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Sample records for c-terminal domain structure

  1. Structure discrimination for the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli trigger factor in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR measurements can give important information on solution structure, without the necessity for a full-scale solution structure determination. The C-terminal protein binding domain of the ribosome-associated chaperone protein trigger factor is composed of non-contiguous parts of the polypeptide chain, with an interpolated prolyl isomerase domain. A construct of the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli trigger factor containing residues 113-149 and 247-432, joined by a Gly-Ser-Gly-Ser linker, is well folded and gives excellent NMR spectra in solution. We have used NMR measurements on this construct, and on a longer construct that includes the prolyl isomerase domain, to distinguish between two possible structures for the C-terminal domain of trigger factor, and to assess the behavior of the trigger factor C-terminal domain in solution. Two X-ray crystal structures, of intact trigger factor from E. coli (Ferbitz et al., Nature 431:590-596, 2004), and of a truncated trigger factor from Vibrio cholerae (Ludlam et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:13436-13441, 2004) showed significant differences in the structure of the C-terminal domain, such that the two structures could not be superimposed. We show using NMR chemical shifts and long range nuclear Overhauser effects that the secondary and tertiary structure of the E. coli C-terminal domain in solution is consistent with the crystal structure of the E. coli trigger factor and not with the V. cholerae protein. Given the similarity of the amino acid sequences of the E. coli and V. cholerae proteins, it appears likely that the structure of the V. cholerae protein has been distorted as a result of truncation of a 44-amino acid segment at the C-terminus. Analysis of residual dipolar coupling measurements shows that the overall topology of the solution structure is completely inconsistent with both structures. Dynamics analysis of the C-terminal domain using T1, T2 and heteronuclear NOE parameters show that the protein is

  2. Structure of the C-terminal domain of nsp4 from feline coronavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolaridis, Ioannis; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Panjikar, Santosh [EMBL Hamburg Outstation, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Snijder, Eric J.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E. [Molecular Virology Laboratory, Department of Medical Microbiology, Center of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Berglind, Hanna; Nordlund, Pär [Division of Biophysics, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Scheeles väg 2, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Coutard, Bruno [Laboratoire Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, UMR 6098, AFMB-CNRS-ESIL, Case 925, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille (France); Tucker, Paul A., E-mail: tucker@embl-hamburg.de [EMBL Hamburg Outstation, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-08-01

    The structure of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of nonstructural protein 4 from feline coronavirus has been determined and analyzed. Coronaviruses are a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses that includes important pathogens of humans and other animals. The large coronavirus genome (26–31 kb) encodes 15–16 nonstructural proteins (nsps) that are derived from two replicase polyproteins by autoproteolytic processing. The nsps assemble into the viral replication–transcription complex and nsp3, nsp4 and nsp6 are believed to anchor this enzyme complex to modified intracellular membranes. The largest part of the coronavirus nsp4 subunit is hydrophobic and is predicted to be embedded in the membranes. In this report, a conserved C-terminal domain (∼100 amino-acid residues) has been delineated that is predicted to face the cytoplasm and has been isolated as a soluble domain using library-based construct screening. A prototypical crystal structure at 2.8 Å resolution was obtained using nsp4 from feline coronavirus. Unmodified and SeMet-substituted proteins were crystallized under similar conditions, resulting in tetragonal crystals that belonged to space group P4{sub 3}. The phase problem was initially solved by single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS), followed by molecular replacement using a SIRAS-derived composite model. The structure consists of a single domain with a predominantly α-helical content displaying a unique fold that could be engaged in protein–protein interactions.

  3. The C-terminal domain of Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase holoenzyme protein p65 induces multiple structural changes in telomerase RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Akiyama, Benjamin M.; Loper, John; Najarro, Kevin; Stone, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase holoenzyme protein p65 induces multiple structural changes in telomerase RNA. Telomerase holoenzyme proteins are required to fold telomerase RNA into its active conformation. In this study, the Stone laboratory employed a combination of single-molecule FRET and RNase protection mapping to demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of the Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme protein p65 is essential for its RNA folding activity. RNase probin...

  4. Probing the Impact of the EchinT C-Terminal Domain on Structure and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Bardaweel; J Pace; T Chou; V Cody; C Wagner

    2011-12-31

    Histidine triad nucleotide binding protein (Hint) is considered as the ancestor of the histidine triad protein superfamily and is highly conserved from bacteria to humans. Prokaryote genomes, including a wide array of both Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria, typically encode one Hint gene. The cellular function of Hint and the rationale for its evolutionary conservation in bacteria have remained a mystery. Despite its ubiquity and high sequence similarity to eukaryote Hint1 [Escherichia coli Hint (echinT) is 48% identical with human Hint1], prokaryote Hint has been reported in only a few studies. Here we report the first conformational information on the full-length N-terminal and C-terminal residues of Hint from the E. coli complex with GMP. Structural analysis of the echinT-GMP complex reveals that it crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with four homodimers in the asymmetric unit. Analysis of electron density for both the N-terminal residues and the C-terminal residues of the echinT-GMP complex indicates that the loops in some monomers can adopt more than one conformation. The observation of conformational flexibility in terminal loop regions could explain the presence of multiple homodimers in the asymmetric unit of this structure. To explore the impact of the echinT C-terminus on protein structure and catalysis, we conducted a series of catalytic radiolabeling and kinetic experiments on the C-terminal deletion mutants of echinT. In this study, we show that sequential deletion of the C-terminus likely has no effect on homodimerization and a modest effect on the secondary structure of echinT. However, we observed a significant impact on the folding structure, as reflected by a significant lowering of the T{sub m} value. Kinetic analysis reveals that the C-terminal deletion mutants are within an order of magnitude less efficient in catalysis compared to wild type, while the overall kinetic mechanism that proceeds through a fast step

  5. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Domain of Splicing Factor Prp8 Carrying Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang,L.; Shen, J.; Guarnieri, M.; Heroux, A.; Yang, K.; Zhao, R.

    2007-01-01

    Prp8 is a critical pre-mRNA splicing factor. Prp8 is proposed to help form and stabilize the spliceosome catalytic core and to be an important regulator of spliceosome activation. Mutations in human Prp8 (hPrp8) cause a severe form of the genetic disorder retinitis pigmentosa, RP13. Understanding the molecular mechanism of Prp8's function in pre-mRNA splicing and RP13 has been hindered by its large size (over 2000 amino acids) and remarkably low-sequence similarity with other proteins. Here we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain (the last 273 residues) of Caenorhabditis elegans Prp8 (cPrp8). The core of the C-terminal domain is an / structure that forms the MPN (Mpr1, Pad1 N-terminal) fold but without Zn{sup 2+} coordination. We propose that the C-terminal domain is a protein interaction domain instead of a Zn{sup 2+}-dependent metalloenzyme as proposed for some MPN proteins. Mapping of RP13 mutants on the Prp8 structure suggests that these residues constitute a binding surface between Prp8 and other partner(s), and the disruption of this interaction provides a plausible molecular mechanism for RP13.

  6. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  7. The BARD1 C-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Polyadenylation Factor CstF-50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Ross A.; Lee, Megan S.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Williams, R. Scott; Tainer, John A.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-07-13

    The BARD1 N-terminal RING domain binds BRCA1 while the BARD1 C-terminal ankyrin and tandem BRCT repeat domains bind CstF-50 to modulate mRNA processing and RNAP II stability in response to DNA damage. Here we characterize the BARD1 structural biochemistry responsible for CstF- 50 binding. The crystal structure of the BARD1 BRCT domain uncovers a degenerate phosphopeptide binding pocket lacking the key arginine required for phosphopeptide interactions in other BRCT proteins.Small angle X-ray scattering together with limited proteolysis results indicates that ankyrin and BRCT domains are linked by a flexible tether and do not adopt a fixed orientation relative to one another. Protein pull-down experiments utilizing a series of purified BARD1 deletion mutants indicate that interactions between the CstF-50 WD-40 domain and BARD1 involve the ankyrin-BRCT linker but do not require ankyrin or BRCT domains. The structural plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker helps to explain the regulated assembly of different protein BARD1 complexes with distinct functions in DNA damage signaling including BARD1-dependent induction of apoptosis plus p53 stabilization and interactions. BARD1 architecture and plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker are suitable to allow the BARD1 C-terminus to act as a hub with multiple binding sites to integrate diverse DNA damage signals directly to RNA polymerase.

  8. Solution structure of the THAP domain from Caenorhabditis elegans C-terminal binding protein (CtBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chu Kong; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P; Nicholas, Hannah R

    2007-02-16

    The THAP (Thanatos-associated protein) domain is a recently discovered zinc-binding domain found in proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, cell-cycle control, apoptosis and chromatin modification. It contains a single zinc atom ligated by cysteine and histidine residues within a Cys-X(2-4)-Cys-X(35-53)-Cys-X(2)-His consensus. We have determined the NMR solution structure of the THAP domain from Caenorhabditis elegans C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) and show that it adopts a fold containing a treble clef motif, bearing similarity to the zinc finger-associated domain (ZAD) from Drosophila Grauzone. The CtBP THAP domain contains a large, positively charged surface patch and we demonstrate that this domain can bind to double-stranded DNA in an electrophoretic mobility-shift assay. These data, together with existing reports, indicate that THAP domains might exhibit a functional diversity similar to that observed for classical and GATA-type zinc fingers. PMID:17174978

  9. Solution structure of the calmodulin-like C-terminal domain of Entamoeba α-actinin2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Göran; Persson, Cecilia; Mayzel, Maxim; Hedenström, Mattias; Backman, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Cell motility is dependent on a dynamic meshwork of actin filaments that is remodelled continuously. A large number of associated proteins that are severs, cross-links, or caps the filament ends have been identified and the actin cross-linker α-actinin has been implied in several important cellular processes. In Entamoeba histolytica, the etiological agent of human amoebiasis, α-actinin is believed to be required for infection. To better understand the role of α-actinin in the infectious process we have determined the solution structure of the C-terminal calmodulin-like domain using NMR. The final structure ensemble of the apo form shows two lobes, that both resemble other pairs of calcium-binding EF-hand motifs, connected with a mobile linker. PMID:26800385

  10. Solution structure of N-terminal SH3 domain of Vav and the recognition site for Grb2 C-terminal SH3 domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal SH3 domain (residues 583-660) of murine Vav, which contains a tetra-proline sequence (Pro 607-Pro 610), was determined by NMR. The solution structure of the SH3 domain shows a typical SH3 fold, but it exists in two conformations due to cis-trans isomerization at the Gly614-Pro615 bond. The NMR structure of the P615G mutant, where Pro615 is replaced by glycine, reveals that the tetra-proline region is inserted into the RT-loop and binds to its own SH3 structure. The C-terminal SH3 domain of Grb2 specifically binds to the trans form of the N-terminal SH3 domain of Vav. The surface of Vav N-terminal SH3 which binds to Grb2 C-terminal SH3 was elucidated by chemical shift mapping experiments using NMR. The surface does not involve the tetra-proline region but involves the region comprising the n-src loop, the N-terminal and the C-terminal regions. This surface is located opposite to the tetra-proline containing region, consistent with that of our previous mutagenesis studies

  11. NMR determines transient structure and dynamics in the disordered C-terminal domain of WASp interacting protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Noam Y; Gross, Renana; Novacek, Jiri; Shaked, Hadassa; Zidek, Lukas; Barda-Saad, Mira; Chill, Jordan H

    2013-07-16

    WASp-interacting protein (WIP) is a 503-residue proline-rich polypeptide expressed in human T cells. The WIP C-terminal domain binds to Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) and regulates its activation and degradation, and the WIP-WASp interaction has been shown to be critical for actin polymerization and implicated in the onset of WAS and X-linked thrombocytopenia. WIP is predicted to be an intrinsically disordered protein, a class of polypeptides that are of great interest because they violate the traditional structure-function paradigm. In this first (to our knowledge) study of WIP in its unbound state, we used NMR to investigate the biophysical behavior of WIP(C), a C-terminal domain fragment of WIP that includes residues 407-503 and contains the WASp-binding site. In light of the poor spectral dispersion exhibited by WIP(C) and the high occurrence (25%) of proline residues, we employed 5D-NMR(13)C-detected NMR experiments with nonuniform sampling to accomplish full resonance assignment. Secondary chemical-shift analysis, (15)N relaxation rates, and protection from solvent exchange all concurred in detecting transient structure located in motifs that span the WASp-binding site. Residues 446-456 exhibited a propensity for helical conformation, and an extended conformation followed by a short, capped helix was observed for residues 468-478. The (13)C-detected approach allows chemical-shift assignment in the WIP(C) polyproline stretches and thus sheds light on their conformation and dynamics. The effects of temperature on chemical shifts referenced to a denatured sample of the polypeptide demonstrate that heating reduces the structural character of WIP(C). Thus, we conclude that the disordered WIP(C) fragment is comprised of regions with latent structure connected by flexible loops, an architecture with implications for binding affinity and function.

  12. NMR-based homology model for the solution structure of the C-terminal globular domain of EMILIN1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdone, Giuliana [Istituto Biochimico Italiano ' G. Lorenzini' (Italy); Corazza, Alessandra [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy); Colebrooke, Simon A. [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Cicero, Daniel; Eliseo, Tommaso [Universita di Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy); Boyd, Jonathan [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Doliana, Roberto [Centro di Riferimento Oncologico di Aviano, Divisione di Oncologia Sperimentale 2 (Italy); Fogolari, Federico; Viglino, Paolo; Colombatti, Alfonso [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy); Campbell, Iain D. [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Esposito, Gennaro [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy)], E-mail: gesposito@mail.dstb.uniud.it

    2009-02-15

    EMILIN1 is a glycoprotein of elastic tissues that has been recently linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The protein is formed by different independently folded structural domains whose role has been partially elucidated. In this paper the solution structure, inferred from NMR-based homology modelling of the C-terminal trimeric globular C1q domain (gC1q) of EMILIN1, is reported. The high molecular weight and the homotrimeric structure of the protein required the combined use of highly deuterated {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C-labelled samples and TROSY experiments. Starting from a homology model, the protein structure was refined using heteronuclear residual dipolar couplings, chemical shift patterns, NOEs and H-exchange data. Analysis of the gC1q domain structure of EMILIN1 shows that each protomer of the trimer adopts a nine-stranded {beta} sandwich folding topology which is related to the conformation observed for other proteins of the family. Distinguishing features, however, include a missing edge-strand and an unstructured 19-residue loop. Although the current data do not allow this loop to be precisely defined, the available evidence is consistent with a flexible segment that protrudes from each subunit of the globular trimeric assembly and plays a key role in inter-molecular interactions between the EMILIN1 gC1q homotrimer and its integrin receptor {alpha}4{beta}1.

  13. NMR-based homology model for the solution structure of the C-terminal globular domain of EMILIN1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EMILIN1 is a glycoprotein of elastic tissues that has been recently linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The protein is formed by different independently folded structural domains whose role has been partially elucidated. In this paper the solution structure, inferred from NMR-based homology modelling of the C-terminal trimeric globular C1q domain (gC1q) of EMILIN1, is reported. The high molecular weight and the homotrimeric structure of the protein required the combined use of highly deuterated 15N, 13C-labelled samples and TROSY experiments. Starting from a homology model, the protein structure was refined using heteronuclear residual dipolar couplings, chemical shift patterns, NOEs and H-exchange data. Analysis of the gC1q domain structure of EMILIN1 shows that each protomer of the trimer adopts a nine-stranded β sandwich folding topology which is related to the conformation observed for other proteins of the family. Distinguishing features, however, include a missing edge-strand and an unstructured 19-residue loop. Although the current data do not allow this loop to be precisely defined, the available evidence is consistent with a flexible segment that protrudes from each subunit of the globular trimeric assembly and plays a key role in inter-molecular interactions between the EMILIN1 gC1q homotrimer and its integrin receptor α4β1

  14. Structure of the MutL C-terminal domain: a model of intact MutL and its roles in mismatch repair

    OpenAIRE

    Guarné, Alba; Ramon-Maiques, Santiago; Wolff, Erika M.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hu, Xiaojian; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Yang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    MutL assists the mismatch recognition protein MutS to initiate and coordinate mismatch repair in species ranging from bacteria to humans. The MutL N-terminal ATPase domain is highly conserved, but the C-terminal region shares little sequence similarity among MutL homologs. We report here the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli MutL C-terminal dimerization domain and the likelihood of its conservation among MutL homologs. A 100-residue proline-rich linker between the ATPase and dimerizat...

  15. Crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the Salmonella type III secretion system export apparatus protein InvA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Liam J; Vuckovic, Marija; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2010-05-01

    InvA is a prominent inner-membrane component of the Salmonella type III secretion system (T3SS) apparatus, which is responsible for regulating virulence protein export in pathogenic bacteria. InvA is made up of an N-terminal integral membrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain that is proposed to form part of a docking platform for the soluble export apparatus proteins notably the T3SS ATPase InvC. Here, we report the novel crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Salmonella InvA which shows a compact structure composed of four subdomains. The overall structure is unique although the first and second subdomains exhibit structural similarity to the peripheral stalk of the A/V-type ATPase and a ring building motif found in other T3SS proteins respectively.

  16. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II and Characterization of Salivary Agglutinin Adherence Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Crowley, Paula J.; Kelly, Charles; Mitchell, Tim J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion (King); (Cornell); (UAB); (Glasgow); (Florida)

    2012-05-29

    The Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein that adheres to salivary components and extracellular matrix molecules. Here we report the 2.5 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complete C-terminal region of AgI/II. The C-terminal region is comprised of three major domains: C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. Each domain adopts a DE-variant IgG fold, with two {beta}-sheets whose A and F strands are linked through an intramolecular isopeptide bond. The adherence of the C-terminal AgI/II fragments to the putative tooth surface receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG), as monitored by surface plasmon resonance, indicated that the minimal region of binding was contained within the first and second DE-variant-IgG domains (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) of the C terminus. The minimal C-terminal region that could inhibit S. mutans adherence to SAG was also confirmed to be within the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains. Competition experiments demonstrated that the C- and N-terminal regions of AgI/II adhere to distinct sites on SAG. A cleft formed at the intersection between these C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains bound glucose molecules from the cryo-protectant solution, revealing a putative binding site for its highly glycosylated receptor SAG. Finally, electron microscopy images confirmed the elongated structure of AgI/II and enabled building a composite tertiary model that encompasses its two distinct binding regions.

  17. Chemical shift assignments and secondary structure prediction of the C-terminal domain of the response regulator BfmR from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Andrew L; Thompson, Richele J; Melander, Christian; Cavanagh, John

    2014-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for severe nocosomial infections by forming biofilms in healthcare environments. The two-domain response regulator BfmR has been shown to be the master controller for biofilm formation. Inactivation of BfmR resulted in an abolition of pili production and consequently biofilm creation. Here we report backbone and sidechain resonance assignments and secondary structure prediction for the C-terminal domain of BfmR (residues 130-238) from A. baumannii.

  18. The Crystal Structure of the C-Terminal Domain of the Salmonella enterica PduO Protein: An Old Fold with a New Heme-Binding Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío; Hickey, Neal; Hensel, Michael; Klare, Johann P; Geremia, Silvano; Tiufiakova, Tatiana; Torda, Andrew E

    2016-01-01

    The two-domain protein PduO, involved in 1,2-propanediol utilization in the pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica is an ATP:Cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase, but this is a function of the N-terminal domain alone. The role of its C-terminal domain (PduOC) is, however, unknown. In this study, comparative growth assays with a set of Salmonella mutant strains showed that this domain is necessary for effective in vivo catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. It was also shown that isolated, recombinantly-expressed PduOC binds heme in vivo. The structure of PduOC co-crystallized with heme was solved (1.9 Å resolution) showing an octameric assembly with four heme moieities. The four heme groups are highly solvent-exposed and the heme iron is hexa-coordinated with bis-His ligation by histidines from different monomers. Static light scattering confirmed the octameric assembly in solution, but a mutation of the heme-coordinating histidine caused dissociation into dimers. Isothermal titration calorimetry using the PduOC apoprotein showed strong heme binding (K d = 1.6 × 10(-7) M). Biochemical experiments showed that the absence of the C-terminal domain in PduO did not affect adenosyltransferase activity in vitro. The evidence suggests that PduOC:heme plays an important role in the set of cobalamin transformations required for effective catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. Salmonella PduO is one of the rare proteins which binds the redox-active metabolites heme and cobalamin, and the heme-binding mode of the C-terminal domain differs from that in other members of this protein family. PMID:27446048

  19. The solution structure of the C-terminal domain of NfeD reveals a novel membrane-anchored OB-fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Yohta; Ohno, Ayako; Morii, Taichi; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Ikuo; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-11-01

    Nodulation formation efficiency D (NfeD) is a member of a class of membrane-anchored ClpP-class proteases. There is a second class of NfeD homologs that lack the ClpP domain. The genes of both NfeD classes usually are part of an operon that also contains a gene for a prokaryotic homolog of stomatin. (Stomatin is a major integral-membrane protein of mammalian erythrocytes.) Such NfeD/stomatin homolog gene pairs are present in more than 290 bacterial and archaeal genomes, and their protein products may be part of the machinery used for quality control of membrane proteins. Herein, we report the structure of the isolated C-terminal domain of PH0471, a Pyrococcus horikoshii NfeD homolog, which lacks the ClpP domain. This C-terminal domain (termed NfeDC) contains a five-strand beta-barrel, which is structurally very similar to the OB-fold (oligosaccharide/oligonucleotide-binding fold) domain. However, there is little sequence similarity between it and previously characterized OB-fold domains. The NfeDC domain lacks the conserved surface residues that are necessary for the binding of an OB-fold domain to DNA/RNA, an ion. Instead, its surface is composed of residues that are uniquely conserved in NfeD homologs and that form the structurally conserved surface turns and beta-bulges. There is also a conserved tryptophan present on the surface. We propose that, in general, NfeDC domains may interact with other spatially proximal membrane proteins and thereby regulate their activities. PMID:18687870

  20. Probing Structural Transitions in the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminal Domain of the Measles Virus Nucleoprotein by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Cyanylated Cysteines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischak, Connor G.; Longhi, Sonia; Snead, David M.; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Terrer, Elodie; Londergan, Casey H.

    2010-01-01

    Four single-cysteine variants of the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (NTAIL) were cyanylated at cysteine and their infrared spectra in the C≡N stretching region were recorded both in the absence and in the presence of one of the physiological partners of NTAIL, namely the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein. Consistent with previous studies showing that XD triggers a disorder-to-order transition within NTAIL, the C≡N stretching bands of the infrared probe were found to be significantly affected by XD, with this effect being position-dependent. When the cyanylated cysteine side chain is solvent-exposed throughout the structural transition, its changing linewidth reflects a local gain of structure. When the probe becomes partially buried due to binding, its frequency reports on the mean hydrophobicity of the microenvironment surrounding the labeled side chain of the bound form. The probe moiety is small compared to other common covalently attached spectroscopic probes, thereby minimizing possible steric hindrance/perturbation at the binding interface. These results show for the first time to our knowledge the suitability of site-specific cysteine mutagenesis followed by cyanylation and infrared spectroscopy to document structural transitions occurring within intrinsically disordered regions, with regions involved in binding and folding being identifiable at the residue level. PMID:20816082

  1. Crystal structures of histone and p53 methyltransferase SmyD2 reveal a conformational flexibility of the autoinhibitory C-terminal domain.

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    Yuanyuan Jiang

    Full Text Available SmyD2 belongs to a new class of chromatin regulators that control gene expression in heart development and tumorigenesis. Besides methylation of histone H3 K4, SmyD2 can methylate non-histone targets including p53 and the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. The methyltransferase activity of SmyD proteins has been proposed to be regulated by autoinhibition via the intra- and interdomain bending of the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD. However, there has been no direct evidence of a conformational change in the CTD. Here, we report two crystal structures of SmyD2 bound either to the cofactor product S-adenosylhomocysteine or to the inhibitor sinefungin. SmyD2 has a two-lobed structure with the active site located at the bottom of a deep crevice formed between the CTD and the catalytic domain. By extensive engagement with the methyltransferase domain, the CTD stabilizes the autoinhibited conformation of SmyD2 and restricts access to the catalytic site. Unexpectedly, despite that the two SmyD2 structures are highly superimposable, significant differences are observed in the first two helices of the CTDs: the two helices bend outwards and move away from the catalytic domain to generate a less closed conformation in the sinefungin-bound structure. Although the overall fold of the individual domains is structurally conserved among SmyD proteins, SmyD2 appear to be a conformational "intermediate" between a close form of SmyD3 and an open form of SmyD1. In addition, the structures reveal that the CTD is structurally similar to tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR, a motif through which many cochaperones bind to the heat shock protein Hsp90. Our results thus provide the first evidence for the intradomain flexibility of the TPR-like CTD, which may be important for the activation of SmyD proteins by Hsp90.

  2. Structural Insights into the Calcium-Mediated Allosteric Transition in the C-Terminal Domain of Calmodulin from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukic, Predrag; Lundström, Patrik; Camilloni, Carlo; Evenäs, Johan; Akke, Mikael; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-12

    Calmodulin is a two-domain signaling protein that becomes activated upon binding cooperatively two pairs of calcium ions, leading to large-scale conformational changes that expose its binding site. Despite significant advances in understanding the structural biology of calmodulin functions, the mechanistic details of the conformational transition between closed and open states have remained unclear. To investigate this transition, we used a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on the Ca(2+)-saturated E140Q C-terminal domain variant. Using chemical shift restraints in replica-averaged metadynamics simulations, we obtained a high-resolution structural ensemble consisting of two conformational states and validated such an ensemble against three independent experimental data sets, namely, interproton nuclear Overhauser enhancements, (15)N order parameters, and chemical shift differences between the exchanging states. Through a detailed analysis of this structural ensemble and of the corresponding statistical weights, we characterized a calcium-mediated conformational transition whereby the coordination of Ca(2+) by just one oxygen of the bidentate ligand E140 triggers a concerted movement of the two EF-hands that exposes the target binding site. This analysis provides atomistic insights into a possible Ca(2+)-mediated activation mechanism of calmodulin that cannot be achieved from static structures alone or from ensemble NMR measurements of the transition between conformations.

  3. The structure of the RNA m5C methyltransferase YebU from Escherichia coli reveals a C-terminal RNA-recruiting PUA domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, B Martin; Ericsson, Ulrika B; Johnson, Kenneth A; Andersen, Niels Møller; Douthwaite, Stephen; Nordlund, Pär; Beuscher, Albert E; Erlandsen, Heidi

    2006-07-21

    Nucleotide methylations are the most common type of rRNA modification in bacteria, and are introduced post-transcriptionally by a wide variety of site-specific enzymes. Three 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) bases are found in the rRNAs of Escherichia coli and one of these, at nucleotide 1407 in 16 S rRNA, is the modification product of the methyltransferase (MTase) YebU (also called RsmF). YebU requires S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) and methylates C1407 within assembled 30 S subunits, but not in naked 16 S rRNA or within tight-couple 70 S ribosomes. Here, we describe the three-dimensional structure of YebU determined by X-ray crystallography, and we present a molecular model for how YebU specifically recognizes, binds and methylates its ribosomal substrate. The YebU protein has an N-terminal SAM-binding catalytic domain with structural similarity to the equivalent domains in several other m(5)C RNA MTases including RsmB and PH1374. The C-terminal one-third of YebU contains a domain similar to that in pseudouridine synthases and archaeosine-specific transglycosylases (PUA-domain), which was not predicted by sequence alignments. Furthermore, YebU is predicted to contain extended regions of positive electrostatic potential that differ from other RNA-MTase structures, suggesting that YebU interacts with its RNA target in a different manner. Docking of YebU onto the 30 S subunit indicates that the PUA and MTase domains make several contacts with 16 S rRNA as well as with the ribosomal protein S12. The ribosomal protein interactions would explain why the assembled 30 S subunit, and not naked 16 S rRNA, is the preferred substrate for YebU.

  4. Bacteriophage endolysin Lyt μ1/6: characterization of the C-terminal binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tišáková, Lenka; Vidová, Barbora; Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The gene product of orf50 from actinophage μ1/6 of Streptomyces aureofaciens is a putative endolysin, Lyt μ1/6. It has a two-domain modular structure, consisting of an N-terminal catalytic and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). Comparative analysis of Streptomyces phage endolysins revealed that they all have a modular structure and contain functional C-terminal domains with conserved amino acids, probably associated with their binding function. A blast analysis of Lyt μ1/6 in conjunction with secondary and tertiary structure prediction disclosed the presence of a PG_binding_1 domain within the CBD. The sequence of the C-terminal domain of lyt μ1/6 and truncated forms of it were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The ability of these CBD variants fused to GFP to bind to the surface of S. aureofaciens NMU was shown by specific binding assays.

  5. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodri M L Morgan

    Full Text Available Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation, R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE of TOMM20.

  6. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Rhodri M L; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Zhou, Lihong; Roe, S Mark; Korbonits, Márta; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h) mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation), R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE) of TOMM20. PMID:23300914

  7. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Rhodri M L; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Zhou, Lihong; Roe, S Mark; Korbonits, Márta; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h) mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation), R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE) of TOMM20.

  8. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S., E-mail: bchss@biochem.iisc.ernet.in

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  9. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. Part I. Importance of hydrophobic interactions in stabilization of β-hairpin structure

    OpenAIRE

    Skwierawska, Agnieszka; Makowska, Joanna; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2009-01-01

    We previously studied a 16-amino acid-residue fragment of the C-terminal β-hairpin (residues 46–61), [IG(46–61)], of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, and found that hydrophobic interactions and the turn region play an important role in stabilizing the structure. Based on these results, we carried out systematic structural studies of peptides derived from the sequence of IG(46–61) by systematically shortening the peptide by one residue at a time from bo...

  10. Crystal Structure of the Human Pol α B Subunit in Complex with the C-terminal Domain of the Catalytic Subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Gu, Jianyou; Baranovskiy, Andrey G; Babayeva, Nigar D; Pavlov, Youri I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2015-06-01

    In eukaryotic DNA replication, short RNA-DNA hybrid primers synthesized by primase-DNA polymerase α (Prim-Pol α) are needed to start DNA replication by the replicative DNA polymerases, Pol δ and Pol ϵ. The C terminus of the Pol α catalytic subunit (p180C) in complex with the B subunit (p70) regulates the RNA priming and DNA polymerizing activities of Prim-Pol α. It tethers Pol α and primase, facilitating RNA primer handover from primase to Pol α. To understand these regulatory mechanisms and to reveal the details of human Pol α organization, we determined the crystal structure of p70 in complex with p180C. The structured portion of p70 includes a phosphodiesterase (PDE) domain and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) domain. The N-terminal domain and the linker connecting it to the PDE domain are disordered in the reported crystal structure. The p180C adopts an elongated asymmetric saddle shape, with a three-helix bundle in the middle and zinc-binding modules (Zn1 and Zn2) on each side. The extensive p180C-p70 interactions involve 20 hydrogen bonds and a number of hydrophobic interactions resulting in an extended buried surface of 4080 Å(2). Importantly, in the structure of the p180C-p70 complex with full-length p70, the residues from the N-terminal to the OB domain contribute to interactions with p180C. The comparative structural analysis revealed both the conserved features and the differences between the human and yeast Pol α complexes.

  11. Structures of three members of Pfam PF02663 (FmdE) implicated in microbial methanogenesis reveal a conserved α+β core domain and an auxiliary C-terminal treble-clef zinc finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first structures from the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663) reveal that some members of this family form tightly intertwined dimers consisting of two domains (N-terminal α+β core and C-terminal zinc-finger domains), whereas others contain only the core domain. The presence of the zinc-finger domain suggests that some members of this family may perform functions associated with transcriptional regulation, protein–protein interaction, RNA binding or metal-ion sensing. Examination of the genomic context for members of the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663), such as the protein encoded by the fmdE gene from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, indicates that 13 of them are co-transcribed with genes encoding subunits of molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.99.5), an enzyme that is involved in microbial methane production. Here, the first crystal structures from PF02663 are described, representing two bacterial and one archaeal species: B8FYU2-DESHY from the anaerobic dehalogenating bacterium Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2, Q2LQ23-SYNAS from the syntrophic bacterium Syntrophus aciditrophicus SB and Q9HJ63-THEAC from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. Two of these proteins, Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS, contain two domains: an N-terminal thioredoxin-like α+β core domain (NTD) consisting of a five-stranded, mixed β-sheet flanked by several α-helices and a C-terminal zinc-finger domain (CTD). B8FYU2-DESHY, on the other hand, is composed solely of the NTD. The CTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS is best characterized as a treble-clef zinc finger. Two significant structural differences between Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS involve their metal binding. First, zinc is bound to the putative active site on the NTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC, but is absent from the NTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS. Second, whereas the structure of the CTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS shows four Cys side chains within coordination distance of the Zn atom, the structure

  12. Conserved C-terminal nascent peptide binding domain of HYPK facilitates its chaperone-like activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swasti Raychaudhuri; Rachana Banerjee; Subhasish Mukhopadhyay; Nitai P Bhattacharyya

    2014-09-01

    Human HYPK (Huntingtin Yeast-two-hybrid Protein K) is an intrinsically unstructured chaperone-like protein with no sequence homology to known chaperones. HYPK is also known to be a part of ribosome-associated protein complex and present in polysomes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the evolutionary influence on HYPK primary structure and its impact on the protein’s function. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed 105 orthologs of human HYPK from plants, lower invertebrates to mammals. C-terminal part of HYPK was found to be particularly conserved and to contain nascent polypeptide-associated alpha subunit (NPAA) domain. This region experiences highest selection pressure, signifying its importance in the structural and functional evolution. NPAA domain of human HYPK has unique amino acid composition preferring glutamic acid and happens to be more stable from a conformational point of view having higher content of -helices than the rest. Cell biology studies indicate that overexpressed C-terminal human HYPK can interact with nascent proteins, co-localizes with huntingtin, increases cell viability and decreases caspase activities in Huntington’s disease (HD) cell culture model. This domain is found to be required for the chaperone-like activity of HYPK in vivo. Our study suggested that by virtue of its flexibility and nascent peptide binding activity, HYPK may play an important role in assisting protein (re)folding.

  13. Significance of the C-terminal domain of Erwinia uredovora ice nucleation-active protein (Ina U).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigami, Y; Abe, K; Obata, H; Arai, S

    1995-12-01

    Ice nucleation-active (Ina) proteins of bacterial origin comprise three distinct domains, i.e., N-terminal (N-), central repeat (R-), and C-terminal (C-) domains, among which the R-domain is essential, and its length may be correlated with the ice nucleation activity. In addition, the short C-terminal domain of about 50 amino acid residues is indispensable for the activity. Using the Ina U protein of Erwinia uredovora, we carried out precise mutational analyses of its C-terminus. The ice nucleation activity (T50) assay showed that the C-terminal 12 amino acids were not necessary, and a deletion mutant (delta C29) with a new C-terminal, Met29 (numbered from the first amino acid residue of the C-domain and corresponding to Met1022), exhibited almost the same activity as the wild-type Ina U protein did. However, deletion of the C-terminal 13 residues including Met29 resulted in almost complete loss of the activity. In the deletion mutant (delta C29), amino acid replacement of the C-terminus, Met29, showed that the activity was retained when Met29 was replaced with a neutral, aromatic, or basic amino acid (Gly, Phe, or Lys), but was lost on the replacement with an acidic amino acid (Asp or Glu). In addition, two other residues in the C-terminal region commonly present in all Ina proteins were examined as to their importance, and it was shown that one of these residues, Tyr27, is important for the activity, although it is not exclusively required; the activity was lost to a great extent when this residue was replaced with Gly or Ala, but to a lesser extent when it was replaced with Leu. These results suggest that significance of the secondary and/or tertiary structure of the C-terminal region of the Ina U protein for the ice nucleation activity. PMID:8720147

  14. The impact of the human DNA topoisomerase II C-terminal domain on activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L Meczes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type II DNA topoisomerases (topos are essential enzymes needed for the resolution of topological problems that occur during DNA metabolic processes. Topos carry out an ATP-dependent strand passage reaction whereby one double helix is passed through a transient break in another. Humans have two topoII isoforms, alpha and beta, which while enzymatically similar are differentially expressed and regulated, and are thought to have different cellular roles. The C-terminal domain (CTD of the enzyme has the most diversity, and has been implicated in regulation. We sought to investigate the impact of the CTD domain on activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We have investigated the role of the human topoII C-terminal domain by creating constructs encoding C-terminally truncated recombinant topoIIalpha and beta and topoIIalpha+beta-tail and topoIIbeta+alpha-tail chimeric proteins. We then investigated function in vivo in a yeast system, and in vitro in activity assays. We find that the C-terminal domain of human topoII isoforms is needed for in vivo function of the enzyme, but not needed for cleavage activity. C-terminally truncated enzymes had similar strand passage activity to full length enzymes, but the presence of the opposite C-terminal domain had a large effect, with the topoIIalpha-CTD increasing activity, and the topoIIbeta-CTD decreasing activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In vivo complementation data show that the topoIIalpha C-terminal domain is needed for growth, but the topoIIbeta isoform is able to support low levels of growth without a C-terminal domain. This may indicate that topoIIbeta has an additional localisation signal. In vitro data suggest that, while the lack of any C-terminal domain has little effect on activity, the presence of either the topoIIalpha or beta C-terminal domain can affect strand passage activity. Data indicates that the topoIIbeta-CTD may be a negative regulator. This is the first report of in vitro

  15. The C-terminal domain of the Bloom syndrome DNA helicase is essential for genomic stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noonan James P

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is a rare cancer-prone disorder in which the cells of affected persons have a high frequency of somatic mutation and genomic instability. Bloom syndrome cells have a distinctive high frequency of sister chromatid exchange and quadriradial formation. BLM, the protein altered in BS, is a member of the RecQ DNA helicase family, whose members share an average of 40% identity in the helicase domain and have divergent N-terminal and C-terminal flanking regions of variable lengths. The BLM DNA helicase has been shown to localize to the ND10 (nuclear domain 10 or PML (promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, where it associates with TOPIIIα, and to the nucleolus. Results This report demonstrates that the N-terminal domain of BLM is responsible for localization of the protein to the nuclear bodies, while the C-terminal domain directs the protein to the nucleolus. Deletions of the N-terminal domain of BLM have little effect on sister chromatid exchange frequency and chromosome stability as compared to helicase and C-terminal mutations which can increase SCE frequency and chromosome abnormalities. Conclusion The helicase activity and the C-terminal domain of BLM are critical for maintaining genomic stability as measured by the sister chromatid exchange assay. The localization of BLM into the nucleolus by the C-terminal domain appears to be more important to genomic stability than localization in the nuclear bodies.

  16. Structure-Function Analysis of the Human TFIIB-Related Factor II Protein Reveals an Essential Role for the C-Terminal Domain in RNA Polymerase III Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, Ashish; Ma, Beicong; Schramm, Laura; Hernandez, Nouria

    2005-01-01

    The transcription factors TFIIB, Brf1, and Brf2 share related N-terminal zinc ribbon and core domains. TFIIB bridges RNA polymerase II (Pol II) with the promoter-bound preinitiation complex, whereas Brf1 and Brf2 are involved, as part of activities also containing TBP and Bdp1 and referred to here as Brf1-TFIIIB and Brf2-TFIIIB, in the recruitment of Pol III. Brf1-TFIIIB recruits Pol III to type 1 and 2 promoters and Brf2-TFIIIB to type 3 promoters such as the human U6 promoter. Brf1 and Brf2...

  17. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Analysis of Dual CFP/YFP Labeled AMPA Receptors Reveals Structural Rearrangement within the C-Terminal Domain during Receptor Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Linda Grønborg; Katchan, Mila; Plested, Andrew;

    2014-01-01

    variants (CFP and YFP, respectively) of green fluorescent protein at various positions in the GluA2 AMPAR subunit to enable measurements of intra- receptor conformational changes using Fo¨ rster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in live cells. We identify dual CFP/YFP-tagged GluA2 subunit con- structs that...... retain function and display intrareceptor FRET. This includes a construct (GluA2-6Y-10C) containing YFP in the intracellular loop between the M1 and M2 membrane-embedded segments and CFP inserted in the C-ter- minal domain (CTD). GluA2-6Y-10C displays FRET with an efficiency of 0.11 while retaining wild......-type receptor expression and kinetic properties. We have used GluA2-6Y-10C to study conformational changes in homomeric GluA2 receptors during receptor activation. Our results show that the FRET efficiency is dependent on functional state of GluA2-6Y-10C and hereby indi- cates that the intracellular CTD...

  18. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. I. Importance of hydrophobic interactions in stabilization of beta-hairpin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwierawska, Agnieszka; Makowska, Joanna; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2009-06-01

    We previously studied a 16-amino acid-residue fragment of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain (residues 46-61), [IG(46-61)] of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, and found that hydrophobic interactions and the turn region play an important role in stabilizing the structure. Based on these results, we carried out systematic structural studies of peptides derived from the sequence of IG (46-61) by systematically shortening the peptide by one residue at a time from both the C- and the N-terminus. To determine the structure and stability of two resulting 12- and 14-amino acid-residue peptides, IG(48-59) and IG(47-60), respectively, we carried out circular dichroism, NMR, and calorimetric studies of these peptides in pure water. Our results show that IG(48-59) possesses organized three-dimensional structure stabilized by hydrophobic interactions (Tyr50-Phe57 and Trp48-Val59) at T = 283 and 305 K. At T = 313 K, the structure breaks down because of increased chain entropy, but the turn region is preserved in the same position observed for the structure of the whole protein. The breakdown of structure occurs near the melting temperature of this peptide (T(m) = 310 K) measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The melting temperature of IG(47-60) determined by DSC is T(m) = 330 K and its structure is similar to that of the native beta-hairpin at all (lower) temperatures examined (283-313 K). Both of these truncated sequences are conserved in all known amino acid sequences of the B domains of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from bacteria. Thus, this study contributes to an understanding of the mechanism of folding of this whole family of proteins, and provides information about the mechanism of formation and stabilization of a beta-hairpin structural element. PMID:19089955

  19. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of a C-terminal domain of human CHD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Silva, Ana P G; Mackay, Joel P; Ryan, Daniel P

    2016-04-01

    Chromatin remodelling proteins are an essential family of eukaryotic proteins. They harness the energy from ATP hydrolysis and apply it to alter chromatin structure in order to regulate all aspects of genome biology. Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1 (CHD1) is one such remodelling protein that has specialised nucleosome organising abilities and is conserved across eukaryotes. CHD1 possesses a pair of tandem chromodomains that directly precede the core catalytic Snf2 helicase-like domain, and a C-terminal SANT-SLIDE DNA-binding domain. We have identified an additional conserved domain in the C-terminal region of CHD1. Here, we report the backbone and side chain resonance assignments for this domain from human CHD1 at pH 6.5 and 25 °C (BMRB No. 25638). PMID:26286320

  20. Efficient, chemoselective synthesis of immunomicelles using single-domain antibodies with a C-terminal thioester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raats Jos MH

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical bioconjugation strategies for generating antibody-functionalized nanoparticles are non-specific and typically result in heterogeneous compounds that can be compromised in activity. Expression systems based on self-cleavable intein domains allow the generation of recombinant proteins with a C-terminal thioester, providing a unique handle for site-specific conjugation using native chemical ligation (NCL. However, current methods to generate antibody fragments with C-terminal thioesters require cumbersome refolding procedures, effectively preventing application of NCL for antibody-mediated targeting and molecular imaging. Results Targeting to the periplasm of E. coli allowed efficient production of correctly-folded single-domain antibody (sdAb-intein fusions proteins. On column purification and 2-mercapthoethanesulfonic acid (MESNA-induced cleavage yielded single-domain antibodies with a reactive C-terminal MESNA thioester in good yields. These thioester-functionalized single-domain antibodies allowed synthesis of immunomicelles via native chemical ligation in a single step. Conclusion A novel procedure was developed to obtain soluble, well-folded single-domain antibodies with reactive C-terminal thioesters in good yields. These proteins are promising building blocks for the chemoselective functionalization via NCL of a broad range of nanoparticle scaffolds, including micelles, liposomes and dendrimers.

  1. Mutant Mice Lacking the p53 C-Terminal Domain Model Telomere Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simeonova, I.; Jaber, S.; Draskovic, I.; Bardot, B.; Fang, M.; Bouarich-Bourimi, R.; Lejour, V.; Charbonnier, L.; Soudais, C.; Bourdon, J.C.; Huerre, M.; Londono-Vallejo, A.; Toledo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in p53, although frequent in human cancers, have not been implicated in telomere-related syndromes. Here, we show that homozygous mutant mice expressing p53(Delta31), a p53 lacking the C-terminal domain, exhibit increased p53 activity and suffer from aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis,

  2. Regulation of Escherichia coli RelA Requires Oligomerization of the C-Terminal Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Gropp, Michal; Strausz, Yael; Gross, Miriam; Glaser, Gad

    2001-01-01

    The E. coli RelA protein is a ribosome-dependent (p)ppGpp synthetase that is activated in response to amino acid starvation. RelA can be dissected both functionally and physically into two domains: The N-terminal domain (NTD) (amino acids [aa] 1 to 455) contains the catalytic domain of RelA, and the C-terminal domain (CTD) (aa 455 to 744) is involved in regulating RelA activity. We used mutational analysis to localize sites important for RelA activity and control in these two domains. We inse...

  3. Conformational effects of a common codon 751 polymorphism on the C-terminal domain of the xeroderma pigmentosum D protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Regina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The xeroderma pigmentosum D (XPD protein is a DNA helicase involved in the repair of DNA damage, including nucleotide excision repair (NER and transcription-coupled repair (TCR. The C-terminal domain of XPD has been implicated in interactions with other components of the TFIIH complex, and it is also the site of a common genetic polymorphism in XPD at amino acid residue 751 (Lys->Gln. Some evidence suggests that this polymorphism may alter DNA repair capacity and increase cancer risk. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these effects could be attributable to conformational changes in XPD induced by the polymorphism. Materials and Methods: Molecular dynamics techniques were used to predict the structure of the wild-type and polymorphic forms of the C-terminal domain of XPD and differences in structure produced by the polymorphic substitution were determined. Results: The results indicate that, although the general configuration of both proteins is similar, the substitution produces a significant conformational change immediately N-terminal to the site of the polymorphism. Conclusion: These results provide support for the hypothesis that this polymorphism in XPD could affect DNA repair capability, and hence cancer risk, by altering the structure of the C-terminal domain.

  4. Dual Thermosensitive Hydrogels Assembled from the Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Dragline Silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Ming-Liang; Song, Wen-Wen; Xia, Xiao-Xia

    2015-11-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have great potentials in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Due to the advantages of precise control over molecular weight and being biodegradable, protein-based hydrogels and their applications have been extensively studied. However, protein hydrogels with dual thermosensitive properties are rarely reported. Here we present the first report of dual thermosensitive hydrogels assembled from the conserved C-terminal domain of spider dragline silk. First, we found that recombinant C-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) of the spider Nephila clavipes formed hydrogels when cooled to approximately 2 °C or heated to 65 °C. The conformational changes and self-assembly of the recombinant protein were studied to understand the mechanism of the gelation processes using multiple methods. It was proposed that the gelation in the low-temperature regime was dominated by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction between folded protein molecules, whereas the gelation in the high-temperature regime was due to cross-linking of the exposed hydrophobic patches resulting from partial unfolding of the protein upon heating. More interestingly, genetic fusion of the C-terminal domain to a short repetitive region of N. clavipes MaSp1 resulted in a chimeric protein that formed a hydrogel with significantly improved mechanical properties at low temperatures between 2 and 10 °C. Furthermore, the formation of similar hydrogels was observed for the recombinant C-terminal domains of dragline silk of different spider species, thus demonstrating the conserved ability to form dual thermosensitive hydrogels. These findings may be useful in the design and construction of novel protein hydrogels with tunable multiple thermosensitivity for applications in the future.

  5. Role of C-terminal domain and transmembrane helices 5 and 6 in function and quaternary structure of major intrinsic proteins: analysis of aquaporin/glycerol facilitator chimeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Laurence; Pellerin, Isabelle; Delamarche, Christian; Deschamps, Stephane; Lagree, Valerie; Froger, Alexandrine; Bonnec, Georgette; Thomas, Daniel; Hubert, Jean-Francois

    2002-06-01

    We previously observed that aquaporins and glycerol facilitators exhibit different oligomeric states when studied by sedimentation on density gradients following nondenaturing detergent solubilization. To determine the domains of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family proteins involved in oligomerization, we constructed protein chimeras corresponding to the aquaporin AQPcic substituted in the loop E (including the proximal part of transmembrane domain (TM) 5) and/or the C-terminal part (including the distal part of TM 6) by the equivalent domain of the glycerol channel aquaglyceroporin (GlpF) (chimeras called AGA, AAG, and AGG). The analogous chimeras of GlpF were also constructed (chimeras GAG, GGA, and GAA). cRNA corresponding to all constructs were injected into Xenopus oocytes. AQPcic, GlpF, AAG, AGG, and GAG were targeted to plasma membranes. Water or glycerol membrane permeability measurements demonstrated that only the AAG chimera exhibited a channel function corresponding to water transport. Analysis of all proteins expressed either in oocytes or in yeast by velocity sedimentation on sucrose gradients following solubilization by 2% n-octyl glucoside indicated that only AQPcic and AAG exist in tetrameric forms. GlpF, GAG, and GAA sediment in a monomeric form, whereas GGA and AGG were found mono/dimeric. These data bring new evidence that, within the MIP family, aquaporins and GlpFs behave differently toward nondenaturing detergents. We demonstrate that the C-terminal part of AQPcic, including the distal half of TM 6, can be substituted by the equivalent domain of GlpF (AAG chimera) without modifying the transport specificity. Our results also suggest that interactions of TM 5 of one monomer with TM 1 of the adjacent monomer are crucial for aquaporin tetramer stability. PMID:11927589

  6. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17, consisting of amino acids 371–553, has been crystallized. Diffraction data have been obtained to around 2.0 Å resolution from two different crystal forms. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress. Bacteriophage T7 attaches to its host using the C-terminal domains of its six fibres, which are trimers of the gp17 protein. A C-terminal fragment of gp17 consisting of amino acids 371–553 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of two forms were obtained, belonging to space group P212121 (unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 86.0, c = 118.4 Å) and space group C2221 (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 145.6, c = 172.1 Å). They diffracted to 1.9 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Both crystals are expected to contain one trimer in the asymmetric unit. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress

  7. Mode of inhibition of HIV-1 Integrase by a C-terminal domain-specific monoclonal antibody*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkel George

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To further our understanding of the structure and function of HIV-1 integrase (IN we developed and characterized a library of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against this protein. One of these antibodies, mAb33, which is specific for the C-terminal domain, was found to inhibit HIV-1 IN processing activity in vitro; a corresponding Fv fragment was able to inhibit HIV-1 integration in vivo. Our subsequent studies, using heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, identified six solvent accessible residues on the surface of the C-terminal domain that were immobilized upon binding of the antibody, which were proposed to comprise the epitope. Here we test this hypothesis by measuring the affinity of mAb33 to HIV-1 proteins that contain Ala substitutions in each of these positions. To gain additional insight into the mode of inhibition we also measured the DNA binding capacity and enzymatic activities of the Ala substituted proteins. Results We found that Ala substitution of any one of five of the putative epitope residues, F223, R224, Y226, I267, and I268, caused a decrease in the affinity of the mAb33 for HIV-1 IN, confirming the prediction from NMR data. Although IN derivatives with Ala substitutions in or near the mAb33 epitope exhibited decreased enzymatic activity, none of the epitope substitutions compromised DNA binding to full length HIV-1 IN, as measured by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Two of these derivatives, IN (I276A and IN (I267A/I268A, exhibited both increased DNA binding affinity and uncharacteristic dissociation kinetics; these proteins also exhibited non-specific nuclease activity. Results from these investigations are discussed in the context of current models for how the C-terminal domain interacts with substrate DNA. Conclusion It is unlikely that inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by mAb33 is caused by direct interaction with residues that are essential for substrate binding. Rather

  8. Docking Studies of Binding of Ethambutol to the C-Terminal Domain of the Arabinosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Salgado-Moran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The binding of ethambutol to the C-terminal domain of the arabinosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was studied. The analysis was performed using an in silico approach in order to find out, by docking calculations and energy descriptors, the conformer of Ethambutol that forms the most stable complex with the C-terminal domain of arabinosyltransferase. The complex shows that location of the Ethambutol coincides with the cocrystallization ligand position and that amino acid residues ASH1051, ASN740, ASP1052, and ARG1055 should be critical in the binding of Ethambutol to C-terminal domain EmbC.

  9. The C-terminal domain of the Bloom syndrome DNA helicase is essential for genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan James P; Yankiwski Victor; Neff Norma F

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is a rare cancer-prone disorder in which the cells of affected persons have a high frequency of somatic mutation and genomic instability. Bloom syndrome cells have a distinctive high frequency of sister chromatid exchange and quadriradial formation. BLM, the protein altered in BS, is a member of the RecQ DNA helicase family, whose members share an average of 40% identity in the helicase domain and have divergent N-terminal and C-terminal flanking regions of ...

  10. A novel PKD2L1 C-terminal domain critical for trimerization and channel function

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wang; Hussein, Shaimaa; Yang, Jungwoo; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Hernandez-Anzaldo, Samuel; Fernandez-Patron, Carlos; Cao, Ying; Zeng, Hongbo; Tang, Jingfeng; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    As a transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily member, polycystic kidney disease 2-like-1 (PKD2L1) is also called TRPP3 and has similar membrane topology as voltage-gated cation channels. PKD2L1 is involved in hedgehog signaling, intestinal development, and sour tasting. PKD2L1 and PKD1L3 form heterotetramers with 3:1 stoichiometry. C-terminal coiled-coil-2 (CC2) domain (G699-W743) of PKD2L1 was reported to be important for its trimerization but independent studies showed that CC2 does n...

  11. Chaperone-like effect of the linker on the isolated C-terminal domain of rabbit muscle creatine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Xia, Mengdie; He, Hua-Wei; Wang, Sha; Liu, Huihui; Gong, Haipeng; Yan, Yong-Bin

    2012-08-01

    Intramolecular chaperones (IMCs), which are specific domains/segments encoded in the primary structure of proteins, exhibit chaperone-like activity against the aggregation of the other domains in the same molecule. In this research, we found that the truncation of the linker greatly promoted the thermal aggregation of the isolated C-terminal domain (CTD) of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (RMCK). Either the existence of the linker covalently linked to CTD or the supply of the synthetic linker peptide additionally could successfully protect the CTD of RMCK against aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. Truncated fragments of the linker also behaved as a chaperone-like effect with lower efficiency, revealing the importance of its C-terminal half in the IMC function of the linker. The aggregation sites in the CTD of RMCK were identified by molecular dynamics simulations. Mutational analysis of the three key hydrophobic residues resulted in opposing effects on the thermal aggregation between the CTD with intact or partial linker, confirming the role of linker as a lid to protect the hydrophobic residues against exposure to solvent. These observations suggested that the linkers in multidomain proteins could act as IMCs to facilitate the correct folding of the aggregation-prone domains. Furthermore, the intactness of the IMC linker after proteolysis modulates the production of off-pathway aggregates, which may be important to the onset of some diseases caused by the toxic effects of aggregated proteolytic fragments.

  12. Mapping C-terminal transactivation domains of the nuclear HER family receptor tyrosine kinase HER3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni M Brand

    Full Text Available Nuclear localized HER family receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs have been observed in primary tumor specimens and cancer cell lines for nearly two decades. Inside the nucleus, HER family members (EGFR, HER2, and HER3 have been shown to function as co-transcriptional activators for various cancer-promoting genes. However, the regions of each receptor that confer transcriptional potential remain poorly defined. The current study aimed to map the putative transactivation domains (TADs of the HER3 receptor. To accomplish this goal, various intracellular regions of HER3 were fused to the DNA binding domain of the yeast transcription factor Gal4 (Gal4DBD and tested for their ability to transactivate Gal4 UAS-luciferase. Results from these analyses demonstrated that the C-terminal domain of HER3 (CTD, amino acids distal to the tyrosine kinase domain contained potent transactivation potential. Next, nine HER3-CTD truncation mutants were constructed to map minimal regions of transactivation potential using the Gal4 UAS-luciferase based system. These analyses identified a bipartite region of 34 (B₁ and 27 (B₂ amino acids in length that conferred the majority of HER3's transactivation potential. Next, we identified full-length nuclear HER3 association and regulation of a 122 bp region of the cyclin D1 promoter. To understand how the B₁ and B₂ regions influenced the transcriptional functions of nuclear HER3, we performed cyclin D1 promoter-luciferase assays in which HER3 deleted of the B₁ and B₂ regions was severely hindered in regulating this promoter. Further, the overexpression of HER3 enhanced cyclin D1 mRNA expression, while HER3 deleted of its identified TADs was hindered at doing so. Thus, the ability for HER3 to function as a transcriptional co-activator may be dependent on specific C-terminal TADs.

  13. The C-terminal domain of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylase from Acinetobacter baumannii is an autoinhibitory domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsak, Thanawat; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Thotsaporn, Kittisak; Oonanant, Worrapoj; Yuvaniyama, Jirundon; Svasti, Jisnuson; Ballou, David P; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2012-07-27

    p-Hydroxyphenylacetate (HPA) 3-hydroxylase from Acinetobacter baumannii consists of a reductase component (C(1)) and an oxygenase component (C(2)). C(1) catalyzes the reduction of FMN by NADH to provide FMNH(-) as a substrate for C(2). The rate of reduction of flavin is enhanced ∼20-fold by binding HPA. The N-terminal domain of C(1) is homologous to other flavin reductases, whereas the C-terminal domain (residues 192-315) is similar to MarR, a repressor protein involved in bacterial antibiotic resistance. In this study, three forms of truncated C(1) variants and single site mutation variants of residues Arg-21, Phe-216, Arg-217, Ile-246, and Arg-247 were constructed to investigate the role of the C-terminal domain in regulating C(1). In the absence of HPA, the C(1) variant in which residues 179-315 were removed (t178C(1)) was reduced by NADH and released FMNH(-) at the same rates as wild-type enzyme carries out these functions in the presence of HPA. In contrast, variants with residues 231-315 removed behaved similarly to the wild-type enzyme. Thus, residues 179-230 are involved in repressing the production of FMNH(-) in the absence of HPA. These results are consistent with the C-terminal domain in the wild-type enzyme being an autoinhibitory domain that upon binding the effector HPA undergoes conformational changes to allow faster flavin reduction and release. Most of the single site variants investigated had catalytic properties similar to those of the wild-type enzyme except for the F216A variant, which had a rate of reduction that was not stimulated by HPA. F216A could be involved with HPA binding or in the required conformational change for stimulation of flavin reduction by HPA. PMID:22661720

  14. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the mouse brain cytosolic long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serek, Robert; Forwood, Jade K. [School of Molecular and Microbial Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Hume, David A. [School of Molecular and Microbial Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Chronic Inflammatory Diseases, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Special Research Centre for Functional and Applied Genomics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Martin, Jennifer L.; Kobe, Bostjan, E-mail: b.kobe@uq.edu.au [School of Molecular and Microbial Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Special Research Centre for Functional and Applied Genomics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2006-02-01

    The C-terminal domain of the mouse long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase has been expressed in bacteria and crystallized by vapour diffusion. The crystals diffract to 2.4 Å resolution. The mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase, the enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of acyl-CoAs to free fatty acids, contains two fused 4HBT (4-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA thioesterase) motifs. The C-terminal domain of the mouse long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase (Acot7) has been expressed in bacteria and crystallized. The crystals were obtained by vapour diffusion using PEG 2000 MME as precipitant at pH 7.0 and 290 K. The crystals have the symmetry of space group R32 (unit-cell parameters a = b = 136.83, c = 99.82 Å, γ = 120°). Two molecules are expected in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.4 Å resolution using the laboratory X-ray source and are suitable for crystal structure determination.

  15. The C-Terminal RpoN Domain of sigma54 Forms an unpredictedHelix-Turn-Helix Motif Similar to domains of sigma70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucleff, Michaeleen; Malak, Lawrence T.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-11-01

    The ''{delta}'' subunit of prokaryotic RNA-polymerase allows gene-specific transcription initiation. Two {sigma} families have been identified, {sigma}{sup 70} and {sigma}{sup 54}, which use distinct mechanisms to initiate transcription and share no detectable sequence homology. Although the {sigma}{sup 70}-type factors have been well characterized structurally by x-ray crystallography, no high-resolution structural information is available for the {sigma}{sup 54}-type factors. Here we present the NMR derived structure of the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} from Aquifex aeolicus. This domain (Thr323 to Gly389), which contains the highly conserved RpoN box sequence, consists of a poorly structured N-terminal tail followed by a three-helix bundle, which is surprisingly similar to domains of the {sigma}{sup 70}-type proteins. Residues of the RpoN box, which have previously been shown to be critical for DNA binding, form the second helix of an unpredicted helix-turn-helix motif. This structure's homology with other DNA binding proteins, combined with previous biochemical data, suggest how the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} binds to DNA.

  16. A C-terminal PDZ domain-binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar;

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling dopamine transporter levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. The dopamine transporters contain a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain-binding sequenc...

  17. Biochemical analysis of the interactions of IQGAP1 C-terminal domain with CDC42

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah; F; Elliott; George; Allen; David; J; Timson

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To understand the interaction of human IQGAP1 and CDC42,especially the effects of phosphorylation and a cancer-associated mutation. METHODS:Recombinant CDC42 and a novel C-termi- nal fragment of IQGAP1 were expressed in,and puri- fied from,Escherichia coli.Site directed mutagenesis was used to create coding sequences for three phos- phomimicking variants(S1441E,S1443D and S1441E/ S1443D)and to recapitulate a cancer-associated mu- tation(M1231I).These variant proteins were also ex- pressed and purified.Protein-protein crosslinking using 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide was used to investigate interactions between the C-terminal fragment and CDC42.These interactions were quanti- fied using surface plasmon resonance measurements.Molecular modelling was employed to make predictions about changes to the structure and flexibility of the protein which occur in the cancer-associated variant. RESULTS:The novel,C-terminal region of human IQGAP1 (residues 877-1558)is soluble following expression and purification.It is also capable of binding to CDC42,as judged by crosslinking experiments.Interaction appears to be strongest in the presence of added GTP.The three phosphomimicking mutants had different affini- ties for CDC42.S1441E had an approximately 200-fold reduction in affinity compared to wild type.This was caused largely by a dramatic reduction in the associa- tion rate constant.In contrast,both S1443D and the double variant S1441E/S1443D had similar affinities to the wild type.The cancer-associated variant,M1231I, also had a similar affinity to wild type.However,in the case of this variant,both the association and dis- sociation rate constants were reduced approximately 10-fold.Molecular modelling of the M1231I variant, based on the published crystal structure of part of the C-terminal region,revealed no gross structural changes compared to wild type(root mean square deviation of 0.564over 5556 equivalent atoms).However,pre- dictions of the

  18. The retromer subunit Vps26 has an arrestin fold and binds Vps35 through its C-terminal domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hang; Rojas, Raul; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Hurley, James H.

