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Sample records for c-terminal domain structure

  1. C-terminal domains of bacterial proteases: structure, function and the biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Wu, C; Liu, D; Yang, X; Wu, R; Zhang, J; Ma, C; He, H

    2017-01-01

    C-terminal domains widely exist in the C-terminal region of multidomain proteases. As a β-sandwich domain in multidomain protease, the C-terminal domain plays an important role in proteolysis including regulation of the secretory process, anchoring and swelling the substrate molecule, presenting as an inhibitor for the preprotease and adapting the protein structural flexibility and stability. In this review, the diversity, structural characteristics and biological function of C-terminal protease domains are described. Furthermore, the application prospects of C-terminal domains, including polycystic kidney disease, prepeptidase C-terminal and collagen-binding domain, in the area of medicine and biological artificial materials are also discussed. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Resonance assignments and secondary structure of apolipoprotein E C-terminal domain in DHPC micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chi-Jen; Chyan, Chia-Lin; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chang, Chi-Fon; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lin, Ta-Hsien

    2015-04-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) has been known to play a key role in the transport of plasma cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism. It is an apolipoprotein of 299 amino acids with a molecular mass, ~34 kDa. ApoE has three major isoforms, apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4 which differ only at residue 112 or 158. ApoE consists of two independently folded domains (N-terminal and C-terminal domain) separated by a hinge region. The N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain of apoE are responsible for the binding to receptor and to lipid, respectively. Since the high resolution structures of apoE in lipids are still unavailable to date, we therefore aim to resolve the structures in lipids by NMR. Here, we reported the resonance assignments and secondary structure distribution of the C-terminal domain of wild-type human apoE (residue 195-299) in the micelles formed by dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine. Our results may provide a novel structural model of apoE in micelles and may shed new light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the apoE related biological processes.

  3. Structure of the Reston ebolavirus VP30 C-terminal domain

    OpenAIRE

    Clifton, Matthew C.; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Raymond, Amy; Grice, Rena; Barnes, Steve; Moen, Spencer; Lorimer, Don; Edwards, Thomas E.; Peter J Myler; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-01-01

    The ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever. Essential to the ebolavirus life cycle is the protein VP30, which serves as a transcriptional cofactor. Here, the crystal structure of the C-terminal, NP-binding domain of VP30 from Reston ebolavirus is presented. Reston VP30 and Ebola VP30 both form homodimers, but the dimeric interfaces are rotated relative to each other, suggesting subtle inherent differences or flexibility in the dimeric interface.

  4. Structure of the Reston ebolavirus VP30 C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Matthew C; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Raymond, Amy; Grice, Rena; Barnes, Steve; Moen, Spencer; Lorimer, Don; Edwards, Thomas E; Myler, Peter J; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-04-01

    The ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever. Essential to the ebolavirus life cycle is the protein VP30, which serves as a transcriptional cofactor. Here, the crystal structure of the C-terminal, NP-binding domain of VP30 from Reston ebolavirus is presented. Reston VP30 and Ebola VP30 both form homodimers, but the dimeric interfaces are rotated relative to each other, suggesting subtle inherent differences or flexibility in the dimeric interface.

  5. Structural and Functional Comparisons of Retroviral Envelope Protein C-Terminal Domains: Still Much to Learn

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    Jonathan D. Steckbeck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses are a family of viruses that cause a broad range of pathologies in animals and humans, from the apparently harmless, long-term genomic insertion of endogenous retroviruses, to tumors induced by the oncogenic retroviruses and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS resulting from human immunodeficiency virus infection. Disease can be the result of diverse mechanisms, including tumorigenesis induced by viral oncogenes or immune destruction, leading to the gradual loss of CD4 T-cells. Of the virally encoded proteins common to all retroviruses, the envelope (Env displays perhaps the most diverse functionality. Env is primarily responsible for binding the cellular receptor and for effecting the fusion process, with these functions mediated by protein domains localized to the exterior of the virus. The remaining C-terminal domain may have the most variable functionality of all retroviral proteins. The C-terminal domains from three prototypical retroviruses are discussed, focusing on the different structures and functions, which include fusion activation, tumorigenesis and viral assembly and lifecycle influences. Despite these genetic and functional differences, however, the C-terminal domains of these viruses share a common feature in the modulation of Env ectodomain conformation. Despite their differences, perhaps each system still has information to share with the others.

  6. Structure of the C-terminal domain of nsp4 from feline coronavirus

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    Manolaridis, Ioannis; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Panjikar, Santosh [EMBL Hamburg Outstation, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Snijder, Eric J.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E. [Molecular Virology Laboratory, Department of Medical Microbiology, Center of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Berglind, Hanna; Nordlund, Pär [Division of Biophysics, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Scheeles väg 2, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Coutard, Bruno [Laboratoire Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, UMR 6098, AFMB-CNRS-ESIL, Case 925, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille (France); Tucker, Paul A., E-mail: tucker@embl-hamburg.de [EMBL Hamburg Outstation, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-08-01

    The structure of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of nonstructural protein 4 from feline coronavirus has been determined and analyzed. Coronaviruses are a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses that includes important pathogens of humans and other animals. The large coronavirus genome (26–31 kb) encodes 15–16 nonstructural proteins (nsps) that are derived from two replicase polyproteins by autoproteolytic processing. The nsps assemble into the viral replication–transcription complex and nsp3, nsp4 and nsp6 are believed to anchor this enzyme complex to modified intracellular membranes. The largest part of the coronavirus nsp4 subunit is hydrophobic and is predicted to be embedded in the membranes. In this report, a conserved C-terminal domain (∼100 amino-acid residues) has been delineated that is predicted to face the cytoplasm and has been isolated as a soluble domain using library-based construct screening. A prototypical crystal structure at 2.8 Å resolution was obtained using nsp4 from feline coronavirus. Unmodified and SeMet-substituted proteins were crystallized under similar conditions, resulting in tetragonal crystals that belonged to space group P4{sub 3}. The phase problem was initially solved by single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS), followed by molecular replacement using a SIRAS-derived composite model. The structure consists of a single domain with a predominantly α-helical content displaying a unique fold that could be engaged in protein–protein interactions.

  7. Structure of the RecQ C-terminal domain of human Bloom syndrome protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Yong; Hakoshima, Toshio; Kitano, Ken

    2013-11-21

    Bloom syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by genomic instability and cancer predisposition. The disease is caused by mutations of the Bloom syndrome protein (BLM). Here we report the crystal structure of a RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain from human BLM. The structure reveals three novel features of BLM RQC which distinguish it from the previous structures of the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and RECQ1. First, BLM RQC lacks an aromatic residue at the tip of the β-wing, a key element of the RecQ-family helicases used for DNA-strand separation. Second, a BLM-specific insertion between the N-terminal helices exhibits a looping-out structure that extends at right angles to the β-wing. Deletion mutagenesis of this insertion interfered with binding to Holliday junction. Third, the C-terminal region of BLM RQC adopts an extended structure running along the domain surface, which may facilitate the spatial positioning of an HRDC domain in the full-length protein.

  8. Solution structure of the RecQ C-terminal domain of human Bloom syndrome protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chin-Ju; Ko, Junsang; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Choi, Byong-Seok

    2014-02-01

    RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain is known as the main DNA binding module of RecQ helicases such as Bloom syndrome protein (BLM) and Werner syndrome protein (WRN) that recognizes various DNA structures. Even though BLM is able to resolve various DNA structures similarly to WRN, BLM has different binding preferences for DNA substrates from WRN. In this study, we determined the solution structure of the RQC domain of human BLM. The structure shares the common winged-helix motif with other RQC domains. However, half of the N-terminal has unstructured regions (α1-α2 loop and α3 region), and the aromatic side chain on the top of the β-hairpin, which is important for DNA duplex strand separation in other RQC domains, is substituted with a negatively charged residue (D1165) followed by the polar residue (Q1166). The structurally distinctive features of the RQC domain of human BLM suggest that the DNA binding modes of the BLM RQC domain may be different from those of other RQC domains.

  9. Solution structure and Rpn1 interaction of the UBL domain of human RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hye Yun

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-like modifier (UBL domain of ubiquitin-like domain proteins (UDPs interacts specifically with subunits of the 26 S proteasome. A novel UDP, ubiquitin-like domain-containing C-terminal domain phosphatase (UBLCP1, has been identified as an interacting partner of the 26 S proteasome. We determined the high-resolution solution structure of the UBL domain of human UBLCP1 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The UBL domain of hUBLCP1 has a unique β-strand (β3 and β3-α2 loop, instead of the canonical β4 observed in other UBL domains. The molecular topology and secondary structures are different from those of known UBL domains including that of fly UBLCP1. Data from backbone dynamics shows that the β3-α2 loop is relatively rigid although it might have intrinsic dynamic profile. The positively charged residues of the β3-α2 loop are involved in interacting with the C-terminal leucine-rich repeat-like domain of Rpn1.

  10. Solution structure and dynamics of C-terminal regulatory domain of Vibrio vulnificus extracellular metalloprotease

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    Yun, Ji-Hye; Kim, Heeyoun [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung Eun [Department of Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Sup, E-mail: jsplee@mail.chosun.ac.kr [Department of Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Weontae, E-mail: wlee@spin.yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have determined solution structures of vEP C-terminal regulatory domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 has a compact {beta}-barrel structure with eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution structure of vEP C-ter100 shares its molecular topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residues in the {beta}3 region of vEP C-ter100 might be important in putative ligand/receptor binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron ion. -- Abstract: An extracellular metalloprotease (vEP) secreted by Vibrio vulnificus ATCC29307 is a 45-kDa proteolytic enzyme that has prothrombin activation and fibrinolytic activities during bacterial infection. The action of vEP could result in clotting that could serve to protect the bacteria from the host defense machinery. Very recently, we showed that the C-terminal propeptide (C-ter100), which is unique to vEP, is involved in regulation of vEP activity. To understand the structural basis of this function of vEP C-ter100, we have determined the solution structure and backbone dynamics using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solution structure shows that vEP C-ter100 is composed of eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands with a unique fold that has a compact {beta}-barrel formation which stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding networks. Protein dynamics shows that the overall structure, including loops, is very rigid and stabilized. By structural database analysis, we found that vEP C-ter100 shares its topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase, despite low sequence homology between the two domains. Fluorescence assay reveals that vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron (Fe{sup 3+}). These findings suggest that vEP protease might recruit substrate molecules, such as collagen, by binding at C-ter100 and that vEP participates

  11. Conservation and divergence of C-terminal domain structure in the retinoblastoma protein family

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    Liban, Tyler J.; Medina, Edgar M.; Tripathi, Sarvind; Sengupta, Satyaki; Henry, R. William; Buchler, Nicolas E.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (Duke); (MSU)

    2017-04-24

    The retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and the homologous pocket proteins p107 and p130 negatively regulate cell proliferation by binding and inhibiting members of the E2F transcription factor family. The structural features that distinguish Rb from other pocket proteins have been unclear but are critical for understanding their functional diversity and determining why Rb has unique tumor suppressor activities. We describe here important differences in how the Rb and p107 C-terminal domains (CTDs) associate with the coiled-coil and marked-box domains (CMs) of E2Fs. We find that although CTD–CM binding is conserved across protein families, Rb and p107 CTDs show clear preferences for different E2Fs. A crystal structure of the p107 CTD bound to E2F5 and its dimer partner DP1 reveals the molecular basis for pocket protein–E2F binding specificity and how cyclin-dependent kinases differentially regulate pocket proteins through CTD phosphorylation. Our structural and biochemical data together with phylogenetic analyses of Rb and E2F proteins support the conclusion that Rb evolved specific structural motifs that confer its unique capacity to bind with high affinity those E2Fs that are the most potent activators of the cell cycle.

  12. Probing the Impact of the EchinT C-Terminal Domain on Structure and Catalysis

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    S Bardaweel; J Pace; T Chou; V Cody; C Wagner

    2011-12-31

    Histidine triad nucleotide binding protein (Hint) is considered as the ancestor of the histidine triad protein superfamily and is highly conserved from bacteria to humans. Prokaryote genomes, including a wide array of both Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria, typically encode one Hint gene. The cellular function of Hint and the rationale for its evolutionary conservation in bacteria have remained a mystery. Despite its ubiquity and high sequence similarity to eukaryote Hint1 [Escherichia coli Hint (echinT) is 48% identical with human Hint1], prokaryote Hint has been reported in only a few studies. Here we report the first conformational information on the full-length N-terminal and C-terminal residues of Hint from the E. coli complex with GMP. Structural analysis of the echinT-GMP complex reveals that it crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with four homodimers in the asymmetric unit. Analysis of electron density for both the N-terminal residues and the C-terminal residues of the echinT-GMP complex indicates that the loops in some monomers can adopt more than one conformation. The observation of conformational flexibility in terminal loop regions could explain the presence of multiple homodimers in the asymmetric unit of this structure. To explore the impact of the echinT C-terminus on protein structure and catalysis, we conducted a series of catalytic radiolabeling and kinetic experiments on the C-terminal deletion mutants of echinT. In this study, we show that sequential deletion of the C-terminus likely has no effect on homodimerization and a modest effect on the secondary structure of echinT. However, we observed a significant impact on the folding structure, as reflected by a significant lowering of the T{sub m} value. Kinetic analysis reveals that the C-terminal deletion mutants are within an order of magnitude less efficient in catalysis compared to wild type, while the overall kinetic mechanism that proceeds through a fast step

  13. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Domain of Splicing Factor Prp8 Carrying Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutants

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    Zhang,L.; Shen, J.; Guarnieri, M.; Heroux, A.; Yang, K.; Zhao, R.

    2007-01-01

    Prp8 is a critical pre-mRNA splicing factor. Prp8 is proposed to help form and stabilize the spliceosome catalytic core and to be an important regulator of spliceosome activation. Mutations in human Prp8 (hPrp8) cause a severe form of the genetic disorder retinitis pigmentosa, RP13. Understanding the molecular mechanism of Prp8's function in pre-mRNA splicing and RP13 has been hindered by its large size (over 2000 amino acids) and remarkably low-sequence similarity with other proteins. Here we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain (the last 273 residues) of Caenorhabditis elegans Prp8 (cPrp8). The core of the C-terminal domain is an / structure that forms the MPN (Mpr1, Pad1 N-terminal) fold but without Zn{sup 2+} coordination. We propose that the C-terminal domain is a protein interaction domain instead of a Zn{sup 2+}-dependent metalloenzyme as proposed for some MPN proteins. Mapping of RP13 mutants on the Prp8 structure suggests that these residues constitute a binding surface between Prp8 and other partner(s), and the disruption of this interaction provides a plausible molecular mechanism for RP13.

  14. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

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    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  15. Crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of the third paralog of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus oligosaccharyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shunsuke; Shimada, Atsushi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2013-07-01

    Protein N-glycosylation occurs in the three domains of life. Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) transfers an oligosaccharide chain to the asparagine residue in the N-glycosylation sequons. The catalytic subunits of the OST enzyme are STT3 in eukaryotes, AglB in archaea and PglB in eubacteria. The genome of a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, encodes three paralogous AglB proteins. We previously solved the crystal structures of the C-terminal globular domains of two paralogs, AglB-Short 1 and AglB-Short 2. We determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of the third AglB paralog, AglB-Long, at 1.9 Å resolutions. The crystallization of the fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP) afforded high quality protein crystals. Two MBP-AglB-L molecules formed a swapped dimer in the crystal. Since the fusion protein behaved as a monomer upon gel filtration, we reconstituted the monomer structure from the swapped dimer by exchanging the swapped segments. The C-terminal domain of A. fulgidus AglB-L includes a structural unit common to AglB-S1 and AglB-S2. This structural unit contains the evolutionally conserved WWDYG and DK motifs. The present structure revealed that A. fulgidus AglB-L contained a variant type of the DK motif with a short insertion, and confirmed that the second signature residue, Lys, of the DK motif participates in the formation of a pocket that binds to the serine and threonine residues at the +2 position of the N-glycosylation sequon. The structure of A. fulgidus AglB-L, together with the two previously solved structures of AglB-S1 and AglB-S2, provides a complete overview of the three AglB paralogs encoded in the A. fulgidus genome. All three AglBs contain a variant type of the DK motif. This finding supports a previously proposed rule: The STT3/AglB/PglB paralogs in one organism always contain the same type of Ser/Thr-binding pocket. The present structure will be useful as a search model for molecular

  16. The BARD1 C-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Polyadenylation Factor CstF-50

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    Edwards, Ross A.; Lee, Megan S.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Williams, R. Scott; Tainer, John A.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-07-13

    The BARD1 N-terminal RING domain binds BRCA1 while the BARD1 C-terminal ankyrin and tandem BRCT repeat domains bind CstF-50 to modulate mRNA processing and RNAP II stability in response to DNA damage. Here we characterize the BARD1 structural biochemistry responsible for CstF- 50 binding. The crystal structure of the BARD1 BRCT domain uncovers a degenerate phosphopeptide binding pocket lacking the key arginine required for phosphopeptide interactions in other BRCT proteins.Small angle X-ray scattering together with limited proteolysis results indicates that ankyrin and BRCT domains are linked by a flexible tether and do not adopt a fixed orientation relative to one another. Protein pull-down experiments utilizing a series of purified BARD1 deletion mutants indicate that interactions between the CstF-50 WD-40 domain and BARD1 involve the ankyrin-BRCT linker but do not require ankyrin or BRCT domains. The structural plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker helps to explain the regulated assembly of different protein BARD1 complexes with distinct functions in DNA damage signaling including BARD1-dependent induction of apoptosis plus p53 stabilization and interactions. BARD1 architecture and plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker are suitable to allow the BARD1 C-terminus to act as a hub with multiple binding sites to integrate diverse DNA damage signals directly to RNA polymerase.

  17. NMR determines transient structure and dynamics in the disordered C-terminal domain of WASp interacting protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Noam Y; Gross, Renana; Novacek, Jiri; Shaked, Hadassa; Zidek, Lukas; Barda-Saad, Mira; Chill, Jordan H

    2013-07-16

    WASp-interacting protein (WIP) is a 503-residue proline-rich polypeptide expressed in human T cells. The WIP C-terminal domain binds to Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) and regulates its activation and degradation, and the WIP-WASp interaction has been shown to be critical for actin polymerization and implicated in the onset of WAS and X-linked thrombocytopenia. WIP is predicted to be an intrinsically disordered protein, a class of polypeptides that are of great interest because they violate the traditional structure-function paradigm. In this first (to our knowledge) study of WIP in its unbound state, we used NMR to investigate the biophysical behavior of WIP(C), a C-terminal domain fragment of WIP that includes residues 407-503 and contains the WASp-binding site. In light of the poor spectral dispersion exhibited by WIP(C) and the high occurrence (25%) of proline residues, we employed 5D-NMR(13)C-detected NMR experiments with nonuniform sampling to accomplish full resonance assignment. Secondary chemical-shift analysis, (15)N relaxation rates, and protection from solvent exchange all concurred in detecting transient structure located in motifs that span the WASp-binding site. Residues 446-456 exhibited a propensity for helical conformation, and an extended conformation followed by a short, capped helix was observed for residues 468-478. The (13)C-detected approach allows chemical-shift assignment in the WIP(C) polyproline stretches and thus sheds light on their conformation and dynamics. The effects of temperature on chemical shifts referenced to a denatured sample of the polypeptide demonstrate that heating reduces the structural character of WIP(C). Thus, we conclude that the disordered WIP(C) fragment is comprised of regions with latent structure connected by flexible loops, an architecture with implications for binding affinity and function. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. NMR-based homology model for the solution structure of the C-terminal globular domain of EMILIN1

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    Verdone, Giuliana [Istituto Biochimico Italiano ' G. Lorenzini' (Italy); Corazza, Alessandra [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy); Colebrooke, Simon A. [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Cicero, Daniel; Eliseo, Tommaso [Universita di Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy); Boyd, Jonathan [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Doliana, Roberto [Centro di Riferimento Oncologico di Aviano, Divisione di Oncologia Sperimentale 2 (Italy); Fogolari, Federico; Viglino, Paolo; Colombatti, Alfonso [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy); Campbell, Iain D. [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Esposito, Gennaro [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy)], E-mail: gesposito@mail.dstb.uniud.it

    2009-02-15

    EMILIN1 is a glycoprotein of elastic tissues that has been recently linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The protein is formed by different independently folded structural domains whose role has been partially elucidated. In this paper the solution structure, inferred from NMR-based homology modelling of the C-terminal trimeric globular C1q domain (gC1q) of EMILIN1, is reported. The high molecular weight and the homotrimeric structure of the protein required the combined use of highly deuterated {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C-labelled samples and TROSY experiments. Starting from a homology model, the protein structure was refined using heteronuclear residual dipolar couplings, chemical shift patterns, NOEs and H-exchange data. Analysis of the gC1q domain structure of EMILIN1 shows that each protomer of the trimer adopts a nine-stranded {beta} sandwich folding topology which is related to the conformation observed for other proteins of the family. Distinguishing features, however, include a missing edge-strand and an unstructured 19-residue loop. Although the current data do not allow this loop to be precisely defined, the available evidence is consistent with a flexible segment that protrudes from each subunit of the globular trimeric assembly and plays a key role in inter-molecular interactions between the EMILIN1 gC1q homotrimer and its integrin receptor {alpha}4{beta}1.

  19. The C-terminal domain of connexin43 modulates cartilage structure via chondrocyte phenotypic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Bechberger, John F; Varela-Eirin, Marta; Varela-Vazquez, Adrian; Acea, Benigno; Fonseca, Eduardo; Naus, Christian C; Mayan, Maria D

    2016-11-08

    Chondrocytes in cartilage and bone cells population express connexin43 (Cx43) and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) is essential to synchronize cells for coordinated electrical, mechanical, metabolic and chemical communication in both tissues. Reduced Cx43 connectivity decreases chondrocyte differentiation and defective Cx43 causes skeletal defects. The carboxy terminal domain (CTD) of Cx43 is located in the cytoplasmic side and is key for protein functions. Here we demonstrated that chondrocytes from the CTD-deficient mice, K258stop/Cx43KO and K258stop/K258stop, have reduced GJIC, increased rates of proliferation and reduced expression of collagen type II and proteoglycans. We observed that CTD-truncated mice were significantly smaller in size. Together these results demonstrated that the deletion of the CTD negatively impacts cartilage structure and normal chondrocyte phenotype. These findings suggest that the proteolytic cleavage of the CTD under pathological conditions, such as under the activation of metalloproteinases during tissue injury or inflammation, may account for the deleterious effects of Cx43 in cartilage and bone disorders such as osteoarthritis.

  20. C-Terminal Domain of Hemocyanin, a Major Antimicrobial Protein from Litopenaeus vannamei: Structural Homology with Immunoglobulins and Molecular Diversity

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    Yue-Ling Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Invertebrates rely heavily on immune-like molecules with highly diversified variability so as to counteract infections. However, the mechanisms and the relationship between this variability and functionalities are not well understood. Here, we showed that the C-terminal domain of hemocyanin (HMC from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei contained an evolutionary conserved domain with highly variable genetic sequence, which is structurally homologous to immunoglobulin (Ig. This domain is responsible for recognizing and binding to bacteria or red blood cells, initiating agglutination and hemolysis. Furthermore, when HMC is separated into three fractions using anti-human IgM, IgG, or IgA, the subpopulation, which reacted with anti-human IgM (HMC-M, showed the most significant antimicrobial activity. The high potency of HMC-M is a consequence of glycosylation, as it contains high abundance of α-d-mannose relative to α-d-glucose and N-acetyl-d-galactosamine. Thus, the removal of these glycans abolished the antimicrobial activity of HMC-M. Our results present a comprehensive investigation of the role of HMC in fighting against infections through genetic variability and epigenetic modification.

  1. Solution structure and DNA-binding properties of the C-terminal domain of UvrC from E.coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.; Folkers, G.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/162277202; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; Boelens, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070151407; Wechselberger, R.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829005; Niztayev, A.; Kaptein, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074334603

    2002-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of the UvrC protein (UvrC CTD) is essential for 5' incision in the prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair process. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the UvrC CTD using heteronuclear NMR techniques. The structure shows two helix±hairpin±helix (HhH) motifs

  2. Structure of the S1 subunit C-terminal domain from bat-derived coronavirus HKU5 spike protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xue; Qi, Jianxun; Song, Hao; Wang, Qihui; Zhang, Yanfang; Wu, Ying; Lu, Guangwen; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2017-07-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that MERS-CoV originated from bat coronaviruses (BatCoVs). Previously, we demonstrated that both MERS-CoV and BatCoV HKU4 use CD26 as a receptor, but how the BatCoVs evolved to bind CD26 is an intriguing question. Here, we solved the crystal structure of the S1 subunit C-terminal domain of HKU5 (HKU5-CTD), another BatCoV that is phylogenetically related to MERS-CoV but cannot bind to CD26. We observed that the conserved core subdomain and those of other betacoronaviruses (betaCoVs) have a similar topology of the external subdomain, indicating the same ancestor of lineage C betaCoVs. However, two deletions in two respective loops located in HKU5-CTD result in conformational variations in CD26-binding interface and are responsible for the non-binding of HKU5-CTD to CD26. Combined with sequence variation in the HKU5-CTD receptor binding interface, we propose the necessity for surveilling the mutation in BatCoV HKU5 spike protein in case of bat-to-human interspecies transmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Three-dimensional structure of a Streptomyces sviceus GNAT acetyltransferase with similarity to the C-terminal domain of the human GH84 O-GlcNAcase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yuan [Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Roth, Christian; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Davies, Gideon J., E-mail: gideon.davies@york.ac.uk [The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of a bacterial acetyltransferase with 27% sequence identity to the C-terminal domain of human O-GlcNAcase has been solved at 1.5 Å resolution. This S. sviceus protein is compared with known GCN5-related acetyltransferases, adding to the diversity observed in this superfamily. The mammalian O-GlcNAc hydrolysing enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is a multi-domain protein with glycoside hydrolase activity in the N-terminus and with a C-terminal domain that has low sequence similarity to known acetyltransferases, prompting speculation, albeit controversial, that the C-terminal domain may function as a histone acetyltransferase (HAT). There are currently scarce data available regarding the structure and function of this C-terminal region. Here, a bacterial homologue of the human OGA C-terminal domain, an acetyltransferase protein (accession No. ZP-05014886) from Streptomyces sviceus (SsAT), was cloned and its crystal structure was solved to high resolution. The structure reveals a conserved protein core that has considerable structural homology to the acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) binding site of GCN5-related acetyltransferases (GNATs). Calorimetric data further confirm that SsAT is indeed able to bind AcCoA in solution with micromolar affinity. Detailed structural analysis provided insight into the binding of AcCoA. An acceptor-binding cavity was identified, indicating that the physiological substrate of SsAT may be a small molecule. Consistent with recently published work, the SsAT structure further questions a HAT function for the human OGA domain.

  4. Structural investigation of a C-terminal EphA2 receptor mutant: Does mutation affect the structure and interaction properties of the Sam domain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Costantini, Susan; Di Natale, Concetta; Pirone, Luciano; Guariniello, Stefano; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Marasco, Daniela; Pedone, Emilia M; Leone, Marilisa

    2017-09-01

    Ephrin A2 receptor (EphA2) plays a key role in cancer, it is up-regulated in several types of tumors and the process of ligand-induced receptor endocytosis, followed by degradation, is considered as a potential path to diminish tumor malignancy. Protein modulators of this mechanism are recruited at the cytosolic Sterile alpha motif (Sam) domain of EphA2 (EphA2-Sam) through heterotypic Sam-Sam associations. These interactions engage the C-terminal helix of EphA2 and close loop regions (the so called End Helix side). In addition, several studies report on destabilizing mutations in EphA2 related to cataract formation and located in/or close to the Sam domain. Herein, we analyzed from a structural point of view, one of these mutants characterized by the insertion of a novel 39 residue long polypeptide at the C-terminus of EphA2-Sam. A 3D structural model was built by computational methods and revealed partial disorder in the acquired C-terminal tail and a few residues participating in an α-helix and two short β-strands. We investigated by CD and NMR studies the conformational properties in solution of two peptides encompassing the whole C-terminal tail and its predicted helical region, respectively. NMR binding experiments demonstrated that these peptides do not interact relevantly with either EphA2-Sam or its interactor Ship2-Sam. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further indicated that the EphA2 mutant could be represented only through a conformational ensemble and that the C-terminal tail should not largely wrap the EphA2-Sam End-Helix interface and affect binding to other Sam domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High-resolution crystal structure reveals a HEPN domain at the C-terminal region of S. cerevisiae RNA endonuclease Swt1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Shuxia, E-mail: pengsx@ihep.ac.cn; Zhou, Ke; Wang, Wenjia; Gao, Zengqiang; Dong, Yuhui; Liu, Quansheng

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 was determined at 2.3 Å. • Structure of the CT domain was identified as HEPN domain superfamily member. • Low-resolution envelope of Swt1 full-length in solution was analyzed by SAXS. • The middle and CT domains gave good fit to SAXS structural model. - Abstract: Swt1 is an RNA endonuclease that plays an important role in quality control of nuclear messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in eukaryotes; however, its structural details remain to be elucidated. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which shares common characteristics of higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide binding (HEPN) domain superfamily. To study in detail the full-length protein structure, we analyzed the low-resolution architecture of Swt1 in solution using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. Both the CT domain and middle domain exhibited a good fit upon superimposing onto the molecular envelope of Swt1. Our study provides the necessary structural information for detailed analysis of the functional role of Swt1, and its importance in the process of nuclear mRNP surveillance.

