack the interdomain interactions observed with homologous fibrillin domains; the exception is the EGF3-cbEGF15 domain pair which has a well-defined interdomain interface. (15N relaxation studies further demonstrate that the three interdomain regions act as flexible linkers, allowing a wide range of motion between the well-structured domains. This work is consistent with the LTBP1 C-terminus adopting a flexible "knotted rope" structure, which may facilitate cell matrix interactions, and the accessibility to proteases or other factors that could contribute to TGFβ activation.

  15. CVs and millisecond pulsar progenitors in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Cool, A. M.; Bailyn, C. D.

    1991-01-01

    The recent discovery of a large population of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters, together with earlier studies of both low luminosity X-ray sources and LMXBs in globulars, suggest there should be significant numbers of CVs in globulars. Although they have been searched for without success in selected cluster X-ray source fields, systematic surveys are lacking and would constrain binary production and both stellar and dynamical evolution in globular clusters. We describe the beginnings of such a search, using narrow band H-alpha imaging, and the sensitivities it might achieve.

  16. Membrane Localization is Critical for Activation of the PICK1 BAR Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kenneth L.; Eriksen, Jacob; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Han, Daniel S.; Niv, Masha Y.; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Henriksen, Ulla; Bhatia, Vikram K.; Stamou, Dimitrios; Sitte, Harald H.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domain protein, protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) contains a C-terminal Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain mediating recognition of curved membranes; however, the molecular mechanisms controlling the activity of this domain are poorly understood. In agreement with negative regulation of the BAR domain by the N-terminal PDZ domain, PICK1 distributed evenly in the cytoplasm, whereas truncation of the PDZ domain caused BAR domain-dependent redistribution to clusters colocalizing with markers of recycling endosomal compartments. A similar clustering was observed both upon truncation of a short putative α-helical segment in the linker between the PDZ and the BAR domains and upon coexpression of PICK1 with a transmembrane PDZ ligand, including the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR2 subunit, the GluR2 C-terminus transferred to the single transmembrane protein Tac or the dopamine transporter C-terminus transferred to Tac. In contrast, transfer of the GluR2 C-terminus to cyan fluorescent protein, a cytosolic protein, did not elicit BAR domain-dependent clustering. Instead, localizing PICK1 to the membrane by introducing an N-terminal myristoylation site produced BAR domain-dependent, but ligand-independent, PICK1 clustering. The data support that in the absence of PDZ ligand, the PICK1 BAR domain is inhibited through a PDZ domain-dependent and linker-dependent mechanism. Moreover, they suggest that unmasking of the BAR domain’s membrane-binding capacity is not a consequence of ligand binding to the PDZ domain per se but results from, and coincides with, recruitment of PICK1 to a membrane compartment. PMID:18466293

  17. Structure of a C-terminal AHNAK peptide in a 1:2:2 complex with S100A10 and an acetylated N-terminal peptide of annexin A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozorowski, Gabriel; Milton, Saskia; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Structure of a 20-amino-acid peptide of AHNAK bound asymmetrically to the AnxA2–S100A10A heterotetramer (1:2:2 symmetry) provides insights into the atomic level interactions that govern this membrane-repair scaffolding complex. AHNAK, a large 629 kDa protein, has been implicated in membrane repair, and the annexin A2–S100A10 heterotetramer [(p11) 2 (AnxA2) 2 )] has high affinity for several regions of its 1002-amino-acid C-terminal domain. (p11) 2 (AnxA2) 2 is often localized near the plasma membrane, and this C2-symmetric platform is proposed to be involved in the bridging of membrane vesicles and trafficking of proteins to the plasma membrane. All three proteins co-localize at the intracellular face of the plasma membrane in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner. The binding of AHNAK to (p11) 2 (AnxA2) 2 has been studied previously, and a minimal binding motif has been mapped to a 20-amino-acid peptide corresponding to residues 5654–5673 of the AHNAK C-terminal domain. Here, the 2.5 Å resolution crystal structure of this 20-amino-acid peptide of AHNAK bound to the AnxA2–S100A10 heterotetramer (1:2:2 symmetry) is presented, which confirms the asymmetric arrangement first described by Rezvanpour and coworkers and explains why the binding motif has high affinity for (p11) 2 (AnxA2) 2 . Binding of AHNAK to the surface of (p11) 2 (AnxA2) 2 is governed by several hydrophobic interactions between side chains of AHNAK and pockets on S100A10. The pockets are large enough to accommodate a variety of hydrophobic side chains, allowing the consensus sequence to be more general. Additionally, the various hydrogen bonds formed between the AHNAK peptide and (p11) 2 (AnxA2) 2 most often involve backbone atoms of AHNAK; as a result, the side chains, particularly those that point away from S100A10/AnxA2 towards the solvent, are largely interchangeable. While the structure-based consensus sequence allows interactions with various stretches of the AHNAK C-terminal domain, comparison

  18. Conservation patterns of HIV-1 RT connection and RNase H domains: identification of new mutations in NRTI-treated patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André F A Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although extensive HIV drug resistance information is available for the first 400 amino acids of its reverse transcriptase, the impact of antiretroviral treatment in C-terminal domains of Pol (thumb, connection and RNase H is poorly understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We wanted to characterize conserved regions in RT C-terminal domains among HIV-1 group M subtypes and CRF. Additionally, we wished to identify NRTI-related mutations in HIV-1 RT C-terminal domains. We sequenced 118 RNase H domains from clinical viral isolates in Brazil, and analyzed 510 thumb and connection domain and 450 RNase H domain sequences collected from public HIV sequence databases, together with their treatment status and histories. Drug-naïve and NRTI-treated datasets were compared for intra- and inter-group conservation, and differences were determined using Fisher's exact tests. One third of RT C-terminal residues were found to be conserved among group M variants. Three mutations were found exclusively in NRTI-treated isolates. Nine mutations in the connection and 6 mutations in the RNase H were associated with NRTI treatment in subtype B. Some of them lay in or close to amino acid residues which contact nucleic acid or near the RNase H active site. Several of the residues pointed out herein have been recently associated to NRTI exposure or increase drug resistance to NRTI. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first comprehensive genotypic analysis of a large sequence dataset that describes NRTI-related mutations in HIV-1 RT C-terminal domains in vivo. The findings into the conservation of RT C-terminal domains may pave the way to more rational drug design initiatives targeting those regions.

  19. Membrane localization is critical for activation of the PICK1 BAR domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Eriksen, Jacob; Milan-Lobo, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domain protein, protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) contains a C-terminal Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain mediating recognition of curved membranes; however, the molecular mechanisms controlling the activity of this domain are poorly understood....

  20. Globular Clusters Shine in a Galaxy Lacking Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-04-01

    You may have seen recent news about NGC 1052DF2, a galaxy that was discovered to have little or no dark matter. Now, a new study explores what NGC 1052DF2 does have: an enigmatic population of unusually large and luminous globular clusters.Keck/LRIS spectra (left and right) and HST images (center) of the 11 clusters associated with NGC 1052DF2. The color images each span 1 1. [van Dokkum et al. 2018]An Unusual DwarfThe ultra-diffuse galaxy NGC 1052DF2, originally identified with the Dragonfly Telescope Array, has puzzled astronomers since the discovery that its dynamical mass determined by the motions of globular-cluster-like objects spotted within it is essentially the same as its stellar mass. This equivalence implies that the galaxy is strangely lacking dark matter; the upper limit set on its dark matter halo is 400 times smaller than what we would expect for such a dwarf galaxy.Led by Pieter van Dokkum (Yale University), the team that made this discovery has now followed up with detailed Hubble Space Telescope imaging and Keck spectroscopy. Their goal? To explore the objects that allowed them to make the dynamical-mass measurement: the oddly bright globular clusters of NGC 1052DF2.Sizes (circularized half-light radii) vs. absolute magnitudes for globular clusters in NGC1052DF2 (black) and the Milky Way (red). [Adapted from van Dokkum et al. 2018]Whats Up with the Globular Clusters?Van Dokkum and collaborators spectroscopically confirmed 11 compact objects associated with the faint galaxy. These objects are globular-cluster-like in their appearance, but the peak of their luminosity distribution is offset by a factor of four from globular clusters of other galaxies; these globular clusters are significantly brighter than is typical.Using the Hubble imaging, the authors determined that NGC 1052DF2s globular clusters are more than twice the size of the Milky Ways globular clusters in the same luminosity range. As is typical for globular clusters, they are an old

  1. Crystallization and X-ray data analysis of the 10 kDa C-terminal lid subdomain from Caenorhabditis elegans Hsp70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrall, Liam; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D., E-mail: m.walkinshaw@ed.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, The King’s Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JR,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-01

    Crystals of the C-terminal 10 kDa lid subdomain from the C. elegans chaperone Hsp70 have been obtained that diffract X-rays to ∼3.5 Å and belong to space group I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Analysis of X-ray data and initial heavy-atom phasing reveals 24 monomers in the asymmetric unit related by 432 non-crystallographic symmetry. Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone involved in the regulation of protein folding. Crystals of the C-terminal 10 kDa helical lid domain (residues 542–640) from a Caenorhabditis elegans Hsp70 homologue have been produced that diffract X-rays to ∼3.4 Å. Crystals belong to space group I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 197, c = 200 Å. The Matthews coefficient, self-rotation function and Patterson map indicate 24 monomers in the asymmetric unit, showing non-crystallographic 432 symmetry. Molecular-replacement studies using the corresponding domain from rat, the only eukaryotic homologue with a known structure, failed and a mercury derivative was obtained. Preliminary MAD phasing using SHELXD and SHARP for location and refinement of the heavy-atom substructure and SOLOMON for density modification produced interpretable maps with a clear protein–solvent boundary. Further density-modification, model-building and refinement are currently under way.

  2. Anti-helium flux as a signature for antimatter globular clusters in our galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belotskij, K.M.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Khlopov, M.Yu.; Konoplich, R.V.; Sakharov, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    The alpha magnetic spectrometer experiment is shown to be sensitive to test the hypothesis on the existence of antimatter globular cluster in our Galaxy. The hypothesis follows from the analysis of possible tests for the mechanisms of baryosynthesis and uses antimatter domain in the matter domain Universe as the probe for the physics underlaying the origin of the matter. The interval of masses for the antimatter in our Galaxy is fixed from below by the condition of antimatter domain survival in the matter dominated Universe and from above by the observed gamma-ray flux. For this interval the expected fluxes of anti-helium-3 and anti-helium-4 are calculated with the account of their interaction with the matter in the Galaxy [ru

  3. Functional properties of a newly identified C-terminal splice variant of Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Gabriella; Gebhart, Mathias; Scharinger, Anja; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Busquet, Perrine; Poggiani, Chiara; Sartori, Simone; Mangoni, Matteo E; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Herzig, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2011-12-09

    An intramolecular interaction between a distal (DCRD) and a proximal regulatory domain (PCRD) within the C terminus of long Ca(v)1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels (Ca(v)1.3(L)) is a major determinant of their voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent gating kinetics. Removal of these regulatory domains by alternative splicing generates Ca(v)1.3(42A) channels that activate at a more negative voltage range and exhibit more pronounced Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. Here we describe the discovery of a novel short splice variant (Ca(v)1.3(43S)) that is expressed at high levels in the brain but not in the heart. It lacks the DCRD but, in contrast to Ca(v)1.3(42A), still contains PCRD. When expressed together with α2δ1 and β3 subunits in tsA-201 cells, Ca(v)1.3(43S) also activated at more negative voltages like Ca(v)1.3(42A) but Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation was less pronounced. Single channel recordings revealed much higher channel open probabilities for both short splice variants as compared with Ca(v)1.3(L). The presence of the proximal C terminus in Ca(v)1.3(43S) channels preserved their modulation by distal C terminus-containing Ca(v)1.3- and Ca(v)1.2-derived C-terminal peptides. Removal of the C-terminal modulation by alternative splicing also induced a faster decay of Ca(2+) influx during electrical activities mimicking trains of neuronal action potentials. Our findings extend the spectrum of functionally diverse Ca(v)1.3 L-type channels produced by tissue-specific alternative splicing. This diversity may help to fine tune Ca(2+) channel signaling and, in the case of short variants lacking a functional C-terminal modulation, prevent excessive Ca(2+) accumulation during burst firing in neurons. This may be especially important in neurons that are affected by Ca(2+)-induced neurodegenerative processes.