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian retromer complex consists of SNX1, SNX2, Vps26, Vps29, and Vps35, and retrieves lysosomal enzyme receptors from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. The structure of human Vps26A at 2.1Å resolution reveals two curvedβ -sandwich domains connected by a polar core and a flexible linker. Vps26 has an unexpected structural relationship to arrestins. The Vps35-binding site on Vps26 maps to a mobile loop spanning residues 235–246, near the tip of the C-terminal domain. The loop is phylogenetically conserved and provides a mechanism for Vps26 integration into the complex that leaves the rest of the structure free for engagements with membranes and for conformational changes. Hydrophobic residues and a Gly in this loop are required for integration into the retromer complex and endosomal localization of human Vps26, and for the function of yeast Vps26 in carboxypeptidase Y sorting. PMID:16732284

  19. C-terminal domain of hepatitis C virus core protein is essential for secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo-Ho Choi; Kyu-Jin Park; So-Yeon Kim; Dong-Hwa Choi; Jung-Min Park; Soon B. Hwang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: We have previously demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is efficiently released into the culture medium in insect cells. The objective of this study is to characterize the HCV core secretion in insect cells.METHODS: We constructed recombinant baculoviruses expressing various-length of mutant core proteins, expressed these proteins in insect cells, and examined core protein secretion in insect cells.RESULTS: Only wild type core was efficiently released into the culture medium, although the protein expression level of wild type core was lower than those of other mutant core proteins. We found that the shorter form of the core construct expressed the higher level of protein. However, if more than 18 amino acids of the core were truncated at the C-terminus,core proteins were no longer seareted into the culture medium.Membrane flotation data show that the secreted core proteins are associated with the cellular membrane protein, indicating that HCV core is secreted as a membrane complex.CONCLUSION: The C-terminal 18 amino acids of HCV core were crucial for core secretion into the culture media.Since HCV replication occurs on lipid raft membrane structure,these results suggest that HCV may utilize a unique core release mechanism to escape immune surveillance, thereby potentially representing the feature of HCV morphogenesis.

  20. Functional and structural analysis of C-terminal BRCA1 missense variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Quiles

    Full Text Available Germline inactivating mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are responsible for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS. Genetic testing of these genes is available, although approximately 15% of tests identify variants of uncertain significance (VUS. Classification of these variants into pathogenic or non-pathogenic type is an important challenge in genetic diagnosis and counseling. The aim of the present study is to functionally assess a set of 7 missense VUS (Q1409L, S1473P, E1586G, R1589H, Y1703S, W1718L and G1770V located in the C-terminal region of BRCA1 by combining in silico prediction tools and structural analysis with a transcription activation (TA assay. The in silico prediction programs gave discrepant results making its interpretation difficult. Structural analysis of the three variants located in the BRCT domains (Y1703S, W1718L and G1770V reveals significant alterations of BRCT structure. The TA assay shows that variants Y1703S, W1718L and G1770V dramatically compromise the transcriptional activity of BRCA1, while variants Q1409L, S1473P, E1586G and R1589H behave like wild-type BRCA1. In conclusion, our results suggest that variants Y1703S, W1718L and G1770V can be classified as likely pathogenic BRCA1 mutations.

  1. The disordered C-terminal domain of human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 contributes to its stability via intramolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Hegde, Pavana M; Holthauzen, Luis Marcelo F; Li, Jing; Oezguen, Numan; Hilser, Vincent J; Tainer, John A; Mitra, Sankar

    2013-07-10

    NEIL1 [Nei (endonuclease VIII)-like protein 1], one of the five mammalian DNA glycosylases that excise oxidized DNA base lesions in the human genome to initiate base excision repair, contains an intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (CTD; ~100 residues), not conserved in its Escherichia coli prototype Nei. Although dispensable for NEIL1's lesion excision and AP lyase activities, this segment is required for efficient in vivo enzymatic activity and may provide an interaction interface for many of NEIL1's interactions with other base excision repair proteins. Here, we show that the CTD interacts with the folded domain in native NEIL1 containing 389 residues. The CTD is poised for local folding in an ordered structure that is induced in the purified fragment by osmolytes. Furthermore, deletion of the disordered tail lacking both Tyr and Trp residues causes a red shift in NEIL1's intrinsic Trp-specific fluorescence, indicating a more solvent-exposed environment for the Trp residues in the truncated protein, which also exhibits reduced stability compared to the native enzyme. These observations are consistent with stabilization of the native NEIL1 structure via intramolecular, mostly electrostatic, interactions that were disrupted by mutating a positively charged (Lys-rich) cluster of residues (amino acids 355-360) near the C-terminus. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis confirms the flexibility and dynamic nature of NEIL1's CTD, a feature that may be critical to providing specificity for NEIL1's multiple, functional interactions.

  2. N- and C-terminal domains determine differential nucleosomal binding geometry and affinity of linker histone isotypes H1(0) and H1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Payal; Brown, David T

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic linker or H1 histones modulate DNA compaction and gene expression in vivo. In mammals, these proteins exist as multiple isotypes with distinct properties, suggesting a functional significance to the heterogeneity. Linker histones typically have a tripartite structure composed of a conserved central globular domain flanked by a highly variable short N-terminal domain and a longer highly basic C-terminal domain. We hypothesized that the variable terminal domains of individual subtypes contribute to their functional heterogeneity by influencing chromatin binding interactions. We developed a novel dual color fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay system in which two H1 proteins fused to spectrally separable fluorescent proteins can be co-expressed and their independent binding kinetics simultaneously monitored in a single cell. This approach was combined with domain swap and point mutagenesis to determine the roles of the terminal domains in the differential binding characteristics of the linker histone isotypes, mouse H1(0) and H1c. Exchanging the N-terminal domains between H1(0) and H1c changed their overall binding affinity to that of the other variant. In contrast, switching the C-terminal domains altered the chromatin interaction surface of the globular domain. These results indicate that linker histone subtypes bind to chromatin in an intrinsically specific manner and that the highly variable terminal domains contribute to differences between subtypes. The methods developed in this study will have broad applications in studying dynamic properties of additional histone subtypes and other mobile proteins.

  3. N-terminal and C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain of APOBEC3G inhibit hepatitis B virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Chang Lei; Dong-Liang Yang; Yong-Jun Tian; Hong-Hui Ding; Bao-Ju Wang; Yan Yang; You-Hua Hao; Xi-Ping Zhao; Meng-Ji Lu; Fei-Li Gong

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of human apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic-polypeptide 3G(APOBEC3G) and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain-mediated antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) in vitro and in vivo.METHODS: The mammalian hepatoma cells HepG2 and HuH7 were cotransfected with APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain expression vector and 1.3-fold-overlength HBV DNA as well as the linear monomeric HBV of genotype B and C. For in vivo study, an HBV vector-based mouse model was used in which APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain expression vectors were co-delivered with 1.3-fold-overlength HBV DNA via high-volume tail vein injection. Levels of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) in the media of the transfected cells and in the sera of mice were determined by ELISA.The expression of hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg)in the transfected cells was determined by Western blot analysis. Core-associated HBV DNA was examined by Southern blot analysis. Levels of HBV DNA in the sera of mice as well as HBV core-associated RNA in the liver of mice were determined by quantitative PCR and quantitative RT-PCR analysis, respectively.RESULTS: Human APOBEC3G exerted an anti-HBV activity in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 cells,and comparable suppressive effects were observed on genotype B and C as that of genotype A. Interestingly,the N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain alone could also inhibit HBV replication in HepG2 cells as well as Huh7 cells. Consistent with in vitro results, the levels of HBsAg in the sera of mice were dramatically decreased, with more than 50 times decrease in the levels of serum HBV DNA and core-associated RNA in the liver of mice treated with APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain as compared to the controls.CONCLUSION: Our findings provide probably the first

  4. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. PMID:26405031

  5. A Superhelical Spiral in the Escherichia coli DNA Gyrase A C-terminal Domain Imparts Unidirectional Supercoiling Bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruthenburg,A.; Graybosch, D.; Huetsch, J.; Verdine, G.

    2005-01-01

    DNA gyrase is unique among type II topoisomerases in that its DNA supercoiling activity is unidirectional. The C-terminal domain of the gyrase A subunit (GyrA-CTD) is required for this supercoiling bias. We report here the x-ray structure of the Escherichia coli GyrA-CTD (Protein Data Bank code 1ZI0). The E. coli GyrA-CTD adopts a circular-shaped {beta}-pinwheel fold first seen in the Borrelia burgdorferi GyrA-CTD. However, whereas the B. burgdorferi GyrA-CTD is flat, the E. coli GyrA-CTD is spiral. DNA relaxation assays reveal that the E. coli GyrA-CTD wraps DNA inducing substantial (+) superhelicity, while the B. burgdorferi GyrA-CTD introduces a more modest (+) superhelicity. The observation of a superhelical spiral in the present structure and that of the Bacillus stearothermophilus ParC-CTD structure suggests unexpected similarities in substrate selectivity between gyrase and Topo IV enzymes. We propose a model wherein the right-handed ((+) solenoidal) wrapping of DNA around the E. coli GyrA-CTD enforces unidirectional (-) DNA supercoiling.

  6. Insights into the Functional Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains of Helicobacter pylori DprA

    OpenAIRE

    Dwivedi, Gajendradhar R.; Kolluru D Srikanth; Praveen Anand; Javed Naikoo; Srilatha, N. S.; Rao, Desirazu N.

    2015-01-01

    DNA processing protein A (DprA) plays a crucial role in the process of natural transformation. This is accomplished through binding and subsequent protection of incoming foreign DNA during the process of internalization. DprA along with Single stranded DNA binding protein A (SsbA) acts as an accessory factor for RecA mediated DNA strand exchange. H. pylori DprA (HpDprA) is divided into an N-terminal domain and a C- terminal domain. In the present study, individual domains of HpDprA have been ...

  7. The C-terminal domain of the MutL homolog from Neisseria gonorrhoeae forms an inverted homodimer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Namadurai

    Full Text Available The mismatch repair (MMR pathway serves to maintain the integrity of the genome by removing mispaired bases from the newly synthesized strand. In E. coli, MutS, MutL and MutH coordinate to discriminate the daughter strand through a mechanism involving lack of methylation on the new strand. This facilitates the creation of a nick by MutH in the daughter strand to initiate mismatch repair. Many bacteria and eukaryotes, including humans, do not possess a homolog of MutH. Although the exact strategy for strand discrimination in these organisms is yet to be ascertained, the required nicking endonuclease activity is resident in the C-terminal domain of MutL. This activity is dependent on the integrity of a conserved metal binding motif. Unlike their eukaryotic counterparts, MutL in bacteria like Neisseria exist in the form of a homodimer. Even though this homodimer would possess two active sites, it still acts a nicking endonuclease. Here, we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain (CTD of the MutL homolog of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NgoL determined to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The structure shows that the metal binding motif exists in a helical configuration and that four of the six conserved motifs in the MutL family, including the metal binding site, localize together to form a composite active site. NgoL-CTD exists in the form of an elongated inverted homodimer stabilized by a hydrophobic interface rich in leucines. The inverted arrangement places the two composite active sites in each subunit on opposite lateral sides of the homodimer. Such an arrangement raises the possibility that one of the active sites is occluded due to interaction of NgoL with other protein factors involved in MMR. The presentation of only one active site to substrate DNA will ensure that nicking of only one strand occurs to prevent inadvertent and deleterious double stranded cleavage.

  8. The C-terminal domain of the MutL homolog from Neisseria gonorrhoeae forms an inverted homodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namadurai, Sivakumar; Jain, Deepti; Kulkarni, Dhananjay S; Tabib, Chaitanya R; Friedhoff, Peter; Rao, Desirazu N; Nair, Deepak T

    2010-01-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) pathway serves to maintain the integrity of the genome by removing mispaired bases from the newly synthesized strand. In E. coli, MutS, MutL and MutH coordinate to discriminate the daughter strand through a mechanism involving lack of methylation on the new strand. This facilitates the creation of a nick by MutH in the daughter strand to initiate mismatch repair. Many bacteria and eukaryotes, including humans, do not possess a homolog of MutH. Although the exact strategy for strand discrimination in these organisms is yet to be ascertained, the required nicking endonuclease activity is resident in the C-terminal domain of MutL. This activity is dependent on the integrity of a conserved metal binding motif. Unlike their eukaryotic counterparts, MutL in bacteria like Neisseria exist in the form of a homodimer. Even though this homodimer would possess two active sites, it still acts a nicking endonuclease. Here, we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the MutL homolog of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NgoL) determined to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The structure shows that the metal binding motif exists in a helical configuration and that four of the six conserved motifs in the MutL family, including the metal binding site, localize together to form a composite active site. NgoL-CTD exists in the form of an elongated inverted homodimer stabilized by a hydrophobic interface rich in leucines. The inverted arrangement places the two composite active sites in each subunit on opposite lateral sides of the homodimer. Such an arrangement raises the possibility that one of the active sites is occluded due to interaction of NgoL with other protein factors involved in MMR. The presentation of only one active site to substrate DNA will ensure that nicking of only one strand occurs to prevent inadvertent and deleterious double stranded cleavage. PMID:21060849

  9. A C-terminal PDZ domain binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Rickhag, Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar; Strandfelt, Kristine Nørgaard; Andresen, Bjørn; Gotfryd, Kamil; Madsen, Kenneth L; Vestergaard-Klewe, Ib; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Eriksen, Jacob; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Gomeza, Jesus; Woldbye, David P.D.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling DAT levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. DAT contains a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain binding sequence believed to bind synaptic scaffolding proteins, but its functional significance is uncertain. Here we demonstrate that two different DAT knock-in mice with disrupted PDZ-binding motifs (DAT-AAA and DAT+Ala) are characterized by dr...

  10. Insights into the Functional Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains of Helicobacter pylori DprA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajendradhar R Dwivedi

    Full Text Available DNA processing protein A (DprA plays a crucial role in the process of natural transformation. This is accomplished through binding and subsequent protection of incoming foreign DNA during the process of internalization. DprA along with Single stranded DNA binding protein A (SsbA acts as an accessory factor for RecA mediated DNA strand exchange. H. pylori DprA (HpDprA is divided into an N-terminal domain and a C- terminal domain. In the present study, individual domains of HpDprA have been characterized for their ability to bind single stranded (ssDNA and double stranded DNA (dsDNA. Oligomeric studies revealed that HpDprA possesses two sites for dimerization which enables HpDprA to form large and tightly packed complexes with ss and dsDNA. While the N-terminal domain was found to be sufficient for binding with ss or ds DNA, C-terminal domain has an important role in the assembly of poly-nucleoprotein complex. Using site directed mutagenesis approach, we show that a pocket comprising positively charged amino acids in the N-terminal domain has an important role in the binding of ss and dsDNA. Together, a functional cross talk between the two domains of HpDprA facilitating the binding and formation of higher order complex with DNA is discussed.

  11. Insights into the Functional Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains of Helicobacter pylori DprA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Gajendradhar R; Srikanth, Kolluru D; Anand, Praveen; Naikoo, Javed; Srilatha, N S; Rao, Desirazu N

    2015-01-01

    DNA processing protein A (DprA) plays a crucial role in the process of natural transformation. This is accomplished through binding and subsequent protection of incoming foreign DNA during the process of internalization. DprA along with Single stranded DNA binding protein A (SsbA) acts as an accessory factor for RecA mediated DNA strand exchange. H. pylori DprA (HpDprA) is divided into an N-terminal domain and a C- terminal domain. In the present study, individual domains of HpDprA have been characterized for their ability to bind single stranded (ssDNA) and double stranded DNA (dsDNA). Oligomeric studies revealed that HpDprA possesses two sites for dimerization which enables HpDprA to form large and tightly packed complexes with ss and dsDNA. While the N-terminal domain was found to be sufficient for binding with ss or ds DNA, C-terminal domain has an important role in the assembly of poly-nucleoprotein complex. Using site directed mutagenesis approach, we show that a pocket comprising positively charged amino acids in the N-terminal domain has an important role in the binding of ss and dsDNA. Together, a functional cross talk between the two domains of HpDprA facilitating the binding and formation of higher order complex with DNA is discussed. PMID:26135134

  12. Domain mapping of Escherichia coli RecQ defines the roles of conserved N- and C-terminal regions in the RecQ family

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Douglas A.; Keck, James L.

    2003-01-01

    RecQ DNA helicases function in DNA replication, recombination and repair. Although the precise cellular roles played by this family of enzymes remain elusive, the importance of RecQ proteins is clear; mutations in any of three human RecQ genes lead to genomic instability and cancer. In this report, proteolysis is used to define a two-domain structure for Escherichia coli RecQ, revealing a large (∼59 kDa) N-terminal and a small (∼9 kDa) C-terminal domain. A short N-terminal segment (7 or 21 re...

  13. Resolving hot spots in the C-terminal dimerization domain that determine the stability of the molecular chaperone Hsp90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Ciglia

    Full Text Available Human heat shock protein of 90 kDa (hHsp90 is a homodimer that has an essential role in facilitating malignant transformation at the molecular level. Inhibiting hHsp90 function is a validated approach for treating different types of tumors. Inhibiting the dimerization of hHsp90 via its C-terminal domain (CTD should provide a novel way to therapeutically interfere with hHsp90 function. Here, we predicted hot spot residues that cluster in the CTD dimerization interface by a structural decomposition of the effective energy of binding computed by the MM-GBSA approach and confirmed these predictions using in silico alanine scanning with DrugScore(PPI. Mutation of these residues to alanine caused a significant decrease in the melting temperature according to differential scanning fluorimetry experiments, indicating a reduced stability of the mutant hHsp90 complexes. Size exclusion chromatography and multi-angle light scattering studies demonstrate that the reduced stability of the mutant hHsp90 correlates with a lower complex stoichiometry due to the disruption of the dimerization interface. These results suggest that the identified hot spot residues can be used as a pharmacophoric template for identifying and designing small-molecule inhibitors of hHsp90 dimerization.

  14. Downstream signaling mechanism of the C-terminal activation domain of transcriptional coactivator CoCoA

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong Hoon; Yang, Catherine K.; Stallcup, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    The coiled-coil coactivator (CoCoA) is a transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors and enhances nuclear receptor function by the interaction with the bHLH-PAS domain (AD3) of p160 coactivators. The C-terminal activation domain (AD) of CoCoA possesses strong transactivation activity and is required for the coactivator function of CoCoA with nuclear receptors. To understand how CoCoA AD transmits its activating signal to the transcription machinery, we defined specific subregions, amino...

  15. An antibody against the C-terminal domain of PCSK9 lowers LDL cholesterol levels in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Felix; Park, John; Redemann, Norbert; Luippold, Gerd; Nar, Herbert

    2014-02-20

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is associated with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia, a state of elevated levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia can result in severe implications such as stroke and coronary heart disease. The inhibition of PCSK9 function by therapeutic antibodies that block interaction of PCSK9 with the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A domain of LDL receptor (LDLR) was shown to successfully lower LDL cholesterol levels in clinical studies. Here we present data on the identification, structural and biophysical characterization and in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of a PCSK9 antibody (mAb1). The X-ray structure shows that mAb1 binds the module 1 of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of PCSK9. It blocks access to an area bearing several naturally occurring gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations. Although the antibody does not inhibit binding of PCSK9 to epidermal growth factor-like repeat A, it partially reverses PCSK9-induced reduction of the LDLR and LDL cholesterol uptake in a cellular assay. mAb1 is also effective in lowering serum levels of LDL cholesterol in cynomolgus monkeys in vivo. Complete loss of PCSK9 is associated with insufficient liver regeneration and increased risk of hepatitis C infections. Blocking of the CTD is sufficient to partially inhibit PCSK9 function. Antibodies binding the CTD of PCSK9 may thus be advantageous in patients that do not tolerate complete inhibition of PCSK9.

  16. The crystal structures of the synthetic C-terminal octa- and dodecapeptides of trichovirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, R; Benos, P; Brückner, H; Kokkinidis, M

    1999-02-01

    The structures of two synthetic peptides with sequences corresponding to the C-terminal region of the naturally occurring 14-residue peptaibol trichovirin have been determined. The crystal structures of 8- and 12-residue segments are presented and are compared with the structures of the tetrapeptide and of the 9-residue segment, which have been reported earlier. A comparison between these segments leads to the hypothesis that the three-dimensional structure of trichovirin is to a large extent determined by the properties of a periodically repeating -Aib-Pro- pattern in the sequence of the peptide.

  17. Interactions of the C-terminal Domain of Human Ku70 with DNA Substrate: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice; Pluth, Janice M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is developing a systems biology approach to improve the assessment of health risks associated with space radiation. The primary toxic and mutagenic lesion following radiation exposure is the DNA double strand break (DSB), thus a model incorporating proteins and pathways important in response and repair of this lesion is critical. One key protein heterodimer for systems models of radiation effects is the Ku(sub 70/80) complex. The Ku70/80 complex is important in the initial binding of DSB ends following DNA damage, and is a component of nonhomologous end joining repair, the primary pathway for DSB repair in mammalian cells. The C-terminal domain of Ku70 (Ku70c, residues 559-609), contains an helix-extended strand-helix motif and similar motifs have been found in other nucleic acid-binding proteins critical for DNA repair. However, the exact mechanism of damage recognition and substrate specificity for the Ku heterodimer remains unclear in part due to the absence of a high-resolution structure of the Ku70c/DNA complex. We performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a system with the subunit Ku70c and a 14 base pairs DNA duplex, whose starting structures are designed to be variable so as to mimic their different binding modes. By analyzing conformational changes and energetic properties of the complex during MD simulations, we found that interactions are preferred at DNA ends, and within the major groove, which is consistent with previous experimental investigations. In addition, the results indicate that cooperation of Ku70c with other subunits of Ku(sub 70/80) is necessary to explain the high affinity of binding as observed in experiments.

  18. Interplay of positive and negative effectors in function of the C-terminal repeat domain of RNA polymerase II.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y.; Kornberg, R D

    1994-01-01

    RNA polymerase II lacking a C-terminal domain (CTD) was active in transcription with purified proteins from yeast but failed to support transcription in a yeast extract. CTD dependence could be reconstituted in the purified system by addition of two fractions from the extract. An inhibitory fraction abolished transcription by both wild-type and CTD-less RNA polymerases; a stimulatory fraction restored activity of the wild-type polymerase but had a much lesser effect on the CTD-less enzyme. Pa...

  19. The C-terminal region of the transcriptional regulator THAP11 forms a parallel coiled-coil domain involved in protein dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukier, Cyprian D; Maveyraud, Laurent; Saurel, Olivier; Guillet, Valérie; Milon, Alain; Gervais, Virginie

    2016-06-01

    Thanatos associated protein 11 (THAP11) is a cell cycle and cell growth regulator differentially expressed in cancer cells. THAP11 belongs to a distinct family of transcription factors recognizing specific DNA sequences via an atypical zinc finger motif and regulating diverse cellular processes. Outside the extensively characterized DNA-binding domain, THAP proteins vary in size and predicted domains, for which structural data are still lacking. We report here the crystal structure of the C-terminal region of human THAP11 protein, providing the first 3D structure of a coiled-coil motif from a THAP family member. We further investigate the stability, dynamics and oligomeric properties of the determined structure combining molecular dynamics simulations and biophysical experiments. Our results show that the C-ter region of THAP11 forms a left-handed parallel homo-dimeric coiled-coil structure possessing several unusual features. PMID:26975212

  20. Intracellular Cleavage of the Cx43 C-Terminal Domain by Matrix-Metalloproteases: A Novel Contributor to Inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke De Bock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The coordination of tissue function is mediated by gap junctions (GJs that enable direct cell-cell transfer of metabolic and electric signals. GJs are formed by connexin (Cx proteins of which Cx43 is most widespread in the human body. Beyond its role in direct intercellular communication, Cx43 also forms nonjunctional hemichannels (HCs in the plasma membrane that mediate the release of paracrine signaling molecules in the extracellular environment. Both HC and GJ channel function are regulated by protein-protein interactions and posttranslational modifications that predominantly take place in the C-terminal domain of Cx43. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs are a major group of zinc-dependent proteases, known to regulate not only extracellular matrix remodeling, but also processing of intracellular proteins. Together with Cx43 channels, both GJs and HCs, MMPs contribute to acute inflammation and a small number of studies reports on an MMP-Cx43 link. Here, we build further on these reports and present a novel hypothesis that describes proteolytic cleavage of the Cx43 C-terminal domain by MMPs and explores possibilities of how such cleavage events may affect Cx43 channel function. Finally, we set out how aberrant channel function resulting from cleavage can contribute to the acute inflammatory response during tissue injury.

  1. Cell-type-specific tuning of Cav1.3 Ca2+-channels by a C-terminal automodulatory domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharinger, Anja; Eckrich, Stephanie; Vandael, David H.; Schönig, Kai; Koschak, Alexandra; Hecker, Dietmar; Kaur, Gurjot; Lee, Amy; Sah, Anupam; Bartsch, Dusan; Benedetti, Bruno; Lieb, Andreas; Schick, Bernhard; Singewald, Nicolas; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Carbone, Emilio; Engel, Jutta; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+-channel function is regulated by a C-terminal automodulatory domain (CTM). It affects channel binding of calmodulin and thereby tunes channel activity by interfering with Ca2+- and voltage-dependent gating. Alternative splicing generates short C-terminal channel variants lacking the CTM resulting in enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation and stronger voltage-sensitivity upon heterologous expression. However, the role of this modulatory domain for channel function in its native environment is unkown. To determine its functional significance in vivo, we interrupted the CTM with a hemagglutinin tag in mutant mice (Cav1.3DCRDHA/HA). Using these mice we provide biochemical evidence for the existence of long (CTM-containing) and short (CTM-deficient) Cav1.3 α1-subunits in brain. The long (HA-labeled) Cav1.3 isoform was present in all ribbon synapses of cochlear inner hair cells. CTM-elimination impaired Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Ca2+-currents in hair cells but increased it in chromaffin cells, resulting in hyperpolarized resting potentials and reduced pacemaking. CTM disruption did not affect hearing thresholds. We show that the modulatory function of the CTM is affected by its native environment in different cells and thus occurs in a cell-type specific manner in vivo. It stabilizes gating properties of Cav1.3 channels required for normal electrical excitability. PMID:26379493

  2. Cell-type-specific tuning of Cav1.3 Ca2+-channels by a C-terminal automodulatory domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eScharinger

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+-channel function is regulated by a C-terminal automodulatory domain (CTM. It affects channel binding of calmodulin and thereby tunes channel activity by interfering with Ca2+- and voltage-dependent gating. Alternative splicing generates short C-terminal channel variants lacking the CTM resulting in enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation and stronger voltage-sensitivity upon heterologous expression. However, the role of this modulatory domain for channel function in its native environment is unkown. To determine its functional significance in vivo, we interrupted the CTM with a hemagglutinin tag in mutant mice (Cav1.3DCRDHA/HA. Using these mice we provide biochemical evidence for the existence of long (CTM-containing and short (CTM-deficient Cav1.3 α1-subunits in brain. The long (HA-labeled Cav1.3 isoform was present in all ribbon synapses of cochlear inner hair cells. CTM-elimination impaired Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Ca2+-currents in hair cells but increased it in chromaffin cells, resulting in hyperpolarized resting potentials and reduced pacemaking. CTM disruption did not affect hearing thresholds. We show that the modulatory function of the CTM is affected by its native environment in different cells and thus occurs in a cell-type specific manner in vivo. It is required to stabilize gating properties of Cav1.3 channels required for normal electrical excitability.

  3. Extensive de novo solid-state NMR assignments of the 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the de novo resonance assignments for the crystalline 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion using an optimized set of five 3D solid-state NMR spectra. We obtained, using a single uniformly 13C, 15N labeled protein sample, sequential chemical-shift information for 74% of the N, Cα, Cβ triples, and for 80% of further side-chain resonances for these spin systems. We describe the procedures and protocols devised, and discuss possibilities and limitations of the assignment of this largest protein assigned today by solid-state NMR, and for which no solution-state NMR shifts were available. A comparison of the NMR chemical shifts with crystallographic data reveals that regions with high crystallographic B-factors are particularly difficult to assign. While the secondary structure elements derived from the chemical shift data correspond mainly to those present in the X-ray crystal structure, we detect an additional helical element and structural variability in the protein crystal, most probably originating from the different molecules in the asymmetric unit, with the observation of doubled resonances in several parts, including entire stretches, of the protein. Our results provide the point of departure towards an atomic-resolution structural analysis of the C-terminal Ure2p domain in the context of the full-length prion fibrils.

  4. Extensive de novo solid-state NMR assignments of the 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habenstein, Birgit [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Wasmer, Christian [Harvard Medical School (United States); Bousset, Luc; Sourigues, Yannick [UPR 3082 CNRS, Laboratoire d' Enzymologie et Biochimie Structurales (France); Schuetz, Anne [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Loquet, Antoine [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Melki, Ronald, E-mail: melki@lebs.cnrs-gif.fr [UPR 3082 CNRS, Laboratoire d' Enzymologie et Biochimie Structurales (France); Boeckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France)

    2011-11-15

    We present the de novo resonance assignments for the crystalline 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion using an optimized set of five 3D solid-state NMR spectra. We obtained, using a single uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeled protein sample, sequential chemical-shift information for 74% of the N, C{alpha}, C{beta} triples, and for 80% of further side-chain resonances for these spin systems. We describe the procedures and protocols devised, and discuss possibilities and limitations of the assignment of this largest protein assigned today by solid-state NMR, and for which no solution-state NMR shifts were available. A comparison of the NMR chemical shifts with crystallographic data reveals that regions with high crystallographic B-factors are particularly difficult to assign. While the secondary structure elements derived from the chemical shift data correspond mainly to those present in the X-ray crystal structure, we detect an additional helical element and structural variability in the protein crystal, most probably originating from the different molecules in the asymmetric unit, with the observation of doubled resonances in several parts, including entire stretches, of the protein. Our results provide the point of departure towards an atomic-resolution structural analysis of the C-terminal Ure2p domain in the context of the full-length prion fibrils.

  5. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. Part IV. Implication for the mechanism of folding of the parent protein

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2010-01-01

    A 34-residue α/β peptide, [IG(28-61)], derived from the C-terminal part of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus was studied using CD and NMR spectroscopy at various temperatures, and by differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that the C-terminal part (a 16-residue-long fragment) of this peptide, which corresponds to the sequence of the β-hairpin in the native structure, forms structure similar to the β-hairpin only at T = 313 K, and the structure is...

  6. Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA formyltransferase: role of amino acids conserved in the linker region and in the C-terminal domain on the specific recognition of the initiator tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gite, S; Li, Y; Ramesh, V; RajBhandary, U L

    2000-03-01

    The formylation of initiator methionyl-tRNA by methionyl-tRNA formyltransferase (MTF) is important for the initiation of protein synthesis in eubacteria. We are studying the molecular mechanisms of recognition of the initiator tRNA by Escherichia coli MTF. MTF from eubacteria contains an approximately 100-amino acid C-terminal extension that is not found in the E. coli glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase, which, like MTF, use N(10)-formyltetrahydrofolate as a formyl group donor. This C-terminal extension, which forms a distinct structural domain, is attached to the N-terminal domain through a linker region. Here, we describe the effect of (i) substitution mutations on some nineteen basic, aromatic and other conserved amino acids in the linker region and in the C-terminal domain of MTF and (ii) deletion mutations from the C-terminus on enzyme activity. We show that the positive charge on two of the lysine residues in the linker region leading to the C-terminal domain are important for enzyme activity. Mutation of some of the basic amino acids in the C-terminal domain to alanine has mostly small effects on the kinetic parameters, whereas mutation to glutamic acid has large effects. However, the deletion of 18, 20, or 80 amino acids from the C-terminus has very large effects on enzyme activity. Overall, our results support the notion that the basic amino acid residues in the C-terminal domain provide a positively charged channel that is used for the nonspecific binding of tRNA, whereas some of the amino acids in the linker region play an important role in activity of MTF.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the C-terminal domain of the human spliceosomal DExD/H-box protein hPrp22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cloning, purification and crystallization of the C-terminal domain of human hPrp22 are reported. This communication also contains data for the preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis. The Homo sapiens DExD/H-box protein hPrp22 is a crucial component of the eukaryotic pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Within the splicing cycle, it is involved in the ligation of exons and generation of the lariat and it additionally catalyzes the release of mature mRNA from the spliceosomal U5 snRNP. The yeast homologue of this protein, yPrp22, shows ATP-dependent RNA-helicase activity and is capable of unwinding RNA/RNA duplex molecules. A truncated construct coding for residues 950–1183 of human Prp22, comprising the structurally and functionally uncharacterized C-terminal domain, was cloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector. The protein was subsequently overproduced, purified and crystallized. The crystals obtained diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution, belonged to the tetragonal space group P41212 or P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 78.2, c = 88.4 Å, and contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit

  8. The C-terminal domain of the Arabinosyltransferase Mycobacterium tuberculosis EmbC is a lectin-like carbohydrate binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke J Alderwick

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The D-arabinan-containing polymers arabinogalactan (AG and lipoarabinomannan (LAM are essential components of the unique cell envelope of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Biosynthesis of AG and LAM involves a series of membrane-embedded arabinofuranosyl (Araf transferases whose structures are largely uncharacterised, despite the fact that several of them are pharmacological targets of ethambutol, a frontline drug in tuberculosis therapy. Herein, we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal hydrophilic domain of the ethambutol-sensitive Araf transferase M. tuberculosis EmbC, which is essential for LAM synthesis. The structure of the C-terminal domain of EmbC (EmbC(CT encompasses two sub-domains of different folds, of which subdomain II shows distinct similarity to lectin-like carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM. Co-crystallisation with a cell wall-derived di-arabinoside acceptor analogue and structural comparison with ligand-bound CBMs suggest that EmbC(CT contains two separate carbohydrate binding sites, associated with subdomains I and II, respectively. Single-residue substitution of conserved tryptophan residues (Trp868, Trp985 at these respective sites inhibited EmbC-catalysed extension of LAM. The same substitutions differentially abrogated binding of di- and penta-arabinofuranoside acceptor analogues to EmbC(CT, linking the loss of activity to compromised acceptor substrate binding, indicating the presence of two separate carbohydrate binding sites, and demonstrating that subdomain II indeed functions as a carbohydrate-binding module. This work provides the first step towards unravelling the structure and function of a GT-C-type glycosyltransferase that is essential in M. tuberculosis.

  9. Bound or free: interaction of the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) with the tetrameric core of SSB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xun-Cheng; Wang, Yao; Yagi, Hiromasa; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Mason, Claire E; Smith, Paul J; Vandevenne, Marylène; Dixon, Nicholas E; Otting, Gottfried

    2014-04-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB) protects ssDNA from degradation and recruits other proteins for DNA replication and repair. Escherichia coli SSB is the prototypical eubacterial SSB in a family of tetrameric SSBs. It consists of a structurally well-defined ssDNA binding domain (OB-domain) and a disordered C-terminal domain (C-domain). The eight-residue C-terminal segment of SSB (C-peptide) mediates the binding of SSB to many different SSB-binding proteins. Previously published nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data of the monomeric state at pH 3.4 showed that the C-peptide binds to the OB-domain at a site that overlaps with the ssDNA binding site, but investigating the protein at neutral pH is difficult because of the high molecular mass and limited solubility of the tetramer. Here we show that the C-domain is highly mobile in the SSB tetramer at neutral pH and that binding of the C-peptide to the OB-domain is so weak that most of the C-peptides are unbound even in the absence of ssDNA. We address the problem of determining intramolecular binding affinities in the situation of fast exchange between two states, one of which cannot be observed by NMR and cannot be fully populated. The results were confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. The C-peptide-OB-domain interaction is shown to be driven primarily by electrostatic interactions, so that binding of 1 equiv of (dT)35 releases practically all C-peptides from the OB-domain tetramer. The interaction is much more sensitive to NaCl than to potassium glutamate, which is the usual osmolyte in E. coli. As the C-peptide is predominantly in the unbound state irrespective of the presence of ssDNA, long-range electrostatic effects from the C-peptide may contribute more to regulating the activity of SSB than any engagement of the C-peptide by the OB-domain.

  10. Cloning, purification and preliminary X-ray analysis of the C-terminal domain of Helicobacter pylori MotB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roujeinikova, Anna, E-mail: anna.roujeinikova@manchester.ac.uk [Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-01

    The cloning, overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a putative peptidoglycan-binding domain of H. pylori MotB, a stator component of the bacterial flagellar motor, are reported. The C-terminal domain of MotB (MotB-C) contains a putative peptidoglycan-binding motif and is believed to anchor the MotA/MotB stator unit of the bacterial flagellar motor to the cell wall. Crystals of Helicobacter pylori MotB-C (138 amino-acid residues) were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. These crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.8, b = 89.5, c = 66.3 Å, β = 112.5°. The crystals diffract X-rays to at least 1.6 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. Self-rotation function and Matthews coefficient calculations suggest that the asymmetric unit contains one tetramer with 222 point-group symmetry. The anomalous difference Patterson maps calculated for an ytterbium-derivative crystal using diffraction data at a wavelength of 1.38 Å showed significant peaks on the v = 1/2 Harker section, suggesting that ab initio phase information could be derived from the MAD data.

  11. Recombinant expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the C-terminal DUF490963–1138 domain of TamB from Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josts, Inokentijs; Grinter, Rhys; Kelly, Sharon M.; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander; Cogdell, Richard; Smith, Brian O.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    TamB is a recently described inner membrane protein that, together with its partner protein TamA, is required for the efficient secretion of a subset of autotransporter proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the C-terminal DUF490963–1138 domain of TamB was overexpressed in Escherichia coli K-12, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the primitive trigonal space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.34, c = 220.74 Å, and diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. Preliminary secondary-structure and X-ray diffraction analyses are reported. Two molecules are predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit. Experimental phasing using selenomethionine-labelled protein will be undertaken in the future. PMID:25195908

  12. Expression and characterization of Kunitz domain 3 and C-terminal of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lina Zhu; Jiping Wang; Jingui Mu; Huijun Wang; Chenqi Zhang; Jue Wang; Xingang Liu; Xiaomin Yan; Linsen Dai; Duan Ma

    2009-01-01

    Human tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (hTFPI-2) is a serine protease inhibitor and its inhibitory activity is enhanced by heparin. The Kunitz domain 3 and C-terminal of hTFPI-2 (bTFPI-2/KD3C), which has the activity toward heparin calcium, have been successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified by SP-Sepharose and heparin-Sepharose chromatography. The Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR),Raman spectroscopy, and circular dichroism (CD)experiment results implied that hTFPI-2/KD3C con-tained small contents of or-helix and β-strand, but large amounts of random coil and two kinds of disulfide bonds, gauche-gauche-gauche (ggg) and trans-gauche-trans (tgt). The interaction of hTFPI-2/KD3C with heparin calcium was investigated by CD. It was found that heparin calcium induced β-strands in hTFPI-2/KD3C to different extents depending on the ratio of hTFPI-2/KD3C and heparin calcium.

  13. Phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of Aquaporin-4 is required for Golgi transition in primary cultured astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is expressed in the perivascular and subpial astrocytes end-feet in mammalian brain, and plays a critical component of an integrated water and potassium homeostasis. Here we examine whether AQP4 is phosphorylated in primary cultured mouse astrocytes. Astrocytes were metabolically labeled with [32P]phosphoric acid, then AQP4 was immunoprecipitated with anti-AQP4 antibody. We observed that AQP4 was constitutively phosphorylated, which is reduced by treatment with protein kinase CK2 inhibitors. To elucidate the phosphorylation of AQP4 by CK2, myc-tagged wild-type or mutant AQP4 was transiently transfected in primary cultured astrocytes. Substitution of Ala residues for four putative CK2 phosphorylation sites in the C terminus abolished the phosphorylation of AQP4. Immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that the quadruple mutant was localized in the Golgi apparatus. These observations indicate that the C-terminal domain of AQP4 is constitutively phosphorylated at least in part by protein kinase CK2 and it is required for Golgi transition.

  14. The Low pH Unfolded State of the C-terminal Domain of the Ribosomal Protein L9 Contains Significant Secondary Structure in the Absence of Denaturant but is No More Compact than the Low pH Urea Unfolded State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bing; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Eliezer, David; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the properties of the unfolded states of proteins, particularly unfolded states which can be populated in the absence of high concentrations of denaturants. Interest in the unfolded state ensemble reflects the fact that it is the starting point for protein folding as well as the reference state for protein stability studies, and can be the starting state for pathological aggregation. The unfolded state of the C-terminal domain (residues 58 to 149) of the ribosomal protein L9 (CTL9) can be populated in the absence of denaturant at low pH. CTL9 is a 92 residue globular α, β protein. The low pH unfolded state contains more secondary structure than low pH urea unfolded state but it is not a molten globule. Backbone (1H, 13C and 15N) NMR assignments as well as side chain 13Cβ and 1Hβ assignments and 15N R2 values were obtained for the pH 2.0 unfolded form of CTL9 and for the urea unfolded state at pH 2.5. Analysis of the deviations of the chemical shifts from random coil values indicates that residues that comprise the two helices in the native state show a clear preference to adopt helical φ, ψ angles in the pH 2.0 unfolded state. There is a less pronounced but nevertheless clear tendency for residues 107 to 124 to preferentially populate helical φ, ψ values in the unfolded state. The urea unfolded state has no detectable tendency to populate any type of secondary structure even though it is as compact as the pH 2.0 unfolded state. Comparison of the two unfolded forms of CTL9 provides direct experimental evidence that states which differ significantly in their secondary structure can have identical hydrodynamic properties. This in turn demonstrates that global parameters such as Rh or Rg are very poor indicators of “random coil” behavior. PMID:18707127

  15. The low-pH unfolded state of the C-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9 contains significant secondary structure in the absence of denaturant but is no more compact than the low-pH urea unfolded state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bing; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Eliezer, David; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2008-09-01

    There is considerable interest in the properties of the unfolded states of proteins, particularly unfolded states which can be populated in the absence of high concentrations of denaturants. Interest in the unfolded state ensemble reflects the fact that it is the starting point for protein folding as well as the reference state for protein stability studies and can be the starting state for pathological aggregation. The unfolded state of the C-terminal domain (residues 58-149) of the ribosomal protein L9 (CTL9) can be populated in the absence of denaturant at low pH. CTL9 is a 92-residue globular alpha, beta protein. The low-pH unfolded state contains more secondary structure than the low-pH urea unfolded state, but it is not a molten globule. Backbone ( (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N) NMR assignments as well as side chain (13)C beta and (1)H beta assignments and (15)N R 2 values were obtained for the pH 2.0 unfolded form of CTL9 and for the urea unfolded state at pH 2.5. Analysis of the deviations of the chemical shifts from random coil values indicates that residues that comprise the two helices in the native state show a clear preference for adopting helical phi and psi angles in the pH 2.0 unfolded state. There is a less pronounced but nevertheless clear tendency for residues 107-124 to preferentially populate helical phi and psi values in the unfolded state. The urea unfolded state has no detectable tendency to populate any type of secondary structure even though it is as compact as the pH 2.0 unfolded state. Comparison of the two unfolded forms of CTL9 provides direct experimental evidence that states which differ significantly in their secondary structure can have identical hydrodynamic properties. This in turn demonstrates that global parameters such as R h or R g are very poor indicators of "random coil" behavior.

  16. Different Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains in Calmodulin for Activation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Lübker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis adenylyl cyclase toxin edema factor (EF is one component of the anthrax toxin and is essential for establishing anthrax disease. EF activation by the eukaryotic Ca2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM leads to massive cAMP production resulting in edema. cAMP also inhibits the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH-oxidase, thus reducing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS used for host defense in activated neutrophils and thereby facilitating bacterial growth. Methionine (Met residues in CaM, important for interactions between CaM and its binding partners, can be oxidized by ROS. We investigated the impact of site-specific oxidation of Met in CaM on EF activation using thirteen CaM-mutants (CaM-mut with Met to leucine (Leu substitutions. EF activation shows high resistance to oxidative modifications in CaM. An intact structure in the C-terminal region of oxidized CaM is sufficient for major EF activation despite altered secondary structure in the N-terminal region associated with Met oxidation. The secondary structures of CaM-mut were determined and described in previous studies from our group. Thus, excess cAMP production and the associated impairment of host defence may be afforded even under oxidative conditions in activated neutrophils.

  17. Segments in the C-terminal folding domain of lipoprotein lipase important for binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and to heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Brejning, Jeanette; García, R.;

    1997-01-01

    -terminal folding domain binds to alpha2MR/LRP, it remains uncertain whether it binds to heparin and to HSPG. To identify segments important for binding to alpha2MR/LRP and to clarify possible binding to heparin, we produced constructs of the human C-terminal folding domain, LpL-(313-448), and of the fragment Lp....../LRP was essentially abolished following deletion of residues 404-430, and pretreatment of CHO cells with the peptide comprising aa 402-423 inhibited the binding of LpL-(313-448). We conclude that the C-terminal folding domain of human LpL has a site for binding to heparin and to HSPG, presumably involving amino acids...... within residues 404-430. Two segments of the domain are necessary for efficient binding to alpha2MR/LRP, one comprising residues 380-384 and another overlapping the segment important for binding to heparin....

  18. The C-terminal domains of NF-H and NF-M subunits maintain axonal neurofilament content by blocking turnover of the stationary neurofilament network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala V Rao

    Full Text Available Newly synthesized neurofilaments or protofilaments are incorporated into a highly stable stationary cytoskeleton network as they are transported along axons. Although the heavily phosphorylated carboxyl-terminal tail domains of the heavy and medium neurofilament (NF subunits have been proposed to contribute to this process and particularly to stability of this structure, their function is still obscure. Here we show in NF-H/M tail deletion [NF-(H/M(tailΔ] mice that the deletion of both of these domains selectively lowers NF levels 3-6 fold along optic axons without altering either rates of subunit synthesis or the rate of slow axonal transport of NF. Pulse labeling studies carried out over 90 days revealed a significantly faster rate of disappearance of NF from the stationary NF network of optic axons in NF-(H/M(tailΔ mice. Faster NF disappearance was accompanied by elevated levels of NF-L proteolytic fragments in NF-(H/M(tailΔ axons. We conclude that NF-H and NF-M C-terminal domains do not normally regulate NF transport rates as previously proposed, but instead increase the proteolytic resistance of NF, thereby stabilizing the stationary neurofilament cytoskeleton along axons.

  19. Pub1p C-terminal RRM domain interacts with Tif4631p through a conserved region neighbouring the Pab1p binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara M Santiveri

    Full Text Available Pub1p, a highly abundant poly(A+ mRNA binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, influences the stability and translational control of many cellular transcripts, particularly under some types of environmental stresses. We have studied the structure, RNA and protein recognition modes of different Pub1p constructs by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of the C-terminal RRM domain (RRM3 shows a non-canonical N-terminal helix that packs against the canonical RRM fold in an original fashion. This structural trait is conserved in Pub1p metazoan homologues, the TIA-1 family, defining a new class of RRM-type domains that we propose to name TRRM (TIA-1 C-terminal domain-like RRM. Pub1p TRRM and the N-terminal RRM1-RRM2 tandem bind RNA with high selectivity for U-rich sequences, with TRRM showing additional preference for UA-rich ones. RNA-mediated chemical shift changes map to β-sheet and protein loops in the three RRMs. Additionally, NMR titration and biochemical in vitro cross-linking experiments determined that Pub1p TRRM interacts specifically with the N-terminal region (1-402 of yeast eIF4G1 (Tif4631p, very likely through the conserved Box1, a short sequence motif neighbouring the Pab1p binding site in Tif4631p. The interaction involves conserved residues of Pub1p TRRM, which define a protein interface that mirrors the Pab1p-Tif4631p binding mode. Neither protein nor RNA recognition involves the novel N-terminal helix, whose functional role remains unclear. By integrating these new results with the current knowledge about Pub1p, we proposed different mechanisms of Pub1p recruitment to the mRNPs and Pub1p-mediated mRNA stabilization in which the Pub1p/Tif4631p interaction would play an important role.

  20. Transient viral DNA replication and repression of viral transcription are supported by the C-terminal domain of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, M C; McBride, A A

    1998-01-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E1 protein is important for viral DNA replication and transcriptional repression. It has been proposed that the full-length E1 protein consists of a small N-terminal and a larger C-terminal domain. In this study, it is shown that an E1 polypeptide containing residues 132 to 605 (which represents the C-terminal domain) is able to support transient viral DNA replication, although at a level lower than that supported by the wild-type protein. This domain can also repress E2-mediated transactivation from the P89 promoter as well as the wild-type E1 protein can. PMID:9420289

  1. Exploring the interaction between the human copper transporter, CTR1, c-terminal domain and a methionine motif in the presence of Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions, using EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenberger, Yulia; Yarmiayev, Valeria; Ruthstein, Sharon

    2013-10-01

    The essentiality and toxicity of copper in human, yeast, and bacteria cells requires precise mechanisms for acquisition, intimately linked to controlled distribution, which have yet to be fully understood. Herein, we utilise continuous wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to explore one aspect in the controlled copper transportation mechanism. This was achieved by probing structural changes that occur in the c-terminal domain of the human copper transporter, CTR1, upon interacting with a methionine segment. The copper transporter CTR1 transports Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions to various intracellular pathways. Methionine motifs are methionine-rich metal binding segments found in many proteins involved in the transportation of copper ions to other cellular pathways. They are also found to bind Ag(I) with an affinity comparable to Cu(I). This study indicates that the methionine motif experiences conformational changes in the presence of the CTR1 c-terminal domain. These structural changes are dependent on the nature of the metal ion, Cu(I) vs. Ag(I). In addition, the data collected in this study emphasise how important the cysteine residue of the CTR1 c-terminal domain is to a correct conformational state of the target metal binding site.

  2. Characterization of the promoter and extended C-terminal domain of Arabidopsis WRKY33 and functional analysis of tomato WRKY33 homologues in plant stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Zuyu; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2015-08-01

    Arabidopsis AtWRKY33 plays a critical role in broad plant stress responses. Whether there are evolutionarily conserved homologues of AtWRKY33 in other plants and what make AtWRKY33 such an important protein in plant stress responses are largely unknown. We compared AtWRKY33 with its close homologues to identify AtWRKY33-specific regulatory and structural elements, which were then functionally analysed through complementation. We also performed phylogenetic analysis to identify structural AtWRKY33 homologues in other plants and functionally analysed two tomato homologues through complementation and gene silencing. AtWRKY33 has an extended C-terminal domain (CTD) absent in its close homologue AtWRKY25. Both its CTD and the strong pathogen/stress-responsive expression of AtWRKY33 are necessary to complement the critical phenotypes of atwrky33. Structural AtWRKY33 homologues were identified in both dicot and monocot plants including two (SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B) in tomato. Molecular complementation and gene silencing confirmed that the two tomato WRKY genes play a critical role similar to that of AtWRKY33 in plant stress responses. Thus, WRKY33 proteins are evolutionarily conserved with a critical role in broad plant stress responses. Both its CTD and promoter are critical for the uniquely important roles of WRKY33 in plant stress responses.

  3. Evidence for involvement of the C-terminal domain in the dimerization of the CopY repressor protein from Enterococcus hirae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazehoski, Kristina O., E-mail: pazehosk@pitt.edu [Division of Natural Sciences, University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg, PA 15601 (United States); Cobine, Paul A., E-mail: pac0006@auburn.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, 101 Rouse Life Science Building, Auburn University, AL 36849 (United States); Winzor, Donald J. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Dameron, Charles T., E-mail: cdameron@francis.edu [Department of Chemistry, Saint Francis University, Loretto, PA 15940 (United States)

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} A metal-binding protein domain is directly involved in protein dimerization. {yields} Fusing the metal-binding domain to a monomeric protein induces dimerization. {yields} Frontal size-exclusion chromatography measures the strength of dimer interaction. {yields} Ultracentrifugation studies confirm the influence of metal binding on dimerization. -- Abstract: Metal binding to the C-terminal region of the copper-responsive repressor protein CopY is responsible for homodimerization and the regulation of the copper homeostasis pathway in Enterococcus hirae. Specific involvement of the 38 C-terminal residues of CopY in dimerization is indicated by zonal and frontal (large zone) size-exclusion chromatography studies. The studies demonstrate that the attachment of these CopY residues to the immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) promotes dimerization of the monomeric protein. Although sensitivity of dimerization to removal of metal from the fusion protein is smaller than that found for CopY (as measured by ultracentrifugation studies), the demonstration that an unrelated protein (GB1) can be induced to dimerize by extending its sequence with the C-terminal portion of CopY confirms the involvement of this region in CopY homodimerization.

  4. Thrombospondin-1-N-Terminal Domain Induces a Phagocytic State and Thrombospondin-1-C-Terminal Domain Induces a Tolerizing Phenotype in Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib, Adi; Krispin, Alon; Trahtemberg, Uriel; Verbovetski, Inna; Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi; Mevorach, Dror

    2009-01-01

    In our previous study, we have found that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is synthesized de novo upon monocyte and neutrophil apoptosis, leading to a phagocytic and tolerizing phenotype of dendritic cells (DC), even prior to DC-apoptotic cell interaction. Interestingly, we were able to show that heparin binding domain (HBD), the N-terminal portion of TSP-1, was cleaved and secreted simultaneously in a caspase- and serine protease- dependent manner. In the current study we were interested to examine the role of HBD in the clearance of apoptotic cells, and whether the phagocytic and tolerizing state of DCs is mediated by the HBD itself, or whether the entire TSP-1 is needed. Therefore, we have cloned the human HBD, and compared its interactions with DC to those with TSP-1. Here we show that rHBD by itself is not directly responsible for immune paralysis and tolerizing phenotype of DCs, at least in the monomeric form, but has a significant role in rendering DCs phagocytic. Binding of TSP-1-C-terminal domain on the other hand induces a tolerizing phenotype in dendritic cells. PMID:19721725

  5. Prokaryotic expression and purification of fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane protein 3 C-terminal domain proteins in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Cai; Jing Yang; He Huang; Fang Li; Ganqiu Wu; Jing Yang; Xuegang Luo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have suggested that fibronectin leucine-rich transmembrane protein 3 (FLRT3) is related to injury and regeneration of the nervous system. However, the expression and biological characteristics of these proteins remain poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To obtain FLRT3 C-terminal gene fragments, to effectively express and purify the target proteins.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study of cellular and molecular biology was performed at the laboratory of Histology and Embryology in Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University between October 2007 and June 2008.MATERIALS: Three Sprague Dawley adult rats were used to extract total RNA from rat brains. The pGEX4T3 and Escherichia coli (E. Coli) JM109 were purchased from Promega. E. Coil BL21 was provided by Novagen.METHODS: FLRT3 protein coding C-terminal DNA fragments, at a length of 786 bp, were amplified using RT-PCR technique from rat total RNA. The amplified products were cloned into the expression vector pGEX4T3. A recombinant expression vector was then constructed and introduced into E. Coli BL21. IsopropyI-D-thiogalactopyranoside was applied to induce expression of recombinant GST fusion proteins, followed by isolation, purification, and renaturation of inclusion bodies that comprised recombinant proteins. Finally, the purified recombinant protein was obtained.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Determination of FLRT3 C-terminal DNA sequence; expression of target proteins was assayed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis; purified recombinant protein was identified with Western blot methods.RESULTS: FLRT3 protein coding C-terminal DNA fragments, at a length of 786 bp, were successfully harvested through RT-PCR amplification, and were then cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX4T3. The results of the sequence were consistent with the known gene sequence. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that there was a specific protein band in the recombinant GST fusion proteins at a relative molecular mass

  6. Expanding the Activity of Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 against Surface-Anchored Metalloproteinases by the Replacement of Its C-Terminal Domain: Implications for Anti-Cancer Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Xian Duan; Magdalini Rapti; Anastasia Tsigkou; Meng Huee Lee

    2015-01-01

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are the endogenous inhibitors of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs). TIMP molecules are made up of two domains: an N-terminal domain that associates with the catalytic cleft of the metalloproteinases (MP) and a smaller C-terminal domain whose role in MP association is still poorly understood. This work is aimed at investigating the role of the C-terminal domain in MP selectivity. In this study, ...

  7. Influence of C-terminal tail deletion on structure and stability of hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Chu, Wen-Ting; Xue, Qiao; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2013-06-01

    The C-terminus tail (G144-T149) of the hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii (Sto-RNase HI) plays an important role in this protein's hyperstabilization and may therefore be a good protein stability tag. Detailed understanding of the structural and dynamic effects of C-terminus tail deletion is required for gaining insights into the thermal stability mechanism of Sto-RNase HI. Focused on Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase HI (Sto-RNase HI) and its derivative lacking the C-terminal tail (ΔC6 Sto-RNase HI) (PDB codes: 2EHG and 3ALY), we applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at four different temperatures (300, 375, 475, and 500 K) to examine the effect of the C-terminal tail on the hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase HI and to investigate the unfolding process of Sto-RNase HI and ΔC6 Sto-RNase HI. The simulations suggest that the C-terminal tail has significant impact in hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase HI and the unfolding of these two proteins evolves along dissimilar pathways. Essential dynamics analysis indicates that the essential subspaces of the two proteins at different temperatures are non-overlapping within the trajectories and they exhibit different directions of motion. Our work can give important information to understand the three-state folding mechanism of Sto-RNase HI and to offer alternative strategies to improve the protein stability.

  8. Properties and catalytic activities of MICAL1, the flavoenzyme involved in cytoskeleton dynamics, and modulation by its CH, LIM and C-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Teresa; Maffioli, Elisa; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Vanoni, Maria A

    2016-03-01

    MICAL1 is a cytoplasmic 119 kDa protein participating in cytoskeleton dynamics through the NADPH-dependent oxidase and F-actin depolymerizing activities of its N-terminal flavoprotein domain, which is followed by calponin homology (CH), LIM domains and a C-terminal region with Pro-, Glu-rich and coiled-coil motifs. MICAL1 and truncated forms lacking the C-terminal, LIM and/or CH regions have been produced and characterized. The CH, LIM and C-terminal regions cause an increase of Km,NADPH exhibited by the NADPH oxidase activity of the flavoprotein domain, paralleling changes in the overall protein charge. The C-terminus also determines a ∼ 10-fold decrease of kcat, revealing its role in establishing an inactive/active conformational equilibrium, which is at the heart of the regulation of MICAL1 in cells. F-actin lowers Km,NADPH (10-50 μM) and increases kcat (10-25 s(-1)) to similar values for all MICAL forms. The apparent Km,actin of MICAL1 is ∼ 10-fold higher than that of the other forms (3-5 μM), reflecting the fact that F-actin binds to the flavoprotein domain in the MICAL's active conformation and stabilizes it. Analyses of the reaction in the presence of F-actin indicate that actin depolymerization is mediated by H2O2 produced by the NADPH oxidase reaction, rather than due to direct hydroxylation of actin methionine residues. PMID:26845023

  9. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of FlhB from Aquifex aeolicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytoplasmic domain of FlhB from A. aeolicus has been purified and crystallized. FlhB is a key protein in the regulation of protein export by the bacterial flagellar secretion system. It is composed of two domains: an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (FlhBc). Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of FlhBc from Aquifex aeolicus are reported. Purified protein was crystallized using the vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 114.49, b = 33.89, c = 122.13 Å, β = 107.53°

  10. Activation of the plasma membrane Na/H antiporter salt-overly-sensitive 1 (SOS1) by phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory C-terminal domain

    KAUST Repository

    Quintero, Francisco J.

    2011-01-24

    The plasma membrane sodium/proton exchanger Salt-Overly-Sensitive 1 (SOS1) is a critical salt tolerance determinant in plants. The SOS2-SOS3 calcium-dependent protein kinase complex upregulates SOS1 activity, but the mechanistic details of this crucial event remain unresolved. Here we show that SOS1 is maintained in a resting state by a C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain that is the target of SOS2-SOS3. The auto-inhibitory domain interacts intramolecularly with an adjacent domain of SOS1 that is essential for activity. SOS1 is relieved from auto-inhibition upon phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory domain by SOS2-SOS3. Mutation of the SOS2 phosphorylation and recognition site impeded the activation of SOS1 in vivo and in vitro. Additional amino acid residues critically important for SOS1 activity and regulation were identified in a genetic screen for hypermorphic alleles.

  11. Functional implications of C-terminus of TBX5 with high homology to C-terminal domain of yeast DNA-directed RNA polymerase Ⅱ largest subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhu-ren; GONG Li-guo; GENG Wen-qing; QIU Guang-rong; SUN Kai-lai

    2008-01-01

    @@ TBX5, as a member of the T-box-containing transcription factor family, encodes a protein of 518 amino acids and is expressed in the embryonic heart and developing limb tissues.1 The coding region of TBX5 cDNA is 1.5 kb with eight exons including the N-terminal portion, the DNA binding domain and C-terminal region. We reported that the abnormality in transcription level of the TbX5 gene might be the mechanism underlying human simple congenital heart disease in the absence of TBX5 mutations.

  12. Structural implications of the C-terminal tail in the catalytic and stability properties of manganese peroxidases from ligninolytic fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Acebes, Sandra [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, María Jesús; Romero, Antonio; Medrano, Francisco Javier, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Guallar, Victor, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Martínez, Angel T., E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-01

    The variable C-terminal tail of manganese peroxidases, a group of enzymes involved in lignin degradation, is implicated in their catalytic and stability properties, as shown by new crystal structures, molecular-simulation and directed-mutagenesis data. Based on this structural–functional evaluation, short and long/extralong manganese peroxidase subfamilies have been accepted; the latter are characterized by exceptional stability, while it is shown for the first time that the former are able to oxidize other substrates at the same site where manganese(II) is oxidized. The genome of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora includes 13 manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes representative of the three subfamilies described in ligninolytic fungi, which share an Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and have varying lengths of the C-terminal tail. Short, long and extralong MnPs were heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized, and the first structure of an extralong MnP was solved. Its C-terminal tail surrounds the haem-propionate access channel, contributing to Mn{sup 2+} oxidation by the internal propionate, but prevents the oxidation of 2, 2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), which is only oxidized by short MnPs and by shortened-tail variants from site-directed mutagenesis. The tail, which is anchored by numerous contacts, not only affects the catalytic properties of long/extralong MnPs but is also associated with their high acidic stability. Cd{sup 2+} binds at the Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and competitively inhibits oxidation of both Mn{sup 2+} and ABTS. Moreover, mutations blocking the haem-propionate channel prevent substrate oxidation. This agrees with molecular simulations that position ABTS at an electron-transfer distance from the haem propionates of an in silico shortened-tail form, while it cannot reach this position in the extralong MnP crystal structure. Only small differences exist between the long and the extralong MnPs, which do not justify their

  13. Structural implications of the C-terminal tail in the catalytic and stability properties of manganese peroxidases from ligninolytic fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variable C-terminal tail of manganese peroxidases, a group of enzymes involved in lignin degradation, is implicated in their catalytic and stability properties, as shown by new crystal structures, molecular-simulation and directed-mutagenesis data. Based on this structural–functional evaluation, short and long/extralong manganese peroxidase subfamilies have been accepted; the latter are characterized by exceptional stability, while it is shown for the first time that the former are able to oxidize other substrates at the same site where manganese(II) is oxidized. The genome of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora includes 13 manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes representative of the three subfamilies described in ligninolytic fungi, which share an Mn2+-oxidation site and have varying lengths of the C-terminal tail. Short, long and extralong MnPs were heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized, and the first structure of an extralong MnP was solved. Its C-terminal tail surrounds the haem-propionate access channel, contributing to Mn2+ oxidation by the internal propionate, but prevents the oxidation of 2, 2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), which is only oxidized by short MnPs and by shortened-tail variants from site-directed mutagenesis. The tail, which is anchored by numerous contacts, not only affects the catalytic properties of long/extralong MnPs but is also associated with their high acidic stability. Cd2+ binds at the Mn2+-oxidation site and competitively inhibits oxidation of both Mn2+ and ABTS. Moreover, mutations blocking the haem-propionate channel prevent substrate oxidation. This agrees with molecular simulations that position ABTS at an electron-transfer distance from the haem propionates of an in silico shortened-tail form, while it cannot reach this position in the extralong MnP crystal structure. Only small differences exist between the long and the extralong MnPs, which do not justify their classification as two

  14. In Sup35p filaments (the [PSI+] prion), the globular C-terminal domains are widely offset from the amyloid fibril backbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxa, U.; Wall, J.; Keller, P. W.; Cheng, N.; Steven, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    In yeast cells infected with the [PSI+] prion, Sup35p forms aggregates and its activity in translation termination is downregulated. Transfection experiments have shown that Sup35p filaments assembled in vitro are infectious, suggesting that they reproduce or closely resemble the prion. We have used several EM techniques to study the molecular architecture of filaments, seeking clues as to the mechanism of downregulation. Sup35p has an N-terminal 'prion' domain; a highly charged middle (M-)domain; and a C-terminal domain with the translation termination activity. By negative staining, cryo-EM and scanning transmission EM (STEM), filaments of full-length Sup35p show a thin backbone fibril surrounded by a diffuse 65-nm-wide cloud of globular C-domains. In diameter ({approx}8 nm) and appearance, the backbones resemble amyloid fibrils of N-domains alone. STEM mass-per-unit-length data yield -1 subunit per 0.47 nm for N-fibrils, NM-filaments and Sup35p filaments, further supporting the fibril backbone model. The 30 nm radial span of decorating C-domains indicates that the M-domains assume highly extended conformations, offering an explanation for the residual Sup35p activity in infected cells, whereby the C-domains remain free enough to interact with ribosomes.