  6. The C-terminal domain of Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase holoenzyme protein p65 induces multiple structural changes in telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Benjamin M.; Loper, John; Najarro, Kevin; Stone, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The unique cellular activity of the telomerase reverse transcriptase ribonucleoprotein (RNP) requires proper assembly of protein and RNA components into a functional complex. In the ciliate model organism Tetrahymena thermophila, the La-domain protein p65 is required for in vivo assembly of telomerase. Single-molecule and biochemical studies have shown that p65 promotes efficient RNA assembly with the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein, in part by inducing a bend in the conserved stem IV region of telomerase RNA (TER). The domain architecture of p65 consists of an N-terminal domain, a La-RRM motif, and a C-terminal domain (CTD). Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET), we demonstrate the p65CTD is necessary for the RNA remodeling activity of the protein and is sufficient to induce a substantial conformational change in stem IV of TER. Moreover, nuclease protection assays directly map the site of p65CTD interaction to stem IV and reveal that, in addition to bending stem IV, p65 binding reorganizes nucleotides that comprise the low-affinity TERT binding site within stem–loop IV. PMID:22315458

  7. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II and Characterization of Salivary Agglutinin Adherence Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Crowley, Paula J.; Kelly, Charles; Mitchell, Tim J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion (King); (Cornell); (UAB); (Glasgow); (Florida)

    2012-05-29

    The Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein that adheres to salivary components and extracellular matrix molecules. Here we report the 2.5 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complete C-terminal region of AgI/II. The C-terminal region is comprised of three major domains: C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. Each domain adopts a DE-variant IgG fold, with two {beta}-sheets whose A and F strands are linked through an intramolecular isopeptide bond. The adherence of the C-terminal AgI/II fragments to the putative tooth surface receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG), as monitored by surface plasmon resonance, indicated that the minimal region of binding was contained within the first and second DE-variant-IgG domains (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) of the C terminus. The minimal C-terminal region that could inhibit S. mutans adherence to SAG was also confirmed to be within the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains. Competition experiments demonstrated that the C- and N-terminal regions of AgI/II adhere to distinct sites on SAG. A cleft formed at the intersection between these C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains bound glucose molecules from the cryo-protectant solution, revealing a putative binding site for its highly glycosylated receptor SAG. Finally, electron microscopy images confirmed the elongated structure of AgI/II and enabled building a composite tertiary model that encompasses its two distinct binding regions.

  8. The AvrM effector from flax rust has a structured C-terminal domain and interacts directly with the M resistance protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Dodds, Peter N; Ve, Thomas; Kobe, Bostjan; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    In plant immunity, recognition of pathogen effectors by plant resistance proteins leads to the activation of plant defenses and a localized cell death response. The AvrM effector from flax rust is a small secreted protein that is recognized by the M resistance protein in flax. Here, we investigate the mechanism of M-AvrM recognition and show that these two proteins directly interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay, and that this interaction correlates with the recognition specificity observed for each of the different AvrM variants. We further characterize this interaction by demonstrating that the C-terminal domain of AvrM is required for M-dependent cell death, and show that this domain also interacts with the M protein in yeast. We investigate the role of C-terminal differences among the different AvrM proteins for their involvement in this interaction and establish that M recognition is hindered by an additional 34 amino acids present at the C terminus of several AvrM variants. Structural characterization of recombinant AvrM-A protein revealed a globular C-terminal domain that dimerizes.

  9. Structure of the C-Terminal Half of UvrC Reveals an RNase H Endonuclease Domain with an Argonaute-like Catalytic Triad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakas,E.; Truglio, J.; Croteau, D.; Rhau, B.; Wang, L.; Van Houten, B.; Kisker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Removal and repair of DNA damage by the nucleotide excision repair pathway requires two sequential incision reactions, which are achieved by the endonuclease UvrC in eubacteria. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of UvrC, which contains the catalytic domain responsible for 5' incision and a helix-hairpin-helix-domain that is implicated in DNA binding. Surprisingly, the 5' catalytic domain shares structural homology with RNase H despite the lack of sequence homology and contains an uncommon DDH triad. The structure also reveals two highly conserved patches on the surface of the protein, which are not related to the active site. Mutations of residues in one of these patches led to the inability of the enzyme to bind DNA and severely compromised both incision reactions. Based on our results, we suggest a model of how UvrC forms a productive protein-DNA complex to excise the damage from DNA.

  10. Structure of the C-terminal domain of AspA (antigen I/II-family protein from Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hall

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes can cause an array of diseases in humans, including moderate infections such as pharyngitis (strep throat as well as life threatening conditions such as necrotizing fasciitis and puerperal fever. The antigen I/II family proteins are cell wall anchored adhesin proteins found on the surfaces of most oral streptococci and are involved in host colonization and biofilm formation. In the present study we have determined the crystal structure of the C2–3-domain of the antigen I/II type protein AspA from S. pyogenes M type 28. The structure was solved to 1.8 Å resolution and shows that the C2–3-domain is comprised of two structurally similar DEv-IgG motifs, designated C2 and C3, both containing a stabilizing covalent isopeptide bond. Furthermore a metal binding site is identified, containing a bound calcium ion. Despite relatively low sequence identity, interestingly, the overall structure shares high similarity to the C2–3-domains of antigen I/II proteins from Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans, although certain parts of the structure exhibit distinct features. In summary this work constitutes the first step in the full structure determination of the AspA protein from S. pyogenes.

  11. Full-length Gαq-phospholipase C-β3 structure reveals interfaces of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, Angeline M.; Dutta, Somnath; Boguth, Cassandra A.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tesmer, John J.G. [Michigan

    2014-08-21

    Phospholipase C-β (PLCβ) is directly activated by Gαq, but the molecular basis for how its distal C-terminal domain (CTD) contributes to maximal activity is poorly understood. Herein we present both the crystal structure and cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstructions of human full-length PLCβ3 in complex with mouse Gαq. The distal CTD forms an extended monomeric helical bundle consisting of three antiparallel segments with structural similarity to membrane-binding bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains. Sequence conservation of the distal CTD suggests putative membrane and protein interaction sites, the latter of which bind the N-terminal helix of Gαq in both the crystal structure and cryo-EM reconstructions. Functional analysis suggests that the distal CTD has roles in membrane targeting and in optimizing the orientation of the catalytic core at the membrane for maximal rates of lipid hydrolysis.

  12. Effect of pH on the structure of the recombinant C-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes dragline silk protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Martin; Leclerc, Jérémie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Gagné, Stéphane M; Auger, Michèle

    2014-12-08

    Spider silk proteins undergo a complex series of molecular events before being converted into an outstanding hierarchically organized fiber. Recent literature has underlined the crucial role of the C-terminal domain in silk protein stability and fiber formation. However, the effect of pH remains to be clarified. We have thus developed an efficient purification protocol to obtain stable native-like recombinant MaSp1 C-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes (NCCTD). Its structure was investigated as a function of pH using circular dichroism, fluorescence and solution NMR spectroscopy. The results show that the NCCTD structure is very sensitive to pH and suggest that a molten globule state occurs at pH 5.0 and below. Electronic microscopy images also indicate fiber formation at low pH and coarser globular particles at more basic pH. The results are consistent with a spinning process model where the NCCTD acts as an aggregation nucleus favoring the β-aggregation of the hydrophobic polyalanine repeats upon spinning.

  13. Identification and solution structure of a highly conserved C-terminal domain within ORF1p required for retrotransposition of long interspersed nuclear element-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszyk, Kurt; Li, Patrick Wai-Lun; Villareal, Valerie; Branciforte, Dan; Wu, Haihong; Xie, Yongming; Feigon, Juli; Loo, Joseph A; Martin, Sandra L; Clubb, Robert T

    2007-08-24

    Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons comprise a large fraction of the human and mouse genomes. The mobility of these successful elements requires the protein encoded by open reading frame-1 (ORF1p), which binds single-stranded RNA with high affinity and functions as a nucleic acid chaperone. In this report, we have used limited proteolysis, filter binding, and NMR spectroscopy to characterize the global structure of ORF1p and the three-dimensional structure of a highly conserved RNA binding domain. ORF1p contains three structured regions, a coiled-coil domain, a middle domain of unknown function, and a C-terminal domain (CTD). We show that high affinity RNA binding by ORF1p requires the CTD and residues within an amino acid protease-sensitive segment that joins the CTD to the middle domain. Insights in the mechanism of RNA binding were obtained by determining the solution structure of the CTD, which is shown to adopt a novel fold consisting of a three-stranded beta sheet that is packed against three alpha-helices. An RNA binding surface on the CTD has been localized using chemical shift perturbation experiments and is proximal to residues previously shown to be essential for retrotransposition, RNA binding, and chaperone activity. A similar structure and mechanism of RNA binding is expected for all vertebrate long interspersed nuclear element-1 elements, since residues encoding the middle, protease-sensitive segment, and CTD are highly conserved.

  14. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy-defined structure of the C-terminal domain of NaChBac and its role in channel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powl, Andrew M.; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Miles, Andrew J.; Wallace, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    Extramembranous domains play important roles in the structure and function of membrane proteins, contributing to protein stability, forming association domains, and binding ancillary subunits and ligands. However, these domains are generally flexible, making them difficult or unsuitable targets for obtaining high-resolution X-ray and NMR structural information. In this study we show that the highly sensitive method of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy can be used as a powerful tool to investigate the structure of the extramembranous C-terminal domain (CTD) of the prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) from Bacillus halodurans, NaChBac. Sequence analyses predict its CTD will consist of an unordered region followed by an α-helix, which has a propensity to form a multimeric coiled-coil motif, and which could form an association domain in the homotetrameric NaChBac channel. By creating a number of shortened constructs we have shown experimentally that the CTD does indeed contain a stretch of ∼20 α-helical residues preceded by a nonhelical region adjacent to the final transmembrane segment and that the efficiency of assembly of channels in the membrane progressively decreases as the CTD residues are removed. Analyses of the CTDs of 32 putative prokaryotic NaV sequences suggest that a CTD helical bundle is a structural feature conserved throughout the bacterial sodium channel family. PMID:20663949

  15. NMR Structure of the C-Terminal Transmembrane Domain of the HDL Receptor, SR-BI, and a Functionally Relevant Leucine Zipper Motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Jensen, Davin R; Hanson, Paul J; Lange, Philip T; Proudfoot, Sarah C; Peterson, Francis C; Volkman, Brian F; Sahoo, Daisy

    2017-03-07

    The interaction of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) with its receptor, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), is critical for lowering plasma cholesterol levels and reducing the risk for cardiovascular disease. The HDL/SR-BI complex facilitates delivery of cholesterol into cells and is likely mediated by receptor dimerization. This work describes the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to generate the first high-resolution structure of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of SR-BI. This region of SR-BI harbors a leucine zipper dimerization motif, which when mutated impairs the ability of the receptor to bind HDL and mediate cholesterol delivery. These losses in function correlate with the inability of SR-BI to form dimers. We also identify juxtamembrane regions of the extracellular domain of SR-BI that may interact with the lipid surface to facilitate cholesterol transport functions of the receptor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 3.3 Å structure of Niemann–Pick C1 protein reveals insights into the function of the C-terminal luminal domain in cholesterol transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaochun; Lu, Feiran; Trinh, Michael N.; Schmiege, Philip; Seemann, Joachim; Wang, Jiawei; Blobel, Günter

    2017-08-07

    Niemann–Pick C1 (NPC1) and NPC2 proteins are indispensable for the export of LDL-derived cholesterol from late endosomes. Mutations in these proteins result in Niemann–Pick type C disease, a lysosomal storage disease. Despite recent reports of the NPC1 structure depicting its overall architecture, the function of its C-terminal luminal domain (CTD) remains poorly understood even though 45% of NPC disease-causing mutations are in this domain. Here, we report a crystal structure at 3.3 Å resolution of NPC1* (residues 314–1,278), which—in contrast to previous lower resolution structures—features the entire CTD well resolved. Notably, all eight cysteines of the CTD form four disulfide bonds, one of which (C909–C914) enforces a specific loop that in turn mediates an interaction with a loop of the N-terminal domain (NTD). Importantly, this loop and its interaction with the NTD were not observed in any previous structures due to the lower resolution. Our mutagenesis experiments highlight the physiological relevance of the CTD–NTD interaction, which might function to keep the NTD in the proper orientation for receiving cholesterol from NPC2. Additionally, this structure allows us to more precisely map all of the disease-causing mutations, allowing future molecular insights into the pathogenesis of NPC disease.

  17. Solution structure of the Arabidopsis thaliana telomeric repeat-binding protein DNA binding domain: a new fold with an additional C-terminal helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Shih-Che; Hsiao, Hsin-Hao; Chung, Ben C-P; Cheng, Ying-Hsien; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Chen, Chung Mong; Ho, Chia Hsing; Huang, Tai-Huang

    2006-02-10

    The double-stranded telomeric repeat-binding protein (TRP) AtTRP1 is isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. Using gel retardation assays, we defined the C-terminal 97 amino acid residues, Gln464 to Val560 (AtTRP1(464-560)), as the minimal structured telomeric repeat-binding domain. This region contains a typical Myb DNA-binding motif and a C-terminal extension of 40 amino acid residues. The monomeric AtTRP1(464-560) binds to a 13-mer DNA duplex containing a single repeat of an A.thaliana telomeric DNA sequence (GGTTTAG) in a 1:1 complex, with a K(D) approximately 10(-6)-10(-7) M. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination revealed that the solution structure of AtTRP1(464-560) is a novel four-helix tetrahedron rather than the three-helix bundle structure found in typical Myb motifs and other TRPs. Binding of the 13-mer DNA duplex to AtTRP1(464-560) induced significant chemical shift perturbations of protein amide resonances, which suggests that helix 3 (H3) and the flexible loop connecting H3 and H4 are essential for telomeric DNA sequence recognition. Furthermore, similar to that in hTRF1, the N-terminal arm likely contributes to or stabilizes DNA binding. Sequence comparisons suggested that the four-helix structure and the involvement of the loop residues in DNA binding may be features unique to plant TRPs.

  18. {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonance assignment, secondary structure and dynamic behaviour of the C-terminal domain of human papillomavirus oncoprotein E6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomine, Yves; Charbonnier, Sebastian [Laboratoire d' Immunotechnologie, CNRS UMR 7100, Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg (France); Miguet, Laurent; Potier, Noelle; Dorsselaer, Alain Van [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse Bio-Organique, CNRS UMR 7509, Faculte de Chimie (France); Atkinson, R. Andrew [Laboratoire de RMN, CNRS UMR 7104, Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg (France); Trave, Gilles [Laboratoire d' Immunotechnologie, CNRS UMR 7100, Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: trave@esbs.u-strasbg.fr; Kieffer, Bruno [Laboratoire de RMN, CNRS UMR 7104, Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: kieffer@esbs.u-strasbg.fr

    2005-02-15

    E6 is a viral oncoprotein implicated in cervical cancers, produced by human papillomaviruses (HPVs). E6 contains two putative zinc-binding domains of about 75 residues each. The difficulty in producing recombinant E6 has long hindered the obtention of structural data. Recently, we described the expression and purification of E6-C 4C/4S, a stable, folded mutant of the C-terminal domain of HPV16 E6. Here, we have produced {sup 15}N-labelled samples of E6-C 4C/4S for structural studies by NMR. We have assigned most {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances and identified the elements of secondary structure of the domain. The domain displays an original {alpha}/{beta} topology with roughly equal proportions of {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet. The PDZ-binding region of E6, located at the extreme C-terminus of the domain, is in a random conformation. Mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of one zinc ion per protein molecule. Kinetics of replacement of zinc by cadmium followed by {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC experiments revealed specific frequency changes for the zinc-binding cysteines and their immediate neighbours. NMR spectra were affected by severe line-broadening effects which seriously hindered the assignment work. Investigation of these effects by {sup 15}N relaxation experiments showed that they are due to heterogeneous dynamic behaviour with {mu}s-ms time scale motions occurring in localised regions of the monomeric domain.

  19. Conserved C-terminal nascent peptide binding domain of HYPK ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amino acid sequence analysis revealed 105 orthologs of human HYPK from plants, lower invertebrates to mammals. C-terminal part of HYPK was found to be particularly conserved and to contain nascent polypeptide-associated alpha subunit (NPAA) domain. This region experiences highest selection pressure, signifying ...

  20. Swapping the N- and C-terminal domains of human apolipoprotein E3 and AI reveals insights into their structure/activity relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Lek

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein (apo E3 and apoAI are exchangeable apolipoproteins that play a dominant role in regulating plasma lipoprotein metabolism. ApoE3 (299 residues is composed of an N-terminal (NT domain bearing a 4-helix bundle and a C-terminal (CT domain bearing a series of amphipathic α-helices. ApoAI (243 residues also comprises a highly helical NT domain and a less structured CT tail. The objective of this study was to understand their structural and functional role by generating domain swapped chimeras: apoE3-NT/apoAI-CT and apoAI-NT/apoE-CT. The bacterially overexpressed chimeras were purified by affinity chromatography and their identity confirmed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. Their α-helical content was comparable to that of the parent proteins. ApoE3-NT/apoAI-CT retained the denaturation profile of apoE3 NT domain, with apoAI CT tail eliciting a relatively unstructured state; its lipid binding ability improved dramatically compared to apoE3 indicative of a significant role of apoAI CT tail in lipid binding interaction. The LDL receptor interaction and ability to promote ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux of apoE3-NT/apoAI-CT was comparable to that of apoE3. In contrast, apoAI-NT/apoE-CT elicited an unfolding pattern and lipid binding ability that were similar to that of apoAI. As expected, DMPC/apoAI-NT/apoE-CT discoidal particles did not elicit LDLr binding ability, and promoted SR-B1 mediated cellular uptake of lipids to a limited extent. However, apoAI-NT/apoE-CT displayed an enhanced ability to promote cholesterol efflux compared to apoAI, indicative of a significant role for apoE CT domain in mediating this function. Together, these results indicate that the functional attributes of apoAI and apoE3 can be conferred on each other and that NT-CT domain interactions significantly modulate their structure and function.

  1. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodri M L Morgan

    Full Text Available Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation, R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE of TOMM20.

  2. Solution structure of the C-terminal domain from poly(A)-binding protein in Trypanosoma cruzi: a vegetal PABC domain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siddiqui, Nadeem; Kozlov, Guennadi; D'Orso, Iván; Trempe, Jean-François; Gehring, Kalle

    2003-01-01

    ...), a representative of the vegetal class of PABP proteins. TcPABC is similar to human PABC (hPABC) and consists of five alpha-helices, in contrast to the four helices observed in PABC domains from yeast (yPABC...

  3. Bacteriophage endolysin Lyt μ1/6: characterization of the C-terminal binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tišáková, Lenka; Vidová, Barbora; Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The gene product of orf50 from actinophage μ1/6 of Streptomyces aureofaciens is a putative endolysin, Lyt μ1/6. It has a two-domain modular structure, consisting of an N-terminal catalytic and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). Comparative analysis of Streptomyces phage endolysins revealed that they all have a modular structure and contain functional C-terminal domains with conserved amino acids, probably associated with their binding function. A blast analysis of Lyt μ1/6 in conjunction with secondary and tertiary structure prediction disclosed the presence of a PG_binding_1 domain within the CBD. The sequence of the C-terminal domain of lyt μ1/6 and truncated forms of it were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The ability of these CBD variants fused to GFP to bind to the surface of S. aureofaciens NMU was shown by specific binding assays. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation of influenza virus A hemagglutinin C-terminal domain by hemagglutinin proteolysis in octylglucoside micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radyukhin, Victor A; Serebryakova, Marina V; Ksenofontov, Alexander L; Lukashina, Elena V; Baratova, Lyudmila A

    2006-01-01

    A method of isolation of hydrophobic membrane-bound C-terminal domain of influenza virus A hemagglutinin (HA) is suggested. The method is based on the insertion of HA into octylglucoside micelles followed by pepsin or thermolysin hydrolysis. Subsequent treatment of proteolytic digests with chloroform-hexafluoroisopropanol mixture resulted in the extraction of a few hydrophobic peptides into organic phase. Mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis revealed that the peptides with ion masses corresponding to the anchoring C-terminal domain with or without modifications predominated in the organic solution. The data obtained confirmed our speculation on the possibility of the suggested isolation scheme following from the strong interactions of anchoring domains in compact trimeric structure of HA spikes combined with micelle protection effect. Several appropriate peptides presence in the organic phase apparently arises from the presence of a few accessible proteolytic sites in HA transmembrane region.

  5. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S., E-mail: bchss@biochem.iisc.ernet.in

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  6. The Structure of the RNA m5C Methyltransferase YebU from Escherichia coli Reveals a C-terminal RNA-recruiting PUA Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallberg, B. Martin; Ericsson, Ulrika B.; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2006-01-01

    Nucleotide methylations are the most common type of rRNA modification in bacteria, and are introduced post-transcriptionally by a wide variety of site-specific enzymes. Three 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) bases are found in the rRNAs of Escherichia coli and one of these, at nucleotide 1407 in 16 S r...... by X-ray crystallography, and we present a molecular model for how YebU specifically recognizes, binds and methylates its ribosomal substrate. The YebU protein has an N-terminal SAM-binding catalytic domain with structural similarity to the equivalent domains in several other m(5)C RNA MTases including...

  7. BS69/ZMYND11 C-Terminal Domains Bind and Inhibit EBNA2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Harter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2 plays an important role in driving immortalization of EBV-infected B cells through regulating the expression of many viral and cellular genes. We report a structural study of the tumor suppressor BS69/ZMYND11 C-terminal region, comprised of tandem coiled-coil-MYND domains (BS69CC-MYND, in complex with an EBNA2 peptide containing a PXLXP motif. The coiled-coil domain of BS69 self-associates to bring two separate MYND domains in close proximity, thereby enhancing the BS69 MYND-EBNA2 interaction. ITC analysis of BS69CC-MYND with a C-terminal fragment of EBNA2 further suggests that the BS69CC-MYND homodimer synergistically binds to the two EBNA2 PXLXP motifs that are respectively located in the conserved regions CR7 and CR8. Furthermore, we showed that EBNA2 interacts with BS69 and down-regulates its expression at both mRNA and protein levels in EBV-infected B cells. Ectopic BS69CC-MYND is recruited to viral target promoters through interactions with EBNA2, inhibits EBNA2-mediated transcription activation, and impairs proliferation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Substitution of critical residues in the MYND domain impairs the BS69-EBNA2 interaction and abolishes the BS69 inhibition of the EBNA2-mediated transactivation and LCL proliferation. This study identifies the BS69 C-terminal domains as an inhibitor of EBNA2, which may have important implications in development of novel therapeutic strategies against EBV infection.

  8. Groundnut bud necrosis virus encoded NSm associates with membranes via its C-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Singh

    Full Text Available Groundnut Bud Necrosis Virus (GBNV is a tripartite ambisense RNA plant virus that belongs to serogroup IV of Tospovirus genus. Non-Structural protein-m (NSm, which functions as movement protein in tospoviruses, is encoded by the M RNA. In this communication, we demonstrate that despite the absence of any putative transmembrane domain, GBNV NSm associates with membranes when expressed in E. coli as well as in N. benthamiana. Incubation of refolded NSm with liposomes ranging in size from 200-250 nm resulted in changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of NSm. A similar behaviour was observed in the presence of anionic and zwitterionic detergents. Furthermore, the morphology of the liposomes was found to be modified in the presence of NSm. Deletion of coiled coil domain resulted in the inability of in planta expressed NSm to interact with membranes. Further, when the C-terminal coiled coil domain alone was expressed, it was found to be associated with membrane. These results demonstrate that NSm associates with membranes via the C-terminal coiled coil domain and such an association may be important for movement of viral RNA from cell to cell.

  9. Conserved C-terminal nascent peptide binding domain of HYPK ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... viability and decreases caspase activities in Huntington's disease (HD) cell culture model. This domain is found to be required ... Huntington's disease (HD), this domain reduces cellular toxicity. We also find that ..... the adaptive functional value conferred by the NPAA domain of. HYPK is quite higher in case ...

  10. Intrinsic Disorder of the C-Terminal Domain of Drosophila Methoprene-Tolerant Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kolonko

    Full Text Available Methoprene tolerant protein (Met has recently been confirmed as the long-sought juvenile hormone (JH receptor. This protein plays a significant role in the cross-talk of the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E and JH signalling pathways, which are important for control of insect development and maturation. Met belongs to the basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH-PAS family of transcription factors. In these proteins, bHLH domains are typically responsible for DNA binding and dimerization, whereas the PAS domains are crucial for the choice of dimerization partner and the specificity of target gene activation. The C-terminal region is usually responsible for the regulation of protein complex activity. The sequence of the Met C-terminal region (MetC is not homologous to any sequence deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB and has not been structurally characterized to date. In this study, we show that the MetC exhibits properties typical for an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP. The final averaged structure obtained with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS experiments indicates that intrinsically disordered MetC exists in an extended conformation. This extended shape and the long unfolded regions characterise proteins with high flexibility and dynamics. Therefore, we suggest that the multiplicity of conformations adopted by the disordered MetC is crucial for its activity as a biological switch modulating the cross-talk of different signalling pathways in insects.

  11. The C-terminal domain of the Bloom syndrome DNA helicase is essential for genomic stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noonan James P

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is a rare cancer-prone disorder in which the cells of affected persons have a high frequency of somatic mutation and genomic instability. Bloom syndrome cells have a distinctive high frequency of sister chromatid exchange and quadriradial formation. BLM, the protein altered in BS, is a member of the RecQ DNA helicase family, whose members share an average of 40% identity in the helicase domain and have divergent N-terminal and C-terminal flanking regions of variable lengths. The BLM DNA helicase has been shown to localize to the ND10 (nuclear domain 10 or PML (promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, where it associates with TOPIIIα, and to the nucleolus. Results This report demonstrates that the N-terminal domain of BLM is responsible for localization of the protein to the nuclear bodies, while the C-terminal domain directs the protein to the nucleolus. Deletions of the N-terminal domain of BLM have little effect on sister chromatid exchange frequency and chromosome stability as compared to helicase and C-terminal mutations which can increase SCE frequency and chromosome abnormalities. Conclusion The helicase activity and the C-terminal domain of BLM are critical for maintaining genomic stability as measured by the sister chromatid exchange assay. The localization of BLM into the nucleolus by the C-terminal domain appears to be more important to genomic stability than localization in the nuclear bodies.

  12. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Analysis of Dual CFP/YFP Labeled AMPA Receptors Reveals Structural Rearrangement within the C-Terminal Domain during Receptor Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Linda Grønborg; Katchan, Mila; Plested, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    variants (CFP and YFP, respectively) of green fluorescent protein at various positions in the GluA2 AMPAR subunit to enable measurements of intra- receptor conformational changes using Fo¨ rster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in live cells. We identify dual CFP/YFP-tagged GluA2 subunit con- structs...... that retain function and display intrareceptor FRET. This includes a construct (GluA2-6Y-10C) containing YFP in the intracellular loop between the M1 and M2 membrane-embedded segments and CFP inserted in the C-ter- minal domain (CTD). GluA2-6Y-10C displays FRET with an efficiency of 0.11 while retaining wild......-type receptor expression and kinetic properties. We have used GluA2-6Y-10C to study conformational changes in homomeric GluA2 receptors during receptor activation. Our results show that the FRET efficiency is dependent on functional state of GluA2-6Y-10C and hereby indi- cates that the intracellular CTD...

  13. Conserved C-terminal nascent peptide binding domain of HYPK ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    non-polar (A, C, G, I, L, M, F,. P, V, W, Y). 4.21. 1.57. 3.57. 0.63. 3.79. 1.39 3.71. 1.06. 3.91. 0.95. 3.83. 0.56 tiny (A, C, G, S, T). 5.70. 2.00. 4.57. 1.00. 5.35. 1.78 5.25. 1.27. 5.74. 1.38. 5.56. 0.63 large (R, I, L, K, M, F, W, Y). 4.07. 1.33. 3.86. 0.59. 4.38. 1.14 4.26. 0.98. 4.19. 0.70. 4.25. 0.58. NPAA domain. Clade1 (n=31) Clade2 ...

  14. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro [Department of Applied Biochemistry, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Yamazaki, Yasuo [Department of Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588 (Japan); Brown, R. Lane [Neurological Science Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006 (United States); Fujimoto, Zui [Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Morita, Takashi, E-mail: tmorita@my-pharm.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588 (Japan); Mizuno, Hiroshi, E-mail: tmorita@my-pharm.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); VALWAY Technology Center, NEC Soft Ltd, Koto-ku, Tokyo 136-8627 (Japan); Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 6, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Department of Applied Biochemistry, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)

    2008-10-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn{sup 2+}-bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn{sup 2+} ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn{sup 2+} binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels.