  4. Catalytic properties of ADAM12 and its domain deletion mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Visse, Robert; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2008-01-01

    of pro, catalytic, disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF domains. Here we present a novel activity of recombinant ADAM12-S and its domain deletion mutants on S-carboxymethylated transferrin (Cm-Tf). Cleavage of Cm-Tf occurred at multiple sites, and N-terminal sequencing showed that the enzyme exhibits...... restricted specificity but a consensus sequence could not be defined as its subsite requirements are promiscuous. Kinetic analysis revealed that the noncatalytic C-terminal domains are important regulators of Cm-Tf activity and that ADAM12-PC consisting of the pro domain and catalytic domain is the most...... active on this substrate. It was also observed that NaCl inhibits ADAM12. Among the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) examined, the N-terminal domain of TIMP-3 (N-TIMP-3) inhibits ADAM12-S and ADAM12-PC with low nanomolar Ki(app) values while TIMP-2 inhibits them with a slightly lower...

  5. The AAA+ ATPase TRIP13 remodels HORMA domains through N-terminal engagement and unfolding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Qiaozhen; Kim, Dong Hyun; Dereli, Ihsan; Rosenberg, Scott C.; Hagemann, Goetz; Herzog, Franz; Tóth, Attila; Cleveland, Don W.; Corbett, Kevin D.

    2017-06-28

    Proteins of the conserved HORMA domain family, including the spindle assembly checkpoint protein MAD2 and the meiotic HORMADs, assemble into signaling complexes by binding short peptides termed “closure motifs”. The AAA+ ATPase TRIP13 regulates both MAD2 and meiotic HORMADs by disassembling these HORMA domain–closure motif complexes, but its mechanisms of substrate recognition and remodeling are unknown. Here, we combine X-ray crystallography and crosslinking mass spectrometry to outline how TRIP13 recognizes MAD2 with the help of the adapter protein p31comet. We show that p31comet binding to the TRIP13 N-terminal domain positions the disordered MAD2 N-terminus for engagement by the TRIP13 “pore loops”, which then unfold MAD2 in the presence of ATP. N-terminal truncation of MAD2 renders it refractory to TRIP13 action in vitro, and in cells causes spindle assembly checkpoint defects consistent with loss of TRIP13 function. Similar truncation of HORMAD1 in mouse spermatocytes compromises its TRIP13-mediated removal from meiotic chromosomes, highlighting a conserved mechanism for recognition and disassembly of HORMA domain–closure motif complexes by TRIP13.

  6. A Conserved Acidic Motif in the N-Terminal Domain of Nitrate Reductase Is Necessary for the Inactivation of the Enzyme in the Dark by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Binding1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigaglio, Emmanuelle; Durand, Nathalie; Meyer, Christian

    1999-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the N-terminal domain of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) nitrate reductase (NR) is involved in the inactivation of the enzyme by phosphorylation, which occurs in the dark (L. Nussaume, M. Vincentz, C. Meyer, J.P. Boutin, and M. Caboche [1995] Plant Cell 7: 611–621). The activity of a mutant NR protein lacking this N-terminal domain was no longer regulated by light-dark transitions. In this study smaller deletions were performed in the N-terminal domain of tobacco NR that removed protein motifs conserved among higher plant NRs. The resulting truncated NR-coding sequences were then fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and introduced in NR-deficient mutants of the closely related species Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. We found that the deletion of a conserved stretch of acidic residues led to an active NR protein that was more thermosensitive than the wild-type enzyme, but it was relatively insensitive to the inactivation by phosphorylation in the dark. Therefore, the removal of this acidic stretch seems to have the same effects on NR activation state as the deletion of the N-terminal domain. A hypothetical explanation for these observations is that a specific factor that impedes inactivation remains bound to the truncated enzyme. A synthetic peptide derived from this acidic protein motif was also found to be a good substrate for casein kinase II. PMID:9880364

  7. Phospho-carboxyl-terminal domain binding and the role of a prolyl isomerase in pre-mRNA 3'-End formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D P; Phatnani, H P; Greenleaf, A L

    1999-10-29

    A phospho-carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) affinity column created with yeast CTD kinase I and the CTD of RNA polymerase II was used to identify Ess1/Pin1 as a phospho-CTD-binding protein. Ess1/Pin1 is a peptidyl prolyl isomerase involved in both mitotic regulation and pre-mRNA 3'-end formation. Like native Ess1, a GSTEss1 fusion protein associates specifically with the phosphorylated but not with the unphosphorylated CTD. Further, hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II appears to be the dominant Ess1 binding protein in total yeast extracts. We demonstrate that phospho-CTD binding is mediated by the small WW domain of Ess1 rather than the isomerase domain. These findings suggest a mechanism in which the WW domain binds the phosphorylated CTD of elongating RNA polymerase II and the isomerase domain reconfigures the CTD though isomerization of proline residues perhaps by a processive mechanism. This process may be linked to a variety of pre-mRNA maturation events that use the phosphorylated CTD, including the coupled processes of pre-mRNA 3'-end formation and transcription termination.

  8. The expression pattern of the C-terminal kinesin gene kifc1 during the spermatogenesis of Sepiella maindroni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fu-Qing; Ma, Xiao-Xin; Zhu, Jun-Quan; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2013-12-10

    In this study, we investigated the gene sequence and characteristic of kifc1 in Sepiella maindroni through PCR and RACE technology. Our research aimed particularly at the spatio-temporal expression pattern of kifc1 in the developmental testis through in situ hybridization. The particular role of kifc1 in the spermatogenesis of S. maindroni was our particular interest. Based on multiple protein sequence alignments of KIFC1 homologues, kifc1 gene from the testis of S. maindroni was identified, which consisted of 2432bp including a 2109 in-frame ORF corresponding to 703 continuous amino acids. The encoded polypeptide shared highest similarity with Octopus tankahkeei. Through the prediction of the secondary and tertiary structures, the motor domain of KIFC1 was conserved at the C-terminal, having putative ATP-binding and microtubule-binding motifs, while the N-terminal was more specific to bind various cargoes for cellular events. The stalk domain connecting between the C-terminal and N-terminal determined the direction of movement. According to RT-PCR results, the kifc1 gene is not tissue-specific, commonly detected in different tissues, for example, the testis, liver, stomach, muscle, caecum and gills. Through an in situ hybridization method, the expression pattern of KIFC1 protein mimics in the spermatogenesis of S. maindroni. During the primary stage of the spermatogenesis, the kifc1 mRNA signal was barely detectable. At the early spermatids, the signal started to be present. With the elongation of spermatids, the signals increased substantially. It peaked and gathered around the acrosome area when the spermatids began to transform to spindle shape. As the spermatids developed into mature sperm, the signal vanished. In summary, the expression of kfic1 at specific stages during spermiogenesis and its distribution shed light on the potential functions of this motor in major cytological transformations. The KIFC1 homologue may provide a direct shaping force to the

  9. Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase 1 Is Regulated by Its N-Terminal Domain in Response to Allosteric Effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldo, Kristian Mark P; Acedo, Jeella Z; Panigrahi, Rashmi; Vederas, John C; Weselake, Randall J; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2017-10-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is an integral membrane enzyme catalyzing the final and committed step in the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG). The biochemical regulation of TAG assembly remains one of the least understood areas of primary metabolism to date. Here, we report that the hydrophilic N-terminal domain of Brassica napus DGAT1 (BnaDGAT1 1-113 ) regulates activity based on acyl-CoA/CoA levels. The N-terminal domain is not necessary for acyltransferase activity and is composed of an intrinsically disordered region and a folded segment. We show that the disordered region has an autoinhibitory function and a dimerization interface, which appears to mediate positive cooperativity, whereas the folded segment of the cytosolic region was found to have an allosteric site for acyl-CoA/CoA. Under increasing acyl-CoA levels, the binding of acyl-CoA with this noncatalytic site facilitates homotropic allosteric activation. Enzyme activation, on the other hand, is prevented under limiting acyl-CoA conditions (low acyl-CoA-to-CoA ratio), whereby CoA acts as a noncompetitive feedback inhibitor through interaction with the same folded segment. The three-dimensional NMR solution structure of the allosteric site revealed an α-helix with a loop connecting a coil fragment. The conserved amino acid residues in the loop interacting with CoA were identified, revealing details of this important regulatory element for allosteric regulation. Based on these results, a model is proposed illustrating the role of the N-terminal domain of BnaDGAT1 as a positive and negative modulator of TAG biosynthesis. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the protein Expansion: an ‘Expansion’ to the Smad MH2 fold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beich-Frandsen, Mads; Aragón, Eric; Llimargas, Marta; Benach, Jordi; Riera, Antoni; Pous, Joan; Macias, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion is a modular protein that is conserved in protostomes. The first structure of the N-terminal domain of Expansion has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution and the new Nα-MH2 domain was found to belong to the Smad/FHA superfamily of structures. Gene-expression changes observed in Drosophila embryos after inducing the transcription factor Tramtrack led to the identification of the protein Expansion. Expansion contains an N-terminal domain similar in sequence to the MH2 domain characteristic of Smad proteins, which are the central mediators of the effects of the TGF-β signalling pathway. Apart from Smads and Expansion, no other type of protein belonging to the known kingdoms of life contains MH2 domains. To compare the Expansion and Smad MH2 domains, the crystal structure of the Expansion domain was determined at 1.6 Å resolution, the first structure of a non-Smad MH2 domain to be characterized to date. The structure displays the main features of the canonical MH2 fold with two main differences: the addition of an α-helical region and the remodelling of a protein-interaction site that is conserved in the MH2 domain of Smads. Owing to these differences, to the new domain was referred to as Nα-MH2. Despite the presence of the Nα-MH2 domain, Expansion does not participate in TGF-β signalling; instead, it is required for other activities specific to the protostome phyla. Based on the structural similarities to the MH2 fold, it is proposed that the Nα-MH2 domain should be classified as a new member of the Smad/FHA superfamily

  11. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the protein Expansion: an ‘Expansion’ to the Smad MH2 fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beich-Frandsen, Mads; Aragón, Eric [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Llimargas, Marta [Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, IBMB–CSIC, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Benach, Jordi [ALBA Synchrotron, BP 1413, km 3.3, Cerdanyola del Vallès (Spain); Riera, Antoni [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pous, Joan [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Platform of Crystallography IBMB–CSIC, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Macias, Maria J., E-mail: maria.macias@irbbarcelona.org [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    Expansion is a modular protein that is conserved in protostomes. The first structure of the N-terminal domain of Expansion has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution and the new Nα-MH2 domain was found to belong to the Smad/FHA superfamily of structures. Gene-expression changes observed in Drosophila embryos after inducing the transcription factor Tramtrack led to the identification of the protein Expansion. Expansion contains an N-terminal domain similar in sequence to the MH2 domain characteristic of Smad proteins, which are the central mediators of the effects of the TGF-β signalling pathway. Apart from Smads and Expansion, no other type of protein belonging to the known kingdoms of life contains MH2 domains. To compare the Expansion and Smad MH2 domains, the crystal structure of the Expansion domain was determined at 1.6 Å resolution, the first structure of a non-Smad MH2 domain to be characterized to date. The structure displays the main features of the canonical MH2 fold with two main differences: the addition of an α-helical region and the remodelling of a protein-interaction site that is conserved in the MH2 domain of Smads. Owing to these differences, to the new domain was referred to as Nα-MH2. Despite the presence of the Nα-MH2 domain, Expansion does not participate in TGF-β signalling; instead, it is required for other activities specific to the protostome phyla. Based on the structural similarities to the MH2 fold, it is proposed that the Nα-MH2 domain should be classified as a new member of the Smad/FHA superfamily.