  15. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. Part IV. Implication for the mechanism of folding of the parent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2010-01-01

    A 34-residue α/β peptide, [IG(28-61)], derived from the C-terminal part of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus was studied using CD and NMR spectroscopy at various temperatures, and by differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that the C-terminal part (a 16-residue-long fragment) of this peptide, which corresponds to the sequence of the β-hairpin in the native structure, forms structure similar to the β-hairpin only at T = 313 K, and the structure is stabilized by non-native long-range hydrophobic interactions (Val47 – Val59). On the other hand, the N-terminal part of IG(28-61), which corresponds to the middle α-helix in the native structure, is unstructured at low temperature (283 K), and forms an α-helix-like structure at 305 K and only one helical turn is observed at 313 K. At all temperatures at which NMR experiments were performed (283, 305 and 313 K), we do not observe any long-range connectivities which would have supported packing between the C-terminal (β-hairpin) and the N-terminal (α-helix) parts of the sequence. Such interactions are absent, in contrast to the folding pathway of the B domain of protein G, proposed recently by Kmiecik and Koliński [Kmiecik, S.; Kolinski, A. Biophys J 2008, 94, 726-736], based on Monte Carlo dynamics studies. Alternative folding mechanisms are proposed and discussed. PMID:20049918

  16. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin-binding protein G from Streptococcus. IV. Implication for the mechanism of folding of the parent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ołdziej, Stanislaw; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2010-05-01

    A 34-residue alpha/beta peptide [IG(28-61)], derived from the C-terminal part of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, was studied using CD and NMR spectroscopy at various temperatures and by differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that the C-terminal part (a 16-residue-long fragment) of this peptide, which corresponds to the sequence of the beta-hairpin in the native structure, forms structure similar to the beta-hairpin only at T = 313 K, and the structure is stabilized by non-native long-range hydrophobic interactions (Val47-Val59). On the other hand, the N-terminal part of IG(28-61), which corresponds to the middle alpha-helix in the native structure, is unstructured at low temperature (283 K) and forms an alpha-helix-like structure at 305 K, and only one helical turn is observed at 313 K. At all temperatures at which NMR experiments were performed (283, 305, and 313 K), we do not observe any long-range connectivities which would have supported packing between the C-terminal (beta-hairpin) and the N-terminal (alpha-helix) parts of the sequence. Such interactions are absent, in contrast to the folding pathway of the B domain of protein G, proposed recently by Kmiecik and Kolinski (Biophys J 2008, 94, 726-736), based on Monte-Carlo dynamics studies. Alternative folding mechanisms are proposed and discussed. PMID:20049918

  17. Drosophila DBT Autophosphorylation of Its C-Terminal Domain Antagonized by SPAG and Involved in UV-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jin-Yuan; Means, John C; Bjes, Edward S; Price, Jeffrey L

    2015-07-01

    Drosophila DBT and vertebrate CKIε/δ phosphorylate the period protein (PER) to produce circadian rhythms. While the C termini of these orthologs are not conserved in amino acid sequence, they inhibit activity and become autophosphorylated in the fly and vertebrate kinases. Here, sites of C-terminal autophosphorylation were identified by mass spectrometry and analysis of DBT truncations. Mutation of 6 serines and threonines in the C terminus (DBT(C/ala)) prevented autophosphorylation-dependent DBT turnover and electrophoretic mobility shifts in S2 cells. Unlike the effect of autophosphorylation on CKIδ, DBT autophosphorylation in S2 cells did not reduce its in vitro activity. Moreover, overexpression of DBT(C/ala) did not affect circadian behavior differently from wild-type DBT (DBT(WT)), and neither exhibited daily electrophoretic mobility shifts, suggesting that DBT autophosphorylation is not required for clock function. While DBT(WT) protected S2 cells and larvae from UV-induced apoptosis and was phosphorylated and degraded by the proteasome, DBT(C/ala) did not protect and was not degraded. Finally, we show that the HSP-90 cochaperone spaghetti protein (SPAG) antagonizes DBT autophosphorylation in S2 cells. These results suggest that DBT autophosphorylation regulates cell death and suggest a potential mechanism by which the circadian clock might affect apoptosis.

  18. A Novel Bmal1 Mutant Mouse Reveals Essential Roles of the C-Terminal Domain on Circadian Rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noheon Park

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock is an endogenous biological timer comprised of transcriptional/translational feedback loops of clock genes. Bmal1 encodes an indispensable transcription factor for the generation of circadian rhythms. Here, we report a new circadian mutant mouse from gene-trapped embryonic stem cells harboring a C-terminus truncated Bmal1 (Bmal1GTΔC allele. The homozygous mutant (Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice immediately lost circadian behavioral rhythms under constant darkness. The heterozygous (Bmal1+/GTΔC mice displayed a gradual loss of rhythms, in contrast to Bmal1+/- mice where rhythms were sustained. Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice also showed arrhythmic mRNA and protein expression in the SCN and liver. Lack of circadian reporter oscillation was also observed in cultured fibroblast cells, indicating that the arrhythmicity of Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice resulted from impaired molecular clock machinery. Expression of clock genes exhibited distinct responses to the mutant allele in Bmal1+/GTΔC and Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice. Despite normal cellular localization and heterodimerization with CLOCK, overexpressed BMAL1GTΔC was unable to activate transcription of Per1 promoter and BMAL1-dependent CLOCK degradation. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of Bmal1 has pivotal roles in the regulation of circadian rhythms and the Bmal1GTΔC mice constitute a novel model system to evaluate circadian functional mechanism of BMAL1.

  19. A systematic study of nuclear interactome of C-terminal domain small phosphatase-like 2 using inducible expression system and shotgun proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, NaNa; Koo, JaeHyung; Wang, Sen; Hur, Sun Jin; Bahk, Young Yil

    2016-06-01

    RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatases are newly emerging family of phosphatases that contain FCPH domain with Mg+2-binding DXDX(T/V) signature motif. Its subfamily includes small CTD phosphatases (SCPs). Recently, we identified several interacting partners of human SCP1 with appearance of dephosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation. In this study, using an established cell line with inducible CTDSPL2 protein (a member of the new phosphatase family), proteomic screening was conducted to identify binding partners of CTDSPL2 in nuclear extract through immunoprecipitation of CTDSPL2 with its associated. This approach led to the identification of several interacting partners of CTDSPL2. This will provide a better understanding on CTDSPL2. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 319-324]. PMID:26674342

  20. A novel COL4A1 frameshift mutation in familial kidney disease: the importance of the C-terminal NC1 domain of type IV collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Daniel P.; Oygar, D. Deren; Lin, Fujun; Oygar, P. Derin; Khan, Nadia; Connor, Thomas M.F.; Lapsley, Marta; Maxwell, Patrick H.; Neild, Guy H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary microscopic haematuria often segregates with mutations of COL4A3, COL4A4 or COL4A5 but in half of families a gene is not identified. We investigated a Cypriot family with autosomal dominant microscopic haematuria with renal failure and kidney cysts. Methods We used genome-wide linkage analysis, whole exome sequencing and cosegregation analyses. Results We identified a novel frameshift mutation, c.4611_4612insG:p.T1537fs, in exon 49 of COL4A1. This mutation predicts truncation of the protein with disruption of the C-terminal part of the NC1 domain. We confirmed its presence in 20 family members, 17 with confirmed haematuria, 5 of whom also had stage 4 or 5 chronic kidney disease. Eleven family members exhibited kidney cysts (55% of those with the mutation), but muscle cramps or cerebral aneurysms were not observed and serum creatine kinase was normal in all individuals tested. Conclusions Missense mutations of COL4A1 that encode the CB3 [IV] segment of the triple helical domain (exons 24 and 25) are associated with HANAC syndrome (hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms and cramps). Missense mutations of COL4A1 that disrupt the NC1 domain are associated with antenatal cerebral haemorrhage and porencephaly, but not kidney disease. Our findings extend the spectrum of COL4A1 mutations linked with renal disease and demonstrate that the highly conserved C-terminal part of the NC1 domain of the α1 chain of type IV collagen is important in the integrity of glomerular basement membrane in humans. PMID:27190376

  1. Monoclonal Antibody 16D10 to the C-Terminal Domain of the Feto-Acinar Pancreatic Protein Binds to Membrane of Human Pancreatic Tumoral SOJ-6 Cells and Inhibits the Growth of Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Panicot-Dubois

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Feto-acinar pancreatic protein (FAPP characterized by mAbJ28 reactivity is a specific component associated with ontogenesis and behaves as an oncodevelopment-associated antigen. We attempted to determine whether pancreatic tumoral SOJ-6 cells are expressed at their surface FAPP antigens and to examine if specific antibodies directed against these FAPP epitopes could decrease the growth of pancreatic tumors in a mice model. For this purpose, we used specific antibodies against either the whole FAPP, the O-glycosylated C-terminal domain, or the N-terminal domain of the protein. Our results indicate that SOJ-6 cells expressed at their surface a 32-kDa peptide corresponding to the C-terminal domain of the FAPP. Furthermore, we show, by using endoproteinase Lys-C or geldanamycin, a drug able to impair the FAPP secretion, that this 32-kDa peptide expressed on the SOJ-6 cell surface comes from the degradation of the FAPP. Finally, an in vivo prospective study using a preventative tumor model in nude mice indicates that targeting this peptide by the use of mAb16D10 inhibits the growth of SOJ-6 xenografts. The specificity of mAb16D10 for pancreatic tumors and the possibility to obtain recombinant structures of mucin-like peptides recognized by mAb16D10 and mAbJ28 are promising tools in immunologic approaches to cure pancreatic cancers.

  2. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RTCter) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RTCter. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells.

  3. Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Baisakhi; Banerjee, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA exists as a dimer in its native form and the C-terminal coiled-coil part plays an important role in the dimerization process. The truncated N-terminal containing the first 700 amino acids (1–700) forms a monomeric variant possessing similar aminoacylation activity like wild type. A point mutation in the C-terminal domain (G674D) also produces a monomeric variant with a fivefold reduced aminoacylation activity compared to the wild type enzyme. Urea induced denaturation of these monomeric mutants along with another alaRS variant (N461 alaRS) was studied together with the full-length enzyme using various spectroscopic techniques such as intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid binding, near- and far-UV circular dichroism, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Aminoacylation activity assay after refolding from denatured state revealed that the monomeric mutants studied here were unable to regain their activity, whereas the dimeric full-length alaRS gets back similar activity as the native enzyme. This study indicates that dimerization is one of the key regulatory factors that is important in the proper folding and stability of E. coli alaRS. PMID:26617997

  4. Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baisakhi Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available E. coli alanyl-tRNA exists as a dimer in its native form and the C-terminal coiled-coil part plays an important role in the dimerization process. The truncated N-terminal containing the first 700 amino acids (1–700 forms a monomeric variant possessing similar aminoacylation activity like wild type. A point mutation in the C-terminal domain (G674D also produces a monomeric variant with a fivefold reduced aminoacylation activity compared to the wild type enzyme. Urea induced denaturation of these monomeric mutants along with another alaRS variant (N461 alaRS was studied together with the full-length enzyme using various spectroscopic techniques such as intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid binding, near- and far-UV circular dichroism, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Aminoacylation activity assay after refolding from denatured state revealed that the monomeric mutants studied here were unable to regain their activity, whereas the dimeric full-length alaRS gets back similar activity as the native enzyme. This study indicates that dimerization is one of the key regulatory factors that is important in the proper folding and stability of E. coli alaRS.

  5. Interaction between the tRNA-binding and C-terminal domains of Yeast Gcn2 regulates kinase activity in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Lageix

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The stress-activated protein kinase Gcn2 regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α. Gcn2 is activated in amino acid-deprived cells by binding of uncharged tRNA to the regulatory domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetase, but the molecular mechanism of activation is unclear. We used a genetic approach to identify a key regulatory surface in Gcn2 that is proximal to the predicted active site of the HisRS domain and likely remodeled by tRNA binding. Mutations leading to amino acid substitutions on this surface were identified that activate Gcn2 at low levels of tRNA binding (Gcd- phenotype, while other substitutions block kinase activation (Gcn- phenotype, in some cases without altering tRNA binding by Gcn2 in vitro. Remarkably, the Gcn- substitutions increase affinity of the HisRS domain for the C-terminal domain (CTD, previously implicated as a kinase autoinhibitory segment, in a manner dampened by HisRS domain Gcd- substitutions and by amino acid starvation in vivo. Moreover, tRNA specifically antagonizes HisRS/CTD association in vitro. These findings support a model wherein HisRS-CTD interaction facilitates the autoinhibitory function of the CTD in nonstarvation conditions, with tRNA binding eliciting kinase activation by weakening HisRS-CTD association with attendant disruption of the autoinhibitory KD-CTD interaction.

  6. Role of C-Terminal Domains in Surface Attachment of the Fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathsam, Catherine; Jacques, Nicholas A.

    1998-01-01

    The cell-associated β-d-fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius, which is devoid of the cell wall anchoring motif, LPXTG, is released on exposure to its substrate, sucrose. Deletions within the C terminus of the enzyme implicated both the hydrophobic and the proline-glycine-serine-threonine-rich wall-associated domain in stabilizing the enzyme on the cell surface. PMID:9829954

  7. The activation function 2 domain of hepatic nuclear factor 4 is regulated by a short C-terminal proline-rich repressor domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Iyemere, V P; Davies, N H; Brownlee, G G

    1998-01-01

    Hepatic nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) is a transcription factor whose expression is crucial for mouse embryonic development, for liver-specific gene expression and for the prevention of one form of maturity-onset diabetes of the young. Its domain structure has been defined previously and is similar to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. A repressor domain has now been localised to a region of 14 amino acids (residues 428-441) near the C-terminus of HNF4 and is sufficient by itself to...

  8. Growth hormone receptor C-terminal domains required for growth hormone-induced intracellular free Ca2+ oscillations and gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Bouchelouche, P; Allevato, G;

    1995-01-01

    of varying frequency and amplitude. GH-induced transcription of the serine protease inhibitor 2.1 gene required the same C-terminal 52-amino acid domain of the receptor as for Ca2+ signaling. Mutation of the four proline residues in the conserved box 1 region of the GHR, which is responsible for binding......The biological effects of growth hormone (GH) are initiated by its binding to the GH receptor (GHR) followed by association and activation of the tyrosine kinase JAK2. Here we report that GH can stimulate an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in cells expressing wild...... and activation of JAK2 kinase, completely abolished GH-induced gene transcription but did not affect the GH-induced rise in [Ca2+]i. The Ca2+ channel blocker verapamil prevented GH-induced Ca2+ signaling as well as GH-induced gene transcription in cells expressing endogenous GHRs. These findings indicate...

  9. The solution structure of the C-terminal modular pair from Clostridium perfringens mu-toxin reveals a noncellulosomal dockerin module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitayat, Seth; Adams, Jarrett J; Furness, Heather S T; Bayer, Edward A; Smith, Steven P

    2008-09-19

    The genome of the opportunistic pathogen Clostridium perfringens encodes a large number of secreted glycoside hydrolases. Their predicted activities indicate that they are involved in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates and other glycans found in the mucosal layer of the human gastrointestinal tract, within the extracellular matrix, and on the surface of host cells. One such group of these enzymes is the family 84 glycoside hydrolases, which has predicted hyaluronidase activity and comprises five members [C. perfringens glycoside hydrolase family 84 (CpGH84) A-E]. The first identified member, CpGH84A, corresponds to the mu-toxin whose modular architecture includes an N-terminal catalytic domain, four family 32 carbohydrate-binding modules, three FIVAR modules of unknown function, and a C-terminal putative calcium-binding module. Here, we report the solution NMR structure of the C-terminal modular pair from the mu-toxin. The three-helix bundle FIVAR module displays structural homology to a heparin-binding module within the N-terminal of the a C protein from group B Streptoccocus. The C-terminal module has a typical calcium-binding dockerin fold comprising two anti-parallel helices that form a planar face with EF-hand calcium-binding loops at opposite ends of the module. The size of the helical face of the mu-toxin dockerin module is approximately equal to the planar region recently identified on the surface of a cohesin-like X82 module of CpGH84C. Size-exclusion chromatography and heteronuclear NMR-based chemical shift mapping studies indicate that the helical face of the dockerin module recognizes the CpGH84C X82 module. These studies represent the structural characterization of a noncellulolytic dockerin module and its interaction with a cohesin-like X82 module. Dockerin/X82-mediated enzyme complexes may have important implications in the pathogenic properties of C. perfringens. PMID:18602403

  10. A Conserved Interaction between a C-Terminal Motif in Norovirus VPg and the HEAT-1 Domain of eIF4G Is Essential for Translation Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, Eoin N; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Correia, Samantha; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Cannac, Fabien; Pastore, Chiara; Xu, Yingqi; Graham, Stephen C; Matthews, Stephen J; Goodfellow, Ian G; Curry, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Translation initiation is a critical early step in the replication cycle of the positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in humans. Norovirus RNA, which has neither a 5´ m7G cap nor an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), adopts an unusual mechanism to initiate protein synthesis that relies on interactions between the VPg protein covalently attached to the 5´-end of the viral RNA and eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) in the host cell. For murine norovirus (MNV) we previously showed that VPg binds to the middle fragment of eIF4G (4GM; residues 652-1132). Here we have used pull-down assays, fluorescence anisotropy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to demonstrate that a stretch of ~20 amino acids at the C terminus of MNV VPg mediates direct and specific binding to the HEAT-1 domain within the 4GM fragment of eIF4G. Our analysis further reveals that the MNV C terminus binds to eIF4G HEAT-1 via a motif that is conserved in all known noroviruses. Fine mutagenic mapping suggests that the MNV VPg C terminus may interact with eIF4G in a helical conformation. NMR spectroscopy was used to define the VPg binding site on eIF4G HEAT-1, which was confirmed by mutagenesis and binding assays. We have found that this site is non-overlapping with the binding site for eIF4A on eIF4G HEAT-1 by demonstrating that norovirus VPg can form ternary VPg-eIF4G-eIF4A complexes. The functional significance of the VPg-eIF4G interaction was shown by the ability of fusion proteins containing the C-terminal peptide of MNV VPg to inhibit in vitro translation of norovirus RNA but not cap- or IRES-dependent translation. These observations define important structural details of a functional interaction between norovirus VPg and eIF4G and reveal a binding interface that might be exploited as a target for antiviral therapy.

  11. A Conserved Interaction between a C-Terminal Motif in Norovirus VPg and the HEAT-1 Domain of eIF4G Is Essential for Translation Initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eoin N Leen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Translation initiation is a critical early step in the replication cycle of the positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in humans. Norovirus RNA, which has neither a 5´ m7G cap nor an internal ribosome entry site (IRES, adopts an unusual mechanism to initiate protein synthesis that relies on interactions between the VPg protein covalently attached to the 5´-end of the viral RNA and eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs in the host cell. For murine norovirus (MNV we previously showed that VPg binds to the middle fragment of eIF4G (4GM; residues 652-1132. Here we have used pull-down assays, fluorescence anisotropy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC to demonstrate that a stretch of ~20 amino acids at the C terminus of MNV VPg mediates direct and specific binding to the HEAT-1 domain within the 4GM fragment of eIF4G. Our analysis further reveals that the MNV C terminus binds to eIF4G HEAT-1 via a motif that is conserved in all known noroviruses. Fine mutagenic mapping suggests that the MNV VPg C terminus may interact with eIF4G in a helical conformation. NMR spectroscopy was used to define the VPg binding site on eIF4G HEAT-1, which was confirmed by mutagenesis and binding assays. We have found that this site is non-overlapping with the binding site for eIF4A on eIF4G HEAT-1 by demonstrating that norovirus VPg can form ternary VPg-eIF4G-eIF4A complexes. The functional significance of the VPg-eIF4G interaction was shown by the ability of fusion proteins containing the C-terminal peptide of MNV VPg to inhibit in vitro translation of norovirus RNA but not cap- or IRES-dependent translation. These observations define important structural details of a functional interaction between norovirus VPg and eIF4G and reveal a binding interface that might be exploited as a target for antiviral therapy.

  12. Photosynthetic control of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in Vallisneria leaves. II. Presence of putative isogenes and a protein equipped with a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Akiko; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Takagi, Shingo

    2002-04-01

    In vitro treatment with trypsin of plasma membrane (PM) vesicles isolated from the leaves of Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, an aquatic monocot, produced a marked decrease in the Km for ATP and an increase in the Vmax of H+-transporting activity. Concomitantly, the removal of 8 kDa of the C-terminal domain from the 94-kDa PM H+-ATPase was confirmed by immunoblotting using different kinds of polyclonal antibody. Three partial clones of putative PM H+-ATPase genes (Vga1, 2, and 3) were isolated from leaves by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Northern blotting analysis revealed that the expression level of Vga3 was high and that of the other two genes was much lower. The H+-transporting activity of PM vesicles was substantially suppressed in the presence of inorganic phosphate (Pi), which has been supposed to be a noncompetitive inhibitor of the PM H+-ATPase, coincident with an increase in the Km for ATP and a decrease in the Vmax. After treatment of the isolated PM vesicles with trypsin, the inhibitory effect of Pi was no longer evident. This result indicates that Pi inhibited the activity through the C-terminal autoinhibitory domain of the PM H+-ATPase. Furthermore, Pi increased the Km for ATP of the H+-transporting activity in the PM vesicles isolated from both dark-adapted and red-light-irradiated leaves. The results suggest that regulation of the Km for ATP through the operation of photosynthesis is independent of regulation through the cytoplasmic level of Pi. PMID:11941463

  13. Interaction of the C-terminal acidic domain of the insulin receptor with histone modulates the receptor kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Alengrin, F; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the insulin receptor domain 1270-1280, an acid-rich sequence located in the receptor C-terminus. Antipeptide IgG raised against this sequence were obtained and used to analyze their effect on receptor function. Antipeptide IgG inhibited receptor autophosphorylation at Tyr1146, Tyr1150 and Tyr1151. These sites are known to be key modulators of the receptor activity. Autophosphorylation at other sites may also have been inhibited. The antipeptide antibody decreased the receptor kinase activity measured with poly(Glu80Tyr20) and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the proreceptor sequence 1142-1158. We provide evidence that the effect of the antibody on substrate phosphorylation may result from the control of the phosphorylation level of the receptor. Concerning the action of the antipeptide IgG on the receptor kinase activity, histone did not behave similarly to poly(Glu80Tyr20). The antibody recognizing sequence 1270-1280 competed with histone for an overlapping binding site. Histone also modulated insulin receptor autophosphorylation, supporting the idea that interference with domain 1270-1280 alters the receptor kinase. Our data suggest that the acidic region including residues 1270-1280 of the insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in the following events: (a) receptor binding with histone, an exogenous substrate of the receptor kinase, and (b) the regulation of receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity. Based on these observations, we would like to propose that this insulin receptor domain could interact with cellular proteins modulating the receptor kinase. PMID:7744039

  14. The structure of Abeta42 C-terminal fragments probed by a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun; Murray, Megan M; Bernstein, Summer L; Condron, Margaret M; Bitan, Gal; Shea, Joan-Emma; Bowers, Michael T

    2009-03-27

    The C-terminus of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) 42 plays an important role in this protein's oligomerization and may therefore be a good therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Certain C-terminal fragments (CTFs) of Abeta42 have been shown to disrupt oligomerization and to strongly inhibit Abeta42-induced neurotoxicity. Here we study the structures of selected CTFs [Abeta(x-42); x=29-31, 39] using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations and ion mobility mass spectrometry. Our simulations in explicit solvent reveal that the CTFs adopt a metastable beta-structure: beta-hairpin for Abeta(x-42) (x=29-31) and extended beta-strand for Abeta(39-42). The beta-hairpin of Abeta(30-42) is converted into a turn-coil conformation when the last two hydrophobic residues are removed, suggesting that I41 and A42 are critical in stabilizing the beta-hairpin in Abeta42-derived CTFs. The importance of solvent in determining the structure of the CTFs is further highlighted in ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments and solvent-free replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. A comparison between structures with solvent and structures without solvent reveals that hydrophobic interactions are critical for the formation of beta-hairpin. The possible role played by the CTFs in disrupting oligomerization is discussed.

  15. Structure determination of Murine Norovirus NS6 proteases with C-terminal extensions designed to probe protease–substrate interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Fernandes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. They encode an NS6 protease that cleaves a viral polyprotein at specific sites to produce mature viral proteins. In an earlier study we obtained crystals of murine norovirus (MNV NS6 protease in which crystal contacts were mediated by specific insertion of the C-terminus of one protein (which contains residues P5-P1 of the NS6-7 cleavage junction into the peptide binding site of an adjacent molecule, forming an adventitious protease-product complex. We sought to reproduce this crystal form to investigate protease–substrate complexes by extending the C-terminus of NS6 construct to include residues on the C-terminal (P′ side of the cleavage junction. We report the crystallization and crystal structure determination of inactive mutants of murine norovirus NS6 protease with C-terminal extensions of one, two and four residues from the N-terminus of the adjacent NS7 protein (NS6 1′, NS6 2′, NS6 4′. We also determined the structure of a chimeric extended NS6 protease in which the P4-P4′ sequence of the NS6-7 cleavage site was replaced with the corresponding sequence from the NS2-3 cleavage junction (NS6 4′ 2|3.The constructs NS6 1′ and NS6 2′ yielded crystals that diffracted anisotropically. We found that, although the uncorrected data could be phased by molecular replacement, refinement of the structures stalled unless the data were ellipsoidally truncated and corrected with anisotropic B-factors. These corrections significantly improved phasing by molecular replacement and subsequent refinement.The refined structures of all four extended NS6 proteases are very similar in structure to the mature MNV NS6—and in one case reveal additional details of a surface loop. Although the packing arrangement observed showed some similarities to those observed in the adventitious protease-product crystals reported previously, in no case were specific protease–substrate interactions

  16. The TAF9 C-terminal conserved region domain is required for SAGA and TFIID promoter occupancy to promote transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint, Malika; Sawhney, Sonal; Sinha, Ishani; Singh, Rana Pratap; Dahiya, Rashmi; Thakur, Anushikha; Siddharthan, Rahul; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2014-05-01

    A common function of the TFIID and SAGA complexes, which are recruited by transcriptional activators, is to deliver TBP to promoters to stimulate transcription. Neither the relative contributions of the five shared TBP-associated factor (TAF) subunits in TFIID and SAGA nor the requirement for different domains in shared TAFs for transcriptional activation is well understood. In this study, we uncovered the essential requirement for the highly conserved C-terminal region (CRD) of Taf9, a shared TAF, for transcriptional activation in yeast. Transcriptome profiling performed under Gcn4-activating conditions showed that the Taf9 CRD is required for induced expression of ∼9% of the yeast genome. The CRD was not essential for the Taf9-Taf6 interaction, TFIID or SAGA integrity, or Gcn4 interaction with SAGA in cell extracts. Microarray profiling of a SAGA mutant (spt20Δ) yielded a common set of genes induced by Spt20 and the Taf9 CRD. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that, although the Taf9 CRD mutation did not impair Gcn4 occupancy, the occupancies of TFIID, SAGA, and the preinitiation complex were severely impaired at several promoters. These results suggest a crucial role for the Taf9 CRD in genome-wide transcription and highlight the importance of conserved domains, other than histone fold domains, as a common determinant for TFIID and SAGA functions.

  17. The X-ray structures of two mutant crystallin domains shed light on the evolution of multi-domain proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norledge, B V; Mayr, E M; Glockshuber, R; Bateman, O A; Slingsby, C; Jaenicke, R; Driessen, H P

    1996-03-01

    We use protein engineering and crystallography to simulate aspects of the early evolution of beta gamma-crystallins by observing how a single domain oligomerizes in response to changes in a sequence extension. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of gamma beta-crystallin with its four-residue C-terminal extension shows that the domain does not form a symmetric homodimer analogous to the two-domain pairing in beta gamma-crystallins. Instead the C-terminal extension now forms heterologous interactions with other domains leading to the solvent exposure of the natural hydrophobic interface with a consequent loss in protein solubility. However, this domain truncated by just the C-terminal tyrosine forms a symmetric homodimer of domains in the crystal lattice. PMID:8605629

  18. DNA double strand break repair is enhanced by P53 following induction by DNA damage and is dependent on the C-terminal domain of P53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor gene p53 can mediate cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Accumulating evidence suggests that it may also directly or indirectly influence the DNA repair machinery. In the present study, we investigated whether p53, induced by DNA damage, could enhance the rejoining of double-strand DNA breaks. Materials and Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) were made by restriction enzyme digestion of a plasmid, between a promoter and a 'reporter' gene: luciferase (LUC) or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). Linear or circular plasmid DNA (LUC or CAT) was co-transfected with circular β-Gal plasmid (to normalize for uptake) into mouse embryonic fibroblasts genetically matched to be (+/+) or (-/-) for p53. Their ability to rejoin linearized plasmid was measured by the luciferase or CAT activity detected in rescued plasmids. The activity detected in cells transfected with linear plasmid was scored relative to the activity detected in cells transfected with circular plasmid. Results: Ionizing radiation (IR, 2 Gy) enhanced the dsb repair activity in wild type p53 cells; however, p53 null cells lose this effect, indicating that the enhancement of dsb repair was p53-dependent. REF cells with dominant-negative mutant p53 showed a similar induction compared with the parental REF cells with wild-type p53. This ala-143 mutant p53 prevents cell cycle arrest and transactivation of p21WAF1/cip1) following IR, indicating that the p53-dependent enhancement of DNA repair is distinct from transactivation. Immortalized murine embryonic fibroblasts, 10(1)VasK1 cells, which express p53 cDNA encoding a temperature-sensitive mutant in the DNA sequence specific binding domain (ala135 to val135) with an alternatively spliced C-terminal domain (ASp53: amino-acids 360-381) and, 10(1)Val5 cells, which express the normal spliced p53 (NSp53) with the same temperature-sensitive mutant were compared. It was found that 10(1)VasK1 cells showed no DNA

  19. A novel C-terminal domain of RecJ is critical for interaction with HerA in Deinococcus radiodurans

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    Kaiying eCheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR generates error-free repair products, which plays an important role in double strand break repair and replication fork rescue processes. DNA end resection, the critical step in HR, is usually performed by a series of nuclease/helicase. RecJ was identified as a 5’-3’ exonuclease involved in bacterial DNA end resection. Typical RecJ possesses a conserved DHH domain, a DHHA1 domain, and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB fold. However, RecJs from Deinococcus-Thermus phylum, such as Deinococcus radiodurans RecJ (DrRecJ, possess an extra C-terminal domain (CTD, of which the function has not been characterized. Here, we showed that a CTD-deletion of DrRecJ (DrRecJΔC could not restore drrecJ mutant growth and mitomycin C (MMC-sensitive phenotypes, indicating that this domain is essential for DrRecJ in vivo. DrRecJΔC displayed reduced DNA nuclease activity and DNA binding ability. Direct interaction was identified between DrRecJ-CTD and DrHerA, which stimulates DrRecJ nuclease activity by enhancing its DNA binding affinity. Moreover, DrNurA nuclease, another partner of DrHerA, inhibited the stimulation of DrHerA on DrRecJ nuclease activity by interaction with DrHerA. Opposing growth and MMC-resistance phenotypes between the recJ and nurA mutants were observed. A novel modulation mechanism among DrRecJ, DrHerA, and DrNurA was also suggested.

  20. Solution and crystal structures of a C-terminal fragment of the neuronal isoform of the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (nPTB

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    Amar Joshi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB serves primarily as a regulator of alternative splicing of messenger RNA, but is also co-opted to other roles such as RNA localisation and translation initiation from internal ribosome entry sites. The neuronal paralogue of PTB (nPTB is 75% identical in amino acid sequence with PTB. Although the two proteins have broadly similar RNA binding specificities and effects on RNA splicing, differential expression of PTB and nPTB can lead to the generation of alternatively spliced mRNAs. RNA binding by PTB and nPTB is mediated by four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs. We present here the crystal and solution structures of the C-terminal domain of nPTB (nPTB34 which contains RRMs 3 and 4. As expected the structures are similar to each other and to the solution structure of the equivalent fragment from PTB (PTB34. The result confirms that, as found for PTB, RRMs 3 and 4 of nPTB interact with one another to form a stable unit that presents the RNA-binding surfaces of the component RRMs on opposite sides that face away from each other. The major differences between PTB34 and nPTB34 arise from amino acid side chain substitutions on the exposed β-sheet surfaces and adjoining loops of each RRM, which are likely to modulate interactions with RNA.

  1. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, sharesa conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-07-25

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1.

  2. Interaction of p190RhoGAP with C-terminal domain of p120-catenin modulates endothelial cytoskeleton and permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebda, Noureddine; Tian, Yufeng; Tian, Xinyong; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Higginbotham, Katherine; Reynolds, Albert B; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2013-06-21

    p120-catenin is a multidomain intracellular protein, which mediates a number of cellular functions, including stabilization of cell-cell transmembrane cadherin complexes as well as regulation of actin dynamics associated with barrier function, lamellipodia formation, and cell migration via modulation of the activities of small GTPAses. One mechanism involves p120 catenin interaction with Rho GTPase activating protein (p190RhoGAP), leading to p190RhoGAP recruitment to cell periphery and local inhibition of Rho activity. In this study, we have identified a stretch of 23 amino acids within the C-terminal domain of p120 catenin as the minimal sequence responsible for the recruitment of p190RhoGAP (herein referred to as CRAD; catenin-RhoGAP association domain). Expression of the p120-catenin truncated mutant lacking the CRAD in endothelial cells attenuated effects of barrier protective oxidized phospholipid, OxPAPC. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of membrane translocation of p190RhoGAP, increased Rho signaling, as well as suppressed activation of Rac1 and its cytoskeletal effectors PAK1 (p21-activated kinase 1) and cortactin. Expression of p120 catenin-truncated mutant lacking CRAD also delayed the recovery process after thrombin-induced endothelial barrier disruption. Concomitantly, RhoA activation and downstream signaling were sustained for a longer period of time, whereas Rac signaling was inhibited. These data demonstrate a critical role for p120-catenin (amino acids 820-843) domain in the p120-catenin·p190RhoGAP signaling complex assembly, membrane targeting, and stimulation of p190RhoGAP activity toward inhibition of the Rho pathway and reciprocal up-regulation of Rac signaling critical for endothelial barrier regulation. PMID:23653363

  3. Recombinant expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the C-terminal DUF490(963-1138) domain of TamB from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josts, Inokentijs; Grinter, Rhys; Kelly, Sharon M; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander; Cogdell, Richard; Smith, Brian O; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    TamB is a recently described inner membrane protein that, together with its partner protein TamA, is required for the efficient secretion of a subset of autotransporter proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the C-terminal DUF490963-1138 domain of TamB was overexpressed in Escherichia coli K-12, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the primitive trigonal space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.34, c = 220.74 Å, and diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. Preliminary secondary-structure and X-ray diffraction analyses are reported. Two molecules are predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit. Experimental phasing using selenomethionine-labelled protein will be undertaken in the future.

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 phosphorylates s/t-p sites in the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain and is incorporated into viral capsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludgate, Laurie; Ning, Xiaojun; Nguyen, David H; Adams, Christina; Mentzer, Laura; Hu, Jianming

    2012-11-01

    Phosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is important for viral RNA packaging, reverse transcription, and subcellular localization. Hepadnavirus capsids also package a cellular kinase. The identity of the host kinase that phosphorylates the core CTD or gets packaged remains to be resolved. In particular, both the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core CTDs harbor several conserved serine/threonine-proline (S/T-P) sites whose phosphorylation state is known to regulate CTD functions. We report here that the endogenous kinase in the HBV capsids was blocked by chemical inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), in particular, CDK2 inhibitors. The kinase phosphorylated the HBV CTD at the serine-proline (S-P) sites. Furthermore, we were able to detect CDK2 in purified HBV capsids by immunoblotting. Purified CDK2 phosphorylated the S/T-P sites of the HBV and DHBV CTD in vitro. Inhibitors of CDKs, of CDK2 in particular, decreased both HBV and DHBV CTD phosphorylation in vivo. Moreover, CDK2 inhibitors blocked DHBV CTD phosphorylation, specifically at the S/T-P sites, in a mammalian cell lysate. These results indicate that cellular CDK2 phosphorylates the functionally critical S/T-P sites of the hepadnavirus core CTD and is incorporated into viral capsids.

  5. Deficiency of syntrophin, dystroglycan, and merosin in a female infant with a congenital muscular dystrophy phenotype lacking cysteine-rich and C-terminal domains of dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, N; Ohya, K; Chiba, S; Matsuo, M; Patria, S Y; Matsumura, K

    1997-08-01

    Primary deficiency of merosin is the cause of the classic form of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) accompanied by brain white matter abnormalities. We report a female infant with dystrophinopathy who was deficient in merosin in skeletal muscle. The patient had a phenotype of typical CMD and white matter abnormalities on brain MRI. Merosin was greatly reduced in the biopsied skeletal muscle. However, the expression of dystroglycan and syntrophin was also greatly reduced, and the immunoreactivity for the antibodies against the cysteine-rich/C-terminal domains of dystrophin was absent in the sarcolemma. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis of the dystrophin gene revealed a complete lack of exons 71 through 74. In skeletal muscle, only the mutant gene was expressed. These results suggest that the patient is a symptomatic Duchenne muscular dystrophy carrier with skewed X-inactivation. This patient illustrates for the first time that a dystrophin abnormality can cause a secondary deficiency of merosin in dystrophinopathy. The reduction of merosin may account for the clinical phenotype of CMD and correlate with the white matter abnormalities in our patient.

  6. Loss of c-Kit and bone marrow failure upon conditional removal of the GATA-2 C-terminal zinc finger domain in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan S; Jin, Jin; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Matatall, Katie A; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Huiyuan; Ullrich, Stephen E; King, Katherine Y; Sun, Shao-Cong; Watowich, Stephanie S

    2016-09-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the transcriptional regulator GATA-2 associate with multilineage immunodeficiency, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The majority of these mutations localize in the zinc finger (ZnF) domains, which mediate GATA-2 DNA binding. Deregulated hematopoiesis with GATA-2 mutation frequently develops in adulthood, yet GATA-2 function in the bone marrow remains unresolved. To investigate this, we conditionally deleted the GATA-2 C-terminal ZnF (C-ZnF) coding sequences in adult mice. Upon Gata2 C-ZnF deletion, we observed rapid peripheral cytopenia, bone marrow failure, and decreased c-Kit expression on hematopoietic progenitors. Transplant studies indicated GATA-2 has a cell-autonomous role in bone marrow hematopoiesis. Moreover, myeloid lineage populations were particularly sensitive to Gata2 hemizygosity, while molecular assays indicated GATA-2 regulates c-Kit expression in multilineage progenitor cells. Enforced c-Kit expression in Gata2 C-ZnF-deficient hematopoietic progenitors enhanced myeloid colony activity, suggesting GATA-2 sustains myelopoiesis via a cell intrinsic role involving maintenance of c-Kit expression. Our results provide insight into mechanisms regulating hematopoiesis in bone marrow and may contribute to a better understanding of immunodeficiency and bone marrow failure associated with GATA-2 mutation.

  7. CBF mediates adenovirus Ela trans-activation by interaction at the C-terminal promoter targeting domain of conserved region 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoff, S N; Wu, B

    1994-12-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence suggest that conserved region 3 (CR3) of the adenovirus Ela polypeptide can provide two distinct and separable functions: an N-terminal transcriptional activation region and a C-terminal promoter targeting region. It is thought that the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 interacts with promoter-specific transcription factors, thereby bringing the activation region of Ela CR3 in proximity of the promoter. Here we report that CBF, a CCAAT-box-binding factor that regulates hsp70 gene expression and mediates Ela trans-activation in vivo, interacts with the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 in vitro. Point mutations in Ela CR3 that are defective in stimulating transcription from the hsp70 promoter are also defective in stimulating transcription directed by a synthetic activator, GAL-CBF, composed of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 fused to CBF. These mutations fall into two classes with respect to their abilities to interact with CBF in vitro. Mutations in the transcriptional activation region of Ela CR3 do not affect binding to CBF, but mutation of the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 prevents association with CBF in vitro.

  8. Adaptive immunity against Leishmania nucleoside hydrolase maps its c-terminal domain as the target of the CD4+ T cell-driven protective response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Dirlei; Claser, Carla; Borja-Cabrera, Gulnara P; Travassos, Luiz R; Palatnik, Marcos; Soares, Irene da Silva; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B

    2010-01-01

    Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs) show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36) responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199-314) and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5-88.23%; p = 0.011) that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and for multivalent

  9. Adaptive Immunity against Leishmania Nucleoside Hydrolase Maps Its C-Terminal Domain as the Target of the CD4+ T Cell–Driven Protective Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Dirlei; Claser, Carla; Borja-Cabrera, Gulnara P.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Palatnik, Marcos; da Silva Soares, Irene; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs) show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36) responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199–314) and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5–88.23%; p = 0.011) that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and for

  10. Adaptive immunity against Leishmania nucleoside hydrolase maps its c-terminal domain as the target of the CD4+ T cell-driven protective response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirlei Nico

    Full Text Available Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36 responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199-314 and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5-88.23%; p = 0.011 that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and

  11. The C-terminal pentapeptide of Nanog tryptophan repeat domain interacts with Nac1 and regulates stem cell proliferation but not pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tianhua; Wang, Zhe; Guo, Yunqian; Pei, Duanqing

    2009-06-12

    Overexpression of Nanog in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has been shown to abrogate the requirement of leukemia inhibitory factor for self-renewal in culture. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of Nanog function. Here we describe the role of the tryptophan repeat (WR) domain, one of the two transactivators at its C terminus, in regulating stem cell proliferation as well as pluripotency. We first created a supertransactivator, W2W3x10, by duplicating repeats W2W3 10 times and discovered that it can functionally substitute for wild type WR at sustaining pluripotency, albeit with a significantly slower cell cycle, phenocopying Nanog(9W) with the C-terminal pentapeptide (WNAAP) of WR deleted. ES cells carrying both W2W3x10 and Nanog(9W) have a longer G1 phase, a shorter S phase in cell cycle distribution and progression analysis, and a lower level of pAkt(Ser473) compared with wild type Nanog, suggesting that both mutants impact the cell cycle machinery via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Both mutants remain competent in dimerizing with Nanog but cannot form a complex with Nac1 efficiently, suggesting that WNAAP may be involved in Nac1 binding. By tagging Gal4DBD with WNAAP, we demonstrated that this pentapeptide is sufficient to confer Nac1 binding. Furthermore, we can rescue W2W3x10 by placing WNAAP at the corresponding locations. Finally, we found that Nanog and Nac1 synergistically up-regulate ERas expression and promote the proliferation of ES cells. These results suggest that Nanog interacts with Nac1 through WNAAP to regulate the cell cycle of ES cells via the ERas/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway, but not pluripotency, thus decoupling cell cycle control from pluripotency.

  12. Easy expression of the C-terminal heavy chain domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A as a vaccine candidate using a bi-cistronic baculovirus system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaflores, Oliver B; Hsei, Chein-Ming; Teng, Chao-Yi; Chen, Ying-Ju; Wey, Jiunn-Jye; Tsui, Pei-Yi; Shyu, Rong-Hwa; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Yeh, Jui-Ming; Chiao, Der-Jiang; Wu, Tzong-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    Clostridial botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is one of the most toxic proteins causing the food borne disease, botulism. In previous studies, recombinant BoNT production by Escherichia coli and yeast Pichia pastoris has been hampered by high AT content and codon bias in the gene encoding BoNT and required a synthetic gene to resolve this intrinsic bottleneck. This paper reports the simultaneous expression of the C-terminal heavy chain domain of BoNT (rBoNT/A-HC-6h) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) using a bi-cistronic baculovirus-insect cell expression system. The expression of EGFP facilitated the monitoring of viral infection, virus titer determination, and isolation of the recombinant virus. Protein fusion with hexa-His-tag and one-step immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) purification produced a homogenous, stable, and immunologically active 55-kDa rBoNT/A-HC-6h (about 3mg/L) with >90% purity. Furthermore, measured levels of serum titers were 8-folds for mice vaccinated with the purified rBoNT/A-HC-6h (2μg) than for mice administered with botulinum toxoid after initial immunization. Challenge experiment with botulinum A toxin demonstrated the immunoprotective activity of purified rBoNT/A-HC-6h providing the mice full protection against 10(2) LD50 botulinum A toxin with a dose as low as 0.2μg. This study provided supportive evidence for the use of a bi-cistronic baculovirus-Sf21 insect cell expression system in the facile expression of an immunogenically active rBoNT/A-HC. PMID:23313783

  13. Thrombospondin-1-N-Terminal Domain Induces a Phagocytic State and Thrombospondin-1-C-Terminal Domain Induces a Tolerizing Phenotype in Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tabib, Adi; Krispin, Alon; Trahtemberg, Uriel; Verbovetski, Inna; Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi; Mevorach, Dror

    2009-01-01

    In our previous study, we have found that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is synthesized de novo upon monocyte and neutrophil apoptosis, leading to a phagocytic and tolerizing phenotype of dendritic cells (DC), even prior to DC-apoptotic cell interaction. Interestingly, we were able to show that heparin binding domain (HBD), the N-terminal portion of TSP-1, was cleaved and secreted simultaneously in a caspase- and serine protease- dependent manner. In the current study we were interested to examine ...

  14. Analysis of Tb{sup 3+}- and melittin-binding with the C-terminal domain of centrin in Euplotes octocarinatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yaqin; Diao Xiuling; Yan Jun; Feng Yanan [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Microcular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Wang Zhijun [Chemical Department, Changzhi University, Changzhi 046011 (China); Liang Aihua, E-mail: aliang@sxu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Microcular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Yang Binsheng, E-mail: yangbs@sxu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Microcular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2012-04-15

    Centrin is a low molecular mass (20 KDa) protein that belongs to the EF-hand superfamily. In this work, the interaction between the Tb{sup 3+}-saturated C-terminal domain of Euplotes octocarinatus centrin (Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen) and 2-p-toluidinylnaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) was investigated using difference UV-vis spectra and the fluorescence spectra methods. In 100 mM N-2-hydroxy-ethylpiperazine-N-2-ethanesulfonic acid (Hepes) at pH 7.4, with the addition of Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen, four new peaks were observed at 265 nm, 278 nm, 317 nm and 360 nm by absorptivity compared with blank solution of TNS. At the same time, the reaction could be measured by fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence emission of TNS was shifted from 480 nm to 445 nm in the presence of Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen. Meanwhile, its fluorescence intensity was increased markedly. The 1:1 stoichiometric ratio of C-EoCen to TNS was confirmed by fluorescence titration curves. The conditional binding constants of TNS with C-EoCen and Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen were calculated to be log K{sub (C-EoCen-TNS)}=5.32{+-}0.04 M{sup -1} and log K{sub (Tb2-C-EoCen-TNS)}=5.58{+-}0.12 M{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, the protein of Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen binding with melittin was also studied. Based on the fluorescence titration curves, the 1:1 stoichiometric ratio of Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen to melittin was confirmed. And the conditional binding constant of C-EoCen with melittin was calculated to be log Ka Prime =6.79{+-}0.17 M{sup -1}. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tb{sup 3+} induced conformational changes of protein C-EoCen from closed state to open state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conformational changes resulted in the exposure of hydrophobic surfaces on C-EoCen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen may bind with target peptide melittin.

  15. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. Part III. Dynamics of long-range hydrophobic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2010-01-01

    A 20-residue peptide, IG(42–61), derived from the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus was studied using CD, NMR spectroscopy at various temperatures and by differential scanning calorimetry. Unlike other related peptides studied so far, this peptide displays two heat capacity peaks in DSC measurements (at a scanning rate of 1.5 deg/min at a peptide concentration of 0.07mM) which suggests a three-state folding/unfolding process. The results from DSC and NMR measurements suggest the formation of a dynamic network of hydrophobic interactions stabilizing the structure, which resembles a β-hairpin shape over a wide range of temperatures (283 – 313 K). Our results show that IG(42–61) possesses a well-organized three-dimensional structure stabilized by long-range hydrophobic interactions (Tyr50 ··· Phe57 and Trp48 ··· Val59) at T = 283 K and (Trp48 ··· Val59) at 305 and 313 K. The mechanism of β-hairpin folding and unfolding, as well as the influence of peptide length on its conformational properties, are also discussed. PMID:19847914

  16. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. III. Dynamics of long-range hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2010-02-15

    A 20-residue peptide, IG(42-61), derived from the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus was studied using circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy at various temperatures and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Unlike other related peptides studied so far, this peptide displays two heat capacity peaks in DSC measurements (at a scanning rate of 1.5 deg/min at a peptide concentration of 0.07 mM), which suggests a three-state folding/unfolding process. The results from DSC and NMR measurements suggest the formation of a dynamic network of hydrophobic interactions stabilizing the structure, which resembles a beta-hairpin shape over a wide range of temperatures (283-313 K). Our results show that IG (42-61) possesses a well-organized three-dimensional structure stabilized by long-range hydrophobic interactions (Tyr50 ... Phe57 and Trp48 ... Val59) at T = 283 K and (Trp48 ... Val59) at 305 and 313 K. The mechanism of beta-hairpin folding and unfolding, as well as the influence of peptide length on its conformational properties, are also discussed. PMID:19847914

  17. Interaction of Cytosolic Glutamine Synthetase of Soybean Root Nodules with the C-terminal Domain of the Symbiosome Membrane Nodulin 26 Aquaglyceroporin*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Masalkar, Pintu; Wallace, Ian S.; Hwang, Jin Ha; Roberts, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    Nodulin 26 (nod26) is a major intrinsic protein that constitutes the major protein component on the symbiosome membrane (SM) of N2-fixing soybean nodules. Functionally, nod26 forms a low energy transport pathway for water, osmolytes, and NH3 across the SM. Besides their transport functions, emerging evidence suggests that high concentrations of major intrinsic proteins on membranes provide interaction and docking targets for various cytosolic proteins. Here it is shown that the C-terminal dom...

  18. Identification of a novel pentatricopeptide repeat subfamily with a C-terminal domain of bacterial origin acquired via ancient horizontal gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Manna, Sam; Barth, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are a large family of sequence-specific RNA binding proteins involved in organelle RNA metabolism. Very little is known about the origin and evolution of these proteins, particularly outside of plants. Here, we report the identification of a novel subfamily of PPR proteins not found in plants and explore their evolution. Results We identified a novel subfamily of PPR proteins, which all contain a C-terminal tRNA guanine methyltransferase (TGM...

  19. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Nobuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. Results The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low μM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Conclusion Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure

  20. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. Part II. Interplay of local backbone conformational dynamics and long-range hydrophobic interactions in hairpin formation

    OpenAIRE

    Skwierawska, Agnieszka; Żmudzińska, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2009-01-01

    Two peptides, corresponding to the turn region of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, consisting of residues 51–56 [IG(51–56)] and 50–57 [IG(50–57)], respectively, were studied by CD and NMR spectroscopy at various temperatures and by differential scanning calorimetry. Our results show that the part of the sequence corresponding to the β-turn in the native structure (DDATKT) of the B3 domain forms bent conformations similar to ...

  1. Structure of a C-terminal AHNAK peptide in a 1:2:2 complex with S100A10 and an acetylated N-terminal peptide of annexin A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozorowski, Gabriel [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Milton, Saskia [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Luecke, Hartmut, E-mail: hudel@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Structure of a 20-amino-acid peptide of AHNAK bound asymmetrically to the AnxA2–S100A10A heterotetramer (1:2:2 symmetry) provides insights into the atomic level interactions that govern this membrane-repair scaffolding complex. AHNAK, a large 629 kDa protein, has been implicated in membrane repair, and the annexin A2–S100A10 heterotetramer [(p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2})] has high affinity for several regions of its 1002-amino-acid C-terminal domain. (p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2} is often localized near the plasma membrane, and this C2-symmetric platform is proposed to be involved in the bridging of membrane vesicles and trafficking of proteins to the plasma membrane. All three proteins co-localize at the intracellular face of the plasma membrane in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. The binding of AHNAK to (p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2} has been studied previously, and a minimal binding motif has been mapped to a 20-amino-acid peptide corresponding to residues 5654–5673 of the AHNAK C-terminal domain. Here, the 2.5 Å resolution crystal structure of this 20-amino-acid peptide of AHNAK bound to the AnxA2–S100A10 heterotetramer (1:2:2 symmetry) is presented, which confirms the asymmetric arrangement first described by Rezvanpour and coworkers and explains why the binding motif has high affinity for (p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2}. Binding of AHNAK to the surface of (p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2} is governed by several hydrophobic interactions between side chains of AHNAK and pockets on S100A10. The pockets are large enough to accommodate a variety of hydrophobic side chains, allowing the consensus sequence to be more general. Additionally, the various hydrogen bonds formed between the AHNAK peptide and (p11){sub 2}(AnxA2){sub 2} most often involve backbone atoms of AHNAK; as a result, the side chains, particularly those that point away from S100A10/AnxA2 towards the solvent, are largely interchangeable. While the structure-based consensus sequence allows interactions with various

  2. Ultrahigh and High Resolution Structures and Mutational Analysis of Monomeric Streptococcus pyogenes SpeB Reveal a Functional Role for the Glycine-rich C-terminal Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Wolan, Dennis W. (Scripps)

    2012-09-05

    Cysteine protease SpeB is secreted from Streptococcus pyogenes and has been studied as a potential virulence factor since its identification almost 70 years ago. Here, we report the crystal structures of apo mature SpeB to 1.06 {angstrom} resolution as well as complexes with the general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and a novel substrate mimetic peptide inhibitor. These structures uncover conformational changes associated with maturation of SpeB from the inactive zymogen to its active form and identify the residues required for substrate binding. With the use of a newly developed fluorogenic tripeptide substrate to measure SpeB activity, we determined IC{sub 50} values for trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and our new peptide inhibitor and the effects of mutations within the C-terminal active site loop. The structures and mutational analysis suggest that the conformational movements of the glycine-rich C-terminal loop are important for the recognition and recruitment of biological substrates and release of hydrolyzed products.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a putative sensor histidine kinase domain: the C-terminal domain of HksP4 from Aquifex aeolicus VF5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The putative sensor histidine kinase domain of the cytoplasmic protein HksP4 from the hyperthermophilic bacterium A. aeolicus VF5 was expressed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals were obtained in the presence of ATP and AMPPNP; they were found to belong to the same space group P212121 and diffracted X-rays to 3.1 and 2.9 Å resolution, respectively. The histidine kinase domain of the cytoplasmic protein HksP4 from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus VF5, located in the C-terminal half of the protein, was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction-quality crystals were obtained in the presence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate (AMPPNP) by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The crystals obtained in the presence of ATP and AMPPNP diffracted X-rays to 3.1 and 2.9 Å resolution, respectively, on BL-5A at Photon Factory (Ibaraki, Japan) and were found to belong to the same space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.2, b = 105.5, c = 122.0 Å and a = 81.5, b = 105.5, c = 130.9 Å, respectively. Their Matthews coefficients (VM = 2.74 and 2.51 Å3 Da−1, respectively) indicated that both crystals contained four protein molecules per asymmetric unit

  4. Apical localization of ASIP/PAR-3:EGFP in zebrafish neuroepithelial cells involves the oligomerization domain CR1, the PDZ domains, and the C-terminal portion of the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Trotha, Jakob W; Campos-Ortega, José A; Reugels, Alexander M

    2006-04-01

    Neurulation in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos is characterized by oriented cell divisions and the progressive establishment of cellular polarity. Mitoses in the neural plate and neural tube are planar, but in the neural keel/rod stage, the mitotic spindle rotates by 90 degrees, causing cell divisions to occur perpendicular to the plane of the neuroepithelium. The mechanisms and molecules that establish cellular polarity and cause the stereotypic orientation of the mitotic spindle during neurulation are largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila, the PAR/aPKC complex has been shown to be involved in both establishment of cellular polarity and spindle orientation. Here, we show that the conserved N-terminal oligomerization domain (CR1) and the PDZ domains of ASIP/PAR-3:EGFP are involved in its localization to the apical membrane in zebrafish neuroepithelial cells. We further show that the C-terminal part of ASIP/PAR-3 contributes to proper localization and that the apical localization signals in ASIP/PAR-3 prevent the basolateral localization of a Numb:PAR-3 fusion protein. The parallel orientation of the mitotic spindle in the neural tube, however, is only weakly impaired upon overexpression of various ASIP/PAR-3:EGFP constructs.

  5. Influence of N- and/or C-terminal regions on activity, expression, characteristics and structure of lipase from Geobacillus sp. 95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiukaitė, Renata; Gegeckas, Audrius; Kazlauskas, Darius; Citavicius, Donaldas

    2014-01-01

    GD-95 lipase from Geobacillus sp. strain 95 and its modified variants lacking N-terminal signal peptide and/or 10 or 20 C-terminal amino acids were successfully cloned, expressed and purified. To our knowledge, GD-95 lipase precursor (Pre-GD-95) is the first Geobacillus lipase possessing more than 80% lipolytic activity at 5 °C. It has maximum activity at 55 °C and displays a broad pH activity range. GD-95 lipase was shown to hydrolyze p-NP dodecanoate, tricaprylin and canola oil better than other analyzed substrates. Structural and sequence alignments of bacterial lipases and GD-95 lipase revealed that the C-terminus forms an α helix, which is a conserved structure in lipases from Pseudomonas, Clostridium or Staphylococcus bacteria. This work demonstrates that 10 and 20 C-terminal amino acids of GD-95 lipase significantly affect stability and other physicochemical properties of this enzyme, which has never been reported before and can help create lipases with more specific properties for industrial application. GD-95 lipase and its modified variants GD-95-10 can be successfully applied to biofuel production, in leather and pulp industries, for the production of cosmetics or perfumes. These lipases are potential biocatalysts in processes, which require extreme conditions: low or high temperature, strongly acidic or alkaline environment and various organic solvents.

  6. Purification and Structural Analysis of LEM-Domain Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrada, Isaline; Bourgeois, Benjamin; Samson, Camille; Buendia, Brigitte; Worman, Howard J; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    LAP2-emerin-MAN1 (LEM)-domain proteins are modular proteins characterized by the presence of a conserved motif of about 50 residues. Most LEM-domain proteins localize at the inner nuclear membrane, but some are also found in the endoplasmic reticulum or nuclear interior. Their architecture has been analyzed by predicting the limits of their globular domains, determining the 3D structure of these domains and in a few cases calculating the 3D structure of specific domains bound to biological targets. The LEM domain adopts an α-helical fold also found in SAP and HeH domains of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. The LEM domain binds to BAF (barrier-to-autointegration factor; BANF1), which interacts with DNA and tethers chromatin to the nuclear envelope. LAP2 isoforms also share an N-terminal LEM-like domain, which binds DNA. The structure and function of other globular domains that distinguish LEM-domain proteins from each other have been characterized, including the C-terminal dimerization domain of LAP2α and C-terminal WH and UHM domains of MAN1. LEM-domain proteins also have large intrinsically disordered regions that are involved in intra- and intermolecular interactions and are highly regulated by posttranslational modifications in vivo.

  7. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. Part III. Dynamics of long-range hydrophobic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2010-01-01

    A 20-residue peptide, IG(42–61), derived from the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus was studied using CD, NMR spectroscopy at various temperatures and by differential scanning calorimetry. Unlike other related peptides studied so far, this peptide displays two heat capacity peaks in DSC measurements (at a scanning rate of 1.5 deg/min at a peptide concentration of 0.07mM) which suggests a three-state folding/unfolding process. The ...

  8. Structure of a C-terminal fragment of its Vps53 subunit suggests similarity of Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex to a family of tethering complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasan, Neil; Hutagalung, Alex; Novick, Peter; Reinisch, Karin M. (Yale); (UCLJ)

    2010-08-13

    The Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex is a membrane-tethering complex that functions in traffic from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. Here we present the structure of a C-terminal fragment of the Vps53 subunit, important for binding endosome-derived vesicles, at a resolution of 2.9 {angstrom}. We show that the C terminus consists of two {alpha}-helical bundles arranged in tandem, and we identify a highly conserved surface patch, which may play a role in vesicle recognition. Mutations of the surface result in defects in membrane traffic. The fold of the Vps53 C terminus is strongly reminiscent of proteins that belong to three other tethering complexes - Dsl1, conserved oligomeric Golgi, and the exocyst - thought to share a common evolutionary origin. Thus, the structure of the Vps53 C terminus suggests that GARP belongs to this family of complexes.

  9. The C-terminal domain of the nuclear factor I-B2 isoform is glycosylated and transactivates the WAP gene in the JEG-3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transcription factor nuclear factor I (NFI) has been shown previously both in vivo and in vitro to be involved in the cooperative regulation of whey acidic protein (WAP) gene transcription along with the glucocorticoid receptor and STAT5. In addition, one of the specific NFI isoforms, NFI-B2, was demonstrated in transient co-transfection experiments in JEG cells, which lack endogenous NFI, to be preferentially involved in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene expression. A comparison of the DNA-binding specificities of the different NFI isoforms only partially explained their differential ability to activate the WAP gene transcription. Here, we analyzed the transactivation regions of two NFI isoforms by making chimeric proteins between the NFI-A and B isoforms. Though, their DNA-binding specificities were not altered as compared to the corresponding wild-type transcription factors, the C-terminal region of the NFI-B isoform was shown to preferentially activate WAP gene transcription in cooperation with GR and STAT5 in transient co-transfection assays in JEG-3 cells. Furthermore, determination of serine and threonine-specific glycosylation (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) of the C-terminus of the NFI-B isoform suggested that the secondary modification by O-GlcNAc might play a role in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene transcription by NFI-B2 and STAT5

  10. Co-expression of the C-terminal domain of Yersinia enterocolitica invasin enhances the efficacy of classical swine-fever-vectored vaccine based on human adenovirus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Helin Li; Pengbo Ning; Zhi Lin; Wulong Liang; Kai Kang; Lei He; Yanming Zhang

    2015-03-01

    The use of adenovirus vector-based vaccines is a promising approach for generating antigen-specific immune responses. Improving vaccine potency is necessary in other approaches to address their inadequate protection for the majority of infectious diseases. This study is the first to reconstruct a recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus co-expressing E2 and invasin C-terminal (InvC) glycoproteins (rAd-E2-InvC). rAd-E2-InvC with 2×106 TCID50 was intramuscularly administered two times to CSFV-free pigs at 14 day intervals. No adverse clinical reactions were observed in any of the pigs after the vaccination. The CSFV E2-specific antibody titer was significantly higher in the rAd-E2-InvC group than that in the rAdV-E2 group as measured by NPLA and blocking ELISA. Pigs immunized with rAd-E2-InvC were completely protected against lethal challenge. Neither CSFV RNA nor pathological changes were detected in the tissues after CSFV challenge. These results demonstrate that rAd-E2-InvC could be an alternative to the existing CSF vaccine. Moreover, InvC that acts as an adjuvant could enhance the immunogenicity of rAdV-E2 and induce high CSFV E2-specific antibody titer and protection level.