  15. Functional role of C-terminal domain of Thermus thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukalo M. A.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study a role of C-terminal domain of T. thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRSTT in the reactions of aminoacylation and editing. Methods. A mutant of LeuRSTT without C- terminal domain (ΔС was obtained by the method of mutagenesis. The kinetic constants in aminoacylation reaction catalyzed by LeuRS and its mutant (ΔС were determined by the methods of equilibrium enzyme kinetics. To evaluate the contribution of C-terminal domain to interaction of the enzyme with tRNALeu, Kd of a complex between tRNA and LeuRSTT and its mutant ΔС was determined by fluorescence titration. Results. The C-terminal domain is shown to play a significant role in the aminoacylation and editing reactions of LeuRSTT and not essential for the activity in the reaction of amino acid activation. The kinetic parameters of aminoacylation of tRNALeu and tRNATyr by LeuRS and ΔС mutant were also determined, their analysis suggests that the C-domain is not critical for the manifestation of specificity of the enzyme in the recognition of homologous RNAs. At the same time a significant influence of the C-terminal domain on the value of catalytic constant was shown. At the domain deletion the kcat value is lower by 152-fold. Conclusion. The C-terminal domain of LeuRSTT is evolutionarily acquired to enhance the rate of catalysis in the aminoacylation and editing reactions, and makes no significant contribution to the specificity of the enzyme in the recognition of tRNA.

  16. Crystallization of the C-terminal globular domain of avian reovirus fibre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaij, Mark J. van, E-mail: vanraaij@usc.es [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Hermo Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado Calvo, Pablo [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fox, Gavin C. [Spanish CRG Beamline BM16, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L. [Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Costas, Celina; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Partial proteolysis of the avian reovirus cell-attachment protein σC yields a major homotrimeric C-terminal fragment that presumably contains the receptor-binding domain. This fragment has been crystallized in the presence and absence of zinc sulfate and cadmium sulfate. One of the crystal forms diffracts synchrotron X-rays to 2.2–2.3 Å. Avian reovirus fibre, a homotrimer of the σC protein, is responsible for primary host-cell attachment. Using the protease trypsin, a C-terminal σC fragment containing amino acids 156–326 has been generated which was subsequently purified and crystallized. Two different crystal forms were obtained, one grown in the absence of divalent cations and belonging to space group P6{sub 3}22 (unit-cell parameters a = 75.6, c = 243.1 Å) and one grown in the presence of either zinc or cadmium sulfate and belonging to space group P321 (unit-cell parameters a = 74.7, c = 74.5 Å and a = 73.1, c = 69.9 Å for the Zn{sup II}- and Cd{sup II}-grown crystals, respectively). The first crystal form diffracted synchrotron radiation to 3.0 Å resolution and the second form to 2.2–2.3 Å. Its closest related structure, the C-terminal fragment of mammalian reovirus fibre, has only 18% sequence identity and molecular-replacement attempts were unsuccessful. Therefore, a search is under way for suitable heavy-atom derivatives and attempts are being made to grow protein crystals containing selenomethionine instead of methionine.

  17. NMR assignments of SPOC domain of the human transcriptional corepressor SHARP in complex with a C-terminal SMRT peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Suzuka; Kanaba, Teppei; Ito, Yutaka; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-10-01

    The transcriptional corepressor SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein (SHARP) recruits histone deacetylases. Human SHARP protein is thought to function in processes involving steroid hormone responses and the Notch signaling pathway. SHARP consists of RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region and the spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain in the C-terminal region. It is known that the SPOC domain binds the LSD motif in the C-terminal tail of corepressors silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptor (SMRT)/nuclear receptor corepressor (NcoR). We are interested in delineating the mechanism by which the SPOC domain recognizes the LSD motif of the C-terminal tail of SMRT/NcoR. To this end, we are investigating the tertiary structure of the SPOC/SMRT peptide using NMR. Herein, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the SPOC domain in complex with a SMRT peptide, which contributes towards a structural understanding of the SPOC/SMRT peptide and its molecular recognition.

  18. Structure and function of the C-terminal domain of MrpA in the Bacillus subtilis Mrp-antiporter complex--the evolutionary progenitor of the long horizontal helix in complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virzintiene, Egle; Moparthi, Vamsi K; Al-Eryani, Yusra; Shumbe, Leonard; Górecki, Kamil; Hägerhäll, Cecilia

    2013-10-11

    MrpA and MrpD are homologous to NuoL, NuoM and NuoN in complex I over the first 14 transmembrane helices. In this work, the C-terminal domain of MrpA, outside this conserved area, was investigated. The transmembrane orientation was found to correspond to that of NuoJ in complex I. We have previously demonstrated that the subunit NuoK is homologous to MrpC. The function of the MrpA C-terminus was tested by expression in a previously used Bacillus subtilis model system. At neutral pH, the truncated MrpA still worked, but at pH 8.4, where Mrp-complex formation is needed for function, the C-terminal domain of MrpA was absolutely required. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Requirement for the E1 Helicase C-Terminal Domain in Papillomavirus DNA Replication In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergvall, Monika; Gagnon, David; Titolo, Steve; Lehoux, Michaël; D'Abramo, Claudia M; Melendy, Thomas; Archambault, Jacques

    2016-01-06

    The papillomavirus (PV) E1 helicase contains a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD), located next to its ATP-binding site, whose function in vivo is still poorly understood. The CTD is comprised of an alpha helix followed by an acidic region (AR) and a C-terminal extension termed the C-tail. Recent biochemical studies on bovine papillomavirus 1 (BPV1) E1 showed that the AR and C-tail regulate the oligomerization of the protein into a double hexamer at the origin. In this study, we assessed the importance of the CTD of human papillomavirus 11 (HPV11) E1 in vivo, using a cell-based DNA replication assay. Our results indicate that combined deletion of the AR and C-tail drastically reduces DNA replication, by 85%, and that further truncation into the alpha-helical region compromises the structural integrity of the E1 helicase domain and its interaction with E2. Surprisingly, removal of the C-tail alone or mutation of highly conserved residues within the domain still allows significant levels of DNA replication (55%). This is in contrast to the absolute requirement for the C-tail reported for BPV1 E1 in vitro and confirmed here in vivo. Characterization of chimeric proteins in which the AR and C-tail from HPV11 E1 were replaced by those of BPV1 indicated that while the function of the AR is transferable, that of the C-tail is not. Collectively, these findings define the contribution of the three CTD subdomains to the DNA replication activity of E1 in vivo and suggest that the function of the C-tail has evolved in a PV type-specific manner. While much is known about hexameric DNA helicases from superfamily 3, the papillomavirus E1 helicase contains a unique C-terminal domain (CTD) adjacent to its ATP-binding site. We show here that this CTD is important for the DNA replication activity of HPV11 E1 in vivo and that it can be divided into three functional subdomains that roughly correspond to the three conserved regions of the CTD: an alpha helix, needed for the structural

  20. Requirement for the E1 Helicase C-Terminal Domain in Papillomavirus DNA Replication In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergvall, Monika; Gagnon, David; Titolo, Steve; Lehoux, Michaël; D'Abramo, Claudia M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The papillomavirus (PV) E1 helicase contains a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD), located next to its ATP-binding site, whose function in vivo is still poorly understood. The CTD is comprised of an alpha helix followed by an acidic region (AR) and a C-terminal extension termed the C-tail. Recent biochemical studies on bovine papillomavirus 1 (BPV1) E1 showed that the AR and C-tail regulate the oligomerization of the protein into a double hexamer at the origin. In this study, we assessed the importance of the CTD of human papillomavirus 11 (HPV11) E1 in vivo, using a cell-based DNA replication assay. Our results indicate that combined deletion of the AR and C-tail drastically reduces DNA replication, by 85%, and that further truncation into the alpha-helical region compromises the structural integrity of the E1 helicase domain and its interaction with E2. Surprisingly, removal of the C-tail alone or mutation of highly conserved residues within the domain still allows significant levels of DNA replication (55%). This is in contrast to the absolute requirement for the C-tail reported for BPV1 E1 in vitro and confirmed here in vivo. Characterization of chimeric proteins in which the AR and C-tail from HPV11 E1 were replaced by those of BPV1 indicated that while the function of the AR is transferable, that of the C-tail is not. Collectively, these findings define the contribution of the three CTD subdomains to the DNA replication activity of E1 in vivo and suggest that the function of the C-tail has evolved in a PV type-specific manner. IMPORTANCE While much is known about hexameric DNA helicases from superfamily 3, the papillomavirus E1 helicase contains a unique C-terminal domain (CTD) adjacent to its ATP-binding site. We show here that this CTD is important for the DNA replication activity of HPV11 E1 in vivo and that it can be divided into three functional subdomains that roughly correspond to the three conserved regions of the CTD: an alpha helix, needed

  1. Efficient, chemoselective synthesis of immunomicelles using single-domain antibodies with a C-terminal thioester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raats Jos MH

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical bioconjugation strategies for generating antibody-functionalized nanoparticles are non-specific and typically result in heterogeneous compounds that can be compromised in activity. Expression systems based on self-cleavable intein domains allow the generation of recombinant proteins with a C-terminal thioester, providing a unique handle for site-specific conjugation using native chemical ligation (NCL. However, current methods to generate antibody fragments with C-terminal thioesters require cumbersome refolding procedures, effectively preventing application of NCL for antibody-mediated targeting and molecular imaging. Results Targeting to the periplasm of E. coli allowed efficient production of correctly-folded single-domain antibody (sdAb-intein fusions proteins. On column purification and 2-mercapthoethanesulfonic acid (MESNA-induced cleavage yielded single-domain antibodies with a reactive C-terminal MESNA thioester in good yields. These thioester-functionalized single-domain antibodies allowed synthesis of immunomicelles via native chemical ligation in a single step. Conclusion A novel procedure was developed to obtain soluble, well-folded single-domain antibodies with reactive C-terminal thioesters in good yields. These proteins are promising building blocks for the chemoselective functionalization via NCL of a broad range of nanoparticle scaffolds, including micelles, liposomes and dendrimers.

  2. Insights into the oligomerization process of the C-terminal domain of human plasma membrane Ca²+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Federico; Mičetić, Ivan; Carsughi, Flavio; Spinozzi, Francesco; Bubacco, Luigi; Beltramini, Mariano

    2011-02-15

    Plasma membrane calcium pumps (PMCAs) sustain a primary transport system for the specific removal of cytosolic calcium ions from eukaryotic cells. PMCAs are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal domain referred to as a regulatory domain. This domain is target of several regulatory mechanisms: activation by Ca²+-calmodulin complex and acidic phospholipids, phosphorylation by kinase A and C, proteolysis by calpain and oligomerization. As far as oligomerization is concerned, the C-terminal domain seems to be crucial for this process. We have cloned the C-terminal domain of the human PMCA isoform 1b, and characterized its properties in solution. The expressed protein maintains its tendency to oligomerize in aqueous solutions, but it is dissociated by amphipathic molecules such as diacylglycerol and sodium dodecyl sulphate. The presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate stabilizes the domain as a compact structure in monomeric form retaining the secondary structure elements, as shown by small angle neutron scattering and circular dichroism measurements. The importance of oligomerization for the regulation of PMCA activity and intracellular calcium concentration is discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The C-terminal domain of CENP-C displays multiple and critical functions for mammalian centromere formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Trazzi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available CENP-C is a fundamental component of functional centromeres. The elucidation of its structure-function relationship with centromeric DNA and other kinetochore proteins is critical to the understanding of centromere assembly. CENP-C carries two regions, the central and the C-terminal domains, both of which are important for the ability of CENP-C to associate with the centromeric DNA. However, while the central region is largely divergent in CENP-C homologues, the C-terminal moiety contains two regions that are highly conserved from yeast to humans, named Mif2p homology domains (blocks II and III. The activity of these two domains in human CENP-C is not well defined. In this study we performed a functional dissection of C-terminal CENP-C region analyzing the role of single Mif2p homology domains through in vivo and in vitro assays. By immunofluorescence and Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP we were able to elucidate the ability of the Mif2p homology domain II to target centromere and contact alpha satellite DNA. We also investigate the interactions with other conserved inner kinetochore proteins by means of coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation on cell nuclei. We found that the C-terminal region of CENP-C (Mif2p homology domain III displays multiple activities ranging from the ability to form higher order structures like homo-dimers and homo-oligomers, to mediate interaction with CENP-A and histone H3. Overall, our findings support a model in which the Mif2p homology domains of CENP-C, by virtue of their ability to establish multiple contacts with DNA and centromere proteins, play a critical role in the structuring of kinethocore chromatin.

  4. Mutant Mice Lacking the p53 C-Terminal Domain Model Telomere Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simeonova, I.; Jaber, S.; Draskovic, I.; Bardot, B.; Fang, M.; Bouarich-Bourimi, R.; Lejour, V.; Charbonnier, L.; Soudais, C.; Bourdon, J.C.; Huerre, M.; Londono-Vallejo, A.; Toledo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in p53, although frequent in human cancers, have not been implicated in telomere-related syndromes. Here, we show that homozygous mutant mice expressing p53(Delta31), a p53 lacking the C-terminal domain, exhibit increased p53 activity and suffer from aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis,

  5. Urinary uromodulin carries an intact ZP domain generated by a conserved C-terminal proteolytic cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santambrogio, Sara; Cattaneo, Angela; Bernascone, Ilenia; Schwend, Thomas; Jovine, Luca; Bachi, Angela; Rampoldi, Luca

    2008-06-06

    Uromodulin (or Tamm-Horsfall protein) is the most abundant protein in human urine under physiological conditions. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of uromodulin secretion. By extensive Mass Spectrometry analyses we mapped the C-termini of human and murine urinary proteins demonstrating that urinary uromodulin is generated by a conserved C-terminal proteolytic cleavage and retains its entire ZP domain.

  6. The domain structure of Helicobacter pylori DnaB helicase: the N-terminal domain can be dispensable for helicase activity whereas the extreme C-terminal region is essential for its function

    OpenAIRE

    Nitharwal, Ram Gopal; Paul, Subhankar; Dar, Ashraf; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Soni, Rajesh K; Prusty, Dhaneswar; Sinha, Sukrat; Kashav, Tara; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Chaudhuri, Tapan Kumar; Gourinath, Samudrala; Dhar, Suman Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Hexameric DnaB type replicative helicases are essential for DNA strand unwinding along with the direction of replication fork movement. These helicases in general contain an amino terminal domain and a carboxy terminal domain separated by a linker region. Due to the lack of crystal structure of a full-length DnaB like helicase, the domain structure and function of these types of helicases are not clear. We have reported recently that Helicobacter pylori DnaB helicase is a replicative helicase...

  7. Conformational effects of a common codon 751 polymorphism on the C-terminal domain of the xeroderma pigmentosum D protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Regina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The xeroderma pigmentosum D (XPD protein is a DNA helicase involved in the repair of DNA damage, including nucleotide excision repair (NER and transcription-coupled repair (TCR. The C-terminal domain of XPD has been implicated in interactions with other components of the TFIIH complex, and it is also the site of a common genetic polymorphism in XPD at amino acid residue 751 (Lys->Gln. Some evidence suggests that this polymorphism may alter DNA repair capacity and increase cancer risk. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these effects could be attributable to conformational changes in XPD induced by the polymorphism. Materials and Methods: Molecular dynamics techniques were used to predict the structure of the wild-type and polymorphic forms of the C-terminal domain of XPD and differences in structure produced by the polymorphic substitution were determined. Results: The results indicate that, although the general configuration of both proteins is similar, the substitution produces a significant conformational change immediately N-terminal to the site of the polymorphism. Conclusion: These results provide support for the hypothesis that this polymorphism in XPD could affect DNA repair capability, and hence cancer risk, by altering the structure of the C-terminal domain.

  8. The domain structure of Helicobacter pylori DnaB helicase: the N-terminal domain can be dispensable for helicase activity whereas the extreme C-terminal region is essential for its function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitharwal, Ram Gopal; Paul, Subhankar; Dar, Ashraf; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Soni, Rajesh K; Prusty, Dhaneswar; Sinha, Sukrat; Kashav, Tara; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Chaudhuri, Tapan Kumar; Gourinath, Samudrala; Dhar, Suman Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Hexameric DnaB type replicative helicases are essential for DNA strand unwinding along with the direction of replication fork movement. These helicases in general contain an amino terminal domain and a carboxy terminal domain separated by a linker region. Due to the lack of crystal structure of a full-length DnaB like helicase, the domain structure and function of these types of helicases are not clear. We have reported recently that Helicobacter pylori DnaB helicase is a replicative helicase in vitro and it can bypass Escherichia coli DnaC activity in vivo. Using biochemical, biophysical and genetic complementation assays, here we show that though the N-terminal region of HpDnaB is required for conformational changes between C6 and C3 rotational symmetry, it is not essential for in vitro helicase activity and in vivo function of the protein. Instead, an extreme carboxy terminal region and an adjacent unique 34 amino acid insertion region were found to be essential for HpDnaB activity suggesting that these regions are important for proper folding and oligomerization of this protein. These results confer great potential in understanding the domain structures of DnaB type helicases and their related function. PMID:17430964

  9. Structural differences between C-terminal regions of tropomyosin isoforms

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    Małgorzata Śliwińska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropomyosins are actin-binding regulatory proteins which overlap end-to-end along the filament. High resolution structures of the overlap regions were determined for muscle and non-muscle tropomyosins in the absence of actin. Conformations of the junction regions bound to actin are unknown. In this work, orientation of the overlap on actin alone and on actin–myosin complex was evaluated by measuring FRET distances between a donor (AEDANS attached to tropomyosin and an acceptor (DABMI bound to actin’s Cys374. Donor was attached to the Cys residue introduced by site-directed mutagenesis near the C-terminal half of the overlap. The recombinant alpha-tropomyosin isoforms used in this study – skeletal muscle skTM, non-muscle TM2 and TM5a, and chimeric TM1b9a had various amino acid sequences of the N- and C-termini involved in the end-to-end overlap. The donor-acceptor distances calculated for each isoform varied between 36.4 Å and 48.1 Å. Rigor binding of myosin S1 increased the apparent FRET distances of skTM and TM2, but decreased the distances separating TM5a and TM1b9a from actin. The results show that isoform-specific sequences of the end-to-end overlaps determine orientations and dynamics of tropomyosin isoforms on actin. This can be important for specificity of tropomyosin in the regulation of actin filament diverse functions.

  10. Targeting the Hsp90 C-terminal domain to induce allosteric inhibition and selective client downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Kourtney M; Petrov, Dino P; Vickman, Renee E; Crist, Scott A; Pascuzzi, Pete E; Ratliff, Tim L; Davisson, V Jo; Hazbun, Tony R

    2017-08-01

    Inhibition of Hsp90 is desirable due to potential downregulation of oncogenic clients. Early generation inhibitors bind to the N-terminal domain (NTD) but C-terminal domain (CTD) inhibitors are a promising class because they do not induce a heat shock response. Here we present a new structural class of CTD binding molecules with a unique allosteric inhibition mechanism. A hit molecule, NSC145366, and structurally similar probes were assessed for inhibition of Hsp90 activities. A ligand-binding model was proposed indicating a novel Hsp90 CTD binding site. Client protein downregulation was also determined. NSC145366 interacts with the Hsp90 CTD and has anti-proliferative activity in tumor cell lines (GI50=0.2-1.9μM). NSC145366 increases Hsp90 oligomerization resulting in allosteric inhibition of NTD ATPase activity (IC50=119μM) but does not compete with NTD or CTD-ATP binding. Treatment of LNCaP prostate tumor cells resulted in selective client protein downregulation including AR and BRCA1 but without a heat shock response. Analogs had similar potencies in ATPase and chaperone activity assays and variable effects on oligomerization. In silico modeling predicted a binding site at the CTD dimer interface distinct from the nucleotide-binding site. A set of symmetrical scaffold molecules with bisphenol A cores induced allosteric inhibition of Hsp90. Experimental evidence and molecular modeling suggest that the binding site is independent of the CTD-ATP site and consistent with unique induction of allosteric effects. Allosteric inhibition of Hsp90 via a mechanism used by the NSC145366-based probes is a promising avenue for selective oncogenic client downregulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Mode of inhibition of HIV-1 Integrase by a C-terminal domain-specific monoclonal antibody*

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    Merkel George

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To further our understanding of the structure and function of HIV-1 integrase (IN we developed and characterized a library of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against this protein. One of these antibodies, mAb33, which is specific for the C-terminal domain, was found to inhibit HIV-1 IN processing activity in vitro; a corresponding Fv fragment was able to inhibit HIV-1 integration in vivo. Our subsequent studies, using heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, identified six solvent accessible residues on the surface of the C-terminal domain that were immobilized upon binding of the antibody, which were proposed to comprise the epitope. Here we test this hypothesis by measuring the affinity of mAb33 to HIV-1 proteins that contain Ala substitutions in each of these positions. To gain additional insight into the mode of inhibition we also measured the DNA binding capacity and enzymatic activities of the Ala substituted proteins. Results We found that Ala substitution of any one of five of the putative epitope residues, F223, R224, Y226, I267, and I268, caused a decrease in the affinity of the mAb33 for HIV-1 IN, confirming the prediction from NMR data. Although IN derivatives with Ala substitutions in or near the mAb33 epitope exhibited decreased enzymatic activity, none of the epitope substitutions compromised DNA binding to full length HIV-1 IN, as measured by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Two of these derivatives, IN (I276A and IN (I267A/I268A, exhibited both increased DNA binding affinity and uncharacteristic dissociation kinetics; these proteins also exhibited non-specific nuclease activity. Results from these investigations are discussed in the context of current models for how the C-terminal domain interacts with substrate DNA. Conclusion It is unlikely that inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by mAb33 is caused by direct interaction with residues that are essential for substrate binding. Rather

  12. C-terminal region of MAP7 domain containing protein 3 (MAP7D3 promotes microtubule polymerization by binding at the C-terminal tail of tubulin.

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    Saroj Yadav

    Full Text Available MAP7 domain containing protein 3 (MAP7D3, a newly identified microtubule associated protein, has been shown to promote microtubule assembly and stability. Its microtubule binding region has been reported to consist of two coiled coil motifs located at the N-terminus. It possesses a MAP7 domain near the C-terminus and belongs to the microtubule associated protein 7 (MAP7 family. The MAP7 domain of MAP7 protein has been shown to bind to kinesin-1; however, the role of MAP7 domain in MAP7D3 remains unknown. Based on the bioinformatics analysis of MAP7D3, we hypothesized that the MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 may have microtubule binding activity. Indeed, we found that MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 bound to microtubules as well as enhanced the assembly of microtubules in vitro. Interestingly, a longer fragment MDCT that contained the MAP7 domain (MD with the C-terminal tail (CT of the protein promoted microtubule polymerization to a greater extent than MD and CT individually. MDCT stabilized microtubules against dilution induced disassembly. MDCT bound to reconstituted microtubules with an apparent dissociation constant of 3.0 ± 0.5 µM. An immunostaining experiment showed that MDCT localized along the length of the preassembled microtubules. Competition experiments with tau indicated that MDCT shares its binding site on microtubules with tau. Further, we present evidence indicating that MDCT binds to the C-terminal tail of tubulin. In addition, MDCT could bind to tubulin in HeLa cell extract. Here, we report a microtubule binding region in the C-terminal region of MAP7D3 that may have a role in regulating microtubule assembly dynamics.

  13. Docking Studies of Binding of Ethambutol to the C-Terminal Domain of the Arabinosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Guillermo Salgado-Moran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The binding of ethambutol to the C-terminal domain of the arabinosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was studied. The analysis was performed using an in silico approach in order to find out, by docking calculations and energy descriptors, the conformer of Ethambutol that forms the most stable complex with the C-terminal domain of arabinosyltransferase. The complex shows that location of the Ethambutol coincides with the cocrystallization ligand position and that amino acid residues ASH1051, ASN740, ASP1052, and ARG1055 should be critical in the binding of Ethambutol to C-terminal domain EmbC.

  14. Effect of C-terminal domain truncation of Thermus thermophilus trehalose synthase on its substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chang-Bae; Park, Da-Yeon; Lee, Soo-Bok

    2017-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of the three-domain-comprising trehalose synthase from Thermus thermophilus was truncated in order to study the effect on the enzyme's activity and substrate specificity. Compared with the wild-type (WT) enzyme, the two truncated enzymes (DM1 and DM2) showed lower maltose- and trehalose-converting activities and a different transglycosylation reaction mechanism. In the mutants, the glucose moiety cleaved from the maltose substrate was released from the enzyme and intercepted by external glucose oxidase, preventing the production of trehalose. The WT enzyme, however, retained the glucose in the active site to effectively produce trehalose. In addition, DM1 synthesized much higher amounts of mannose-containing disaccharide trehalose analog (Man-TA) than did the WT and DM2. The results suggest that the C-terminal domain in the WT enzyme is important for retaining the glucose moiety within the active site. The mutant enzymes could be used to produce Man-TA, a postulated inhibitor of gut disaccharidases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigating the Roles of the C-Terminal Domain of Plasmodium falciparum GyrA.

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    Soshichiro Nagano

    Full Text Available Malaria remains as one of the most deadly diseases in developing countries. The Plasmodium causative agents of human malaria such as Plasmodium falciparum possess an organelle, the apicoplast, which is the result of secondary endosymbiosis and retains its own circular DNA. A type II topoisomerase, DNA gyrase, is present in the apicoplast. In prokaryotes this enzyme is a proven, effective target for antibacterial agents, and its discovery in P. falciparum opens up the prospect of exploiting it as a drug target. Basic characterisation of P. falciparum gyrase is important because there are significant sequence differences between it and the prokaryotic enzyme. However, it has proved difficult to obtain soluble protein. Here we have predicted a new domain boundary in P. falciparum GyrA that corresponds to the C-terminal domain of prokaryotic GyrA and successfully purified it in a soluble form. Biochemical analyses revealed many similarities between the C-terminal domains of GyrA from E. coli and P. falciparum, suggesting that despite its considerably larger size, the malarial protein carries out a similar DNA wrapping function. Removal of a unique Asn-rich region in the P. falciparum protein did not result in a significant change, suggesting it is dispensable for DNA wrapping.

  16. Phage Endolysin: A Way To Understand A Binding Function Of C-Terminal Domains A Mini Review

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    Jarábková Veronika

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Endolysins are bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases, which are synthesized in the end of phage reproduction cycle, in an infected host cell. Usually, for endolysins from phages that infect Gram-positive bacteria, a modular structure is typical. Therefore, these are composed of at least two separate functional domains: an N-terminal catalytic domain (EAD and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD. Specific ligand recognition of CBDs and following peptidoglycan (PG binding mostly allows a rapid lytic activity of an EAD. Here we briefly characterize phage endolysin CBDs in conjuction with their domain architecture, (nonnecessity for the following lytic activity and a high/low specificity of their ligands as well. Such an overall assessment of CBDs may help to find new ways to widen opportunities in their protein design to create ‛designer recombinant endolysins’ with diverse applications.

  17. Hevea brasiliensis prohevein possesses a conserved C-terminal domain with amyloid-like properties in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Bentaleb, Ahmed; Peruch, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Prohevein is a wound-induced protein and a main allergen from latex of Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). This 187 amino-acid protein is cleaved in two fragments: a N-terminal 43 amino-acids called hevein, a lectin bearing a chitin-binding motif with antifungal properties and a C-terminal domain (C-ter) far less characterized. We provide here new insights on the characteristics of prohevein, hevein and C-terminal domain. Using complementary biochemical (ThT/CR/chitin binding, agglutination) and structural (modeling, ATR-FTIR, TEM, WAXS) approaches, we show that this domain clearly displays all the characteristics of an amyloid-like proteins in vitro, that could confer agglutination activity in synergy with its chitin-binding activity. Additionally, this C-ter domain is highly conserved and present in numerous plant prohevein-like proteins or pathogenesis-related (PR and WIN) proteins. This could be the hallmark of the eventual presence of proteins with amyloid properties in plants, that could potentially play a role in defense through aggregation properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of AWAP IV, the C-terminal domain of the avian protein AWAK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, C L; Milona, P; Hall, J

    2006-04-01

    AWAP IV constitutes the C-terminal domain of the larger 81 kDa protein AWAK [Avian WAP (whey acidic protein) domain- and Kunitz domain-containing], which is predicted, through conserved domain database searching, to contain at least four WAP domains and one Kunitz domain. RT (reverse transcription)-PCR analyses revealed mRNA transcripts encoding AWAP IV in the small intestinal and kidney tissues of 5-day-old Salmonella-infected chicks. Time-kill antimicrobial assays using rAWAP IV (recombinant AWAP IV) cell lysate indicated antimicrobial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria including Salmonella, Streptococcus and Staphylococcus spp. In addition, permeabilization of the outer membrane of Salmonella, as shown by the NPN (N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine) fluorescent probe assay, supported the ability of rAWAP IV to disrupt prokaryotic membranes. WAP domains can function as inhibitors of serine protease activity, and the microbial serine proteases subtilisin and proteinase K were inhibited by rAWAP IV cell lysate. However, at comparable concentrations, no significant inhibition of the mammalian serine protease elastase was observed. The combined broad-spectrum antibacterial and anti-protease activities of AWAP IV suggest a novel role in the avian innate defence mechanisms operating against microbial infection.