  12. C-terminal KDEL-modified cystatin C is retained in transfected CHO cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Teit Eliot; Vogel, Charlotte Katrine; Schwartz, Thue W.

    1990-01-01

    The significance of a C-terminal tetrapeptide, Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu (KDEL), as a retention signal for the endoplasmatic reticulum was studied using cystatin C, a general thiol protease inhibitor, as the reporter protein. Clones of CHO cells were analyzed after stable transfection with eukaryotic...

  13. Trafficking Dynamics of PCSK9-Induced LDLR Degradation: Focus on Human PCSK9 Mutations and C-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Poirier

    Full Text Available PCSK9 is a secreted ligand and negative post-translational regulator of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR in hepatocytes. Gain-of-function (GOF or loss-of-function (LOF mutations in PCSK9 are directly correlated with high or low plasma LDL-cholesterol levels, respectively. Therefore, PCSK9 is a prevailing lipid-lowering target to prevent coronary heart diseases and stroke. Herein, we fused monomeric fluorescent proteins to PCSK9 and LDLR to visualize their intra- and extracellular trafficking dynamics by live confocal microscopy. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP showed that PCSK9 LOF R46L mutant and GOF mutations S127R and D129G, but not the LDLR high-affinity mutant D374Y, significantly accelerate PCSK9 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Quantitative analysis of inverse FRAP revealed that only R46L presented a much slower trafficking from the trans-Golgi network (TGN to the plasma membrane and a lower mobile fraction likely suggesting accumulation or delayed exit at the TGN as an underlying mechanism. While not primarily involved in LDLR binding, PCSK9 C-terminal domain (CTD was found to be essential to induce LDLR degradation both upon its overexpression in cells or via the extracellular pathway. Our data revealed that PCSK9 CTD is required for the localization of PCSK9 at the TGN and increases its LDLR-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, intracellular lysosomal targeting of PCSK9-ΔCTD was able to rescue its capacity to induce LDLR degradation emphasizing a role of the CTD in the sorting of PCSK9-LDLR complex towards late endocytic compartments. Finally, we validated our dual fluorescence system as a cell based-assay by preventing PCSK9 internalization using a PCSK9-LDLR blocking antibody, which may be expended to identify protein, peptide or small molecule inhibitors of PCSK9.

  14. Voltage-sensing phosphatase modulation by a C2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Paul M; Zolman, Kevin D; Kohout, Susy C

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) is the first example of an enzyme controlled by changes in membrane potential. VSP has four distinct regions: the transmembrane voltage-sensing domain (VSD), the inter-domain linker, the cytosolic catalytic domain, and the C2 domain. The VSD transmits the changes in membrane potential through the inter-domain linker activating the catalytic domain which then dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids. The role of the C2, however, has not been established. In this study, we explore two possible roles for the C2: catalysis and membrane-binding. The Ci-VSP crystal structures show that the C2 residue Y522 lines the active site suggesting a contribution to catalysis. When we mutated Y522 to phenylalanine, we found a shift in the voltage dependence of activity. This suggests hydrogen bonding as a mechanism of action. Going one step further, when we deleted the entire C2 domain, we found voltage-dependent enzyme activity was no longer detectable. This result clearly indicates the entire C2 is necessary for catalysis as well as for modulating activity. As C2s are known membrane-binding domains, we tested whether the VSP C2 interacts with the membrane. We probed a cluster of four positively charged residues lining the top of the C2 and suggested by previous studies to interact with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] (Kalli et al., 2014). Neutralizing those positive charges significantly shifted the voltage dependence of activity to higher voltages. We tested membrane binding by depleting PI(4,5)P2 from the membrane using the 5HT2C receptor and found that the VSD motions as measured by voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) were not changed. These results suggest that if the C2 domain interacts with the membrane to influence VSP function it may not occur exclusively through PI(4,5)P2. Together, this data advances our understanding of the VSP C2 by demonstrating a necessary and critical role for the C2 domain in

  15. Replacement of the C-terminal tetrapeptide ( 314 PAPV 317 to 314 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 4. Replacement of the C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317 to 314SSSM317) in interferon regulatory factor-2 alters its N-terminal DNA-binding activity. Krishna Prakash Pramod C Rath. Articles Volume 35 Issue 4 December 2010 pp 547-556 ...

  16. The EBNA-2 N-Terminal Transactivation Domain Folds into a Dimeric Structure Required for Target Gene Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Friberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a γ-herpesvirus that may cause infectious mononucleosis in young adults. In addition, epidemiological and molecular evidence links EBV to the pathogenesis of lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. EBV has the unique ability to transform resting B cells into permanently proliferating, latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2 is a key regulator of viral and cellular gene expression for this transformation process. The N-terminal region of EBNA-2 comprising residues 1-58 appears to mediate multiple molecular functions including self-association and transactivation. However, it remains to be determined if the N-terminus of EBNA-2 directly provides these functions or if these activities merely depend on the dimerization involving the N-terminal domain. To address this issue, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the EBNA-2 N-terminal dimerization (END domain by heteronuclear NMR-spectroscopy. The END domain monomer comprises a small fold of four β-strands and an α-helix which form a parallel dimer by interaction of two β-strands from each protomer. A structure-guided mutational analysis showed that hydrophobic residues in the dimer interface are required for self-association in vitro. Importantly, these interface mutants also displayed severely impaired self-association and transactivation in vivo. Moreover, mutations of solvent-exposed residues or deletion of the α-helix do not impair dimerization but strongly affect the functional activity, suggesting that the EBNA-2 dimer presents a surface that mediates functionally important intra- and/or intermolecular interactions. Our study shows that the END domain is a novel dimerization fold that is essential for functional activity. Since this specific fold is a unique feature of EBNA-2 it might provide a novel target for anti-viral therapeutics.

  17. Globular adiponectin induces a pro-inflammatory response in human astrocytic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Zhongxiao; Mah, Dorrian; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Klegeris, Andis; Little, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Adiponectin receptors are expressed in human astrocytes. • Globular adiponectin induces secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 from cultured astrocytes. • Adiponectin may play a pro-inflammatory role in astrocytes. - Abstract: Neuroinflammation, mediated in part by activated brain astrocytes, plays a critical role in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine secreted from adipose tissue and has been reported to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects in peripheral tissues; however, the effects of adiponectin on astrocytes remain unknown. Shifts in peripheral concentrations of adipokines, including adiponectin, could contribute to the observed link between midlife adiposity and increased AD risk. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of globular adiponectin (gAd) on pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and secretion in human U373 MG astrocytic cells and to explore the potential involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3 K) signaling pathways in these processes. We demonstrated expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (adipoR1) and adipoR2 in U373 MG cells and primary human astrocytes. gAd induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and gene expression of IL-6, MCP-1, IL-1β and IL-8 in U373 MG cells. Using specific inhibitors, we found that NF-κB, p38MAPK and ERK1/2 pathways are involved in gAd-induced induction of cytokines with ERK1/2 contributing the most. These findings provide evidence that gAd may induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in human astrocytes

  18. Globular adiponectin induces a pro-inflammatory response in human astrocytic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Zhongxiao; Mah, Dorrian; Simtchouk, Svetlana [School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Klegeris, Andis [Department of Biology, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Little, Jonathan P., E-mail: jonathan.little@ubc.ca [School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC (Canada)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Adiponectin receptors are expressed in human astrocytes. • Globular adiponectin induces secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 from cultured astrocytes. • Adiponectin may play a pro-inflammatory role in astrocytes. - Abstract: Neuroinflammation, mediated in part by activated brain astrocytes, plays a critical role in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine secreted from adipose tissue and has been reported to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects in peripheral tissues; however, the effects of adiponectin on astrocytes remain unknown. Shifts in peripheral concentrations of adipokines, including adiponectin, could contribute to the observed link between midlife adiposity and increased AD risk. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of globular adiponectin (gAd) on pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and secretion in human U373 MG astrocytic cells and to explore the potential involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3 K) signaling pathways in these processes. We demonstrated expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (adipoR1) and adipoR2 in U373 MG cells and primary human astrocytes. gAd induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and gene expression of IL-6, MCP-1, IL-1β and IL-8 in U373 MG cells. Using specific inhibitors, we found that NF-κB, p38MAPK and ERK1/2 pathways are involved in gAd-induced induction of cytokines with ERK1/2 contributing the most. These findings provide evidence that gAd may induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in human astrocytes.

  19. Reconstructing galaxy histories from globular clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Michael J; Côté, Patrick; Marzke, Ronald O; Jordán, Andrés

    2004-01-01

    Nearly a century after the true nature of galaxies as distant 'island universes' was established, their origin and evolution remain great unsolved problems of modern astrophysics. One of the most promising ways to investigate galaxy formation is to study the ubiquitous globular star clusters that surround most galaxies. Globular clusters are compact groups of up to a few million stars. They generally formed early in the history of the Universe, but have survived the interactions and mergers that alter substantially their parent galaxies. Recent advances in our understanding of the globular cluster systems of the Milky Way and other galaxies point to a complex picture of galaxy genesis driven by cannibalism, collisions, bursts of star formation and other tumultuous events.

  20. Nova-driven winds in globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, E.H.; Durisen, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Recent sensitive searches for Hα emission from ionized intracluster gas in globular clusters have set upper limits that conflict with theoretical predictions. We suggest that nova outbursts heat the gas, producing winds that resolve this discrepancy. The incidence of novae in globular clusters, the conversion of kinetic energy of the nova shell to thermal energy of the intracluster gas, and the characteristics of the resultant winds are discussed. Calculated emission from the nova-driven models does not conflict with any observations to date. Some suggestions are made concerning the most promising approaches for future detection of intracluster gas on the basis of these models. The possible relationship of nova-driven winds of globular cluster X-ray sources is also considered

  1. Dinamical properties of globular clusters: Primordial or evolutional?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdin, V. G.