  11. Comparison of adjuvant activity of N- and C-terminal domain of gp96 in a Her2-positive breast cancer model

    OpenAIRE

    Pakravan, Nafiseh; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    It has been frequently reported that gp96 acts as a strong biologic adjuvant. Some studies have even investigated adjuvant activity of the gp96 C- or N-terminal domain. The controversy surrounding adjuvant activity of gp96 terminal domains prompted us to compare adjuvant activity of gp96 C- or N-terminal domain toward Her2/neu, as DNA vaccine in a Her2/neu-positive breast cancer model. To do so, mice were immunized with DNA vaccine consisting of transmembrane and extracellular domain (TM + EC...

  12. The 18-kilodalton Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) contains a potential N-terminal dimerization site and a C-terminal nucleic acid-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Birkelund, S; Holm, A;

    1996-01-01

    , in part, be due to Hc1-mediated alterations of DNA topology. To locate putative functional domains within Hc1, polypeptides Hc1(2-57) and Hc1(53-125), corresponding to the N- and C-terminal parts of Hc1, respectively, were generated. By chemical cross-linking with ethylene glycol-bis (succinic acid N...... retardation assays, Hc1(53-125) was shown to contain a domain capable of binding both DNA and RNA. Under the same conditions, Hc1(2-57) had no nucleic acid-binding activity. Electron microscopy of Hc1-DNA and Hc1(53-125)-DNA complexes revealed differences suggesting that the N-terminal part of Hc1 may affect...

  13. Structural analysis of the C-terminal region (modules 18-20 of complement regulator factor H (FH.

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    Hugh P Morgan

    Full Text Available Factor H (FH is a soluble regulator of the human complement system affording protection to host tissues. It selectively inhibits amplification of C3b, the activation-specific fragment of the abundant complement component C3, in fluid phase and on self-surfaces and accelerates the decay of the alternative pathway C3 convertase, C3bBb. We have determined the crystal structure of the three carboxyl-terminal complement control protein (CCP modules of FH (FH18-20 that bind to C3b, and which additionally recognize polyanionic markers specific to self-surfaces. These CCPs harbour nearly 30 disease-linked missense mutations. We have also deployed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS to investigate FH18-20 flexibility in solution using FH18-20 and FH19-20 constructs. In the crystal lattice FH18-20 adopts a "J"-shape: A ~122-degree tilt between the structurally highly similar modules 18 and 19 precedes an extended, linear arrangement of modules 19 and 20 as observed in previously determined structures of these two modules alone. However, under solution conditions FH18-20 adopts multiple conformations mediated by flexibility between CCPs 18 and 19. We also pinpoint the locations of disease-associated missense mutations on the module 18 surface and discuss our data in the context of the C3b:FH interaction.

  14. DFT Study of the Electronic Structure of Cubic-SiC Nanopores with a C-Terminated Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Calvino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the dependence of the electronic structure and energetic stability on the chemical surface passivation of cubic porous silicon carbide (pSiC was performed using density functional theory (DFT and the supercell technique. The pores were modeled by removing atoms in the [001] direction to produce a surface chemistry composed of only carbon atoms (C-phase. Changes in the electronic states of the porous structures were studied by using different passivation schemes: one with hydrogen (H atoms and the others gradually replacing pairs of H atoms with oxygen (O atoms, fluorine (F atoms, and hydroxide (OH radicals. The results indicate that the band gap behavior of the C-phase pSiC depends on the number of passivation agents (other than H per supercell. The band gap decreased with an increasing number of F, O, or OH radical groups. Furthermore, the influence of the passivation of the pSiC on its surface relaxation and the differences in such parameters as bond lengths, bond angles, and cell volume are compared between all surfaces. The results indicate the possibility of nanostructure band gap engineering based on SiC via surface passivation agents.

  15. pHluorin-assisted expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data analysis of the C-terminal domain of the HsdR subunit of the Escherichia coli type I restriction-modification system EcoR124I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinkevich, Pavel; Iermak, Iuliia; Luedtke, Nicholas A; Mesters, Jeroen R; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Ludwig, Jost

    2016-09-01

    The HsdR subunit of the type I restriction-modification system EcoR124I is responsible for the translocation as well as the restriction activity of the whole complex consisting of the HsdR, HsdM and HsdS subunits, and while crystal structures are available for the wild type and several mutants, the C-terminal domain comprising approximately 150 residues was not resolved in any of these structures. Here, three fusion constructs with the GFP variant pHluorin developed to overexpress, purify and crystallize the C-terminal domain of HsdR are reported. The shortest of the three encompassed HsdR residues 887-1038 and yielded crystals that belonged to the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.42, b = 176.58, c = 126.03 Å, α = β = γ = 90.00° and two molecules in the asymmetric unit (VM = 2.55 Å(3) Da(-1), solvent content 50.47%). X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.45 Å. PMID:27599856

  16. A C-terminal segment of the V{sub 1}R vasopressin receptor is unstructured in the crystal structure of its chimera with the maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adikesavan, Nallini Vijayarangan; Mahmood, Syed Saad; Stanley, Nithianantham; Xu, Zhen; Wu, Nan [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Thibonnier, Marc [Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Shoham, Menachem, E-mail: mxs10@case.edu [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The 1.8 Å crystal structure of an MBP-fusion protein with the C-terminal cytoplasmic segment of the V1 vasopressin receptor reveals that the receptor segment is unstructured. The V{sub 1} vascular vasopressin receptor (V{sub 1}R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in the regulation of body-fluid osmolality, blood volume and blood pressure. Signal transduction is mediated by the third intracellular loop of this seven-transmembrane protein as well as by the C-terminal cytoplasmic segment. A chimera of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) and the C-terminal segment of V{sub 1}R has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.10, b = 66.56, c = 115.72 Å, β = 95.99°. The 1.8 Å crystal structure reveals the conformation of MBP and part of the linker region of this chimera, with the C-terminal segment being unstructured. This may reflect a conformational plasticity in the C-terminal segment that may be necessary for proper function of V{sub 1}R.

  17. Molecular dissection of the C-terminal regulatory domain of the plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase AHA2: Mapping of residues that when altered give rise to an activated enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, K.B.; Venema, K.; Jah, T.;

    1999-01-01

    The plasma membrane H+-ATPase is a proton pump belonging to the P-type ATPase superfamily and is important for nutrient acquisition in plants, The H+-ATPase is controlled by an autoinhibitory C-terminal regulatory domain and is activated by 14-3-3 proteins which bind to this part of the enzyme....... Alanine-scanning mutagenesis through 87 consecutive amino acid residues was used to evaluate the role of the C-terminus in autoinhibition of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase AHA2 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutant enzymes were expressed in a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a defective endogenous H......+-ATPase. The enzymes were characterized by their ability to promote growth in acidic conditions and to promote H+ extrusion from intact cells, both of which are measures of plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity, and were also characterized with respect to kinetic properties such as affinity for H+ and ATP...

  18. The C-terminal region of thermophilic tRNA (m7G46) methyltransferase (TrmB) stabilizes the dimer structure and enhances fidelity of methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomikawa, Chie; Ochi, Anna; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2008-05-15

    Transfer RNA (m(7)G46) methyltransferase catalyzes methyl-transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to N(7) atom of the semi-conserved G46 base in tRNA. Aquifex aeolicus is a hyper thermophilic eubacterium that grows at close to 95 degrees C. A. aeolicus tRNA (m(7)G46) methyltransferase [TrmB] has an elongated C-terminal region as compared with mesophilic counterparts. In this study, the authors focused on the functions of this C-terminal region. Analytic gel filtration chromatography and amino acid sequencing reveled that the start point (Glu202) of the C-terminal region is often cleaved by proteases during purification steps and the C-terminal region tightly binds to another subunit even in the presence of 6M urea. Because the C-terminal region contains abundant basic amino acid residues, the authors assumed that some of these residues might be involved in tRNA binding. To address this idea, the authors prepared eight alanine substitution mutant proteins. However, measurements of initial velocities of these mutant proteins suggested that the basic amino acid residues in the C-terminal region are not involved in tRNA binding. The authors investigated effects of the deletion of the C-terminal region. Deletion mutant protein of the C-terminal region (the core protein) was precipitated by incubation at 85 degrees C, while the wild type protein was soluble at that temperature, demonstrating that the C-terminal region contributes to the protein stability at high temperatures. The core protein had a methyl-transfer activity to yeast tRNA(Phe) transcript. Furthermore, the core protein slowly methylated tRNA transcripts, which did not contain G46 base. Moreover, the modified base was identified as m(7)G by two-dimensional thin layer chromatography. Thus, the deletion of the C-terminal region causes nonspecific methylation of N(7) atom of guanine base(s) in tRNA transcripts.

  19. Calmodulin and calcium interplay in the modulation of TRPC5 channel activity. Identification of a novel C-terminal domain for calcium/calmodulin-mediated facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Benito; Tang, Jisen; Xiao, Rui; Salgado, Alfonso; Sampieri, Alicia; Zhu, Michael X; Vaca, Luis

    2005-09-01

    TRPC5 forms Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channels important for neurite outgrowth and growth cone morphology of hippocampal neurons. Here we studied the activation of mouse TRPC5 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary and human embryonic kidney 293 cells by agonist stimulation of several receptors that couple to the phosphoinositide signaling cascade and the role of calmodulin (CaM) on the activation. We showed that exogenous application of 10 microM CaM through patch pipette accelerated the agonist-induced channel activation by 2.8-fold, with the time constant for half-activation reduced from 4.25 +/- 0.4 to 1.56 +/- 0.85 min. We identified a novel CaM-binding site located at the C terminus of TRPC5, 95 amino acids downstream from the previously determined common CaM/IP3R-binding (CIRB) domain for all TRPC proteins. Deletion of the novel CaM-binding site attenuated the acceleration in channel activation induced by CaM. However, disruption of the CIRB domain from TRPC5 rendered the channel irresponsive to agonist stimulation without affecting the cell surface expression of the channel protein. Furthermore, we showed that high (>5 microM) intracellular free Ca2+ inhibited the current density without affecting the time course of TRPC5 activation by receptor agonists. These results demonstrated that intracellular Ca2+ has dual and opposite effects on the activation of TRPC5. The novel CaM-binding site is important for the Ca2+/CaM-mediated facilitation, whereas the CIRB domain is critical for the overall response of receptor-induced TRPC5 channel activation.

  20. Hepatitis B virus DNA-negative dane particles lack core protein but contain a 22-kDa precore protein without C-terminal arginine-rich domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tatsuji; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Terada, Nobuo; Rokuhara, Akinori; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Yagi, Shintaro; Tanaka, Eiji; Kiyosawa, Kendo; Ohno, Shinichi; Maki, Noboru

    2005-06-10

    DNA-negative Dane particles have been observed in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected sera. The capsids of the empty particles are thought to be composed of core protein but have not been studied in detail. In the present study, the protein composition of the particles was examined using new enzyme immunoassays for the HBV core antigen (HBcAg) and for the HBV precore/core proteins (core-related antigens, HBcrAg). HBcrAg were abundant in fractions slightly less dense than HBcAg and HBV DNA. Three times more Dane-like particles were observed in the HBcrAg-rich fraction than in the HBV DNA-rich fraction by electron microscopy. Western blots and mass spectrometry identified the HBcrAg as a 22-kDa precore protein (p22cr) containing the uncleaved signal peptide and lacking the arginine-rich domain that is involved in binding the RNA pregenome or the DNA genome. In sera from 30 HBV-infected patients, HBcAg represented only a median 10.5% of the precore/core proteins in enveloped particles. These data suggest that most of the Dane particles lack viral DNA and core capsid but contain p22cr. This study provides a model for the formation of the DNA-negative Dane particles. The precore proteins, which lack the arginine-rich nucleotide-binding domain, form viral RNA/DNA-negative capsid-like particles and are enveloped and released as empty particles.

  1. 鸡大肠杆菌FimH基因C端结构域克隆及特性分析%Cloning and characterization of C terminal domain of avian E .coli ’Fim H gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白宇琛; 谢金峰; 周广防; 冯秀丽

    2016-01-01

    Objective]Through further study of Fim H ,the the main structure gene of avian Escherichia coli type I , the research aimed to provide necessary theoretical foundation for pathogenic mechanism of avian E .coli and develop-ment of gene engineering vaccinE.[Methods]Based on the published C terminal domain nucleotide sequence of Fim H gene for reference,this research designed and synthesized primers,amplified three strains of the relevant Fim H genes in avian E .coli including JS1,JS2 and JS6,used Lasergene software for sequence alignment and protein structure pre-diction,and the evolutionary tree was drew,etc.[Results]The results showed that the homology of gene nucleotide sequences between Reference strain and JS1,JS2 or JS6 were 97.3%,97.7% and 97.3%,and their amino acid se-quences was 95.3%,97.6% and 95.3%,respectively.Although their Fim H antigenic nucleotide sequences between Reference strain and JS1,JS2 or JS6 were 97.3%,97.7% and 97.3%,and their amino acid sequences was 95.3%, 97.6% and 95.3%,respectively.Although their Fim H antigenic determinants are basically similar,amino acids changes at 78 th and 79 th caused the different antigenic determinant at C terminal domain of Fim H ,which indicated that amino acid variation of Fim H sequences might have the minor effect on the antigenic property of Fim H .Further-more,the evolutionary tree analysis showed the close evolutionary relationship among three isolated strains and the do-mestic avian E .coli strains.[Conclusion]The results indicated that the Fim H gene of avian E .coli had no significant variation,which makes important foundation for further research on molecular mechanism of avian E .coli and the con-trol strategies against pathogenic avian E .coli.%[目的]通过进一步研究禽大肠杆菌 I 型菌毛主要结构基因 FimH 的基因结构及其抗原特性,为深入探索鸡大肠杆菌致病机理及研制基因工程疫苗奠定必要的理论基础。[方法]本文以已发表的 Fim H

  2. A conserved BURP domain defines a novel group of plant proteins with unusual primary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, J; Boutilier, K A; van Lookeren Campagne, M M; Miki, B L

    1998-09-01

    We have identified a new class of plant proteins containing a common C-terminal region, which we have termed the BURP domain. These proteins are defined not only by the BURP domain, but also by the overall similarity in their modular construction. The BURP domain proteins consist of either three or four modules: (i) an N-terminal hydrophobic domain -- a presumptive transit peptide, joined to (ii) a short conserved segment or other short segment, (iii) an optional segment consisting of repeated units which is unique to each member, and (iv) the C-terminal BURP domain. These individual modules appear to be combined to form two main classes of BURP domain proteins. The BURP domain proteins, despite the similarities in their primary structural features, show no obvious similarities in the tissues or conditions under which they are expressed. The presence of the conserved BURP domain in diverse plant proteins suggests an important and fundamental functional role for this domain. PMID:9790599

  3. Crystal structure of the fibrinogen-like recognition domain of FIBCD1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper Bonnet; Schlosser, Anders; Sørensen, Grith Lykke;

    The high resolution crystal structures of a recombinant fragment of the C-terminal fibrinogen-related domain of FIBCD1, a vertebrate chitin receptor, have been determined. The overall structure shows similarity in structure and aggregation to the homologous innate immune protein tachylectin 5A...

  4. The effect of pH on recombinant C-terminal domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin type E (rBoNT/E-HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jafar Mousavy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins are tending to be the most favorable vaccine-candidates against botulism. Recombinant Carboxy-terminal of botulinum neurotoxin serotype E (rBoNT/E-HCC has been introduced as an efficient vaccine against botulism type E. In this report, we made an effort to investigate the effect of different pH on protein structure to assess if rBoNT/E-HCC could be used as a vaccine for oral administration. Initially, rBoNT/E-HCC was expressed and purified. Structural changes of rBoNT/E-HCC at several pH conditions were studied by various techniques including circular dichroism (CD, fluorescence, aggregation and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results showed the more compact and more stable structure for rBoNT/E-HCC at acidic pH, and loosely folded structure at alkaline pH. Our finding as the first step of rBoNT/E-HCC evaluation, hopefully introduce it as a suitable vaccine candidate for oral administration.

  5. TWEAK-independent Fn14 self-association and NF-κB activation is mediated by the C-terminal region of the Fn14 cytoplasmic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharron A N Brown

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily member TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokine implicated in physiological tissue regeneration and wound repair. TWEAK binds to a 102-amino acid type I transmembrane cell surface receptor named fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14. TWEAK:Fn14 engagement activates several intracellular signaling cascades, including the NF-κB pathway, and sustained Fn14 signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Although several groups are developing TWEAK- or Fn14-targeted agents for therapeutic use, much more basic science research is required before we fully understand the TWEAK/Fn14 signaling axis. For example, we and others have proposed that TWEAK-independent Fn14 signaling may occur in cells when Fn14 levels are highly elevated, but this idea has never been tested directly. In this report, we first demonstrate TWEAK-independent Fn14 signaling by showing that an Fn14 deletion mutant that is unable to bind TWEAK can activate the NF-κB pathway in transfected cells. We then show that ectopically-expressed, cell surface-localized Fn14 can self-associate into Fn14 dimers, and we show that Fn14 self-association is mediated by an 18-aa region within the Fn14 cytoplasmic domain. Endogenously-expressed Fn14 as well as ectopically-overexpressed Fn14 could also be detected in dimeric form when cell lysates were subjected to SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions. Additional experiments revealed that Fn14 dimerization occurs during cell lysis via formation of an intermolecular disulfide bond at cysteine residue 122. These findings provide insight into the Fn14 signaling mechanism and may aid current studies to develop therapeutic agents targeting this small cell surface receptor.

  6. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin C-terminal domain labeled to fluorescent dyes for in vivo visualization of micrometastatic chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Emiliano; Shapiro, Erik M; Gasparrini, Sara; Lopez, Salvatore; Schwab, Carlton L; Bellone, Stefania; Bortolomai, Ileana; Sumi, Natalia J; Bonazzoli, Elena; Nicoletti, Roberta; Deng, Yang; Saltzman, W Mark; Zeiss, Caroline J; Centritto, Floriana; Black, Jonathan D; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Ratner, Elena; Azodi, Masoud; Rutherford, Thomas J; Schwartz, Peter E; Pecorelli, Sergio; Santin, Alessandro D

    2015-12-01

    Identification of micrometastatic disease at the time of surgery remains extremely challenging in ovarian cancer patients. We used fluorescence microscopy, an in vivo imaging system and a fluorescence stereo microscope to evaluate fluorescence distribution in Claudin-3- and -4-overexpressing ovarian tumors, floating tumor clumps isolated from ascites and healthy organs. To do so, mice harboring chemotherapy-naïve and chemotherapy-resistant human ovarian cancer xenografts or patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) were treated with the carboxyl-terminal binding domain of the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (c-CPE) conjugated to FITC (FITC-c-CPE) or the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent tag IRDye CW800 (CW800-c-CPE) either intraperitoneally (IP) or intravenously (IV). We found tumor fluorescence to plateau at 30 min after IP injection of both the FITC-c-CPE and the CW800-c-CPE peptides and to be significantly higher than in healthy organs (p < 0.01). After IV injection of CW800-c-CPE, tumor fluorescence plateaued at 6 hr while the most favorable tumor-to-background fluorescence ratio (TBR) was found at 48 hr in both mouse models. Importantly, fluorescent c-CPE was highly sensitive for the in vivo visualization of peritoneal micrometastatic tumor implants and the identification of ovarian tumor spheroids floating in malignant ascites that were otherwise not detectable by conventional visual observation. The use of the fluorescent c-CPE peptide may represent a novel and effective optical approach at the time of primary debulking surgery for the real-time detection of micrometastatic ovarian disease overexpressing the Claudin-3 and -4 receptors or the identification of residual disease at the time of interval debulking surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment.

  7. The C-terminal domain of the bacterial SSB protein acts as a DNA maintenance hub at active chromosome replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    Full Text Available We have investigated in vivo the role of the carboxy-terminal domain of the Bacillus subtilis Single-Stranded DNA Binding protein (SSB(Cter as a recruitment platform at active chromosomal forks for many proteins of the genome maintenance machineries. We probed this SSB(Cter interactome using GFP fusions and by Tap-tag and biochemical analysis. It includes at least 12 proteins. The interactome was previously shown to include PriA, RecG, and RecQ and extended in this study by addition of DnaE, SbcC, RarA, RecJ, RecO, XseA, Ung, YpbB, and YrrC. Targeting of YpbB to active forks appears to depend on RecS, a RecQ paralogue, with which it forms a stable complex. Most of these SSB partners are conserved in bacteria, while others, such as the essential DNA polymerase DnaE, YrrC, and the YpbB/RecS complex, appear to be specific to B. subtilis. SSB(Cter deletion has a moderate impact on B. subtilis cell growth. However, it markedly affects the efficiency of repair of damaged genomic DNA and arrested replication forks. ssbΔCter mutant cells appear deficient in RecA loading on ssDNA, explaining their inefficiency in triggering the SOS response upon exposure to genotoxic agents. Together, our findings show that the bacterial SSB(Cter acts as a DNA maintenance hub at active chromosomal forks that secures their propagation along the genome.

  8. The C-terminal domain of the bacterial SSB protein acts as a DNA maintenance hub at active chromosome replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Audrey; Lecointe, François; McGovern, Stephen; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Polard, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated in vivo the role of the carboxy-terminal domain of the Bacillus subtilis Single-Stranded DNA Binding protein (SSB(Cter)) as a recruitment platform at active chromosomal forks for many proteins of the genome maintenance machineries. We probed this SSB(Cter) interactome using GFP fusions and by Tap-tag and biochemical analysis. It includes at least 12 proteins. The interactome was previously shown to include PriA, RecG, and RecQ and extended in this study by addition of DnaE, SbcC, RarA, RecJ, RecO, XseA, Ung, YpbB, and YrrC. Targeting of YpbB to active forks appears to depend on RecS, a RecQ paralogue, with which it forms a stable complex. Most of these SSB partners are conserved in bacteria, while others, such as the essential DNA polymerase DnaE, YrrC, and the YpbB/RecS complex, appear to be specific to B. subtilis. SSB(Cter) deletion has a moderate impact on B. subtilis cell growth. However, it markedly affects the efficiency of repair of damaged genomic DNA and arrested replication forks. ssbΔCter mutant cells appear deficient in RecA loading on ssDNA, explaining their inefficiency in triggering the SOS response upon exposure to genotoxic agents. Together, our findings show that the bacterial SSB(Cter) acts as a DNA maintenance hub at active chromosomal forks that secures their propagation along the genome. PMID:21170359

  9. LC8 dynein light chain (DYNLL1) binds to the C-terminal domain of ATM-interacting protein (ATMIN/ASCIZ) and regulates its subcellular localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapali, Peter [Dept. Biochemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Garcia-Mayoral, Maria Flor [Dept. Biological Physical Chemistry, IQFR, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Moreno, Monica [Dept. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Tarnok, Krisztian; Schlett, Katalin [Dept. Physiology and Neurobiology, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Albar, Juan Pablo [Proteomics Facility, CNB, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Bruix, Marta [Dept. Biological Physical Chemistry, IQFR, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Nyitray, Laszlo, E-mail: nyitray@elte.hu [Dept. Biochemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Rodriguez-Crespo, Ignacio, E-mail: nacho@bbm1.ucm.es [Dept. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have screened a human library with dynein light chain DYNLL1 (DLC8) as bait. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynein light chain DYNLL1 binds to ATM-kinase interacting protein (ATMIN). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATMIN has 17 SQ/TQ motifs, a motif frequently found in DYNLL1-binding partners. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two proteins interact in vitro, with ATMIN displaying at least five binding sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction of ATMIN and DYNNL1 in transfected cells can also be observed. -- Abstract: LC8 dynein light chain (now termed DYNLL1 and DYNLL2 in mammals), a dimeric 89 amino acid protein, is a component of the dynein multi-protein complex. However a substantial amount of DYNLL1 is not associated to microtubules and it can thus interact with dozens of cellular and viral proteins that display well-defined, short linear motifs. Using DYNLL1 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart library we identified ATMIN, an ATM kinase-interacting protein, as a DYNLL1-binding partner. Interestingly, ATMIN displays at least 18 SQ/TQ motifs in its sequence and DYNLL1 is known to bind to proteins with KXTQT motifs. Using pepscan and yeast two-hybrid techniques we show that DYNLL1 binds to multiple SQ/TQ motifs present in the carboxy-terminal domain of ATMIN. Recombinant expression and purification of the DYNLL1-binding region of ATMIN allowed us to obtain a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass in gel filtration close to 400 kDa that could bind to DYNLL1 in vitro. The NMR data-driven modelled complexes of DYNLL1 with two selected ATMIN peptides revealed a similar mode of binding to that observed between DYNLL1 and other peptide targets. Remarkably, co-expression of mCherry-DYNLL1 and GFP-ATMIN mutually affected intracellular protein localization. In GFP-ATMIN expressing-cells DNA damage induced efficiently nuclear foci formation, which was partly impeded by the presence of mCherry-DYNLL1

  10. The lectin domain of the polypeptide GalNAc transferase family of glycosyltransferases (ppGalNAc Ts) acts as a switch directing glycopeptide substrate glycosylation in an N- or C-terminal direction, further controlling mucin type O-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Thomas A; Revoredo, Leslie; Thome, Joseph J C; Tabak, Lawrence A; Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Clausen, Henrik; Gahlay, Gagandeep K; Jarvis, Donald L; Johnson, Roy W; Moniz, Heather A; Moremen, Kelley

    2013-07-01

    Mucin type O-glycosylation is initiated by a large family of polypeptide GalNAc transferases (ppGalNAc Ts) that add α-GalNAc to the Ser and Thr residues of peptides. Of the 20 human isoforms, all but one are composed of two globular domains linked by a short flexible linker: a catalytic domain and a ricin-like lectin carbohydrate binding domain. Presently, the roles of the catalytic and lectin domains in peptide and glycopeptide recognition and specificity remain unclear. To systematically study the role of the lectin domain in ppGalNAc T glycopeptide substrate utilization, we have developed a series of novel random glycopeptide substrates containing a single GalNAc-O-Thr residue placed near either the N or C terminus of the glycopeptide substrate. Our results reveal that the presence and N- or C-terminal placement of the GalNAc-O-Thr can be important determinants of overall catalytic activity and specificity that differ between transferase isoforms. For example, ppGalNAc T1, T2, and T14 prefer C-terminally placed GalNAc-O-Thr, whereas ppGalNAc T3 and T6 prefer N-terminally placed GalNAc-O-Thr. Several transferase isoforms, ppGalNAc T5, T13, and T16, display equally enhanced N- or C-terminal activities relative to the nonglycosylated control peptides. This N- and/or C-terminal selectivity is presumably due to weak glycopeptide binding to the lectin domain, whose orientation relative to the catalytic domain is dynamic and isoform-dependent. Such N- or C-terminal glycopeptide selectivity provides an additional level of control or fidelity for the O-glycosylation of biologically significant sites and suggests that O-glycosylation may in some instances be exquisitely controlled.

  11. Identification of the C-Terminal GH5 Domain from CbCel9B/Man5A as the First Glycoside Hydrolase with Thermal Activation Property from a Multimodular Bifunctional Enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Wang

    Full Text Available Caldicellulosiruptor bescii encodes at least six unique multimodular glycoside hydrolases crucial for plant cell wall polysaccharides degradation, with each having two catalytic domains separated by two to three carbohydrate binding modules. Among the six enzymes, three have one N- or C-terminal GH5 domain with identical amino acid sequences. Despite a few reports on some of these multimodular enzymes, little is known about how the conserved GH5 domains behave, which are believed to be important due to the gene duplication. We thus cloned a representative GH5 domain from the C-terminus of a multimodular protein, i.e. the bifunctional cellulase/mannanase CbCel9B/Man5A which has been reported, and expressed it in Escherichia coli. Without any appending CBMs, the recombinant CbMan5A was still able to hydrolyze a variety of mannan substrates with different backbone linkages or side-chain decorations. While CbMan5A displayed the same pH optimum as CbCel9B/Man5A, it had an increased optimal temperature (90°C and moreover, was activated by heating at 70°C and 80°C, a property not ever reported for the full-length protein. The turnover numbers of CbMan5A on mannan substrates were, however, lower than those of CbCel9B/Man5A. These data suggested that evolution of CbMan5A and the other domains into a single polypeptide is not a simple assembly; rather, the behavior of one module may be affected by the other ones in the full-length enzyme. The differential scanning calorimetry analysis further indicated that heating CbMan5A was not a simple transition state process. To the best knowledge of the authors, CbMan5A is the first glycoside hydrolase with thermal activation property identified from a multimodular bifunctional enzyme.

  12. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong (Toronto); (Penn)

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  13. Structure of the human Nac1 POZ domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Mark A; Carr, Stephen B; Wright, Stephanie C

    2009-05-01

    Nac1 is a POZ-domain transcription factor that is involved in the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. It is overexpressed in ovarian serous carcinoma and targeting the interactions of its POZ domain is a potential therapeutic strategy. Nac1 lacks a zinc-finger DNA-binding domain and thereby differs from most other POZ-domain transcription factors. Here, the crystal structure of the Nac1 POZ domain at 2.1 A resolution is reported. The Nac1 POZ domain crystallized as a dimer in which the interaction interfaces between subunits resemble those found in the POZ-zinc finger transcription factors. The organization of the Nac1 POZ-domain core resembles reported POZ-domain structures, whereas the C-terminus differs markedly. The C-terminal alpha-helix of the Nac1 POZ domain is shorter than that observed in most other POZ-domain transcription factors; variation in the organization of this region may be a general feature of POZ-domain structures.

  14. Peptide inhibitors of CDK2-cyclin A that target the cyclin recruitment-site: structural variants of the C-terminal Phe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Gail E; Cowan, Angela; McInnes, Campbell; Zheleva, Daniella I; Fischer, Peter M; Chan, Weng C

    2002-09-16

    A focused series of octapeptides based on the lead compound H-His-Ala-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu-Ile-Phe-NH(2) 1, in which the C-terminal phenylalanine residue was replaced by alpha and/or beta-modified variants, was synthesized using solid-phase chemistry. Both the L-threo-beta-hydroxy-phenylalanine (beta-phenylserine, Pse) and (2S)-phenylalaninol derivatives, as competitive binders at the cyclin-recruitment site, displayed potent inhibitory activity towards the CDK2-cyclin A complex. Unexpectedly, the D-threo-Pse derivatives also showed inhibitory activity. PMID:12182847

  15. Alternative Splicing of Toll-Like Receptor 9 Transcript in Teleost Fish Grouper Is Regulated by NF-κB Signaling via Phosphorylation of the C-Terminal Domain of the RPB1 Subunit of RNA Polymerase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Frank Fang-Yao; Hui, Cho-Fat; Chang, Tien-Hsien; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2016-01-01

    Similar to its mammalian counterparts, teleost Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes unmethylated CpG DNA presented in the genome of bacteria or DNA viruses and initiates signaling pathway(s) for immune responses. We have previously shown that the TLR9 pathway in grouper, an economically important teleost, can be debilitated by an inhibitory gTLR9B isoform, whose production is mediated by RNA alternative splicing. However, how does grouper TLR9 (gTLR9) signaling impinge on the RNA splicing machinery to produce gTlr9B is unknown. Here we show that the gTlr9 alternative splicing is regulated through ligand-induced phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We first observed that ligand-activated NF- κB pathway biased the production of the gTlr9B isoform. Because NF- κB is known to recruit p-TEFb kinase, which phosphorylates the Pol II CTD at Ser2 residues, we examined p-TEFb’s role in alternative splicing. We found that promoting p-TEFb kinase activity significantly favored the production of the gTlr9B isoform, whereas inhibiting p-TEFb yielded an opposite result. We further showed that p-TEFb-mediated production of the gTlr9B isoform down-regulates its own immune responses, suggesting a self-limiting mechanism. Taken together, our data indicate a feedback mechanism of the gTLR9 signaling pathway to regulate the alternative splicing machinery, which in turn produces an inhibitor to the pathway. PMID:27658294

  16. Structural Studies of Geosmin Synthase, a Bifunctional Sesquiterpene Synthase with αα Domain Architecture That Catalyzes a Unique Cyclization-Fragmentation Reaction Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Golda G; Lombardi, Patrick M; Pemberton, Travis A; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Cole, Kathryn E; Köksal, Mustafa; Murphy, Frank V; Vedula, L Sangeetha; Chou, Wayne K W; Cane, David E; Christianson, David W

    2015-12-01

    Geosmin synthase from Streptomyces coelicolor (ScGS) catalyzes an unusual, metal-dependent terpenoid cyclization and fragmentation reaction sequence. Two distinct active sites are required for catalysis: the N-terminal domain catalyzes the ionization and cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate to form germacradienol and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the protonation, cyclization, and fragmentation of germacradienol to form geosmin and acetone through a retro-Prins reaction. A unique αα domain architecture is predicted for ScGS based on amino acid sequence: each domain contains the metal-binding motifs typical of a class I terpenoid cyclase, and each domain requires Mg(2+) for catalysis. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the unliganded N-terminal domain of ScGS and the structure of its complex with three Mg(2+) ions and alendronate. These structures highlight conformational changes required for active site closure and catalysis. Although neither full-length ScGS nor constructs of the C-terminal domain could be crystallized, homology models of the C-terminal domain were constructed on the basis of ∼36% sequence identity with the N-terminal domain. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments yield low-resolution molecular envelopes into which the N-terminal domain crystal structure and the C-terminal domain homology model were fit, suggesting possible αα domain architectures as frameworks for bifunctional catalysis.

  17. Formation of C-terminally truncated version of the Taz1 protein employs cleavage-box structure in mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunisova, Stanislava; Bartosova, Zdenka [Department of Genetics, Comenius University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, 842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kramara, Juraj; Nosek, Jozef [Department of Biochemistry, Comenius University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, 842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Tomaska, Lubomir, E-mail: tomaska@fns.uniba.sk [Department of Genetics, Comenius University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, 842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-02-12

    When expressed in various hosts the taz1{sup +} gene encoding the fission yeast telomere-binding protein produces two forms of polypeptides: full-length (Taz1p) and truncated (Taz1p{Delta}C) version lacking almost entire Myb-domain. Whereas Taz1p binds telomeric DNA in vitro, Taz1p{Delta}C forms long filaments unable of DNA binding. The formation of Taz1p{Delta}C is a result of neither site-specific proteolysis, nor premature termination of transcription. In silico analysis of the taz1{sup +} RNA transcript revealed a stem-loop structure at the site of cleavage (cleavage box; CB). In order to explore whether it possesses inherent destabilizing effects, we cloned CB sequence into the open reading frame (ORF) of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and observed that when expressed in Escherichia coli the engineered gene produced two forms of the reporter protein. The formation of the truncated version of GST was abolished, when CB was replaced with recoded sequence containing synonymous codons thus indicating that the truncation is based on structural properties of taz1{sup +} mRNA.

  18. Formation of C-terminally truncated version of the Taz1 protein employs cleavage-box structure in mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When expressed in various hosts the taz1+ gene encoding the fission yeast telomere-binding protein produces two forms of polypeptides: full-length (Taz1p) and truncated (Taz1pΔC) version lacking almost entire Myb-domain. Whereas Taz1p binds telomeric DNA in vitro, Taz1pΔC forms long filaments unable of DNA binding. The formation of Taz1pΔC is a result of neither site-specific proteolysis, nor premature termination of transcription. In silico analysis of the taz1+ RNA transcript revealed a stem-loop structure at the site of cleavage (cleavage box; CB). In order to explore whether it possesses inherent destabilizing effects, we cloned CB sequence into the open reading frame (ORF) of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and observed that when expressed in Escherichia coli the engineered gene produced two forms of the reporter protein. The formation of the truncated version of GST was abolished, when CB was replaced with recoded sequence containing synonymous codons thus indicating that the truncation is based on structural properties of taz1+ mRNA.

  19. Active and accurate trans-translation requires distinct determinants in the C-terminal tail of SmpB protein and the mRNA-like domain of transfer messenger RNA (tmRNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenares, Devin; Dulebohn, Daniel P; Svetlanov, Anton; Karzai, A Wali

    2013-10-18

    Unproductive ribosome stalling in eubacteria is resolved by the actions of SmpB protein and transfer messenger (tm) RNA. We examined the functional significance of conserved regions of SmpB and tmRNA to the trans-translation process. Our investigations reveal that the N-terminal 20 residues of SmpB, which are located near the ribosomal decoding center, are dispensable for all known SmpB activities. In contrast, a set of conserved residues that reside at the junction between the tmRNA-binding core and the C-terminal tail of SmpB play an important role in tmRNA accommodation. Our data suggest that the highly conserved glycine 132 acts as a flexible hinge that enables movement of the C-terminal tail, thus permitting proper positioning and establishment of the tmRNA open reading frame (ORF) as the surrogate template. To gain further insights into the function of the SmpB C-terminal tail, we examined the tagging activity of hybrid variants of tmRNA and the SmpB protein, in which the tmRNA ORF or the SmpB C-terminal tail was substituted with the equivalent but highly divergent sequences from Francisella tularensis. We observed that the hybrid tmRNA was active but resulted in less accurate selection of the resume codon. Cognate hybrid SmpB was necessary to restore activity. Furthermore, accurate tagging was observed when the identity of the resume codon was reverted from GGC to GCA. Taken together, these data suggest that the engagement of the tmRNA ORF and the selection of the correct translation resumption point are distinct activities that are influenced by independent tmRNA and SmpB determinants.

  20. High-resolution NMR structures of the domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tho1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Julian O. B.; Allen, Mark D.; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Bycroft, Mark, E-mail: mxb@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-23

    In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and the C-terminal RNA-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tho1 have been determined. THO is a multi-protein complex involved in the formation of messenger ribonuclear particles (mRNPs) by coupling transcription with mRNA processing and export. THO is thought to be formed from five subunits, Tho2p, Hpr1p, Tex1p, Mft1p and Thp2p, and recent work has determined a low-resolution structure of the complex [Poulsen et al. (2014 ▸), PLoS One, 9, e103470]. A number of additional proteins are thought to be involved in the formation of mRNP in yeast, including Tho1, which has been shown to bind RNA in vitro and is recruited to actively transcribed chromatin in vivo in a THO-complex and RNA-dependent manner. Tho1 is known to contain a SAP domain at the N-terminus, but the ability to suppress the expression defects of the hpr1Δ mutant of THO was shown to reside in the RNA-binding C-terminal region. In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and C-terminal RNA-binding domain have been determined.

  1. Structure of NS1A effector domain from the influenza A/Udorn/72 virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Shuangluo; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Robertus, Jon D., E-mail: jrobertus@mail.utexas.edu [Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, 1 University Station A5300, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the effector domain of the influenza protein NS1, a validated antiviral drug target, has been solved in two space groups. The nonstructural protein NS1A from influenza virus is a multifunctional virulence factor and a potent inhibitor of host immunity. It has two functional domains: an N-terminal 73-amino-acid RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal effector domain. Here, the crystallographic structure of the NS1A effector domain of influenza A/Udorn/72 virus is presented. Structure comparison with the NS1 effector domain from mouse-adapted influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus strain reveals a similar monomer conformation but a different dimer interface. Further analysis and evaluation shows that the dimer interface observed in the structure of the PR8 NS1 effector domain is likely to be a crystallographic packing effect. A hypothetical model of the intact NS1 dimer is presented.

  2. Structure of NS1A effector domain from the influenza A/Udorn/72 virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the effector domain of the influenza protein NS1, a validated antiviral drug target, has been solved in two space groups. The nonstructural protein NS1A from influenza virus is a multifunctional virulence factor and a potent inhibitor of host immunity. It has two functional domains: an N-terminal 73-amino-acid RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal effector domain. Here, the crystallographic structure of the NS1A effector domain of influenza A/Udorn/72 virus is presented. Structure comparison with the NS1 effector domain from mouse-adapted influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus strain reveals a similar monomer conformation but a different dimer interface. Further analysis and evaluation shows that the dimer interface observed in the structure of the PR8 NS1 effector domain is likely to be a crystallographic packing effect. A hypothetical model of the intact NS1 dimer is presented

  3. The Lectin Domain of the Polypeptide GalNAc Transferase Family of Glycosyltransferases (ppGalNAc Ts) Acts as a Switch Directing Glycopeptide Substrate Glycosylation in an N- or C-terminal Direction, Further Controlling Mucin Type O-Glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerken, Thomas A; Revoredo, Leslie; Thome, Joseph J C;

    2013-01-01

    Mucin type O-glycosylation is initiated by a large family of polypeptide GalNAc transferases (ppGalNAc Ts) that add α-GalNAc to the Ser and Thr residues of peptides. Of the 20 human isoforms, all but one are composed of two globular domains linked by a short flexible linker: a catalytic domain...... and a ricin-like lectin carbohydrate binding domain. Presently, the roles of the catalytic and lectin domains in peptide and glycopeptide recognition and specificity remain unclear. To systematically study the role of the lectin domain in ppGalNAc T glycopeptide substrate utilization, we have developed...... a series of novel random glycopeptide substrates containing a single GalNAc-O-Thr residue placed near either the N or C terminus of the glycopeptide substrate. Our results reveal that the presence and N- or C-terminal placement of the GalNAc-O-Thr can be important determinants of overall catalytic activity...

  4. Structural and histone binding ability characterizations of human PWWP domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. CONCLUSIONS: PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical β-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third β-strands and a C-terminal α-helix bundle. Both the canonical β-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones. ENHANCED VERSION: This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web

  5. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein. Importance of the C-terminal unstructured tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisne, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55(Gag), reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNA(Lys) 3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity. PMID:25144404

  6. Crystal Structures of the Outer Membrane Domain of Intimin and Invasin from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli and Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairman, James W.; Dautin, Nathalie; Wojtowicz, Damian; Liu, Wei; Noinaj, Nicholas; Barnard, Travis J.; Udho, Eshwar; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Buchanan, Susan K. (CUA); (Einstein); (NIH); (Scripps)

    2012-12-10

    Intimins and invasins are virulence factors produced by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. They contain C-terminal extracellular passenger domains that are involved in adhesion to host cells and N-terminal {beta} domains that are embedded in the outer membrane. Here, we identify the domain boundaries of an E. coli intimin {beta} domain and use this information to solve its structure and the {beta} domain structure of a Y. pseudotuberculosis invasin. Both {beta} domain structures crystallized as monomers and reveal that the previous range of residues assigned to the {beta} domain also includes a protease-resistant domain that is part of the passenger. Additionally, we identify 146 nonredundant representative members of the intimin/invasin family based on the boundaries of the highly conserved intimin and invasin {beta} domains. We then use this set of sequences along with our structural data to find and map the evolutionarily constrained residues within the {beta} domain.

  7. Tyrosine kinase activity of a chimeric insulin-like-growth-factor-1 receptor containing the insulin receptor C-terminal domain. Comparison with the tyrosine kinase activities of the insulin and insulin-like-growth-factor-1 receptors using a cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothe, I; Tartare, S; Kowalski-Chauvel, A; Kaliman, P; Van Obberghen, E; Ballotti, R

    1995-03-15

    In a previous study, we showed that a chimeric insulin-like-growth-factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor, with the beta subunit C-terminal part of the insulin receptor was more efficient in stimulating glycogen synthesis and p44mapk activity compared to the wild-type IFG-1 receptor [Tartare, S., Mothe, I., Kowalski-Chauvel, A., Breittmayer, J.-P., Ballotti, R. & Van Obberghen, E. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 11449-11455]. These data indicate that the receptor C-terminal domain plays an important role in the transmission of biological effects. To understand the molecular basis of the differences in receptor specificity, we studied the characteristics of insulin, IGF-1 and chimeric receptor tyrosine kinase activities in a cell-free system. We found that, compared to wild-type insulin and IGF-1 receptors, the chimeric receptor showed a decrease in (a) autophosphorylation, (b) tyrosine kinase activity towards insulin receptor substrate-1 and the insulin receptor-(1142-1158)-peptide, and (c) the ability to activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, for all the effects measured in a cell-free system, the chimeric receptor displayed an increased response to IGF-1 compared to the native IGF-1 receptor. Concerning the cation dependence of the tyrosine kinase activity, we showed that, at 10 mM Mg2+, the ligand-stimulated phosphorylation of poly(Glu80Tyr20) by both insulin receptor and chimeric receptor was increased by Mn2+. Conversely at 50 mM Mg2+, the chimeric receptor behaved like the IGF-1 receptor, since the presence of Mn2+ decreased the stimulatory effect of IGF-1 on their kinase activity. Furthermore, the Km of the chimeric receptor for ATP was increased compared to the wild-type receptors. These data demonstrate that the replacement of the C-terminal tail of the IGF-1 receptor by that of the insulin receptor has changed the receptor characteristics studied in a cell-free system. Our findings indicate that the C-terminal domain of the insulin receptor beta subunit plays a

  8. A C-terminal truncated hepatitis C virus core protein variant assembles in vitro into virus-like particles in the absence of structured nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little is known about the assembly pathway or structure of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In this work a truncated HCcAg variant covering the first 120 aa (HCcAg.120) with a 32 aa N-terminal fusion peptide (6x Histag-Xpress epitope) was purified as a monomer under strong denaturing conditions. In addition, minor HCcAg.120 peaks exhibiting little different molecular mass by SDS-PAGE which possibly represents alternative forms harboring the N-termini of HCcAg.120 were detected. Analysis using gel filtration chromatography showed that HCcAg.120 assembled into high molecular weight structures in vitro in the absence of structured nucleic acids. The negative-stain electron microscopy analysis revealed that these structures correspond with spherical VLPs of uniform morphology and size distribution. The diameters of these particles ranged from 20 to 43 nm with an average diameter of approximately 30 nm and were specifically immunolabelled with a mouse monoclonal antibody against the residues 5-35 of HCcAg. Results presented in this work showed that HCcAg.120 assembled in vitro into VLPs in the absence of structured nucleic acids with similar morphology and size distribution to those found in sera and hepatocytes from HCV-infected patients. Therefore, these VLPs would be important to elucidate the mechanisms behind the ability of HCcAg to assemble into a nucleocapsid structure

  9. Structuring very large domain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    a lower level of detail have not been dealt with. This paper aims at filling this gap by reporting personal experiences from a very large scale industrial domain modeling project. There, structuring the logical view turned out to be a critical success factor. We explain the project and its setting......, analyze the role and repercussions of model structuring, and examine the implications model structuring decisions have on other parts of the project. We then explain the model structure abstracted from a very large scale industrial modeling project. Finally, we discuss lessons learned....

  10. Structure of the C-terminal fragment 300-320 of the rat angiotensin II AT1A receptor and its relevance with respect to G-protein coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzoni, L; Nicastro, G; Pertinhez, T A; Tatò, M; Nakaie, C R; Paiva, A C; Schreier, S; Spisni, A

    1997-04-11

    Angiotensin II AT1A receptor is coupled to G-protein, and the molecular mechanism of signal transduction is still unclear. The solution conformation of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 300-320 of the rat AT1A receptor, located in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail and indicated by mutagenesis work to be critical for the G-protein coupling, has been investigated by circular dichroism (CD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and restrained molecular dynamics calculations. The CD data indicate that, in acidic water, at concentration below 0.8 mM, the peptide exists in a predominantly coil structure while at higher concentration it can form helical aggregates; addition of small amounts of trifluoroethanol induces a secondary structure, mostly due to the presence of helical elements. Using NMR-derived constraints, an ensemble of conformers for the peptide has been determined by restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Analysis of the converged three-dimensional structures indicates that a significant population of them adopts an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation that, depending upon experimental conditions, presents a variable extension in the stretch Leu6-Tyr20. An equilibrium with nonhelical structured conformers is also observed. We suggest that the capability of the peptide to modulate its secondary structure as a function of the medium dielectric constant, as well as its ability to form helical aggregates by means of intermolecular hydrophobic interactions, can play a significant role for G-protein activation.

  11. The crystal structure of a partial mouse Notch-1 ankyrin domain: Repeats 4 through 7 preserve an ankyrin fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubman, Olga Y.; Kopan, Raphael; Waksman, Gabriel; Korolev, Sergey (Birbeck); (St. Louis-MED); (WU-MED)

    2010-07-20

    Folding and stability of proteins containing ankyrin repeats (ARs) is of great interest because they mediate numerous protein-protein interactions involved in a wide range of regulatory cellular processes. Notch, an ankyrin domain containing protein, signals by converting a transcriptional repression complex into an activation complex. The Notch ANK domain is essential for Notch function and contains seven ARs. Here, we present the 2.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of ARs 4-7 from mouse Notch 1 (m1ANK). These C-terminal repeats were resistant to degradation during crystallization, and their secondary and tertiary structures are maintained in the absence of repeats 1-3. The crystallized fragment adopts a typical ankyrin fold including the poorly conserved seventh AR, as seen in the Drosophila Notch ANK domain (dANK). The structural preservation and stability of the C-terminal repeats shed a new light onto the mechanism of hetero-oligomeric assembly during Notch-mediated transcriptional activation.

  12. Biochemical properties and catalytic domain structure of the CcmH protein from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xue-Ming; Hong, Jing; Li, Hai-Yin; Lin, Dong-Hai; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-12-01

    In the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli, eight genes organized as a ccm operon (ccmABCDEFGH) are involved in the maturation of c-type cytochromes. The proteins encoded by the last three genes ccmFGH are believed to form a lyase complex functioning in the reduction of apocytochrome c and haem attachment. Among them, CcmH is a membrane-associated protein; its N-terminus is a catalytic domain with the active CXXC motif and the C-terminus is predicted as a TPR-like domain with unknown function. By using SCAM (scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis) and Gaussia luciferase fusion assays, we provide experimental evidence for the entire topological structure of E. coli CcmH. The mature CcmH is a periplasm-resident oxidoreductase anchored to the inner membrane by two transmembrane segments. Both N- and C-terminal domains are located and function in the periplasmic compartment. Moreover, the N-terminal domain forms a monomer in solution, while the C-terminal domain is a compact fold with helical structures. The NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain in reduced form exhibits mainly a three-helix bundle, providing further information for the redox mechanism. The redox potential suggests that CcmH exhibits a strong reductase that may function in the last step of reduction of apocytochrome c for haem attachment. PMID:22789558

  13. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Aaron; Persson, Cecilia; Mayzel, Maxim; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Öhman, Anders; Karlsson, B Göran; Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth

    2015-12-01

    The metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae serves an important function for the ability of bacteria to invade the mammalian host cell. The protein belongs to the family of M6 proteases, with a characteristic zinc ion in the catalytic active site. PrtV constitutes a 918 amino acids (102 kDa) multidomain pre-pro-protein that undergoes several N- and C-terminal modifications to form a catalytically active protease. We report here the NMR structure of the PrtV N-terminal domain (residues 23-103) that contains two short α-helices in a coiled coil motif. The helices are held together by a cluster of hydrophobic residues. Approximately 30 residues at the C-terminal end, which were predicted to form a third helical structure, are disordered. These residues are highly conserved within the genus Vibrio, which suggests that they might be functionally important.

  14. The modular xylanase Xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus is cell-attached, and its C-terminal domain has several putative homologues among cell-attached proteins within the phylum Bacteroidetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Eva Nordberg; Hachem, Maher Abou; Ramchuran, Santosh;

    2004-01-01

    Until recently, the function of the fifth domain of the thermostable modular xylanase Xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus was unresolved. A putative homologue to this domain was however identified in a mannanase (Man26A) from the same microorganism which raised questions regarding a common function....

  15. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Chingakham R. [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan [University of Kansas, Del Shankel Structural Biology Center, Lawrence, KS 66047 (United States); Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S. [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Battaile, Kevin P. [IMCA-CAT Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 435A, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Roelofs, Jeroen, E-mail: jroelofs@ksu.edu [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  16. Disorder and structure in the Rab11 binding domain of Rab11 family interacting protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Liu, Yuqi; Bose, Kakoli; Henry, Gillian D; Baleja, James D

    2009-01-27

    Rab11 plays a central role in plasma membrane recycling which returns cellular receptors for reuse at the cell surface. A recently identified family of Rab11 interacting proteins (FIP) includes FIP2. The C-terminal region of FIP2 is essential for colocalization with Rab11 on early endosomes and for enabling formation of higher-order oligomers. Rab11 binding and oligomerization of FIP2 are separable. Here we have determined the three-dimensional structure of the 40-residue coiled-coil oligomerization domain of FIP2 in the absence of Rab11 using NMR methods. The N-terminal half showed strong NOE cross-peaks and well-dispersed NMR resonances, whereas the C-terminal half had fewer NOE cross-peaks and less chemical shift dispersion. The 10 C-terminal residues were mostly disordered. The final structures of the dimer had favorable Ramachandran angles and a root-mean-square deviation of 0.59 +/- 0.13 A over superimposed backbone residues. The structure allows a comparison to a structure of FIP2 in complex with Rab11 that was determined crystallographically. In complex with Rab11, the C-terminal residues are not disordered but have a helical structure that predicts residual dipolar coupling constants that are incompatible with those measured on the unbound FIP2. In both structures, a histidine residue is found at the normally hydrophobic position of the heptad repeat of the coiled coil, and here we show its ionization destabilizes the coiled-coil structure. Together, these data allow us to build a model in which the binding of FIP family proteins to Rab11 can be described in terms of conformational changes and that suggests new modes of regulation. PMID:19119858

  17. Solution Structure of the cGMP Binding GAF Domain from Phosphodiesterase 5: Insights into Nucleotide Specificity, Dimerization, and cGMP-Dependent Conformational Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikaus, Clemens C.; Stout, Joseph R.; Sekharan, Monica R.; Eakin, Catherine M.; Rajagopal, Ponni; Brzovic, Peter S.; Beavo, Joseph A.; Klevit, Rachel E.

    2008-08-15

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) controls intracellular levels of cGMP through its regulation of cGMP hydrolysis. Hydrolytic activity of the C-terminal catalytic domain is increased by cGMP binding to the N-terminal GAF A domain. We present the NMR solution structure of the cGMP-bound PDE5A GAF A domain. The cGMP orientation in the buried binding pocket was defined through 37 intermolecular NOEs.

  18. The crystal structures of dystrophin and utrophin spectrin repeats: implications for domain boundaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidharan Muthu

    Full Text Available Dystrophin and utrophin link the F-actin cytoskeleton to the cell membrane via an associated glycoprotein complex. This functionality results from their domain organization having an N-terminal actin-binding domain followed by multiple spectrin-repeat domains and then C-terminal protein-binding motifs. Therapeutic strategies to replace defective dystrophin with utrophin in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy require full-characterization of both these proteins to assess their degree of structural and functional equivalence. Here the high resolution structures of the first spectrin repeats (N-terminal repeat 1 from both dystrophin and utrophin have been determined by x-ray crystallography. The repeat structures both display a three-helix bundle fold very similar to one another and to homologous domains from spectrin, α-actinin and plectin. The utrophin and dystrophin repeat structures reveal the relationship between the structural domain and the canonical spectrin repeat domain sequence motif, showing the compact structural domain of spectrin repeat one to be extended at the C-terminus relative to its previously defined sequence repeat. These structures explain previous in vitro biochemical studies in which extending dystrophin spectrin repeat domain length leads to increased protein stability. Furthermore we show that the first dystrophin and utrophin spectrin repeats have no affinity for F-actin in the absence of other domains.

  19. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  20. Domain-swapped dimer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551: structural insights into domain swapping of cytochrome c family proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nagao

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c (cyt c family proteins, such as horse cyt c, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551 (PA cyt c551, and Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c552 (HT cyt c552, have been used as model proteins to study the relationship between the protein structure and folding process. We have shown in the past that horse cyt c forms oligomers by domain swapping its C-terminal helix, perturbing the Met-heme coordination significantly compared to the monomer. HT cyt c552 forms dimers by domain swapping the region containing the N-terminal α-helix and heme, where the heme axial His and Met ligands belong to different protomers. Herein, we show that PA cyt c551 also forms domain-swapped dimers by swapping the region containing the N-terminal α-helix and heme. The secondary structures of the M61A mutant of PA cyt c551 were perturbed slightly and its oligomer formation ability decreased compared to that of the wild-type protein, showing that the stability of the protein secondary structures is important for domain swapping. The hinge loop of domain swapping for cyt c family proteins corresponded to the unstable region specified by hydrogen exchange NMR measurements for the monomer, although the swapping region differed among proteins. These results show that the unstable loop region has a tendency to become a hinge loop in domain-swapped proteins.

  1. Domain Modeling: NP_055672.3 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_055672.3 chr1 Solution structure of the chimera of the C-terminal PID domain of ...Fe65L and the C-terminal tail peptide of APP p2ysza_ chr1/NP_055672.3/NP_055672.3_apo_116-314.pdb swppa 0 ...

  2. The first crystal structure of the peptidase domain of the U32 peptidase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacherl, Magdalena; Montada, Angelika A M; Brunstein, Elena; Baumann, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    The U32 family is a collection of over 2500 annotated peptidases in the MEROPS database with unknown catalytic mechanism. They mainly occur in bacteria and archaea, but a few representatives have also been identified in eukarya. Many of the U32 members have been linked to pathogenicity, such as proteins from Helicobacter and Salmonella. The first crystal structure analysis of a U32 catalytic domain from Methanopyrus kandleri (gene mk0906) reveals a modified (βα)8 TIM-barrel fold with some unique features. The connecting segment between strands β7 and β8 is extended and helix α7 is located on top of the C-terminal end of the barrel body. The protein exhibits a dimeric quaternary structure in which a zinc ion is symmetrically bound by histidine and cysteine side chains from both monomers. These residues reside in conserved sequence motifs. No typical proteolytic motifs are discernible in the three-dimensional structure, and biochemical assays failed to demonstrate proteolytic activity. A tunnel in which an acetate ion is bound is located in the C-terminal part of the β-barrel. Two hydrophobic grooves lead to a tunnel at the C-terminal end of the barrel in which an acetate ion is bound. One of the grooves binds to a Strep-Tag II of another dimer in the crystal lattice. Thus, these grooves may be binding sites for hydrophobic peptides or other ligands. PMID:26627657

  3. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B (LigB) Binds to Both the C-Terminal 23 Amino Acids of Fibrinogen αC Domain and Factor XIII: Insight into the Mechanism of LigB-Mediated Blockage of Fibrinogen α Chain Cross-Linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Chang, Eric; Tseng, Andrew; Ptak, Christopher; Wu, Li-Chen; Su, Chun-Li; McDonough, Sean P; Lin, Yi-Pin; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2016-09-01

    The coagulation system provides a primitive but effective defense against hemorrhage. Soluble fibrinogen (Fg) monomers, composed of α, β and γ chains, are recruited to provide structural support for the formation of a hemostatic plug. Fg binds to platelets and is processed into a cross-linked fibrin polymer by the enzymatic clotting factors, thrombin and Factor XIII (FXIII). The newly formed fibrin-platelet clot can act as barrier to protect against pathogens from entering the bloodstream. Further, injuries caused by bacterial infections can be confined to the initial wound site. Many pathogenic bacteria have Fg-binding adhesins that can circumvent the coagulation pathway and allow the bacteria to sidestep containment. Fg expression is upregulated during lung infection providing an attachment surface for bacteria with the ability to produce Fg-binding adhesins. Fg binding by leptospira might play a crucial factor in Leptospira-associated pulmonary hemorrhage, the main factor contributing to lethality in severe cases of leptospirosis. The 12th domain of Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB12), a leptospiral adhesin, interacts with the C-terminus of FgαC (FgαCC). In this study, the binding site for LigB12 was mapped to the final 23 amino acids at the C-terminal end of FgαCC (FgαCC8). The association of FgαCC8 with LigB12 (ELISA, KD = 0.76 μM; SPR, KD = 0.96 μM) was reduced by mutations of both charged residues (R608, R611 and H614 from FgαCC8; D1061 from LigB12) and hydrophobic residues (I613 from FgαCC8; F1054 and A1065 from LigB12). Additionally, LigB12 bound strongly to FXIII and also inhibited fibrin formation, suggesting that LigB can disrupt coagulation by suppressing FXIII activity. Here, the detailed binding mechanism of a leptospiral adhesin to a host hemostatic factor is characterized for the first time and should provide better insight into the pathogenesis of leptospirosis. PMID:27622634

  4. The host-binding domain of the P2 phage tail spike reveals a trimeric iron-binding structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C-terminal domain of a bacteriophage P2 tail-spike protein, gpV, was crystallized and its structure was solved at 1.27 Å resolution. The refined model showed a triple β-helix structure and the presence of iron, calcium and chloride ions. The adsorption and infection of bacteriophage P2 is mediated by tail fibres and tail spikes. The tail spikes on the tail baseplate are used to irreversibly adsorb to the host cells. Recently, a P2 phage tail-spike protein, gpV, was purified and it was shown that a C-terminal domain, Ser87–Leu211, is sufficient for the binding of gpV to host Escherichia coli membranes [Kageyama et al. (2009 ▶), Biochemistry, 48, 10129–10135]. In this paper, the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of P2 gpV is reported. The structure is a triangular pyramid and looks like a spearhead composed of an intertwined β-sheet, a triple β-helix and a metal-binding region containing iron, calcium and chloride ions

  5. Analysis of DCC domain structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wavelet-type methods are employed for the analysis of pion field configurations that have been obtained by dynamical simulations in idealized scenarios relevant to the formation of disoriented chiral condensates. It is illustrated how the measurement of the isospin domain structure depends on the ability to zoom in on limited parts of the phase space, due to the interplay between the pion correlation length and the effective source geometry. The need for advanced analysis methods is underscored by the fact that the extracted neutral-fraction distribution would differ significantly from the ideal form, even under perfect experimental conditions, and, moreover, by the circumstance that thermal sources with suitably adjusted temperatures can lead to distributions that may be practically indistinguishable from those arising from DCC-type nonequilibrium evolutions. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. The C-Terminal Domain of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 5 Promotes Start Codon Recognition by Its Dynamic Interplay with eIF1 and eIF2β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael E. Luna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of the proper start codon on mRNAs is essential for protein synthesis, which requires scanning and involves eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs eIF1, eIF1A, eIF2, and eIF5. The carboxyl terminal domain (CTD of eIF5 stimulates 43S preinitiation complex (PIC assembly; however, its precise role in scanning and start codon selection has remained unknown. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, we identified the binding sites of eIF1 and eIF2β on eIF5-CTD and found that they partially overlapped. Mutating select eIF5 residues in the common interface specifically disrupts interaction with both factors. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that these eIF5-CTD mutations impair start codon recognition and impede eIF1 release from the PIC by abrogating eIF5-CTD binding to eIF2β. This study provides mechanistic insight into the role of eIF5-CTD's dynamic interplay with eIF1 and eIF2β in switching PICs from an open to a closed state at start codons.

  7. Identification, structure, and differential expression of members of a BURP domain containing protein family in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Cheryl; Coryell, Virginia; Khanna, Anupama; Keim, Paul; Vodkin, Lila; Shoemaker, Randy C

    2002-08-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) exhibiting homology to a BURP domain containing gene family were identified from the Glycine max (L.) Merr. EST database. These ESTs were assembled into 16 contigs of variable sizes and lengths. Consistent with the structure of known BURP domain containing proteins, the translation products exhibit a modular structure consisting of a C-terminal BURP domain, an N-terminal signal sequence, and a variable internal region. The soybean family members exhibit 35-98% similarity in a -100-amino-acid C-terminal region, and a phylogenetic tree constructed using this region shows that some soybean family members group together in closely related pairs, triplets, and quartets, whereas others remain as singletons. The structure of these groups suggests that multiple gene duplication events occurred during the evolutionary history of this family. The depth and diversity of G. max EST libraries allowed tissue-specific expression patterns of the putative soybean BURPs to be examined. Consistent with known BURP proteins, the newly identified soybean BURPs have diverse expression patterns. Furthermore, putative paralogs can have both spatially and quantitatively distinct expression patterns. We discuss the functional and evolutionary implications of these findings, as well as the utility of EST-based analyses for identifying and characterizing gene families. PMID:12175072

  8. Neurological disease mutations compromise a C-terminal ion pathway in the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Hanne; Khandelia, Himanshu; Morth, J Preben;

    2010-01-01

    The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pumps three sodium ions out of and two potassium ions into the cell for each ATP molecule that is split, thereby generating the chemical and electrical gradients across the plasma membrane that are essential in, for example, signalling, secondary transport and volume...... regulation in animal cells. Crystal structures of the potassium-bound form of the pump revealed an intimate docking of the alpha-subunit carboxy terminus at the transmembrane domain. Here we show that this element is a key regulator of a previously unrecognized ion pathway. Current models of P-type ATPases...... operate with a single ion conduit through the pump, but our data suggest an additional pathway in the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase between the ion-binding sites and the cytoplasm. The C-terminal pathway allows a cytoplasmic proton to enter and stabilize site III when empty in the potassium-bound state, and when...