  19. C-terminal domains implicated in the functional surface expression of potassium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Marc; Sánchez, Araceli; Monje, Francisco; Stühmer, Walter; Weseloh, Rüdiger M.; Pardo, Luis A.

    2003-01-01

    A short C-terminal domain is required for correct tetrameric assembly in some potassium channels. Here, we show that this domain forms a coiled coil that determines not only the stability but also the selectivity of the multimerization. Synthetic peptides comprising the sequence of this domain in Eag1 and other channels are able to form highly stable tetrameric coiled coils and display selective heteromultimeric interactions. We show that loss of function caused by disruption of this domain in Herg1 can be rescued by introducing the equivalent domain from Eag1, and that this chimeric protein can form heteromultimers with Eag1 while wild-type Erg1 cannot. Additionally, a short endoplasmic reticulum retention sequence closely preceding the coiled coil plays a crucial role for surface expression. Both domains appear to co-operate to form fully functional channels on the cell surface and are a frequent finding in ion channels. Many pathological phenotypes may be attributed to mutations affecting one or both domains. PMID:12554641

  20. Structural insight into the specificity of the B3 DNA-binding domains provided by the co-crystal structure of the C-terminal fragment of BfiI restriction enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovenko, Dmitrij; Manakova, Elena; Zakrys, Linas; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Gražulis, Saulius; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-04-01

    The B3 DNA-binding domains (DBDs) of plant transcription factors (TF) and DBDs of EcoRII and BfiI restriction endonucleases (EcoRII-N and BfiI-C) share a common structural fold, classified as the DNA-binding pseudobarrel. The B3 DBDs in the plant TFs recognize a diverse set of target sequences. The only available co-crystal structure of the B3-like DBD is that of EcoRII-N (recognition sequence 5'-CCTGG-3'). In order to understand the structural and molecular mechanisms of specificity of B3 DBDs, we have solved the crystal structure of BfiI-C (recognition sequence 5'-ACTGGG-3') complexed with 12-bp cognate oligoduplex. Structural comparison of BfiI-C-DNA and EcoRII-N-DNA complexes reveals a conserved DNA-binding mode and a conserved pattern of interactions with the phosphodiester backbone. The determinants of the target specificity are located in the loops that emanate from the conserved structural core. The BfiI-C-DNA structure presented here expands a range of templates for modeling of the DNA-bound complexes of the B3 family of plant TFs.

  1. A Novel Fold in the Tral Relaxase-Helicase C-Terminal Domain Is Essential for Conjugative DNA Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guogas, Laura M.; Kennedy, Sarah A.; Lee, Jin-Hyup; Redinbo, Matthew R.; (UNC)

    2009-06-04

    TraI relaxase-helicase is the central catalytic component of the multiprotein relaxosome complex responsible for conjugative DNA transfer (CDT) between bacterial cells. CDT is a primary mechanism for the lateral propagation of microbial genetic material, including the spread of antibiotic resistance genes. The 2.4-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli F (fertility) plasmid TraI protein is presented, and specific structural regions essential for CDT are identified. The crystal structure reveals a novel fold composed of a 28-residue N-terminal {alpha}-domain connected by a proline-rich loop to a compact {alpha}/{beta}-domain. Both the globular nature of the {alpha}/{beta}-domain and the presence as well as rigidity of the proline-rich loop are required for DNA transfer and single-stranded DNA binding. Taken together, these data establish the specific structural features of this noncatalytic domain that are essential to DNA conjugation.

  2. Insights into the Structure of Dimeric RNA Helicase CsdA and Indispensable Role of Its C-Terminal Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling; Wang, Lijun; Peng, Junhui; Li, Fudong; Wu, Lijie; Zhang, Beibei; Lv, Mengqi; Zhang, Jiahai; Gong, Qingguo; Zhang, Rongguang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wu, Jihui; Tang, Yajun; Shi, Yunyu

    2017-12-05

    CsdA has been proposed to be essential for the biogenesis of ribosome and gene regulation after cold shock. However, the structure of CsdA and the function of its long C-terminal regions are still unclear. Here, we solved all of the domain structures of CsdA and found two previously uncharacterized auxiliary domains: a dimerization domain (DD) and an RNA-binding domain (RBD). Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments helped to track the conformational flexibilities of the helicase core domains and C-terminal regions. Biochemical assays revealed that DD is indispensable for stabilizing the CsdA dimeric structure. We also demonstrate for the first time that CsdA functions as a stable dimer at low temperature. The C-terminal regions are critical for RNA binding and efficient enzymatic activities. CsdA_RBD could specifically bind to the regions with a preference for single-stranded G-rich RNA, which may help to bring the helicase core to unwind the adjacent duplex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The C-Terminal RpoN Domain of sigma54 Forms an unpredictedHelix-Turn-Helix Motif Similar to domains of sigma70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucleff, Michaeleen; Malak, Lawrence T.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-11-01

    The ''{delta}'' subunit of prokaryotic RNA-polymerase allows gene-specific transcription initiation. Two {sigma} families have been identified, {sigma}{sup 70} and {sigma}{sup 54}, which use distinct mechanisms to initiate transcription and share no detectable sequence homology. Although the {sigma}{sup 70}-type factors have been well characterized structurally by x-ray crystallography, no high-resolution structural information is available for the {sigma}{sup 54}-type factors. Here we present the NMR derived structure of the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} from Aquifex aeolicus. This domain (Thr323 to Gly389), which contains the highly conserved RpoN box sequence, consists of a poorly structured N-terminal tail followed by a three-helix bundle, which is surprisingly similar to domains of the {sigma}{sup 70}-type proteins. Residues of the RpoN box, which have previously been shown to be critical for DNA binding, form the second helix of an unpredicted helix-turn-helix motif. This structure's homology with other DNA binding proteins, combined with previous biochemical data, suggest how the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} binds to DNA.

  4. The Stability Enhancement of Nitrile Hydratase from Bordetella petrii by Swapping the C-terminal Domain of β subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weifeng; Zhu, Longbao; Chen, Xianggui; Wu, Lunjie; Zhou, Zhemin; Liu, Yi

    2016-04-01

    The thermal stability of most nitrile hydratases (NHase) is poor, which has been enhanced to some extent by molecular modifications in several specific regions of the C-terminal domain (C-domain) of β subunit of NHase. Since the C-domain could be present as a naturally separate domain in a few NHases, the whole C-domain is proposed to be related to the NHase stability. The chimeric NHase (SBpNHase) from the thermal-sensitive BpNHase (NHase from Bordetella petrii) and the relatively thermal-stable PtNHase (NHase from Pseudonocardia thermophila) was constructed by swapping the corresponding C-domains. After 30 min incubation at 50 °C, the original BpNHase nearly lost its activity, while the SBpNHase retained 50 % residual activity, compared with the melting temperature (Tm) (50 °C) of the original BpNHase, that of the SBpNHase was 55 °C. The SBpNHase with higher thermal stability would be useful for the thermal stability enhancement of NHase and for the understanding of the relationship between the stability of NHase and its structure.

  5. Factor H C-Terminal Domains Are Critical for Regulation of Platelet/Granulocyte Aggregate Formation

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    Adam Z. Blatt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Platelet/granulocyte aggregates (PGAs increase thromboinflammation in the vasculature, and PGA formation is tightly controlled by the complement alternative pathway (AP negative regulator, Factor H (FH. Mutations in FH are associated with the prothrombotic disease atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, yet it is unknown whether increased PGA formation contributes to the thrombosis seen in patients with aHUS. Here, flow cytometry assays were used to evaluate the effects of aHUS-related mutations on FH regulation of PGA formation and characterize the mechanism. Utilizing recombinant fragments of FH spanning the entire length of the protein, we mapped the regions of FH most critical for limiting AP activity on the surface of isolated human platelets and neutrophils, as well as the regions most critical for regulating PGA formation in human whole blood stimulated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP. FH domains 19–20 were the most critical for limiting AP activity on platelets, neutrophils, and at the platelet/granulocyte interface. The role of FH in PGA formation was attributed to its ability to regulate AP-mediated C5a generation. AHUS-related mutations in domains 19–20 caused differential effects on control of PGA formation and AP activity on platelets and neutrophils. Our data indicate FH C-terminal domains are key for regulating PGA formation, thus increased FH protection may have a beneficial impact on diseases characterized by increased PGA formation, such as cardiovascular disease. Additionally, aHUS-related mutations in domains 19–20 have varying effects on control of TRAP-mediated PGA formation, suggesting that some, but not all, aHUS-related mutations may cause increased PGA formation that contributes to excessive thrombosis in patients with aHUS.

  6. Trypanosoma evansi: identification and characterization of a variant surface glycoprotein lacking cysteine residues in its C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yonggen; Zhao, Xinxin; Zou, Jingru; Suo, Xun

    2011-01-01

    African trypanosomes are flagellated unicellular parasites which proliferate extracellularly in the mammalian host blood-stream and tissue spaces. They evade the hosts' antibody-mediated lyses by sequentially changing their variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). VSG tightly coats the entire parasite body, serving as a physical barrier. In Trypanosoma brucei and the closely related species Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma equiperdum, each VSG polypeptide can be divided into N- and C-terminal domains, based on cysteine distribution and sequence homology. N-terminal domain, the basis of antigenic variation, is hypervariable and contains all the exposed epitopes; C-terminal domain is relatively conserved and a full set of four or eight cysteines were generally observed. We cloned two genes from two distinct variants of T. evansi, utilizing RT-PCR with VSG-specific primers. One contained a VSG type A N-terminal domain followed a C-terminal domain lacking cysteine residues. To confirm that this gene is expressed as a functional VSG, the expression and localization of the corresponding gene product were characterized using Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining of living trypanosomes. Expression analysis showed that this protein was highly expressed, variant-specific, and had a ubiquitous cellular surface localization. All these results indicated that it was expressed as a functional VSG. Our finding showed that cysteine residues in VSG C-terminal domain were not essential; the conserved C-terminal domain generally in T. brucei like VSGs would possibly evolve for regulating the VSG expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Amyloidogenic Properties of a D/N Mutated 12 Amino Acid Fragment of the C-Terminal Domain of the Cholesteryl-Ester Transfer Protein (CETP

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    Victor García-González

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP facilitates the transfer of cholesterol esters and triglycerides between lipoproteins in plasma where the critical site for its function is situated in the C-terminal domain. Our group has previously shown that this domain presents conformational changes in a non-lipid environment when the mutation D470N is introduced. Using a series of peptides derived from this C-terminal domain, the present study shows that these changes favor the induction of a secondary β-structure as characterized by spectroscopic analysis and fluorescence techniques. From this type of secondary structure, the formation of peptide aggregates and fibrillar structures with amyloid characteristics induced cytotoxicity in microglial cells in culture. These supramolecular structures promote cell cytotoxicity through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and change the balance of a series of proteins that control the process of endocytosis, similar to that observed when β-amyloid fibrils are employed. Therefore, a fine balance between the highly dynamic secondary structure of the C-terminal domain of CETP, the net charge, and the physicochemical characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment define the type of secondary structure acquired. Changes in this balance might favor misfolding in this region, which would alter the lipid transfer capacity conducted by CETP, favoring its propensity to substitute its physiological function.

  8. Cooperative cold denaturation: the case of the C-terminal domain of ribosomal protein L9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Bowu; Shan, Bing; Baiz, Carlos; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2013-04-09

    Cold denaturation is a general property of globular proteins, but it is difficult to directly characterize because the transition temperature of protein cold denaturation, T(c), is often below the freezing point of water. As a result, studies of protein cold denaturation are often facilitated by addition of denaturants, using destabilizing pHs or extremes of pressure, or reverse micelle encapsulation, and there are few studies of cold-induced unfolding under near native conditions. The thermal and denaturant-induced unfolding of single-domain proteins is usually cooperative, but the cooperativity of cold denaturation is controversial. The issue is of both fundamental and practical importance because cold unfolding may reveal information about otherwise inaccessible partially unfolded states and because many therapeutic proteins need to be stabilized against cold unfolding. It is thus desirable to obtain more information about the process under nonperturbing conditions. The ability to access cold denaturation in native buffer is also very useful for characterizing protein thermodynamics, especially when other methods are not applicable. In this work, we study a point mutant of the C-terminal domain of ribosomal protein L9 (CTL9), which has a T(c) above 0 °C. The mutant was designed to allow the study of cold denaturation under near native conditions. The cold denaturation process of I98A CTL9 was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, circular dichroism, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results are consistent with apparently cooperative, two-state cold unfolding. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies show that the unfolded state expands as the temperature is lowered.

  9. A C-terminal PDZ domain-binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling dopamine transporter levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. The dopamine transporters contain a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain-binding sequence...

  10. Characterization of a novel mutant KCNQ1 channel subunit lacking a large part of the C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Katsuya; Kinoshita, Koshi; Yokoyama, Tomoki; Hata, Yukiko; Komatsu, Takuto; Tsushima, Eikichi; Nishide, Kohki; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Mizumaki, Koichi; Tabata, Toshihide; Inoue, Hiroshi; Nishida, Naoki; Fukurotani, Kenkichi

    2013-10-18

    A mutation of KCNQ1 gene encoding the alpha subunit of the channel mediating the slow delayed rectifier K(+) current in cardiomyocytes may cause severe arrhythmic disorders. We identified KCNQ1(Y461X), a novel mutant gene encoding KCNQ1 subunit whose C-terminal domain is truncated at tyrosine 461 from a man with a mild QT interval prolongation. We made whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from HEK-293T cells transfected with either of wild-type KCNQ1 [KCNQ1(WT)], KCNQ1(Y461X), or their mixture plus KCNE1 auxiliary subunit gene. The KCNQ1(Y461X)-transfected cells showed no delayed rectifying current. The cells transfected with both KCNQ1(WT) and KCNQ1(Y461X) showed the delayed rectifying current that is thought to be mediated largely by homomeric channel consisting of KCNQ1(WT) subunit because its voltage-dependence of activation, activation rate, and deactivation rate were similar to the current in the KCNQ1(WT)-transfected cells. The immunoblots of HEK-293T cell-derived lysates showed that KCNQ1(Y461X) subunit cannot form channel tetramers by itself or with KCNQ1(WT) subunit. Moreover, immunocytochemical analysis in HEK-293T cells showed that the surface expression level of KCNQ1(Y461X) subunit was very low with or without KCNQ1(WT) subunit. These findings suggest that the massive loss of the C-terminal domain of KCNQ1 subunit impairs the assembly, trafficking, and function of the mutant subunit-containing channels, whereas the mutant subunit does not interfere with the functional expression of the homomeric wild-type channel. Therefore, the homozygous but not heterozygous inheritance of KCNQ1(Y461X) might cause major arrhythmic disorders. This study provides a new insight into the structure-function relation of KCNQ1 channel and treatments of cardiac channelopathies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cdc15 Phosphorylates the C-terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II for Transcription during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Rastogi, Shivangi; Shukla, Harish; Asalam, Mohd; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2017-03-31

    In eukaryotes, the basal transcription in interphase is orchestrated through the regulation by kinases (Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1) and phosphatases (Ssu72, Rtr1, and Fcp1), which act through the post-translational modification of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The CTD comprises the repeated Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser motif with potential epigenetic modification sites. Despite the observation of transcription and periodic expression of genes during mitosis with entailing CTD phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, the associated CTD specific kinase(s) and its role in transcription remains unknown. Here we have identified Cdc15 as a potential kinase phosphorylating Ser-2 and Ser-5 of CTD for transcription during mitosis in the budding yeast. The phosphorylation of CTD by Cdc15 is independent of any prior Ser phosphorylation(s). The inactivation of Cdc15 causes reduction of global CTD phosphorylation during mitosis and affects the expression of genes whose transcript levels peak during mitosis. Cdc15 also influences the complete transcription of clb2 gene and phosphorylates Ser-5 at the promoter and Ser-2 toward the 3' end of the gene. The observation that Cdc15 could phosphorylate Ser-5, as well as Ser-2, during transcription in mitosis is in contrast to the phosphorylation marks put by the kinases in interphase (G1, S, and G2), where Cdck7/Kin28 phosphorylates Ser-5 at promoter and Bur1/Ctk1 phosphorylates Ser-2 at the 3' end of the genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. N-Terminal Domains in Two-Domain Proteins Are Biased to Be Shorter and Predicted to Fold Faster Than Their C-Terminal Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etai Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational analysis of proteomes in all kingdoms of life reveals a strong tendency for N-terminal domains in two-domain proteins to have shorter sequences than their neighboring C-terminal domains. Given that folding rates are affected by chain length, we asked whether the tendency for N-terminal domains to be shorter than their neighboring C-terminal domains reflects selection for faster-folding N-terminal domains. Calculations of absolute contact order, another predictor of folding rate, provide additional evidence that N-terminal domains tend to fold faster than their neighboring C-terminal domains. A possible explanation for this bias, which is more pronounced in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, is that faster folding of N-terminal domains reduces the risk for protein aggregation during folding by preventing formation of nonnative interdomain interactions. This explanation is supported by our finding that two-domain proteins with a shorter N-terminal domain are much more abundant than those with a shorter C-terminal domain.

  13. Structural Aspects of N-Glycosylations and the C-terminal Region in Human Glypican-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Wael; Adamczyk, Barbara; Örnros, Jessica; Karlsson, Niclas G; Mani, Katrin; Logan, Derek T

    2015-09-18

    Glypicans are multifunctional cell surface proteoglycans involved in several important cellular signaling pathways. Glypican-1 (Gpc1) is the predominant heparan sulfate proteoglycan in the developing and adult human brain. The two N-linked glycans and the C-terminal domain that attach the core protein to the cell membrane are not resolved in the Gpc1 crystal structure. Therefore, we have studied Gpc1 using crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chromatographic approaches to elucidate the composition, structure, and function of the N-glycans and the C terminus and also the topology of Gpc1 with respect to the membrane. The C terminus is shown to be highly flexible in solution, but it orients the core protein transverse to the membrane, directing a surface evolutionarily conserved in Gpc1 orthologs toward the membrane, where it may interact with signaling molecules and/or membrane receptors on the cell surface, or even the enzymes involved in heparan sulfate substitution in the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, the N-glycans are shown to extend the protein stability and lifetime by protection against proteolysis and aggregation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. C-Terminal Domain Swapping of SSB Changes the Size of the ssDNA Binding Site

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    Yen-Hua Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB plays an important role in DNA metabolism, including DNA replication, repair, and recombination, and is therefore essential for cell survival. Bacterial SSB consists of an N-terminal ssDNA-binding/oligomerization domain and a flexible C-terminal protein-protein interaction domain. We characterized the ssDNA-binding properties of Klebsiella pneumoniae SSB (KpSSB, Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium LT2 SSB (StSSB, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 SSB (PaSSB, and two chimeric KpSSB proteins, namely, KpSSBnStSSBc and KpSSBnPaSSBc. The C-terminal domain of StSSB or PaSSB was exchanged with that of KpSSB through protein chimeragenesis. By using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we characterized the stoichiometry of KpSSB, StSSB, PaSSB, KpSSBnStSSBc, and KpSSBnPaSSBc, complexed with a series of ssDNA homopolymers. The binding site sizes were determined to be 26±2, 21±2, 29±2, 21±2, and 29±2 nucleotides (nt, respectively. Comparison of the binding site sizes of KpSSB, KpSSBnStSSBc, and KpSSBnPaSSBc showed that the C-terminal domain swapping of SSB changes the size of the binding site. Our observations suggest that not only the conserved N-terminal domain but also the C-terminal domain of SSB is an important determinant for ssDNA binding.

  15. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Inactivation of Mechanically Activated Piezo1 Ion Channels Is Determined by the C-Terminal Extracellular Domain and the Inner Pore Helix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezo proteins form mechanically activated ion channels that are responsible for our sense of light touch, proprioception, and vascular blood flow. Upon activation by mechanical stimuli, Piezo channels rapidly inactivate in a voltage-dependent manner through an unknown mechanism. Inactivation of Piezo channels is physiologically important, as it modulates overall mechanical sensitivity, gives rise to frequency filtering of repetitive mechanical stimuli, and is itself the target of numerous human disease-related channelopathies that are not well understood mechanistically. Here, we identify the globular C-terminal extracellular domain as a structure that is sufficient to confer the time course of inactivation and a single positively charged lysine residue at the adjacent inner pore helix as being required for its voltage dependence. Our results are consistent with a mechanism for inactivation that is mediated through voltage-dependent conformations of the inner pore helix and allosteric coupling with the C-terminal extracellular domain.

  17. The C-terminal domain of human grp94 protects the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) against thermal aggregation. Role of disulfide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roher, N; Miró, F; Boldyreff, B

    2001-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (residues 518-803) of the 94 kDa glucose regulated protein (grp94) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with a His6-N-terminal tag (grp94-CT). This truncated form of grp94 formed dimers and oligomers that could be dissociated into monomers by treatment...... ratios of 4 : 1. The presence of dithiothreitol markedly reduced the anti-aggregation effects of grp94-CT on CK2alpha without altering the solubility of the chaperone. It is concluded that the chaperone activity of the C-terminal domain of human grp94 requires the maintenance of its quaternary structure...... (dimers and oligomers), which seems to be stabilised by disulphide bonds....

  18. Crystal structures reveal a thiol protease-like catalytic triad in the C-terminal region of Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadokoro, Kengo; Kamitani, Shigeki; Miyazawa, Masayuki; Hanajima-Ozawa, Miyuki; Fukui, Aya; Miyake, Masami; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2007-03-20

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT), one of the virulence factors produced by the bacteria, exerts its toxicity by up-regulating various signaling cascades downstream of the heterotrimeric GTPases Gq and G12/13 in an unknown fashion. Here, we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal region (residues 575-1,285) of PMT, which carries an intracellularly active moiety. The overall structure of C-terminal region of PMT displays a Trojan horse-like shape, composed of three domains with a "feet"-,"body"-, and "head"-type arrangement, which were designated C1, C2, and C3 from the N to the C terminus, respectively. The C1 domain, showing marked similarity in steric structure to the N-terminal domain of Clostridium difficile toxin B, was found to lead the toxin molecule to the plasma membrane. The C3 domain possesses the Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad that is organized only when the Cys is released from a disulfide bond. The steric alignment of the triad corresponded well to that of papain or other enzymes carrying Cys-His-Asp. PMT toxicities on target cells were completely abrogated when one of the amino acids constituting the triad was mutated. Our results indicate that PMT is an enzyme toxin carrying the cysteine protease-like catalytic triad dependent on the redox state and functions on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane of target cells.

  19. A Superhelical Spiral in the Escherichia coli DNA Gyrase A C-terminal Domain Imparts Unidirectional Supercoiling Bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruthenburg,A.; Graybosch, D.; Huetsch, J.; Verdine, G.

    2005-01-01

    DNA gyrase is unique among type II topoisomerases in that its DNA supercoiling activity is unidirectional. The C-terminal domain of the gyrase A subunit (GyrA-CTD) is required for this supercoiling bias. We report here the x-ray structure of the Escherichia coli GyrA-CTD (Protein Data Bank code 1ZI0). The E. coli GyrA-CTD adopts a circular-shaped {beta}-pinwheel fold first seen in the Borrelia burgdorferi GyrA-CTD. However, whereas the B. burgdorferi GyrA-CTD is flat, the E. coli GyrA-CTD is spiral. DNA relaxation assays reveal that the E. coli GyrA-CTD wraps DNA inducing substantial (+) superhelicity, while the B. burgdorferi GyrA-CTD introduces a more modest (+) superhelicity. The observation of a superhelical spiral in the present structure and that of the Bacillus stearothermophilus ParC-CTD structure suggests unexpected similarities in substrate selectivity between gyrase and Topo IV enzymes. We propose a model wherein the right-handed ((+) solenoidal) wrapping of DNA around the E. coli GyrA-CTD enforces unidirectional (-) DNA supercoiling.

  20. Bio-molecular architects: a scaffold provided by the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengmeng; Gill, Gordon N; Zhang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the transcription of genes is accurately orchestrated both spatially and temporally by the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (CTD). The CTD provides a dynamic platform to recruit different regulators of the transcription apparatus. Different posttranslational modifications are precisely applied to specific sites of the CTD to coordinate transcription process. Regulators of the RNA polymerase II must identify specific sites in the CTD for cellular survival, metabolism, and development. Even though the CTD is disordered in the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II crystal structures due to its intrinsic flexibility, recent advances in the complex structural analysis of the CTD with its binding partners provide essential clues for understanding how selectivity is achieved for individual site recognition. The recent discoveries of the interactions between the CTD and histone modification enzymes disclose an important role of the CTD in epigenetic control of the eukaryotic gene expression. The intersection of the CTD code with the histone code discloses an intriguing yet complicated network for eukaryotic transcriptional regulation.

  1. Bio-molecular architects: a scaffold provided by the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, the transcription of genes is accurately orchestrated both spatially and temporally by the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (CTD. The CTD provides a dynamic platform to recruit different regulators of the transcription apparatus. Different posttranslational modifications are precisely applied to specific sites of the CTD to coordinate transcription process. Regulators of the RNA polymerase II must identify specific sites in the CTD for cellular survival, metabolism, and development. Even though the CTD is disordered in the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II crystal structures due to its intrinsic flexibility, recent advances in the complex structural analysis of the CTD with its binding partners provide essential clues for understanding how selectivity is achieved for individual site recognition. The recent discoveries of the interactions between the CTD and histone modification enzymes disclose an important role of the CTD in epigenetic control of the eukaryotic gene expression. The intersection of the CTD code with the histone code discloses an intriguing yet complicated network for eukaryotic transcriptional regulation.

  2. Insights into the Functional Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains of Helicobacter pylori DprA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajendradhar R Dwivedi

    Full Text Available DNA processing protein A (DprA plays a crucial role in the process of natural transformation. This is accomplished through binding and subsequent protection of incoming foreign DNA during the process of internalization. DprA along with Single stranded DNA binding protein A (SsbA acts as an accessory factor for RecA mediated DNA strand exchange. H. pylori DprA (HpDprA is divided into an N-terminal domain and a C- terminal domain. In the present study, individual domains of HpDprA have been characterized for their ability to bind single stranded (ssDNA and double stranded DNA (dsDNA. Oligomeric studies revealed that HpDprA possesses two sites for dimerization which enables HpDprA to form large and tightly packed complexes with ss and dsDNA. While the N-terminal domain was found to be sufficient for binding with ss or ds DNA, C-terminal domain has an important role in the assembly of poly-nucleoprotein complex. Using site directed mutagenesis approach, we show that a pocket comprising positively charged amino acids in the N-terminal domain has an important role in the binding of ss and dsDNA. Together, a functional cross talk between the two domains of HpDprA facilitating the binding and formation of higher order complex with DNA is discussed.

  3. Dissection of influenza A virus M1 protein: pH-dependent oligomerization of N-terminal domain and dimerization of C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Wang, Zhao; Liu, Xiaoling; Yin, Changcheng; Basit, Zeshan; Xia, Bin; Liu, Wenjun

    2012-01-01

    The matrix 1 (M1) protein of Influenza A virus plays many critical roles throughout the virus life cycle. The oligomerization of M1 is essential for the formation of the viral matrix layer during the assembly and budding process. In the present study, we report that M1 can oligomerize in vitro, and that the oligomerization is pH-dependent. The N-terminal domain of M1 alone exists as multiple-order oligomers at pH 7.4, and the C-terminal domain alone forms an exclusively stable dimer. As a result, intact M1 can display different forms of oligomers and dimer is the smallest oligomerization state, at neutral pH. At pH 5.0, oligomers of the N-terminal domain completely dissociate into monomers, while the C-terminal domain remains in dimeric form. As a result, oligomers of intact M1 dissociate into a stable dimer at acidic pH. Oligomerization of M1 involves both the N- and C-terminal domains. The N-terminal domain determines the pH-dependent oligomerization characteristic, and C-terminal domain forms a stable dimer, which contributes to the dimerization of M1. The present study will help to unveil the mechanisms of influenza A virus assembly and uncoating process.

  4. Resolving hot spots in the C-terminal dimerization domain that determine the stability of the molecular chaperone Hsp90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Ciglia

    Full Text Available Human heat shock protein of 90 kDa (hHsp90 is a homodimer that has an essential role in facilitating malignant transformation at the molecular level. Inhibiting hHsp90 function is a validated approach for treating different types of tumors. Inhibiting the dimerization of hHsp90 via its C-terminal domain (CTD should provide a novel way to therapeutically interfere with hHsp90 function. Here, we predicted hot spot residues that cluster in the CTD dimerization interface by a structural decomposition of the effective energy of binding computed by the MM-GBSA approach and confirmed these predictions using in silico alanine scanning with DrugScore(PPI. Mutation of these residues to alanine caused a significant decrease in the melting temperature according to differential scanning fluorimetry experiments, indicating a reduced stability of the mutant hHsp90 complexes. Size exclusion chromatography and multi-angle light scattering studies demonstrate that the reduced stability of the mutant hHsp90 correlates with a lower complex stoichiometry due to the disruption of the dimerization interface. These results suggest that the identified hot spot residues can be used as a pharmacophoric template for identifying and designing small-molecule inhibitors of hHsp90 dimerization.