    1995-04-01

    Some observable relations between globular cluster parameters appear as a result of dynamical evolution of the cluster system. These relations are inapplicable to the studies of the globular cluster origin

  2. Multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization of PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintz, Udo; Meinhart, Anton; Winkler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Crystal structures of two truncated variants of the transcription factor PpsR from R. sphaeroides are presented that enabled the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct. Together, these structures reveal the importance of α-helical PAS extensions for multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function. Per–ARNT–Sim (PAS) domains are essential modules of many multi-domain signalling proteins that mediate protein interaction and/or sense environmental stimuli. Frequently, multiple PAS domains are present within single polypeptide chains, where their interplay is required for protein function. Although many isolated PAS domain structures have been reported over the last decades, only a few structures of multi-PAS proteins are known. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function is poorly understood. The transcription factor PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is such a multi-PAS domain protein that, in addition to its three PAS domains, contains a glutamine-rich linker and a C-terminal helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motif. Here, crystal structures of two N-terminally and C-terminally truncated PpsR variants that comprise a single (PpsR Q-PAS1 ) and two (PpsR N-Q-PAS1 ) PAS domains, respectively, are presented and the multi-step strategy required for the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct (PpsR ΔHTH ) is illustrated. While parts of the biologically relevant dimerization interface can already be observed in the two shorter constructs, the PpsR ΔHTH structure reveals how three PAS domains enable the formation of multiple oligomeric states (dimer, tetramer and octamer), highlighting that not only the PAS cores but also their α-helical extensions are essential for protein oligomerization. The results demonstrate that the long helical glutamine-rich linker of PpsR results from a direct fusion of the N-cap of the PAS1 domain with the C-terminal extension of the N-domain that plays an important

  3. Updating the profile of C-terminal MECP2 deletions in Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, A; Percy, A; Christodoulou, J; Ravine, D; Ho, G; Jacoby, P; Anderson, A; Pineda, M; Ben Zeev, B; Bahi-Buisson, N; Smeets, E; Leonard, H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare the phenotype of Rett syndrome cases with C-terminal deletions to that of cases with different MECP2 mutations and to examine the phenotypic variation within C-terminal deletions. Methods Cases were selected from InterRett, an international database and from the population-based Australian Rett Syndrome Database. Cases (n=832) were included if they had a pathogenic MECP2 mutation in which the nature of the amino acid change was known. Three severity scale systems were used, and individual aspects of the phenotype were also compared. Results Lower severity was associated with C-terminal deletions (n=79) compared to all other MECP2 mutations (e.g. Pineda scale C-terminals mean 15.0 (95% CI 14.0–16.0) vs 16.2 (15.9–16.5). Cases with C-terminal deletions were more likely to have a normal head circumference (odds ratio 3.22, 95% CI 1.53 – 6.79) and weight (odds ratio 2.97, 95% CI 1.25–5.76). Onset of stereotypies tended to be later (median age 2.5 years vs 2 years, pmiddle of the range. In terms of individual aspects of phenotype growth and ability to ambulate appear to be particular strengths. By pooling data internationally this study has achieved the case numbers to provide a phenotypic profile of C-terminal deletions in Rett syndrome. PMID:19914908

  4. The Biotechnological Applications of Recombinant Single-Domain Antibodies are Optimized by the C-Terminal Fusion to the EPEA Sequence (C Tag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Djender

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We designed a vector for the bacterial expression of recombinant antibodies fused to a double tag composed of 6xHis and the EPEA amino acid sequence. EPEA sequence (C tag is tightly bound by a commercial antibody when expressed at the C-term end of a polypeptide. The antigen is released in the presence of 2 M MgCl2. Consequently, constructs fused to the 6xHis-C tags can be purified by two successive and orthogonal affinity steps. Single-domain antibodies were produced either in the periplasmic or in the cytoplasmic space of E. coli. Surprisingly, the first affinity purification step performed using the EPEA-binding resin already yielded homogeneous proteins. The presence of the C tag did not interfere with the binding activity of the antibodies, as assessed by FACS and SPR analyses, and the C tag was extremely effective for immunoprecipitating HER2 receptor. Finally, the Alexa488-coupled anti-C tag allowed for simplification of FACS and IF analyses. These results show that a tag of minimal dimensions can be effectively used to improve the applicability of recombinant antibodies as reagents. In our hands, C tag was superior to His-tag in affinity purification and pull-down experiments, and practical in any other standard immune technique.

  5. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AS CRADLES OF LIFE AND ADVANCED CIVILIZATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefano, R. Di [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (United States); Ray, A., E-mail: rdistefano@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: akr@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (India)

    2016-08-10

    Globular clusters are ancient stellar populations in compact dense ellipsoids. There is no star formation and there are no core-collapse supernovae, but several lines of evidence suggest that globular clusters are rich in planets. If so, and if advanced civilizations can develop there, then the distances between these civilizations and other stars would be far smaller than typical distances between stars in the Galactic disk, facilitating interstellar communication and travel. The potent combination of long-term stability and high stellar densities provides a globular cluster opportunity. Yet the very proximity that promotes interstellar travel also brings danger, as stellar interactions can destroy planetary systems. We find, however, that large portions of many globular clusters are “sweet spots,” where habitable-zone planetary orbits are stable for long times. Globular clusters in our own and other galaxies are, therefore, among the best targets for searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). We use the Drake equation to compare the likelihood of advanced civilizations in globular clusters to that in the Galactic disk. We also consider free-floating planets, since wide-orbit planets can be ejected to travel through the cluster. Civilizations spawned in globular clusters may be able to establish self-sustaining outposts, reducing the probability that a single catastrophic event will destroy the civilization. Although individual civilizations may follow different evolutionary paths, or even be destroyed, the cluster may continue to host advanced civilizations once a small number have jumped across interstellar space. Civilizations residing in globular clusters could therefore, in a sense, be immortal.

  6. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AS CRADLES OF LIFE AND ADVANCED CIVILIZATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefano, R. Di; Ray, A.

    2016-01-01

    Globular clusters are ancient stellar populations in compact dense ellipsoids. There is no star formation and there are no core-collapse supernovae, but several lines of evidence suggest that globular clusters are rich in planets. If so, and if advanced civilizations can develop there, then the distances between these civilizations and other stars would be far smaller than typical distances between stars in the Galactic disk, facilitating interstellar communication and travel. The potent combination of long-term stability and high stellar densities provides a globular cluster opportunity. Yet the very proximity that promotes interstellar travel also brings danger, as stellar interactions can destroy planetary systems. We find, however, that large portions of many globular clusters are “sweet spots,” where habitable-zone planetary orbits are stable for long times. Globular clusters in our own and other galaxies are, therefore, among the best targets for searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). We use the Drake equation to compare the likelihood of advanced civilizations in globular clusters to that in the Galactic disk. We also consider free-floating planets, since wide-orbit planets can be ejected to travel through the cluster. Civilizations spawned in globular clusters may be able to establish self-sustaining outposts, reducing the probability that a single catastrophic event will destroy the civilization. Although individual civilizations may follow different evolutionary paths, or even be destroyed, the cluster may continue to host advanced civilizations once a small number have jumped across interstellar space. Civilizations residing in globular clusters could therefore, in a sense, be immortal.

  7. Expression, purification, and DNA-binding activity of the solubilized NtrC protein of Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twerdochlib, Adriana L; Chubatsu, Leda S; Souza, Emanuel M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Steffens, M Berenice R; Yates, M Geoffrey; Rigo, Liu U

    2003-07-01

    NtrC is a bacterial enhancer-binding protein (EBP) that activates transcription by the sigma54 RNA polymerase holoenzyme. NtrC has a three domain structure typical of EBP family. In Herbaspirillum seropedicae, an endophytic diazotroph, NtrC regulates several operons involved in nitrogen assimilation, including glnAntrBC. In order to over-express and purify the NtrC protein, DNA fragments containing the complete structural gene for the whole protein, and for the N-terminal+Central and Central+C-terminal domains were cloned into expression vectors. The NtrC and NtrC(N-terminal+Central) proteins were over-expressed as His-tag fusion proteins upon IPTG addition, solubilized using N-lauryl-sarcosyl and purified by metal affinity chromatography. The over-expressed His-tag-NtrC(Central+C-terminal) fusion protein was partially soluble and was also purified by affinity chromatography. DNA band-shift assays showed that the NtrC protein and the Central+C-terminal domains bound specifically to the H. seropedicae glnA promoter region. The C-terminal domain is presumably necessary for DNA-protein interaction and DNA-binding does not require a phosphorylated protein.

  8. Molecular phylogeny of C1 inhibitor depicts two immunoglobulin-like domains fusion in fishes and ray-finned fishes specific intron insertion after separation from zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Sarde, Sandeep J.; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • C1 inhibitors of fishes have two Ig domains fused in the N-terminal end. • Spliceosomal introns gain in two Ig domains of selected ray-finned fishes. • C1 inhibitors gene is maintained from 450 MY on the same locus. • C1 inhibitors gene is missing in frog and lampreys. • C1 inhibitors of tetrapod and fishes differ in the RCL region. - Abstract: C1 inhibitor (C1IN) is a multi-facet serine protease inhibitor in the plasma cascades, inhibiting several proteases, notably, regulates both complement and contact system activation. Despite huge advancements in the understanding of C1IN based on biochemical properties and its roles in the plasma cascades, the phylogenetic history of C1IN remains uncharacterized. To date, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history of C1IN. Herein, we explored phylogenetic history of C1IN gene in vertebrates. Fishes have C1IN with two immunoglobulin like domains attached in the N-terminal region. The RCL regions of CIIN from fishes and tetrapod genomes have variations at the positions P2 and P1′. Gene structures of C1IN gene from selected ray-finned fishes varied in the Ig domain region with creation of novel intron splitting exon Im2 into Im2a and Im2b. This intron is limited to ray-finned fishes with genome size reduced below 1 Gb. Hence, we suggest that genome compaction and associated double-strand break repairs are behind this intron gain. This study reveals the evolutionary history of C1IN and confirmed that this gene remains the same locus for ∼450 MY in 52 vertebrates analysed, but it is not found in frogs and lampreys

  9. Molecular phylogeny of C1 inhibitor depicts two immunoglobulin-like domains fusion in fishes and ray-finned fishes specific intron insertion after separation from zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Abhishek, E-mail: akumar@bot.uni-kiel.de [Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology in Botany, Institute of Botany, Christian-Albrechts-University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Bhandari, Anita [Molecular Physiology, Zoological Institute, Christian-Albrechts-University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Sarde, Sandeep J. [Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology in Botany, Institute of Botany, Christian-Albrechts-University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Goswami, Chandan [National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar, Orissa (India)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • C1 inhibitors of fishes have two Ig domains fused in the N-terminal end. • Spliceosomal introns gain in two Ig domains of selected ray-finned fishes. • C1 inhibitors gene is maintained from 450 MY on the same locus. • C1 inhibitors gene is missing in frog and lampreys. • C1 inhibitors of tetrapod and fishes differ in the RCL region. - Abstract: C1 inhibitor (C1IN) is a multi-facet serine protease inhibitor in the plasma cascades, inhibiting several proteases, notably, regulates both complement and contact system activation. Despite huge advancements in the understanding of C1IN based on biochemical properties and its roles in the plasma cascades, the phylogenetic history of C1IN remains uncharacterized. To date, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history of C1IN. Herein, we explored phylogenetic history of C1IN gene in vertebrates. Fishes have C1IN with two immunoglobulin like domains attached in the N-terminal region. The RCL regions of CIIN from fishes and tetrapod genomes have variations at the positions P2 and P1′. Gene structures of C1IN gene from selected ray-finned fishes varied in the Ig domain region with creation of novel intron splitting exon Im2 into Im2a and Im2b. This intron is limited to ray-finned fishes with genome size reduced below 1 Gb. Hence, we suggest that genome compaction and associated double-strand break repairs are behind this intron gain. This study reveals the evolutionary history of C1IN and confirmed that this gene remains the same locus for ∼450 MY in 52 vertebrates analysed, but it is not found in frogs and lampreys.