  9. Neurological disease mutations compromise a C-terminal ion pathway in the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Hanne; Khandelia, Himanshu; Morth, Jens Preben;

    2010-01-01

    The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pumps three sodium ions out of and two potassium ions into the cell for each ATP molecule that is split, thereby generating the chemical and electrical gradients across the plasma membrane that are essential in, for example, signalling, secondary transport and volume...... regulation in animal cells. Crystal structures of the potassium-bound form of the pump revealed an intimate docking of the alpha-subunit carboxy terminus at the transmembrane domain. Here we show that this element is a key regulator of a previously unrecognized ion pathway. Current models of P-type ATPases...... operate with a single ion conduit through the pump, but our data suggest an additional pathway in the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase between the ion-binding sites and the cytoplasm. The C-terminal pathway allows a cytoplasmic proton to enter and stabilize site III when empty in the potassium-bound state, and when...

  10. High-resolution NMR structures of the domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tho1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Julian O. B.; Allen, Mark D.; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Bycroft, Mark

    2016-01-01

    THO is a multi-protein complex involved in the formation of messenger ribonuclear particles (mRNPs) by coupling transcription with mRNA processing and export. THO is thought to be formed from five subunits, Tho2p, Hpr1p, Tex1p, Mft1p and Thp2p, and recent work has determined a low-resolution structure of the complex [Poulsen et al. (2014 ▸), PLoS One, 9, e103470]. A number of additional proteins are thought to be involved in the formation of mRNP in yeast, including Tho1, which has been shown to bind RNA in vitro and is recruited to actively transcribed chromatin in vivo in a THO-complex and RNA-dependent manner. Tho1 is known to contain a SAP domain at the N-terminus, but the ability to suppress the expression defects of the hpr1Δ mutant of THO was shown to reside in the RNA-binding C-terminal region. In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and C-terminal RNA-binding domain have been determined. PMID:27303905

  11. Data on structural transitions in domains of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Valentin V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Kalinina, Natalia O

    2016-09-01

    This data article is related to the research article entitled "in vitro properties of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes" (Makarov et al., 2015 [1]), demonstrating that upon incubation with viral RNA the poa semilatent hordeivirus (PSLV) TGB1 protein (the movement 63 K protein encoded by the first gene of the triple gene block) in vitro forms RNP structures resembling filamentous virus-like particles and its internal domain (ID) performs a major structural role in this process. This article reports the additional results on the structural lability of ID and the structural transitions in the C-terminal NTPase/helicase domain (HELD) induced by interaction with tRNA and phosphorylation. PMID:27331098

  12. Telomere Capping Proteins are Structurally Related to RPA with an additional Telomere-Specific Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelinas, A.; Paschini, M; Reyes, F; Heroux, A; Batey, R; Lundblad, V; Wuttke, D

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  13. EssC: domain structures inform on the elusive translocation channel in the Type VII secretion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoltner, Martin; Ng, Wui M.A.V.; Money, Jillian J.; Fyfe, Paul K.; Kneuper, Holger; Palmer, Tracy; Hunter, William N.

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-bound protein EssC is an integral component of the bacterial Type VII secretion system (T7SS), which is a determinant of virulence in important Gram-positive pathogens. The protein is predicted to consist of an intracellular repeat of forkhead-associated (FHA) domains at the N-terminus, two transmembrane helices and three P-loop-containing ATPase-type domains, D1–D3, forming the C-terminal intracellular segment. We present crystal structures of the N-terminal FHA domains (EssC-N) and a C-terminal fragment EssC-C from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, encompassing two of the ATPase-type modules, D2 and D3. Module D2 binds ATP with high affinity whereas D3 does not. The EssC-N and EssC-C constructs are monomeric in solution, but the full-length recombinant protein, with a molecular mass of approximately 169 kDa, forms a multimer of approximately 1 MDa. The observation of protomer contacts in the crystal structure of EssC-C together with similarity to the DNA translocase FtsK, suggests a model for a hexameric EssC assembly. Such an observation potentially identifies the key, and to date elusive, component of pore formation required for secretion by this recently discovered secretion system. The juxtaposition of the FHA domains suggests potential for interacting with other components of the secretion system. The structural data were used to guide an analysis of which domains are required for the T7SS machine to function in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus. The extreme C-terminal ATPase domain appears to be essential for EssC activity as a key part of the T7SS, whereas D2 and FHA domains are required for the production of a stable and functional protein. PMID:27130157

  14. EssC: domain structures inform on the elusive translocation channel in the Type VII secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoltner, Martin; Ng, Wui M A V; Money, Jillian J; Fyfe, Paul K; Kneuper, Holger; Palmer, Tracy; Hunter, William N

    2016-07-01

    The membrane-bound protein EssC is an integral component of the bacterial Type VII secretion system (T7SS), which is a determinant of virulence in important Gram-positive pathogens. The protein is predicted to consist of an intracellular repeat of forkhead-associated (FHA) domains at the N-terminus, two transmembrane helices and three P-loop-containing ATPase-type domains, D1-D3, forming the C-terminal intracellular segment. We present crystal structures of the N-terminal FHA domains (EssC-N) and a C-terminal fragment EssC-C from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, encompassing two of the ATPase-type modules, D2 and D3. Module D2 binds ATP with high affinity whereas D3 does not. The EssC-N and EssC-C constructs are monomeric in solution, but the full-length recombinant protein, with a molecular mass of approximately 169 kDa, forms a multimer of approximately 1 MDa. The observation of protomer contacts in the crystal structure of EssC-C together with similarity to the DNA translocase FtsK, suggests a model for a hexameric EssC assembly. Such an observation potentially identifies the key, and to date elusive, component of pore formation required for secretion by this recently discovered secretion system. The juxtaposition of the FHA domains suggests potential for interacting with other components of the secretion system. The structural data were used to guide an analysis of which domains are required for the T7SS machine to function in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus The extreme C-terminal ATPase domain appears to be essential for EssC activity as a key part of the T7SS, whereas D2 and FHA domains are required for the production of a stable and functional protein.

  15. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Soo Hyun [School of Life Sciences, Steitz Center for Structural Biology, and Department of Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, ChangJu, E-mail: cchun1130@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Young Jun, E-mail: imyoungjun@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  16. The Structural Basis of Cyclic Diguanylate Signal Transduction by PilZ Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benach,J.; Swaminathan, S.; Tamayo, R.; Handelman, S.; Folta-Stogniew, E.; Ramos, J.; Forouhar, F.; Neely, H.; Seetharaman, J.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) controls the transition between motile and sessile growth in eubacteria, but little is known about the proteins that sense its concentration. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that PilZ domains bind c-di-GMP and allosterically modulate effector pathways. We have determined a 1.9 Angstroms crystal structure of c-di-GMP bound to VCA0042/PlzD, a PilZ domain-containing protein from Vibrio cholerae. Either this protein or another specific PilZ domain-containing protein is required for V. cholerae to efficiently infect mice. VCA0042/PlzD comprises a C-terminal PilZ domain plus an N-terminal domain with a similar beta-barrel fold. C-di-GMP contacts seven of the nine strongly conserved residues in the PilZ domain, including three in a seven-residue long N-terminal loop that undergoes a conformational switch as it wraps around c-di-GMP. This switch brings the PilZ domain into close apposition with the N-terminal domain, forming a new allosteric interaction surface that spans these domains and the c-di-GMP at their interface. The very small size of the N-terminal conformational switch is likely to explain the facile evolutionary diversification of the PilZ domain.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Passenger Domain of the Escherichia coli Autotransporter EspP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Shekeb; Mian, Hira S.; Sandercock, Linda E.; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Pai, Emil F. (Toronto); (OCI)

    2013-03-07

    Autotransporters represent a large superfamily of known and putative virulence factors produced by Gram-negative bacteria. They consist of an N-terminal 'passenger domain' responsible for the specific effector functions of the molecule and a C-terminal '{beta}-domain' responsible for translocation of the passenger across the bacterial outer membrane. Here, we present the 2.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of the passenger domain of the extracellular serine protease EspP, produced by the pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 and a member of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs). Like the previously structurally characterized SPATE passenger domains, the EspP passenger domain contains an extended right-handed parallel {beta}-helix preceded by an N-terminal globular domain housing the catalytic function of the protease. Of note, however, is the absence of a second globular domain protruding from this {beta}-helix. We describe the structure of the EspP passenger domain in the context of previous results and provide an alternative hypothesis for the function of the {beta}-helix within SPATEs.

  18. Disulfide assignment of the C-terminal cysteine knot of agouti-related protein (AGRP) by direct sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Y; Zeni, L; Rosenfeld, R D; Stark, K L; Rohde, M F; Haniu, M

    1999-12-01

    We have assigned the disulfide structure of Md-65 agouti-related protein (Md65-AGRP) using differential reduction and alkylation followed by direct sequencing analysis. The mature human AGRP is a single polypeptide chain of 112 amino acid residues, consisting of an N-terminal acidic region and a unique C-terminal cysteine-rich domain. The C-terminal domain, a 48 amino acid peptide named Md65-AGRP, was expressed in Escherichia coil cells and refolded under different conditions from the mature recombinant protein. The disulfide bonds in the cystine knot structure of Md65-AGRP were partially reduced using tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (TCEP) under acidic conditions, followed by alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). The procedure generated several isoforms with varying degrees of NEM alkylation. The multiple forms of Md65-AGRP generated by partial reduction and NEM modification were then completely reduced and carboxymethylated to identify unreactive disulfide bonds. Differentially labeled Md65-AGRP were directly sequenced and analyzed by MALDI mass spectrometry. The results confirmed that Md65-AGRP contained the same disulfide structure as that of Md5-AGRP reported previously [Bures, E. J., Hui, J. O., Young, Y. et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 12172-12177].

  19. C-terminal interactors of the AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit Shisa9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R Karataeva

    Full Text Available Shisa9 (initially named CKAMP44 has been identified as auxiliary subunit of the AMPA-type glutamate receptors and was shown to modulate its physiological properties. Shisa9 is a type-I transmembrane protein and contains a C-terminal PDZ domain that potentially interacts with cytosolic proteins. In this study, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening that yielded eight PDZ domain-containing interactors of Shisa9, which were independently validated. The identified interactors are known scaffolding proteins residing in the neuronal postsynaptic density. To test whether C-terminal scaffolding interactions of Shisa9 affect synaptic AMPA receptor function in the hippocampus, we disrupted these interactions using a Shisa9 C-terminal mimetic peptide. In the absence of scaffolding interactions of Shisa9, glutamatergic AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in the lateral perforant path of the mouse hippocampus had a faster decay time, and paired-pulse facilitation was reduced. Furthermore, disruption of the PDZ interactions between Shisa9 and its binding partners affected hippocampal network activity. Taken together, our data identifies novel interaction partners of Shisa9, and shows that the C-terminal interactions of Shisa9 through its PDZ domain interaction motif are important for AMPA receptor synaptic and network functions.

  20. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and

  1. Structural principles governing domain motions in proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayward, S

    1999-01-01

    With the use of a recently developed method, twenty-four proteins for which two or more X-ray conformers are known have been analyzed to reveal structural principles that govern domain motions in proteins. In all 24 cases, the domain motion is a rotation about a physical axis created through local i

  2. Regulation of sorting and post-Golgi trafficking of rhodopsin by its C-terminal sequence QVS(A)PA

    OpenAIRE

    Deretic, Dusanka; Schmerl, Sonia; Hargrave, Paul A.; Arendt, Anatol; McDowell, J. Hugh

    1998-01-01

    Several mutations that cause severe forms of the human disease autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa cluster in the C-terminal region of rhodopsin. Recent studies have implicated the C-terminal domain of rhodopsin in its trafficking on specialized post-Golgi membranes to the rod outer segment of the photoreceptor cell. Here we used synthetic peptides as competitive inhibitors of rhodopsin trafficking in the frog retinal cell-free system to delineate the potential regulatory sequence within ...

  3. Crystal structure and dynamics of Spt16N-domain of FACT complex from Cicer arietinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are, Venkat N; Ghosh, Biplab; Kumar, Ashwani; Gadre, Rekha; Makde, Ravindra D

    2016-07-01

    The facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) complex, a heterodimer of SSRP1 and Spt16 proteins, is an essential histone chaperone that transiently reorganizes nucleosomes during transcription, replication and repair. N-terminal domain of Spt16 subunit (Spt16N) is strictly conserved in all the known Spt16 orthologs. Genetic studies in yeast have revealed a partially redundant role of Spt16N for the FACT functionality. Here, we report the crystal structure of Spt16N from a plant origin (Spt16Nca, Cicer arietinum) and its comparisons with the known Spt16N structures from yeasts and human. The inter-domain angle in Spt16Nca is significantly different from that of the yeast and human Spt16N structures. Normal mode analysis and classical molecular dynamics simulations reveal inter-domain movement in Spt16Nca and later also shows conformational flexibility of the critical loops. Spt16Nca binds to histone H3/H4 complex, similar to its orthologs from yeast and human origins. Further, conservation of electrostatic surface potentials in Spt16N structures from evolutionary distinct domains of eukaryotes (plant, human and fungi) have provided the potential sites on Spt16N for histone interactions. The structural comparisons with M24 peptidases show that the hydrophobic pocket shielded by a flexible loop of C-terminal domain of Spt16N that may be functionally important. PMID:26995613

  4. PDZ Binding Domains, Structural Disorder and Phosphorylation: A Menage-a-trois Tailing Dcp2 mRNA Decapping Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardana, Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Diverse cellular activities are mediated through the interaction of protein domains and their binding partners. One such protein domain widely distributed in the higher metazoan world is the PDZ domain, which facilitates abundant protein-protein interactions. The PDZ domain-PDZ binding domain interaction has been implicated in several pathologies including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Down syndrome. PDZ domains bind to C-terminal peptides/proteins which have either of the following combinations: S/T-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type I, hydrophobic-Xhydrophobic- COOH for type II, and D/E-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type III, although hydrophobicity in the termini form the key characteristic of the PDZ-binding domains. We identified and characterized a Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana, a protein containing a putative PDZ-binding domain using mutagenesis and protein biochemistry. Now we are using bioinformatics to study the Cterminal end of mRNA decapping enzymes from complex metazoans with the aim of (1) identifying putative PDZ-binding domains (2) Correlating structural disorder with PDZ binding domains and (3) Demonstrating the presence of phosphorylation sites in C-terminal extremities of Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzymes. It is proposed here that the trinity of PDZbinding domains, structural disorder and phosphorylation-susceptible sites are a feature of the Dcp2 family of decapping enzymes and perhaps is a wider trick in protein evolution where scaffolding/tethering is a requirement for localization and function. It is critical though laboratory-based supporting evidence is sought to back-up this bioinformatics exploration into tail regions of mRNA decapping enzymes. PMID:27151193

  5. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunita, S; Zhenxing, H; Swaathi, J; Cygler, Miroslaw; Matte, Allan; Sivaraman, J

    2006-06-16

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine (Psi) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF at 2.6A resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of Psi-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  6. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunita,S.; Zhenxing, H.; Swaathi, J.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Sivaraman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine ({psi}) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E. coli RluF at 2.6 Angstroms resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of {psi}-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  7. Solution NMR structure and histone binding of the PHD domain of human MLL5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lemak

    Full Text Available Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5 is a histone methyltransferase that plays a key role in hematopoiesis, spermatogenesis and cell cycle progression. In addition to its catalytic domain, MLL5 contains a PHD finger domain, a protein module that is often involved in binding to the N-terminus of histone H3. Here we report the NMR solution structure of the MLL5 PHD domain showing a variant of the canonical PHD fold that combines conserved H3 binding features from several classes of other PHD domains (including an aromatic cage along with a novel C-terminal α-helix, not previously seen. We further demonstrate that the PHD domain binds with similar affinity to histone H3 tail peptides di- and tri-methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me2 and H3K4me3, the former being the putative product of the MLL5 catalytic reaction. This work establishes the PHD domain of MLL5 as a bone fide 'reader' domain of H3K4 methyl marks suggesting that it may guide the spreading or further methylation of this site on chromatin.

  8. Structure of the stand-alone RAM-domain protein from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of the stand-alone RAM domain from T. thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 2.4 Å resolution. The structure revealed that five dimers are arranged to form a ring. The stand-alone RAM (regulation of amino-acid metabolism) domain protein SraA from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TTHA0845) was crystallized in the presence of zinc ions. The X-ray crystal structure was determined using a multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique and was refined at 2.4 Å resolution to a final R factor of 25.0%. The monomeric structure is a βαββαβ fold and it dimerizes mainly through interactions between the antiparallel β-sheets. Furthermore, five SraA dimers form a ring with external and internal diameters of 70 and 20 Å, respectively. This decameric structure is unique compared with the octameric and dodecameric structures found for other stand-alone RAM-domain proteins and the C-terminal RAM domains of Lrp/AsnC-family proteins

  9. Role of the C-terminal YG repeats of the primer-dependent streptococcal glucosyltransferase, GtfJ, in binding to dextran and mutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Kim B; Allen, Donna M; Jacques, Nicholas A

    2002-02-01

    The recombinant primer-dependent glucosyltransferase GtfJ of Streptococcus salivarius possesses a C-terminal glucan-binding domain composed of eighteen 21 aa YG repeats. By engineering a series of C-terminal truncated proteins, the position at which truncation prevented further mutan synthesis was defined to a region of 43 aa, confirming that not all of the YG motifs were required for the formation of mutan by GtfJ. The role of the YG repeats in glucan binding was investigated in detail. Three proteins consisting of 3.8, 7.2 or 11.0 C-terminal YG repeats were expressed in Escherichia coli. Each of the three purified proteins bound to both the 1,6-alpha-linked glucose residues of dextran and the 1,3-alpha-linked glucose residues of mutan, indicating that a protein consisting of nothing but 3.8 YG repeats could attach to either substrate. Secondary structure predictions of the primary amino acid sequence suggested that 37% of the amino acids were capable of forming a structure such that five regions of beta-sheet were separated by regions capable of forming beta-turns and random coils. CD spectral analysis showed that the purified 3.8 YG protein possessed an unordered secondary structure with some evidence of possible beta-sheet formation and that the protein maintained this relatively unordered structure on binding to dextran. PMID:11832518

  10. Role of N-terminal extension of Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 and C-terminal extension of Thermotoga maritima RNase H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permanasari, Etin-Diah; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Koga, Yuichi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2013-10-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 (BstRNH2) and Thermotoga maritima RNase H2 (TmaRNH2) have N-terminal and C-terminal extensions, respectively, as compared with Aquifex aeolicus RNase H2 (AaeRNH2). To analyze the role of these extensions, BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2 without these extensions were constructed, and their biochemical properties were compared with those of their intact partners and AaeRNH2. The far-UV CD spectra of all proteins were similar, suggesting that the protein structure is not significantly altered by removal of these extensions. However, both the junction ribonuclease and RNase H activities of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2, as well as their substrate-binding affinities, were considerably decreased by removal of these extensions. The stability of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2 was also decreased by removal of these extensions. The activity, substrate binding affinity and stability of TmaRNH2 without the C-terminal 46 residues were partly restored by the attachment of the N-terminal extension of BstRNH2. These results suggest that the N-terminal extension of BstRNH2 functions as a substrate-binding domain and stabilizes the RNase H domain. Because the C-terminal extension of TmaRNH2 assumes a helix hairpin structure and does not make direct contact with the substrate, this extension is probably required to make the conformation of the substrate-binding site functional. AaeRNH2 showed comparable junction ribonuclease activity to those of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2, and was more stable than these proteins, indicating that bacterial RNases H2 do not always require an N-terminal or C-terminal extension to increase activity, substrate-binding affinity, and/or stability. PMID:23937561

  11. Structure of the Taz2 domain of p300: insights into ligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Maria, E-mail: mariami@mail.nih.gov [Protein Structure Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew [Synchrotron Radiation Research Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cherry, Scott; Tropea, Joseph E. [Protein Purification Core, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201 (United States); Wlodawer, Alexander [Protein Structure Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201 (United States)

    2009-12-01

    The crystal structure of the Taz2 zinc-finger domain of the human p300 transcriptional coactivator was determined using the anomalous diffraction signal of the bound Zn ions. Crystal contacts suggested a possible novel mode of Taz2–peptide ligand interactions. CBP and its paralog p300 are histone acetyl transferases that regulate gene expression by interacting with multiple transcription factors via specialized domains. The structure of a segment of human p300 protein (residues 1723–1836) corresponding to the extended zinc-binding Taz2 domain has been investigated. The crystal structure was solved by the SAD approach utilizing the anomalous diffraction signal of the bound Zn ions. The structure comprises an atypical helical bundle stabilized by three Zn ions and closely resembles the solution structures determined previously for shorter peptides. Residues 1813–1834 from the current construct form a helical extension of the C-terminal helix and make extensive crystal-contact interactions with the peptide-binding site of Taz2, providing additional insights into the mechanism of the recognition of diverse transactivation domains (TADs) by Taz2. On the basis of these results and molecular modeling, a hypothetical model of the binding of phosphorylated p53 TAD1 to Taz2 has been proposed.

  12. Structural investigations of recombinant urokinase growth factor-like domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloglazova, I B; Beabealashvilli, R Sh; Gursky, Ya G; Bocharov, E V; Mineev, K S; Parfenova, E V; Tkachuk, V A

    2013-05-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease that converts the plasminogen zymogen into the enzymatically active plasmin. uPA is synthesized and secreted as the single-chain molecule (scuPA) composed of an N-terminal domain (GFD) and kringle (KD) and C-terminal proteolytic (PD) domains. Earlier, the structure of ATF (which consists of GFD and KD) was solved by NMR (A. P. Hansen et al. (1994) Biochemistry, 33, 4847-4864) and by X-ray crystallography alone and in a complex with the soluble form of the urokinase receptor (uPAR, CD87) lacking GPI (C. Barinka et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol., 363, 482-495). According to these data, GFD contains two β-sheet regions oriented perpendicularly to each other. The area in the GFD responsible for binding to uPAR is localized in the flexible Ω-loop, which consists of seven amino acid residues connecting two strings of antiparallel β-sheet. It was shown by site-directed mutagenesis that shortening of the Ω-loop length by one amino acid residue leads to the inability of GFD to bind to uPAR (V. Magdolen et al. (1996) Eur. J. Biochem., 237, 743-751). Here we show that, in contrast to the above-mentioned studies, we found no sign of the β-sheet regions in GFD in our uPA preparations either free or in a complex with uPAR. The GFD seems to be a rather flexible and unstructured domain, demonstrating in spite of its apparent flexibility highly specific interaction with uPAR both in vitro and in cell culture experiments. Circular dichroism, tryptophan fluorescence during thermal denaturation of the protein, and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy of ¹⁵N/¹³C-labeled ATF both free and in complex with urokinase receptor were used to judge the secondary structure of GFD of uPA. PMID:23848154

  13. Automation of C-terminal sequence analysis of 2D-PAGE separated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P. Moerman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental assignment of the protein termini remains essential to define the functional protein structure. Here, we report on the improvement of a proteomic C-terminal sequence analysis method. The approach aims to discriminate the C-terminal peptide in a CNBr-digest where Met-Xxx peptide bonds are cleaved in internal peptides ending at a homoserine lactone (hsl-derivative. pH-dependent partial opening of the lactone ring results in the formation of doublets for all internal peptides. C-terminal peptides are distinguished as singlet peaks by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS is then used for their identification. We present a fully automated protocol established on a robotic liquid-handling station.

  14. Structure and function of the interacting domains of Spire and Fmn-family formins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizcarra, Christina L.; Kreutz, Barry; Rodal, Avital A.; Toms, Angela V.; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Wei; Quinlan, Margot E.; Eck, Michael J. (UCLA); (Brandeis); (DFCI)

    2012-07-11

    Evidence for cooperation between actin nucleators is growing. The WH2-containing nucleator Spire and the formin Cappuccino interact directly, and both are essential for assembly of an actin mesh during Drosophila oogenesis. Their interaction requires the kinase noncatalytic C-lobe domain (KIND) domain of Spire and the C-terminal tail of the formin. Here we describe the crystal structure of the KIND domain of human Spir1 alone and in complex with the tail of Fmn2, a mammalian ortholog of Cappuccino. The KIND domain is structurally similar to the C-lobe of protein kinases. The Fmn2 tail is coordinated in an acidic cleft at the base of the domain that appears to have evolved via deletion of a helix from the canonical kinase fold. Our functional analysis of Cappuccino reveals an unexpected requirement for its tail in actin assembly. In addition, we find that the KIND/tail interaction blocks nucleation by Cappuccino and promotes its displacement from filament barbed ends providing insight into possible modes of cooperation between Spire and Cappuccino.

  15. Structure of a mutant [beta] toxin from Staphylococcus aureus reveals domain swapping and conformational flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Huseby, Medora J.; Shi, Ke; Digre, Jeff; Ohlendorf, Douglas H.; Earhart, Cathleen A. (UMM)

    2011-09-16

    The 3.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mutant form of the staphylococcal sphingomyelinase {beta} toxin in which a conserved hydrophobic {beta}-hairpin has been deleted is reported. It is shown that this mutation induces domain swapping of a C-terminal {beta}-strand, leading to the formation of dimers linked by a conformationally flexible hinge region. Eight dimers are seen in the asymmetric unit, exhibiting a broad spectrum of conformations trapped in place by intermolecular contacts within the crystal lattice. Furthermore, the 16 monomers within each asymmetric unit exhibit a remarkable heterogeneity in thermal factors, which can be accounted for by the varying degrees to which each monomer interacts with other molecules in the crystal. This structure provides a unique example of the challenges associated with crystallographic study of flexible proteins.

  16. Crystal structure of a coiled-coil domain from human ROCK I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqi Tu

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Rho and one of its targets, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, participate in a variety of actin-based cellular processes including smooth muscle contraction, cell migration, and stress fiber formation. The ROCK protein consists of an N-terminal kinase domain, a central coiled-coil domain containing a Rho binding site, and a C-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. Here we present the crystal structure of a large section of the central coiled-coil domain of human ROCK I (amino acids 535-700. The structure forms a parallel α-helical coiled-coil dimer that is structurally similar to tropomyosin, an actin filament binding protein. There is an unusual discontinuity in the coiled-coil; three charged residues (E613, R617 and D620 are positioned at what is normally the hydrophobic core of coiled-coil packing. We speculate that this conserved irregularity could function as a hinge that allows ROCK to adopt its autoinhibited conformation.

  17. C-terminal substitution of MDM2 interacting peptides modulates binding affinity by distinctive mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Brown

    Full Text Available The complex between the proteins MDM2 and p53 is a promising drug target for cancer therapy. The residues 19-26 of p53 have been biochemically and structurally demonstrated to be a most critical region to maintain the association of MDM2 and p53. Variation of the amino acid sequence in this range obviously alters the binding affinity. Surprisingly, suitable substitutions contiguous to this region of the p53 peptides can yield tightly binding peptides. The peptide variants may differ by a single residue that vary little in their structural conformations and yet are characterized by large differences in their binding affinities. In this study a systematic analysis into the role of single C-terminal mutations of a 12 residue fragment of the p53 transactivation domain (TD and an equivalent phage optimized peptide (12/1 were undertaken to elucidate their mechanistic and thermodynamic differences in interacting with the N-terminal of MDM2. The experimental results together with atomistically detailed dynamics simulations provide insight into the principles that govern peptide design protocols with regard to protein-protein interactions and peptidomimetic design.

  18. Structured hints : extracting and abstracting domain expertise.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hereld, M.; Stevens, R.; Sterling, T.; Gao, G. R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; California Inst. of Tech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ. of Delaware

    2009-03-16

    We propose a new framework for providing information to help optimize domain-specific application codes. Its design addresses problems that derive from the widening gap between the domain problem statement by domain experts and the architectural details of new and future high-end computing systems. The design is particularly well suited to program execution models that incorporate dynamic adaptive methodologies for live tuning of program performance and resource utilization. This new framework, which we call 'structured hints', couples a vocabulary of annotations to a suite of performance metrics. The immediate target is development of a process by which a domain expert describes characteristics of objects and methods in the application code that would not be readily apparent to the compiler; the domain expert provides further information about what quantities might provide the best indications of desirable effect; and the interactive preprocessor identifies potential opportunities for the domain expert to evaluate. Our development of these ideas is progressing in stages from case study, through manual implementation, to automatic or semi-automatic implementation. In this paper we discuss results from our case study, an examination of a large simulation of a neural network modeled after the neocortex.

  19. Structural and histone binding ability characterization of the ARB2 domain of a histone deacetylase Hda1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Zhu, Yuwei; Wang, Chongyuan; Yan, Hui; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Hda1 is the catalytic core component of the H2B- and H3- specific histone deacetylase (HDAC) complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is involved in the epigenetic repression and plays a crucial role in transcriptional regulation and developmental events. Though the N-terminal catalytic HDAC domain of Hda1 is well characterized, the function of the C-terminal ARB2 domain remains unknown. In this study, we determine the crystal structure of the ARB2 domain from S. cerevisiae Hda1 at a resolution of 2.7 Å. The ARB2 domain displays an α/β sandwich architecture with an arm protruding outside. Two ARB2 domain molecules form a compact homo-dimer via the arm elements, and assemble as an inverse “V” shape. The pull-down and ITC results reveal that the ARB2 domain possesses the histone binding ability, recognizing both the H2A-H2B dimer and H3-H4 tetramer. Perturbation of the dimer interface abolishes the histone binding ability of the ARB2 domain, indicating that the unique dimer architecture of the ARB2 domain coincides with the function for anchoring to histone. Collectively, our data report the first structure of the ARB2 domain and disclose its histone binding ability, which is of benefit for understanding the deacetylation reaction catalyzed by the class II Hda1 HDAC complex. PMID:27665728

  20. Structure and function of the carboxyl-terminal oxygen-binding domain from the subunit of Octopus dofleini hemocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K I; van Holde, K E; Toumadje, A; Johnson, W C; Lamy, J

    1988-09-20

    The C-terminal domain, Od-1, of the 7-domain subunit of Octopus dofleini hemocyanin has been prepared by partial trypsinolysis followed by ion-exchange chromatography. It binds oxygen reversibly and is homogeneous in molecular weight. Its physical properties have been compared with those of the subunit. The domain molecular weight is found by sedimentation equilibrium to be 4.7 X 10(4), in excellent agreement with the result recently obtained in our laboratory from cDNA sequencing of this domain [Lang, W. H. (1988) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)]. It has a sedimentation coefficient of 3.8 S. Both the molecular weight and sedimentation coefficient are consistent with the domain constituting approximately one-seventh of the Mr 3.5 X 10(5) subunit. Its amino acid composition and carbohydrate content differ significantly from that of the whole subunit, confirming the heterogeneity in domains previously established on an immunological basis. Circular dichroism predicts similar secondary structure for the domain and subunit. The domain does not self-associate in the presence of Mg2+ but does bind to the whole molecule in a ratio of approximately 1 domain/subunit. The oxygen affinity of this domain is quite low. It shows intrinsic magnesium and Bohr effects similar to those of the whole molecule but of greatly reduced magnitude. PMID:3207676

  1. Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirC2 enhances T-DNA transfer and virulence through its C-terminal ribbon–helix–helix DNA-binding fold

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jun; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirC2 stimulates processing of single-stranded T-DNA that is translocated into plants to induce tumor formation, but how VirC2 functions is unclear. Here, we report the 1.7-Å X-ray crystal structure of its trypsin-resistant C-terminal domain, VirC282–202, which reveals a form of the ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) DNA-binding fold contained within a single polypeptide chain. DNA-binding assays and mutagenesis indicate that VirC2 uses this RHH fold to bind double-stranded DN...

  2. Structure of the Taz2 domain of p300: insights into ligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Maria; Dauter, Zbigniew; Cherry, Scott; Tropea, Joseph E.; Wlodawer, Alexander; (NCI)

    2010-01-12

    CBP and its paralog p300 are histone acetyl transferases that regulate gene expression by interacting with multiple transcription factors via specialized domains. The structure of a segment of human p300 protein (residues 1723-1836) corresponding to the extended zinc-binding Taz2 domain has been investigated. The crystal structure was solved by the SAD approach utilizing the anomalous diffraction signal of the bound Zn ions. The structure comprises an atypical helical bundle stabilized by three Zn ions and closely resembles the solution structures determined previously for shorter peptides. Residues 1813-1834 from the current construct form a helical extension of the C-terminal helix and make extensive crystal-contact interactions with the peptide-binding site of Taz2, providing additional insights into the mechanism of the recognition of diverse transactivation domains (TADs) by Taz2. On the basis of these results and molecular modeling, a hypothetical model of the binding of phosphorylated p53 TAD1 to Taz2 has been proposed.

  3. The RST and PARP-like domain containing SRO protein family: analysis of protein structure, function and conservation in land plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salojärvi Jarkko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SROs (SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE are a group of plant-specific proteins which have important functions in stress adaptation and development. They contain the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP domain and a C-terminal RST (RCD-SRO-TAF4 domain. In addition to these domains, several, but not all, SROs contain an N-terminal WWE domain. Results SROs are present in all analyzed land plants and sequence analysis differentiates between two structurally distinct groups; cryptogams and monocots possess only group I SROs whereas eudicots also contain group II. Group I SROs possess an N-terminal WWE domain (PS50918 but the WWE domain is lacking in group II SROs. Group I domain structure is widely represented in organisms as distant as humans (for example, HsPARP11. We propose a unified nomenclature for the SRO family. The SROs are able to interact with transcription factors through the C-terminal RST domain but themselves are generally not regulated at the transcriptional level. The most conserved feature of the SROs is the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PS51059 domain. However, bioinformatic analysis of the SRO PARP domain fold-structure and biochemical assays of AtRCD1 suggested that SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Conclusions The SROs are a highly conserved family of plant specific proteins. Sequence analysis of the RST domain implicates a highly preserved protein structure in that region. This might have implications for functional conservation. We suggest that, despite the presence of the catalytic core of the PARP domain, the SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Nevertheless, the function of SROs is critical for plants and might be related to transcription factor regulation and complex formation.

  4. Physical association of GPR54 C-terminal with protein phosphatase 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KiSS1 was discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene and subsequently found to encode kisspeptins (KP), ligands for a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR54. This ligand-receptor pair was later shown to play a critical role in the neuro-endocrine regulation of puberty. The C-terminal cytoplasmic (C-ter) domain of GPR54 contains a segment rich in proline and arginine residues that corresponds to the primary structure of four overlapping SH3 binding motifs. Yeast two hybrid experiments identified the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-C) as an interacting protein. Pull-down experiments with GST fusion proteins containing the GPR54 C-ter confirmed binding to PP2A-C in cell lysates and these complexes contained phosphatase activity. The proline arginine rich segment is necessary for these interactions. The GPR54 C-ter bound directly to purified recombinant PP2A-C, indicating the GPR54 C-ter may form complexes involving the catalytic subunit of PP2A that regulate phosphorylation of critical signaling intermediates.

  5. Structure and Membrane Binding Properties of the Endosomal Tetratricopeptide Repeat (TPR) Domain-containing Sorting Nexins SNX20 and SNX21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairfeuille, Thomas; Norwood, Suzanne J; Qi, Xiaying; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M

    2015-06-01

    Sorting nexins (SNX) orchestrate membrane trafficking and signaling events required for the proper distribution of proteins within the endosomal network. Their phox homology (PX) domain acts as a phosphoinositide (PI) recognition module that targets them to specific endocytic membrane domains. The modularity of SNX proteins confers a wide variety of functions from signaling to membrane deformation and cargo binding, and many SNXs are crucial modulators of endosome dynamics and are involved in a myriad of physiological and pathological processes such as neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and inflammation. Here, we have studied the poorly characterized SNX20 and its paralogue SNX21, which contain an N-terminal PX domain and a C-terminal PX-associated B (PXB) domain of unknown function. The two proteins share similar PI-binding properties and are recruited to early endosomal compartments by their PX domain. The crystal structure of the SNX21 PXB domain reveals a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-fold, a module that typically binds short peptide motifs, with three TPR α-helical repeats. However, the C-terminal capping helix adopts a highly unusual and potentially self-inhibitory topology. SAXS solution structures of SNX20 and SNX21 show that these proteins adopt a compact globular architecture, and membrane interaction analyses indicate the presence of overlapping PI-binding sites that may regulate their intracellular localization. This study provides the first structural analysis of this poorly characterized subfamily of SNX proteins, highlighting a likely role as endosome-associated scaffolds.

  6. Dimeric structure of the N-terminal domain of PriB protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis solved ab initio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew; Nowak, Marta; Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin

    2012-12-01

    PriB is one of the components of the bacterial primosome, which catalyzes the reactivation of stalled replication forks at sites of DNA damage. The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure was solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. The protein chain, which encompasses the first 104 residues of the full 220-residue protein, adopts the characteristic oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) structure consisting of a five-stranded β-barrel filled with hydrophobic residues and equipped with four loops extending from the barrel. In the crystal two protomers dimerize, forming a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The structure of the N-terminal OB domain of T. tengcongensis shows significant differences compared with mesophile PriBs. While in all other known structures of PriB a dimer is formed by two identical OB domains in separate chains, TtePriB contains two consecutive OB domains in one chain. However, sequence comparison of both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of TtePriB suggests that they have analogous structures and that the natural protein possesses a structure similar to a dimer of two N-terminal domains.

  7. Crystal structure of a putative aspartic proteinase domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell surface antigen PE_PGRS16☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barathy, Deivanayaga V.; Suguna, Kaza

    2013-01-01

    We report the crystal structure of the first prokaryotic aspartic proteinase-like domain identified in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A search in the genomes of Mycobacterium species showed that the C-terminal domains of some of the PE family proteins contain two classic DT/SG motifs of aspartic proteinases with a low overall sequence similarity to HIV proteinase. The three-dimensional structure of one of them, Rv0977 (PE_PGRS16) of M. tuberculosis revealed the characteristic pepsin-fold and catalytic site architecture. However, the active site was completely blocked by the N-terminal His-tag. Surprisingly, the enzyme was found to be inactive even after the removal of the N-terminal His-tag. A comparison of the structure with pepsins showed significant differences in the critical substrate binding residues and in the flap tyrosine conformation that could contribute to the lack of proteolytic activity of Rv0977. PMID:23923105

  8. Fluorescence study of domain structure and lipid interaction of human apolipoproteins E3 and E4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Hata, Mami; Dhanasekaran, Padmaja; Nickel, Margaret; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Phillips, Michael C; Lund-Katz, Sissel; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) isoforms exhibit different conformational stabilities and lipid-binding properties that give rise to altered cholesterol metabolism among the isoforms. Using Trp-substituted mutations and site- directed fluorescence labeling, we made a comprehensive comparison of the conformational organization of the N- and C-terminal domains and lipid interactions between the apoE3 and apoE4 isoforms. Trp fluorescence measurements for selectively Trp-substituted variants of apoE isoforms demonstrated that apoE4 adopts less stable conformations in both the N- and C-terminal domains compared to apoE3. Consistent with this, the conformational reorganization of the N-terminal helix bundle occurs at lower guanidine hydrochloride concentration in apoE4 than in apoE3 as monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Trp residues to acrylodan attached at the N-terminal helix. Upon binding of apoE3 and apoE4 variants to egg phosphatidylcholine small unilamellar vesicles, similar changes in Trp fluorescence or FRET efficiency were observed for the isoforms, indi- cating that the opening of the N-terminal helix bundle occurs similarly in apoE3 and apoE4. Introduction of mutations into the C-terminal domain of the apoE isoforms to prevent self-association and maintain the monomeric state resulted in great increase in the rate of binding of the C-terminal helices to a lipid surface. Overall, our results demonstrate that the different conformational organizations of the N- and C-terminal domains have a minor effect on the steady-state lipid-binding behavior of apoE3 and apoE4: rather, self-association property is a critical determinant in the kinetics of lipid binding through the C-terminal helices of apoE isoforms.

  9. Functional mechanism of C-terminal tail in the enzymatic role of porcine testicular carbonyl reductase: a combined experiment and molecular dynamics simulation study of the C-terminal tail in the enzymatic role of PTCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minky Son

    Full Text Available Porcine testicular carbonyl reductase, PTCR which is one of the short chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR superfamily catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of carbonyl compounds including steroids and prostaglandins. Previously we reported C-terminal tail of PTCR was deleted due to a nonsynonymous single nucleotide variation (nsSNV. Here we identified from kinetic studies that the enzymatic properties for 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT were different between wild-type and C-terminal-deleted PTCRs. Compared to wild-type PTCR, C-terminal-deleted PTCR has much higher reduction rate. To investigate structural difference between wild-type and C-terminal-deleted PTCRs upon 5α-DHT binding, we performed molecular dynamics simulations for two complexes. Using trajectories, molecular interactions including hydrogen bonding patterns, distance between 5α-DHT and catalytic Tyr193, and interaction energies are analyzed and compared. During the MD simulation time, the dynamic behavior of C-terminal tail in wild-type PTCR is also examined using essential dynamics analysis. The results of our simulations reveal that the binding conformation of 5α-DHT in C-terminal-deleted PTCR is more favorable for reduction reaction in PTCR, which shows strong agreement with kinetic data. These structural findings provide valuable information to understand substrate specificity of PTCR and further kinetic properties of enzymes belonging to the SDR superfamily.

  10. Effects of C-terminal truncations on trafficking of the yeast plasma membrane H+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A Brett; Allen, Kenneth E; Slayman, Carolyn W

    2006-08-18

    Within the large family of P-type cation-transporting ATPases, members differ in the number of C-terminal transmembrane helices, ranging from two in Cu2+-ATPases to six in H+-, Na+,K+-, Mg2+-, and Ca2+-ATPases. In this study, yeast Pma1 H+-ATPase has served as a model to examine the role of the C-terminal membrane domain in ATPase stability and targeting to the plasma membrane. Successive truncations were constructed from the middle of the major cytoplasmic loop to the middle of the extended cytoplasmic tail, adding back the C-terminal membrane-spanning helices one at a time. When the resulting constructs were expressed transiently in yeast, there was a steady increase in half-life from 70 min in Pma1 delta452 to 348 min in Pma1 delta901, but even the longest construct was considerably less stable than wild-type ATPase (t(1/2) = 11 h). Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy showed that 11 of 12 constructs were arrested in the endoplasmic reticulum and degraded in the proteasome. The only truncated ATPase that escaped the ER, Pma1 delta901, traveled slowly to the plasma membrane, where it hydrolyzed ATP and supported growth. Limited trypsinolysis showed Pma1 delta901 to be misfolded, however, resulting in premature delivery to the vacuole for degradation. As model substrates, this series of truncations affirms the importance of the entire C-terminal domain to yeast H+-ATPase biogenesis and defines a sequence element of 20 amino acids in the carboxyl tail that is critical to ER escape and trafficking to the plasma membrane.

  11. Structural and Functional Studies of the Ras-Associating and Pleckstrin Homology Domains of Grb10 and Grb14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depetris, R.; Wu, J; Hubbard, S

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor receptor-binding proteins Grb7, Grb10 and Grb14 are adaptor proteins containing a Ras-associating (RA) domain, a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a family-specific BPS (between PH and SH2) region and a C-terminal Src-homology-2 domain. Previous structural studies showed that the Grb14 BPS region binds as a pseudosubstrate inhibitor in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor to suppress insulin signaling. Here we report the crystal structure of the RA and PH domains of Grb10 at 2.6-A resolution. The structure reveals that these two domains, along with the intervening linker, form an integrated, dimeric structural unit. Biochemical studies demonstrated that Grb14 binds to activated Ras, which may serve as a timing mechanism for downregulation of insulin signaling. Our results illuminate the membrane-recruitment mechanisms not only of Grb7, Grb10 and Grb14 but also of MIG-10, Rap1-interacting adaptor molecule, lamellipodin and Pico, proteins involved in actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement that share a structurally related RA-PH tandem unit.

  12. Structural Time Domain Identification Toolbox User's Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Brincker, Rune

    This manual describes the Structural Time Domain Identification toolbox for use with MA TLAB. This version of the tool box has been developed using the PC-based MA TLAB version 4.2c, but is compatible with prior versions of MATLAB and UNIX-based versions. The routines of the toolbox are the so-ca......-called m-files that can be executed from the MA TLAB command line prompt or built into other m-files....

  13. Crystal structure and functional analysis of Dcp2p from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    OpenAIRE

    She, Meipei; Decker, Carolyn J.; Chen, Nan; Tumati, Suneeta; Parker, Roy; Song, Haiwei

    2005-01-01

    Decapping is a key step in both general and nonsense-mediated 5′ → ′ mRNA-decay pathways. Removal of the cap structure is catalyzed by the Dcp1–Dcp2 complex. The crystal structure of a C-terminally truncated Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dcp2p reveals two distinct domains: an all-helical N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain that is a classic Nudix fold. The C-terminal domain of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pombe Dcp2p proteins is sufficient for decapping activity, although the N-term...

  14. Structures of the {alpha}L I domain and its complex with ICAM-1 reveal a shape-shifting pathway for integrin regulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimaoka, M.; Xiao, T.; Liu, J.-H.; Yang, Y.; Dong, Y.; Jun, C.-D.; McCormack, A.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Takagi, A.; Wang, J.-H.; Springer, T. A.; Center for Blood Research; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.

    2003-01-10

    The structure of the I domain of integrin {alpha}L{beta}2 bound to the Ig superfamily ligand ICAM-1 reveals the open ligand binding conformation and the first example of an integrin-IgSF interface. The I domain Mg{sup 2+} directly coordinates Glu-34 of ICAM-1, and a dramatic swing of I domain residue Glu-241 enables a critical salt bridge. Liganded and unliganded structures for both high- and intermediate-affinity mutant I domains reveal that ligand binding can induce conformational change in the {alpha}L I domain and that allosteric signals can convert the closed conformation to intermediate or open conformations without ligand binding. Pulling down on the C-terminal {alpha}7 helix with introduced disulfide bonds ratchets the {beta}6-{alpha}7 loop into three different positions in the closed, intermediate, and open conformations, with a progressive increase in affinity.

  15. Synaptic Vesicle Tethering and the CaV2.2 Distal C-terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona K Wong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available . Evidence that synaptic vesicles (SVs can be gated by a single voltage sensitive calcium channel (CaV2.2 predict a molecular linking mechanism or ‘tether’[Stanley 1993]. Recent studies have proposed that the SV binds to the distal C-terminal on the CaV2.2 calcium channel [Kaeser et al. 2011;Wong, Li, and Stanley 2013] while genetic analysis proposed a double tether mechanism via RIM: directly to the C terminus PDZ ligand domain or indirectly via a more proximal proline rich site [Kaeser et al. 2011]. Using a novel in vitro SV-PD binding assay, we reported that SVs bind to a fusion protein comprising the C-terminal distal third (C3, aa 2137-2357 [Wong, Li, and Stanley 2013]. Here we limit the binding site further to the last 58 aa, beyond the proline rich site, by the absence of SV capture by a truncated C3 fusion protein (aa 2137-2299. To test PDZ-dependent binding we generated two C terminus-mutant C3 fusion proteins and a mimetic blocking peptide (H-WC, aa 2349-2357 and validated these by elimination of MINT-1 or RIM binding. Persistence of SV capture with all three fusion proteins or with the full length C3 protein but in the presence of the blocking peptide, demonstrated that SVs can bind to the distal C-terminal via a PDZ-independent mechanism. These results were supported in situ by normal SV turnover in H-WC-loaded synaptosomes, as assayed by a novel peptide cryoloading method. Thus, SVs tether to the CaV2.2 C-terminal within a 49 aa region immediately prior to the terminus PDZ ligand domain. Long tethers that could reflect extended C termini were imaged by electron microscopy of synaptosome ghosts. To fully account for SV tethering we propose a model where SVs are initially captured, or ‘grabbed’, from the cytoplasm by a binding site on the distal region of the channel C-terminal and are then retracted to be ‘locked’ close to the channel by a second attachment mechanism in preparation for single channel domain gating.

  16. Presence and expression of hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidases in cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindblad Peter

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrogenases catalyze the simplest of all chemical reactions: the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen or vice versa. Cyanobacteria can express an uptake, a bidirectional or both NiFe-hydrogenases. Maturation of those depends on accessory proteins encoded by hyp-genes. The last maturation step involves the cleavage of a ca. 30 amino acid long peptide from the large subunit by a C-terminal endopeptidase. Until know, nothing is known about the maturation of cyanobacterial NiFe-hydrogenases. The availability of three complete cyanobacterial genome sequences from strains with either only the uptake (Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133/PCC 73102, only the bidirectional (Synechocystis PCC 6803 or both NiFe-hydrogenases (Anabaena PCC 7120 prompted us to mine these genomes for hydrogenase maturation related genes. In this communication we focus on the presence and the expression of the NiFe-hydrogenases and the corresponding C-terminal endopeptidases, in the three strains mentioned above. Results We identified genes encoding putative cyanobacterial hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidases in all analyzed cyanobacterial genomes. The genes are not part of any known hydrogenase related gene cluster. The derived amino acid sequences show only low similarity (28–41% to the well-analyzed hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidase HybD from Escherichia coli, the crystal structure of which is known. However, computational secondary and tertiary structure modeling revealed the presence of conserved structural patterns around the highly conserved active site. Gene expression analysis shows that the endopeptidase encoding genes are expressed under both nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing conditions. Conclusion Anabaena PCC 7120 possesses two NiFe-hydrogenases and two hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidases but only one set of hyp-genes. Thus, in contrast to the Hyp-proteins, the C-terminal endopeptidases are the only known

  17. Domain structure of black hole space-times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce the domain structure for stationary black hole space-times. The domain structure lives on the submanifold of fixed points of the Killing vector fields. Depending on which Killing vector field has fixed points the submanifold is naturally divided into domains. The domain structure provides invariants of the space-time, both topological and continuous. It is defined for any space-time dimension and any number of Killing vector fields. We examine the domain structure for asymptotically flat space-times and find a canonical form for the metric of such space-times. The domain structure generalizes the rod structure introduced for space-times with D-2 commuting Killing vector fields. We analyze in detail the domain structure for Minkowski space, the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black hole and the Myers-Perry black hole in six and seven dimensions. Finally, we consider the possible domain structures for asymptotically flat black holes in six and seven dimensions.

  18. [Construction and expression of six deletion mutants of human astrovirus C-terminal nsP1a/4 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Ke; Zhao, Jian; Jin, Yi-ming; Sui, Ting-ting; Wang, Wen

    2013-09-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) is one of the leading causes of actue virual diarrhea in infants. HAstV-induced epithdlial cell apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of HAstV infection. Our previous study indicated that HAstV non-structural protein nsPla C-terminal protein nsPla/4 was the major apoptosis functional protein and probably contained the main apoptosis domains. In order to screen for astrovirus encoded apoptotic protien, nsPla/4 and six turncated proteins, which possessed nsPla/4 protein different function domain ,were cloned into green fluorescent protein (GFP) vector pEG-FP-N3. After 24-72 h transfection, the fusion protein expression in BHK21 cells, was analysis by fluorescence microscope and Western blot. The results indicated seven fusion proteins were observed successfully in BHK21 cell after transfected for 24 h. Western blot analysis showed that the level of fusion protein expressed in BHK21 cells was increased significantly at 72h compared to 48h in transfected cells. The successful expression of deletion mutants of nsPla/4 protein was an important foundation to gain further insights into the function of apoptosis domains of nsPla/4 protein and it would also provide research platform to further confirm the molecule pathogenic mechanism of human astrovirus. PMID:24386845

  19. [Construction and expression of six deletion mutants of human astrovirus C-terminal nsP1a/4 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Ke; Zhao, Jian; Jin, Yi-ming; Sui, Ting-ting; Wang, Wen

    2013-09-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) is one of the leading causes of actue virual diarrhea in infants. HAstV-induced epithdlial cell apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of HAstV infection. Our previous study indicated that HAstV non-structural protein nsPla C-terminal protein nsPla/4 was the major apoptosis functional protein and probably contained the main apoptosis domains. In order to screen for astrovirus encoded apoptotic protien, nsPla/4 and six turncated proteins, which possessed nsPla/4 protein different function domain ,were cloned into green fluorescent protein (GFP) vector pEG-FP-N3. After 24-72 h transfection, the fusion protein expression in BHK21 cells, was analysis by fluorescence microscope and Western blot. The results indicated seven fusion proteins were observed successfully in BHK21 cell after transfected for 24 h. Western blot analysis showed that the level of fusion protein expressed in BHK21 cells was increased significantly at 72h compared to 48h in transfected cells. The successful expression of deletion mutants of nsPla/4 protein was an important foundation to gain further insights into the function of apoptosis domains of nsPla/4 protein and it would also provide research platform to further confirm the molecule pathogenic mechanism of human astrovirus.

  20. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alison A; Mehler, Vera J; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2. PMID:27442528

  1. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison A Williams

    Full Text Available Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X, a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80 and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2.

  2. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alison A; Mehler, Vera J; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2.

  3. The structure of SSO2064, the first representative of Pfam family PF01796, reveals a novel two-domain zinc-ribbon OB-fold architecture with a potential acyl-CoA-binding role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of SSO2064, the first structural representative of Pfam family PF01796 (DUF35), reveals a two-domain architecture comprising an N-terminal zinc-ribbon domain and a C-terminal OB-fold domain. Analysis of the domain architecture, operon organization and bacterial orthologs combined with the structural features of SSO2064 suggests a role involving acyl-CoA binding for this family of proteins. SSO2064 is the first structural representative of PF01796 (DUF35), a large prokaryotic family with a wide phylogenetic distribution. The structure reveals a novel two-domain architecture comprising an N-terminal, rubredoxin-like, zinc ribbon and a C-terminal, oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold domain. Additional N-terminal helical segments may be involved in protein–protein interactions. Domain architectures, genomic context analysis and functional evidence from certain bacterial representatives of this family suggest that these proteins form a novel fatty-acid-binding component that is involved in the biosynthesis of lipids and polyketide antibiotics and that they possibly function as acyl-CoA-binding proteins. This structure has led to a re-evaluation of the DUF35 family, which has now been split into two entries in the latest Pfam release (v.24.0)

  4. Modulation of voltage-gated potassium Kv2.1 via the cytoplasmic C terminal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Man Jin; Peiyuan Lu

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels comprise 12 subtypes (Kv1-Kv12). Kv2.1, which is expressed in most mammalian central neurons, provides the majority of delayed-rectifier K current in cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and plays an especially prominent role in repolarizing membrane potential, as well as in facilitation of exocytosis. Kv2.1-encoded K efflux is essential for neuronal apoptosis programming. The human form of the Kv2.1 potassium channel contains large intracellular regions. The cytoplasmic C-terminal plays a key role in modulating Kv2.1 gating. The present manuscript summarized Kv2.1 structure and modulation in neurons and analyzed the roles of the cytoplasmic C-terminal.

  5. 157 nm Photodissociation of a Complete Set of Dipeptide Ions Containing C-Terminal Arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Webber, Nathaniel; Reilly, James P.

    2013-05-01

    Twenty singly-charged dipeptide ions with C-terminal arginine were photodissociated with 157 nm light and their tandem mass spectra recorded. Many of the small product ions that were observed are standard peptide fragments that have been commonly seen in VUV photodissociation studies. However, the study of a library of dipeptides containing all 20 N-terminal amino acids enabled the recognition of trends associated with the occurrence of w-, v-, and immonium ions, the observation of competition between forming N- and C-terminal fragments in dipeptide RR, and the identification of some unusual fragment ions appearing at masses of 183, 187, 196, and 197 Da. A highly accurate internal calibration of the photodissociation TOF-TOF data enabled molecular formulae for these four product ions to be derived. Their proposed structures reflect the rather high-energy nature of this fragmentation phenomenon.

  6. Crystallization and X-ray data analysis of the 10 kDa C-terminal lid subdomain from Caenorhabditis elegans Hsp70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrall, Liam; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D., E-mail: m.walkinshaw@ed.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, The King’s Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JR,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-01

    Crystals of the C-terminal 10 kDa lid subdomain from the C. elegans chaperone Hsp70 have been obtained that diffract X-rays to ∼3.5 Å and belong to space group I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Analysis of X-ray data and initial heavy-atom phasing reveals 24 monomers in the asymmetric unit related by 432 non-crystallographic symmetry. Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone involved in the regulation of protein folding. Crystals of the C-terminal 10 kDa helical lid domain (residues 542–640) from a Caenorhabditis elegans Hsp70 homologue have been produced that diffract X-rays to ∼3.4 Å. Crystals belong to space group I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 197, c = 200 Å. The Matthews coefficient, self-rotation function and Patterson map indicate 24 monomers in the asymmetric unit, showing non-crystallographic 432 symmetry. Molecular-replacement studies using the corresponding domain from rat, the only eukaryotic homologue with a known structure, failed and a mercury derivative was obtained. Preliminary MAD phasing using SHELXD and SHARP for location and refinement of the heavy-atom substructure and SOLOMON for density modification produced interpretable maps with a clear protein–solvent boundary. Further density-modification, model-building and refinement are currently under way.

  7. Reuse of structural domain–domain interactions in protein networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman Alex; Schuster-Böckler Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein interactions are thought to be largely mediated by interactions between structural domains. Databases such as iPfam relate interactions in protein structures to known domain families. Here, we investigate how the domain interactions from the iPfam database are distributed in protein interactions taken from the HPRD, MPact, BioGRID, DIP and IntAct databases. Results We find that known structural domain interactions can only explain a subset of 4–19% of the available...

  8. Insight into the modulation of Shaw2 Kv channels by general anesthetics: structural and functional studies of S4-S5 linker and S6 C-terminal peptides in micelles by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Qu, Xiaoguang; Covarrubias, Manuel; Germann, Markus W

    2013-02-01

    The modulation of the Drosophila Shaw2 Kv channel by 1-alkanols and inhaled anesthetics is correlated with the involvement of the S4-S5 linker and C-terminus of S6, and consistent with stabilization of the channel's closed state. Structural analysis of peptides from S4-S5 (L45) and S6 (S6c), by nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy supports that an α-helical conformation was adopted by L45, while S6c was only in an unstable/dynamic partially folded α-helix in dodecylphosphocholine micelles. Solvent accessibility and paramagnetic probing of L45 revealed that L45 lies parallel to the surface of micelles with charged and polar residues pointing towards the solution while hydrophobic residues are buried inside the micelles. Chemical shift perturbation introduced by 1-butanol on residues Gln320, Thr321, Phe322 and Arg323 of L45, as well as Thr423 and Gln424 of S6c indicates possible anesthetic binding sites on these two important components in the channel activation apparatus. Diffusion measurements confirmed the association of L45, S6c and 1-butanol with micelles which suggests the capability of 1-butanol to influence a possible interaction of L45 and S6c in the micelle environment.

  9. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  10. Dimeric structure of the N-terminal domain of PriB protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis solved ab initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebschner, Dorothee [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Brzezinski, Krzysztof [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Bialystok, 15-399 Bialystok (Poland); Dauter, Miroslawa [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Nowak, Marta; Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [Gdansk University of Technology, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium T. tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure has been solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. PriB is one of the components of the bacterial primosome, which catalyzes the reactivation of stalled replication forks at sites of DNA damage. The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure was solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. The protein chain, which encompasses the first 104 residues of the full 220-residue protein, adopts the characteristic oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) structure consisting of a five-stranded β-barrel filled with hydrophobic residues and equipped with four loops extending from the barrel. In the crystal two protomers dimerize, forming a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The structure of the N-terminal OB domain of T. tengcongensis shows significant differences compared with mesophile PriBs. While in all other known structures of PriB a dimer is formed by two identical OB domains in separate chains, TtePriB contains two consecutive OB domains in one chain. However, sequence comparison of both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of TtePriB suggests that they have analogous structures and that the natural protein possesses a structure similar to a dimer of two N-terminal domains.

  11. Structural modeling of the N-terminal signal–receiving domain of IκBα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira eYazdi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB exerts essential roles in many biological processes including cell growth, apoptosis and innate and adaptive immunity. The NF-kB inhibitor (IκBα retains NF-κB in the cytoplasm and thus inhibits nuclear localization of NF-κB and its association with DNA. Recent protein crystal structures of the C-terminal part of IκBα in complex with NF-κB provided insights into the protein-protein interactions but could not reveal structural details about the N-terminal signal receiving domain (SRD. The SRD of IκBα contains a degron, formed following phosphorylation by IκB kinases (IKK. In current protein X-ray structures, however, the SRD is not resolved and assumed to be disordered. Here, we combined secondary structure annotation and domain threading followed by long molecular dynamics (MD simulations and showed that the SRD possesses well-defined secondary structure elements. We show that the SRD contains 3 additional stable α-helices supplementing the six ARDs present in crystallized IκBα. The IκBα/NF-κB protein-protein complex remained intact and stable during the entire simulations. Also in solution, free IκBα retains its structural integrity. Differences in structural topology and dynamics were observed by comparing the structures of NF-κB free and NF-κB bound IκBα-complex. This study paves the way for investigating the signaling properties of the SRD in the IκBα degron. A detailed atomic scale understanding of molecular mechanism of NF-κB activation, regulation and the protein-protein interactions may assist to design and develop novel chronic inflammation modulators.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Mycoplasma arthritidis-Derived Mitogen in Apo Form Reveals a 3D Domain-Swapped Dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.; Li, Z; Guo, Y; VanVranken, S; Mourad, W; Li, H

    2010-01-01

    Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing particular V{beta} elements of T cell receptor. Here, we report the crystal structure of a MAM mutant K201A in apo form (unliganded) at 2.8-{angstrom} resolutions. We also partially refined the crystal structures of the MAM wild type and another MAM mutant L50A in apo forms at low resolutions. Unexpectedly, the structures of these apo MAM molecules display a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimer. The entire C-terminal domains of these MAM molecules are involved in the domain swapping. Functional analyses demonstrated that the K201A and L50A mutants do not show altered ability to bind to their host receptors and that they stimulate the activation of T cells as efficiently as does the wild type. Structural comparisons indicated that the 'reconstituted' MAM monomer from the domain-swapped dimer displays large differences at the hinge regions from the MAM{sub wt} molecule in the receptor-bound form. Further comparison indicated that MAM has a flexible N-terminal loop, implying that conformational changes could occur upon receptor binding.

  13. C-terminal moiety of Tudor contains its in vivo activity in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Anne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In early Drosophila embryos, the germ plasm is localized to the posterior pole region and is partitioned into the germline progenitors, known as pole cells. Germ plasm, or pole plasm, contains the polar granules which form during oogenesis and are required for germline development. Components of these granules are also present in the perinuclear region of the nurse cells, the nuage. One such component is Tudor (Tud which is a large protein containing multiple Tudor domains. It was previously reported that specific Tudor domains are required for germ cell formation and Tud localization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to better understand the function of Tud the distribution and functional activity of fragments of Tud were analyzed. These fragments were fused to GFP and the fusion proteins were synthesized during oogenesis. Non-overlapping fragments of Tud were found to be able to localize to both the nuage and pole plasm. By introducing these fragments into a tud mutant background and testing their ability to rescue the tud phenotype, I determined that the C-terminal moiety contains the functional activity of Tud. Dividing this fragment into two parts reduces its localization in pole plasm and abolishes its activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: I conclude that the C-terminal moiety of Tud contains all the information necessary for its localization in the nuage and pole plasm and its pole cell-forming activity. The present results challenge published data and may help refining the functional features of Tud.