  5. Downstream signaling mechanism of the C-terminal activation domain of transcriptional coactivator CoCoA

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong Hoon; Yang, Catherine K.; Stallcup, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    The coiled-coil coactivator (CoCoA) is a transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors and enhances nuclear receptor function by the interaction with the bHLH-PAS domain (AD3) of p160 coactivators. The C-terminal activation domain (AD) of CoCoA possesses strong transactivation activity and is required for the coactivator function of CoCoA with nuclear receptors. To understand how CoCoA AD transmits its activating signal to the transcription machinery, we defined specific subregions, amino...

  6. Tandem duplications in the C-terminal domain of the mesotocin receptor exclusively identified among East Eurasian thrushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hideaki; Nishiumi, Isao; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2013-12-01

    Mesotocin is a neurohypophyseal hormone found in some non-mammalian vertebrates, including birds, reptiles, and amphibians. In this study, we identified and characterized 18-amino acid duplications in the C-terminal domain of the mesotocin receptor (MTR), specifically found in Turdus thrushes (Aves: Passeriforms: Turdidae). These duplicated elements are located in the distal part of the C-terminal tails of MTR and consist of amino acids that are highly conserved among major vertebrates. Intraspecific polymorphisms in a variable number of tandem duplications are commonly found in East Eurasian Turdus, but not in any other genus of Turdidae. Moreover, the genus Turdus can be further classified into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of a 3-amino acid deletion just adjacent to the putative palmitoylation site in the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. The phylogeny presented here strongly supports the conspecific group of 4 East Eurasian thrushes (Turdus pallidus, T. chrysolaus, T. obscurus, and T. celaenops). Our findings, therefore, provide a new synapomorphy that can be used for phylogenetic assumptions and shed a light on the history of diversification within Eurasian Turdus clades.

  7. Structural and Functional Characterization of the C-terminal Transmembrane Region of NBCe1-A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Pushkin, Alexander; Liu, Weixin; Chang, Connie; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    NBCe1-A and AE1 both belong to the SLC4 HCO3− transporter family. The two transporters share 40% sequence homology in the C-terminal transmembrane region. In this study, we performed extensive substituted cysteine-scanning mutagenesis analysis of the C-terminal region of NBCe1-A covering amino acids Ala800–Lys967. Location of the introduced cysteines was determined by whole cell labeling with a membrane-permeant biotin maleimide and a membrane-impermeant 2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino) ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA) cysteine-reactive reagent. The results show that the extracellular surface of the NBCe1-A C-terminal transmembrane region is minimally exposed to aqueous media with Met858 accessible to both biotin maleimide and TAMRA and Thr926–Ala929 only to TAMRA labeling. The intracellular surface contains a highly exposed (Met813–Gly828) region and a cryptic (Met887–Arg904) connecting loop. The lipid/aqueous interface of the last transmembrane segment is at Asp960. Our data clearly determined that the C terminus of NBCe1-A contains 5 transmembrane segments with greater average size compared with AE1. Functional assays revealed only two residues in the region of Pro868–Leu967 (a functionally important region in AE1) that are highly sensitive to cysteine substitution. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A is tightly folded with unique structural and functional features that differ from AE1. PMID:20837482

  8. Dandelion PPO-1/PPO-2 domain-swaps: the C-terminal domain modulates the pH optimum and the linker affects SDS-mediated activation and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leufken, Christine M; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Dirks-Hofmeister, Mareike E

    2015-02-01

    Plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) have a conserved three-domain structure: (i) the N-terminal domain (containing the active site) is connected via (ii) a linker to (iii) the C-terminal domain. The latter covers the active site, thereby maintaining the enzyme in a latent state. Activation can be achieved with SDS but little is known about the mechanism. We prepared domain-swap variants of dandelion PPO-1 and PPO-2 to test the specific functions of individual domains and their impact on enzyme characteristics. Our experiments revealed that the C-terminal domain modulates the pH optimum curve and has a strong influence on the optimal pH value. The linker determines the SDS concentration required for full activation. It also influences the SDS concentration required for half maximal activation (kSDS) and the stability of the enzyme during prolonged incubation in buffers containing SDS, but the N-terminal domain has the strongest effect on these parameters. The N-terminal domain also determines the IC50 of SDS and the stability in buffers containing or lacking SDS. We propose that the linker and C-terminal domain fine-tune the activation of plant PPOs. The C-terminal domain adjusts the pH optimum and the linker probably contains an SDS-binding/interaction site that influences inactivation and determines the SDS concentration required for activation. For the first time, we have determined the influence of the three PPO domains on enzyme activation and stability providing insight into the regulation and activation mechanisms of type-3 copper proteins in general. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of a Novel TGF-β-Binding Site in the Zona Pellucida C-terminal (ZP-C) Domain of TGF-β-Receptor-3 (TGFR-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestel, Uschi; Resch, Marcus; Meinhardt, Kathrin; Weiler, Sigrid; Hellmann, Tina V; Mueller, Thomas D; Nickel, Joachim; Eichler, Jutta; Muller, Yves A

    2013-01-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) domain is present in extracellular proteins such as the zona pellucida proteins and tectorins and participates in the formation of polymeric protein networks. However, the ZP domain also occurs in the cytokine signaling co-receptor transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor type 3 (TGFR-3, also known as betaglycan) where it contributes to cytokine ligand recognition. Currently it is unclear how the ZP domain architecture enables this dual functionality. Here, we identify a novel major TGF-β-binding site in the FG loop of the C-terminal subdomain of the murine TGFR-3 ZP domain (ZP-C) using protein crystallography, limited proteolysis experiments, surface plasmon resonance measurements and synthetic peptides. In the murine 2.7 Å crystal structure that we are presenting here, the FG-loop is disordered, however, well-ordered in a recently reported homologous rat ZP-C structure. Surprisingly, the adjacent external hydrophobic patch (EHP) segment is registered differently in the rat and murine structures suggesting that this segment only loosely associates with the remaining ZP-C fold. Such a flexible and temporarily-modulated association of the EHP segment with the ZP domain has been proposed to control the polymerization of ZP domain-containing proteins. Our findings suggest that this flexibility also extends to the ZP domain of TGFR-3 and might facilitate co-receptor ligand interaction and presentation via the adjacent FG-loop. This hints that a similar C-terminal region of the ZP domain architecture possibly regulates both the polymerization of extracellular matrix proteins and cytokine ligand recognition of TGFR-3.

  10. Structural and dynamic properties of the C-terminal region of the Escherichia coli RNA chaperone Hfq: integrative experimental and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Bin; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Jiahai; Gong, Qingguo; Shi, Yunyu; Wu, Jihui; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2017-08-09

    In Escherichia coli, hexameric Hfq is an important RNA chaperone that facilitates small RNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. The Hfq monomer consists of an evolutionarily conserved Sm domain (residues 1-65) and a flexible C-terminal region (residues 66-102). It has been recognized that the existence of the C-terminal region is important for the function of Hfq, but its detailed structural and dynamic properties remain elusive due to its disordered nature. In this work, using integrative experimental techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering, as well as multi-scale computational simulations, new insights into the structure and dynamics of the C-terminal region in the context of the Hfq hexamer are provided. Although the C-terminal region is intrinsically disordered, some residues (83-86) are motionally restricted. The hexameric core may affect the secondary structure propensity of the C-terminal region, due to transient interactions between them. The residues at the rim and the proximal side of the core have significantly more transient contacts with the C-terminal region than those residues at the distal side, which may facilitate the function of the C-terminal region in the release of double-stranded RNAs and the cycling of small non-coding RNAs. Structure ensembles constructed by fitting the experimental data also support that the C-terminal region prefers to locate at the proximal side. From multi-scale simulations, we propose that the C-terminal region may play a dual role of steric effect (especially at the proximal side) and recruitment (at the both sides) in the binding process of RNA substrates. Interestingly, we have found that these motionally restricted residues may serve as important binding sites for the incoming RNAs that is probably driven by favorable electrostatic interactions. These integrative studies may aid in our understanding of the functional role of the C-terminal region of Hfq.

  11. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between phospho-peptides and the C-terminal domain of BRCA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Victor M.; Ziemys, Arturas; Kizhake, Smitha; Yuan, Ziyan; Natarajan, Amarnath; Cavasotto, Claudio N.

    2011-11-01

    The C-terminal domain of BRCA1(BRCT) is involved in the DNA repair pathway by recognizing the pSXXF motif in interacting proteins. It has been reported that short peptides containing this motif bind to BRCA1(BRCT) in the micromolar range with high specificity. In this work, the binding of pSXXF peptides has been studied computationally and experimentally in order to characterize their interaction with BRCA1(BRCT). Elucidation of the contacts that drive the protein-ligand interaction is critical for the development of high affinity small-molecule BRCA1 inhibitors. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealed the key role of threonine at the peptide P+2 position in providing structural rigidity to the ligand in the bound state. The mutation at P+1 had minor effects. Peptide extension at the N-terminal position with the naphthyl amino acid exhibited a modest increase in binding affinity, what could be explained by the dispersion interaction of the naphthyl side-chain with a hydrophobic patch. Three in silico end-point methods were considered for the calculation of binding free energy. The Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area and the Solvated Interaction Energy methods gave reasonable agreement with experimental data, exhibiting a Pearlman predictive index of 0.71 and 0.78, respectively. The MM-quantum mechanics-surface area method yielded improved results, which was characterized by a Pearlman index of 0.78. The correlation coefficients were 0.59, 0.61 and 0.69, respectively. The ability to apply a QM level of theory within an end-point binding free energy protocol may provide a way for a consistent improvement of accuracy in computer-aided drug design.

  12. Extensive de novo solid-state NMR assignments of the 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habenstein, Birgit [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Wasmer, Christian [Harvard Medical School (United States); Bousset, Luc; Sourigues, Yannick [UPR 3082 CNRS, Laboratoire d' Enzymologie et Biochimie Structurales (France); Schuetz, Anne [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Loquet, Antoine [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Melki, Ronald, E-mail: melki@lebs.cnrs-gif.fr [UPR 3082 CNRS, Laboratoire d' Enzymologie et Biochimie Structurales (France); Boeckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France)

    2011-11-15

    We present the de novo resonance assignments for the crystalline 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion using an optimized set of five 3D solid-state NMR spectra. We obtained, using a single uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeled protein sample, sequential chemical-shift information for 74% of the N, C{alpha}, C{beta} triples, and for 80% of further side-chain resonances for these spin systems. We describe the procedures and protocols devised, and discuss possibilities and limitations of the assignment of this largest protein assigned today by solid-state NMR, and for which no solution-state NMR shifts were available. A comparison of the NMR chemical shifts with crystallographic data reveals that regions with high crystallographic B-factors are particularly difficult to assign. While the secondary structure elements derived from the chemical shift data correspond mainly to those present in the X-ray crystal structure, we detect an additional helical element and structural variability in the protein crystal, most probably originating from the different molecules in the asymmetric unit, with the observation of doubled resonances in several parts, including entire stretches, of the protein. Our results provide the point of departure towards an atomic-resolution structural analysis of the C-terminal Ure2p domain in the context of the full-length prion fibrils.

  13. Design and verification of halogen-bonding system at the complex interface of human fertilization-related MUP PDZ5 domain with CAMK's C-terminal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Guo, Yunjie; Zhang, Xue

    2017-11-21

    Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAMK) is physiologically activated in fertilized human oocytes and is involved in the Ca2+ response pathways that link the fertilization calmodulin signal to meiosis resumption and cortical granule exocytosis. The kinase has an unstructured C-terminal tail that can be recognized and bound by the PDZ5 domain of its cognate partner, the multi-PDZ domain protein (MUP). In the current study, we reported a rational biomolecular design of halogen-bonding system at the complex interface of CAMK's C-terminal peptide with MUP PDZ5 domain by using high-level computational approaches. Four organic halogens were employed as atom probes to explore the structural geometry and energetic property of designed halogen bonds in the PDZ5-peptide complex. It was found that the heavier halogen elements such as bromine Br and iodine I can confer stronger halogen bond but would cause bad atomic contacts and overlaps at the complex interface, while fluorine F cannot form effective halogen bond in the complex. In addition, the halogen substitution at different positions of peptide's aromatic ring would result in distinct effects on the halogen-bonding system. The computational findings were then verified by using fluorescence analysis; it is indicated that the halogen type and substitution position play critical role in the interaction strength of halogen bonds, and thus the PDZ5-peptide binding affinity can be improved considerably by optimizing their combination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tight intramolecular regulation of the human Upf1 helicase by its N- and C-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Francesca; Boudvillain, Marc; Le Hir, Hervé

    2013-02-01

    The RNA helicase Upf1 is a multifaceted eukaryotic enzyme involved in DNA replication, telomere metabolism and several mRNA degradation pathways. Upf1 plays a central role in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a surveillance process in which it links premature translation termination to mRNA degradation with its conserved partners Upf2 and Upf3. In human, both the ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity and the phosphorylation of Upf1 are essential for NMD. Upf1 activation occurs when Upf2 binds its N-terminal domain, switching the enzyme to the active form. Here, we uncovered that the C-terminal domain of Upf1, conserved in higher eukaryotes and containing several essential phosphorylation sites, also inhibits the flanking helicase domain. With different biochemical approaches we show that this domain, named SQ, directly interacts with the helicase domain to impede ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. The phosphorylation sites in the distal half of the SQ domain are not directly involved in this inhibition. Therefore, in the absence of multiple binding partners, Upf1 is securely maintained in an inactive state by two intramolecular inhibition mechanisms. This study underlines the tight and intricate regulation pathways required to activate multifunctional RNA helicases like Upf1.

  15. Function and control of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphorylation in vertebrate transcription and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsin, Jing-Ping; Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L

    2014-07-01

    The C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit (the Rpb1 CTD) is composed of tandem heptad repeats of the consensus sequence Y(1)S(2)P(3)T(4)S(5)P(6)S(7). We reported previously that Thr 4 is phosphorylated and functions in histone mRNA 3'-end formation in chicken DT40 cells. Here, we have extended our studies on Thr 4 and to other CTD mutations by using these cells. We found that an Rpb1 derivative containing only the N-terminal half of the CTD, as well as a similar derivative containing all-consensus repeats (26r), conferred full viability, while the C-terminal half, with more-divergent repeats, did not, reflecting a strong and specific defect in snRNA 3'-end formation. Mutation in 26r of all Ser 2 (S2A) or Ser 5 (S5A) residues resulted in lethality, while Ser 7 (S7A) mutants were fully viable. While S2A and S5A cells displayed defects in transcription and RNA processing, S7A cells behaved identically to 26r cells in all respects. Finally, we found that Thr 4 was phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 9 in cells and dephosphorylated both in vitro and in vivo by the phosphatase Fcp1. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. The Ancient Link between G-Protein-Coupled Receptors and C-Terminal Phospholipid Kinase Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sensing external signals and transducing these into intracellular responses requires a molecular signaling system that is crucial for every living organism. Two important eukaryotic signal transduction pathways that are often interlinked are G-protein signaling and phospholipid signaling. Heterotrimeric G-protein subunits activated by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are typical stimulators of phospholipid signaling enzymes such as phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs) or phospholipase C (PLC). However, a direct connection between the two pathways likely exists in oomycetes and slime molds, as they possess a unique class of GPCRs that have a PIPK as an accessory domain. In principle, these so-called GPCR-PIPKs have the capacity of perceiving an external signal (via the GPCR domain) that, via PIPK, directly activates downstream phospholipid signaling. Here we reveal the sporadic occurrence of GPCR-PIPKs in all eukaryotic supergroups, except for plants. Notably, all species having GPCR-PIPKs are unicellular microorganisms that favor aquatic environments. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that GPCR-PIPKs are likely ancestral to eukaryotes and significantly expanded in the last common ancestor of oomycetes. In addition to GPCR-PIPKs, we identified five hitherto-unknown classes of GPCRs with accessory domains, four of which are universal players in signal transduction. Similarly to GPCR-PIPKs, this enables a direct coupling between extracellular sensing and downstream signaling. Overall, our findings point to an ancestral signaling system in eukaryotes where GPCR-mediated sensing is directly linked to downstream responses. PMID:29362235

  17. [C-terminal lysosome targeting domain of CD63 modifies cellular localization of rabies virus glycoprotein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2017-01-01

    The glycoprotein of rabies virus is the central antigen elicited the immune response to infection; therefore, the majority of developing anti-rabies vaccines are based on this protein. In order to increase the efficacy of DNA immunogen encoding rabies virus glycoprotein, the construction of chimeric protein with the CD63 domain has been proposed. The CD63 is a transmembrane protein localized on the cell surface and in lysosomes. The lysosome targeting motif GYEVM is located at its C-terminus. We used the domain that bears this motif (c-CD63) to generate chimeric glycoprotein in order to relocalize it into lysosomes. Here, it was shown that, in cells transfected with plasmid that encodes glycoprotein with c-CD63 motif at the C-terminus, the chimeric protein was predominantly observed in lysosomes and at the cell membrane where the unmodified glycoprotein is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and at the cell surface. We suppose that current modification of the glycoprotein may improve the immunogenicity of anti-rabies DNA vaccines due to more efficient antibody production.

  18. The C-terminal domain of the Arabinosyltransferase Mycobacterium tuberculosis EmbC is a lectin-like carbohydrate binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke J Alderwick

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The D-arabinan-containing polymers arabinogalactan (AG and lipoarabinomannan (LAM are essential components of the unique cell envelope of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Biosynthesis of AG and LAM involves a series of membrane-embedded arabinofuranosyl (Araf transferases whose structures are largely uncharacterised, despite the fact that several of them are pharmacological targets of ethambutol, a frontline drug in tuberculosis therapy. Herein, we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal hydrophilic domain of the ethambutol-sensitive Araf transferase M. tuberculosis EmbC, which is essential for LAM synthesis. The structure of the C-terminal domain of EmbC (EmbC(CT encompasses two sub-domains of different folds, of which subdomain II shows distinct similarity to lectin-like carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM. Co-crystallisation with a cell wall-derived di-arabinoside acceptor analogue and structural comparison with ligand-bound CBMs suggest that EmbC(CT contains two separate carbohydrate binding sites, associated with subdomains I and II, respectively. Single-residue substitution of conserved tryptophan residues (Trp868, Trp985 at these respective sites inhibited EmbC-catalysed extension of LAM. The same substitutions differentially abrogated binding of di- and penta-arabinofuranoside acceptor analogues to EmbC(CT, linking the loss of activity to compromised acceptor substrate binding, indicating the presence of two separate carbohydrate binding sites, and demonstrating that subdomain II indeed functions as a carbohydrate-binding module. This work provides the first step towards unravelling the structure and function of a GT-C-type glycosyltransferase that is essential in M. tuberculosis.

  19. A novel fold in the TraI relaxase-helicase c-terminal domain is essential for conjugative DNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guogas, Laura M; Kennedy, Sarah A; Lee, Jin-Hyup; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2009-02-20

    TraI relaxase-helicase is the central catalytic component of the multiprotein relaxosome complex responsible for conjugative DNA transfer (CDT) between bacterial cells. CDT is a primary mechanism for the lateral propagation of microbial genetic material, including the spread of antibiotic resistance genes. The 2.4-A resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli F (fertility) plasmid TraI protein is presented, and specific structural regions essential for CDT are identified. The crystal structure reveals a novel fold composed of a 28-residue N-terminal alpha-domain connected by a proline-rich loop to a compact alpha/beta-domain. Both the globular nature of the alpha/beta-domain and the presence as well as rigidity of the proline-rich loop are required for DNA transfer and single-stranded DNA binding. Taken together, these data establish the specific structural features of this noncatalytic domain that are essential to DNA conjugation.

  20. N- and C-terminal flanking regions modulate light-induced signal transduction in the LOV2 domain of the blue light sensor phototropin 1 from Avena sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halavaty, Andrei S; Moffat, Keith

    2007-12-11

    Light sensing by photoreceptors controls phototropism, chloroplast movement, stomatal opening, and leaf expansion in plants. Understanding the molecular mechanism by which these processes are regulated requires a quantitative description of photoreceptor dynamics. We focus on a light-driven signal transduction mechanism in the LOV2 domain (LOV, light, oxygen, voltage) of the blue light photoreceptor phototropin 1 from Avena sativa (oat). High-resolution crystal structures of the dark and light states of an oat LOV2 construct including residues Leu404 through Leu546 (LOV2 (404-546)) have been determined at 105 and 293 K. In all four structures, LOV2 (404-546) exhibits the typical Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) fold, flanked by an additional conserved N-terminal turn-helix-turn motif and a C-terminal flanking region containing an amphipathic Jalpha helix. These regions dock on the LOV2 core domain and bury several hydrophobic residues of the central beta-sheet of the core domain that would otherwise be exposed to solvent. Light structures of LOV2 (404-546) reveal that formation of the covalent bond between Cys450 and the C4a atom of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) results in local rearrangement of the hydrogen-bonding network in the FMN binding pocket. These rearrangements are associated with disruption of the Asn414-Asp515 hydrogen bond on the surface of the protein and displacement of the N- and C-terminal flanking regions of LOV2 (404-546), both of which constitute a structural signal.

  1. Evolutionary Divergence of the C-terminal Domain of Complexin Accounts for Functional Disparities between Vertebrate and Invertebrate Complexins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel T. Wragg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Complexin is a critical presynaptic protein that regulates both spontaneous and calcium-triggered neurotransmitter release in all synapses. Although the SNARE-binding central helix of complexin is highly conserved and required for all known complexin functions, the remainder of the protein has profoundly diverged across the animal kingdom. Striking disparities in complexin inhibitory activity are observed between vertebrate and invertebrate complexins but little is known about the source of these differences or their relevance to the underlying mechanism of complexin regulation. We found that mouse complexin 1 (mCpx1 failed to inhibit neurotransmitter secretion in Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions lacking the worm complexin 1 (CPX-1. This lack of inhibition stemmed from differences in the C-terminal domain (CTD of mCpx1. Previous studies revealed that the CTD selectively binds to highly curved membranes and directs complexin to synaptic vesicles. Although mouse and worm complexin have similar lipid binding affinity, their last few amino acids differ in both hydrophobicity and in lipid binding conformation, and these differences strongly impacted CPX-1 inhibitory function. Moreover, function was not maintained if a critical amphipathic helix in the worm CPX-1 CTD was replaced with the corresponding mCpx1 amphipathic helix. Invertebrate complexins generally shared more C-terminal similarity with vertebrate complexin 3 and 4 isoforms, and the amphipathic region of mouse complexin 3 significantly restored inhibitory function to worm CPX-1. We hypothesize that the CTD of complexin is essential in conferring an inhibitory function to complexin, and that this inhibitory activity has been attenuated in the vertebrate complexin 1 and 2 isoforms. Thus, evolutionary changes in the complexin CTD differentially shape its synaptic role across phylogeny.

  2. Crystallization of the C-terminal head domain of the avian adenovirus CELO long fibre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardado Calvo, Pablo [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L. [Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Langlois, Patrick [Agence Francaise de Securité Sanitaire des Aliments, Unité Génétique Virale et Biosecurité, Site Les Croix, BP 53, F-22440 Ploufragan (France); Raaij, Mark J. van, E-mail: vanraaij@usc.es [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-05-01

    Avian adenovirus long-fibre head trimers were expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 216.5, b = 59.2, c = 57.5 Å, β = 101.3°). A complete highly redundant data set was collected to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K using a rotating-anode X-ray source. Avian adenovirus CELO contains two different fibres: fibre 1, the long fibre, and fibre 2, the short fibre. The short fibre is responsible for binding to an unknown avian receptor and is essential for infection of birds. The long fibre is not essential, but is known to bind the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor protein. Both trimeric fibres are attached to the same penton base, of which each icosahedral virus contains 12 copies. The short fibre extends straight outwards, while the long fibre emerges at an angle. The carboxy-terminal amino acids 579–793 of the avian adenovirus long fibre have been expressed with an amino-terminal hexahistidine tag and the expressed trimeric protein has been purified by nickel-affinity chromatography and crystallized. Crystals were grown at low pH using PEG 10 000 as precipitant and belonged to space group C2. The crystals diffracted rotating-anode Cu Kα radiation to at least 1.9 Å resolution and a complete data set was collected from a single crystal to 2.2 Å resolution. Unit-cell parameters were a = 216.5, b = 59.2, c = 57.5 Å, β = 101.3°, suggesting one trimer per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of 46%. The long fibre head does not have significant sequence homology to any other protein of known structure and molecular-replacement attempts with known fibre-head structures were unsuccessful. However, a map calculated using SIRAS phasing shows a clear trimer with a shape similar to known adenovirus fibre-head structures. Structure solution is in progress.

  3. C-terminal β9-strand of the cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain stabilizes activated states of Kv11.1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available Kv11.1 potassium channels are important for regulation of the normal rhythm of the heartbeat. Reduced activity of Kv11.1 channels causes long QT syndrome type 2, a disorder that increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest. Kv11.1 channels are members of the KCNH subfamily of voltage-gated K(+ channels. However, they also share many similarities with the cyclic nucleotide gated ion channel family, including having a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology (cNBH domain. Kv11.1 channels, however, are not directly regulated by cyclic nucleotides. Recently, crystal structures of the cNBH domain from mEAG and zELK channels, both members of the KCNH family of voltage-gated potassium channels, revealed that a C-terminal β9-strand in the cNBH domain occupied the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding site thereby precluding binding of cyclic nucleotides. Here we show that mutations to residues in the β9-strand affect the stability of the open state relative to the closed state of Kv11.1 channels. We also show that disrupting the structure of the β9-strand reduces the stability of the inactivated state relative to the open state. Clinical mutations located in this β9-strand result in reduced trafficking efficiency, which suggests that binding of the C-terminal β9-strand to the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding pocket is also important for assembly and trafficking of Kv11.1 channels.

  4. Probing the interaction of the p53 C-terminal domain to the histone demethylase LSD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranzini, Valentina; Ciossani, Giuseppe; Marabelli, Chiara; Mattevi, Andrea

    2017-10-15

    The p53 transcription factor plays a central role in the regulation of the expression of several genes, and itself is post-translationally regulated through its different domains. Of particular relevance for p53 function is its intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (CTD), representing a hotspot for post-translational modifications and a docking site for transcriptional regulators. For example, the histone H3 lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1) interacts with p53 via the p53-CTD for mutual regulation. To biochemically and functionally characterize this complex, we evaluated the in vitro interactions of LSD1 with several p53-CTD peptides differing in length and modifications. Binding was demonstrated through thermal shift, enzymatic and fluorescence polarization assays, but no enzymatic activity could be detected on methylated p53-CTD peptides in vitro. These experiments were performed using the wild-type enzyme and LSD1 variants that are mutated on three active-site residues. We found that LSD1 demethylase activity is inhibited by p53-CTD. We also noted that the association between the two proteins is mediated by mostly non-specific electrostatic interactions involving conserved active-site residues of LSD1 and a highly charged segment of the p53-CTD. We conclude that p53-CTD inhibits LSD1 activity and that the direct association between the two proteins can contribute to their functional cross-talk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cloning, purification and preliminary X-ray analysis of the C-terminal domain of Helicobacter pylori MotB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roujeinikova, Anna, E-mail: anna.roujeinikova@manchester.ac.uk [Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-01

    The cloning, overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a putative peptidoglycan-binding domain of H. pylori MotB, a stator component of the bacterial flagellar motor, are reported. The C-terminal domain of MotB (MotB-C) contains a putative peptidoglycan-binding motif and is believed to anchor the MotA/MotB stator unit of the bacterial flagellar motor to the cell wall. Crystals of Helicobacter pylori MotB-C (138 amino-acid residues) were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. These crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.8, b = 89.5, c = 66.3 Å, β = 112.5°. The crystals diffract X-rays to at least 1.6 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. Self-rotation function and Matthews coefficient calculations suggest that the asymmetric unit contains one tetramer with 222 point-group symmetry. The anomalous difference Patterson maps calculated for an ytterbium-derivative crystal using diffraction data at a wavelength of 1.38 Å showed significant peaks on the v = 1/2 Harker section, suggesting that ab initio phase information could be derived from the MAD data.

  6. Influence of C-terminal truncation of murine Serum amyloid A on fibril structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthies Rennegarbe; Inga Lenter; Angelika Schierhorn; Romy Sawilla; Christian Haupt

    2017-01-01

    .... While the protein precursor in humans and mice is the acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A (SAA) 1.1, the deposited fibrils consist mainly of C-terminally truncated SAA fragments, termed AA proteins...