  10. Transiently disordered tails accelerate folding of globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Ray, Tanaya; Kundu, Sudip

    2017-07-01

    Numerous biological proteins exhibit intrinsic disorder at their termini, which are associated with multifarious functional roles. Here, we show the surprising result that an increased percentage of terminal short transiently disordered regions with enhanced flexibility (TstDREF) is associated with accelerated folding rates of globular proteins. Evolutionary conservation of predicted disorder at TstDREFs and drastic alteration of folding rates upon point-mutations suggest critical regulatory role(s) of TstDREFs in shaping the folding kinetics. TstDREFs are associated with long-range intramolecular interactions and the percentage of native secondary structural elements physically contacted by TstDREFs exhibit another surprising positive correlation with folding kinetics. These results allow us to infer probable molecular mechanisms behind the TstDREF-mediated regulation of folding kinetics that challenge protein biochemists to assess by direct experimental testing. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Structure of a C-terminal AHNAK peptide in a 1:2:2 complex with S100A10 and an acetylated N-terminal peptide of annexin A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozorowski, Gabriel [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Milton, Saskia [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Luecke, Hartmut, E-mail: hudel@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Structure of a 20-amino-acid peptide of AHNAK bound asymmetrically to the AnxA2–S100A10A heterotetramer (1:2:2 symmetry) provides insights into the atomic level interactions that govern this membrane-repair scaffolding complex. AHNAK, a large 629 kDa protein, has been implicated in membrane repair, and the annexin A2–S100A10 heterotetramer [(p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2})] has high affinity for several regions of its 1002-amino-acid C-terminal domain. (p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2} is often localized near the plasma membrane, and this C2-symmetric platform is proposed to be involved in the bridging of membrane vesicles and trafficking of proteins to the plasma membrane. All three proteins co-localize at the intracellular face of the plasma membrane in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. The binding of AHNAK to (p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2} has been studied previously, and a minimal binding motif has been mapped to a 20-amino-acid peptide corresponding to residues 5654–5673 of the AHNAK C-terminal domain. Here, the 2.5 Å resolution crystal structure of this 20-amino-acid peptide of AHNAK bound to the AnxA2–S100A10 heterotetramer (1:2:2 symmetry) is presented, which confirms the asymmetric arrangement first described by Rezvanpour and coworkers and explains why the binding motif has high affinity for (p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2}. Binding of AHNAK to the surface of (p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2} is governed by several hydrophobic interactions between side chains of AHNAK and pockets on S100A10. The pockets are large enough to accommodate a variety of hydrophobic side chains, allowing the consensus sequence to be more general. Additionally, the various hydrogen bonds formed between the AHNAK peptide and (p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2} most often involve backbone atoms of AHNAK; as a result, the side chains, particularly those that point away from S100A10/AnxA2 towards the solvent, are largely interchangeable. While the structure-based consensus sequence allows interactions with various

  12. Voltage-sensing phosphatase modulation by a C2 domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Castle

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP is the first example of an enzyme controlled by changes in membrane potential. VSP has four distinct regions: the transmembrane voltage-sensing domain (VSD, the inter-domain linker, the cytosolic catalytic domain and the C2 domain. The VSD transmits the changes in membrane potential through the inter-domain linker activating the catalytic domain which then dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol phosphate lipids. The role of the C2, however, has not been established. In this study, we explore two possible roles for the C2: catalysis and membrane-binding. The Ci-VSP crystal structures show that the C2 residue Y522 lines the active site suggesting a contribution to catalysis. When we mutated Y522 to phenylalanine, we found a shift in the voltage dependence of activity. This suggests hydrogen bonding as a mechanism of action. Going one step further, when we deleted the entire C2 domain, we found voltage-dependent enzyme activity was no longer detectable. This result clearly indicates the entire C2 is necessary for catalysis as well as for modulating activity. As C2s are known membrane-binding domains, we tested whether the VSP C2 interacts with the membrane. We probed a cluster of four positively charged residues lining the top of the C2 and suggested by previous studies to interact with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2 (Kalli et al., 2014. Neutralizing those positive charges significantly shifted the voltage dependence of activity to higher voltages. We tested membrane binding by depleting PI(4,5P2 from the membrane using the 5HT2C receptor and found that the VSD motions as measured by voltage clamp fluorometry were not changed. These results suggest that if the C2 domain interacts with the membrane to influence VSP function it may not occur exclusively through PI(4,5P2. Together, this data advances our understanding of the VSP C2 by demonstrating a necessary and critical role for the C2 domain in

  13. The Role of the N-Domain in the ATPase Activity of the Mammalian AAA ATPase p97/VCP*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Hajime; Ewens, Caroline A.; Tsang, Chun; Yeung, Heidi O.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Freemont, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    p97/valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a type II ATPase associated with various cellular activities that forms a homohexamer with each protomer containing an N-terminal domain (N-domain); two ATPase domains, D1 and D2; and a disordered C-terminal region. Little is known about the role of the N-domain or the C-terminal region in the p97 ATPase cycle. In the p97-associated human disease inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia, the majority of missense mutations are located at the N-domain D1 interface. Structure-based predictions suggest that such mutations affect the interaction of the N-domain with D1. Here we have tested ten major inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia-linked mutants for ATPase activity and found that all have increased activity over the wild type, with one mutant, p97A232E, having three times higher activity. Further mutagenesis of p97A232E shows that the increase in ATPase activity is mediated through D2 and requires both the N-domain and a flexible ND1 linker. A disulfide mutation that locks the N-domain to D1 in a coplanar position reversibly abrogates ATPase activity. A cryo-EM reconstruction of p97A232E suggests that the N-domains are flexible. Removal of the C-terminal region also reduces ATPase activity. Taken together, our data suggest that the conformation of the N-domain in relation to the D1-D2 hexamer is directly linked to ATP hydrolysis and that the C-terminal region is required for hexamer stability. This leads us to propose a model where the N-domain adopts either of two conformations: a flexible conformation compatible with ATP hydrolysis or a coplanar conformation that is inactive. PMID:22270372

  14. The role of the N-domain in the ATPase activity of the mammalian AAA ATPase p97/VCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Hajime; Ewens, Caroline A; Tsang, Chun; Yeung, Heidi O; Zhang, Xiaodong; Freemont, Paul S

    2012-03-09

    p97/valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a type II ATPase associated with various cellular activities that forms a homohexamer with each protomer containing an N-terminal domain (N-domain); two ATPase domains, D1 and D2; and a disordered C-terminal region. Little is known about the role of the N-domain or the C-terminal region in the p97 ATPase cycle. In the p97-associated human disease inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia, the majority of missense mutations are located at the N-domain D1 interface. Structure-based predictions suggest that such mutations affect the interaction of the N-domain with D1. Here we have tested ten major inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia-linked mutants for ATPase activity and found that all have increased activity over the wild type, with one mutant, p97(A232E), having three times higher activity. Further mutagenesis of p97(A232E) shows that the increase in ATPase activity is mediated through D2 and requires both the N-domain and a flexible ND1 linker. A disulfide mutation that locks the N-domain to D1 in a coplanar position reversibly abrogates ATPase activity. A cryo-EM reconstruction of p97(A232E) suggests that the N-domains are flexible. Removal of the C-terminal region also reduces ATPase activity. Taken together, our data suggest that the conformation of the N-domain in relation to the D1-D2 hexamer is directly linked to ATP hydrolysis and that the C-terminal region is required for hexamer stability. This leads us to propose a model where the N-domain adopts either of two conformations: a flexible conformation compatible with ATP hydrolysis or a coplanar conformation that is inactive.

  15. Comparison of structure, function and regulation of plant cold shock domain proteins to bacterial and animal cold shock domain proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikam, Vijay; Karlson, Dale T

    2010-01-01

    The cold shock domain (CSD) is among the most ancient and well conserved nucleic acid binding domains from bacteria to higher animals and plants. The CSD facilitates binding to RNA, ssDNA and dsDNA and most functions attributed to cold shock domain proteins are mediated by this nucleic acid binding activity. In prokaryotes, cold shock domain proteins only contain a single CSD and are termed cold shock proteins (Csps). In animal model systems, various auxiliary domains are present in addition to the CSD and are commonly named Y-box proteins. Similar to animal CSPs, plant CSPs contain auxiliary C-terminal domains in addition to their N-terminal CSD. Cold shock domain proteins have been shown to play important roles in development and stress adaptation in wide variety of organisms. In this review, the structure, function and regulation of plant CSPs are compared and contrasted to the characteristics of bacterial and animal CSPs. [BMB reports 2010; 43(1): 1-8].

  16. Truncation of the C-terminal region of Toscana Virus NSs protein is critical for interferon-β antagonism and protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori Savellini, Gianni; Gandolfo, Claudia; Cusi, Maria Grazia

    2015-12-01

    Toscana Virus (TOSV) is a Phlebovirus responsible for central nervous system (CNS) injury in humans. The TOSV non-structural protein (NSs), which interacting with RIG-I leads to its degradation, was analysed in the C terminus fragment in order to identify its functional domains. To this aim, two C-terminal truncated NSs proteins, Δ1C-NSs (aa 1-284) and Δ2C-NSs (aa 1-287) were tested. Only Δ1C-NSs did not present any inhibitory effect on RIG-I and it showed a greater stability than the whole NSs protein. Moreover, the deletion of the TLQ aa sequence interposed between the two ΔC constructs caused a greater accumulation of the protein with a weak inhibitory effect on RIG-I, indicating some involvement of these amino acids in the NSs activity. Nevertheless, all the truncated proteins were still able to interact with RIG-I, suggesting that the domains responsible for RIG-I signaling and RIG-I interaction are mapped on different regions of the protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The evoluation of the galactic globular clusters; I Metal abundance calibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Park, N.K.

    1984-01-01

    Five different calibrations of metal abundances of globular clusters are examined and these are compared with metallicity ranking parameters such as (Sp)sub(c), , Q39 and IR-indices. Except for the calibration *(Fe/H*)sub(H) by the high dispersion echelle analysis, the other calibration scales are correlated with the morphological parameters of red giant branch. In the *(Fe/H*)sub(Hsup(-))scale, the clusters later than approx.F8 have nearly a constant metal abundance, *(Fe/H*)sub(H)approx.-1.05, regardless of morphological characteristics of horizontal branch and red giant branch. By the two fundamental calibration scales of *(Fe/H*)sub(L) (derived by the low dispersion analysis), and *(Fe/H*)sub(delta S) (derived by the spectral analysis of RR Lyrae stars), the globular clusters are divided into the halo clusters with *(Fe/H*)<-1.0 and the disk clusters confined within the galactocentric distance rsub(G)=10 kpc and galactic plane distance absolute z=3 kpc. In this case the abundance gradient is given by d*(Fe/H*)/drsub(G)approx.-0.05kpcsup(-1) and d*(Fe/H*)/d absolute z approx. -0.08 kpcsup(-1) within rsub(G)=20 kpc and absolute z=10 kpc, respectively. According to these characteristics of the spatial distribution of globular clusters, the chemical evolution of the galactic globular clusters can be accounted for by the two-zone (disk-halo) slow collapse model when the *(Fe/H*)sub(Lsup(-)) or *(Fe/H*)sub(DELTA Ssup(-))scale is applied. In the case of *(Fe/H*)sub(Hsup(-))scale, the one-zone fast collapse model is preferred for the evolution of globular clusters. (Author)

  18. The structure of the nucleoprotein binding domain of lyssavirus phosphoprotein reveals a structural relationship between the N-RNA binding domains of Rhabdoviridae and Paramyxoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Olivier; Assenberg, Rene; Grimes, Jonathan M; Bourhy, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    The phosphoprotein P of non-segmented negative-sense RNA viruses is an essential component of the replication and transcription complex and acts as a co-factor for the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. P recruits the viral polymerase to the nucleoprotein-bound viral RNA (N-RNA) via an interaction between its C-terminal domain and the N-RNA complex. We have obtained the structure of the C-terminal domain of P of Mokola virus (MOKV), a lyssavirus that belongs to the Rhabdoviridae family and mapped at the amino acid level the crucial positions involved in interaction with N and in the formation of the viral replication complex. Comparison of the N-RNA binding domains of P solved to date suggests that the N-RNA binding domains are structurally conserved among paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses in spite of low sequence conservation. We also review the numerous other functions of this domain and more generally of the phosphoprotein.