  14. Structure and Specificity of a Binary Tandem Domain F-Lectin from Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchet, M.; Odom, E; Vasta, J; Amzel, M

    2010-01-01

    The plasma of the striped bass Morone saxatilis contains a fucose-specific lectin (MsaFBP32) that consists of two F-type carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in tandem. The crystal structure of the complex of MsaFBP32 with l-fucose reported here shows a cylindrical 81-A-long and 60-A-wide trimer divided into two globular halves: one containing N-terminal CRDs (N-CRDs) and the other containing C-terminal CRDs (C-CRDs). The resulting binding surfaces at the opposite ends of the cylindrical trimer have the potential to cross-link cell surface or humoral carbohydrate ligands. The N-CRDs and C-CRDs of MsaFBP32 exhibit significant structural differences, suggesting that they recognize different glycans. Analysis of the carbohydrate binding sites provides the structural basis for the observed specificity of MsaFBP32 for simple carbohydrates and suggests that the N-CRD recognizes more complex fucosylated oligosaccharides and with a relatively higher avidity than the C-CRD. Modeling of MsaFBP32 complexed with fucosylated glycans that are widely distributed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes rationalizes the observation that binary tandem CRD F-type lectins function as opsonins by cross-linking 'non-self' carbohydrate ligands and 'self' carbohydrate ligands, such as sugar structures displayed by microbial pathogens and glycans on the surface of phagocytic cells from the host.

  15. Anisotropic domain structure of KTiOPO4 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urenski, P.; Lesnykh, M.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Rosenman, G.; Molotskii, M.

    2001-08-01

    Highly anisotropic ferroelectric domain structure is observed in KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystals reversed by low electric field. The applied Miller-Weinreich model for sidewise motion of domain walls indicates that this anisotropy results from the peculiarities of KTP crystal lattice. The domain nuclei of dozen nanometer size, imaged by atomic force microscopy method, demonstrate regular hexagonal forms. The orientation of domain walls of the elementary nuclei coincides with the orientation of the facets of macroscopic KTP crystals. The observed strong domain elongation along one principal crystal axis allows us to improve tailoring of ferroelectric domain engineered structures for nonlinear optical converters.

  16. Identification of antigenic domains in the non-structural protein of Muscovy duck parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian-Fei; Li, Ming; Yan, Bing; Shao, Shu-Li; Fan, Xing-Dong; Wang, Jia; Wang, Dan-Na

    2016-08-01

    Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) infection is widespread in many Muscovy-duck-farming countries, leading to a huge economic loss. By means of overlapping peptides expressed in Escherichia coli in combination with Western blot, antigenic domains on the non-structural protein (NSP) of MDPV were identified for the first time. On the Western blot, the fragments NS(481-510), NS (501-530), NS (521-550), NS (541-570), NS (561-590), NS (581-610) and NS (601-627) were positive (the numbers in parentheses indicate the location of amino acids), and other fragments were negative. These seven fragments were also reactive in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (i-ELISA). We therefore conclude that a linear antigenic domain of the NSP is located at its C-terminal end (amino acid residues 481-627). These results may facilitate future investigations into the function of NSP of MDPV and the development of immunoassays for the diagnosis of MDPV infection. PMID:27154558

  17. Low resolution solution structure of HAMLET and the importance of its alpha-domains in tumoricidal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C S James Ho

    Full Text Available HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells is the first member in a new family of protein-lipid complexes with broad tumoricidal activity. Elucidating the molecular structure and the domains crucial for HAMLET formation is fundamental for understanding its tumoricidal function. Here we present the low-resolution solution structure of the complex of oleic acid bound HAMLET, derived from small angle X-ray scattering data. HAMLET shows a two-domain conformation with a large globular domain and an extended part of about 2.22 nm in length and 1.29 nm width. The structure has been superimposed into the related crystallographic structure of human α-lactalbumin, revealing that the major part of α-lactalbumin accommodates well in the shape of HAMLET. However, the C-terminal residues from L105 to L123 of the crystal structure of the human α-lactalbumin do not fit well into the HAMLET structure, resulting in an extended conformation in HAMLET, proposed to be required to form the tumoricidal active HAMLET complex with oleic acid. Consistent with this low resolution structure, we identified biologically active peptide epitopes in the globular as well as the extended domains of HAMLET. Peptides covering the alpha1 and alpha2 domains of the protein triggered rapid ion fluxes in the presence of sodium oleate and were internalized by tumor cells, causing rapid and sustained changes in cell morphology. The alpha peptide-oleate bound forms also triggered tumor cell death with comparable efficiency as HAMLET. In addition, shorter peptides corresponding to those domains are biologically active. These findings provide novel insights into the structural prerequisites for the dramatic effects of HAMLET on tumor cells.

  18. Low resolution solution structure of HAMLET and the importance of its alpha-domains in tumoricidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C S James; Rydstrom, Anna; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is the first member in a new family of protein-lipid complexes with broad tumoricidal activity. Elucidating the molecular structure and the domains crucial for HAMLET formation is fundamental for understanding its tumoricidal function. Here we present the low-resolution solution structure of the complex of oleic acid bound HAMLET, derived from small angle X-ray scattering data. HAMLET shows a two-domain conformation with a large globular domain and an extended part of about 2.22 nm in length and 1.29 nm width. The structure has been superimposed into the related crystallographic structure of human α-lactalbumin, revealing that the major part of α-lactalbumin accommodates well in the shape of HAMLET. However, the C-terminal residues from L105 to L123 of the crystal structure of the human α-lactalbumin do not fit well into the HAMLET structure, resulting in an extended conformation in HAMLET, proposed to be required to form the tumoricidal active HAMLET complex with oleic acid. Consistent with this low resolution structure, we identified biologically active peptide epitopes in the globular as well as the extended domains of HAMLET. Peptides covering the alpha1 and alpha2 domains of the protein triggered rapid ion fluxes in the presence of sodium oleate and were internalized by tumor cells, causing rapid and sustained changes in cell morphology. The alpha peptide-oleate bound forms also triggered tumor cell death with comparable efficiency as HAMLET. In addition, shorter peptides corresponding to those domains are biologically active. These findings provide novel insights into the structural prerequisites for the dramatic effects of HAMLET on tumor cells.

  19. Structure of a Thyroid Hormone Receptor DNA-Binding Domain Homodimer Bound to an Inverted Palindrome DNA Response Element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi; Young, Matthew A. (Michigan)

    2010-10-22

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR), as a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, can recognize and bind different classes of DNA response element targets as either a monomer, a homooligomer, or a heterooligomer. We report here the first crystal structure of a homodimer TR DNA-binding domain (DBD) in complex with an inverted repeat class of thyroid response element (TRE). The structure shows a nearly symmetric structure of the TR DBD assembled on the F2 TRE where the base recognition contacts in the homodimer DNA complex are conserved relative to the previously published structure of a TR-9-cis-retinoic acid receptor heterodimer DNA complex. The new structure also reveals that the T-box region of the DBD can function as a structural hinge that enables a large degree of flexibility in the position of the C-terminal extension helix that connects the DBD to the ligand-binding domain. Although the isolated TR DBDs exist as monomers in solution, we have measured highly cooperative binding of the two TR DBD subunits onto the inverted repeat DNA sequence. This suggests that elements of the DBD can influence the specific TR oligomerization at target genes, and it is not just interactions between the ligand-binding domains that are responsible for TR oligomerization at target genes. Mutational analysis shows that intersubunit contacts at the DBD C terminus account for some, but not all, of the cooperative homodimer TR binding to the inverted repeat class TRE.

  20. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane–solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane–solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor. PMID

  1. A Nonoligomerizing Mutant Form of Helicobacter pylori VacA Allows Structural Analysis of the p33 Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rivera, Christian; Campbell, Anne M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Pyburn, Tasia M; Foegeding, Nora J; Barke, Theresa L; Spiller, Benjamin W; McClain, Mark S; Ohi, Melanie D; Lacy, D Borden; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori secretes a pore-forming VacA toxin that has structural features and activities substantially different from those of other known bacterial toxins. VacA can assemble into multiple types of water-soluble flower-shaped oligomeric structures, and most VacA activities are dependent on its capacity to oligomerize. The 88-kDa secreted VacA protein can undergo limited proteolysis to yield two domains, designated p33 and p55. The p33 domain is required for membrane channel formation and intracellular toxic activities, and the p55 domain has an important role in mediating VacA binding to cells. Previous studies showed that the p55 domain has a predominantly β-helical structure, but no structural data are available for the p33 domain. We report here the purification and analysis of a nonoligomerizing mutant form of VacA secreted by H. pylori The nonoligomerizing 88-kDa mutant protein retains the capacity to enter host cells but lacks detectable toxic activity. Analysis of crystals formed by the monomeric protein reveals that the β-helical structure of the p55 domain extends into the C-terminal portion of p33. Fitting the p88 structural model into an electron microscopy map of hexamers formed by wild-type VacA (predicted to be structurally similar to VacA membrane channels) reveals that p55 and the β-helical segment of p33 localize to peripheral arms but do not occupy the central region of the hexamers. We propose that the amino-terminal portion of p33 is unstructured when VacA is in a monomeric form and that it undergoes a conformational change during oligomer assembly. PMID:27382020

  2. Crystal structure of the sensory domain of Escherichia coli CadC, a member of the ToxR-like protein family

    OpenAIRE

    Eichinger, Andreas; Haneburger, Ina; Koller, Christiane; Jung, Kirsten; Skerra, Arne

    2011-01-01

    The membrane-integral transcriptional activator CadC comprises sensory and transcriptional regulatory functions within one polypeptide chain. Its C-terminal periplasmic domain, CadCpd, is responsible for sensing of environmental pH as well as for binding of the feedback inhibitor cadaverine. Here we describe the crystal structure of CadCpd (residues 188–512) solved at a resolution of 1.8 Å via multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) using a ReCl62− derivative. CadCpd reveals a novel fo...

  3. Computational Methods for Domain Partitioning of Protein Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veretnik, Stella; Shindyalov, Ilya

    Analysis of protein structures typically begins with decomposition of structure into more basic units, called "structural domains". The underlying goal is to reduce a complex protein structure to a set of simpler yet structurally meaningful units, each of which can be analyzed independently. Structural semi-independence of domains is their hallmark: domains often have compact structure and can fold or function independently. Domains can undergo so-called "domain shuffling"when they reappear in different combinations in different proteins thus implementing different biological functions (Doolittle, 1995). Proteins can then be conceived as being built of such basic blocks: some, especially small proteins, consist usually of just one domain, while other proteins possess a more complex architecture containing multiple domains. Therefore, the methods for partitioning a structure into domains are of critical importance: their outcome defines the set of basic units upon which structural classifications are built and evolutionary analysis is performed. This is especially true nowadays in the era of structural genomics. Today there are many methods that decompose the structure into domains: some of them are manual (i.e., based on human judgment), others are semiautomatic, and still others are completely automatic (based on algorithms implemented as software). Overall there is a high level of consistency and robustness in the process of partitioning a structure into domains (for ˜80% of proteins); at least for structures where domain location is obvious. The picture is less bright when we consider proteins with more complex architectures—neither human experts nor computational methods can reach consistent partitioning in many such cases. This is a rather accurate reflection of biological phenomena in general since domains are formed by different mechanisms, hence it is nearly impossible to come up with a set of well-defined rules that captures all of the observed cases.

  4. The Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli Group 4 Capsule Protein GfcC Reveals a Domain Organization Resembling That of Wza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Mills, Erez; Franzmann, Titus M.; Rosenshine, Ilan; Saper, Mark A. (Michigan); (Hebrew)

    2012-03-15

    We report the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli GfcC, a periplasmic protein encoded by the gfc operon, which is essential for assembly of group 4 polysaccharide capsule (O-antigen capsule). Presumed gene orthologs of gfcC are present in capsule-encoding regions of at least 29 genera of Gram-negative bacteria. GfcC, a member of the DUF1017 family, is comprised of tandem {beta}-grasp (ubiquitin-like) domains (D2 and D3) and a carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix, a domain arrangement reminiscent of that of Wza that forms an exit pore for group 1 capsule export. Unlike the membrane-spanning C-terminal helix from Wza, the GfcC C-terminal helix packs against D3. Previously unobserved in a {beta}-grasp domain structure is a 48-residue helical hairpin insert in D2 that binds to D3, constraining its position and sequestering the carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix. A centrally located and invariant Arg115 not only is essential for proper localization but also forms one of two mostly conserved pockets. Finally, we draw analogies between a GfcC protein fused to an outer membrane {beta}-barrel pore in some species and fusion proteins necessary for secreting biofilm-forming exopolysaccharides.

  5. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli group 4 capsule protein GfcC reveals a domain organization resembling that of Wza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Mills, Erez; Franzmann, Titus M; Rosenshine, Ilan; Saper, Mark A

    2011-06-21

    We report the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli GfcC, a periplasmic protein encoded by the gfc operon, which is essential for assembly of group 4 polysaccharide capsule (O-antigen capsule). Presumed gene orthologs of gfcC are present in capsule-encoding regions of at least 29 genera of Gram-negative bacteria. GfcC, a member of the DUF1017 family, is comprised of tandem β-grasp (ubiquitin-like) domains (D2 and D3) and a carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix, a domain arrangement reminiscent of that of Wza that forms an exit pore for group 1 capsule export. Unlike the membrane-spanning C-terminal helix from Wza, the GfcC C-terminal helix packs against D3. Previously unobserved in a β-grasp domain structure is a 48-residue helical hairpin insert in D2 that binds to D3, constraining its position and sequestering the carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix. A centrally located and invariant Arg115 not only is essential for proper localization but also forms one of two mostly conserved pockets. Finally, we draw analogies between a GfcC protein fused to an outer membrane β-barrel pore in some species and fusion proteins necessary for secreting biofilm-forming exopolysaccharides. PMID:21449614

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of C-terminal tails in cellular microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L.; Sataric, Bogdan M.; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Bugay, Aleksandr N.; Sataric, Miljko V.

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano-electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C-terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C-terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink-waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of C-terminal tails in cellular microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L; Sataric, Bogdan M; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Bugay, Aleksandr N; Sataric, Miljko V

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano-electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C-terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C-terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink-waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process. PMID:27475079

  8. Molecular Details of Olfactomedin Domains Provide Pathway to Structure-Function Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon E Hill

    Full Text Available Olfactomedin (OLF domains are found within extracellular, multidomain proteins in numerous tissues of multicellular organisms. Even though these proteins have been implicated in human disorders ranging from cancers to attention deficit disorder to glaucoma, little is known about their structure(s and function(s. Here we biophysically, biochemically, and structurally characterize OLF domains from H. sapiens olfactomedin-1 (npoh-OLF, also called noelin, pancortin, OLFM1, and hOlfA, and M. musculus gliomedin (glio-OLF, also called collomin, collmin, and CRG-L2, and compare them with available structures of myocilin (myoc-OLF recently reported by us and R. norvegicus glio-OLF and M. musculus latrophilin-3 (lat3-OLF by others. Although the five-bladed β-propeller architecture remains unchanged, numerous physicochemical characteristics differ among these OLF domains. First, npoh-OLF and glio-OLF exhibit prominent, yet distinct, positive surface charges and copurify with polynucleotides. Second, whereas npoh-OLF and myoc-OLF exhibit thermal stabilities typical of human proteins near 55°C, and most myoc-OLF variants are destabilized and highly prone to aggregation, glio-OLF is nearly 20°C more stable and significantly more resistant to chemical denaturation. Phylogenetically, glio-OLF is most similar to primitive OLFs, and structurally, glio-OLF is missing distinguishing features seen in OLFs such as the disulfide bond formed by N- and C- terminal cysteines, the sequestered Ca2+ ion within the propeller central hydrophilic cavity, and a key loop-stabilizing cation-π interaction on the top face of npoh-OLF and myoc-OLF. While deciphering the explicit biological functions, ligands, and binding partners for OLF domains will likely continue to be a challenging long-term experimental pursuit, we used structural insights gained here to generate a new antibody selective for myoc-OLF over npoh-OLF and glio-OLF as a first step in overcoming the impasse in

  9. Sequences determining the cytoplasmic localization of a chemoreceptor domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, L; Bailey, J; Manoil, C

    1995-01-01

    The Escherichia coli serine chemoreceptor (Tsr) is a protein with a simple topology consisting of two membrane-spanning sequences (TM1 and TM2) separating a large periplasmic domain from N-terminal and C-terminal cytoplasmic regions. We analyzed the contributions of several sequence elements to the cytoplasmic localization of the C-terminal domain by using chemoreceptor-alkaline phosphatase gene fusions. The principal findings were as follows. (i) The cytoplasmic localization of the C-terminal domain depended on TM2 but was quite tolerant of mutations partially deleting or introducing charged residues into the sequence. (ii) The basal level of C-terminal domain export was significantly higher in proteins with the wild-type periplasmic domain than in derivatives with a shortened periplasmic domain, suggesting that the large size of the wild-type domain promotes partial membrane misinsertion. (iii) The membrane insertion of deletion derivatives with a single spanning segment (TM1 or TM2) could be controlled by either an adjacent positively charged sequence or an adjacent amphipathic sequence. The results provide evidence that the generation of the Tsr membrane topology is an overdetermined process directed by an interplay of sequences promoting and opposing establishment of the normal structure. PMID:7730259

  10. Structure and Functional Studies of the CS Domain of the Essential H/ACA Ribonucleoparticle Assembly Protein SHQ1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mahavir; Gonzales, Fernando A.; Cascio, Duilio; Heckmann, Nathanael; Chanfreau, Guillaume; Feigon, Juli; (UCLA)

    2009-03-16

    H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles are essential for ribosomal RNA and telomerase RNA processing and metabolism. Shq1p has been identified as an essential eukaryotic H/ACA small nucleolar (sno) ribonucleoparticle (snoRNP) biogenesis and assembly factor. Shq1p is postulated to be involved in the early biogenesis steps of H/ACA snoRNP complexes, and Shq1p depletion leads to a specific decrease in H/ACA small nucleolar RNA levels and to defects in ribosomal RNA processing. Shq1p contains two predicted domains as follows: an N-terminal CS (named after CHORD-containing proteins and SGT1) or HSP20-like domain, and a C-terminal region of high sequence homology called the Shq1 domain. Here we report the crystal structure and functional studies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Shq1p CS domain. The structure consists of a compact anti-parallel {beta}-sandwich fold that is composed of two {beta}-sheets containing four and three {beta}-strands, respectively, and a short {alpha}-helix. Deletion studies showed that the CS domain is required for the essential functions of Shq1p. Point mutations in residues Phe-6, Gln-10, and Lys-80 destabilize Shq1p in vivo and induce a temperature-sensitive phenotype with depletion of H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs and defects in rRNA processing. Although CS domains are frequently found in co-chaperones of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone, no interaction was detected between the Shq1p CS domain and yeast Hsp90 in vitro. These results show that the CS domain is essential for Shq1p function in H/ACA snoRNP biogenesis in vivo, possibly in an Hsp90-independent manner.

  11. Structure-guided mutational analysis of the OB, HhH, and BRCT domains of Escherichia coli DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Kai; Nair, Pravin A; Shuman, Stewart

    2008-08-22

    NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases (LigAs) are ubiquitous in bacteria and essential for growth. LigA enzymes have a modular structure in which a central catalytic core composed of nucleotidyltransferase and oligonucleotide-binding (OB) domains is linked via a tetracysteine zinc finger to distal helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and BRCT (BRCA1-like C-terminal) domains. The OB and HhH domains contribute prominently to the protein clamp formed by LigA around nicked duplex DNA. Here we conducted a structure-function analysis of the OB and HhH domains of Escherichia coli LigA by alanine scanning and conservative substitutions, entailing 43 mutations at 22 amino acids. We thereby identified essential functional groups in the OB domain that engage the DNA phosphodiester backbone flanking the nick (Arg(333)); penetrate the minor grove and distort the nick (Val(383) and Ile(384)); or stabilize the OB fold (Arg(379)). The essential constituents of the HhH domain include: four glycines (Gly(455), Gly(489), Gly(521), Gly(553)), which bind the phosphate backbone across the minor groove at the outer margins of the LigA-DNA interface; Arg(487), which penetrates the minor groove at the outer margin on the 3 (R)-OH side of the nick; and Arg(446), which promotes protein clamp formation via contacts to the nucleotidyltransferase domain. We find that the BRCT domain is required in its entirety for effective nick sealing and AMP-dependent supercoil relaxation.

  12. Influence of the valine zipper region on the structure and aggregation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Natalie A; Reynolds, T Steele; Middaugh, C Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of α-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation. PMID:23067245

  13. Influence of the valine zipper region on the structure and aggregation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Natalie A; Reynolds, T Steele; Middaugh, C Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of α-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation.

  14. On the structure of Fatou domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI GuiZhen; PENG Wen Juan

    2008-01-01

    Let U be a multiply-connected fixed attracting Fatou domain of a rational map f. We prove that there exist a rational map g and a completely invariant Fatou domain Ⅴ of g such that (f, U)and (g, V) are holomorphically conjugate, and each non-trivial Julia component of g is a quasi-circle which bounds an eventually superattracting Fatou domain of g containing at most one postcritical point of g. Moreover, g is unique up to a holomorphic conjugation.

  15. On the structure of Fatou domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Let U be a multiply-connected fixed attracting Fatou domain of a rational map f.We prove that there exist a rational map g and a completely invariant Fatou domain V of g such that(f,U) and(g,V) are holomorphically conjugate,and each non-trivial Julia component of g is a quasi-circle which bounds an eventually superattracting Fatou domain of g containing at most one postcritical point of g.Moreover,g is unique up to a holomorphic conjugation.

  16. Structure-dependent electrical conductivity of protein: its differences between alpha-domain and beta-domain structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transports in the α-domain and β-domain of proteins have been comprehensively investigated. The structure-dependent electron transport of proteins has been experimentally measured and theoretically simulated, and both the theoretical and experimental results demonstrate significant differences in electrical conductivity between the α-domain and β-domain. By controlling the feedback system of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the conductance of a single α-domain protein hemoglobin (Hgb) and a β-domain protein superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD) were measured, respectively. The current signal of Hgb is obviously stronger, indicating that the α-domain is more conductive. To confirm our finding, molecular orbitals of both the β-domain in SOD and α-domain in Hgb have been analyzed based on first-principles calculations. As expected, tunneling transport and hopping in the α-domain are both more efficient, indicating that it is easier for electrons to transport through the α-domain, which are in great agreement with our experimental data. In order to explain our results, molecular structures of α- and β-domains have been carefully analyzed and show that the explanation should lie in the differences in packing mode between the α-domain and β-domain. This research should be very important to application prospects in molecular electronics. (paper)

  17. Reuse of structural domain–domain interactions in protein networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman Alex

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein interactions are thought to be largely mediated by interactions between structural domains. Databases such as iPfam relate interactions in protein structures to known domain families. Here, we investigate how the domain interactions from the iPfam database are distributed in protein interactions taken from the HPRD, MPact, BioGRID, DIP and IntAct databases. Results We find that known structural domain interactions can only explain a subset of 4–19% of the available protein interactions, nevertheless this fraction is still significantly bigger than expected by chance. There is a correlation between the frequency of a domain interaction and the connectivity of the proteins it occurs in. Furthermore, a large proportion of protein interactions can be attributed to a small number of domain interactions. We conclude that many, but not all, domain interactions constitute reusable modules of molecular recognition. A substantial proportion of domain interactions are conserved between E. coli, S. cerevisiae and H. sapiens. These domains are related to essential cellular functions, suggesting that many domain interactions were already present in the last universal common ancestor. Conclusion Our results support the concept of domain interactions as reusable, conserved building blocks of protein interactions, but also highlight the limitations currently imposed by the small number of available protein structures.

  18. Structure-based identification of CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and rational design of peptide ligands to target such interaction in human fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Le; Han, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2016-06-01

    The recognition and association between Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated protein kinase II-α (CaMKIIα) and multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) plays an important role in sperm acrosome reaction and human fertilization, which is mediated by the binding of CaMKIIα's C-terminal tail to one or more PDZ domains of the scaffolding protein MUPP1. In this study, we attempt to identify the CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and to design peptide ligands that can potently target and then competitively disrupt such interaction. Here, a synthetic biology approach was proposed to systematically characterize the structural basis, energetic property, dynamic behavior and biological implication underlying the intermolecular interactions between the C-terminal peptide of CaMKIIα and all the 13 PDZ domains of MUPP1. These domains can be grouped into four clusters in terms of their sequence, structure and physiochemical profile; different clusters appear to recognize different classes of PDZ-binding motifs. The cluster 3 includes two members, i.e. MUPP1 PDZ 5 and 11 domains, which were suggested to bind class II motif Φ-X-Φ(-COOH) of the C-terminal peptide SGAPSV(-COOH) of CaMKIIα. Subsequently, the two domains were experimentally measured as the moderate- and high-affinity binders of the peptide by using fluorescence titration (dissociation constants K d = 25.2 ± 4.6 and 0.47 ± 0.08 µM for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively), which was in line with theoretical prediction (binding free energies ΔG total = -7.6 and -9.2 kcal/mol for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively). A systematic mutation of SGAPSV(-COOH) residues suggested few favorable amino acids at different residue positions of the peptide, which were then combined to generate a number of potent peptide mutants for PDZ 11 domain. Consequently, two peptides (SIAPNV(-COOH) and SIVMNV(-COOH)) were identified to have considerably improved affinity with K d increase by ~tenfold relative to

  19. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of the defunct domain of calcium vector protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théret, I; Baladi, S; Cox, J A; Gallay, J; Sakamoto, H; Craescu, C T

    2001-11-20

    CaVP (calcium vector protein) is a Ca(2+) sensor of the EF-hand protein family which is highly abundant in the muscle of Amphioxus. Its three-dimensional structure is not known, but according to the sequence analysis, the protein is composed of two domains, each containing a pair of EF-hand motifs. We determined recently the solution structure of the C-terminal domain (Trp81-Ser161) and characterized the large conformational and dynamic changes induced by Ca(2+) binding. In contrast, the N-terminal domain (Ala1-Asp86) has lost the capacity to bind the metal ion due to critical mutations and insertions in the two calcium loops. In this paper, we report the solution structure of the N-terminal domain and its backbone dynamics based on NMR spectroscopy, nuclear relaxation, and molecular modeling. The well-resolved three-dimensional structure is typical of a pair of EF-hand motifs, joined together by a short antiparallel beta-sheet. The tertiary arrangement of the two EF-hands results in a closed-type conformation, with near-antiparallel alpha-helices, similar to other EF-hand pairs in the absence of calcium ions. To characterize the internal dynamics of the protein, we measured the (15)N nuclear relaxation rates and the heteronuclear NOE effect in (15)N-labeled N-CaVP at a magnetic field of 11.74 T and 298 K. The domain is mainly monomeric in solution and undergoes an isotropic Brownian rotational diffusion with a correlation time of 7.1 ns, in good agreement with the fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements. Data analysis using a model-free procedure showed that the amide backbone groups in the alpha-helices and beta-strands undergo highly restricted movements on a picosecond to nanosecond time scale. The amide groups in Ca(2+) binding loops and in the linker fragment also display rapid fluctuations with slightly increased amplitudes. PMID:11705378

  20. X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of plasmid encoded toxin(Pet), an autotransporter enterotoxin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo Meza-Aguilar, J. [Departamento de Salud Pública Facultad de Medicina UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Laboratorio de Patogenicidad Bacteriana, Unidad de Hemato Oncología e Investigación, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez 06720, D.F. (Mexico); Fromme, Petra [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Physical Sciences BLDG D-102, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Torres-Larios, Alfredo [Instituto de Fisiología Celular UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo [Instituto de Química UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F (Mexico); Hernandez-Chiñas, Ulises [Departamento de Salud Pública Facultad de Medicina UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Laboratorio de Patogenicidad Bacteriana, Unidad de Hemato Oncología e Investigación, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez 06720, D.F. (Mexico); Arreguin-Espinosa de los Monteros, Roberto A. [Instituto de Química UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F (Mexico); and others

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of Plasmid encoded toxin at 2.3 Å. • Structural differences between Pet passenger domain and EspP protein are described. • High flexibility of the C-terminal beta helix is structurally assigned. - Abstract: Autotransporters (ATs) represent a superfamily of proteins produced by a variety of pathogenic bacteria, which include the pathogenic groups of Escherichia coli (E. coli) associated with gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections. We present the first X-ray structure of the passenger domain from the Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) a 100 kDa protein at 2.3 Å resolution which is a cause of acute diarrhea in both developing and industrialized countries. Pet is a cytoskeleton-altering toxin that induces loss of actin stress fibers. While Pet (pdb code: 4OM9) shows only a sequence identity of 50% compared to the closest related protein sequence, extracellular serine protease plasmid (EspP) the structural features of both proteins are conserved. A closer structural look reveals that Pet contains a β-pleaded sheet at the sequence region of residues 181–190, the corresponding structural domain in EspP consists of a coiled loop. Secondary, the Pet passenger domain features a more pronounced beta sheet between residues 135 and 143 compared to the structure of EspP.

  1. Crystal structure of the stress-inducible human heat shock protein 70 substrate-binding domain in complex with peptide substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingfeng Zhang

    Full Text Available The HSP70 family of molecular chaperones function to maintain protein quality control and homeostasis. The major stress-induced form, HSP70 (also called HSP72 or HSPA1A is considered an important anti-cancer drug target because it is constitutively overexpressed in a number of human cancers and promotes cancer cell survival. All HSP70 family members contain two functional domains: an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD and a C-terminal protein substrate-binding domain (SBD; the latter is subdivided into SBDα and SBDβ subdomains. The NBD and SBD structures of the bacterial ortholog, DnaK, have been characterized, but only the isolated NBD and SBDα segments of eukaryotic HSP70 proteins have been determined. Here we report the crystal structure of the substrate-bound human HSP70-SBD to 2 angstrom resolution. The overall fold of this SBD is similar to the corresponding domain in the substrate-bound DnaK structures, confirming a similar overall architecture of the orthologous bacterial and human HSP70 proteins. However, conformational differences are observed in the peptide-HSP70-SBD complex, particularly in the loop L(α, β that bridges SBDα to SBDβ, and the loop L(L,1 that connects the SBD and NBD. The interaction between the SBDα and SBDβ subdomains and the mode of substrate recognition is also different between DnaK and HSP70. This suggests that differences may exist in how different HSP70 proteins recognize their respective substrates. The high-resolution structure of the substrate-bound-HSP70-SBD complex provides a molecular platform for the rational design of small molecule compounds that preferentially target this C-terminal domain, in order to modulate human HSP70 function.

  2. Domain Modeling: NP_073738.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_073738.2 chr17 atomic resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the electron transfer cata...lyst DsbD (reduced form at pH7) d2fwga1 chr17/NP_073738.2/NP_073738.2_apo_91-215.pd

  3. Domain Modeling: NP_061971.3 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_061971.3 chr8 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE C-TERMINAL DOMAIN OF BCLA, THE MAJOR ANTI...GEN OF THE EXOSPORIUM OF THE BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORE. p1wcka_ chr8/NP_061971.3/NP_061971.3_holo_674-808.pdb swppa 677K,729E,731E,805E CAC 0 ...

  4. Structural and functional characterization of the recombinant death domain from death-associated protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Dioletis

    Full Text Available Death-associated protein kinase (DAPk is a calcium/calmodulin-regulated Ser/Thr-protein kinase that functions at an important point of integration for cell death signaling pathways. DAPk has a structurally unique multi-domain architecture, including a C-terminally positioned death domain (DD that is a positive regulator of DAPk activity. In this study, recombinant DAPk-DD was observed to aggregate readily and could not be prepared in sufficient yield for structural analysis. However, DAPk-DD could be obtained as a soluble protein in the form of a translational fusion protein with the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G. In contrast to other DDs that adopt the canonical six amphipathic α-helices arranged in a compact fold, the DAPk-DD was found to possess surprisingly low regular secondary structure content and an absence of a stable globular fold, as determined by circular dichroism (CD, NMR spectroscopy and a temperature-dependent fluorescence assay. Furthermore, we measured the in vitro interaction between extracellular-regulated kinase-2 (ERK2 and various recombinant DAPk-DD constructs. Despite the low level of structural order, the recombinant DAPk-DD retained the ability to interact with ERK2 in a 1∶1 ratio with a K d in the low micromolar range. Only the full-length DAPk-DD could bind ERK2, indicating that the apparent 'D-motif' located in the putative sixth helix of DAPk-DD is not sufficient for ERK2 recognition. CD analysis revealed that binding of DAPk-DD to ERK2 is not accompanied by a significant change in secondary structure. Taken together our data argue that the DAPk-DD, when expressed in isolation, does not adopt a classical DD fold, yet in this state retains the capacity to interact with at least one of its binding partners. The lack of a stable globular structure for the DAPk-DD may reflect either that its folding would be supported by interactions absent in our experimental set-up, or a limitation in the structural

  5. Crystal Structure of a Full-Length [beta]-Catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yi; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Liu, Jing; Berndt, Jason D.; Zheng, Jie J.; Moon, Randall T.; Xu, Wenqing (UW-MED); (SJCH)

    2008-08-19

    {beta}-catenin plays essential roles in cell adhesion and Wnt signaling, while deregulation of {beta}-catenin is associated with multiple diseases including cancers. Here, we report the crystal structures of full-length zebrafish {beta}-catenin and a human {beta}-catenin fragment that contains both the armadillo repeat and the C-terminal domains. Our structures reveal that the N-terminal region of the C-terminal domain, a key component of the C-terminal transactivation domain, forms a long {alpha} helix that packs on the C-terminal end of the armadillo repeat domain, and thus forms part of the {beta}-catenin superhelical core. The existence of this helix redefines our view of interactions of {beta}-catenin with some of its critical partners, including ICAT and Chibby, which may form extensive interactions with this C-terminal domain {alpha} helix. Our crystallographic and NMR studies also suggest that the unstructured N-terminal and C-terminal tails interact with the ordered armadillo repeat domain in a dynamic and variable manner.

  6. Structural Insights into the Functional Role of the Hcn Sub-domain of the Receptor-Binding Domain of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Mosaic Serotype C/D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gardberg, Anna; Edwards, Tom E.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.; Buchko, Garry W.

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the causative agent of the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism, is the most poisonous protein known for humans. Produced by different strains of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum, BoNT effects cellular intoxication via a multistep mechanism executed by the three modules of the activated protein. Endocytosis, the first step of cellular intoxication, is triggered by the ~50 kDa, heavy-chain receptor-binding module (HCR) that is specific for a ganglioside and a protein receptor on neuronal cell surfaces. This dual receptor recognition mechanism between BoNT and the host cell’s membrane is well documented and occurs via specific intermolecular interactions with the C-terminal sub-domain, Hcc, of BoNT-HCR. The N-terminal sub-domain of BoNT-HCR, Hcn, comprises ~50% of BoNT-HCR and adopts a B-sheet jelly roll fold. While suspected in assisting cell surface recognition, no unambiguous function for the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT has been indentified. To obtain insights into the potential function of the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT, the first crystal structure of a BoNT with an organic ligand bound to the Hcn sub-domain has been obtained. Here, we describe the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR determined at 1.70 Å resolution with a tetraethylene glycol (PG4) molecule bound in an hydrophobic cleft between B-strands in the B-sheet jelly fold roll of the Hcn sub-domain. The molecule is completely engulfed in the cleft, making numerous hydrophobic (Y932, S959, W966, and D1042) and hydrophilic (S935, W977, L979, N1013, and I1066) contacts with the protein’s side chain and backbone that may mimic in vivo interactions with the phospholipid membranes on neuronal cell surfaces. A sulfate ion was also observed bound to residues T1176, D1177, K1196, and R1243 in the Hcc sub-domain of BoNT/CD-HCR. In the crystal structure of a similar protein, BoNT/D-HCR, a sialic acid

  7. Structural and functional characterization of the CAP domain of pathogen-related yeast 1 (Pry1) protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwiche, Rabih; Kelleher, Alan; Hudspeth, Elissa M.; Schneiter, Roger; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2016-06-01

    The production, crystal structure, and functional characterization of the C-terminal cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1 (CAP) domain of pathogen-related yeast protein-1 (Pry1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. The CAP domain of Pry1 (Pry1CAP) is functional in vivo as its expression restores cholesterol export to yeast mutants lacking endogenous Pry1 and Pry2. Recombinant Pry1CAP forms dimers in solution, is sufficient for in vitro cholesterol binding, and has comparable binding properties as full-length Pry1. Two crystal structures of Pry1CAP are reported, one with Mg2+ coordinated to the conserved CAP tetrad (His208, Glu215, Glu233 and His250) in spacegroup I41 and the other without divalent cations in spacegroup P6122. The latter structure contains four 1,4-dioxane molecules from the crystallization solution, one of which sits in the cholesterol binding site. Both structures reveal that the divalent cation and cholesterol binding sites are connected upon dimerization, providing a structural basis for the observed Mg2+-dependent sterol binding by Pry1.

  8. C-terminal methylation of truncated neuropeptides: an enzyme-assisted extraction artifact involving methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmler, Elizabeth A; Barton, Elizabeth E; Esonu, Onyinyechi K; Polasky, Daniel A; Onderko, Laura L; Bergeron, Audrey B; Christie, Andrew E; Dickinson, Patsy S

    2013-08-01

    Neuropeptides are the largest class of signaling molecules used by nervous systems. Today, neuropeptide discovery commonly involves chemical extraction from a tissue source followed by mass spectrometric characterization. Ideally, the extraction procedure accurately preserves the sequence and any inherent modifications of the native peptides. Here, we present data showing that this is not always true. Specifically, we present evidence showing that, in the lobster Homarus americanus, the orcokinin family members, NFDEIDRSGFG-OMe and SSEDMDRLGFG-OMe, are non-native peptides generated from full-length orcokinin precursors as the result of a highly selective peptide modification (peptide truncation with C-terminal methylation) that occurs during extraction. These peptides were observed by MALDI-FTMS and LC-Q-TOFMS analyses when eyestalk ganglia were extracted in a methanolic solvent, but not when tissues were dissected, co-crystallized with matrix, and analyzed directly with methanol excluded from the sample preparation. The identity of NFDEIDRSGFG-OMe was established using MALDI-FTMS/SORI-CID, LC-Q-TOFMS/MS, and comparison with a peptide standard. Extraction substituting deuterated methanol for methanol confirmed that the latter is the source of the C-terminal methyl group, and MS/MS confirmed the C-terminal localization of the added CD3. Surprisingly, NFDEIDRSGFG-OMe is not produced via a chemical acid-catalyzed esterification. Instead, the methylated peptide appears to result from proteolytic truncation in the presence of methanol, as evidenced by a reduction in conversion with the addition of a protease-inhibitor cocktail; heat effectively eliminated the conversion. This unusual and highly specific extraction-derived peptide conversion exemplifies the need to consider both chemical and biochemical processes that may modify the structure of endogenous neuropeptides.

  9. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Stricher, Francois;

    2008-01-01

    instance of communication over a noisy channel. In particular, we analyze the conformational correlations between protein residues and apply the concept of mutual information to quantify information exchange. Mapping out changes of mutual information on the protein structure then allows visualizing how...... distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located...... by crossing the core of the SH2 domain. Conclusion: As a result, our method provides a means to directly map the exchange of biological information on the structure of protein domains, making it clear how binding triggers conformational changes in the protein structure. As such it provides a structural road...

  10. Arrangement of subunits and domains within the Octopus dofleini hemocyanin molecule.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, K I; Schabtach, E; van Holde, K E

    1990-01-01

    Native Octopus dofleini hemocyanin appears as a hollow cylinder in the electron microscope. It is composed of 10 polypeptide subunits, each folded into seven globular oxygen-binding domains. The native structure reassociates spontaneously from subunits in the presence of Mg2+ ions. We have selectively removed the C-terminal domain and purified the resulting six-domain subunits. Although these six-domain subunits do not associate efficiently at pH 7.2, they undergo nearly complete reassociatio...

  11. Structural basis for oxygen degradation domain selectivity of the HIF prolyl hydroxylases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Tian, Ya-Min; Abboud, Martine I.; Ge, Wei; Domene, Carmen; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Landrieu, Isabelle; Hardy, Adam P.; Pugh, Christopher W.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    The response to hypoxia in animals involves the expression of multiple genes regulated by the αβ-hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). The hypoxia-sensing mechanism involves oxygen limited hydroxylation of prolyl residues in the N- and C-terminal oxygen-dependent degradation domains (NODD and CODD) of HIFα isoforms, as catalysed by prolyl hydroxylases (PHD 1-3). Prolyl hydroxylation promotes binding of HIFα to the von Hippel-Lindau protein (VHL)-elongin B/C complex, thus signalling for proteosomal degradation of HIFα. We reveal that certain PHD2 variants linked to familial erythrocytosis and cancer are highly selective for CODD or NODD. Crystalline and solution state studies coupled to kinetic and cellular analyses reveal how wild-type and variant PHDs achieve ODD selectivity via different dynamic interactions involving loop and C-terminal regions. The results inform on how HIF target gene selectivity is achieved and will be of use in developing selective PHD inhibitors.

  12. Domain swapping in the low-similarity isomerase/hydratase superfamily: the crystal structure of rat mitochondrial Delta3, Delta2-enoyl-CoA isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Paul A; Yu, Wenfeng; Schulz, Horst; Kim, Jung-Ja P

    2005-06-01

    Two monofunctional Delta(3), Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerases, one in mitochondria (mECI) and the other in both mitochondria and peroxisomes (pECI), belong to the low-similarity isomerase/hydratase superfamily. Both enzymes catalyze the movement of a double bond from C3 to C2 of an unsaturated acyl-CoA substrate for re-entry into the beta-oxidation pathway. Mutagenesis has shown that Glu165 of rat mECI is involved in catalysis; however, the putative catalytic residue in yeast pECI, Glu158, is not conserved in mECI. To elucidate whether Glu165 of mECI is correctly positioned for catalysis, the crystal structure of rat mECI has been solved. Crystal packing suggests the enzyme is trimeric, in contrast to other members of the superfamily, which appear crystallographically to be dimers of trimers. The polypeptide fold of mECI, like pECI, belongs to a subset of this superfamily in which the C-terminal domain of a given monomer interacts with its own N-terminal domain. This differs from that of crotonase and 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphtoyl-CoA synthase, whose C-terminal domains are involved in domain swapping with an adjacent monomer. The structure confirms Glu165 as the putative catalytic acid/base, positioned to abstract the pro-R proton from C2 and reprotonate at C4 of the acyl chain. The large tunnel-shaped active site cavity observed in the mECI structure explains the relative substrate promiscuity in acyl-chain length and stereochemistry. Comparison with the crystal structure of pECI suggests the catalytic residues from both enzymes are spatially conserved but not in their primary structures, providing a powerful reminder of how catalytic residues cannot be determined solely by sequence alignments. PMID:15883186

  13. Solution structure of histone chaperone ANP32B: interaction with core histones H3-H4 through its acidic concave domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochio, Naoya; Umehara, Takashi; Munemasa, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Toru; Sato, Shin; Tsuda, Kengo; Koshiba, Seizo; Kigawa, Takanori; Nagai, Ryozo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by histone deposition onto and eviction from nucleosomes, which are mediated by several chromatin-modulating factors. Among them, histone chaperones are key factors that facilitate nucleosome assembly. Acidic nuclear phosphoprotein 32B (ANP32B) belongs to the ANP32 family, which shares N-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and a C-terminal variable anionic region. The C-terminal region functions as an inhibitor of histone acetylation, but the functional roles of the LRR domain in chromatin regulation have remained elusive. Here, we report that the LRR domain of ANP32B possesses histone chaperone activity and forms a curved structure with a parallel beta-sheet on the concave side and mostly helical elements on the convex side. Our analyses revealed that the interaction of ANP32B with the core histones H3-H4 occurs on its concave side, and both the acidic and hydrophobic residues that compose the concave surface are critical for histone binding. These results provide a structural framework for understanding the functional mechanisms of acidic histone chaperones.

  14. Extra-domain B in Oncofetal Fibronectin Structurally Promotes Fibrillar Head-to-tail Dimerization of Extracellular Matrix Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefner, André; Gebauer, Michaela; Skerra, Arne

    2012-01-01

    The type III extra-domain B (ED-B) is specifically spliced into fibronectin (Fn) during embryogenesis and neoangiogenesis, including many cancers. The x-ray structure of the recombinant four-domain fragment FnIII7B89 reveals a tightly associated, extended head-to-tail dimer, which is stabilized via pair-wise shape and charge complementarity. A tendency toward ED-B-dependent dimer formation in solution was supported by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. When amending the model with the known three-dimensional structure of the FnIII10 domain, its RGD loop as well as the adhesion synergy region in FnIII9–10 become displayed on the same face of the dimer; this should allow simultaneous binding of at least two integrins and, thus, receptor clustering on the cell surface and intracellular signaling. Insertion of ED-B appears to stabilize overall head-to-tail dimerization of two separate Fn chains, which, together with alternating homodimer formation via disulfide bridges at the C-terminal Fn tail, should lead to the known macromolecular fibril formation. PMID:22442152

  15. Mirror Domain Structures Induced by Interlayer Magnetic Wall Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, W. S.; Li, S. P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Hatton, D. C.; Bland, J. A.

    2003-05-01

    We have found that during giant magnetoresistance measurements in ˜10×10 mm2 NiFe/Cu/Co continuous film spin-valve structures, the resistance value suddenly drops to its absolute minimum during the NiFe reversal. The results reveal that the alignment of all magnetic domains in the NiFe film follow exactly that of corresponding domains in the Co film for an appropriate applied field strength. This phenomenon is caused by trapping of the NiFe domain walls through the magnetostatic interaction with the Co domain-wall stray fields. Consequently, the interlayer domain-wall coupling induces a mirror domain structure in the magnetic trilayer.

  16. Mirror domain structures induced by interlayer magnetic wall coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, W S; Li, S P; Lopez-Diaz, L; Hatton, D C; Bland, J A C

    2003-05-30

    We have found that during giant magnetoresistance measurements in approximately 10 x 10 mm(2) NiFe/Cu/Co continuous film spin-valve structures, the resistance value suddenly drops to its absolute minimum during the NiFe reversal. The results reveal that the alignment of all magnetic domains in the NiFe film follow exactly that of corresponding domains in the Co film for an appropriate applied field strength. This phenomenon is caused by trapping of the NiFe domain walls through the magnetostatic interaction with the Co domain-wall stray fields. Consequently, the interlayer domain-wall coupling induces a mirror domain structure in the magnetic trilayer. PMID:12786582

  17. The C-terminal region of OVGP1 remodels the zona pellucida and modifies fertility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, B; Han, L; Soriano-Úbeda, C; Avilés, M; Coy, P; Jovine, L; Jiménez-Movilla, M

    2016-01-01

    OVGP1 is the major non-serum glycoprotein in the oviduct fluid at the time of fertilization and early embryo development. Its activity differs among species. Here, we show that the C-terminal region of recombinant OVGP1 regulates its binding to the extracellular zona pellucida and affects its activity during fertilization. While porcine OVGP1 penetrates two-thirds of the thickness of the zona pellucida, shorter OVGP1 glycoproteins, including rabbit OVGP1, are restricted to the outer one-third of the zona matrix. Deletion of the C-terminal region reduces the ability of the glycoprotein to penetrate through the zona pellucida and prevents OVGP1 endocytosis. This affects the structure of the zona matrix and increases its resistance to protease digestion. However, only full-length porcine OVGP1 is able to increase the efficiency rate of in vitro fertilization. Thus, our findings document that the presence or absence of conserved regions in the C-terminus of OVGP1 modify its association with the zona pellucida that affects matrix structure and renders the zona matrix permissive to sperm penetration and OVGP1 endocytosis into the egg. PMID:27601270

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Shows that the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-Unique Domain Contains a Macrodomain Fold▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Amarnath; Johnson, Margaret A.; Serrano, Pedro; Pedrini, Bill; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Neuman, Benjamin W.; Saikatendu, Kumar; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Kuhn, Peter; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of a central segment of the previously annotated severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-unique domain (SUD-M, for “middle of the SARS-unique domain”) in SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) has been determined. SUD-M(513-651) exhibits a macrodomain fold containing the nsp3 residues 528 to 648, and there is a flexibly extended N-terminal tail with the residues 513 to 527 and a C-terminal flexible tail of residues 649 to 651. As a follow-up to this initial result, we also solved the structure of a construct representing only the globular domain of residues 527 to 651 [SUD-M(527-651)]. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments showed that SUD-M(527-651) binds single-stranded poly(A) and identified the contact area with this RNA on the protein surface, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays then confirmed that SUD-M has higher affinity for purine bases than for pyrimidine bases. In a further search for clues to the function, we found that SUD-M(527-651) has the closest three-dimensional structure homology with another domain of nsp3, the ADP-ribose-1"-phosphatase nsp3b, although the two proteins share only 5% sequence identity in the homologous sequence regions. SUD-M(527-651) also shows three-dimensional structure homology with several helicases and nucleoside triphosphate-binding proteins, but it does not contain the motifs of catalytic residues found in these structural homologues. The combined results from NMR screening of potential substrates and the structure-based homology studies now form a basis for more focused investigations on the role of the SARS-unique domain in viral infection. PMID:19052085

  19. Three-dimensional structure of N-terminal domain of DnaB helicase and helicase-primase interactions in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Kashav

    Full Text Available Replication initiation is a crucial step in genome duplication and homohexameric DnaB helicase plays a central role in the replication initiation process by unwinding the duplex DNA and interacting with several other proteins during the process of replication. N-terminal domain of DnaB is critical for helicase activity and for DnaG primase interactions. We present here the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD of H. pylori DnaB (HpDnaB helicase at 2.2 A resolution and compare the structural differences among helicases and correlate with the functional differences. The structural details of NTD suggest that the linker region between NTD and C-terminal helicase domain plays a vital role in accurate assembly of NTD dimers. The sequence analysis of the linker regions from several helicases reveals that they should form four helix bundles. We also report the characterization of H. pylori DnaG primase and study the helicase-primase interactions, where HpDnaG primase stimulates DNA unwinding activity of HpDnaB suggesting presence of helicase-primase cohort at the replication fork. The protein-protein interaction study of C-terminal domain of primase and different deletion constructs of helicase suggests that linker is essential for proper conformation of NTD to interact strongly with HpDnaG. The surface charge distribution on the primase binding surface of NTDs of various helicases suggests that DnaB-DnaG interaction and stability of the complex is most probably charge dependent. Structure of the linker and helicase-primase interactions indicate that HpDnaB differs greatly from E.coli DnaB despite both belong to gram negative bacteria.

  20. Structural characterization of thyroglobulin type-1 domains of equistatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galesa, K.; Pain, R.; Jongsma, M.A.; Turk, V.; Lenarci, B.

    2003-01-01

    Equistatin is a protein composed of three thyroglobulin type-1 domains. It inhibits papain-like cysteine proteinases and the aspartic proteinase, cathepsin D. To determine the structural basis for this inhibition we cloned and expressed the separated domains (eq d-1, eq d-2, eq d-3) in Pichia pastor

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the nucleic acid-binding domain of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nonstructural protein 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Pedro; Johnson, Margaret A; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Neuman, Benjamin W; Joseph, Jeremiah S; Buchmeier, Michael J; Kuhn, Peter; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2009-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of a globular domain of residues 1071 to 1178 within the previously annotated nucleic acid-binding region (NAB) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) has been determined, and N- and C-terminally adjoining polypeptide segments of 37 and 25 residues, respectively, have been shown to form flexibly extended linkers to the preceding globular domain and to the following, as yet uncharacterized domain. This extension of the structural coverage of nsp3 was obtained from NMR studies with an nsp3 construct comprising residues 1066 to 1181 [nsp3(1066-1181)] and the constructs nsp3(1066-1203) and nsp3(1035-1181). A search of the protein structure database indicates that the globular domain of the NAB represents a new fold, with a parallel four-strand beta-sheet holding two alpha-helices of three and four turns that are oriented antiparallel to the beta-strands. Two antiparallel two-strand beta-sheets and two 3(10)-helices are anchored against the surface of this barrel-like molecular core. Chemical shift changes upon the addition of single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) identified a group of residues that form a positively charged patch on the protein surface as the binding site responsible for the previously reported affinity for nucleic acids. This binding site is similar to the ssRNA-binding site of the sterile alpha motif domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vts1p protein, although the two proteins do not share a common globular fold.

  2. The capping domain in RalF regulates effector functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Alix

    Full Text Available The Legionella pneumophila effector protein RalF functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF that activates the host small GTPase protein ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf, and recruits this host protein to the vacuoles in which this pathogen resides. GEF activity is conferred by the Sec7 domain located in the N-terminal region of RalF. Structural studies indicate that the C-terminal region of RalF makes contacts with residues in the Sec7 domain important for Arf interactions. Theoretically, the C-terminal region of RalF could prevent nucleotide exchange activity by blocking the ability of Arf to interact with the Sec7 domain. For this reason, the C-terminal region of RalF has been termed a capping domain. Here, the role of the RalF capping domain was investigated by comparing biochemical and effector activities mediated by this domain in both the Legionella RalF protein (LpRalF and in a RalF ortholog isolated from the unrelated intracellular pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii (RpRalF. These data indicate that both RalF proteins contain a functional Sec7 domain and that the capping domain regulates RalF GEF activity. The capping domain has intrinsic determinants that mediate localization of the RalF protein inside of host cells and confer distinct effector activities. Localization mediated by the capping domain of LpRalF enables the GEF to modulate membrane transport in the secretory pathway, whereas, the capping domain of RpRalF enables this bacterial GEF to modulate actin dynamics occurring near the plasma membrane. Thus, these data reveal that divergence in the function of the C-terminal capping domain alters the in vivo functions of the RalF proteins.

  3. Occurrence of C-terminal residue exclusion in peptide fragmentation by ESI and MALDI tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2012-02-01

    By screening a data set of 392 synthetic peptides MS/MS spectra, we found that a known C-terminal rearrangement was unexpectedly frequently occurring from monoprotonated molecular ions in both ESI and MALDI tandem mass spectrometry upon low and high energy collision activated dissociations with QqTOF and TOF/TOF mass analyzer configuration, respectively. Any residue localized at the C-terminal carboxylic acid end, even a basic one, was lost, provided that a basic amino acid such arginine and to a lesser extent histidine and lysine was present in the sequence leading to a fragment ion, usually depicted as (b(n-1) + H(2)O) ion, corresponding to a shortened non-scrambled peptide chain. Far from being an epiphenomenon, such a residue exclusion from the peptide chain C-terminal extremity gave a fragment ion that was the base peak of the MS/MS spectrum in certain cases. Within the frame of the mobile proton model, the ionizing proton being sequestered onto the basic amino acid side chain, it is known that the charge directed fragmentation mechanism involved the C-terminal carboxylic acid function forming an anhydride intermediate structure. The same mechanism was also demonstrated from cationized peptides. To confirm such assessment, we have prepared some of the peptides that displayed such C-terminal residue exclusion as a C-terminal backbone amide. As expected in this peptide amide series, the production of truncated chains was completely suppressed. Besides, multiply charged molecular ions of all peptides recorded in ESI mass spectrometry did not undergo such fragmentation validating that any mobile ionizing proton will prevent such a competitive C-terminal backbone rearrangement. Among all well-known nondirect sequence fragment ions issued from non specific loss of neutral molecules (mainly H(2)O and NH(3)) and multiple backbone amide ruptures (b-type internal ions), the described C-terminal residue exclusion is highly identifiable giving raise to a single fragment

  4. The effect of surfaces on the domain structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1987-12-01

    The second-order phase transition from the paramagnetic phase to the ferromagnetic phase with domain structure in a ferromagnetic film with strong uniaxial anisotropy is studied. The easy axis is perpendicular to the surface of the film. It is assumed that the short range interactions depend on the distance to the surface. The phase diagram of the film and the form of the domain structure which occurs at the phase transition temperature are obtained.

  5. Structured and Unstructured Cache Models for SMT Domain Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Louis, Annie; Webber, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a French to English translation system for Wikipedia biography articles. We use training data from out-of-domain corpora and adapt the system for biographies. We propose two forms of domain adaptation. The first biases the system towards words likely in biographies and encourages repetition of words across the document. Since biographies in Wikipedia follow a regular structure, our second model exploits this structure as a sequence of topic segments, where each segment discusses a ...

  6. Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) Toolbox for Use with MATLAB

    OpenAIRE

    KIRKEGAARD, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune

    1996-01-01

    The Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) toolbox for use with MATLABTM is developed at Aalborg University, Denmark, based on the system identification research performed during recent years. By now, a reliable set of functions offers a wide spectrum of services for all the important steps of multivariate time domain system identification of time-variant as well as time-invariant civil engineering structures from ambient testing data. A graphical user interface (GUI) is also developed ...

  7. Domain structures of ferroelectric films under different electrical boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Z. D. Zhou; Wu, D Y

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional phase field simulation of ferroelectric films is used that incorporates Landau-Devonshire energy, gradient energy and depolarization electrical energy. A new intermediate electrical boundary condition is firstly presented to study the effects on domain structures of ferroelectric films. Two-dimensional simulations of domain structures are carried out under the open circuit (OC), short circuit (SC) and intermediate (IM) electrical boundary conditions. The simulation results s...

  8. C-terminal Src kinase-mediated EPIYA phosphorylation of Pragmin creates a feed-forward C-terminal Src kinase activation loop that promotes cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Yoshie; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-07-01

    Pragmin is one of the few mammalian proteins containing the Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) tyrosine-phosphorylation motif that was originally discovered in the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein. Following delivery into gastric epithelial cells by type IV secretion and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation at the EPIYA motifs, CagA serves as an oncogenic scaffold/adaptor that promiscuously interacts with SH2 domain-containing mammalian proteins such as the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) and the C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), a negative regulator of Src family kinases. Like CagA, Pragmin also forms a physical complex with Csk. In the present study, we found that Pragmin directly binds to Csk by the tyrosine-phosphorylated EPIYA motif. The complex formation potentiates kinase activity of Csk, which in turn phosphorylates Pragmin on tyrosine-238 (Y238), Y343, and Y391. As Y391 of Pragmin comprises the EPIYA motif, Pragmin-Csk interaction creates a feed-forward regulatory loop of Csk activation. Together with the finding that Pragmin and Csk are colocalized to focal adhesions, these observations indicate that the Pragmin-Csk interaction, triggered by Pragmin EPIYA phosphorylation, robustly stimulates the kinase activity of Csk at focal adhesions, which direct cell-matrix adhesion that regulates cell morphology and cell motility. As a consequence, expression of Pragmin and/or Csk in epithelial cells induces an elongated cell shape with elevated cell scattering in a manner that is mutually dependent on Pragmin and Csk. Deregulation of the Pragmin-Csk axis may therefore induce aberrant cell migration that contributes to tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:27116701

  9. Structurally distinct Arabidopsis thaliana NLR immune receptors recognize tandem WY domains of an oomycete effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goritschnig, Sandra; Steinbrenner, Adam D; Grunwald, Derrick J; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2016-05-01

    Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR, or NLR) receptors mediate pathogen recognition. The Arabidopsis thaliana NLR RPP1 recognizes the tandem WY-domain effector ATR1 from the oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis through direct association with C-terminal LRRs. We isolated and characterized homologous NLR genes RPP1-EstA and RPP1-ZdrA from two Arabidopsis ecotypes, Estland (Est-1) and Zdarec (Zdr-1), responsible for recognizing a novel spectrum of ATR1 alleles. RPP1-EstA and -ZdrA encode nearly identical NLRs that are phylogenetically distinct from known immunity-activating RPP1 homologs and possess greatly expanded LRR domains. Site-directed mutagenesis and truncation analysis of ATR1 suggests that these homologs recognize a novel surface of the 2(nd) WY domain of ATR1, partially specified by a C-terminal region of the LRR domain. Synteny comparison with RPP1 loci involved in hybrid incompatibility suggests that these functions evolved independently. Closely related RPP1 homologs have diversified their recognition spectra through LRR expansion and sequence variation, allowing them to detect multiple surfaces of the same pathogen effector. Engineering NLR receptor specificity may require a similar combination of repeat expansion and tailored amino acid variation. PMID:26725254

  10. Structural context of disease-associated mutations and putative mechanism of autoinhibition revealed by X-ray crystallographic analysis of the EZH2-SET domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Antonysamy

    Full Text Available The enhancer-of-zeste homolog 2 (EZH2 gene product is an 87 kDa polycomb group (PcG protein containing a C-terminal methyltransferase SET domain. EZH2, along with binding partners, i.e., EED and SUZ12, upon which it is dependent for activity forms the core of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2. PRC2 regulates gene silencing by catalyzing the methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. Both overexpression and mutation of EZH2 are associated with the incidence and aggressiveness of various cancers. The novel crystal structure of the SET domain was determined in order to understand disease-associated EZH2 mutations and derive an explanation for its inactivity independent of complex formation. The 2.00 Å crystal structure reveals that, in its uncomplexed form, the EZH2 C-terminus folds back into the active site blocking engagement with substrate. Furthermore, the S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM binding pocket observed in the crystal structure of homologous SET domains is notably absent. This suggests that a conformational change in the EZH2 SET domain, dependent upon complex formation, must take place for cofactor and substrate binding activities to be recapitulated. In addition, the data provide a structural context for clinically significant mutations found in the EZH2 SET domain.

  11. Comparative structural analysis of lipid binding START domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Gerd Thorsell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein related lipid transfer (START domains are small globular modules that form a cavity where lipids and lipid hormones bind. These domains can transport ligands to facilitate lipid exchange between biological membranes, and they have been postulated to modulate the activity of other domains of the protein in response to ligand binding. More than a dozen human genes encode START domains, and several of them are implicated in a disease. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report crystal structures of the human STARD1, STARD5, STARD13 and STARD14 lipid transfer domains. These represent four of the six functional classes of START domains. SIGNIFICANCE: Sequence alignments based on these and previously reported crystal structures define the structural determinants of human START domains, both those related to structural framework and those involved in ligand specificity. ENHANCED VERSION: This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1.

  12. Structure of the Escherichia coli ArnA N-formyltransferase domain in complex with N(5) -formyltetrahydrofolate and UDP-Ara4N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genthe, Nicholas A; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2016-08-01

    ArnA from Escherichia coli is a key enzyme involved in the formation of 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose. The addition of this sugar to the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria allows these organisms to evade the cationic antimicrobial peptides of the host immune system. Indeed, it is thought that such modifications may be responsible for the repeated infections of cystic fibrosis patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ArnA is a bifunctional enzyme with the N- and C-terminal domains catalyzing formylation and oxidative decarboxylation reactions, respectively. The catalytically competent cofactor for the formylation reaction is N(10) -formyltetrahydrofolate. Here we describe the structure of the isolated N-terminal domain of ArnA in complex with its UDP-sugar substrate and N(5) -formyltetrahydrofolate. The model presented herein may prove valuable in the development of new antimicrobial therapeutics.