  7. Identification of two pentatricopeptide repeat genes required for RNA editing and zinc binding by C-terminal cytidine deaminase-like domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Michael L; Giang, Karolyn; Berhane, Beniam; Mulligan, R Michael

    2013-12-20

    Many transcripts expressed from plant organelle genomes are modified by C-to-U RNA editing. Nuclear encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are required as RNA binding specificity determinants in the RNA editing mechanism. Bioinformatic analysis has shown that most of the Arabidopsis PPR proteins necessary for RNA editing events include a C-terminal portion that shares structural characteristics with a superfamily of deaminases. The DYW deaminase domain includes a highly conserved zinc binding motif that shares characteristics with cytidine deaminases. The Arabidopsis PPR genes, ELI1 and DOT4, both have DYW deaminase domains and are required for single RNA editing events in chloroplasts. The ELI1 DYW deaminase domain was expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and was shown to bind two zinc atoms per polypeptide. Thus, the DYW deaminase domain binds a zinc metal ion, as expected for a cytidine deaminase, and is potentially the catalytic component of an editing complex. Genetic complementation experiments demonstrate that large portions of the DYW deaminase domain of ELI1 may be eliminated, but the truncated genes retain the ability to restore editing site conversion in a mutant plant. These results suggest that the catalytic activity can be supplied in trans by uncharacterized protein(s) of the editosome.

  8. Functional C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDE (CEP) plant hormone domains evolved de novo in the plant parasite Rotylenchulus reniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eves-Van Den Akker, Sebastian; Lilley, Catherine J; Yusup, Hazijah B; Jones, John T; Urwin, Peter E

    2016-10-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs) induce and maintain an intimate relationship with their host, stimulating cells adjacent to root vascular tissue to re-differentiate into unique and metabolically active 'feeding sites'. The interaction between PPNs and their host is mediated by nematode effectors. We describe the discovery of a large and diverse family of effector genes, encoding C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDE (CEP) plant hormone mimics (RrCEPs), in the syncytia-forming plant parasite Rotylenchulus reniformis. The particular attributes of RrCEPs distinguish them from all other CEPs, regardless of origin. Together with the distant phylogenetic relationship of R. reniformis to the only other CEP-encoding nematode genus identified to date (Meloidogyne), this suggests that CEPs probably evolved de novo in R. reniformis. We have characterized the first member of this large gene family (RrCEP1), demonstrating its significant up-regulation during the plant-nematode interaction and expression in the effector-producing pharyngeal gland cell. All internal CEP domains of multi-domain RrCEPs are followed by di-basic residues, suggesting a mechanism for cleavage. A synthetic peptide corresponding to RrCEP1 domain 1 is biologically active and capable of up-regulating plant nitrate transporter (AtNRT2.1) expression, whilst simultaneously reducing primary root elongation. When a non-CEP-containing, syncytia-forming PPN species (Heterodera schachtii) infects Arabidopsis in a CEP-rich environment, a smaller feeding site is produced. We hypothesize that CEPs of R. reniformis represent a two-fold adaptation to sustained biotrophy in this species: (i) increasing host nitrate uptake, whilst (ii) limiting the size of the syncytial feeding site produced. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology Published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The identification of putative RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain associated proteins in red and green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunlin; Hager, Paul W; Stiller, John W

    2014-01-01

    A tandemly repeated C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II is functionally essential and strongly conserved in many organisms, including animal, yeast and plant models. Although present in simple, ancestral red algae, CTD tandem repeats have undergone extensive modifications and degeneration during the evolutionary transition to developmentally complex rhodophytes. In contrast, CTD repeats are conserved in both green algae and their more complex land plant relatives. Understanding the mechanistic differences that underlie these variant patterns of CTD evolution requires knowledge of CTD-associated proteins in these 2 lineages. To provide an initial baseline comparison, we bound potential phospho-CTD associated proteins (PCAPs) to artificially synthesized and phosphorylated CTD repeats from the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae and green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our results indicate that red and green algae share a number of PCAPs, including kinases and proteins involved in mRNA export. There also are important taxon-specific differences, including mRNA splicing-related PCAPs recovered from Chlamydomonas but not Cyanidioschyzon, consistent with the relative intron densities in green and red algae. Our results also offer the first experimental indication that different proteins bind 2 distinct types of repeats in Cyanidioschyzon, suggesting a division of function between the proximal and distal CTD, similar to patterns identified in more developmentally complex model organisms.

  10. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-08

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Mutations in the C-terminal domain of ALSV (Avian Leukemia and Sarcoma Viruses) integrase alter the concerted DNA integration process in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Karen; Faure, Claudine; Violot, Sébastien; Verdier, Gérard; Ronfort, Corinne

    2003-11-01

    Integrase (IN) is the retroviral enzyme responsible for the integration of the DNA copy of the retroviral genome into the host cell DNA. The C-terminal domain of IN is involved in DNA binding and enzyme multimerization. We previously performed single amino acid substitutions in the C-terminal domain of the avian leukemia and sarcoma viruses (ALSV) IN. Here, we modelled these IN mutants and analysed their ability to mediate concerted DNA integration (in an in vitro assay) as well as to form dimers (by size exclusion chromatography and protein-protein cross-linking). Mutations of residues located at the dimer interface (V239, L240, Y246, V257 and K266) have the greatest effects on the activity of the IN. Among them: (a) the L240A mutation resulted in a decrease of integration efficiency that was concomitant with a decrease of IN dimerization; (b) the V239A, V249A and K266A mutants preferentially mediated non-concerted DNA integration rather than concerted DNA integration although they were found as dimers. Other mutations (V260E and Y246W/DeltaC25) highlight the role of the C-terminal domain in the general folding of the enzyme and, hence, on its activity. This study points to the important role of residues at the IN C-terminal domain in the folding and dimerization of the enzyme as well as in the concerted DNA integration of viral DNA ends.

  12. Identification and characterization of the first mutation (Arg776Cys) in the C-terminal domain of the Human Molybdenum Cofactor Sulfurase (HMCS) associated with type II classical xanthinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Hava; Naamati, Meirav Shtauber; Levartovsky, David; Lagziel, Ayala; Shani, Esther; Horn, Ivona; Shalev, Hanna; Landau, Daniel

    2007-05-01

    Classical xanthinuria type II is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by deficiency of xanthine dehydrogenase and aldehyde oxidase activities due to lack of a common sulfido-olybdenum cofactor (MoCo). Two mutations, both in the N-terminal domain of the Human Molybdenum Cofactor Sulfurase (HMCS), were reported in patients with type II xanthinuria. Whereas the N-terminal domain of HMCS was demonstrated to have cysteine desulfurase activity, the C-terminal domain hypothetically transfers the sulfur to the MoCo. We describe the first mutation in the C-terminal domain of HMCS identified in a Bedouin-Arab child presenting with urolithiasis and in an asymptomatic Jewish female. Patients were diagnosed with type II xanthinuria by homozygosity mapping and/or allopurinol loading test. The Bedouin-Arab child was homozygous for a c.2326C>T (p.Arg776Cys) mutation, while the female patient was compound heterozygous for this and a novel c.1034insA (p.Gln347fsStop379) mutation in the N-terminal domain of HMCS. Cosegregation of the homozygous mutant genotype with hypouricemia and hypouricosuria was demonstrated in the Bedouin family. Haplotype analysis indicated that p.Arg776Cys is a recurrent mutation. Arg776 together with six surrounding amino acid residues were found fully conserved and predicted to be buried in homologous eukaryotic MoCo sulfurases. Moreover, Arg776 is conserved in a diversity of eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins that posses a domain homologous to the C-terminal domain of HMCS. Our findings suggest that Arg776 is essential for a core structure of the C-terminal domain of the HMCS and identification of a mutation at this site may contribute clarifying the mechanism of MoCo sulfuration.

  13. The C-terminal domains of NF-H and NF-M subunits maintain axonal neurofilament content by blocking turnover of the stationary neurofilament network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala V Rao

    Full Text Available Newly synthesized neurofilaments or protofilaments are incorporated into a highly stable stationary cytoskeleton network as they are transported along axons. Although the heavily phosphorylated carboxyl-terminal tail domains of the heavy and medium neurofilament (NF subunits have been proposed to contribute to this process and particularly to stability of this structure, their function is still obscure. Here we show in NF-H/M tail deletion [NF-(H/M(tailΔ] mice that the deletion of both of these domains selectively lowers NF levels 3-6 fold along optic axons without altering either rates of subunit synthesis or the rate of slow axonal transport of NF. Pulse labeling studies carried out over 90 days revealed a significantly faster rate of disappearance of NF from the stationary NF network of optic axons in NF-(H/M(tailΔ mice. Faster NF disappearance was accompanied by elevated levels of NF-L proteolytic fragments in NF-(H/M(tailΔ axons. We conclude that NF-H and NF-M C-terminal domains do not normally regulate NF transport rates as previously proposed, but instead increase the proteolytic resistance of NF, thereby stabilizing the stationary neurofilament cytoskeleton along axons.

  14. Repressor of temperate mycobacteriophage L1 harbors a stable C-terminal domain and binds to different asymmetric operator DNAs with variable affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Nitai C

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysogenic mode of life cycle of a temperate bacteriophage is generally maintained by a protein called 'repressor'. Repressor proteins of temperate lambdoid phages bind to a few symmetric operator DNAs in order to regulate their gene expression. In contrast, repressor molecules of temperate mycobacteriophages and some other phages bind to multiple asymmetric operator DNAs. Very little is known at present about the structure-function relationship of any mycobacteriophage repressor. Results Using highly purified repressor (CI of temperate mycobacteriophage L1, we have demonstrated here that L1 CI harbors an N-terminal domain (NTD and a C-terminal domain (CTD which are separated by a small hinge region. Interestingly, CTD is more compact than NTD at 25°C. Both CTD and CI contain significant amount of α-helix at 30°C but unfold partly at 42°C. At nearly 200 nM concentration, both proteins form appreciable amount of dimers in solution. Additional studies reveal that CI binds to O64 and OL types of asymmetric operators of L1 with variable affinity at 25°C. Interestingly, repressor – operator interaction is affected drastically at 42°C. The conformational change of CI is most possibly responsible for its reduced operator binding affinity at 42°C. Conclusion Repressors encoded by mycobacteriophages differ significantly from the repressor proteins of λ and related phages at functional level but at structural level they are nearly similar.

  15. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling studies of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the human mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurashima-Ito, Kaori [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Ikeya, Teppei [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), (Japan); Senbongi, Hiroshi [Mitochondrial Diseases Group, MRC Dunn Human NutritionUnit (United Kingdom); Tochio, Hidehito [International Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Supramolecular Biology, Yokohama City University, Molecular Biophysics Laboratory (Japan); Mikawa, Tsutomu [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Shibata, Takehiko [RIKEN, Shibata Distinguished Senior Scientist Laboratory (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan)], E-mail: ito-yutaka@center.tmu.ac.jp

    2006-05-15

    Human ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 6 (ABCB6) is a mitochondrial ABC transporter, and presumably contributes to iron homeostasis. Aimed at understanding the structural basis for the conformational changes accompanying the substrate-transportation cycle, we have studied the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of ABCB6 (ABCB6-C) in both the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling. A non-linear sampling scheme was utilised for indirectly acquired {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N dimensions of all 3D triple-resonance NMR experiments, in order to overcome the instability and the low solubility of ABCB6-C. The backbone resonances for approximately 25% of non-proline residues, which are mostly distributed around the functionally important loops and in the Helical domain, were not observed for nucleotide-free form of ABCB6-C. From the pH, temperature and magnetic field strength dependencies of the resonance intensities, we concluded that this incompleteness in the assignments is mainly due to the exchange between multiple conformations at an intermediate rate on the NMR timescale. These localised conformational dynamics remained in ADP-bound ABCB6-C except for the loops responsible for adenine base and {alpha}/{beta}-phosphate binding. These results revealed that the localised dynamic cooperativity, which was recently proposed for a prokaryotic ABC MJ1267, also exists in a higher eukaryotic ABC, and is presumably shared by all members of the ABC family. Since the Helical domain is the putative interface to the transmembrane domain, this cooperativity may explain the coupled functions between domains in the substrate-transportation cycle.

  16. Insights into PG-binding, conformational change, and dimerization of the OmpA C-terminal domains from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Borrelia burgdorferi: Characterization of OmpA C-Terminal Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Wu, Ruiying [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Cuff, Marianne [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Fan, Yao [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Bigelow, Lance [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Jedrzejczak, Robert P. [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Adkins, Joshua N. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Cort, John R. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Babnigg, Gyorgy [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Joachimiak, Andrzej [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439

    2017-06-19

    S. Typhimurium can induce both humoral and cell-mediated responses when establishing itself in the host. These responses are primarily stimulated against the lipopolysaccharide and major outer membrane (OM) proteins of the bacterium. OmpA is one of these major OM proteins. It comprises a N-terminal eight-stranded -barrel membrane domain and a C-terminal so-called OmpA C-terminal domain (OmpACTD). The OmpACTD and its homologs are believed to bind to peptidoglycan (PG) within the periplasm, maintaining bacterial osmotic homeostasis and modulating the permeability and integrity of the outer membrane. Here we present the structures of two forms of the OmpACTD of S. Typhimurium (STOmpACTD) and one structure of the less-studied OmpACTD of Borrelia burgdorferi (BbOmpACTD). In the open form of STOmpACTD, an aspartic acid residue from a long 2-3 loop points into the binding pocket, suggesting that an anion group such as a carboxylate group from PG is favored at the binding site. In the closed form of STOmpACTD and in the structure of BbOmpACTD, a sulfate group from the crystallization buffer is tightly bound at the equivalent site. The differences between the closed and open forms of STOmpACTD, suggest a large conformational change that includes an extension of 3 helix by ordering a part of 2-3 loop. We suggest that the sulfate anion observed in these structures mimics the carboxylate group of PG when bound to STOmpACTD. In addition, the binding of PG or a ligand mimic may enhance dimerization of STOmpACTD, or possibly that of full length STOmpA.

  17. C-terminal Domain Modulates the Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein via an Electrostatic Mechanism*

    OpenAIRE

    Qualley, Dominic F.; Stewart-Maynard, Kristen M.; Wang, Fei; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate nucleic acid (NA) remodeling events critical in viral replication processes such as reverse transcription. Surprisingly, the NC protein from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an extremely poor NA chaperone. Using bulk and single molecule methods, we find that removal of the anionic C-terminal domain (CTD) of HTLV-1 NC results in a protein with chaperone properties comparable with that of other retrovir...

  18. The linkage between binding of the C-terminal domain of hirudin and amidase activity in human alpha-thrombin.

    OpenAIRE

    de Cristofaro, R; Rocca, B; Bizzi, B; Landolfi, R

    1993-01-01

    A method derived from the analysis of viscosity effects on the hydrolysis of the amide substrates D-phenylalanylpipecolyl-arginine-p-nitroaniline, tosylglycylprolylarginine-p-nitroanaline and cyclohexylglycylalanylarginine-p-nitroalanine by human alpha-thrombin was developed to dissect the Michaelis-Menten parameters Km and kcat into the individual rate constants of the binding, acylation and deacylation reactions. This method was used to analyse the effect of the C-terminal hirudin (residues...

  19. The C-terminal domain of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin as a vaccine candidate against bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Evy; Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Valgaeren, Bonnie R; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Schauvliege, Stijn; Rodrigo-Mocholí, Diego; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet R; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-04-27

    Bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis is caused by Clostridium perfringens and leads to sudden death. Alpha toxin, together with perfringolysin O, has been identified as the principal toxin involved in the pathogenesis. We assessed the potential of alpha toxin as a vaccine antigen. Using an intestinal loop model in calves, we investigated the protection afforded by antisera raised against native alpha toxin or its non-toxic C-terminal fragment against C. perfringens-induced intestinal necrosis. Immunization of calves with either of the vaccine preparations induced a strong antibody response. The resulting antisera were able to neutralize the alpha toxin activity and the C. perfringens-induced endothelial cytotoxicity in vitro. The antisera raised against the native toxin had a stronger neutralizing activity than those against the C-terminal fragment. However, antibodies against alpha toxin alone were not sufficient to completely neutralize the C. perfringens-induced necrosis in the intestinal loop model. The development of a multivalent vaccine combining the C-terminal fragment of alpha toxin with other C. perfringens virulence factors might be necessary for complete protection against bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis.

  20. Influence of C-terminal tail deletion on structure and stability of hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Chu, Wen-Ting; Xue, Qiao; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2013-06-01

    The C-terminus tail (G144-T149) of the hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii (Sto-RNase HI) plays an important role in this protein's hyperstabilization and may therefore be a good protein stability tag. Detailed understanding of the structural and dynamic effects of C-terminus tail deletion is required for gaining insights into the thermal stability mechanism of Sto-RNase HI. Focused on Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase HI (Sto-RNase HI) and its derivative lacking the C-terminal tail (ΔC6 Sto-RNase HI) (PDB codes: 2EHG and 3ALY), we applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at four different temperatures (300, 375, 475, and 500 K) to examine the effect of the C-terminal tail on the hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase HI and to investigate the unfolding process of Sto-RNase HI and ΔC6 Sto-RNase HI. The simulations suggest that the C-terminal tail has significant impact in hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase HI and the unfolding of these two proteins evolves along dissimilar pathways. Essential dynamics analysis indicates that the essential subspaces of the two proteins at different temperatures are non-overlapping within the trajectories and they exhibit different directions of motion. Our work can give important information to understand the three-state folding mechanism of Sto-RNase HI and to offer alternative strategies to improve the protein stability.

  1. A C-terminal Myb extension domain defines a novel family of double-strand telomeric DNA-binding proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamysheva, Zemfira N; Surovtseva, Yulia V; Vespa, Laurent; Shakirov, Eugene V; Shippen, Dorothy E

    2004-11-12

    Little is known about the protein composition of plant telomeres. We queried the Arabidopsis thaliana genome data base in search of genes with similarity to the human telomere proteins hTRF1 and hTRF2. hTRF1/hTRF2 are distinguished by the presence of a single Myb-like domain in their C terminus that is required for telomeric DNA binding in vitro. Twelve Arabidopsis genes fitting this criterion, dubbed TRF-like (TRFL), fell into two distinct gene families. Notably, TRFL family 1 possessed a highly conserved region C-terminal to the Myb domain called Myb-extension (Myb-ext) that is absent in TRFL family 2 and hTRF1/hTRF2. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that recombinant proteins from TRFL family 1, but not those from family 2, formed homodimers and heterodimers in vitro. DNA binding studies with isolated C-terminal fragments from TRFL family 1 proteins, but not family 2, showed specific binding to double-stranded plant telomeric DNA in vitro. Removal of the Myb-ext domain from TRFL1, a family 1 member, abolished DNA binding. However, when the Myb-ext domain was introduced into the corresponding region in TRFL3, a family 2 member, telomeric DNA binding was observed. Thus, Myb-ext is required for binding plant telomeric DNA and defines a novel class of proteins in Arabidopsis.

  2. Activation of the plasma membrane Na/H antiporter salt-overly-sensitive 1 (SOS1) by phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory C-terminal domain

    KAUST Repository

    Quintero, Francisco J.

    2011-01-24

    The plasma membrane sodium/proton exchanger Salt-Overly-Sensitive 1 (SOS1) is a critical salt tolerance determinant in plants. The SOS2-SOS3 calcium-dependent protein kinase complex upregulates SOS1 activity, but the mechanistic details of this crucial event remain unresolved. Here we show that SOS1 is maintained in a resting state by a C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain that is the target of SOS2-SOS3. The auto-inhibitory domain interacts intramolecularly with an adjacent domain of SOS1 that is essential for activity. SOS1 is relieved from auto-inhibition upon phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory domain by SOS2-SOS3. Mutation of the SOS2 phosphorylation and recognition site impeded the activation of SOS1 in vivo and in vitro. Additional amino acid residues critically important for SOS1 activity and regulation were identified in a genetic screen for hypermorphic alleles.

  3. Structural features discriminate androgen receptor N/C terminal and coactivator interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Emily B; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-01-30

    Human androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity involves interdomain and coactivator interactions with the agonist-bound AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Structural determinants of the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction between the AR NH(2)-terminal FXXLF motif and activation function 2 (AF2) in the LBD were shown previously by crystallography. In this report, we provide evidence for a region in AR LBD helix 12 outside the AF2 binding cleft that facilitates interactions with the FXXLF and LXXLL motifs. Mutagenesis of glutamine 902 to alanine in AR LBD helix 12 (Q902A) disrupted AR FXXLF motif binding to AF2, but enhanced coactivator LXXLL motif binding. Functional compensation for defective FXXLF motif binding by AR-Q902A was suggested by the slower dissociation rate of bound androgen. Functional importance of glutamine 902 was indicated by the charged residue germline mutation Q902R that caused partial androgen insensitivity, and a similar somatic mutation Q902K reported in prostate cancer, both of which increased the androgen dissociation rate and decreased AR transcriptional activity. High affinity equilibrium androgen binding was retained by alanine substitution mutations at Tyr-739 in AR LBD helix 5 or Lys-905 in helix 12 structurally adjacent to AF2, whereas transcriptional activity decreased and the androgen dissociation increased. Deleterious effects of these loss of function mutations were rescued by the helix stabilizing AR prostate cancer somatic mutation H874Y. Sequence NH(2)-terminal to the AR FXXLF motif contributed to the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction based on greater AR-2-30 FXXLF motif peptide binding to the agonist-bound AR LBD than a shorter AR-20-30 FXXLF motif peptide. We conclude that helix 12 residues outside the AF2 binding cleft modulate AR transcriptional activity by providing flexibility to accommodate FXXLF or LXXLL motif binding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. γ-Tubulin and the C-Terminal Motor Domain Kinesin-like Protein, KLPA, Function in the Establishment of Spindle Bipolarity in Aspergillus nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    Prigozhina, Natalie L.; Walker, Richard A.; Oakley, C. Elizabeth; Oakley, Berl R.

    2001-01-01

    Previous research has found that a γ-tubulin mutation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is synthetically lethal with a deletion of the C-terminal motor domain kinesin-like protein gene pkl1, but the lethality of the double mutant prevents a phenotypic analysis of the synthetic interaction. We have investigated interactions between klpA1, a deletion of an Aspergillus nidulans homolog of pkl1, and mutations in the mipA, γ-tubulin gene. We find that klpA1 dramatically increases the cold sensitivity a...

  5. Contribution of the C-terminal region within the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase to yeast lethality, chromatin binding and viral replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belhumeur Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 integrase (IN is a key viral enzymatic molecule required for the integration of the viral cDNA into the genome. Additionally, HIV-1 IN has been shown to play important roles in several other steps during the viral life cycle, including reverse transcription, nuclear import and chromatin targeting. Interestingly, previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of HIV-1 IN induces the lethal phenotype in some strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses of the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN in order to delineate the critical amino acid(s and/or motif(s required for the induction of the lethal phenotype in the yeast strain HP16, and to further elucidate the molecular mechanism which causes this phenotype. Results Our study identified three HIV-1 IN mutants, V165A, A179P and KR186,7AA, located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of IN that do not induce the lethal phenotype in yeast. Chromatin binding assays in yeast and mammalian cells demonstrated that these IN mutants were impaired for the ability to bind chromatin. Additionally, we determined that while these IN mutants failed to interact with LEDGF/p75, they retained the ability to bind Integrase interactor 1. Furthermore, we observed that VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 containing these IN mutants was unable to replicate in the C8166 T cell line and this defect was partially rescued by complementation with the catalytically inactive D64E IN mutant. Conclusion Overall, this study demonstrates that three mutations located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN inhibit the IN-induced lethal phenotype in yeast by inhibiting the binding of IN to the host chromatin. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN is important for binding to host chromatin and is crucial for both viral replication and the promotion of

  6. Structure of the DNA-bound BRCA1 C-terminal region from human replication factor C p140 and model of the protein-DNA complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, M.; AB, E.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; Siegal, G.

    2010-01-01

    BRCA1 C-terminal domain (BRCT)-containing proteins are found widely throughout the animal and bacteria kingdoms where they are exclusively involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA metabolism. Whereas most BRCT domains are involved in protein-protein interactions, a small subset has bona fide DNA

  7. Homologies between the non-collagenous C-terminal (NC1) globular domains of the alpha 1 and alpha 2 subunits of type-IV collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaytes, P S; Theriault, N Y; Vogeli, G

    1987-01-01

    The non-collagenous C-terminal globular domain (NC1) of type-IV collagen has the dual role of initiating triple-helix formation among the subunits and of crosslinking two collagen molecules during basement-membrane meshwork formation. By cloning a cDNA for the NC1 domain of the alpha 2(IV) collagen chain, we have found a high degree of homology (63% for nucleotides, 66% for amino acids) between the NC1 of the alpha 2 and alpha 1 chains of type-IV collagen. All cysteine residues are conserved. This high degree of homology is not found within the helical portion where the homology is 41% for amino acids (only 14% if the obligatory glycine is not used for this analysis). We propose that this high degree of homology within the non-collagenous domain indicates a close evolutionary relationship maintained by functional restraints between the two chains of type IV collagen.

  8. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France); Chapuis, Sophie [Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, Laboratoire propre du CNRS conventionné avec l’Université de Strasbourg, 12 rue du Général Zimmer, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France); Revers, Frédéric [INRA, Université de Bordeaux, UMR 1332 de Biologie du Fruit et Pathologie, 33882 Villenave d’Ornon (France); Ziegler-Graff, Véronique [Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, Laboratoire propre du CNRS conventionné avec l’Université de Strasbourg, 12 rue du Général Zimmer, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Brault, Véronique, E-mail: veronique.brault@colmar.inra.fr [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France)

    2015-12-15

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74 kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. - Highlights: • The C-terminal domain of TuYV-RT is required for long-distance movement. • CIPK7 from Arabidopsis interacts with RT{sub Cter} in yeast and in plants. • CIPK7 overexpression increases virus titer locally but not virus systemic movement. • CIPK7 localizes to plasmodesmata. • CIPK7 could be a defense protein regulating virus export.

  9. In Sup35p filaments (the [PSI+] prion), the globular C-terminal domains are widely offset from the amyloid fibril backbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxa, U.; Wall, J.; Keller, P. W.; Cheng, N.; Steven, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    In yeast cells infected with the [PSI+] prion, Sup35p forms aggregates and its activity in translation termination is downregulated. Transfection experiments have shown that Sup35p filaments assembled in vitro are infectious, suggesting that they reproduce or closely resemble the prion. We have used several EM techniques to study the molecular architecture of filaments, seeking clues as to the mechanism of downregulation. Sup35p has an N-terminal 'prion' domain; a highly charged middle (M-)domain; and a C-terminal domain with the translation termination activity. By negative staining, cryo-EM and scanning transmission EM (STEM), filaments of full-length Sup35p show a thin backbone fibril surrounded by a diffuse 65-nm-wide cloud of globular C-domains. In diameter ({approx}8 nm) and appearance, the backbones resemble amyloid fibrils of N-domains alone. STEM mass-per-unit-length data yield -1 subunit per 0.47 nm for N-fibrils, NM-filaments and Sup35p filaments, further supporting the fibril backbone model. The 30 nm radial span of decorating C-domains indicates that the M-domains assume highly extended conformations, offering an explanation for the residual Sup35p activity in infected cells, whereby the C-domains remain free enough to interact with ribosomes.

  10. p53 searches on DNA by rotation-uncoupled sliding at C-terminal tails and restricted hopping of core domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Kenzaki, Hiroo; Takada, Shoji

    2012-09-05

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that searches its cognate sites on DNA. During the search, the roles and interplay of its two DNA binding domains, the folded core domain and the disordered C-terminal domain (CTD), have been controversial. Here, we performed molecular simulations of p53 at various salt concentrations finding that, at physiological salt concentration, p53 diffuses along nonspecific DNA via rotation-uncoupled sliding with its CTD, whereas the core domain repeats dissociation and association. This is in perfect agreement with a recent single molecule experiment. In the simulation of tetrameric full-length p53, two DNA binding domains both bound to nonspecific DNA in a characteristic form at low salt concentration, whereas at physiological salt concentration, only CTD kept bound to DNA and the core domain frequently hopped on DNA. Simulations of a construct that lacks the core domain (TetCD) clarified rotation-uncoupled diffusion on nonspecific DNA. At low salt concentration, the diffusion constant due to sliding was dependent on the salt concentration, which differs from the prediction of a classic theory of transcription factors. At physiological salt concentration, it was independent of the salt concentration, in harmony with experiments. Moreover, we found that the sliding via the CTD follows the helical pitch of DNA (i.e., rotation-coupled sliding) at low salt concentration while it is virtually uncoupled to the helical pitch, a hallmark of rotation-uncoupled sliding at physiological salt concentration.