  19. 47 CFR 25.134 - Licensing provisions of Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensing provisions of Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. 25.134 Section 25.134 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS...

  20. Analysis of Domain Architecture and Phylogenetics of Family 2 Glycoside Hydrolases (GH2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Talens-Perales

    Full Text Available In this work we report a detailed analysis of the topology and phylogenetics of family 2 glycoside hydrolases (GH2. We distinguish five topologies or domain architectures based on the presence and distribution of protein domains defined in Pfam and Interpro databases. All of them share a central TIM barrel (catalytic module with two β-sandwich domains (non-catalytic at the N-terminal end, but differ in the occurrence and nature of additional non-catalytic modules at the C-terminal region. Phylogenetic analysis was based on the sequence of the Pfam Glyco_hydro_2_C catalytic module present in most GH2 proteins. Our results led us to propose a model in which evolutionary diversity of GH2 enzymes is driven by the addition of different non-catalytic domains at the C-terminal region. This model accounts for the divergence of β-galactosidases from β-glucuronidases, the diversification of β-galactosidases with different transglycosylation specificities, and the emergence of bicistronic β-galactosidases. This study also allows the identification of groups of functionally uncharacterized protein sequences with potential biotechnological interest.

  1. Overexpression of YB1 C-terminal domain inhibits proliferation, angiogenesis and tumorigenicity in a SK-BR-3 breast cancer xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian-Hong; Cui, Nai-Peng; Wang, Shuo; Zhao, Ming-Zhi; Wang, Bing; Wang, Ya-Nan; Chen, Bao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB1) is a multifunctional transcription factor with vital roles in proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this study, we have examined the role of its C-terminal domain (YB1 CTD) in proliferation, angiogenesis and tumorigenicity in breast cancer. Breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3 was infected with GFP-tagged YB1 CTD adenovirus expression vector. An 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) proliferation assay showed that YB1 CTD decreased SK-BR-3 cell proliferation, and down-regulated cyclin B1 and up-regulated p21 levels in SK-BR-3 cells. YB1 CTD overexpression changed the cytoskeletal organization and slightly inhibited the migration of SK-BR-3 cells. YB1 CTD also inhibited secreted VEGF expression in SK-BR-3 cells, which decreased SK-BR-3-induced EA.hy926 endothelial cell angiogenesis in vitro. YB1 CTD overexpression attenuated the ability of SK-BR-3 cells to form tumours in nude mice, and decreased in vivo VEGF levels and angiogenesis in the xenografts in SK-BR-3 tumour-bearing mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the vital role of YB1 CTD overexpression in inhibiting proliferation, angiogenesis and tumorigenicity of breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3.

  2. Search for optical millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleditch, J.H.; Imamura, J.N.; Steiman-Cameron, T.Y.

    1988-01-01

    A search for millisecond optical pulsars in several bright, compact globular clusters was conducted. The sample included M28, and the X-ray clusters 47 Tuc, NGC 6441, NGC 6624, M22, and M15. The globular cluster M28 contains the recently discovered 327 Hz radio pulsar. Upper limits of 4 sigma to pulsed emission of (1-20) solar luminosities were found for the globular clusters tested, and 0.3 solar luminosity for the M28 pulsar for frequencies up to 500 Hz. 8 references

  3. C-terminal peptide extension via gas-phase ion/ion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhou; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of peptide bonds is of great importance from both a biological standpoint and in routine organic synthesis. Recent work from our group demonstrated the synthesis of peptides in the gas-phase via ion/ion reactions with sulfo-NHS reagents, which resulted in conjugation of individual amino acids or small peptides to the N-terminus of an existing ‘anchor’ peptide. Here, we demonstrate a complementary approach resulting in the C-terminal extension of peptides. Individual amino acids or short peptides can be prepared as reagents by incorporating gas phase-labile protecting groups to the reactive C-terminus and then converting the N-terminal amino groups to the active ketenimine reagent. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions between the anionic reagents and doubly protonated “anchor” peptide cations results in extension of the “anchor” peptide with new amide bond formation at the C-terminus. We have demonstrated that ion/ion reactions can be used as a fast, controlled, and efficient means for C-terminal peptide extension in the gas phase. PMID:26640400

  4. Improving developer productivity with C++ embedded domain specific languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozacik, Stephen; Chao, Evenie; Paolini, Aaron; Bonnett, James; Kelmelis, Eric

    2017-05-01

    Domain-specific languages are a useful tool for productivity allowing domain experts to program using familiar concepts and vocabulary while benefiting from performance choices made by computing experts. Embedding the domain specific language into an existing language allows easy interoperability with non-domain-specific code and use of standard compilers and build systems. In C++, this is enabled through the template and preprocessor features. C++ embedded domain specific languages (EDSLs) allow the user to write simple, safe, performant, domain specific code that has access to all the low-level functionality that C and C++ offer as well as the diverse set of libraries available in the C/C++ ecosystem. In this paper, we will discuss several tools available for building EDSLs in C++ and show examples of projects successfully leveraging EDSLs. Modern C++ has added many useful new features to the language which we have leveraged to further extend the capability of EDSLs. At EM Photonics, we have used EDSLs to allow developers to transparently benefit from using high performance computing (HPC) hardware. We will show ways EDSLs combine with existing technologies and EM Photonics high performance tools and libraries to produce clean, short, high performance code in ways that were not previously possible.

  5. Integrity of Helix 2-Helix 3 Domain of the PrP Protein Is Not Mandatory for Prion Replication*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamat, Khalid; Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Herzog, Laetitia; Jaumain, Emilie; Béringue, Vincent; Rezaei, Human; Pastore, Annalisa; Laude, Hubert; Dron, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The process of prion conversion is not yet well understood at the molecular level. The regions critical for the conformational change of PrP remain mostly debated and the extent of sequence change acceptable for prion conversion is poorly documented. To achieve progress on these issues, we applied a reverse genetic approach using the Rov cell system. This allowed us to test the susceptibility of a number of insertion mutants to conversion into prion in the absence of wild-type PrP molecules. We were able to propagate several prions with 8 to 16 extra amino acids, including a polyglycine stretch and His or FLAG tags, inserted in the middle of the protease-resistant fragment. These results demonstrate the possibility to increase the length of the loop between helices H2 and H3 up to 4-fold, without preventing prion replication. They also indicate that this loop probably remains unstructured in PrPSc. We also showed that bona fide prions can be produced following insertion of octapeptides in the two C-terminal turns of H2. These insertions do not interfere with the overall fold of the H2-H3 domain indicating that the highly conserved sequence of the terminal part of H2 is not critical for the conversion. Altogether these data showed that the amplitude of modifications acceptable for prion conversion in the core of the globular domain of PrP is much greater than one might have assumed. These observations should help to refine structural models of PrPSc and elucidate the conformational changes underlying prions generation. PMID:22511770

  6. Integrity of helix 2-helix 3 domain of the PrP protein is not mandatory for prion replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamat, Khalid; Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Herzog, Laetitia; Jaumain, Emilie; Béringue, Vincent; Rezaei, Human; Pastore, Annalisa; Laude, Hubert; Dron, Michel

    2012-06-01

    The process of prion conversion is not yet well understood at the molecular level. The regions critical for the conformational change of PrP remain mostly debated and the extent of sequence change acceptable for prion conversion is poorly documented. To achieve progress on these issues, we applied a reverse genetic approach using the Rov cell system. This allowed us to test the susceptibility of a number of insertion mutants to conversion into prion in the absence of wild-type PrP molecules. We were able to propagate several prions with 8 to 16 extra amino acids, including a polyglycine stretch and His or FLAG tags, inserted in the middle of the protease-resistant fragment. These results demonstrate the possibility to increase the length of the loop between helices H2 and H3 up to 4-fold, without preventing prion replication. They also indicate that this loop probably remains unstructured in PrP(Sc). We also showed that bona fide prions can be produced following insertion of octapeptides in the two C-terminal turns of H2. These insertions do not interfere with the overall fold of the H2-H3 domain indicating that the highly conserved sequence of the terminal part of H2 is not critical for the conversion. Altogether these data showed that the amplitude of modifications acceptable for prion conversion in the core of the globular domain of PrP is much greater than one might have assumed. These observations should help to refine structural models of PrP(Sc) and elucidate the conformational changes underlying prions generation.

  7. Peptides derived from human galectin-3 N-terminal tail interact with its carbohydrate recognition domain in a phosphorylation-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berbís, M. Álvaro [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); André, Sabine [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany); Cañada, F. Javier [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pipkorn, Rüdiger [Central Peptide Synthesis Unit, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ippel, Hans [Department of Biochemistry, CARIM, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Mayo, Kevin H. [Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kübler, Dieter [Biomolecular Interactions, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gabius, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany); Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús, E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Galectin-3 is composed of a carbohydrate recognition domain and an N-terminal tail. •Synthetic peptides derived from the tail are shown to interact with the CRD. •This interaction is modulated by Ser- and Tyr-phosphorylation of the peptides. -- Abstract: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multi-functional effector protein that functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, as well as extracellularly following non-classical secretion. Structurally, Gal-3 is unique among galectins with its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) attached to a rather long N-terminal tail composed mostly of collagen-like repeats (nine in the human protein) and terminating in a short non-collagenous terminal peptide sequence unique in this lectin family and not yet fully explored. Although several Ser and Tyr sites within the N-terminal tail can be phosphorylated, the physiological significance of this post-translational modification remains unclear. Here, we used a series of synthetic (phospho)peptides derived from the tail to assess phosphorylation-mediated interactions with {sup 15}N-labeled Gal-3 CRD. HSQC-derived chemical shift perturbations revealed selective interactions at the backface of the CRD that were attenuated by phosphorylation of Tyr 107 and Tyr 118, while phosphorylation of Ser 6 and Ser 12 was essential. Controls with sequence scrambling underscored inherent specificity. Our studies shed light on how phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail may impact on Gal-3 function and prompt further studies using phosphorylated full-length protein.