  13. Function of C-terminal hydrophobic region in fructose dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) catalyzes oxidation of D-fructose into 2-keto-D-fructose and is one of the enzymes allowing a direct electron transfer (DET)-type bioelectrocatalysis. FDH is a heterotrimeric membrane-bound enzyme (subunit I, II, and III) and subunit II has a C terminal hydrophobic region (CHR), which was expected to play a role in anchoring to membranes from the amino acid sequence. We have constructed a mutated FDH lacking of CHR (ΔchrFDH). Contrary to the expected function of CHR, ΔchrFDH is expressed in the membrane fraction, and subunit I/III subcomplex (ΔcFDH) is also expressed in a similar activity level but in the soluble fraction. In addition, the enzyme activity of the purified ΔchrFDH is about one twentieth of the native FDH. These results indicate that CHR is concerned with the binding between subunit I(/III) and subunit II and then with the enzyme activity. ΔchrFDH has clear DET activity that is larger than that expected from the solution activity, and the characteristics of the catalytic wave of ΔchrFDH are very similar to those of FDH. The deletion of CHR seems to increase the amounts of the enzyme with the proper orientation for the DET reaction at electrode surfaces. Gel filtration chromatography coupled with urea treatment shows that the binding in ΔchrFDH is stronger than that in FDH. It can be considered that the rigid binding between subunit I(/III) and II without CHR results in a conformation different from the native one, which leads to the decrease in the enzyme activity in solution

  14. Nucleation Process of a Fibril Precursor in the C-Terminal Segment of Amyloid-β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Pietrucci, Fabio; Biarnés, Xevi; Laio, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    By extended atomistic simulations in explicit solvent and bias-exchange metadynamics, we study the aggregation process of 18 chains of the C-terminal segment of amyloid-β, an intrinsically disordered protein involved in Alzheimer’s disease and prone to form fibrils. Starting from a disordered aggregate, we are able to observe the formation of an ordered nucleus rich in beta sheets. The rate limiting step in the nucleation pathway involves crossing a barrier of approximately 40kcal/mol and is associated with the formation of a very specific interdigitation of the side chains belonging to different sheets. This structural pattern is different from the one observed experimentally in a microcrystal of the same system, indicating that the structure of a “nascent” fibril may differ from the one of an “extended” fibril.

  15. The Atomic Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Transmembrane Domain and Its Connection to the Immunogenic Membrane-proximal External Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Serrano, Soraya; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Jiménez, M Ángeles; Nieva, José L

    2015-05-22

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) C-terminal segment and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 are involved in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion and modulation of immune responses during viral infection. However, the atomic structure of this functional region remains unsolved. Here, based on the high resolution NMR data obtained for peptides spanning the C-terminal segment of MPER and the TMD, we report two main findings: (i) the conformational variability of the TMD helix at a membrane-buried position; and (ii) the existence of an uninterrupted α-helix spanning MPER and the N-terminal region of the TMD. Thus, our structural data provide evidence for the bipartite organization of TMD predicted by previous molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, but they do not support the breaking of the helix at Lys-683, as was suggested by some models to mark the initiation of the TMD anchor. Antibody binding energetics examined with isothermal titration calorimetry and humoral responses elicited in rabbits by peptide-based vaccines further support the relevance of a continuous MPER-TMD helix for immune recognition. We conclude that the transmembrane anchor of HIV-1 envelope is composed of two distinct subdomains: 1) an immunogenic helix at the N terminus also involved in promoting membrane fusion; and 2) an immunosuppressive helix at the C terminus, which might also contribute to the late stages of the fusion process. The unprecedented high resolution structural data reported here may guide future vaccine and inhibitor developments.

  16. Structural and binding properties of the PASTA domain of PonA2, a key penicillin binding protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvanese, Luisa; Falcigno, Lucia; Maglione, Cira; Marasco, Daniela; Ruggiero, Alessia; Squeglia, Flavia; Berisio, Rita; D'Auria, Gabriella

    2014-07-01

    PonA2 is one of the two class A penicillin binding proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis. It plays a complex role in mycobacterial physiology and is spotted as a promising target for inhibitors. PonA2 is involved in adaptation of M. tuberculosis to dormancy, an ability which has been attributed to the presence in its sequence of a C-terminal PASTA domain. Since PASTA modules are typically considered as β-lactam antibiotic binding domains, we determined the solution structure of the PASTA domain from PonA2 and analyzed its binding properties versus a plethora of potential binders, including the β-lactam antibiotics, two typical muropeptide mimics, and polymeric peptidoglycan. We show that, despite a high structural similarity with other PASTA domains, the PASTA domain of PonA2 displays different binding properties, as it is not able to bind muropeptides, or β-lactams, or polymeric peptidoglycan. These results indicate that the role of PASTA domains cannot be generalized, as their specific binding properties strongly depend on surface residues, which are widely variable.

  17. Domain and wall structures in films with helical magnetization profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubuget, Vincent [Laboratoire d' Electrodynamique des Materiaux Avances, Universite Francois Rabelais, CNRS UMR 6157, Parc de Grandmont, F-37200 Tours (France); CEA, DAM, Le Ripault, F-37260 Monts (France); Thiaville, Andre [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR 8502, Bat. 510, F-91405 Orsay (France); Adenot-Engelvin, Anne-Lise, E-mail: anne-lise.adenot-engelvin@cea.f [CEA, DAM, Le Ripault, F-37260 Monts (France); Duverger, Francois; Dubourg, Sebastien [CEA, DAM, Le Ripault, F-37260 Monts (France)

    2011-06-15

    We study soft magnetic bilayers having orthogonal, in-plane easy axes. The layers are thicker than the Bloch wall width linked to the anisotropy, so that a helical magnetization with a large angle exists across the sample thickness. The magnetic domains structure has been investigated at both sample surfaces, using magneto-optical microscopy. The domain structure is found to be similar to that of double films with biquadratic coupling. Two kinds of domain walls are identified, namely with a 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} rotation of the average magnetization. The detailed structure and energy of these walls are studied by micromagnetic calculations. - Research highlights: This paper is devoted to the peculiar domain structure resulting from an anisotropy distribution in the thickness of the sample, realized through specific elaboration conditions. The helical magnetization profile obtained leads to a complex dynamic behaviour described and modelled in Phys.Rev. B 80, 134412 (published in October 2009) which has been already cited three times. This paper sheds light on of the demagnetized state of such samples: a variety of domains structure has been observed by Kerr microscopy, under various saturation fields. The most striking conclusion is driven by the analysis of the magnetization process which implies the co-existence of two types of domain walls in the sample, with four possible directions for the mean magnetization. The magnetization profile of the two walls has been confirmed by numerical simulation.

  18. Cell surface expression level variation between two common Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles, HLA-A2 and HLA-B8, is dependent on the structure of the C terminal part of the alpha 2 and the alpha 3 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Nehlin, Jan O; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive cell surface expression of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I antigens vary extremely from tissue to tissue and individual antigens may differ widely in expression levels. Down-regulation of class I expression is a known immune evasive mechanism used by cancer cells and viruses....... Moreover, recent observations suggest that even minor differences in expression levels may influence the course of viral infections and the frequency of complications to stem cell transplantation. We have shown that some human multipotent stem cells have high expression of HLA-A while HLA-B is only weakly...... expressed, and demonstrate here that this is also the case for the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T. Using quantitative flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction we found expression levels of endogenous HLA-A3 (median 71,204 molecules per cell) 9.2-fold higher than the expression of...

  19. A structural model of anti-anti-[sigma] inhibition by a two-component receiver domain: the PhyR stress response regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2012-05-09

    PhyR is a hybrid stress regulator conserved in {alpha}-proteobacteria that contains an N-terminal {sigma}-like (SL) domain and a C-terminal receiver domain. Phosphorylation of the receiver domain is known to promote binding of the SL domain to an anti-{sigma} factor. PhyR thus functions as an anti-anti-{sigma} factor in its phosphorylated state. We present genetic evidence that Caulobacter crescentus PhyR is a phosphorylation-dependent stress regulator that functions in the same pathway as {sigma}{sup T} and its anti-{sigma} factor, NepR. Additionally, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PhyR at 1.25 {angstrom} resolution, which provides insight into the mechanism of anti-anti-{sigma} regulation. Direct intramolecular contact between the PhyR receiver and SL domains spans regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4}, likely serving to stabilize the SL domain in a closed conformation. The molecular surface of the receiver domain contacting the SL domain is the structural equivalent of {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, which is known to undergo dynamic conformational change upon phosphorylation in a diverse range of receiver proteins. We propose a structural model of PhyR regulation in which receiver phosphorylation destabilizes the intramolecular interaction between SL and receiver domains, thereby permitting regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4} in the SL domain to open about a flexible connector loop and bind anti-{sigma} factor.

  20. A structural model of anti-anti-[sigma];#963; inhibition by a two-component receiver domain: the PhyR stress response regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2012-03-30

    PhyR is a hybrid stress regulator conserved in {alpha}-proteobacteria that contains an N-terminal {sigma}-like (SL) domain and a C-terminal receiver domain. Phosphorylation of the receiver domain is known to promote binding of the SL domain to an anti-{sigma} factor. PhyR thus functions as an anti-anti-{sigma} factor in its phosphorylated state. We present genetic evidence that Caulobacter crescentus PhyR is a phosphorylation-dependent stress regulator that functions in the same pathway as {sigma}{sup T} and its anti-{sigma} factor, NepR. Additionally, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PhyR at 1.25 {angstrom} resolution, which provides insight into the mechanism of anti-anti-{sigma} regulation. Direct intramolecular contact between the PhyR receiver and SL domains spans regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4}, likely serving to stabilize the SL domain in a closed conformation. The molecular surface of the receiver domain contacting the SL domain is the structural equivalent of {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, which is known to undergo dynamic conformational change upon phosphorylation in a diverse range of receiver proteins. We propose a structural model of PhyR regulation in which receiver phosphorylation destabilizes the intramolecular interaction between SL and receiver domains, thereby permitting regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4} in the SL domain to open about a flexible connector loop and bind anti-{sigma} factor.

  1. Structures of KIX domain of CBP in complex with two FOXO3a transactivation domains reveal promiscuity and plasticity in coactivator recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Marshall, Christopher B; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Li, Guang-Yao; Gasmi-Seabrook, Geneviève M C; Okada, Hitoshi; Mak, Tak W; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2012-04-17

    Forkhead box class O 3a (FOXO3a) is a transcription factor and tumor suppressor linked to longevity that determines cell fate through activating transcription of cell differentiation, survival, and apoptotic genes. Recruitment of the coactivator CBP/p300 is a crucial step in transcription, and we revealed that in addition to conserved region 3 (CR3) of FOXO3a, the C-terminal segment of CR2 (CR2C) binds CBP/p300 and contributes to transcriptional activity. CR2C and CR3 of FOXO3a interact with the KIX domain of CBP/p300 at both "MLL" and "c-Myb" binding sites simultaneously. A FOXO3a CR2C-CR3 peptide in complex with KIX exists in equilibrium between two equally populated conformational states, one of which has CR2C bound to the MLL site and CR3 bound to the c-Myb site, whereas in the other, CR2C and CR3 bind the c-Myb and MLL sites, respectively. This promiscuous interaction between FOXO3a and CBP/p300 is further supported by additional binding sites on CBP/p300, namely, the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains. In functional studies, our structure-guided mutagenesis showed that both CR2C and CR3 are involved in the activation of certain endogenous FOXO3a target genes. Further, phosphorylation of S626, a known AMP-dependent protein kinase target in CR3, increased affinity for CBP/p300 and the phosphomimetic mutation enhanced transactivation of luciferase. These findings underscore the significance of promiscuous multivalent interactions and posttranslational modification in the recruitment of transcriptional coactivators, which may allow transcription factors to adapt to various gene-specific genomic and chromatin structures and respond to cell signals. PMID:22474372

  2. Wnts grasp the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 at two distinct binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekes, Krisztina; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2015-10-01

    Wnts have a structure resembling a hand with "thumb" and "index" fingers that grasp the cysteine rich domains of Frizzled receptors at two distinct binding sites. In the present work we show that the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 is also bound by Wnts at two sites. Using C-terminal domains of Wnt5a and Wnt7a and arginine-scanning mutagenesis of the WIF domain we demonstrate that, whereas the N-terminal, lipid-modified "thumb" of Wnts interacts with the alkyl-binding site of the WIF domain, the C-terminal domain of Wnts (Wnt-CTD) binds to a surface on the opposite side of the WIF domain. PMID:26342861

  3. C-terminal sequences of hsp70 and hsp90 as non-specific anchors for tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Andrew J; Russell, Lance C; Chinkers, Michael

    2009-10-12

    Steroid-hormone-receptor maturation is a multi-step process that involves several TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) proteins that bind to the maturation complex via the C-termini of hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) and hsp90 (heat-shock protein 90). We produced a random T7 peptide library to investigate the roles played by the C-termini of the two heat-shock proteins in the TPR-hsp interactions. Surprisingly, phages with the MEEVD sequence, found at the C-terminus of hsp90, were not recovered from our biopanning experiments. However, two groups of phages were isolated that bound relatively tightly to HsPP5 (Homo sapiens protein phosphatase 5) TPR. Multiple copies of phages with a C-terminal sequence of LFG were isolated. These phages bound specifically to the TPR domain of HsPP5, although mutation studies produced no evidence that they bound to the domain's hsp90-binding groove. However, the most abundant family obtained in the initial screen had an aspartate residue at the C-terminus. Two members of this family with a C-terminal sequence of VD appeared to bind with approximately the same affinity as the hsp90 C-12 control. A second generation pseudo-random phage library produced a large number of phages with an LD C-terminus. These sequences acted as hsp70 analogues and had relatively low affinities for hsp90-specific TPR domains. Unfortunately, we failed to identify residues near hsp90's C-terminus that impart binding specificity to individual hsp90-TPR interactions. The results suggest that the C-terminal sequences of hsp70 and hsp90 act primarily as non-specific anchors for TPR proteins.

  4. Microstructure of polycrystalline PBTTT films: domain mapping and structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuettfort, Torben; Watts, Benjamin; Thomsen, Lars; Lee, Mijung; Sirringhaus, Henning; McNeill, Christopher R

    2012-02-28

    We utilize near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to study the microstructure and domain structure of polycrystalline films of the semiconducting polymer poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT). Total electron yield NEXAFS spectroscopy is used to examine the surface structure of the first 1-2 molecular layers, while bulk-sensitive STXM is used to produce maps of domain orientation and order sampled through the entire film thickness. We study different phases of PBTTT including as-cast, terraced and nanoribbon morphologies produced via spin-coating as well as aligned films of as-cast and nanoribbon morphologies produced by zone-casting. For the terraced morphology, domains are observed that are larger than the size of the terraced surface features, and the calculated degree of order is reduced compared to the nanoribbon morphology. For zone-cast films, we find that, although little optical anisotropy is observed in the bulk of as-cast films, a high degree of surface structural anisotropy is observed with NEXAFS spectroscopy, similar to what is observed in annealed nanoribbon films. This observation indicates that the aligned surface structure in unannealed zone-cast films templates the bulk ordering of the aligned nanoribbon phase. STXM domain mapping of aligned nanoribbon films reveals elongated, micrometer-wide domains with each domain misoriented with respect to its neighbor by up to 45°, but with broad domain boundaries. Within each nanoribbon domain, a high degree of X-ray dichroism is observed, indicating correlated ordering throughout the bulk of the film.

  5. Magnetic domain structure in thin CoPt perpendicular magnetic anisotropy films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komine T.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation between thickness and domain structure of Co80Pt20 perpendicular magnetic anisotropy films was investigated through experiments and micromagnetic simulation. The films with thickness over 10 nm exhibited clear maze domain structure, while for the films thinner than 10 nm the domain structure abruptly changed from maze domain to irregular and large domain as the thickness became thinner. The irregular domain had narrower domain wall width than maze domain.

  6. Conservation of structural and functional domains in complement component C3 of Xenopus and mammals.

    OpenAIRE

    Grossberger, D; Marcuz, A; Du Pasquier, L; LAMBRIS, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The cDNA sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence of the Mr 34,000 C-terminal fragment of Xenopus laevis complement component C3 are presented. The sequence of Xenopus C3 has 57% nucleotide identity to the corresponding sequence of human C3 and approximately 49% amino acid identity to C3 from human, mouse, and rabbit. The Xenopus C3 sequence shows clusters of high and of low similarity to the mammalian C3 sequences. One of these regions of high similarity represents the domain of mammalia...

  7. Ferromagnetic domain structures and spin configurations measured in doped manganite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, J.Q.; Volkov, V.V.; Beleggia, Marco;

    2010-01-01

    We report on measurements of the spin configuration across ferromagnetic domains in La0.325Pr0.3Ca0.375MnO3 films obtained by means of low-temperature Lorentz electron microscopy with in situ magnetizing capabilities. Due to the particular crystal symmetry of the material, we observe two sets...... of independent ferromagnetic twin variants, one of which was pinned by crystallographic twinning. The spin orientation and configuration of the domains were measured quantitatively using electron diffraction and electron holography, and verified with structural modeling. The observed deviation of spin...... orientations from the expected 90 degrees head-to-tail configuration across the domain walls was attributed to the variation in the domains' aspect ratios as a result of the demagnetization field. Our study provides important insight on how the spin configuration coupled with the magnetic structure...

  8. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasily F. Shabanov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface.

  9. Solution structure of the PsIAA4 oligomerization domain reveals interaction modes for transcription factors in early auxin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Dhurvas Chandrasekaran; Kovermann, Michael; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Hellmuth, Antje; Calderón Villalobos, Luz Irina A; Lilie, Hauke; Balbach, Jochen; Abel, Steffen

    2015-05-12

    The plant hormone auxin activates primary response genes by facilitating proteolytic removal of auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA)-inducible repressors, which directly bind to transcriptional auxin response factors (ARF). Most AUX/IAA and ARF proteins share highly conserved C-termini mediating homotypic and heterotypic interactions within and between both protein families. The high-resolution NMR structure of C-terminal domains III and IV of the AUX/IAA protein PsIAA4 from pea (Pisum sativum) revealed a globular ubiquitin-like β-grasp fold with homologies to the Phox and Bem1p (PB1) domain. The PB1 domain of wild-type PsIAA4 features two distinct surface patches of oppositely charged amino acid residues, mediating front-to-back multimerization via electrostatic interactions. Mutations of conserved basic or acidic residues on either face suppressed PsIAA4 PB1 homo-oligomerization in vitro and confirmed directional interaction of full-length PsIAA4 in vivo (yeast two-hybrid system). Mixing of oppositely mutated PsIAA4 PB1 monomers enabled NMR mapping of the negatively charged interface of the reconstituted PsIAA4 PB1 homodimer variant, whose stoichiometry (1:1) and equilibrium binding constant (KD ∼ 6.4 μM) were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. In silico protein-protein docking studies based on NMR and yeast interaction data derived a model of the PsIAA4 PB1 homodimer, which is comparable with other PB1 domain dimers, but indicated considerable differences between the homodimeric interfaces of AUX/IAA and ARF PB1 domains. Our study provides an impetus for elucidating the molecular determinants that confer specificity to complex protein-protein interaction circuits between members of the two central families of transcription factors important to the regulation of auxin-responsive gene expression. PMID:25918389

  10. Analysis of time-domain scattering by periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yixian; Li, Peijun

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the mathematical analysis of a time-domain electromagnetic scattering by periodic structures which are known as diffraction gratings. The scattering problem is reduced equivalently into an initial-boundary value problem in a bounded domain by using an exact transparent boundary condition. The well-posedness and stability of the solution are established for the reduced problem. Moreover, a priori energy estimates are obtained with minimum regularity requirement for the data and explicit dependence on the time.

  11. Optical and thermal control of domain structures in ferroelectric crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Paul Thomas

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of investigations into the thermal and optical control of ferroelectric domains within lithium tantalate and strontium barium niobate crystals. The aim of the work was to develop techniques for optically pattering domain inverted structures within ferroelectric crystals. Initial studies involving strontium barium niobate revealed an enhanced temperature sensitivity for transient repoling occurring at room temperatures for this material. This has important...

  12. Solution Structure of Proinsulin: CONNECTING DOMAIN FLEXIBILITY AND PROHORMONE PROCESSING*

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yanwu; Hua, Qing-Xin; Liu, Jin; Shimizu, Eri H.; Choquette, Meredith H.; Mackin, Robert B.; Weiss, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The folding of proinsulin, the single-chain precursor of insulin, ensures native disulfide pairing in pancreatic β-cells. Mutations that impair folding cause neonatal diabetes mellitus. Although the classical structure of insulin is well established, proinsulin is refractory to crystallization. Here, we employ heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to characterize a monomeric analogue. Proinsulin contains a native-like insulin moiety (A- and B-domains); the tethered connecting (C) domain (as probed b...

  13. Selective enzymatic hydrolysis of C-terminal tert-butyl esters of peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Eggen, I.F.; Boeriu, C.G.

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for the selective enzymatic hydrolysis of C-terminal esters of peptide substrates in the synthesis of peptides, comprising hydrolysing C-terminal tert-butyl esters using the protease subtilisin. This process is useful in the production of protected or unprotected peptides.

  14. Selective enzymatic hydrolysis of C-terminal tert-butyl esters of peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggen, I.F.; Boeriu, C.G.

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for the selective enzymatic hydrolysis of C-terminal esters of peptide substrates in the synthesis of peptides, comprising hydrolysing C-terminal tert-butyl esters using the protease subtilisin. This process is useful in the production of protected or unpro

  15. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD–linker domain–TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  16. Structural and functional characterization of DUF1471 domains of Salmonella proteins SrfN, YdgH/SssB, and YahO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Eletsky

    Full Text Available Bacterial species in the Enterobacteriaceae typically contain multiple paralogues of a small domain of unknown function (DUF1471 from a family of conserved proteins also known as YhcN or BhsA/McbA. Proteins containing DUF1471 may have a single or three copies of this domain. Representatives of this family have been demonstrated to play roles in several cellular processes including stress response, biofilm formation, and pathogenesis. We have conducted NMR and X-ray crystallographic studies of four DUF1471 domains from Salmonella representing three different paralogous DUF1471 subfamilies: SrfN, YahO, and SssB/YdgH (two of its three DUF1471 domains: the N-terminal domain I (residues 21-91, and the C-terminal domain III (residues 244-314. Notably, SrfN has been shown to have a role in intracellular infection by Salmonella Typhimurium. These domains share less than 35% pairwise sequence identity. Structures of all four domains show a mixed α+β fold that is most similar to that of bacterial lipoprotein RcsF. However, all four DUF1471 sequences lack the redox sensitive cysteine residues essential for RcsF activity in a phospho-relay pathway, suggesting that DUF1471 domains perform a different function(s. SrfN forms a dimer in contrast to YahO and SssB domains I and III, which are monomers in solution. A putative binding site for oxyanions such as phosphate and sulfate was identified in SrfN, and an interaction between the SrfN dimer and sulfated polysaccharides was demonstrated, suggesting a direct role for this DUF1471 domain at the host-pathogen interface.

  17. Domain structures and molecular evolution of class I and class II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products deduced from amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Koji

    1984-12-01

    Domain structures of class I and class II MHC products were analyzed from a viewpoint of amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies. Alignment statistics revealed that class I (transplantation) antigen H chains consist of four mutually homologous domains, and that class II (HLA-DR) antigen β and α chains are both composed of three mutually homologous ones. The N-terminal three and two domains of class I and class II (both β and α) gene products, respectively, all of which being ˜90 residues long, were concluded to be homologous to β2-microglobulin (β2M). The membraneembedded C-terminal shorter domains of these MHC products were also found to be homologous to one another and to the third domain of class I H chains. Class I H chains were found to be more closely related to class II α chains than to class II β chains. Based on these findings, an exon duplication history from a common ancestral gene encoding a β2M-like primodial protein of one-domain-length up to the contemporary MHC products was proposed.

  18. Disease-Homologous Mutation in the Cation Diffusion Facilitator Protein MamM Causes Single-Domain Structural Loss and Signifies Its Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Uebe, René; Davidov, Geula; Navon, Yotam; Sherf, Dror; Chill, Jordan H; Kass, Itamar; Bitton, Ronit; Schüler, Dirk; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-08-23

    Cation diffusion facilitators (CDF) are highly conserved, metal ion efflux transporters that maintain divalent transition metal cation homeostasis. Most CDF proteins contain two domains, the cation transporting transmembrane domain and the regulatory cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (CTD). MamM is a magnetosome-associated CDF protein essential for the biomineralization of magnetic iron-oxide particles in magnetotactic bacteria. To investigate the structure-function relationship of CDF cytoplasmic domains, we characterized a MamM M250P mutation that is synonymous with the disease-related mutation L349P of the human CDF protein ZnT-10. Our results show that the M250P exchange in MamM causes severe structural changes in its CTD resulting in abnormal reduced function. Our in vivo, in vitro and in silico studies indicate that the CTD fold is critical for CDF proteins' proper function and support the previously suggested role of the CDF cytoplasmic domain as a CDF regulatory element. Based on our results, we also suggest a mechanism for the effects of the ZnT-10 L349P mutation in human.

  19. Mapping the structural domains of E. coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase using limited proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareya, S M; Raushel, F M

    1995-05-01

    The structural and functional domains of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) have been identified by limited proteolysis. Incubation of CPS with several proteases, including trypsin, chymotrypsin, subtilisin and endoproteinase Asp-N, under native conditions, causes a time-dependent loss of enzymatic activity and the generation of a common fragmentation pattern. Amino-terminal sequencing studies demonstrated that the initial cleavage event by trypsin occurred at the carboxy-terminal end of the large subunit. The ultimate fragments produced in most of the proteolysis studies, 35- and 45-kDa peptides, were derived from areas corresponding to the putative ATP binding regions. Substrate protection studies showed that the addition of ligands did not affect the final fragmentation pattern of the protein. However, ornithine and UMP were found to significantly reduce the rate of inactivation by inhibition of proteolytic cleavage. MgATP and IMP provided modest protection whereas bicarbonate and glutamine showed no overall effect on proteolysis. Limited proteolysis by endoproteinase Asp-N resulted in the production of a fragment (or multiple fragments) which contained enzymatic activity but had lost all regulation by the allosteric ligands, UMP and ornithine. The small subunit has been shown to be protected from proteolysis by the large subunit. Proteolysis of the isolated small subunit resulted in the generation of a stable 31-kDa species which contained 10% of the original glutaminase activity. These studies demonstrate that a portion of the C-terminal end of the large subunit can be excised without entirely destroying the ability of CPS to catalyze the formation of carbamoyl phosphate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7648201

  20. Structures of the spectrin-ankyrin interaction binding domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Huang, Lei; Mondragón, Alfonso; (NWU)

    2010-01-07

    As key components of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, spectrin and ankyrin specifically interact to tether the spectrin cytoskeleton to the cell membrane. The structure of the spectrin binding domain of ankyrin and the ankyrin binding domain of spectrin have been solved to elucidate the structural basis for ankyrin-spectrin recognition. The structure of repeats 14 and 15 of spectrin shows that these repeats are similar to all other spectrin repeats. One feature that could account for the preference of ankyrin for these repeats is the presence of a conserved, negatively charged patch on one side of repeat 14. The structure of the ankyrin ZU5 domain shows a novel structure containing a {beta} core. The structure reveals that the canonical ZU5 consensus sequence is likely to be missing an important region that codes for a {beta} strand that forms part of the core of the domain. In addition, a positively charged region is suggestive of a binding surface for the negatively charged spectrin repeat 14. Previously reported mutants of ankyrin that map to this region lie mostly on the surface of the protein, although at least one is likely to be part of the core.

  1. Modeling Microwave Structures in Time Domain Using Laguerre Polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Raida

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on time domain modeling of microwave structures by the method of moments. Two alternative schemes with weighted Laguerre polynomials are presented. Thanks to their properties, these schemes are free of late time oscillations. Further, the paper is aimed to effective and accurate evaluation of Green's functions integrals within these schemes. For this evaluation, a first- and second-order polynomial approximation is developed. The last part of the paper deals with modeling microstrip structures in the time domain. Conditions of impedance matching are derived, and the proposed approach is verified by modeling a microstrip filter.

  2. EFFICIENT TIME DOMAIN ANALYSIS of ARBITRARILY SHAPED CONDUCTING WIRE STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI-Majdi Kadhum; Ming Qi

    2007-01-01

    We developed an efficient analysis the current induced in the wire structure. The analysis based on the time-Domain Integral Equation, in which a thin wire approximation is used. The time-domain electric field integral equation is used with the moment method to develop a numerical procedure for treating problems of scattering by arbitrary shaped bodies. We present an efficient numerical method for calculating the electromagnetic scattering from arbitrary shaped conducting bodies in the time domain with a comprehensive treatment of a single, straight thin wire.A time domain electric field integral equation is formulated for the problem of an arbitrary shape. The solution method is based on the moment method to solve the straight thin-wire problem.

  3. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I' band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D₂O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  4. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I‧ region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin A.; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I‧ band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D2O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  5. Structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged-helix DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal regulatory domains which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all-α-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR-C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of FadR-family members, those of Escherichia coli FadR protein and LldR from Corynebacterium glutamicum, have been described to date in the literature. Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator and contains a buried metal-binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, it is shown that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni2+ ions but that it is able to bind Zn2+ with Kd < 70 nM. It is concluded that Zn2+ is the likely physiological metal and that it may perform either structural or regulatory roles or both. Finally, the TM0439 structure is compared with two other FadR-family structures recently deposited by structural genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors

  6. The Contribution of the C-Terminal Tails of Microtubules in Altering the Force Production Specifications of Multiple Kinesin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizabadi, Mitra Shojania

    2016-09-01

    The extent to which beta tubulin isotypes contribute to the function of microtubules and the microtubule-driven transport of molecular motors is poorly understood. The major differences in these isotypes are associated with the structure of their C-terminal tails. Recent studies have revealed a few aspects of the C-terminal tails' regulatory role on the activities of some of the motor proteins on a single-molecule level. However, little attention is given to the degree to which the function of a team of motor proteins can be altered by the microtubule's tail. In a set of parallel experiments, we investigated this open question by studying the force production of several kinesin-1 (kinesin) molecular motors along two groups of microtubules: regular ones and those microtubules whose C-terminals are cleaved by subtilisin digestion. The results indicate that the difference between the average of the force production of motors along two types of microtubules is statistically significant. The underlying mechanism of such production is substantially different as well. As compared to untreated microtubules, the magnitude of the binding time of several kinesin-1 is almost three times greater along subtilisin-treated microtubules. Also, the velocity of the group of kinesin molecules shows a higher sensitivity to external loads and reduces significantly under higher loads along subtilisin-treated microtubules. Together, this work shows the capacity of the tails in fine-tuning the force production characteristics of several kinesin molecules. PMID:27503105

  7. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity, and membrane permeabilizing properties of C-terminally modified nisin conjugates accessed by CuAAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootweg, Jack C; van der Wal, Steffen; Quarles van Ufford, H C; Breukink, Eefjan; Liskamp, Rob M J; Rijkers, Dirk T S

    2013-12-18

    Functionalization of the lantibiotic nisin with fluorescent reporter molecules is highly important for the understanding of its mode of action as a potent antimicrobial peptide. In addition to this, multimerization of nisin to obtain multivalent peptide constructs and conjugation of nisin to bioactive molecules or grafting it on surfaces can be attractive methods for interference with bacterial growth. Here, we report a convenient method for the synthesis of such nisin conjugates and show that these nisin derivatives retain both their antimicrobial activity and their membrane permeabilizing properties. The synthesis is based on the Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC) as a bioorthogonal ligation method for large and unprotected peptides in which nisin was C-terminally modified with propargylamine and subsequently efficiently conjugated to a series of functionalized azides. Two fluorescently labeled nisin conjugates together with a dimeric nisin construct were prepared while membrane insertion as well as antimicrobial activity were unaffected by these modifications. This study shows that C-terminal modification of nisin does not deteriorate biological activity in sharp contrast to N-terminal modification and therefore C-terminally modified nisin analogues are valuable tools to study the antibacterial mode of action of nisin. Furthermore, the ability to use stoichiometric amounts of the azide containing molecule opens up possibilities for surface tethering and more complex multivalent structures.

  8. Structure-function relations in the NTPase domain of the antiviral tRNA ribotoxin Escherichia coli PrrC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meineke, Birthe; Shuman, Stewart, E-mail: s-shuman@ski.mskcc.org

    2012-06-05

    Breakage of tRNA by Escherichia coli anticodon nuclease PrrC (EcoPrrC) underlies a host antiviral response to phage T4 infection. Expression of EcoPrrC is cytocidal in yeast, signifying that PrrC ribotoxicity crosses phylogenetic domain boundaries. EcoPrrC consists of an N-terminal NTPase module that resembles ABC transporters and a C-terminal nuclease module that is sui generis. PrrC homologs are prevalent in many other bacteria. Here we report that Haemophilus influenzae PrrC is toxic in E. coli and yeast. To illuminate structure-activity relations, we conducted a new round of mutational analysis of EcoPrrC guided by primary structure conservation among toxic PrrC homologs. We indentify 17 candidate active site residues in the NTPase module that are essential for toxicity in yeast when EcoPrrC is expressed at high gene dosage. Their functions could be educed by integrating mutational data with the atomic structure of the transition-state complex of a homologous ABC protein.

  9. Soil-structure-interaction analysis in time domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedures to perform nonlinear soil-structure-interaction analysis in the time domain are summarized. The nonlinearity is restricted to the structure and possibly an adjacent irregular soil region. The unbounded soil (far field) must remain linear in this formulation. Besides the direct method where local frequency-independent boundary conditions are enforced on the artificial boundary, various formulations based on the substructure method are addressed, ranging from a discrete model with springs, dashpots and masses to boundary-element methods with convolution integrals involving either the dynamic-stiffness coefficients or the Green's functions in the time domain via the iterative hybrid-frequency-time-domain analysis procedure with the nonlinearities affecting only the right-hand side of the equations of motion. (orig.)

  10. Motifs in the C-terminal region of the Penicillium chrysogenum ACV synthetase are essential for valine epimerization and processivity of tripeptide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaobin; García-Estrada, Carlos; Vaca, Inmaculada; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2012-02-01

    The first step in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway is the non-ribosomal condensation of L-α-aminoadipic acid, L-cysteine and L-valine into the tripeptide δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine (ACV). This reaction is catalysed by the multienzyme ACV synthetase (ACVS), which is encoded in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum by the pcbAB gene. This enzyme contains at least ten catalytic domains. The precise role of the C-terminal domain of this multidomain NRPS still remains obscure. The C-terminal region of ACVS bears the epimerase and the thioesterase domains and may be involved in the epimerization of LLL-ACV to LLD-ACV and in the hydrolysis of the thioester bond. In this work, the conserved motifs (3371)EGHGRE(3376) (located in the putative epimerase domain) and (3629)GWSFG(3633) (located in the thioesterase domain) were changed by site-directed-mutagenesis to LGFGLL and GWAFG, respectively. In addition, the whole thioesterase domain (230 amino acids) and the different parts of this domain were deleted. The activity of these mutant enzymes was assessed in vivo by two different procedures: i) through the quantification of bisACV produced by the fungus and ii) by quantifying the benzylpenicillin production using tailored strains of P. chrysogenum, which lack the pcbAB gene, as host strains. All indicated mutant enzymes showed lower or null activity than the control strain confirming that E3371, H3373, R3375 and E3376 belong to the epimerase active centre. Different fragments included in the C-terminal region of ACVS control thioester hydrolysis. Overexpression of the sequence encoding the ACVS integrated thioesterase domain as a separate (stand-alone) transcriptional unit complemented mutants lacking the integrated thioesterase domain, although with low ACV releasing activity, suggesting that the stand-alone thioesterease interacts with the other ACVS domains.

  11. Identification and characterization of the role of c-terminal Src kinase in dengue virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rinki; Agrawal, Tanvi; Khan, Naseem Ahmed; Nakayama, Yuji; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R

    2016-01-01

    We screened a siRNA library targeting human tyrosine kinases in Huh-7 cells and identified c-terminal Src kinase (Csk) as one of the kinases involved in dengue virus replication. Knock-down of Csk expression by siRNAs or inhibition of Csk by an inhibitor reduced dengue virus RNA levels but did not affect viral entry. Csk partially colocalized with viral replication compartments. Dengue infection was drastically reduced in cells lacking the three ubiquitous src family kinases, Src, Fyn and Yes. Csk knock-down in these cells failed to block dengue virus replication suggesting that the effect of Csk is via regulation of Src family kinases. Csk was found to be hyper-phosphorylated during dengue infection and inhibition of protein kinase A led to a block in Csk phosphorylation and dengue virus replication. Overexpression studies suggest an important role for the kinase and SH3 domains in this process. Our results identified a novel role for Csk as a host tyrosine kinase involved in dengue virus replication and provide further insights into the role of host factors in dengue replication. PMID:27457684

  12. Plasma membrane CFTR regulates RANTES expression via its C-terminal PDZ-interacting motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estell, Kim; Braunstein, Gavin; Tucker, Torry; Varga, Karoly; Collawn, James F; Schwiebert, Lisa M

    2003-01-01

    Despite the identification of 1,000 mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene product CFTR, there remains discordance between CFTR genotype and lung disease phenotype. The study of CFTR, therefore, has expanded beyond its chloride channel activity into other possible functions, such as its role as a regulator of gene expression. Findings indicate that CFTR plays a role in the expression of RANTES in airway epithelia. RANTES is a chemokine that has been implicated in the regulation of mucosal immunity and the pathogenesis of airway inflammatory diseases. Results demonstrate that CFTR triggers RANTES expression via a mechanism that is independent of CFTR's chloride channel activity. Neither pharmacological inhibition of CFTR nor activation of alternative chloride channels, including hClC-2, modulated RANTES expression. Through the use of CFTR disease-associated and truncation mutants, experiments suggest that CFTR-mediated transcription factor activation and RANTES expression require (i) insertion of CFTR into the plasma membrane and (ii) an intact CFTR C-terminal PDZ-interacting domain. Expression of constructs encoding wild-type or dominant-negative forms of the PDZ-binding protein EBP50 suggests that EBP50 may be involved in CFTR-dependent RANTES expression. Together, these data suggest that CFTR modulates gene expression in airway epithelial cells while located in a macromolecular signaling complex at the plasma membrane. PMID:12509457

  13. DOG 1.0: illustrator of protein domain structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Ren; Longping Wen; Xinjiao Gao; Changjiang Jin; Yu Xue; Xuebiao Yao

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, A good picture is worth a thousand words. Schematic diagram of protein domain structures with functional motifs/sites in a concise and illustrative drawing is greatly helpful for a broad readership to grasp the old and novel functions of proteins rapidly.

  14. Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) Toolbox for Use with MATLAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune

    The Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) toolbox for use with MATLABTM is developed at Aalborg University, Denmark, based on the system identification research performed during recent years. By now, a reliable set of functions offers a wide spectrum of services for all the important steps...

  15. Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) Toolbox for Use with MATLAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune

    1997-01-01

    The Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) toolbox for use with MATLABTM is developed at Aalborg University, Denmark, based on the system identification research performed during recent years. By now, a reliable set of functions offers a wide spectrum of services for all the important steps...

  16. Relevance of amyloid precursor-like protein 2 C-terminal fragments in pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    PETERS, HALEY L.; Tuli, Amit; Wang, Xiaojian; Liu, Cuiling; Pan, Zenggang; Ouellette, Michel M.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; MacDonald, Richard G.; Solheim, Joyce C.

    2012-01-01

    In some cellular systems, particularly neurons, amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2), and its highly homologous family member amyloid precursor protein (APP), have been linked to cellular growth. APLP2 and APP undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis to produce C-terminal fragments. In this study, we found comprehensive expression of APLP2 C-terminal fragments in a panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines; however, APP C-terminal fragments were notably limited to the BxPC3 cell line. Exte...

  17. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein SA1388 from S. aureus reveals a capped hexameric toroid with two PII domain lids and a dinuclear metal center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Zhang, Xuejun; Kinch, Lisa; Leybourne, Matthew; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong (Texas-D); (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2009-01-26

    The protein encoded by the SA1388 gene from Staphylococcus aureus was chosen for structure determination to elucidate its domain organization and confirm our earlier remote homology based prediction that it housed a nitrogen regulatory PII protein-like domain. SA1388 was predicted to contain a central PII-like domain and two flanking regions, which together belong to the NIF3-like protein family. Proteins like SA1388 remain a poorly studied group and their structural characterization could guide future investigations aimed at understanding their function. The structure of SA1388 has been solved to 2.0{angstrom} resolution by single wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method using selenium anomalous signals. It reveals a canonical NIF3-like fold containing two domains with a PII-like domain inserted in the middle of the polypeptide. The N and C terminal halves of the NIF3-like domains are involved in dimerization, while the PII domain forms trimeric contacts with symmetry related monomers. Overall, the NIF3-like domains of SA1388 are organized as a hexameric toroid similar to its homologs, E. coli ybgI and the hypothetical protein SP1609 from Streptococcus pneumoniae. The openings on either side of the toroid are partially covered by trimeric 'lids' formed by the PII domains. The junction of the two NIF3 domains has two zinc ions bound at what appears to be a histidine rich active site. A well-defined electron density corresponding to an endogenously bound ligand of unknown identity is observed in close proximity to the metal site. SA1388 is the third member of the NIF3-like family of proteins to be structurally characterized, the other two also being hypothetical proteins of unknown function. The structure of SA1388 confirms our earlier prediction that the inserted domain that separates the two NIF3 domains adopts a PII-like fold and reveals an overall capped toroidal arrangement for the protein hexamer. The six PII-like domains form two trimeric

  18. ASH structure alignment package: Sensitivity and selectivity in domain classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toh Hiroyuki

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structure alignment methods offer the possibility of measuring distant evolutionary relationships between proteins that are not visible by sequence-based analysis. However, the question of how structural differences and similarities ought to be quantified in this regard remains open. In this study we construct a training set of sequence-unique CATH and SCOP domains, from which we develop a scoring function that can reliably identify domains with the same CATH topology and SCOP fold classification. The score is implemented in the ASH structure alignment package, for which the source code and a web service are freely available from the PDBj website http://www.pdbj.org/ASH/. Results The new ASH score shows increased selectivity and sensitivity compared with values reported for several popular programs using the same test set of 4,298,905 structure pairs, yielding an area of .96 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. In addition, weak sequence homologies between similar domains are revealed that could not be detected by BLAST sequence alignment. Also, a subset of domain pairs is identified that exhibit high similarity, even though their CATH and SCOP classification differs. Finally, we show that the ranking of alignment programs based solely on geometric measures depends on the choice of the quality measure. Conclusion ASH shows high selectivity and sensitivity with regard to domain classification, an important step in defining distantly related protein sequence families. Moreover, the CPU cost per alignment is competitive with the fastest programs, making ASH a practical option for large-scale structure classification studies.

  19. Structure of the first PDZ domain of human PSD-93

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiorentini, Monica; Nielsen, Ann Kallehauge; Kristensen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of the PDZ1 domain of human PSD-93 has been determined to 2.0 A resolution. The PDZ1 domain forms a crystallographic trimer that is also predicted to be stable in solution. The main contributions to the stabilization of the trimer seem to arise from interactions involving the...... well as of the closely related human PSD-95 PDZ1 shows that they are very similar in terms of amino-acid composition. However, the cleft is significantly narrower in PSD-95. This could be part of the basis of peptide selectivity between PSD-93 PDZ1 and PSD-95 PDZ1....

  20. Structural basis for the recognition of two consecutive mutually interacting DPF motifs by the SGIP1 μ homology domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Kohda, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    FCHo1, FCHo2, and SGIP1 are key regulators of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Their μ homology domains (μHDs) interact with the C-terminal region of an endocytic scaffold protein, Eps15, containing fifteen Asp-Pro-Phe (DPF) motifs. Here, we show that the high-affinity μHD-binding site in Eps15 is a region encompassing six consecutive DPF motifs, while the minimal μHD-binding unit is two consecutive DPF motifs. We present the crystal structures of the SGIP1 μHD in complex with peptides containing two DPF motifs. The peptides bind to a novel ligand-binding site of the μHD, which is distinct from those of other distantly related μHD-containing proteins. The two DPF motifs, which adopt three-dimensional structures stabilized by sequence-specific intramotif and intermotif interactions, are extensively recognized by the μHD and are both required for binding. Thus, consecutive and singly scattered DPF motifs play distinct roles in μHD binding.

  1. The structure of the complex between a branched pentasaccharide and Thermobacillus xylanilyticus GH-51 arabinofuranosidase reveals xylan-binding determinants and induced fit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paës, Gabriel; Skov, Lars K; O'Donohue, Michael J;

    2008-01-01

    substrate xylan. The overall structure shows the two characteristic GH-51 domains: a catalytic domain that is folded into a (beta/alpha) 8-barrel and a C-terminal domain that displays jelly roll architecture. The pentasaccharide is bound in a groove on the surface of the enzyme, with the mono arabinosyl...

  2. Sequence and modified group analysis on C-terminal modified analogs of endomorphin-2 using electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a series of C-terminal modified analogs of endomorphin-2 is investigated using ESI-FT-ICR-MS. Some b, y″, a, and internal ions are found in the CID spectra and slight mass differ- ences between the calculated and observed results are obtained. Moreover, if the C-terminal modified group is t-butyloxy, it can lose butene through McLafferty rearrangement. FT-ICR MS shows its power in peptide sequencing successfully helping us obtain the structure of peptide analogs.

  3. Sequence and modified group analysis on C-terminal modified analogs of endomorphin-2 using electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,a series of C-terminal modified analogs of endomorphin-2 is investigated using ESI-FT-ICR-MS. Some b, y", a, and internal ions are found in the CID spectra and slight mass differences between the calculated and observed results are obtained. Moreover, if the C-terminal modified group is t-butyloxy, it can lose butene through McLafferty rearrangement. FT-ICR MS shows its power in peptide sequencing successfully helping us obtain the structure of peptide analogs.

  4. Domain structure effects in the relaxor ferroelectric PZN-PT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: PZN-PT (Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O33-x%PbTiO33) exhibits a maximum strain versus electric field exceeding 1% if it is poled along Two suggestions exist for the origin of this exceptional strain the domain structure created during poling, 'polarisation rotation' due to the existence of a monoclinic phase reported for PZN 8%PT Neutron diffraction data will be presented that shows the monoclmic phase is in fact a distortion of the ambient phase resulting from intersecting domain structures This interpretation also reconciles PZN-4 5%PT which shows similar properties to PZN 8%PT yet does not exist in the monoclmic structure. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  5. Approximation method to compute domain related integrals in structural studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oanta, E.; Panait, C.; Raicu, A.; Barhalescu, M.; Axinte, T.

    2015-11-01

    Various engineering calculi use integral calculus in theoretical models, i.e. analytical and numerical models. For usual problems, integrals have mathematical exact solutions. If the domain of integration is complicated, there may be used several methods to calculate the integral. The first idea is to divide the domain in smaller sub-domains for which there are direct calculus relations, i.e. in strength of materials the bending moment may be computed in some discrete points using the graphical integration of the shear force diagram, which usually has a simple shape. Another example is in mathematics, where the surface of a subgraph may be approximated by a set of rectangles or trapezoids used to calculate the definite integral. The goal of the work is to introduce our studies about the calculus of the integrals in the transverse section domains, computer aided solutions and a generalizing method. The aim of our research is to create general computer based methods to execute the calculi in structural studies. Thus, we define a Boolean algebra which operates with ‘simple’ shape domains. This algebraic standpoint uses addition and subtraction, conditioned by the sign of every ‘simple’ shape (-1 for the shapes to be subtracted). By ‘simple’ shape or ‘basic’ shape we define either shapes for which there are direct calculus relations, or domains for which their frontiers are approximated by known functions and the according calculus is carried out using an algorithm. The ‘basic’ shapes are linked to the calculus of the most significant stresses in the section, refined aspect which needs special attention. Starting from this idea, in the libraries of ‘basic’ shapes, there were included rectangles, ellipses and domains whose frontiers are approximated by spline functions. The domain triangularization methods suggested that another ‘basic’ shape to be considered is the triangle. The subsequent phase was to deduce the exact relations for the

  6. Structure and evolution of the magnetochrome domains: no longer alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eArnoux

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB can swim along Earth’s magnetic field lines, thanks to the alignment of dedicated cytoplasmic organelles. These organelles, termed magnetosomes, are proteolipidic vesicles filled by a 35-120 nm crystal of either magnetite or greigite. The formation and alignment of magnetosomes are mediated by a group of specific genes, the mam genes, encoding the magnetosome-associated proteins. The whole process of magnetosome biogenesis can be divided into four sequential steps; (i cytoplasmic membrane invagination, (ii magnetosomes alignment, (iii iron crystal nucleation and (iv species-dependent mineral size and shape control. Since both magnetite and greigite are a mix of iron(III and iron(II, iron redox state management within the magnetosome vesicle is a key issue. Recently, studies have started pointing out the importance of a MTB-specific c-type cytochrome domain found in several magnetosome-associated proteins (MamE, P, T and X. This magnetochrome (MCR domain is almost always found in tandem, and this tandem is either found alone (MamT, in combination with a PDZ domain (MamP, a domain of unknown function (MamX or with a trypsin combined to one or two PDZ domains (MamE. By taking advantage of new genomic data available on MTB and a recent structural study of MamP, which helped define the MCR domain boundaries, we attempt to retrace the evolutionary history within and between the different MCR-containing proteins. We propose that the observed tandem repeat of MCR is the result of a convergent evolution and attempt to explain why this domain is rarely found alone.

  7. Structure and evolution of the magnetochrome domains: no longer alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, Pascal; Siponen, Marina I; Lefèvre, Christopher T; Ginet, Nicolas; Pignol, David

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) can swim along Earth's magnetic field lines, thanks to the alignment of dedicated cytoplasmic organelles. These organelles, termed magnetosomes, are proteolipidic vesicles filled by a 35-120 nm crystal of either magnetite or greigite. The formation and alignment of magnetosomes are mediated by a group of specific genes, the mam genes, encoding the magnetosome-associated proteins. The whole process of magnetosome biogenesis can be divided into four sequential steps; (i) cytoplasmic membrane invagination, (ii) magnetosomes alignment, (iii) iron crystal nucleation and (iv) species-dependent mineral size and shape control. Since both magnetite and greigite are a mix of iron (III) and iron (II), iron redox state management within the magnetosome vesicle is a key issue. Recently, studies have started pointing out the importance of a MTB-specific c-type cytochrome domain found in several magnetosome-associated proteins (MamE, P, T, and X). This magnetochrome (MCR) domain is almost always found in tandem, and this tandem is either found alone (MamT), in combination with a PDZ domain (MamP), a domain of unknown function (MamX) or with a trypsin combined to one or two PDZ domains (MamE). By taking advantage of new genomic data available on MTB and a recent structural study of MamP, which helped define the MCR domain boundaries, we attempt to retrace the evolutionary history within and between the different MCR-containing proteins. We propose that the observed tandem repeat of MCR is the result of a convergent evolution and attempt to explain why this domain is rarely found alone. PMID:24723915

  8. cGMP-binding prepares PKG for substrate binding by disclosing the C-terminal domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alverdi, V.; Mazon, H.F.M.; Versluis, C.; Hemrika, W.; Esposito, G.; van den Heuvel, R.H.H.; Scholten, A.; Heck, A.J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Type I cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is involved in the nitric oxide/cGMP signaling pathway. PKG has been identified in many different species, ranging from unicelõlular organisms to mammals. The enzyme serves as one of the major receptor proteins for int

  9. A C-terminal acidic domain regulates degradation of the transcriptional coactivator Bob1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, John M; Wong, Christina S F; Möller, Andreas; Nielsen, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    Bob1 (Obf-1 or OCA-B) is a 34-kDa transcriptional coactivator encoded by the Pou2af1 gene that is essential for normal B-cell development and immune responses in mice. During lymphocyte activation, Bob1 protein levels dramatically increase independently of mRNA levels, suggesting that the stability of Bob1 is regulated. We used a fluorescent protein-based reporter system to analyze protein stability in response to genetic and physiological perturbations and show that, while Bob1 degradation is proteasome mediated, it does not require ubiquitination of Bob1. Furthermore, degradation of Bob1 in B cells appears to be largely independent of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah. We propose a novel mechanism of Bob1 turnover in B cells, whereby an acidic region in the C terminus of Bob1 regulates the activity of degron signals elsewhere in the protein. Changes that make the C terminus more acidic, including tyrosine phosphorylation-mimetic mutations, stabilize the instable murine Bob1 protein, indicating that B cells may regulate Bob1 stability and activity via signaling pathways. Finally, we show that expressing a stable Bob1 mutant in B cells suppresses cell proliferation and induces changes in surface marker expression commonly seen during B-cell differentiation.

  10. Biophysical Studies of the C-terminal domains of the melibiose transporter from Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Fürst, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    En este trabajo, el objetivo principal ha sido el estudio del mecanismo del co-transporte de la permeasa de melibiosa (MelB) de Escherichia coli. Este proteina de membrana realiza co-transporte activo de varios oligosacáridos utilizando la fuerza electroquímica de cationes. Una característica remarcable de este transportador es el hecho que permite utilizar tres diferentes cationes, el protón, el sodio y el litio. Los sustratos con mayor afinidad a la proteína son el sodio y la melibiosa. ...

  11. C-terminal engineering of CXCL12 and CCL5 chemokines: functional characterization by electrophysiological recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Picciocchi

    Full Text Available Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines comprised of 70-100 amino acids. The chemokines CXCL12 and CCL5 are the endogenous ligands of the CXCR4 and CCR5 G protein-coupled receptors that are also HIV co-receptors. Biochemical, structural and functional studies of receptors are ligand-consuming and the cost of commercial chemokines hinders their use in such studies. Here, we describe methods for the expression, refolding, purification, and functional characterization of CXCL12 and CCL5 constructs incorporating C-terminal epitope tags. The model tags used were hexahistidines and Strep-Tag for affinity purification, and the double lanthanoid binding tag for fluorescence imaging and crystal structure resolution. The ability of modified and purified chemokines to bind and activate CXCR4 and CCR5 receptors was tested in Xenopus oocytes expressing the receptors, together with a Kir3 G-protein activated K(+ channel that served as a reporter of receptor activation. Results demonstrate that tags greatly influence the biochemical properties of the recombinant chemokines. Besides, despite the absence of any evidence for CXCL12 or CCL5 C-terminus involvement in receptor binding and activation, we demonstrated unpredictable effects of tag insertion on the ligand apparent affinity and efficacy or on the ligand dissociation. These tagged chemokines should constitute useful tools for the selective purification of properly-folded chemokines receptors and the study of their native quaternary structures.

  12. TMAO promotes fibrillization and microtubule assembly activity in the C-terminal repeat region of tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramozzino, Francesca; Peterson, Dylan W; Farmer, Patrick; Gerig, J T; Graves, Donald J; Lew, John

    2006-03-21

    Alzheimer's disease most closely correlates with the appearance of the neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), intracellular fibrous aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein, tau. Under native conditions, tau is an unstructured protein, and its physical characterization has revealed no clues about the three-dimensional structural determinants essential for aggregation or microtubule binding. We have found that the natural osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) induces secondary structure in a C-terminal fragment of tau (tau(187)) and greatly promotes both self-aggregation and microtubule (MT) assembly activity. These processes could be distinguished, however, by a single-amino acid substitution (Tyr(310) --> Ala), which severely inhibited aggregation but had no effect on MT assembly activity. The inability of this mutant to aggregate could be completely reversed by TMAO. We propose a model in which TMAO induces partial order in tau(187), resulting in conformers that may correspond to on-pathway intermediates of either aggregation or tau-dependent MT assembly or both. These studies set the stage for future high-resolution structural characterization of these intermediates and the basis by which Tyr(310) may direct pathologic versus normal tau function. PMID:16533051

  13. Identification of a Chemical Probe for Bromo and Extra C-Terminal Bromodomain Inhibition through Optimization of a Fragment-Derived Hit

    OpenAIRE

    Fish, Paul V.; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Bish, Gerwyn; Brennan, Paul E.; Bunnage, Mark E.; Cook, Andrew S.; Federov, Oleg; Gerstenberger, Brian S.; Jones, Hannah; Knapp, Stefan; Marsden, Brian; Nocka, Karl; Owen, Dafydd R.; Philpott, Martin; Picaud, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of chromatin through acetylation at selected histone lysine residues is governed by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). The significance of this subset of the epigenetic code is interrogated and interpreted by an acetyllysine-specific protein–protein interaction with bromodomain reader modules. Selective inhibition of the bromo and extra C-terminal domain (BET) family of bromodomains with a small molecule is feasible, and this...

  14. Structural analysis of the DNA-binding domain of the Erwinia amylovora RcsB protein and its interaction with the RcsAB box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristovsek, Primoz; Sengupta, Kaushik; Löhr, Frank; Schäfer, Birgit; von Trebra, Markus Wehland; Rüterjans, Heinz; Bernhard, Frank

    2003-05-16

    The transcriptional regulator RcsB interacts with other coactivators to control the expression of biosynthetic operons in enterobacteria. While in a heterodimer complex with the regulator RcsA the RcsAB box consensus is recognized, DNA binding sites for RcsB without RcsA have also been identified. The conformation of RcsB might therefore be modulated upon interaction with various coactivators, resulting in the recognition of different DNA targets. We report the solution structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of the RcsB protein from Erwinia amylovora spanning amino acid residues 129-215 solved by heteronuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C-terminal domain is composed of four alpha-helices where two central helices form a helix-turn-helix motif similar to the structures of the regulatory proteins GerE, NarL, and TraR. Amino acid residues involved in the RcsA independent DNA binding of RcsB were identified by titration studies with a RcsAB box consensus fragment. Data obtained from NMR spectroscopy together with surface plasmon resonance measurements demonstrate that the RcsAB box is specifically recognized by the RcsAB heterodimer as well as by RcsB alone. However, the binding constant of RcsB alone at target promoters from Escherichia coli, E. amylovora, and Pantoea stewartii was approximately 1 order of magnitude higher compared with that of the RcsAB heterodimer. We present evidence that the obvious role of RcsA is not to alter the DNA binding specificity of RcsB but to stabilize RcsB-DNA complexes. PMID:12740396

  15. Domain wall structure transformations in epitaxial ferrite garnet films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic characteristics of domain walls (DW) in the process of the transformation of their structure occuring under the static field effect in the film plane are investigated. The epitaxiat ferrite-garnet film of the (YSmBa)3(FeGa)5O12 composition with parameters: 4πM=178 Gs (M=saturation magnetization), quality factor approximately equal to 10, thickness = 6.5 μm, band domain structure period = 13.5 μm has been studied. The signal of DW resonance oscillations excited by radio-frequency field with amplitude 0.01:1 Oe, oscillating along the slight magnetization axis perpendicular to the film plane has been observed. The constant magnetic field, H, in the film plane is oriented along the DW and is used not only for the transformation of DW structure but also for changing its resonance frequency by changing it effective mass. The results presented testify to the fact that the resonance methods may be successfully used not only for studying the DW dynamics but also for investigating into the domain wall structure and the process of its transformation

  16. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  17. Asparagine 326 in the extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 is essential for the cell survival after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XRCC4 is one of the crucial proteins in the repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). As XRCC4 consists of 336 amino acids, N-terminal 200 amino acids include domains for dimerization and for association with DNA ligase IV and XLF and shown to be essential for XRCC4 function in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. On the other hand, the role of the remaining C-terminal region of XRCC4 is not well understood. In the present study, we noticed that a stretch of ∼20 amino acids located at the extreme C-terminus of XRCC4 is highly conserved among vertebrate species. To explore its possible importance, series of mutants in this region were constructed and assessed for the functionality in terms of ability to rescue radiosensitivity of M10 cells lacking XRCC4. Among 13 mutants, M10 transfectant with N326L mutant (M10-XRCC4N326L) showed elevated radiosensitivity. N326L protein showed defective nuclear localization. N326L sequence matched the consensus sequence of nuclear export signal. Leptomycin B treatment accumulated XRCC4N326L in the nucleus but only partially rescued radiosensitivity of M10-XRCC4N326L. These results collectively indicated that the functional defects of XRCC4N326L might be partially, but not solely, due to its exclusion from nucleus by synthetic nuclear export signal. Further mutation of XRCC4 Asn326 to other amino acids, i.e., alanine, aspartic acid or glutamine did not affect the nuclear localization but still exhibited radiosensitivity. The present results indicated the importance of the extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 and, especially, Asn326 therein. - Highlights: • Extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 is highly conserved among vertebrate species. • XRCC4 C-terminal point mutants, R325F and N326L, are functionally deficient in terms of survival after irradiation. • N326L localizes to the cytoplasm because of synthetic nuclear export signal. • Leptomycin B restores the nuclear localization of N

  18. Asparagine 326 in the extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 is essential for the cell survival after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanotayan, Rujira; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa, E-mail: yoshim@nr.titech.ac.jp

    2015-02-20

    XRCC4 is one of the crucial proteins in the repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). As XRCC4 consists of 336 amino acids, N-terminal 200 amino acids include domains for dimerization and for association with DNA ligase IV and XLF and shown to be essential for XRCC4 function in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. On the other hand, the role of the remaining C-terminal region of XRCC4 is not well understood. In the present study, we noticed that a stretch of ∼20 amino acids located at the extreme C-terminus of XRCC4 is highly conserved among vertebrate species. To explore its possible importance, series of mutants in this region were constructed and assessed for the functionality in terms of ability to rescue radiosensitivity of M10 cells lacking XRCC4. Among 13 mutants, M10 transfectant with N326L mutant (M10-XRCC4{sup N326L}) showed elevated radiosensitivity. N326L protein showed defective nuclear localization. N326L sequence matched the consensus sequence of nuclear export signal. Leptomycin B treatment accumulated XRCC4{sup N326L} in the nucleus but only partially rescued radiosensitivity of M10-XRCC4{sup N326L}. These results collectively indicated that the functional defects of XRCC4{sup N326L} might be partially, but not solely, due to its exclusion from nucleus by synthetic nuclear export signal. Further mutation of XRCC4 Asn326 to other amino acids, i.e., alanine, aspartic acid or glutamine did not affect the nuclear localization but still exhibited radiosensitivity. The present results indicated the importance of the extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 and, especially, Asn326 therein. - Highlights: • Extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 is highly conserved among vertebrate species. • XRCC4 C-terminal point mutants, R325F and N326L, are functionally deficient in terms of survival after irradiation. • N326L localizes to the cytoplasm because of synthetic nuclear export signal. • Leptomycin B restores the

  19. Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirC2 enhances T-DNA transfer and virulence through its C-terminal ribbon–helix–helix DNA-binding fold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirC2 stimulates processing of single-stranded T-DNA that is translocated into plants to induce tumor formation, but how VirC2 functions is unclear. Here, we report the 1.7-Å X-ray crystal structure of its trypsin-resistant C-terminal domain, VirC282–202, which reveals a form of the ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) DNA-binding fold contained within a single polypeptide chain. DNA-binding assays and mutagenesis indicate that VirC2 uses this RHH fold to bind double-stranded DNA but not single-stranded DNA. Mutations that severely affect VirC2 DNA binding are highly deleterious for both T-DNA transfer into yeast and the virulence of A. tumefaciens in different plants including Nicotiana glauca and Kalanchoe daigremontiana. These data suggest that VirC2 enhances T-DNA transfer and virulence through DNA binding with its RHH fold. The RHH fold of VirC2 is the first crystal structure representing a group of predicted RHH proteins that facilitate endonucleolytic processing of DNA for horizontal gene transfer. PMID:19482939

  20. Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirC2 enhances T-DNA transfer and virulence through its C-terminal ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Hooykaas, Paul J J; Glover, J N Mark

    2009-06-16

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirC2 stimulates processing of single-stranded T-DNA that is translocated into plants to induce tumor formation, but how VirC2 functions is unclear. Here, we report the 1.7-A X-ray crystal structure of its trypsin-resistant C-terminal domain, VirC2(82-202), which reveals a form of the ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) DNA-binding fold contained within a single polypeptide chain. DNA-binding assays and mutagenesis indicate that VirC2 uses this RHH fold to bind double-stranded DNA but not single-stranded DNA. Mutations that severely affect VirC2 DNA binding are highly deleterious for both T-DNA transfer into yeast and the virulence of A. tumefaciens in different plants including Nicotiana glauca and Kalanchoe daigremontiana. These data suggest that VirC2 enhances T-DNA transfer and virulence through DNA binding with its RHH fold. The RHH fold of VirC2 is the first crystal structure representing a group of predicted RHH proteins that facilitate endonucleolytic processing of DNA for horizontal gene transfer. PMID:19482939

  1. Distinct Roles for the N- and C-terminal Regions of M-Sec in Plasma Membrane Deformation during Tunneling Nanotube Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shunsuke; Yamashita, Masami; Yamakami-Kimura, Megumi; Sato, Yusuke; Yamagata, Atsushi; Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Amada, Takako; Hase, Koji; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Fukai, Shuya

    2016-01-01

    The tunneling nanotube (TNT) is a structure used for intercellular communication, and is a thin membrane protrusion mediating transport of various signaling molecules and cellular components. M-Sec has potent membrane deformation ability and induces TNT formation in cooperation with the Ral/exocyst complex. Here, we show that the N-terminal polybasic region of M-Sec directly binds phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate for its localization to the plasma membrane during the initial stage of TNT formation. We further report a crystal structure of M-Sec, which consists of helix bundles arranged in a straight rod-like shape, similar to the membrane tethering complex subunits. A positively charged surface in the C-terminal domains is required for M-Sec interaction with active RalA to extend the plasma membrane protrusions. Our results suggest that the membrane-associated M-Sec recruits active RalA, which directs the exocyst complex to form TNTs. PMID:27629377

  2. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII

    OpenAIRE

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain i...