  11. A novel COL4A1 frameshift mutation in familial kidney disease: the importance of the C-terminal NC1 domain of type IV collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Daniel P.; Oygar, D. Deren; Lin, Fujun; Oygar, P. Derin; Khan, Nadia; Connor, Thomas M.F.; Lapsley, Marta; Maxwell, Patrick H.; Neild, Guy H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary microscopic haematuria often segregates with mutations of COL4A3, COL4A4 or COL4A5 but in half of families a gene is not identified. We investigated a Cypriot family with autosomal dominant microscopic haematuria with renal failure and kidney cysts. Methods We used genome-wide linkage analysis, whole exome sequencing and cosegregation analyses. Results We identified a novel frameshift mutation, c.4611_4612insG:p.T1537fs, in exon 49 of COL4A1. This mutation predicts truncation of the protein with disruption of the C-terminal part of the NC1 domain. We confirmed its presence in 20 family members, 17 with confirmed haematuria, 5 of whom also had stage 4 or 5 chronic kidney disease. Eleven family members exhibited kidney cysts (55% of those with the mutation), but muscle cramps or cerebral aneurysms were not observed and serum creatine kinase was normal in all individuals tested. Conclusions Missense mutations of COL4A1 that encode the CB3 [IV] segment of the triple helical domain (exons 24 and 25) are associated with HANAC syndrome (hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms and cramps). Missense mutations of COL4A1 that disrupt the NC1 domain are associated with antenatal cerebral haemorrhage and porencephaly, but not kidney disease. Our findings extend the spectrum of COL4A1 mutations linked with renal disease and demonstrate that the highly conserved C-terminal part of the NC1 domain of the α1 chain of type IV collagen is important in the integrity of glomerular basement membrane in humans. PMID:27190376

  12. The Interplay of the N- and C-Terminal Domains of MCAK Control Microtubule Depolymerization Activity and Spindle Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ems-McClung, Stephanie C.; Hertzer, Kathleen M.; Zhang, Xin; Miller, Mill W.; Walczak, Claire E.

    2007-01-01

    Spindle assembly and accurate chromosome segregation require the proper regulation of microtubule dynamics. MCAK, a Kinesin-13, catalytically depolymerizes microtubules, regulates physiological microtubule dynamics, and is the major catastrophe factor in egg extracts. Purified GFP-tagged MCAK domain mutants were assayed to address how the different MCAK domains contribute to in vitro microtubule depolymerization activity and physiological spindle assembly activity in egg extracts. Our biochem...

  13. Insights into PG-binding, conformational change, and dimerization of the OmpA C-terminal domains from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Borrelia burgdorferi: Characterization of OmpA C-Terminal Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Wu, Ruiying [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Cuff, Marianne [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Fan, Yao [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Bigelow, Lance [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Jedrzejczak, Robert P. [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Adkins, Joshua N. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Cort, John R. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99352; Babnigg, Gyorgy [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Joachimiak, Andrzej [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637; Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439

    2017-06-19

    S. Typhimurium can induce both humoral and cell-mediated responses when establishing itself in the host. These responses are primarily stimulated against the lipopolysaccharide and major outer membrane (OM) proteins. OmpA is one of these major OM proteins. It comprises a N-terminal eight-stranded b-barrel trans membrane domain and a C-terminal domain (OmpACTD). The OmpACTD and its homologs are believed to bind to peptidoglycan (PG) within the periplasm, maintaining bacterial osmotic homeostasis and modulating the permeability and integrity of the OM. Here we present the first crystal structures of the OmpACTD from two pathogens: S. Typhimurium (STOmpACTD) in open and closed forms and causative agent of Lyme Disease Borrelia burgdorferi (BbOmpACTD), in closed form. In the open form of STOmpACTD, an aspartic acid residue from a long b2-a3 loop points into the binding pocket, suggesting that an anion group such as a carboxylate group from PG is favored at the binding site. In the closed form of STOmpACTD and in the structure of BbOmpACTD, a sulfate group from the crystallization buffer is tightly bound at the binding site. The differences between the closed and open forms of STOmpACTD, suggest a large conformational change that includes an extension of a3 helix by ordering a part of b2-a3 loop. We propose that the sulfate anion observed in these structures mimics the carboxylate group of PG when bound to STOmpACTD suggesting PG-anchoring mechanism. In addition, the binding of PG or a ligand mimic may enhance dimerization of STOmpACTD, or possibly that of full length STOmpA.

  14. The C-terminal aqueous-exposed domain of the 45 kDa subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is a Cu(I) sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Steve S-F; Ji, Cheng-Zhi; Wu, Ya Ping; Lee, Tsu-Lin; Lai, Chien-Hung; Lin, Su-Ching; Yang, Zong-Lin; Wang, Vincent C-C; Chen, Kelvin H-C; Chan, Sunney I

    2007-12-04

    The crystal structure of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has been reported recently [Lieberman, R. L., and Rosenzweig, A. C. (2005) Crystal structure of a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that catalyses the biological oxidation of methane, Nature 434, 177-182]. Subsequent work has shown that the preparation on which the X-ray analysis is based might be missing many of the important metal cofactors, including the putative trinuclear copper cluster at the active site as well as ca. 10 copper ions (E-clusters) that have been proposed to serve as a buffer of reducing equivalents to re-reduce the copper atoms at the active site following the catalytic chemistry [Chan, S. I., Wang, V. C.-C., Lai, J. C.-H., Yu, S. S.-F., Chen, P. P.-Y., Chen, K. H.-C., Chen, C.-L., and Chan, M. K. (2007) Redox potentiometry studies of particulate methane monooxygenase: Support for a trinuclear copper cluster active site, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 46, 1992-1994]. Since the aqueous-exposed domains of the 45 kDa subunit (PmoB) have been suggested to be the putative binding domains for the E-cluster copper ions, we have cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli the two aqueous-exposed subdomains toward the N- and C-termini of the subunit: the N-terminal subdomain (residues 54-178) and the C-terminal subdomain (residues 257-394 and 282-414). The recombinant C-terminal water-exposed subdomain is shown to behave like a Cu(I) sponge, taking up to ca. 10 Cu(I) ions cooperatively when cupric ions are added to the protein fragment in the presence of dithiothreitol or ascorbate. In addition, circular dichroism measurements reveal that the C-terminal subdomain folds into a beta-sheet structure in the presence of Cu(I). The propensity for the C-terminal subdomain to bind Cu(I) is consistent with the high redox potential(s) determined for the E-cluster copper ions in the pMMO. These properties of the E-clusters are in accordance with the function proposed

  15. Structure determination of Murine Norovirus NS6 proteases with C-terminal extensions designed to probe protease–substrate interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Fernandes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. They encode an NS6 protease that cleaves a viral polyprotein at specific sites to produce mature viral proteins. In an earlier study we obtained crystals of murine norovirus (MNV NS6 protease in which crystal contacts were mediated by specific insertion of the C-terminus of one protein (which contains residues P5-P1 of the NS6-7 cleavage junction into the peptide binding site of an adjacent molecule, forming an adventitious protease-product complex. We sought to reproduce this crystal form to investigate protease–substrate complexes by extending the C-terminus of NS6 construct to include residues on the C-terminal (P′ side of the cleavage junction. We report the crystallization and crystal structure determination of inactive mutants of murine norovirus NS6 protease with C-terminal extensions of one, two and four residues from the N-terminus of the adjacent NS7 protein (NS6 1′, NS6 2′, NS6 4′. We also determined the structure of a chimeric extended NS6 protease in which the P4-P4′ sequence of the NS6-7 cleavage site was replaced with the corresponding sequence from the NS2-3 cleavage junction (NS6 4′ 2|3.The constructs NS6 1′ and NS6 2′ yielded crystals that diffracted anisotropically. We found that, although the uncorrected data could be phased by molecular replacement, refinement of the structures stalled unless the data were ellipsoidally truncated and corrected with anisotropic B-factors. These corrections significantly improved phasing by molecular replacement and subsequent refinement.The refined structures of all four extended NS6 proteases are very similar in structure to the mature MNV NS6—and in one case reveal additional details of a surface loop. Although the packing arrangement observed showed some similarities to those observed in the adventitious protease-product crystals reported previously, in no case were specific protease–substrate interactions

  16. Ras GAP-related and C-terminal domain-dependent localization and tumorigenic activities of IQGAP1 in melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Reimer

    Full Text Available IQGAP1 interacts with a number of binding partners through a calponin homology domain (CHD, a WW motif, IQ repeats, a Ras GAP-related domain (GRD, and a conserved C-terminal (CT domain. Among various biological and cellular functions, IQGAP1 is known to play a role in actin cytoskeleton dynamics during membrane ruffling and lamellipodium protrusion. In addition, phosphorylation near the CT domain is thought to control IQGAP1 activity through regulation of intramolecular interaction. In a previous study, we discovered that IQGAP1 preferentially localizes to retracting areas in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells, not areas of membrane ruffling and lamellipodium protrusion. Nothing is known of the domains needed for retraction localization and very little is known of IQGAP1 function in the actin cytoskeleton of melanoma cells. Thus, we examined localization of IQGAP1 mutants to retracting areas, and characterized knock down phenotypes on tissue culture plastic and physiologic-stiffness hydrogels. Localization of IQGAP1 mutants (S1441E/S1443D, S1441A/S1443A, ΔCHD, ΔGRD or ΔCT to retracting and protruding cell edges were measured. In retracting areas there was a decrease in S1441A/S1443A, ΔGRD and ΔCT localization, a minor decrease in ΔCHD localization, and normal localization of the S1441E/S1443D mutant. In areas of cell protrusion just behind the lamellipodium leading edge, we surprisingly observed both ΔGRD and ΔCT localization, and increased number of microtubules. IQGAP1 knock down caused loss of cell polarity on laminin-coated glass, decreased proliferation on tissue culture polystyrene, and abnormal spheroid growth on laminin-coated hydrogels. We propose that the GRD and CT domains regulate IQGAP1 localization to retracting actin networks to promote a tumorigenic role in melanoma cells.

  17. Evidence against Extracellular Exposure of a Highly Immunogenic Region in the C-Terminal Domain of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus gp41 Transmembrane Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postler, Thomas S.; Martinez-Navio, José M.; Yuste, Eloísa

    2012-01-01

    The generally accepted model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein topology includes a single membrane-spanning domain. An alternate model has been proposed which features multiple membrane-spanning domains. Consistent with the alternate model, a high percentage of HIV-1-infected individuals produce unusually robust antibody responses to a region of envelope, the so-called “Kennedy epitope,” that in the conventional model should be in the cytoplasm. Here we show analogous, robust antibody responses in simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques to a region of SIVmac239 envelope located in the C-terminal domain, which in the conventional model should be inside the cell. Sera from SIV-infected rhesus macaques consistently reacted with overlapping oligopeptides corresponding to a region located within the cytoplasmic domain of gp41 by the generally accepted model, at intensities comparable to those observed for immunodominant areas of the surface component gp120. Rabbit serum raised against this highly immunogenic region (HIR) reacted with SIV envelope in cell surface-staining experiments, as did monoclonal anti-HIR antibodies isolated from an SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaque. However, control experiments demonstrated that this surface staining could be explained in whole or in part by the release of envelope protein from expressing cells into the supernatant and the subsequent attachment to the surfaces of cells in the culture. Serum and monoclonal antibodies directed against the HIR failed to neutralize even the highly neutralization-sensitive strain SIVmac316. Furthermore, a potential N-linked glycosylation site located close to the HIR and postulated to be outside the cell in the alternate model was not glycosylated. An artificially introduced glycosylation site within the HIR was also not utilized for glycosylation. Together, these data support the conventional model of SIV envelope as a type Ia

  18. Role of p54 RNA helicase activity and its C-terminal domain in translational repression, P-body localization and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, Nicola; Kress, Michel; Weil, Dominique; Standart, Nancy

    2009-05-01

    The RNA helicase p54 (DDX6, Dhh1, Me31B, Cgh-1, RCK) is a prototypic component of P-(rocessing) bodies in cells ranging from yeast to human. Previously, we have shown that it is also a component of the large cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein translation repressor complex in Xenopus oocytes and that when tethered to the 3' untranslated region, Xp54 represses reporter mRNA translation. Here, we examine the role of the p54 helicase activity in translational repression and in P-body formation. Mutagenesis of conserved p54 helicase motifs activates translation in the tethered function assay, reduces accumulation of p54 in P-bodies in HeLa cells, and inhibits its capacity to assemble P-bodies in p54-depleted cells. Similar results were obtained in four helicase motifs implicated in ATP binding and in coupling ATPase and RNA binding activities. This is accompanied by changes in the interaction of the mutant p54 with the oocyte repressor complex components. Surprisingly, the C-terminal D2 domain alone is sufficient for translational repression and complete accumulation in P-bodies, although it is deficient for P-body assembly. We propose a novel RNA helicase model, in which the D2 domain acts as a protein binding platform and the ATPase/helicase activity allows protein complex remodeling that dictates the balance between repressors and an activator of translation.

  19. Rare RNF213 variants in the C-terminal region encompassing the RING-finger domain are associated with moyamoya angiopathy in Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guey, Stéphanie; Kraemer, Markus; Hervé, Dominique; Ludwig, Thomas; Kossorotoff, Manoëlle; Bergametti, Françoise; Schwitalla, Jan Claudius; Choi, Simone; Broseus, Lucile; Callebaut, Isabelle; Genin, Emmanuelle; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2017-08-01

    Moyamoya angiopathy (MMA) is a cerebral angiopathy affecting the terminal part of internal carotid arteries. Its prevalence is 10 times higher in Japan and Korea than in Europe. In East Asian countries, moyamoya is strongly associated to the R4810K variant in the RNF213 gene that encodes for a protein containing a RING-finger and two AAA+ domains. This variant has never been detected in Caucasian MMA patients, but several rare RNF213 variants have been reported in Caucasian cases. Using a collapsing test based on exome data from 68 European MMA probands and 573 ethnically matched controls, we showed a significant association between rare missense RNF213 variants and MMA in European patients (odds ratio (OR)=2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI)=(1.19-4.11), P=0.01). Variants specific to cases had higher pathogenicity predictive scores (median of 24.2 in cases versus 9.4 in controls, P=0.029) and preferentially clustered in a C-terminal hotspot encompassing the RING-finger domain of RNF213 (P<10(-3)). This association was even stronger when restricting the analysis to childhood-onset and familial cases (OR=4.54, 95% CI=(1.80-11.34), P=1.1 × 10(-3)). All clinically affected relatives who were genotyped were carriers. However, the need for additional factors to develop MMA is strongly suggested by the fact that only 25% of mutation carrier relatives were clinically affected.

  20. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of the two C-terminal domains of the bifunctional cellulase ctCel9D-Cel44A from Clostridium thermocellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najmudin, Shabir [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, FCT-UNL, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Guerreiro, Catarina I. P. D.; Ferreira, Luís M. A. [CIISA - Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisboa (Portugal); Romão, Maria J. C. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, FCT-UNL, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Prates, José A. M., E-mail: japrates@fmv.utl.pt [CIISA - Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisboa (Portugal); REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, FCT-UNL, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2005-12-01

    The two C-terminal domains of the cellulase ctCel9D-Cel44A from C. thermocellum cellulosome have been crystallized in tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.1 and 2.8 Å from native and seleno-l-methionine-derivative crystals, respectively. Clostridium thermocellum produces a highly organized multi-enzyme complex of cellulases and hemicellulases for the hydrolysis of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, which is termed the cellulosome. The bifunctional multi-modular cellulase ctCel9D-Cel44A is one of the largest components of the C. thermocellum cellulosome. The enzyme contains two internal catalytic domains belonging to glycoside hydrolase families 9 and 44. The C-terminus of this cellulase, comprising a polycystic kidney-disease module (PKD) and a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM44), has been crystallized. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, containing a single molecule in the asymmetric unit. Native and seleno-l-methionine-derivative crystals diffracted to 2.1 and 2.8 Å, respectively.

  1. A novel C-terminal domain of RecJ is critical for interaction with HerA in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiying eCheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR generates error-free repair products, which plays an important role in double strand break repair and replication fork rescue processes. DNA end resection, the critical step in HR, is usually performed by a series of nuclease/helicase. RecJ was identified as a 5’-3’ exonuclease involved in bacterial DNA end resection. Typical RecJ possesses a conserved DHH domain, a DHHA1 domain, and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB fold. However, RecJs from Deinococcus-Thermus phylum, such as Deinococcus radiodurans RecJ (DrRecJ, possess an extra C-terminal domain (CTD, of which the function has not been characterized. Here, we showed that a CTD-deletion of DrRecJ (DrRecJΔC could not restore drrecJ mutant growth and mitomycin C (MMC-sensitive phenotypes, indicating that this domain is essential for DrRecJ in vivo. DrRecJΔC displayed reduced DNA nuclease activity and DNA binding ability. Direct interaction was identified between DrRecJ-CTD and DrHerA, which stimulates DrRecJ nuclease activity by enhancing its DNA binding affinity. Moreover, DrNurA nuclease, another partner of DrHerA, inhibited the stimulation of DrHerA on DrRecJ nuclease activity by interaction with DrHerA. Opposing growth and MMC-resistance phenotypes between the recJ and nurA mutants were observed. A novel modulation mechanism among DrRecJ, DrHerA, and DrNurA was also suggested.

  2. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, sharesa conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-07-25

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1.

  3. C-terminal domain modulates the nucleic acid chaperone activity of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein via an electrostatic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualley, Dominic F; Stewart-Maynard, Kristen M; Wang, Fei; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate nucleic acid (NA) remodeling events critical in viral replication processes such as reverse transcription. Surprisingly, the NC protein from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an extremely poor NA chaperone. Using bulk and single molecule methods, we find that removal of the anionic C-terminal domain (CTD) of HTLV-1 NC results in a protein with chaperone properties comparable with that of other retroviral NCs. Increasing the ionic strength of the solution also improves the chaperone activity of full-length HTLV-1 NC. To determine how the CTD negatively modulates the chaperone activity of HTLV-1 NC, we quantified the thermodynamics and kinetics of wild-type and mutant HTLV-1 NC/NA interactions. The wild-type protein exhibits very slow dissociation kinetics, and removal of the CTD or mutations that eliminate acidic residues dramatically increase the protein/DNA interaction kinetics. Taken together, these results suggest that the anionic CTD interacts with the cationic N-terminal domain intramolecularly when HTLV-1 NC is not bound to nucleic acids, and similar interactions occur between neighboring molecules when NC is NA-bound. The intramolecular N-terminal domain-CTD attraction slows down the association of the HTLV-1 NC with NA, whereas the intermolecular interaction leads to multimerization of HTLV-1 NC on the NA. The latter inhibits both NA/NC aggregation and rapid protein dissociation from single-stranded DNA. These features make HTLV-1 NC a poor NA chaperone, despite its robust duplex destabilizing capability.

  4. Characterization of human cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12) and CDK13 complexes in C-terminal domain phosphorylation, gene transcription, and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Gao, Xin; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Smith, Edwin; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and CDK12 have each been demonstrated to phosphorylate the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) at serine 2 of the heptad repeat, both in vitro and in vivo. CDK9, as part of P-TEFb and the super elongation complex (SEC), is by far the best characterized of CDK9, CDK12, and CDK13. We employed both in vitro and in vivo assays to further investigate the molecular properties of CDK12 and its paralog CDK13. We isolated Flag-tagged CDK12 and CDK13 and found that they associate with numerous RNA processing factors. Although knockdown of CDK12, CDK13, or their cyclin partner CCNK did not affect the bulk CTD phosphorylation levels in HCT116 cells, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis revealed that CDK12 and CDK13 losses in HCT116 cells preferentially affect expression of DNA damage response and snoRNA genes, respectively. CDK12 and CDK13 depletion also leads to a loss of expression of RNA processing factors and to defects in RNA processing. These findings suggest that in addition to implementing CTD phosphorylation, CDK12 and CDK13 may affect RNA processing through direct physical interactions with RNA processing factors and by regulating their expression. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. γ-Tubulin and the C-Terminal Motor Domain Kinesin-like Protein, KLPA, Function in the Establishment of Spindle Bipolarity in Aspergillus nidulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigozhina, Natalie L.; Walker, Richard A.; Oakley, C. Elizabeth; Oakley, Berl R.

    2001-01-01

    Previous research has found that a γ-tubulin mutation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is synthetically lethal with a deletion of the C-terminal motor domain kinesin-like protein gene pkl1, but the lethality of the double mutant prevents a phenotypic analysis of the synthetic interaction. We have investigated interactions between klpA1, a deletion of an Aspergillus nidulans homolog of pkl1, and mutations in the mipA, γ-tubulin gene. We find that klpA1 dramatically increases the cold sensitivity and slightly reduces the growth rate at all temperatures, of three mipA alleles. In synchronized cells we find that klpA1 causes a substantial but transient inhibition of the establishment of spindle bipolarity. At a restrictive temperature, mipAD123 causes a slight, transient inhibition of spindle bipolarity and a more significant inhibition of anaphase A. In the mipAD123/klpA1 strain, formation of bipolar spindles is more strongly inhibited than in the klpA1 single mutant and many spindles apparently never become bipolar. These results indicate, surprisingly, that γ-tubulin and the klpA kinesin have overlapping roles in the establishment of spindle bipolarity. We propose a model to account for these data. PMID:11598200

  6. Transglutaminase 2 strongly binds to an extracellular matrix component other than fibronectin via its second C-terminal beta-barrel domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamnaes, Jorunn; Cardoso, Inês; Iversen, Rasmus; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2016-11-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a ubiquitous crosslinking enzyme present in both intra- and extracellular in many cell types and tissues. TG2 is upregulated upon cellular stress or injury, and extracellular TG2 is implicated in several human diseases, including celiac disease. However, incomplete knowledge about extracellular TG2 biology limits our understanding of how TG2 is involved in disease. Here, we demonstrate that binding of TG2 to the ECM of small intestinal tissue sections is the sum of binding to fibronectin (FN) via its N-terminal domain and binding to an abundant, novel extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction partner via its second C-terminal beta-barrel domain. The latter interaction dominates and gives rise to the characteristic reticular staining pattern of extracellular TG2. Of relevance for celiac disease, we show that self-multimerized TG2 does not efficiently deposit in the intestinal ECM, and TG2 complexes may thus become free-floating antigens in tissues in contrast to monomeric TG2 that would readily become sequestered by the ECM. Upon injection of monoclonal antibody targeting the FN-binding site, we observe antibody deposition on extracellular TG2 in cryosections, suggesting that the FN-binding site of TG2 is exposed in vivo. This would explain how and why celiac autoantibodies recognizing the FN-binding site of TG2 can bind TG2 in vitro, in situ as well as in vivo. © 2016 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Adaptive immunity against Leishmania nucleoside hydrolase maps its c-terminal domain as the target of the CD4+ T cell-driven protective response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Dirlei; Claser, Carla; Borja-Cabrera, Gulnara P; Travassos, Luiz R; Palatnik, Marcos; Soares, Irene da Silva; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B

    2010-11-09

    Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs) show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36) responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199-314) and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5-88.23%; p = 0.011) that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and for multivalent

  8. Adaptive immunity against Leishmania nucleoside hydrolase maps its c-terminal domain as the target of the CD4+ T cell-driven protective response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirlei Nico

    Full Text Available Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36 responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199-314 and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5-88.23%; p = 0.011 that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and

  9. The C-Terminal SynMuv/DdDUF926 Domain Regulates the Function of the N-Terminal Domain of DdNKAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyashri D Burgute

    Full Text Available NKAP (NF-κB activating protein is a highly conserved SR (serine/arginine-rich protein involved in transcriptional control and splicing in mammals. We identified DdNKAP, the Dictyostelium discoideum ortholog of mammalian NKAP, as interacting partner of the nuclear envelope protein SUN-1. DdNKAP harbors a number of basic RDR/RDRS repeats in its N-terminal domain and the SynMuv/DUF926 domain at its C-terminus. We describe a novel and direct interaction between DdNKAP and Prp19 (Pre mRNA processing factor 19 which might be relevant for the observed DdNKAP ubiquitination. Genome wide analysis using cross-linking immunoprecipitation-high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq revealed DdNKAP association with intergenic regions, exons, introns and non-coding RNAs. Ectopic expression of DdNKAP and its domains affects several developmental aspects like stream formation, aggregation, and chemotaxis. We conclude that DdNKAP is a multifunctional protein, which might influence Dictyostelium development through its interaction with RNA and RNA binding proteins. Mutants overexpressing full length DdNKAP and the N-terminal domain alone (DdN-NKAP showed opposite phenotypes in development and opposite expression profiles of several genes and rRNAs. The observed interaction between DdN-NKAP and the DdDUF926 domain indicates that the DdDUF926 domain acts as negative regulator of the N-terminus.

  10. Ca2+-dependent photocrosslinking of tropomyosin residue 146 to residues 157-163 in the C-terminal domain of troponin I in reconstituted skeletal muscle thin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalige, Wasana A.K.A.; Tao, Terence C.; Lehrer, Sherwin S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The Ca2+-dependent interaction of troponin I (TnI) with actin•tropomyosin (Actin•Tm) in the muscle thin filament is a critical step in the regulation of muscle contraction. Previous studies have suggested that, in the absence of Ca2+, TnI interacts with Tm as well as actin in the reconstituted muscle thin filament, maintaining Tm at the outer domain of actin and blocking myosin-actin interaction. To obtain direct evidence for this Tm-TnI interaction we performed photochemical crosslinking studies using Tm labeled with 4-maleimidobenzophenone (BPmal) at position 146 or 174 (Tm146* or Tm174*, respectively), reconstituted with actin and troponin (composed of TnI; troponin T, TnT; and troponin C, TnC) or with actin and TnI. After near uv-irradiation, SDS gels of the Tm*146-containing thin filament showed 3 new high molecular weight bands determined to be crosslinked products Tm*146-TnI, Tm*146-TnC and Tm*146-TnT using fluorescence-labeled TnI, mass spectrometry and Western blots. While Tm*146-TnI was produced only in the absence of Ca2+, the production of the other crosslinked species did not show a Ca2+ dependence. Tm*174 mainly crosslinked to TnT. In the absence of actin a similar crosslinking pattern was obtained with a much lower yield. A tryptic peptide from Tm*146-TnI of MW 2601.2 Da that was not present in the tryptic peptides of Tm*146 or TnI was identified using HPLC and MALDI-TOF. This was shown, using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, to be the BPmal-labeled peptide from Tm crosslinked to TnI peptide 157-163. These data showing that a region in the C-terminal domain of TnI interacts with Tm in the absence of Ca2+ support the hypothesis that a TnI-Tm interaction maintains Tm at the outer domain of actin, and will help efforts to localize Tn in the actin•Tm muscle thin filament. PMID:19379756

  11. The Small C-terminal Domain Phosphatase 1 Inhibits Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion by Dephosphorylating Ser(P)68-Twist1 to Accelerate Twist1 Protein Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tong; Fu, Junjiang; Shen, Tao; Lin, Xia; Liao, Lan; Feng, Xin-Hua; Xu, Jianming

    2016-05-27

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that strongly promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. The MAPK-phosphorylated Twist1 on its serine 68 (Ser(P)(68)-Twist1) has a significantly enhanced stability and function to drive cancer cell invasion and metastasis. However, the phosphatase that dephosphorylates Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and destabilizes Twist1 has not been identified and characterized. In this study, we screened a serine/threonine phosphatase cDNA expression library in HEK293T cells with ectopically coexpressed Twist1. We found that the small C-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (SCP1) specifically dephosphorylates Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 in both cell-free reactions and living cells. SCP1 uses its amino acid residues 43-63 to interact with the N terminus of Twist1. Increased SCP1 expression in cells decreased Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and total Twist1 proteins, whereas knockdown of SCP1 increased Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and total Twist1 proteins. Furthermore, the levels of SCP1 are negatively correlated with Twist1 protein levels in several cancer cell lines. SCP1-dephosphorylated Twist1 undergoes fast degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Importantly, an increase in SCP1 expression in breast cancer cells with either endogenous or ectopically expressed Twist1 largely inhibits the Twist1-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype and the migration and invasion capabilities of these cells. These results indicate that SCP1 is the phosphatase that counterregulates the MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of Ser(68)-Twist1. Thus, an increase in SCP1 expression and activity may be a useful strategy for eliminating the detrimental roles of Twist1 in cancer cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. TAL effectors target the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (CTD by inhibiting the prolyl-isomerase activity of a CTD-associated cyclophilin.

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    Mariane Noronha Domingues

    Full Text Available Transcriptional activator-like (TAL effectors of plant pathogenic bacteria function as transcription factors in plant cells. However, how TAL effectors control transcription in the host is presently unknown. Previously, we showed that TAL effectors of the citrus canker pathogen Xanthomonas citri, named PthAs, targeted the citrus protein complex comprising the thioredoxin CsTdx, ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes CsUev/Ubc13 and cyclophilin CsCyp. Here we show that CsCyp complements the function of Cpr1 and Ess1, two yeast cyclophilins that regulate transcription by the isomerization of proline residues of the regulatory C-terminal domain (CTD of RNA polymerase II. We also demonstrate that CsCyp, CsTdx, CsUev and four PthA variants interact with the citrus CTD and that CsCyp co-immunoprecipitate with the CTD in citrus cell extracts and with PthA2 transiently expressed in sweet orange epicotyls. The interactions of CsCyp with the CTD and PthA2 were inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA, a cyclophilin inhibitor. Moreover, we present evidence that PthA2 inhibits the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase activity of CsCyp in a similar fashion as CsA, and that silencing of CsCyp, as well as treatments with CsA, enhance canker lesions in X. citri-infected leaves. Given that CsCyp appears to function as a negative regulator of cell growth and that Ess1 negatively regulates transcription elongation in yeast, we propose that PthAs activate host transcription by inhibiting the PPIase activity of CsCyp on the CTD.