  8. Peptides derived from human galectin-3 N-terminal tail interact with its carbohydrate recognition domain in a phosphorylation-dependent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berbís, M. Álvaro; André, Sabine; Cañada, F. Javier; Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Ippel, Hans; Mayo, Kevin H.; Kübler, Dieter; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Galectin-3 is composed of a carbohydrate recognition domain and an N-terminal tail. •Synthetic peptides derived from the tail are shown to interact with the CRD. •This interaction is modulated by Ser- and Tyr-phosphorylation of the peptides. -- Abstract: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multi-functional effector protein that functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, as well as extracellularly following non-classical secretion. Structurally, Gal-3 is unique among galectins with its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) attached to a rather long N-terminal tail composed mostly of collagen-like repeats (nine in the human protein) and terminating in a short non-collagenous terminal peptide sequence unique in this lectin family and not yet fully explored. Although several Ser and Tyr sites within the N-terminal tail can be phosphorylated, the physiological significance of this post-translational modification remains unclear. Here, we used a series of synthetic (phospho)peptides derived from the tail to assess phosphorylation-mediated interactions with 15 N-labeled Gal-3 CRD. HSQC-derived chemical shift perturbations revealed selective interactions at the backface of the CRD that were attenuated by phosphorylation of Tyr 107 and Tyr 118, while phosphorylation of Ser 6 and Ser 12 was essential. Controls with sequence scrambling underscored inherent specificity. Our studies shed light on how phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail may impact on Gal-3 function and prompt further studies using phosphorylated full-length protein

  9. New VVV Survey Globular Cluster Candidates in the Milky Way Bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Dante; Gómez, Matías [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Av. Fernandez Concha 700, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Geisler, Douglas; Fernández-Trincado, Jose G. [Departamento de Astronomía, Casilla 160-C, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Alonso-García, Javier; Beamín, Juan Carlos; Borissova, Jura; Catelan, Marcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Kurtev, Radostin; Pullen, Joyce [Instituto Milenio de Astrofísica, Santiago (Chile); Palma, Tali; Clariá, Juan J. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, Córdoba (Argentina); Cohen, Roger E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 2700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore (United States); Dias, Bruno [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Hempel, Maren [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Instituto de Astrofísica, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Ivanov, Valentin D. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarszchild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Lucas, Phillip W. [Dept. of Astronomy, University of Hertfordshire, Hertfordshire (United Kingdom); Moni-Bidin, Christian; Alegría, Sebastian Ramírez [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Católica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile); and others

    2017-11-10

    It is likely that a number of Galactic globular clusters remain to be discovered, especially toward the Galactic bulge. High stellar density combined with high and differential interstellar reddening are the two major problems for finding globular clusters located toward the bulge. We use the deep near-IR photometry of the VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey to search for globular clusters projected toward the Galactic bulge, and hereby report the discovery of 22 new candidate globular clusters. These objects, detected as high density regions in our maps of bulge red giants, are confirmed as globular cluster candidates by their color–magnitude diagrams. We provide their coordinates as well as their near-IR color–magnitude diagrams, from which some basic parameters are derived, such as reddenings and heliocentric distances. The color–magnitude diagrams reveal well defined red giant branches in all cases, often including a prominent red clump. The new globular cluster candidates exhibit a variety of extinctions (0.06 < A {sub Ks} < 2.77) and distances (5.3 < D < 9.5 kpc). We also classify the globular cluster candidates into 10 metal-poor and 12 metal-rich clusters, based on the comparison of their color–magnitude diagrams with those of known globular clusters also observed by the VVV Survey. Finally, we argue that the census for Galactic globular clusters still remains incomplete, and that many more candidate globular clusters (particularly the low luminosity ones) await to be found and studied in detail in the central regions of the Milky Way.

  10. Activity of the C-terminal-dependent vacuolar sorting signal of horseradish peroxidase C1a is enhanced by its secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takeshi; Tabayashi, Ayako; Iwano, Megumi; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Kato, Ko; Nakayama, Hideki

    2011-02-01

    Plant class III peroxidase (PRX) catalyzes the oxidation and oxidative polymerization of a variety of phenolic compounds while reducing hydrogen peroxide. PRX proteins are classified into apoplast type and vacuole type based on the absence or the presence of C-terminal propeptides, which probably function as vacuolar sorting signals (VSSs). In this study, in order to improve our understanding of vacuole-type PRX, we analyzed regulatory mechanisms of vacuolar sorting of a model vacuole-type PRX, the C1a isozyme of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) (HRP C1a). Using cultured transgenic tobacco cells and protoplasts derived from horseradish leaves, we characterized HRP C1a's VSS, which is a 15 amino acid C-terminal propeptide (C15). We found that the C-terminal hexapeptide of C15 (C6), which is well conserved among vacuole-type PRX proteins, forms the core of the C-terminal-dependent VSS. We also found that the function of C6 is enhanced by the remaining N-terminal part of C15 which probably folds into an amphiphilic α-helix.

  11. Yeast eIF4B binds to the head of the 40S ribosomal subunit and promotes mRNA recruitment through its N-terminal and internal repeat domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sarah E; Zhou, Fujun; Mitchell, Sarah F; Larson, Victoria S; Valasek, Leos; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2013-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)4B stimulates recruitment of mRNA to the 43S ribosomal pre-initiation complex (PIC). Yeast eIF4B (yeIF4B), shown previously to bind single-stranded (ss) RNA, consists of an N-terminal domain (NTD), predicted to be unstructured in solution; an RNA-recognition motif (RRM); an unusual domain comprised of seven imperfect repeats of 26 amino acids; and a C-terminal domain. Although the mechanism of yeIF4B action has remained obscure, most models have suggested central roles for its RRM and ssRNA-binding activity. We have dissected the functions of yeIF4B's domains and show that the RRM and its ssRNA-binding activity are dispensable in vitro and in vivo. Instead, our data indicate that the 7-repeats and NTD are the most critical domains, which mediate binding of yeIF4B to the head of the 40S ribosomal subunit via interaction with Rps20. This interaction induces structural changes in the ribosome's mRNA entry channel that could facilitate mRNA loading. We also show that yeIF4B strongly promotes productive interaction of eIF4A with the 43S•mRNA PIC in a manner required for efficient mRNA recruitment.

  12. Photometric studies of globular clusters in the Andromeda nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharov, A.S.; Lyutyj, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    The comparison of the frequency distribution of Bergh Q and Racine R metallicity parameters for globular clusters in the Galaxy and M31 is given. Mean values of the parameters are: in the Galaxy anti Q=-0.31 and anti R=0.40, in M31 anti Q=-0.32 and anti R=0.42. Hence the mean metallicity of globular clusters in two galaxies is identical. The differences in the observed frequency distribution of the parameters, in particular in the limits of general metallicity, are related to the random errors of photometrical measurements of globular clusters, considerably greater in the case of M31. Thereby the preference should be given to Hanes conclusion that globular clusters form a uniform population at least in two close systems. It should not be excepted that in other galaxies mean colour characteristics and hence metallicity of clusters may be of other type. Thus globular clusters related to the M31-NGC 205 satellite have somewhat minor B-V colour factors

  13. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed

  14. TOWARDS THE CONCEPT OF GLOBULAR PEARLITE

    OpenAIRE

    A. G. Anisovich; M. K. Stepankova; A. A. Andrushevich

    2016-01-01

    Explanatory imprecisions of concept of globular pearlite and ferrite-carbide-mixture are considered. The need of concept binding of globular pearlite to specific grain with 0.8% carbon content is explained with the assistance of exemplary data obtained at the present metallographic equipment. The question of educational material presentation concerning the process of teaching of discipline «Materials and construction materials technology» is discussed in relation to the educational process of...

  15. The GDP-switched GAF domain of DcpA modulates the concerted synthesis/hydrolysis of c-di-GMP in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Jie; Li, Na; Luo, Ye; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Chen, Yuxing; Li, Qiong

    2018-04-09

    The second messenger c-di-GMP [bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate] plays a key role in bacterial growth, survival and pathogenesis, and thus its intracellular homeostasis should be finely maintained. Mycobacterium smegmatis encodes a GAF (mammalian c G MP-regulated phosphodiesterases, Anabaena a denylyl cyclases and Escherichia coli transcription activator F hlA) domain containing bifunctional enzyme DcpA ( d iguanylate c yclase and p hosphodiesterase A ) that catalyzes the synthesis and hydrolysis of c-di-GMP . Here, we found that M. smegmatis DcpA catalyzes the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP at a higher velocity, compared with synthetic activity, resulting in a sum reaction from the ultimate substrate GTP to the final product pGpG [5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'-5')-guanosine]. Fusion with the N-terminal GAF domain enables the GGDEF (Gly-Gly-Asp-Glu-Phe) domain of DcpA to dimerize and accordingly gain synthetic activity. Screening of putative metabolites revealed that GDP is the ligand of the GAF domain. Binding of GDP to the GAF domain down-regulates synthetic activity, but up-regulates hydrolytic activity, which, in consequence, might enable a timely response to the transient accumulation of c-di-GMP at the stationary phase or under stresses. Combined with the crystal structure of the EAL (Glu-Ala-Leu) domain and the small-angle X-ray scattering data, we propose a putative regulatory model of the GAF domain finely tuned by the intracellular GTP/GDP ratio. These findings help us to better understand the concerted control of the synthesis and hydrolysis of c-di-GMP in M. smegmatis in various microenvironments. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Domain duplication, divergence, and loss events in vertebrate Msx paralogs reveal phylogenomically informed disease markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, John R; Mazza, Maureen E; Jezewski, Peter A

    2009-01-20

    Msx originated early in animal evolution and is implicated in human genetic disorders. To reconstruct the functional evolution of Msx and inform the study of human mutations, we analyzed the phylogeny and synteny of 46 metazoan Msx proteins and tracked the duplication, diversification and loss of conserved motifs. Vertebrate Msx sequences sort into distinct Msx1, Msx2 and Msx3 clades. The sister-group relationship between MSX1 and MSX2 reflects their derivation from the 4p/5q chromosomal paralogon, a derivative of the original "MetaHox" cluster. We demonstrate physical linkage between Msx and other MetaHox genes (Hmx, NK1, Emx) in a cnidarian. Seven conserved domains, including two Groucho repression domains (N- and C-terminal), were present in the ancestral Msx. In cnidarians, the Groucho domains are highly similar. In vertebrate Msx1, the N-terminal Groucho domain is conserved, while the C-terminal domain diverged substantially, implying a novel function. In vertebrate Msx2 and Msx3, the C-terminal domain was lost. MSX1 mutations associated with ectodermal dysplasia or orofacial clefting disorders map to conserved domains in a non-random fashion. Msx originated from a MetaHox ancestor that also gave rise to Tlx, Demox, NK, and possibly EHGbox, Hox and ParaHox genes. Duplication, divergence or loss of domains played a central role in the functional evolution of Msx. Duplicated domains allow pleiotropically expressed proteins to evolve new functions without disrupting existing interaction networks. Human missense sequence variants reside within evolutionarily conserved domains, likely disrupting protein function. This phylogenomic evaluation of candidate disease markers will inform clinical and functional studies.