  3. Modeling Microwave Structures in Time Domain Using Laguerre Polynomials

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Raida; Lacik, J.

    2006-01-01

    The paper is focused on time domain modeling of microwave structures by the method of moments. Two alternative schemes with weighted Laguerre polynomials are presented. Thanks to their properties, these schemes are free of late time oscillations. Further, the paper is aimed to effective and accurate evaluation of Green's functions integrals within these schemes. For this evaluation, a first- and second-order polynomial approximation is developed. The last part of the paper deals with mode...

  4. Solution structure of the first immunoglobulin domain of human myotilin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkinen, Outi [University of Helsinki, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry (Finland)], E-mail: Outi.K.Heikkinen@helsinki.fi; Permi, Perttu [University of Helsinki, Program in Structural Biology and Biophysics, Institute of Biotechnology (Finland); Koskela, Harri [University of Helsinki, Finnish Institute for Verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (VERIFIN) (Finland); Carpen, Olli [University of Helsinki, Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience Program, Biomedicum (Finland); Ylaenne, Jari [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Nanoscience Center (Finland); Kilpelaeinen, Ilkka [University of Helsinki, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    Myotilin is a 57 kDa actin-binding and -bundling protein that consists of a unique serine-rich amino-terminus, two Ig-domains and a short carboxy-terminus with a PDZ-binding motif. Myotilin localizes in sarcomeric Z-discs, where it interacts with several sarcomeric proteins. Point mutations in myotilin cause muscle disorders morphologically highlighted by sarcomeric disarray and aggregation. The actin-binding and dimerization propensity of myotilin has been mapped to the Ig-domains. Here we present high-resolution structure of the first Ig-domain of myotilin (MyoIg1) determined with solution state NMR spectroscopy. Nearly complete chemical shift assignments of MyoIg1 were achieved despite several missing backbone {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N-HSQC signals. The structure derived from distance and dihedral angle restraints using torsion angle dynamics was further refined using molecular dynamics. The structure of MyoIg1 exhibits I-type Ig-fold. The absence of several backbone {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N-HSQC signals can be explained by conformational exchange taking place at the hydrophobic core of the protein.

  5. Structure and functional relevance of the Slit2 homodimerization domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiradake, Elena; von Philipsborn, Anne C; Henry, Maud; Fritz, Martin; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Jamin, Marc; Hemrika, Wieger; Bastmeyer, Martin; Cusack, Stephen; McCarthy, Andrew A

    2009-07-01

    Slit proteins are secreted ligands that interact with the Roundabout (Robo) receptors to provide important guidance cues in neuronal and vascular development. Slit-Robo signalling is mediated by an interaction between the second Slit domain and the first Robo domain, as well as being dependent on heparan sulphate. In an effort to understand the role of the other Slit domains in signalling, we determined the crystal structure of the fourth Slit2 domain (D4) and examined the effects of various Slit2 constructs on chick retinal ganglion cell axons. Slit2 D4 forms a homodimer using the conserved residues on its concave face, and can also bind to heparan sulphate. We observed that Slit2 D4 frequently results in growth cones with collapsed lamellipodia and that this effect can be inhibited by exogenously added heparan sulphate. Our results show that Slit2 D4-heparan sulphate binding contributes to a Slit-Robo signalling mechanism more intricate than previously thought.

  6. Molecular and structural characterisation of the human sodium/iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) C-terminus and the implication of this domain in the transporter regulation; Caracterisation moleculaire et structurale de l'extremite C-Terminale du co-transporteur sodium/iode humain (h N.I.S.): Implication de ce domaine dans la regulation du transporteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huc, S

    2007-12-15

    The human natrium iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) is an intrinsic membrane protein expressed in thyroid cells where it allows iodide uptake and accumulation. It is composed of thirteen transmembrane helices and its ninety- three amino acids long cytosolic C-terminus presents many potential post-translational regulatory sites. A first part of the PhD work has been dedicated to the expression in a bacterial system and to the purification of the cytosolic C-terminal fragment. Biochemical and structural characterisation have revealed that this C-terminus is very flexible but prone to dimerization. The fragment has also been used as a bait to test the interactions with PDZ domain proteins spotted on a membrane. Several proteins interacting with the (natrium/iodide symporter) N.I.S. C-terminus have thus been identified and the study of their implication in the protein regulation has been initiated. A second part of the work has underlined the existence of a N.I.S. fragment co-purified with the entire protein. This fragment has been found in cells in culture stably expressing N.I.S. and also in human thyroid extracts and in rodent thyroid cells. We observed that this fragment is spontaneously associated with the entire protein. It is composed of the last 131 amino acid of the protein and so comprises the last transmembrane domain and the C-terminal extremity. The expression of a truncated form of h N.I.S., lacking the last 131 amino acids, shows that this protein is not correctly addressed to the cell membrane and cells expressing this mutated symporter cannot accumulate iodide. However, our results show that the co-expression of the two N.I.S. parts, the truncated form lacking the last 131 amino acid, and the complementary C-terminal fragment, leads to cells presenting 10 % of the activity of cells expressing the whole N.I.S.. (author)

  7. Evolutionary origins of C-terminal (GPPn 3-hydroxyproline formation in vertebrate tendon collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Hudson

    Full Text Available Approximately half the proline residues in fibrillar collagen are hydroxylated. The predominant form is 4-hydroxyproline, which helps fold and stabilize the triple helix. A minor form, 3-hydroxyproline, still has no clear function. Using peptide mass spectrometry, we recently revealed several previously unknown molecular sites of 3-hydroxyproline in fibrillar collagen chains. In fibril-forming A-clade collagen chains, four new partially occupied 3-hydroxyproline sites were found (A2, A3, A4 and (GPPn in addition to the fully occupied A1 site at Pro986. The C-terminal (GPPn motif has five consecutive GPP triplets in α1(I, four in α2(I and three in α1(II, all subject to 3-hydroxylation. The evolutionary origins of this substrate sequence were investigated by surveying the pattern of its 3-hydroxyproline occupancy from early chordates through amphibians, birds and mammals. Different tissue sources of type I collagen (tendon, bone and skin and type II collagen (cartilage and notochord were examined by mass spectrometry. The (GPPn domain was found to be a major substrate for 3-hydroxylation only in vertebrate fibrillar collagens. In higher vertebrates (mouse, bovine and human, up to five 3-hydroxyproline residues per (GPPn motif were found in α1(I and four in α2(I, with an average of two residues per chain. In vertebrate type I collagen the modification exhibited clear tissue specificity, with 3-hydroxyproline prominent only in tendon. The occupancy also showed developmental changes in Achilles tendon, with increasing 3-hydroxyproline levels with age. The biological significance is unclear but the level of 3-hydroxylation at the (GPPn site appears to have increased as tendons evolved and shows both tendon type and developmental variations within a species.

  8. Topology of the C-terminal tail of HIV-1 gp41: differential exposure of the Kennedy epitope on cell and viral membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Sun, Chengqun; Sturgeon, Timothy J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal tail (CTT) of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope (Env) protein is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of Env structure and functional properties, including fusogenicity and antigenicity. While the CTT has been commonly referred to as the "intracytoplasmic domain" based on the assumption of an exclusive localization inside the membrane lipid bilayer, early antigenicity studies and recent biochemical analyses have produced a credible case for surface exposure of specific CTT sequences, including the classical "Kennedy epitope" (KE) of gp41, leading to an alternative model of gp41 topology with multiple membrane-spanning domains. The current study was designed to test these conflicting models of CTT topology by characterizing the exposure of native CTT sequences and substituted VSV-G epitope tags in cell- and virion-associated Env to reference monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Surface staining and FACS analysis of intact, Env-expressing cells demonstrated that the KE is accessible to binding by MAbs directed to both an inserted VSV-G epitope tag and the native KE sequence. Importantly, the VSV-G tag was only reactive when inserted into the KE; no reactivity was observed in cells expressing Env with the VSV-G tag inserted into the LLP2 domain. In contrast to cell-surface expressed Env, no binding of KE-directed MAbs was observed to Env on the surface of intact virions using either immune precipitation or surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. These data indicate apparently distinct CTT topologies for virion- and cell-associated Env species and add to the case for a reconsideration of CTT topology that is more complex than currently envisioned.

  9. Topology of the C-terminal tail of HIV-1 gp41: differential exposure of the Kennedy epitope on cell and viral membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Steckbeck

    Full Text Available The C-terminal tail (CTT of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope (Env protein is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of Env structure and functional properties, including fusogenicity and antigenicity. While the CTT has been commonly referred to as the "intracytoplasmic domain" based on the assumption of an exclusive localization inside the membrane lipid bilayer, early antigenicity studies and recent biochemical analyses have produced a credible case for surface exposure of specific CTT sequences, including the classical "Kennedy epitope" (KE of gp41, leading to an alternative model of gp41 topology with multiple membrane-spanning domains. The current study was designed to test these conflicting models of CTT topology by characterizing the exposure of native CTT sequences and substituted VSV-G epitope tags in cell- and virion-associated Env to reference monoclonal antibodies (MAbs. Surface staining and FACS analysis of intact, Env-expressing cells demonstrated that the KE is accessible to binding by MAbs directed to both an inserted VSV-G epitope tag and the native KE sequence. Importantly, the VSV-G tag was only reactive when inserted into the KE; no reactivity was observed in cells expressing Env with the VSV-G tag inserted into the LLP2 domain. In contrast to cell-surface expressed Env, no binding of KE-directed MAbs was observed to Env on the surface of intact virions using either immune precipitation or surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. These data indicate apparently distinct CTT topologies for virion- and cell-associated Env species and add to the case for a reconsideration of CTT topology that is more complex than currently envisioned.

  10. Characterization of the transcriptional activation domains of human TEF3-1 (transcription enhancer factor 3 isoform 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Cheng; Jiang, Yajie; Deng, Cuilan; Huang, Zebo; Teng, Kaixuan; Chen, Lan; Liu, Xin

    2015-03-01

    TEF3-1 (transcription enhancer factor 3 isoform 1) is a human transcriptional factor, which has a N-terminal TEA/ATTS domain supposedly for DNA binding and C-terminal PRD and STY domains for transcriptional activation. Taking advantage of the efficient reporter design of yeast two-hybrid system, we characterized the TEF3-1 domains in activating gene expression. Previously study usually mentioned that the C-terminal domain of TEF3-1 has the transcriptional activity, however, our data shows that the peptides TEF3-11-66 and TEF3-1197-434 functioned as two independent activation domains, suggesting that N-terminal domain of TEF3-1 also has transcriptional activation capacity. Additionally, more deletions of amino acids 197-434 showed that only the peptides TEF3-1197-265 contained the minimum sequences for the C-terminal transcriptional activation domain. The protein structure is predicted to contain a helix-turn-helix structure in TEF3-11-66 and four β sheets in TEF3-1197-265. Finally, after the truncated fragments of TEF3-1 were expressed in HUVEC cells, the whole TEF3-1 and the two activation domains could increase F-actin stress fiber, cell proliferation, migration and targeted gene expression. Further analysis and characterization of the activation domains in TEF3-1 may broaden our understanding of the gene involved in angiogenesis and other pathological processes.

  11. A crystal structure of the Dengue virus NS5 protein reveals a novel inter-domain interface essential for protein flexibility and virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqian Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Flavivirus RNA replication occurs within a replication complex (RC that assembles on ER membranes and comprises both non-structural (NS viral proteins and host cofactors. As the largest protein component within the flavivirus RC, NS5 plays key enzymatic roles through its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase and C-terminal RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp domains, and constitutes a major target for antivirals. We determined a crystal structure of the full-length NS5 protein from Dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3 at a resolution of 2.3 Å in the presence of bound SAH and GTP. Although the overall molecular shape of NS5 from DENV3 resembles that of NS5 from Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, the relative orientation between the MTase and RdRp domains differs between the two structures, providing direct evidence for the existence of a set of discrete stable molecular conformations that may be required for its function. While the inter-domain region is mostly disordered in NS5 from JEV, the NS5 structure from DENV3 reveals a well-ordered linker region comprising a short 310 helix that may act as a swivel. Solution Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS analysis reveals an increased mobility of the thumb subdomain of RdRp in the context of the full length NS5 protein which correlates well with the analysis of the crystallographic temperature factors. Site-directed mutagenesis targeting the mostly polar interface between the MTase and RdRp domains identified several evolutionarily conserved residues that are important for viral replication, suggesting that inter-domain cross-talk in NS5 regulates virus replication. Collectively, a picture for the molecular origin of NS5 flexibility is emerging with profound implications for flavivirus replication and for the development of therapeutics targeting NS5.

  12. Two distinct domains of protein 4.1 critical for assembly offunctional nuclei in Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Heald, Rebecca; Lee, Gloria; Nunomura, Wataru; Gimm,J. Aura; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel AnneJ. Aura; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2002-11-15

    Protein 4.1R, a multifunctional structural protein, acts asan adaptor in mature red cell membrane skeletons linking spectrin-actincomplexes to plasma membrane-associated proteins. In nucleated cellsprotein 4.1 is not associated exclusively with plasma membrane but isalso detected at several important subcellular locations crucial for celldivision. To identify 4.1 domains having critical functions in nuclearassembly, 4.1 domain peptides were added to Xenopus egg extract nuclearreconstitution reactions. Morphologically disorganized, replicationdeficient nuclei assembled when spectrin-actin binding domain orNuMA-binding C-terminal domain peptides were present. However, controlvariant spectrin-actin binding domain peptides incapable of bindingactin, or mutant C-terminal domain peptides with reduced NuMA binding,had no deleterious effects on nuclear reconstitution. To test if 4.1 isrequired for proper nuclear assembly, 4.1 isoforms were depleted withspectrin-actin binding or C-terminal domain-specific antibodies. Nucleiassembled in depleted extracts ha d deranged phenotypes. However, nuclearassembly could be rescued by addition of recombinant 4.1R. Our dataestablishes that protein 4.1 is essential for nuclear assembly andidentifies two distinct 4.1 domains, initially characterized incytoskeletal interactions, that have crucial and versatile functions innuclear assembly.

  13. Crystal structure of the sensory domain of Escherichia coli CadC, a member of the ToxR-like protein family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, Andreas; Haneburger, Ina; Koller, Christiane; Jung, Kirsten; Skerra, Arne

    2011-01-01

    The membrane-integral transcriptional activator CadC comprises sensory and transcriptional regulatory functions within one polypeptide chain. Its C-terminal periplasmic domain, CadCpd, is responsible for sensing of environmental pH as well as for binding of the feedback inhibitor cadaverine. Here we describe the crystal structure of CadCpd (residues 188–512) solved at a resolution of 1.8 Å via multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) using a ReCl62− derivative. CadCpd reveals a novel fold comprising two subdomains: an N-terminal subdomain dominated by a β-sheet in contact with three α-helices and a C-terminal subdomain formed by an eleven-membered α-helical bundle, which is oriented almost perpendicular to the helices in the first subdomain. Further to the native protein, crystal structures were also solved for its variants D471N and D471E, which show functionally different behavior in pH sensing. Interestingly, in the heavy metal derivative of CadCpd used for MAD phasing a ReCl62− ion was found in a cavity located between the two subdomains. Amino acid side chains that coordinate this complex ion are conserved in CadC homologues from various bacterial species, suggesting a function of the cavity in the binding of cadaverine, which was supported by docking studies. Notably, CadCpd forms a homo-dimer in solution, which can be explained by an extended, albeit rather polar interface between two symmetry-related monomers in the crystal structure. The occurrence of several acidic residues in this region suggests protonation-dependent changes in the mode of dimerization, which could eventually trigger transcriptional activation by CadC in the bacterial cytoplasm. PMID:21308846

  14. Crystal structure of calpain-3 penta-EF-hand (PEF) domain - a homodimerized PEF family member with calcium bound at the fifth EF-hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partha, Sarathy K.; Ravulapalli, Ravikiran; Allingham, John S.; Campbell, Robert L.; Davies, Peter L. [Queens

    2014-08-21

    Calpains are Ca2+dependent intracellular cysteine proteases that cleave a wide range of protein substrates to help implement Ca2+ signaling in the cell. The major isoforms of this enzyme family, calpain-1 and calpain-2, are heterodimers of a large and a small subunit, with the main dimer interface being formed through their C-terminal penta-EF hand (PEF) domains. Calpain-3, or p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific isoform that is genetically linked to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Biophysical and modeling studies with the PEF domain of calpain-3 support the suggestion that full-length calpain-3 exists as a homodimer. Here, we report the crystallization of calpain-3's PEF domain and its crystal structure in the presence of Ca2+, which provides evidence for the homodimer architecture of calpain-3 and supports the molecular model that places a protease core at either end of the elongated dimer. Unlike other calpain PEF domain structures, the calpain-3 PEF domain contains a Ca2+ bound at the EF5-hand used for homodimer association. Three of the four Ca2+-binding EF-hands of the PEF domains are concentrated near the protease core, and have the potential to radically change the local charge within the dimer during Ca2+ signaling. Examination of the homodimer interface shows that there would be steric clashes if the calpain-3 large subunit were to try to pair with a calpain small subunit.

  15. Domain Modeling: NP_036204.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_036204.2 chr20 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE C-TERMINAL DOMAIN OF BCLA, THE MAJOR ANT...IGEN OF THE EXOSPORIUM OF THE BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORE. p2r6qa_ chr20/NP_036204.2/NP_036204.2_apo_496-632.pd...b p1wcka_ chr20/NP_036204.2/NP_036204.2_holo_496-632.pdb swppa 551H,628Y CAC 1 ...

  16. Molecular and structural characterisation of the human sodium/iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) C-terminus and the implication of this domain in the transporter regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human natrium iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) is an intrinsic membrane protein expressed in thyroid cells where it allows iodide uptake and accumulation. It is composed of thirteen transmembrane helices and its ninety- three amino acids long cytosolic C-terminus presents many potential post-translational regulatory sites. A first part of the PhD work has been dedicated to the expression in a bacterial system and to the purification of the cytosolic C-terminal fragment. Biochemical and structural characterisation have revealed that this C-terminus is very flexible but prone to dimerization. The fragment has also been used as a bait to test the interactions with PDZ domain proteins spotted on a membrane. Several proteins interacting with the (natrium/iodide symporter) N.I.S. C-terminus have thus been identified and the study of their implication in the protein regulation has been initiated. A second part of the work has underlined the existence of a N.I.S. fragment co-purified with the entire protein. This fragment has been found in cells in culture stably expressing N.I.S. and also in human thyroid extracts and in rodent thyroid cells. We observed that this fragment is spontaneously associated with the entire protein. It is composed of the last 131 amino acid of the protein and so comprises the last transmembrane domain and the C-terminal extremity. The expression of a truncated form of h N.I.S., lacking the last 131 amino acids, shows that this protein is not correctly addressed to the cell membrane and cells expressing this mutated symporter cannot accumulate iodide. However, our results show that the co-expression of the two N.I.S. parts, the truncated form lacking the last 131 amino acid, and the complementary C-terminal fragment, leads to cells presenting 10 % of the activity of cells expressing the whole N.I.S.. (author)

  17. Structural and functional analyses of beta-glucosidase 3B from Thermotoga neapolitana: a thermostable three-domain representative of glycoside hydrolase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzo, Tania; Pasten, Javier Linares; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg; Logan, Derek T

    2010-04-01

    Based on sequence and phylogenetic analyses, glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 3 can be divided into several clusters that differ in the length of their primary sequences. However, structural data on representatives of GH3 are still scarce, since only three of their structures are known and only one of them has been thoroughly characterized-that of an exohydrolase from barley. To allow a deeper structural understanding of the GH3 family, we have determined the crystal structure of the thermostable beta-glucosidase from Thermotoga neapolitana, which has potentially important applications in environmentally friendly industrial biosynthesis at a resolution of 2.05 A. Selected active-site mutants have been characterized kinetically, and the structure of the mutant D242A is presented at 2.1 A resolution. Bgl3B from Th. neapolitana is the first example of a GH3 glucosidase with a three-domain structure. It is composed of an (alpha/beta)(8) domain similar to a triose phosphate isomerase barrel, a five-stranded alpha/beta sandwich domain (both of which are important for active-site organization), and a C-terminal fibronectin type III domain of unknown function. Remarkably, the direction of the second beta-strand of the triose phosphate isomerase barrel domain is reversed, which has implications for the active-site shape. The active site, at the interface of domains 1 and 2, is much more open to solvent than the corresponding site in the structurally homologous enzyme from barley, and only the -1 site is well defined. The structures, in combination with kinetic studies of active-site variants, allow the identification of essential catalytic residues (the nucleophile D242 and the acid/base E458), as well as other residues at the -1 subsite, including D58 and W243, which, by mutagenesis, are shown to be important for substrate accommodation/interaction. The position of the fibronectin type III domain excludes a direct participation of this domain in the recognition of small

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure of the Nucleic Acid-Binding Domain of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nonstructural Protein 3▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Pedro; Johnson, Margaret A.; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Neuman, Benjamin W.; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Kuhn, Peter; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of a globular domain of residues 1071 to 1178 within the previously annotated nucleic acid-binding region (NAB) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) has been determined, and N- and C-terminally adjoining polypeptide segments of 37 and 25 residues, respectively, have been shown to form flexibly extended linkers to the preceding globular domain and to the following, as yet uncharacterized domain. This extension of the structural coverage of nsp3 was obtained from NMR studies with an nsp3 construct comprising residues 1066 to 1181 [nsp3(1066-1181)] and the constructs nsp3(1066-1203) and nsp3(1035-1181). A search of the protein structure database indicates that the globular domain of the NAB represents a new fold, with a parallel four-strand β-sheet holding two α-helices of three and four turns that are oriented antiparallel to the β-strands. Two antiparallel two-strand β-sheets and two 310-helices are anchored against the surface of this barrel-like molecular core. Chemical shift changes upon the addition of single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) identified a group of residues that form a positively charged patch on the protein surface as the binding site responsible for the previously reported affinity for nucleic acids. This binding site is similar to the ssRNA-binding site of the sterile alpha motif domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vts1p protein, although the two proteins do not share a common globular fold. PMID:19828617

  19. Imaging of Spin Dynamics in Closure Domain and Vortex Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. P.; Eames, P.; Engebretson, D. M.; Berezovsky, J.; Crowell, P. A.

    2003-03-01

    Time-resolved Kerr microscopy is used to study the excitations of individual micron-scale ferromagnetic thin film elements in their remnant state. Thin (18 nm) square elements with edge dimensions between 1 and 10 μm form closure domain structures with 90 degree Néel walls between domains. We identify two classes of excitations in these systems. The first corresponds to precession of the magnetization about the local demagnetizing field in each quadrant, while the second excitation is localized in the domain walls. Two modes are also identified in ferromagnetic disks with thicknesses of 60 nm and diameters from 2 μm down to 500 nm. The equilibrium state of each disk is a vortex with a singularity at the center. As in the squares, the higher frequency mode is due to precession about the internal field, but in this case the lower frequency mode corresponds to gyrotropic motion of the entire vortex. The effect of a non-zero magnetic field on the excitation spectrum of vortices is also explored. Although an applied field shifts the position of the vortex core, it has only a small effect on the excitation spectrum. These results demonstrate clearly the existence of well-defined excitations in inhomogeneously magnetized microstructures. This work was supported by NSF DMR 99-83777, the Research Corporation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the University of Minnesota MRSEC (DMR 98-09364), and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  20. Decay accelerating factor of complement is anchored to cells by a C-terminal glycolipid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane-associated decay accelerating factor (DAF) of human erythrocytes (E/sup hu/) was analyzed for a C-terminal glycolipid anchoring structure. Automated amino acid analysis of DAF following reductive radiomethylation revealed ethanolamine and glucosamine residues in proportions identical with those present in the E/sup hu/ acetylcholinesterase (AChE) anchor. Cleavage of radiomethylated 70-kilodalton (kDa) DAF with papain released the labeled ethanolamine and glucosamine and generated 61- and 55-kDa DAF products that retained all labeled Lys and labeled N-terminal Asp. Incubation of intact E/sup hu/ with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), which cleaves the anchors in trypanosome membrane form variant surface glycoproteins (mfVSGs) and murine thymocyte Thy-1 antigen, released 15% of the cell-associated DAF antigen. The released 67-kDa PI-PLC DAF derivative retained its ability to decay the classical C3 convertase C4b2a but was unable to membrane-incorporate and displayed physicochemical properties similar to urine DAF, a hydrophilic DAF form that can be isolated for urine. Nitrous acid deamination cleavage of E/sup hu/ DAF at glucosamine following labeling with the lipophilic photoreagent 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([125I]TID) released the [125I]TID label in a parallel fashion as from [125I]TID-labeled AChE. Biosynthetic labeling of HeLa cells with [3H] ethanolamine resulted in rapid 3H incorporation into both 48-kDa pro-DAF and 72-kDa mature epithelial cell DAF. The findings indicate that DAF and AChE are anchored in E/sup hu/ by the same or a similar glycolipid structure and that, like VSGs, this structure is incorporated into DAF early in DAF biosynthesis prior to processing of pro-DAF in the Golgi

  1. The C-terminal binding protein (CTBP-1) regulates dorsal SMD axonal morphology in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A; Sherry, T J; Yücel, D; Llamosas, E; Nicholas, H R

    2015-12-17

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are transcriptional co-repressors which cooperate with a variety of transcription factors to repress gene expression. Caenorhabditis elegans CTBP-1 expression has been observed in the nervous system and hypodermis. In C. elegans, CTBP-1 regulates several processes including Acute Functional Tolerance to ethanol and functions in the nervous system to modulate both lifespan and expression of a lipase gene called lips-7. Incorrect structure and/or function of the nervous system can lead to behavioral changes. Here, we demonstrate reduced exploration behavior in ctbp-1 mutants. Our examination of a subset of neurons involved in regulating locomotion revealed that the axonal morphology of dorsal SMD (SMDD) neurons is altered in ctbp-1 mutants at the fourth larval (L4) stage. Expressing CTBP-1 under the control of the endogenous ctbp-1 promoter rescued both the exploration behavior phenotype and defective SMDD axon structure in ctbp-1 mutants at the L4 stage. Interestingly, the pre-synaptic marker RAB-3 was found to localize to the mispositioned portion of SMDD axons in a ctbp-1 mutant. Further analysis of SMDD axonal morphology at days 1, 3 and 5 of adulthood revealed that the number of ctbp-1 mutants showing an SMDD axonal morphology defect increases in early adulthood and the observed defect appears to be qualitatively more severe. CTBP-1 is prominently expressed in the nervous system with weak expression detected in the hypodermis. Surprisingly, solely expressing CTBP-1a in the nervous system or hypodermis did not restore correct SMDD axonal structure in a ctbp-1 mutant. Our results demonstrate a role for CTBP-1 in exploration behavior and the regulation of SMDD axonal morphology in C. elegans.

  2. Crystal Structures of the BAR-PH and PTB Domains of Human APPL1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li,J.; Mao, X.; Dong, L.; Liu, F.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    APPL1 interacts with adiponectin receptors and other important signaling molecules. It contains a BAR and a PH domain near its N terminus, and the two domains may function as a unit (BAR-PH domain). We report here the crystal structures of the BAR-PH and PTB domains of human APPL1. The structures reveal novel features for BAR domain dimerization and for the interactions between the BAR and PH domains. The BAR domain dimer of APPL1 contains two four-helical bundles, whereas other BAR domain dimers have only three helices in each bundle. The PH domain is located at the opposite ends of the BAR domain dimer. Yeast two-hybrid assays confirm the interactions between the BAR and PH domains. Lipid binding assays show that the BAR, PH, and PTB domains can bind phospholipids. The ability of APPL1 to interact with multiple signaling molecules and phospholipids supports an important role for this adaptor in cell signaling.

  3. Dual N- and C-terminal helices are required for endoplasmic reticulum and lipid droplet association of alcohol acetyltransferases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyun-Liang Lin

    Full Text Available In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae two alcohol acetyltransferases (AATases, Atf1 and Atf2, condense short chain alcohols with acetyl-CoA to produce volatile acetate esters. Such esters are, in large part, responsible for the distinctive flavors and aromas of fermented beverages including beer, wine, and sake. Atf1 and Atf2 localize to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Atf1 is known to localize to lipid droplets (LDs. The mechanism and function of these localizations are unknown. Here, we investigate potential mechanisms of Atf1 and Atf2 membrane association. Segments of the N- and C-terminal domains of Atf1 (residues 24-41 and 508-525, respectively are predicted to be amphipathic helices. Truncations of these helices revealed that the terminal domains are essential for ER and LD association. Moreover, mutations of the basic or hydrophobic residues in the N-terminal helix and hydrophobic residues in the C-terminal helix disrupted ER association and subsequent sorting from the ER to LDs. Similar amphipathic helices are found at both ends of Atf2, enabling ER and LD association. As was the case with Atf1, mutations to the N- and C-terminal helices of Atf2 prevented membrane association. Sequence comparison of the AATases from Saccharomyces, non-Saccharomyces yeast (K. lactis and P. anomala and fruits species (C. melo and S. lycopersicum showed that only AATases from Saccharomyces evolved terminal amphipathic helices. Heterologous expression of these orthologs in S. cerevisiae revealed that the absence of terminal amphipathic helices eliminates LD association. Combined, the results of this study suggest a common mechanism of membrane association for AATases via dual N- and C-terminal amphipathic helices.

  4. C-terminal KDEL-modified cystatin C is retained in transfected CHO cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Teit Eliot; Vogel, Charlotte Katrine; Schwartz, Thue W.

    1990-01-01

    The significance of a C-terminal tetrapeptide, Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu (KDEL), as a retention signal for the endoplasmatic reticulum was studied using cystatin C, a general thiol protease inhibitor, as the reporter protein. Clones of CHO cells were analyzed after stable transfection with eukaryotic...... expression vectors encoding either cystatin C, KDEL extended cystatin C, or cystatin C extended with a control sequence. It is concluded that cystatin C with the KDEL tetrapeptide as a C-terminal extension is retained intracellularly without apparent accumulation of the molecule....

  5. Change in structure and ligand binding properties of hyperstable cytochrome c555 from Aquifex aeolicus by domain swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Masaru; Nagao, Satoshi; Komori, Hirofumi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome c555 from hyperthermophilic bacteria Aquifex aeolicus (AA cyt c555 ) is a hyperstable protein belonging to the cyt c protein family, which possesses a unique long 310 -α-310 helix containing the heme-ligating Met61. Herein, we show that AA cyt c555 forms dimers by swapping the region containing the extra 310 -α-310 helix and C-terminal α-helix. The asymmetric unit of the crystal of dimeric AA cyt c555 contained two dimer structures, where the structure of the hinge region (Val53-Lys57) was different among all four protomers. Dimeric AA cyt c555 dissociated to monomers at 92 ± 1°C according to DSC measurements, showing that the dimer was thermostable. According to CD measurements, the secondary structures of dimeric AA cyt c555 were maintained at pH 2.2-11.0. CN(-) and CO bound to dimeric AA cyt c555 in the ferric and ferrous states, respectively, owing to the flexibility of the hinge region close to Met61 in the dimer, whereas these ligands did not bind to the monomer under the same conditions. In addition, CN(-) and CO bound to the oxidized and reduced dimer at neutral pH and a wide range of pH (pH 2.2-11.0), respectively, in a wide range of temperature (25-85°C), owing to the thermostability and pH tolerance of the dimer. These results show that the ligand binding character of hyperstable AA cyt c555 changes upon dimerization by domain swapping. PMID:25586341

  6. Heterotic domain wall solutions and SU(3) structure manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, James; Lust, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    We examine compactifications of heterotic string theory on manifolds with SU(3) structure. In particular, we study N = 1/2 domain wall solutions which correspond to the perturbative vacua of the 4D, N =1 supersymmetric theories associated to these compactifications. We extend work which has appeared previously in the literature in two important regards. Firstly, we include two additional fluxes which have been, heretofore, omitted in the general analysis of this situation. This allows for solutions with more general torsion classes than have previously been found. Secondly, we provide explicit solutions for the fluxes as a function of the torsion classes. These solutions are particularly useful in deciding whether equations such as the Bianchi identities can be solved, in addition to the Killing spinor equations themselves. Our work can be used to straightforwardly decide whether any given SU(3) structure on a six-dimensional manifold is associated with a solution to heterotic string theory. To illustrate how...

  7. Production of Slit2 LRR domains in mammalian cells for structural studies and the structure of human Slit2 domain 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlot, Cecile; Hemrika, Wieger; Romijn, Roland A; Gros, Piet; Cusack, Stephen; McCarthy, Andrew A

    2007-09-01

    Slit2 and Roundabout 1 (Robo1) provide a key ligand-receptor interaction for the navigation of commissural neurons during the development of the central nervous system. Slit2 is a large multidomain protein containing an unusual domain organization of four tandem leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains at its N-terminus. These domains are well known to mediate protein-protein interactions; indeed, the Robo1-binding region has been mapped to the concave face of the second LRR domain. It has also been shown that the fourth LRR domain may mediate Slit dimerization and that both the first and second domains can bind heparin. Thus, while roles have been ascribed for three of the LRR domains, there is still no known role for the third domain. Each of the four LRR domains from human Slit2 have now been successfully expressed in milligram quantities using expression in mammalian cells. Here, the crystallization of the second and third LRR domains and the structure of the third LRR domain are presented. This is the first structure of an LRR domain from human Slit2, which has an extra repeat compared with the Drosophila homologue. It is proposed that a highly conserved patch of surface residues on the concave face may mediate any protein-protein interactions involving this LRR domain, a result that will be useful in guiding further studies on Slit2.

  8. Evaluation of Heavy-Chain C-Terminal Deletion on Product Quality and Pharmacokinetics of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoying; Yu, Christopher; Yadav, Daniela B; Hu, Zhilan; Amurao, Annamarie; Duenas, Eileen; Wong, Marc; Iverson, Mark; Zheng, Kai; Lam, Xanthe; Chen, Jia; Vega, Roxanne; Ulufatu, Sheila; Leddy, Cecilia; Davis, Helen; Shen, Amy; Wong, Pin Y; Harris, Reed; Wang, Y John; Li, Dongwei

    2016-07-01

    Due to their potential influence on stability, pharmacokinetics, and product consistency, antibody charge variants have attracted considerable attention in the biotechnology industry. Subtle to significant differences in the level of charge variants and new charge variants under various cell culture conditions are often observed during routine manufacturing or process changes and pose a challenge when demonstrating product comparability. To explore potential solutions to control charge heterogeneity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with native, wild-type C-termini, and mutants with C-terminal deletions of either lysine or lysine and glycine were constructed, expressed, purified, and characterized in vitro and in vivo. Analytical and physiological characterization demonstrated that the mAb mutants had greatly reduced levels of basic variants without decreasing antibody biologic activity, structural stability, pharmacokinetics, or subcutaneous bioavailability in rats. This study provides a possible solution to mitigate mAb heterogeneity in C-terminal processing, improve batch-to-batch consistency, and facilitate the comparability study during process changes. PMID:27262204

  9. The E2-25K ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain aids in polyubiquitin chain synthesis and linkage specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → We examine the role of a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain in an E2 enzyme. → The E2-25K UBA domain directs polyubiquitin chain linkage specificity. → The E2-25K UBA domain regulates length of polyubiquitin chains synthesized. -- Abstract: E2-25K is an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with the ability to synthesize Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chains. E2-25K and its homologs represent the only known E2 enzymes which contain a C-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain as well as the conserved catalytic ubiquitin-conjugating (UBC) domain. As an additional non-covalent binding surface for ubiquitin, the UBA domain must provide some functional specialization. We mapped the protein-protein interface involved in the E2-25K UBA/ubiquitin complex by solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and subsequently modeled the structure of the complex. Domain-domain interactions between the E2-25K catalytic UBC domain and the UBA domain do not induce significant structural changes in the UBA domain or alter the affinity of the UBA domain for ubiquitin. We determined that one of the roles of the C-terminal UBA domain, in the context of E2-25K, is to increase processivity in Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chain synthesis, possibly through increased binding to the ubiquitinated substrate. Additionally, we see evidence that the UBA domain directs specificity in polyubiquitin chain linkage.

  10. Synapse associated protein 102 (SAP102 binds the C-terminal part of the scaffolding protein neurobeachin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Lauks

    Full Text Available Neurobeachin (Nbea is a multidomain scaffold protein abundant in the brain, where it is highly expressed during development. Nbea-null mice have severe defects in neuromuscular synaptic transmission resulting in lethal paralysis of the newborns. Recently, it became clear that Nbea is important also for the functioning of central synapses, where it is suggested to play a role in trafficking membrane proteins to both, the pre- and post-synaptic sites. So far, only few binding partners of Nbea have been found and the precise mechanism of their trafficking remains unclear. Here, we used mass spectrometry to identify SAP102, a MAGUK protein implicated in trafficking of the ionotropic glutamate AMPA- and NMDA-type receptors during synaptogenesis, as a novel Nbea interacting protein in mouse brain. Experiments in heterologous cells confirmed this interaction and revealed that SAP102 binds to the C-terminal part of Nbea that contains the DUF, PH, BEACH and WD40 domains. Furthermore, we discovered that introducing a mutation in Nbea's PH domain, which disrupts its interaction with the BEACH domain, abolishes this binding, thereby creating an excellent starting point to further investigate Nbea-SAP102 function in the central nervous system.

  11. The HhH domain of the human DNA repair protein XPF forms stable homodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Devashish; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2008-03-01

    The human XPF-ERCC1 protein complex plays an essential role in nucleotide excision repair by catalysing positioned nicking of a DNA strand at the 5' side of the damage. We have recently solved the structure of the heterodimeric complex of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1 (Tripsianes et al., Structure 2005;13:1849-1858). We found that this complex comprises a pseudo twofold symmetry axis and that the helix-hairpin-helix motif of ERCC1 is required for DNA binding, whereas the corresponding domain of XPF is functioning as a scaffold for complex formation with ERCC1. Despite the functional importance of heterodimerization, the C-terminal domain of XPF can also form homodimers in vitro. We here compare the stabilities of homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1. The higher stability of the XPF HhH complexes under various experimental conditions, determined using CD and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, is well explained by the structural differences that exist between the HhH domains of the two complexes. The XPF HhH homodimer has a larger interaction interface, aromatic stacking interactions, and additional hydrogen bond contacts as compared to the XPF/ERCC1 HhH complex, which accounts for its higher stability.

  12. Protein C-terminal labeling and biotinylation using synthetic peptide and split-intein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Volkmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Site-specific protein labeling or modification can facilitate the characterization of proteins with respect to their structure, folding, and interaction with other proteins. However, current methods of site-specific protein labeling are few and with limitations, therefore new methods are needed to satisfy the increasing need and sophistications of protein labeling. METHODOLOGY: A method of protein C-terminal labeling was developed using a non-canonical split-intein, through an intein-catalyzed trans-splicing reaction between a protein and a small synthetic peptide carrying the desired labeling groups. As demonstrations of this method, three different proteins were efficiently labeled at their C-termini with two different labels (fluorescein and biotin either in solution or on a solid surface, and a transferrin receptor protein was labeled on the membrane surface of live mammalian cells. Protein biotinylation and immobilization on a streptavidin-coated surface were also achieved in a cell lysate without prior purification of the target protein. CONCLUSIONS: We have produced a method of site-specific labeling or modification at the C-termini of recombinant proteins. This method compares favorably with previous protein labeling methods and has several unique advantages. It is expected to have many potential applications in protein engineering and research, which include fluorescent labeling for monitoring protein folding, location, and trafficking in cells, and biotinylation for protein immobilization on streptavidin-coated surfaces including protein microchips. The types of chemical labeling may be limited only by the ability of chemical synthesis to produce the small C-intein peptide containing the desired chemical groups.

  13. A C-terminal truncated mutation of spr-3 gene extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Yang; Ruilin Sun; Minghui Yao; Weidong Chen; Zhugang Wang; Jian Fei

    2013-01-01

    The lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans is determined by various genetic and environmental factors.In this paper,spr-3,a C.elegans homologous gene of the mammalian neural restrictive silencing factor (NRSF/REST),is reported to be an important gene regulating lifespan of C.elegans.A deletion mutation ofspr-3,spr-3(ok2525),or RNAi inhibition of spr-3 expression led to the short lifespan phenotype in C.elegans.However,a nonsense mutation of spr-3,spr3(by108),increased the lifespan by 26% when compared with that of wild-type nematode.The spr-3(by108) also showed increased resistance to environmental stress.The spr-3(by108) mutated gene encodes a C-terminal truncated protein with a structure comparable with the REST4,a splice variant of the NRSF/REST in mammalian.The long lifespan phenotype of spr-3(by108) mutant is confirmed as a gain of function and dependent on normal functions of daf16 and glp-1.The lifespan of the spr-3(by108) can be synergistically enhanced by inducing a mutation in daf-2.Quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the expression of daf-16 as well as its target gene sod-3,mtl1,and sip-1 was up-regulated in the spr-3(by108) mutant.These results would be helpful to further understand the complex function of NRSF/REST gene in mammalian,especially in the aging process and longevity determination.

  14. Influence of domain interactions on conformational mobility of the progesterone receptor detected by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Devrishi; Callaway, Celetta; Pascal, Bruce D; Kumar, Raj; Edwards, Dean P.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    Structural and functional details of the N-terminal activation function 1 (AF1) of most nuclear receptors are poorly understood due to the highly dynamic intrinsically disordered nature of this domain. A hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry based investigation of TATA box binding protein (TBP) interaction with various domains of progesterone receptor (PR) demonstrate that agonist bound PR interaction with TBP via AF1 impacts the mobility of the C-terminal AF2. Results from HDX ...

  15. Antibodies against the C-terminal peptide of rabbit oviductin inhibit mouse early embryo development to pass 2-cell stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A full-length rabbit oviductin cDNA(1909bp) was cloned. It consists of a 5'-UTR of 52bp, an open reading frame (ORF) of 1374bp and a 3'-UTR of 483bp and has more than 80% homology with that of other mammal oviductins. N-terminal peptide (NTP) (384 residues) and C-terminal peptide (CTP)(73 residues) of deduced protein precursor has about 80% and 50% identity with that of other mammals respectively. Fusion proteins GST-NTP 368(1R-368N)and GST-CTP73 (369F-441A) were expressed and purified. NH2-terminal of CTP sequencing reveals that the purified protein is consistent with the deduced one. In order to study the function of NTP and CTP the mouse anti-NTP and rabbit anti-CTP antisera were prepared. Tissue-specific (skeleton muscle, oviduct, uterus, ovary, liver, heart and brain) analysis indicated that rabbit oviductin was only found in oviduct. The conditioned medium derived from the rabbit oviduct mucosa epithelial cells has a function of overcoming the early embryonic development block of Kunming mouse cultured in vitro. Anti-CTP antiserum could totally inhibit the early embryo development at 2-cell stage cultured in the conditioned culture medium, but anti-NTP antiserum couldn't. There was a positive relationship between the ratio of early embryos at development block and the dosage of anti-CTP antiserum added in the conditioned culture medium. These results suggest that oviductin has a function not only on fertilization, but also on the release of early embryonic development block, and the later function domain of rabbit oviductin may be situate in its C-terminal.

  16. Structural Basis of Actin Filament Nucleation by Tandem W Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorui Chen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous nucleation of actin is very inefficient in cells. To overcome this barrier, cells have evolved a set of actin filament nucleators to promote rapid nucleation and polymerization in response to specific stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of actin nucleation remains poorly understood. This is hindered largely by the fact that actin nucleus, once formed, rapidly polymerizes into filament, thus making it impossible to capture stable multisubunit actin nucleus. Here, we report an effective double-mutant strategy to stabilize actin nucleus by preventing further polymerization. Employing this strategy, we solved the crystal structure of AMPPNP-actin in complex with the first two tandem W domains of Cordon-bleu (Cobl, a potent actin filament nucleator. Further sequence comparison and functional studies suggest that the nucleation mechanism of Cobl is probably shared by the p53 cofactor JMY, but not Spire. Moreover, the double-mutant strategy opens the way for atomic mechanistic study of actin nucleation and polymerization.

  17. Non-overlapping domain decomposition methods in structural mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gosselet, Pierre; 10.1007/BF02905857

    2012-01-01

    The modern design of industrial structures leads to very complex simulations characterized by nonlinearities, high heterogeneities, tortuous geometries... Whatever the modelization may be, such an analysis leads to the solution to a family of large ill-conditioned linear systems. In this paper we study strategies to efficiently solve to linear system based on non-overlapping domain decomposition methods. We present a review of most employed approaches and their strong connections. We outline their mechanical interpretations as well as the practical issues when willing to implement and use them. Numerical properties are illustrated by various assessments from academic to industrial problems. An hybrid approach, mainly designed for multifield problems, is also introduced as it provides a general framework of such approaches.

  18. Autotransporters with GDSL passenger domains: molecular physiology and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Susanne; Rosenau, Frank; Kolmar, Harald; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2011-07-01

    Autotransporters are large proteins produced and secreted by Gram-negative bacteria. They consist of an N-terminal passenger domain, which typically harbours enzymatic activity and exerts a virulence function, and a C-terminal membrane anchor domain. Somehow, the membrane domain facilitates the transport of the passenger domain into the extracellular space. Several autotransporters possess hydrolase passenger domains that belong to the GDSL family of lipolytic enzymes. GDSL autotransporters represent a functionally distinct family and are characterized by several features of their passenger domains; these include 1) the absence of a conserved right-handed parallel β-helix, 2) lipolytic activity, and thus the capability to hydrolyse membranes, and 3) covalent attachment to the respective C-terminal β-domain, with the hydrolase domain exposed to the exterior. The esterase EstA of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a typical enzyme of this type. Its physiological role was studied, its potential biotechnological application has been demonstrated, and its crystal structure was solved recently. Furthermore, it is capable of displaying different classes of enzymes in a range of Gram-negative bacteria including Escherichia coli, and FACS-based high-throughput screening for enantioselective esterases could be achieved using EstA. PMID:21598370

  19. α-Helical to β-Helical Conformation Change in the C-Terminal of the Mammalian Prion Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jesse; Whitford, Paul; Hayre, Natha; Cox, Daniel; Onuchic, José.

    2011-03-01

    We employ all-atom structure-based models with mixed basis contact maps to explore whether there are any significant geometric or energetic constraints limiting conjectured conformational transitions between the alpha-helical (α H) and the left handed beta helical (LHBH) conformations for the C-terminal (residues 166-226) of the mammalian prion protein. The LHBH structure has been proposed to describe infectious oligomers and one class of in vitro grown fibrils, as well as possibly self- templating the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to the infectious form. Our results confirm that the kinetics of the conformation change are not strongely limited by large scale geometry modification and there exists an overall preference for the LHBH conformation.

  20. C-terminal residues of plant glutamate decarboxylase are required for oligomerization of a high-molecular weight complex and for activation by calcium/calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zik, Moriyah; Fridmann-Sirkis, Yael; Fromm, Hillel

    2006-05-01

    Bacterial glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is a homohexameric enzyme of about 330 kDa. Plant GAD differs from the bacterial enzyme in having a C-terminal extension of 33 amino acids within which resides a calmodulin (CaM)-binding domain. In order to assess the role of the C-terminal extension in the formation of GAD complexes and in activation by Ca2+/CaM, we examined complexes formed with the purified full-length recombinant petunia GAD expressed in E. coli, and with a 9 amino acid C-terminal deletion mutant (GADDeltaC9). Size exclusion chromatography revealed that the full-length GAD formed complexes of about 580 kDa and 300 kDa in the absence of Ca2+/CaM, whereas in the presence of Ca2+/CaM all complexes shifted to approximately 680 kDa. With deletion of 9 amino acids from the C-terminus (KKKKTNRVC(500)), the ability to bind CaM in the presence of Ca2+, and to purify it by CaM-affinity chromatography was retained, but the formation of GAD complexes larger than 340 kDa and enzyme activation by Ca2+/CaM were completely abolished. Hence, responsiveness to Ca2+/CaM is associated with the formation of protein complexes of 680 kDa, and requires some or all of the nine C-terminal amino acid residues. We suggest that evolution of plant GAD from a bacterial ancestral enzyme involved the formation of higher molecular weight complexes required for activation by Ca2+/CaM.

  1. Mapping the structural and dynamical features of kinesin motor domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Scarabelli

    Full Text Available Kinesin motor proteins drive intracellular transport by coupling ATP hydrolysis to conformational changes that mediate directed movement along microtubules. Characterizing these distinct conformations and their interconversion mechanism is essential to determining an atomic-level model of kinesin action. Here we report a comprehensive principal component analysis of 114 experimental structures along with the results of conventional and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations that together map the structural dynamics of the kinesin motor domain. All experimental structures were found to reside in one of three distinct conformational clusters (ATP-like, ADP-like and Eg5 inhibitor-bound. These groups differ in the orientation of key functional elements, most notably the microtubule binding α4-α5, loop8 subdomain and α2b-β4-β6-β7 motor domain tip. Group membership was found not to correlate with the nature of the bound nucleotide in a given structure. However, groupings were coincident with distinct neck-linker orientations. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of ATP, ADP and nucleotide free Eg5 indicate that all three nucleotide states could sample the major crystallographically observed conformations. Differences in the dynamic coupling of distal sites were also evident. In multiple ATP bound simulations, the neck-linker, loop8 and the α4-α5 subdomain display correlated motions that are absent in ADP bound simulations. Further dissection of these couplings provides evidence for a network of dynamic communication between the active site, microtubule-binding interface and neck-linker via loop7 and loop13. Additional simulations indicate that the mutations G325A and G326A in loop13 reduce the flexibility of these regions and disrupt their couplings. Our combined results indicate that the reported ATP and ADP-like conformations of kinesin are intrinsically accessible regardless of nucleotide state and support a model where neck

  2. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H. (Toronto); (Dundee)

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  3. The Human Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter (hSGLT1) Is a Disulfide-Bridged Homodimer with a Re-Entrant C-Terminal Loop

    OpenAIRE

    Sasseville, Louis J.; Michael Morin; Coady, Michael J.; Rikard Blunck; Jean-Yves Lapointe

    2016-01-01

    Na-coupled cotransporters are proteins that use the trans-membrane electrochemical gradient of Na to activate the transport of a second solute. The sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) constitutes a well-studied prototype of this transport mechanism but essential molecular characteristics, namely its quaternary structure and the exact arrangement of the C-terminal transmembrane segments, are still debated. After expression in Xenopus oocytes, human SGLT1 molecules (hSGLT1) were labelled on ...

  4. NMR structure of a complex between the VirB9/VirB7 interaction domains of the pKM101 type IV secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Richard; Harris, Richard; Coutte, Loic; Monier, Amy; Fronzes, Remi; Christie, Peter J; Driscoll, Paul C; Waksman, Gabriel

    2007-01-30

    Type IV secretion (T4S) systems translocate DNA and protein effectors through the double membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The paradigmatic T4S system in Agrobacterium tumefaciens is assembled from 11 VirB subunits and VirD4. Two subunits, VirB9 and VirB7, form an important stabilizing complex in the outer membrane. We describe here the NMR structure of a complex between the C-terminal domain of the VirB9 homolog TraO (TraO(CT)), bound to VirB7-like TraN from plasmid pKM101. TraO(CT) forms a beta-sandwich around which TraN winds. Structure-based mutations in VirB7 and VirB9 of A. tumefaciens show that the heterodimer interface is conserved. Opposite this interface, the TraO structure shows a protruding three-stranded beta-appendage, and here, we supply evidence that the corresponding region of VirB9 of A. tumefaciens inserts in the membrane and protrudes extracellularly. This complex structure elucidates the molecular basis for the interaction between two essential components of a T4S system. PMID:17244707

  5. Conformational instability of the MARK3 UBA domain compromises ubiquitin recognition and promotes interaction with the adjacent kinase domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, James M.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Briant, Douglas J.; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Sicheri, Frank; Kay, Lewis E.; Pawson, Tony (Mount Sinai Hospital); (Toronto)

    2012-10-23

    The Par-1/MARK protein kinases play a pivotal role in establishing cellular polarity. This family of kinases contains a unique domain architecture, in which a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain is located C-terminal to the kinase domain. We have used a combination of x-ray crystallography and NMR dynamics experiments to understand the interaction of the human (h) MARK3 UBA domain with the adjacent kinase domain as compared with ubiquitin. The x-ray crystal structure of the linked hMARK3 kinase and UBA domains establishes that the UBA domain forms a stable intramolecular interaction with the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. However, solution-state NMR studies of the isolated UBA domain indicate that it is highly dynamic, undergoing conformational transitions that can be explained by a folding-unfolding equilibrium. NMR titration experiments indicated that the hMARK3 UBA domain has a detectable but extremely weak affinity for mono ubiquitin, which suggests that conformational instability of the isolated hMARK3 UBA domain attenuates binding to ubiquitin despite the presence of residues typically involved in ubiquitin recognition. Our data identify a molecular mechanism through which the hMARK3 UBA domain has evolved to bind the kinase domain, in a fashion that stabilizes an open conformation of the N- and C-terminal lobes, at the expense of its capacity to engage ubiquitin. These results may be relevant more generally to the 30% of UBA domains that lack significant ubiquitin-binding activity, and they suggest a unique mechanism by which interaction domains may evolve new binding properties.

  6. Domain structure and magnetic anisotropy fluctuations in (Ga,Mn)As : effect of annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Dourlat, Alexandre; Jeudy, Vincent; Testelin, Christophe; Bernardot, Frédéric; Bernardot, Frédérick; Khazen, Khashayar; Gourdon, Catherine; Thevenard, Laura; Largeau, Ludovic; Mauguin, Olivia; Lemaître, Aristide

    2007-01-01

    International audience We investigate the effect of post-growth annealing on the magnetic domain structure and magnetization reversal process of (Ga,Mn)As epilayers grown with tensile strain on a (Ga,In)As buffer. In the case of perpendicular magnetic easy-axis, annealing drastically changes the domain structure observed at magnetization reversal. In as-grown samples, strongly anisotropic domain growth is observed. Dendritic-like domain expansion with guided branching along the directions...

  7. Time-domain seismic reliability of nonlinear structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Achintya Haldar; Jungwon Huh; Ali Mehrabian

    2006-08-01

    A novel reliability analysis technique is presented to estimate the reliability of real structural systems. Its unique feature is that the dynamic loadings can be applied in time domain. It is a nonlinear stochastic finite element logarithm combined with the response surface method (RSM). It generates the response surface around the most probable failure point and incorporates information of the distribution of the random variables in the RSM formulation. It is verified using the Monte Carlo simulation technique, and is found to be very efficient and accurate. Most sources of nonlinearlity and uncertainty can be explicitly incorporated in the formulation. The flexibility of connections, represented by moment-relative rotation $(M–\\theta )$ curves, is addressed. After the Northridge earthquake of 1994, several improved steel connections were proposed. Structural Sesimic Design Associates (SSDA) tested several full-scale proprietory slotted web beam–column connections. The authors suggested $(M–\\theta )$ curves for this connection using actual test data. Behaviours of steel frames, assuming the connections are fully restrained, partially restrained, consisting of pre- and post-Northridge connections are evaluated and compared. Desirable features of the post-Northridge connections observed during testing are analytically confirmed. Laterally weak steel frame is then strengthened with concrete shear walls. Capabilities and the advanced nature of the method are demonstrated with the help of realistic examples.

  8. Improving protein structure similarity searches using domain boundaries based on conserved sequence information

    OpenAIRE

    Madej Tom; Wang Yanli; Thompson Kenneth; Bryant Stephen H

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The identification of protein domains plays an important role in protein structure comparison. Domain query size and composition are critical to structure similarity search algorithms such as the Vector Alignment Search Tool (VAST), the method employed for computing related protein structures in NCBI Entrez system. Currently, domains identified on the basis of structural compactness are used for VAST computations. In this study, we have investigated how alternative definit...

  9. The 14-3-3 protein interacts directly with the C-terminal region of the plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, T.; Fuglsang, A.T.; Olsson, A.;

    1997-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that 14-3-3 proteins are involved in the regulation of plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity. However, it is not known whether the 14-3-3 protein interacts directly or indirectly with the H(+)-ATPase. In this study, detergent-solubilized plasma membrane H(+)-AT...... plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. We propose that the 14-3-3 protein is a natural ligand of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, regulating proton pumping by displacing the C-terminal autoinhibitory domain of the H(+)-ATPase....

  10. Structures of heterodimeric POZ domains of Miz1/BCL6 and Miz1/NAC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Mark Alexander; Wright, Stephanie Claire

    2014-12-01

    The POZ domain is an evolutionarily conserved protein-protein interaction domain that is found in approximately 40 mammalian transcription factors. POZ domains mediate both homodimerization and the heteromeric interactions of different POZ-domain transcription factors with each other. Miz1 is a POZ-domain transcription factor that regulates cell-cycle arrest and DNA-damage responses. The activities of Miz1 are altered by its interaction with the POZ-domain transcriptional repressors BCL6 and NAC1, and these interactions have been implicated in tumourigenesis in B-cell lymphomas and in ovarian serous carcinomas that overexpress BCL6 and NAC1, respectively. A strategy for the purification of tethered POZ domains that form forced heterodimers is described, and crystal structures of the heterodimeric POZ domains of Miz1/BCL6 and of Miz1/NAC1 are reported. These structures will be relevant for the design of therapeutics that target POZ-domain interaction interfaces.

  11. Graphene on C-terminated face of 4H-SiC observed by noncontact scanning nonlinear dielectric potentiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasue, Kohei; Fukidome, Hirokazu; Tashima, Keiichiro; Suemitsu, Maki; Cho, Yasuo

    2016-08-01

    We studied graphene synthesized on the C-terminated face (C-face) of a 4H-SiC substrate by noncontact scanning nonlinear dielectric potentiometry. As already reported by other researchers, multilayer graphene sheets with moiré patterns were observed in our sample, which indicates the existence of rotational disorder between adjacent layers. We found that the potentials of graphene on the C-face are almost neutral and significantly smaller than those observed on the Si-terminated face (Si-face). In addition, the neutrality of potentials is not affected by various topographic features underlying the multilayer graphene sheets. These results indicate that graphene on the C-face of SiC is decoupled or screened from the underlying structures and substrate, unlike graphene on the Si-face.

  12. Molecular basis for TPR domain-mediated regulation of protein phosphatase 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Roe, S Mark; Cliff, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A; Ladbury, John E; Cohen, Patricia T W; Barford, David

    2005-01-12

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain N-terminal to its phosphatase domain. Ppp5 functions in signalling pathways that control cellular responses to stress, glucocorticoids and DNA damage. Its phosphatase activity is suppressed by an autoinhibited conformation maintained by the TPR domain and a C-terminal subdomain. By interacting with the TPR domain, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and fatty acids including arachidonic acid stimulate phosphatase activity. Here, we describe the structure of the autoinhibited state of Ppp5, revealing mechanisms of TPR-mediated phosphatase inhibition and Hsp90- and arachidonic acid-induced stimulation of phosphatase activity. The TPR domain engages with the catalytic channel of the phosphatase domain, restricting access to the catalytic site. This autoinhibited conformation of Ppp5 is stabilised by the C-terminal alphaJ helix that contacts a region of the Hsp90-binding groove on the TPR domain. Hsp90 activates Ppp5 by disrupting TPR-phosphatase domain interactions, permitting substrate access to the constitutively active phosphatase domain, whereas arachidonic acid prompts an alternate conformation of the TPR domain, destabilising the TPR-phosphatase domain interface.

  13. Structural and functional diversity of Topologically Associating Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Job; Heard, Edith

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that chromosomes in a range of organisms are compartmentalized in different types of chromatin domains. In mammals, chromosomes form compartments that are composed of smaller Topologically Associating Domains (TADs). TADs are thought to represent functional domains of gene regulation but much is still unknown about the mechanisms of their formation and how they exert their regulatory effect on embedded genes. Further, similar domains have been detected in other organisms, including flies, worms, fungi and bacteria. Although in all these cases these domains appear similar as detected by 3C-based methods, their biology appears to be quite distinct with differences in the protein complexes involved in their formation and differences in their internal organization. Here we outline our current understanding of such domains in different organisms and their roles in gene regulation. PMID:26348399

  14. C-Terminally modified peptides via cleavage of the HMBA linker by O-, i>N>- or S-nucleophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Diness, Frederik; Meldal, Morten Peter

    2016-01-01

    A large variety of C-terminally modified peptides was obtained by nucleophilic cleavage of the ester bond in solid phase linked peptide esters of 4-hydroxymethyl benzamide (HMBA). The developed methods provided peptides, C-terminally functionalized as esters, amides and thioesters, with high puri...

  15. Activation of human acid sphingomyelinase through modification or deletion of C-terminal cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Huawei; Edmunds, Tim; Baker-Malcolm, Jennifer; Karey, Kenneth P; Estes, Scott; Schwarz, Cordula; Hughes, Heather; Van Patten, Scott M

    2003-08-29

    One form of Niemann-Pick disease is caused by a deficiency in the enzymatic activity of acid sphingomyelinase. During efforts to develop an enzyme replacement therapy based on a recombinant form of human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM), purified preparations of the recombinant enzyme were found to have substantially increased specific activity if cell harvest media were stored for several weeks at -20 degrees C prior to purification. This increase in activity was found to correlate with the loss of the single free thiol on rhASM, suggesting the involvement of a cysteine residue. It was demonstrated that a variety of chemical modifications of the free cysteine on rhASM all result in substantial activation of the enzyme, and the modified cysteine responsible for this activation was shown to be the C-terminal residue (Cys629). Activation was also achieved by copper-promoted dimerization of rhASM (via cysteine) and by C-terminal truncation using carboxypeptidase Y. The role of the C-terminal cysteine in activation was confirmed by creating mutant forms of rhASM in which this residue was either deleted or replaced by a serine, with both forms having substantially higher specific activity than wild-type rhASM. These results indicate that purified rhASM can be activated in vitro by loss of the free thiol on the C-terminal cysteine via chemical modification, dimerization, or deletion of this amino acid residue. This method of activation is similar to the cysteine switch mechanism described previously for matrix metalloproteinases and could represent a means of posttranslational regulation of ASM activity in vivo.

  16. C-terminal fluorescent labeling impairs functionality of DNA mismatch repair proteins.

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    Angela Brieger

    Full Text Available The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR process is crucial to maintain the integrity of the genome and requires many different proteins which interact perfectly and coordinated. Germline mutations in MMR genes are responsible for the development of the hereditary form of colorectal cancer called Lynch syndrome. Various mutations mainly in two MMR proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, have been identified so far, whereas 55% are detected within MLH1, the essential component of the heterodimer MutLα (MLH1 and PMS2. Most of those MLH1 variants are pathogenic but the relevance of missense mutations often remains unclear. Many different recombinant systems are applied to filter out disease-associated p