  17. Domain duplication, divergence, and loss events in vertebrate Msx paralogs reveal phylogenomically informed disease markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finnerty John R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Msx originated early in animal evolution and is implicated in human genetic disorders. To reconstruct the functional evolution of Msx and inform the study of human mutations, we analyzed the phylogeny and synteny of 46 metazoan Msx proteins and tracked the duplication, diversification and loss of conserved motifs. Results Vertebrate Msx sequences sort into distinct Msx1, Msx2 and Msx3 clades. The sister-group relationship between MSX1 and MSX2 reflects their derivation from the 4p/5q chromosomal paralogon, a derivative of the original "MetaHox" cluster. We demonstrate physical linkage between Msx and other MetaHox genes (Hmx, NK1, Emx in a cnidarian. Seven conserved domains, including two Groucho repression domains (N- and C-terminal, were present in the ancestral Msx. In cnidarians, the Groucho domains are highly similar. In vertebrate Msx1, the N-terminal Groucho domain is conserved, while the C-terminal domain diverged substantially, implying a novel function. In vertebrate Msx2 and Msx3, the C-terminal domain was lost. MSX1 mutations associated with ectodermal dysplasia or orofacial clefting disorders map to conserved domains in a non-random fashion. Conclusion Msx originated from a MetaHox ancestor that also gave rise to Tlx, Demox, NK, and possibly EHGbox, Hox and ParaHox genes. Duplication, divergence or loss of domains played a central role in the functional evolution of Msx. Duplicated domains allow pleiotropically expressed proteins to evolve new functions without disrupting existing interaction networks. Human missense sequence variants reside within evolutionarily conserved domains, likely disrupting protein function. This phylogenomic evaluation of candidate disease markers will inform clinical and functional studies.

  18. Three distinct domains contribute to nuclear transport of murine Foxp3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne W Hancock

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Foxp3, a 47-kDa transcription factor, is necessary for the function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs, with an essential role in the control of self-reactive T cells and in preventing autoimmunity. Activation of Tregs by TCR engagement results in upregulation of Foxp3 expression, followed by its rapid nuclear transport and binding to chromatin. Here, we identify three distinct Foxp3 domains that contribute to nuclear transport. The first domain (Domain 1 comprises the C-terminal 12 amino acids. The second domain (Domain 2 is located immediately N-terminal to the forkhead domain (FHD, recently reported to be a binding site for the runt-related transcription factor 1/acute myeloid leukemia 1 (Runx1/AML1. The third domain (Domain 3 is located within the N-terminal first 51 amino acids. Unlike the known nuclear localization signals (NLSs, none of these three regions are rich in basic residues and do not bear any similarity to known monopartite or bipartite NLSs that have one or more clusters of basic amino acids. The basic arginine-lysine-lysine-arginine (RKKR sequence, located 12-aa from the C-terminal end of Foxp3 was previously reported to be a nuclear localization signal (NLS for several proteins, including for a GFP-Foxp3 hybrid. Evidence is provided here that in the full-length native Foxp3 RKKR does not function as an NLS. The data reported in this study indicates that Foxp3 achieves nuclear transport by binding to other nuclear factors and co-transporting with them to the nucleus.

  19. The structure of C2b, a fragment of complement component C2 produced during C3 convertase formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Vengadesan [Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, School of Optometry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Xu, Yuanyuan [Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Macon, Kevin [Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, School of Optometry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Volanakis, John E. [Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Narayana, Sthanam V. L., E-mail: narayana@uab.edu [Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, School of Optometry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The crystal structure of C2b has been determined at 1.8 Å resolution, which reveals the arrangement of its three complement control protein (CCP) modules. A model for complement component C2 is presented and its conformational changes during the C3-convertase formation are also discussed. The second component of complement (C2) is a multi-domain serine protease that provides catalytic activity for the C3 and C5 convertases of the classical and lectin pathways of human complement. The formation of these convertases requires the Mg{sup 2+}-dependent binding of C2 to C4b and the subsequent cleavage of C2 by C1s or MASP2, respectively. The crystal structure of full-length C2 is not yet available, although the structure of its C-terminal catalytic segment C2a has been determined. The crystal structure of the N-terminal segment C2b of C2 determined to 1.8 Å resolution presented here reveals the arrangement of its three CCP domains. The domains are arranged differently compared with most other CCP-domain assemblies, but their arrangement is similar to that found in the Ba part of the full-length factor B structure. The crystal structures of C2a, C2b and full-length factor B are used to generate a model for C2 and a discussion of the domain association and possible interactions with C4b during formation of the C4b–C2 complex is presented. The results of this study also suggest that upon cleavage by C1s, C2a domains undergo conformational rotation while bound to C4b and the released C2b domains may remain folded together similar to as observed in the intact protein.

  20. The structure of C2b, a fragment of complement component C2 produced during C3 convertase formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Vengadesan; Xu, Yuanyuan; Macon, Kevin; Volanakis, John E.; Narayana, Sthanam V. L.

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of C2b has been determined at 1.8 Å resolution, which reveals the arrangement of its three complement control protein (CCP) modules. A model for complement component C2 is presented and its conformational changes during the C3-convertase formation are also discussed. The second component of complement (C2) is a multi-domain serine protease that provides catalytic activity for the C3 and C5 convertases of the classical and lectin pathways of human complement. The formation of these convertases requires the Mg 2+ -dependent binding of C2 to C4b and the subsequent cleavage of C2 by C1s or MASP2, respectively. The crystal structure of full-length C2 is not yet available, although the structure of its C-terminal catalytic segment C2a has been determined. The crystal structure of the N-terminal segment C2b of C2 determined to 1.8 Å resolution presented here reveals the arrangement of its three CCP domains. The domains are arranged differently compared with most other CCP-domain assemblies, but their arrangement is similar to that found in the Ba part of the full-length factor B structure. The crystal structures of C2a, C2b and full-length factor B are used to generate a model for C2 and a discussion of the domain association and possible interactions with C4b during formation of the C4b–C2 complex is presented. The results of this study also suggest that upon cleavage by C1s, C2a domains undergo conformational rotation while bound to C4b and the released C2b domains may remain folded together similar to as observed in the intact protein

  1. Structure of the thioredoxin-fold domain of human phosducin-like protein 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, Xiaochu; Bao, Rui; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Chen, Yuxing

    2009-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the Trx-fold domain of hPDCL2 was solved at 2.70 Å resolution and resembled the Trx-fold domain of rat phosducin. Human phosducin-like protein 2 (hPDCL2) has been identified as belonging to subgroup II of the phosducin (Pdc) family. The members of this family share an N-terminal helix domain and a C-terminal thioredoxin-fold (Trx-fold) domain. The X-ray crystal structure of the Trx-fold domain of hPDCL2 was solved at 2.70 Å resolution and resembled the Trx-fold domain of rat phosducin. Comparative structural analysis revealed the structural basis of their putative functional divergence

  2. Characterization of the hormone-binding domain of the chicken c-erbA/thyroid hormone receptor protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, A; Zenke, M; Gehring, U

    1988-01-01

    mutations present in the carboxy-terminal half of P75gag-v-erbA co-operate in abolishing hormone binding, and that the ligand-binding domain resides in a position analogous to that of steroid receptors. Furthermore, a point mutation that is located between the putative DNA and ligand-binding domains of P75......To identify and characterize the hormone-binding domain of the thyroid hormone receptor, we analyzed the ligand-binding capacities of proteins representing chimeras between the normal receptor and P75gag-v-erbA, the retrovirus-encoded form deficient in binding ligand. Our results show that several......gag-v-erbA and that renders it biologically inactive fails to affect hormone binding by the c-erbA protein. These results suggest that the mutation changed the ability of P75gag-v-erbA to affect transcription since it also had no effect on DNA binding. Our data also suggest that hormone...

  3. Features of the Env leader protein and the N-terminal Gag domain of feline foamy virus important for virus morphogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiselhart, Verena; Schwantes, Astrid; Bastone, Patrizia; Frech, Matthias; Loechelt, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that foamy virus (FV) particle budding, especially the involvement of the viral Env glycoprotein, is different from that of other (ortho) retroviruses: the N-terminal Env leader protein Elp is a constituent of released FV particles. A defined sequence in Elp required for particle budding binds to the MA domain of Gag. To extend these findings, we show that feline FV Elp is a membrane-anchored protein with the N-terminus located inside the particle. Thus, the internal/cytoplasmic domain of Elp has the correct topology for interacting with Gag during budding. In addition to Elp, an Elp-related protein of about 9 kDa was shown to be virion associated and is probably generated by cellular signal peptidases. Besides the function of Elp binding, the N-terminal domain of Gag was shown to be required for proper localization of feline FV Gag to the cytoplasm and the perinuclear/nuclear region

  4. The 14-3-3 protein interacts directly with the C-terminal region of the plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, T.; Fuglsang, A.T.; Olsson, A.

    1997-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that 14-3-3 proteins are involved in the regulation of plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity. However, it is not known whether the 14-3-3 protein interacts directly or indirectly with the H(+)-ATPase. In this study, detergent-solubilized plasma membrane H...... plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. We propose that the 14-3-3 protein is a natural ligand of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, regulating proton pumping by displacing the C-terminal autoinhibitory domain of the H(+)-ATPase....

  5. THE PRODUCTION RATE OF SN Ia EVENTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washabaugh, Pearce C.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2013-01-01

    In globular clusters, dynamical evolution produces luminous X-ray emitting binaries at a rate about 200 times greater than in the field. If globular clusters also produce SN Ia at a high rate, it would account for many of the SN Ia production in early-type galaxies and provide insight into their formation. Here we use archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of nearby galaxies that have hosted an SN Ia to examine the rate at which globular clusters produce these events. The location of the SN Ia is registered on an HST image obtained before the event or after the supernova (SN) faded. Of the 36 nearby galaxies examined, 21 had sufficiently good data to search for globular cluster hosts. None of the 21 SNe have a definite globular cluster counterpart, although there are some ambiguous cases. This places an upper limit to the enhancement rate of SN Ia production in globular clusters of about 42 at the 95% confidence level, which is an order of magnitude lower than the enhancement rate for luminous X-ray binaries. Even if all of the ambiguous cases are considered as having a globular cluster counterpart, the upper bound for the enhancement rate is 82 at the 95% confidence level, still a factor of several below that needed to account for half of the SN Ia events. Barring unforeseen selection effects, we conclude that globular clusters are not responsible for producing a significant fraction of the SN Ia events in early-type galaxies.

  6. N-terminally truncated POM121C inhibits HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Saito

    Full Text Available Recent studies have identified host cell factors that regulate early stages of HIV-1 infection including viral cDNA synthesis and orientation of the HIV-1 capsid (CA core toward the nuclear envelope, but it remains unclear how viral DNA is imported through the nuclear pore and guided to the host chromosomal DNA. Here, we demonstrate that N-terminally truncated POM121C, a component of the nuclear pore complex, blocks HIV-1 infection. This truncated protein is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, does not bind to CA, does not affect viral cDNA synthesis, reduces the formation of 2-LTR and diminished the amount of integrated proviral DNA. Studies with an HIV-1-murine leukemia virus (MLV chimeric virus carrying the MLV-derived Gag revealed that Gag is a determinant of this inhibition. Intriguingly, mutational studies have revealed that the blockade by N-terminally-truncated POM121C is closely linked to its binding to importin-β/karyopherin subunit beta 1 (KPNB1. These results indicate that N-terminally-truncated POM121C inhibits HIV-1 infection after completion of reverse transcription and before integration, and suggest an important role for KPNB1 in HIV-1 replication.

  7. Fragment-Based Drug Discovery in the Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Domain Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Mostafa; Serya, Rabah

    2017-08-01

    Bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) inhibition has emerged recently as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of many human disorders such as atherosclerosis, inflammatory disorders, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), some viral infections, and cancer. Since the discovery of the two potent inhibitors, I-BET762 and JQ1, different research groups have used different techniques to develop novel potent and selective inhibitors. In this review, we will be concerned with the trials that used fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) approaches to discover or optimize BET inhibitors, also showing fragments that can be further optimized in future projects to reach novel potent BET inhibitors. © 2017 Deutsche Pharmazeutische Gesellschaft.

  8. C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors regulates their agoni