  13. Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex contains a C-terminal Ras-like domain that promotes association of Paf1 complex with chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amrich C. G.; Heroux A.; Davis, C. P.; Rogal, W. P.; Shirra, M. K.; Gardner, R. G.; Arndt, K. M.; VanDemark, A. P.

    2012-03-30

    The conserved Paf1 complex localizes to the coding regions of genes and facilitates multiple processes during transcription elongation, including the regulation of histone modifications. However, the mechanisms that govern Paf1 complex recruitment to active genes are undefined. Here we describe a previously unrecognized domain within the Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex, the Cdc73 C-domain, and demonstrate its importance for Paf1 complex occupancy on transcribed chromatin. Deletion of the C-domain causes phenotypes associated with elongation defects without an apparent loss of complex integrity. Simultaneous mutation of the C-domain and another subunit of the Paf1 complex, Rtf1, causes enhanced mutant phenotypes and loss of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation. The crystal structure of the C-domain reveals unexpected similarity to the Ras family of small GTPases. Instead of a deep nucleotide-binding pocket, the C-domain contains a large but comparatively flat surface of highly conserved residues, devoid of ligand. Deletion of the C-domain results in reduced chromatin association for multiple Paf1 complex subunits. We conclude that the Cdc73 C-domain probably constitutes a protein interaction surface that functions with Rtf1 in coupling the Paf1 complex to the RNA polymerase II elongation machinery.

  14. Regulation of abiotic stress signalling by Arabidopsis C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 requires interaction with a k-homology domain-containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sil Jeong

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN (CTD PHOSPHATASE-LIKE 1 (CPL1 regulates plant transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals. Unlike typical CTD phosphatases, CPL1 contains two double-stranded (ds RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs at its C-terminus. Some dsRBMs can bind to dsRNA and/or other proteins, but the function of the CPL1 dsRBMs has remained obscure. Here, we report identification of REGULATOR OF CBF GENE EXPRESSION 3 (RCF3 as a CPL1-interacting protein. RCF3 co-purified with tandem-affinity-tagged CPL1 from cultured Arabidopsis cells and contains multiple K-homology (KH domains, which were predicted to be important for binding to single-stranded DNA/RNA. Yeast two-hybrid, luciferase complementation imaging, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses established that CPL1 and RCF3 strongly associate in vivo, an interaction mediated by the dsRBM1 of CPL1 and the KH3/KH4 domains of RCF3. Mapping of functional regions of CPL1 indicated that CPL1 in vivo function requires the dsRBM1, catalytic activity, and nuclear targeting of CPL1. Gene expression profiles of rcf3 and cpl1 mutants were similar during iron deficiency, but were distinct during the cold response. These results suggest that tethering CPL1 to RCF3 via dsRBM1 is part of the mechanism that confers specificity to CPL1-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  15. Analysis of Tb{sup 3+}- and melittin-binding with the C-terminal domain of centrin in Euplotes octocarinatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yaqin; Diao Xiuling; Yan Jun; Feng Yanan [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Microcular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Wang Zhijun [Chemical Department, Changzhi University, Changzhi 046011 (China); Liang Aihua, E-mail: aliang@sxu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Microcular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Yang Binsheng, E-mail: yangbs@sxu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Microcular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2012-04-15

    Centrin is a low molecular mass (20 KDa) protein that belongs to the EF-hand superfamily. In this work, the interaction between the Tb{sup 3+}-saturated C-terminal domain of Euplotes octocarinatus centrin (Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen) and 2-p-toluidinylnaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) was investigated using difference UV-vis spectra and the fluorescence spectra methods. In 100 mM N-2-hydroxy-ethylpiperazine-N-2-ethanesulfonic acid (Hepes) at pH 7.4, with the addition of Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen, four new peaks were observed at 265 nm, 278 nm, 317 nm and 360 nm by absorptivity compared with blank solution of TNS. At the same time, the reaction could be measured by fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence emission of TNS was shifted from 480 nm to 445 nm in the presence of Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen. Meanwhile, its fluorescence intensity was increased markedly. The 1:1 stoichiometric ratio of C-EoCen to TNS was confirmed by fluorescence titration curves. The conditional binding constants of TNS with C-EoCen and Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen were calculated to be log K{sub (C-EoCen-TNS)}=5.32{+-}0.04 M{sup -1} and log K{sub (Tb2-C-EoCen-TNS)}=5.58{+-}0.12 M{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, the protein of Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen binding with melittin was also studied. Based on the fluorescence titration curves, the 1:1 stoichiometric ratio of Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen to melittin was confirmed. And the conditional binding constant of C-EoCen with melittin was calculated to be log Ka Prime =6.79{+-}0.17 M{sup -1}. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tb{sup 3+} induced conformational changes of protein C-EoCen from closed state to open state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conformational changes resulted in the exposure of hydrophobic surfaces on C-EoCen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tb{sub 2}-C-EoCen may bind with target peptide melittin.

  16. Structure-function analysis of mouse Sry reveals dual essential roles of the C-terminal polyglutamine tract in sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Ng, Ee Ting; Davidson, Tara-Lynne; Longmuss, Enya; Urschitz, Johann; Elston, Marlee; Moisyadi, Stefan; Bowles, Josephine; Koopman, Peter

    2014-08-12

    The mammalian sex-determining factor SRY comprises a conserved high-mobility group (HMG) box DNA-binding domain and poorly conserved regions outside the HMG box. Mouse Sry is unusual in that it includes a C-terminal polyglutamine (polyQ) tract that is absent in nonrodent SRY proteins, and yet, paradoxically, is essential for male sex determination. To dissect the molecular functions of this domain, we generated a series of Sry mutants, and studied their biochemical properties in cell lines and transgenic mouse embryos. Sry protein lacking the polyQ domain was unstable, due to proteasomal degradation. Replacing this domain with irrelevant sequences stabilized the protein but failed to restore Sry's ability to up-regulate its key target gene SRY-box 9 (Sox9) and its sex-determining function in vivo. These functions were restored only when a VP16 transactivation domain was substituted. We conclude that the polyQ domain has important roles in protein stabilization and transcriptional activation, both of which are essential for male sex determination in mice. Our data disprove the hypothesis that the conserved HMG box domain is the only functional domain of Sry, and highlight an evolutionary paradox whereby mouse Sry has evolved a novel bifunctional module to activate Sox9 directly, whereas SRY proteins in other taxa, including humans, seem to lack this ability, presumably making them dependent on partner proteins(s) to provide this function.

  17. Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Mannitol Phosphotransferase System of Escherichia coli : Overexpression, Purification, and Characterization of the Enzymatically Active C-Terminal Domain of Enzyme IImtl Equivalent to Enzyme IIImtl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeghel, R.P. van; Keck, W.; Robillard, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    The extreme C-terminus (Ser-490 to Lys-637) of the Escherichia coli EII(mtl) was subcloned to test structural and mechanistic proposals about the existence of an EIII-like domain in this enzyme. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to produce a unique NcoI restriction site and, at the same

  18. The C-terminal domain of BinA is responsible for Bacillus sphaericus binary toxin BinA-BinB interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpanawat, Suweeraya; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Boonserm, Panadda

    2009-11-01

    The binary toxin (Bin) from Bacillus sphaericus consists of two polypeptides, BinA (42 kDa) and BinB (51 kDa) that work together to kill susceptible mosquito larvae. To investigate the functional regions of BinA involved in the interaction with BinB, four BinA truncated fragments, from both N- and C- termini, were constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. Neither individual nor a mixture of fragments of BinA showed larvicidal activity against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae even using a high dose of toxins. Far-Western dot blot analysis showed strong binding of both C-terminal fragments (17 and 28 kDa) to BinB protein. This is the first report to demonstrate that the C-terminal part of BinA plays an important role for the interaction with BinB.

  19. Organization of the multifunctional enzyme type 1: interaction between N- and C-terminal domains is required for the hydratase-1/isomerase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Kiema, Tiila-Riikka; Taskinen, Jukka P; Päivi L Pirilä; Koivuranta, Kari T; Wierenga, Rik K; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo

    2002-01-01

    Rat peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 1 (perMFE-1) is a monomeric protein of beta-oxidation. We have defined five functional domains (A, B, C, D and E) in the perMFE-1 based on comparison of the amino acid sequence with homologous proteins from databases and structural data of the hydratase-1/isomerases (H1/I) and (3 S )-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenases (HAD). Domain A (residues 1-190) comprises the H1/I fold and catalyses both 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase-1 and Delta(3)-Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isome...

  20. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Nobuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. Results The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low μM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Conclusion Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure

  1. The Shapes of Z-α1-Antitrypsin Polymers in Solution Support the C-Terminal Domain-Swap Mechanism of Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Manja Annette; Sendall, Timothy J.; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2014-01-01

    Emphysema and liver cirrhosis can be caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys) in the serine protease inhibitor α1-antitrypsin (α1AT), which is found in more than 4% of the Northern European population. Homozygotes experience deficiency in the lung concomitantly with a massive accumulation of polymers......-like structures in strong support of a common domain-swap polymerization mechanism that can lead to self-terminating polymers...

  2. Ultrahigh and High Resolution Structures and Mutational Analysis of Monomeric Streptococcus pyogenes SpeB Reveal a Functional Role for the Glycine-rich C-terminal Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Wolan, Dennis W. (Scripps)

    2012-09-05

    Cysteine protease SpeB is secreted from Streptococcus pyogenes and has been studied as a potential virulence factor since its identification almost 70 years ago. Here, we report the crystal structures of apo mature SpeB to 1.06 {angstrom} resolution as well as complexes with the general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and a novel substrate mimetic peptide inhibitor. These structures uncover conformational changes associated with maturation of SpeB from the inactive zymogen to its active form and identify the residues required for substrate binding. With the use of a newly developed fluorogenic tripeptide substrate to measure SpeB activity, we determined IC{sub 50} values for trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and our new peptide inhibitor and the effects of mutations within the C-terminal active site loop. The structures and mutational analysis suggest that the conformational movements of the glycine-rich C-terminal loop are important for the recognition and recruitment of biological substrates and release of hydrolyzed products.

  3. Structural model of the TRPP2/PKD1 C-terminal coiled-coil complex produced by a combined computational and experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Yu, Yong; Ulbrich, Maximilian H; Li, Ming-hui; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Honig, Barry; Yang, Jian

    2011-06-21

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations in TRPP2 and PKD1, which form an ion channel/receptor complex containing three TRPP2 and one PKD1. A TRPP2 C-terminal coiled-coil trimer, critical for the assembly of this complex, associates with a single PKD1 C-terminal coiled-coil. Many ADPKD pathogenic mutations result in the abolishment of the TRPP2/PKD1 coiled-coil complex. To gain molecular and functional insights into this heterotetrameric complex, we computationally constructed a structural model by using a two-step docking strategy, based on a known crystal structure of the TRPP2 coiled-coil trimer. The model shows that this tetrameric complex has a novel di-trimer configuration: An upstream trimer made of three TRPP2 helices and a downstream trimer made of two TRPP2 helices and one PKD1 helix. Mutagenesis and biochemical analysis identified critical TRPP2/PKD1 interface contacts essential for the heteromeric coiled-coil complex. Mutation of these interface positions in the full-length proteins showed that these interactions were critical for the assembly of the full-length complex in cells. Our results provide a means to specifically weaken the TRPP2 and PKD1 association, thus facilitating future in vitro and in vivo studies on the functional importance of this association.

  4. Influence of N- and/or C-terminal regions on activity, expression, characteristics and structure of lipase from Geobacillus sp. 95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiukaitė, Renata; Gegeckas, Audrius; Kazlauskas, Darius; Citavicius, Donaldas

    2014-01-01

    GD-95 lipase from Geobacillus sp. strain 95 and its modified variants lacking N-terminal signal peptide and/or 10 or 20 C-terminal amino acids were successfully cloned, expressed and purified. To our knowledge, GD-95 lipase precursor (Pre-GD-95) is the first Geobacillus lipase possessing more than 80% lipolytic activity at 5 °C. It has maximum activity at 55 °C and displays a broad pH activity range. GD-95 lipase was shown to hydrolyze p-NP dodecanoate, tricaprylin and canola oil better than other analyzed substrates. Structural and sequence alignments of bacterial lipases and GD-95 lipase revealed that the C-terminus forms an α helix, which is a conserved structure in lipases from Pseudomonas, Clostridium or Staphylococcus bacteria. This work demonstrates that 10 and 20 C-terminal amino acids of GD-95 lipase significantly affect stability and other physicochemical properties of this enzyme, which has never been reported before and can help create lipases with more specific properties for industrial application. GD-95 lipase and its modified variants GD-95-10 can be successfully applied to biofuel production, in leather and pulp industries, for the production of cosmetics or perfumes. These lipases are potential biocatalysts in processes, which require extreme conditions: low or high temperature, strongly acidic or alkaline environment and various organic solvents.

  5. The role of the Brr5/Ysh1 C-terminal domain and its homolog Syc1 in mRNA 3′-end processing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasser, Tommy; Tacahashi, Zhelkovsky A.; He, X.

    2006-01-01

    subunit Pap1. Because of similarity to other nucleases in the metallo-beta-lactamase family, the Brr5/Ysh1 subunit has been proposed to be the endonuclease. The C-terminal domain of Brr5 lies outside of beta-lactamase homology, and its function has not been elucidated. We show here that this region of Brr......5 is necessary for cell viability and mRNA 3'-end processing. It is highly homologous to another CPF subunit, Syc1. Syc1 is not essential, but its removal improves the growth of other processing mutants at restrictive temperatures and restores in vitro processing activity to cleavage...

  6. Proteolysis-induced N-terminal ectodomain shedding of the integral membrane glycoprotein CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of its C-terminal domain and recruitment of Src and PKCdelta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaowu; Wortmann, Andreas; Burke, Les J; Reid, Janet C; Adams, Mark N; Abdul-Jabbar, Ibtissam; Quigley, James P; Leduc, Richard; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Hooper, John D

    2010-08-20

    CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is an integral membrane glycoprotein with potential as a marker and therapeutic target for a number of cancers. Here we examine mechanisms regulating cellular processing of CDCP1. By analyzing cell lines exclusively passaged non-enzymatically and through use of a panel of protease inhibitors, we demonstrate that full-length 135 kDa CDCP1 is post-translationally processed in a range of cell lines by a mechanism involving serine protease activity, generating a C-terminal 70-kDa fragment. Immunopurification and N-terminal sequencing of this cell-retained fragment and detailed mutagenesis, show that proteolytic processing of CDCP1 occurs at two sites, Arg-368 and Lys-369. We show that the serine protease matriptase is an efficient, but not essential, cellular processor of CDCP1 at Arg-368. Importantly, we also demonstrate that proteolysis induces tyrosine phosphorylation of 70-kDa CDCP1 and recruitment of Src and PKCdelta to this fragment. In addition, Western blot and mass spectroscopy analyses show that an N-terminal 65-kDa CDCP1 ectodomain is shed intact from the cell surface. These data provide new insights into mechanisms regulating CDCP1 and suggest that the biological role of this protein and, potentially, its function in cancer, may be mediated by both 70-kDa cell retained and 65-kDa shed fragments, as well as the full-length 135-kDa protein.

  7. Effect of the C-terminal domain of Vibrio proteolyticus chitinase A on the chitinolytic activity in association with pH changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, S; Kanomata, Y; Uchida, S; Kadokura, K; Nishio, T; Oku, T; Sugita, H

    2012-05-01

    To reveal the cause of the difference in activity of chitinase A from Vibrio proteolyticus and chitinase A from a strain of Vibrio carchariae (a junior synonym of Vibrio harveyi), we investigated the pH-dependent activity of full-length V. proteolyticus chitinase A and a truncated recombinant corresponding to the V. harveyi form of chitinase A. After overexpression in Escherichia coli strain DH5α, the full-length and truncated recombinant chitinases were purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and anion exchange column chromatography. Chitinase activity was measured at various pH values using α-crystal and colloidal chitins as the substrate. The pH-dependent patterns of the relative specific activities for α-crystal chitin differed between the full-length and truncated recombinant chitinases, whereas those for colloidal chitin were similar to each other. The difference in the activity of V. proteolyticus chitinase A and V. harveyi chitinase A might be partly due to a change in the pH dependence of the chitinase activities against α-crystal chitin, resulting from C-terminal processing. The present results are important findings for not only ecological studies on the genus Vibrio in association with survival strategies, but also phylogenetic studies. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Crystal structure of a C-terminal deletion mutant of human protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermakova, Inessa; Boldyreff, Brigitte; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2003-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly called: casein kinase 2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two separate catalytic chains (CK2alpha) and a stable dimer of two non-catalytic subunits (CK2beta). CK2alpha is a highly conserved member of the superfamily of eukaryotic protein kinases. The crystal...... main regions of conformational plasticity and regulatory importance in eukaryotic protein kinases, in active conformations stabilized by extensive contacts to the N-terminal segment. This arrangement is in accordance with the constitutive activity of the enzyme. By structural superimposition of human...... CK2alpha in isolated form and embedded in the human CK2 holoenzyme the loop connecting the strands beta4 and beta5 and the ATP-binding loop were identified as elements of structural variability. This structural comparison suggests that the ATP-binding loop may be the key region by which the non...

  9. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2016-02-18

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  10. Downregulation of 5-HT7 Serotonin Receptors by the Atypical Antipsychotics Clozapine and Olanzapine. Role of Motifs in the C-Terminal Domain and Interaction with GASP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfra, Ornella; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Skieterska, Kamila; Frimurer, Thomas; Schwartz, Thue W; Levy, Finn Olav; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel

    2015-07-15

    The human 5-HT7 serotonin receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), activates adenylyl cyclase constitutively and upon agonist activation. Biased ligands differentially activate 5-HT7 serotonin receptor desensitization, internalization and degradation in addition to G protein activation. We have previously found that the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine inhibited G protein activation and, surprisingly, induced both internalization and lysosomal degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. Here, we aimed to determine the mechanism of clozapine- and olanzapine-mediated degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. In the C-terminus of the 5-HT7 receptor, we identified two YXXΦ motifs, LR residues, and a palmitoylated cysteine anchor as potential sites involved in receptor trafficking to lysosomes followed by receptor degradation. Mutating either of these sites inhibited clozapine- and olanzapine-mediated degradation of 5-HT7 receptors and also interfered with G protein activation. In addition, we tested whether receptor degradation was mediated by the GPCR-associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1). We show that GASP-1 binds the 5-HT7 receptor and regulates the clozapine-mediated degradation. Mutations of the identified motifs and residues, located in or close to Helix-VIII of the 5-HT7 receptor, modified antipsychotic-stimulated binding of proteins (such as GASP-1), possibly by altering the flexibility of Helix-VIII, and also interfered with G protein activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that binding of clozapine or olanzapine to the 5-HT7 receptor leads to antagonist-mediated lysosomal degradation by exposing key residues in the C-terminal tail that interact with GASP-1.

  11. The C-terminal portion of BM-40 (SPARC/osteonectin) is an autonomously folding and crystallisable domain that binds calcium and collagen IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, P; Hohenadl, C; Hohenester, E; Göhring, W; Timpl, R; Engel, J

    1995-10-20

    The extracellular glycoprotein BM-40 consists of three domains, an acidic domain I, a follistatin (FS)-like domain II and a calcium-binding EC domain with an EF-hand related motif. BM-40 and several other related proteins (QR1, SC1/hevin, testican and tsc-36/FRP) are members of a novel modular protein family that share the FS domain followed by an EC domain. We have expressed this pair of FS and EC domains (mutant delta I) and the calcium-binding EC domain alone (mutant delta I, II) of human BM-40 as recombinant proteins in human 293 cells. Circular dichroism demonstrated that both mutants were obtained as folded proteins with a distinct three-dimensional conformation. In addition, mutant delta I, II could be readily crystallized and diffraction patterns with a resolution limit of 2.4 A resolution were obtained. Calcium binding to this fragment was ten times weaker (Kd = 0.8 microM) than for the wild-type protein. Identical reversible increases in alpha-helicity upon calcium binding were observed for the 150-residue long mutant delta I, II and for BM-40 (286 residues). A 26-residue synthetic peptide corresponding to the EF-hand related motif exhibited much weaker calcium binding. The apparent dissociation constant decreased with increasing peptide concentration (from Kd 2.4 mM at 1 microM, to Kd 0.3 mM at 100 microM peptide concentration) and calcium binding was accompanied by dimerization of the peptide. This suggests that for strong calcium binding the EF-hand related motif has to be embedded into a larger protein domain that can form an autonomously folding protein module. The EC domain was also shown by surface plasmon resonance assay to be responsible for calcium-dependent binding to collagen IV with an affinity (Kd = 19 microM) only sixfold lower than that of intact human BM-40.

  12. The 18-kilodalton Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) contains a potential N-terminal dimerization site and a C-terminal nucleic acid-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, LB; Birkelund, Svend; Holm, A

    1996-01-01

    , in part, be due to Hc1-mediated alterations of DNA topology. To locate putative functional domains within Hc1, polypeptides Hc1(2-57) and Hc1(53-125), corresponding to the N- and C-terminal parts of Hc1, respectively, were generated. By chemical cross-linking with ethylene glycol-bis (succinic acid N...... retardation assays, Hc1(53-125) was shown to contain a domain capable of binding both DNA and RNA. Under the same conditions, Hc1(2-57) had no nucleic acid-binding activity. Electron microscopy of Hc1-DNA and Hc1(53-125)-DNA complexes revealed differences suggesting that the N-terminal part of Hc1 may affect...

  13. Hydrogen-induced nanotunnel structure on the C-terminated β-SiC(0 0 1)-c(2 × 2) surface investigated by ab-initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, E.F. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Baierle, R.J., E-mail: rbaierle@smail.ufsm.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Orellana, W. [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello, República 220, 837-0134 Santiago (Chile); Miwa, R.H. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38408-100, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • β-SiC(0 0 1) surface. • Hydrogenation. • DFT calculations – PBE and HSE06 functional for the exchange correlation term. • Nanotunnel formation. • Electronic confinement. - Abstract: The structural and electronic properties of pristine and H-passivated C-terminated β-SiC(0 0 1)-c(2 × 2) surface are addressed by ab initio calculations. Here, we verify the formation of C chains composed by double-bonded dimers rows (C=C), separated by triple-bonded bridged dimers (C≡C). The surface states near the bandgap are confined along the C=C dimer rows, with no electronic contribution from the C≡C bridged dimers. After hydrogenation, the C-chains are strongly modified, forming subsurface voids or nanotunnel (NT) structures. By considering a plausible set of energy release steps for increasing hydrogenation, we obtain a C-rich NT ruled by the C=C dimer rows. Somewhat similar to that recently reported on the Si-rich termination, but 0.8 eV lower in energy. The electronic band structures of both Si-rich and C-rich NTs have been examined within the hybrid HSE06 functional, which are compared with those previously reported using a semilocal functional.

  14. Adaptive Immunity against Leishmania Nucleoside Hydrolase Maps Its C-Terminal Domain as the Target of the CD4+ T Cell-Driven Protective Response

    OpenAIRE

    Dirlei Nico; Carla Claser; Borja-Cabrera, Gulnara P.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Marcos Palatnik; Irene da Silva Soares; Mauricio Martins Rodrigues; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs) show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36) responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral ...

  15. Crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 reveals a three-helical domain architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyanka, Anu; Solanki, Vipul; Parkesh, Raman; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-10-01

    Human SIRT7 is an NAD(+) dependent deacetylase, which belongs to sirtuin family of proteins. SIRT7, like other sirtuins has conserved catalytic domain and is flanked by N- and C-terminal domains reported to play vital functional roles. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 (SIRT7(NTD) ) at 2.3 Å resolution as MBP-SIRT7(NTD) fusion protein. SIRT7(NTD) adopts three-helical domain architecture and comparative structural analyses suggest similarities to some DNA binding motifs and transcription regulators. We also report here the importance of N- and C-terminal domains in soluble expression of SIRT7. Proteins 2016; 84:1558-1563. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. New structural insight of C-terminal region of Syntenin-1, enhancing the molecular dimerization and inhibitory function related on Syndecan-4 signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Youngsil; Yun, Ji-Hye; Yoo, Jiho

    2016-01-01

    The PDZ domain-containing scaffold protein, syntenin-1, binds to the transmembrane proteoglycan, syndecan-4, but the molecular mechanism/function of this interaction are unknown. Crystal structure analysis of syntenin-1/syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domains revealed that syntenin-1 forms a symmetrical...

  17. Direct interaction of Gβγ with a C-terminal Gβγ-binding domain of the Ca2+ channel α1 subunit is responsible for channel inhibition by G protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ning; Platano, Daniela; Olcese, Riccardo; Stefani, Enrico; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    1997-01-01

    Several classes of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are inhibited by G proteins activated by receptors for neurotransmitters and neuromodulatory peptides. Evidence has accumulated to indicate that for non-L-type Ca2+ channels the executing arm of the activated G protein is its βγ dimer (Gβγ). We report below the existence of two Gβγ-binding sites on the A-, B-, and E-type α1 subunits that form non-L-type Ca2+ channels. One, reported previously, is in loop 1 connecting transmembrane domains I and II. The second is located approximately in the middle of the ca. 600-aa-long C-terminal tails. Both Gβγ-binding regions also bind the Ca2+ channel β subunit (CCβ), which, when overexpressed, interferes with inhibition by activated G proteins. Replacement in α1E of loop 1 with that of the G protein-insensitive and Gβγ-binding-negative loop 1 of α1C did not abolish inhibition by G proteins, but the exchange of the α1E C terminus with that of α1C did. This and properties of α1E C-terminal truncations indicated that the Gβγ-binding site mediating the inhibition of Ca2+ channel activity is the one in the C terminus. Binding of Gβγ to this site was inhibited by an α1-binding domain of CCβ, thus providing an explanation for the functional antagonism existing between CCβ and G protein inhibition. The data do not support proposals that Gβγ inhibits α1 function by interacting with the site located in the loop I–II linker. These results define the molecular mechanism by which presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors inhibit neurotransmission. PMID:9238069

  18. Direct interaction of gbetagamma with a C-terminal gbetagamma-binding domain of the Ca2+ channel alpha1 subunit is responsible for channel inhibition by G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, N; Platano, D; Olcese, R; Stefani, E; Birnbaumer, L

    1997-08-05

    Several classes of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are inhibited by G proteins activated by receptors for neurotransmitters and neuromodulatory peptides. Evidence has accumulated to indicate that for non-L-type Ca2+ channels the executing arm of the activated G protein is its betagamma dimer (Gbetagamma). We report below the existence of two Gbetagamma-binding sites on the A-, B-, and E-type alpha1 subunits that form non-L-type Ca2+ channels. One, reported previously, is in loop 1 connecting transmembrane domains I and II. The second is located approximately in the middle of the ca. 600-aa-long C-terminal tails. Both Gbetagamma-binding regions also bind the Ca2+ channel beta subunit (CCbeta), which, when overexpressed, interferes with inhibition by activated G proteins. Replacement in alpha1E of loop 1 with that of the G protein-insensitive and Gbetagamma-binding-negative loop 1 of alpha1C did not abolish inhibition by G proteins, but the exchange of the alpha1E C terminus with that of alpha1C did. This and properties of alpha1E C-terminal truncations indicated that the Gbetagamma-binding site mediating the inhibition of Ca2+ channel activity is the one in the C terminus. Binding of Gbetagamma to this site was inhibited by an alpha1-binding domain of CCbeta, thus providing an explanation for the functional antagonism existing between CCbeta and G protein inhibition. The data do not support proposals that Gbetagamma inhibits alpha1 function by interacting with the site located in the loop I-II linker. These results define the molecular mechanism by which presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors inhibit neurotransmission.

  19. C-Terminal Substitution of HBV Core Proteins with Those from DHBV Reveals That Arginine-Rich 167RRRSQSPRR175 Domain Is Critical for HBV Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyeung; Shin, Bo-Hye; Park, Gil-Soon; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the contributions of carboxyl-terminal nucleic acid binding domain of HBV core (C) protein for hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, chimeric HBV C proteins were generated by substituting varying lengths of the carboxyl-terminus of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) C protein for the corresponding regions of HBV C protein. All chimeric C proteins formed core particles. A chimeric C protein with 221–262 amino acids of DHBV C protein, in place of 146–185 amino acids of the HBV C protein, supported HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) encapsidation and DNA synthesis: 40% amino acid sequence identity or 45% homology in the nucleic-acid binding domain of HBV C protein was sufficient for pgRNA encapsidation and DNA synthesis, although we predominantly detected spliced DNA. A chimeric C protein with 221–241 and 251–262 amino acids of DHBV C, in place of HBV C 146–166 and 176–185 amino acids, respectively, could rescue full-length DNA synthesis. However, a reciprocal C chimera with 242–250 of DHBV C (242RAGSPLPRS250) introduced in place of 167–175 of HBV C (167RRRSQSPRR175) significantly decreased pgRNA encapsidation and DNA synthesis, and full-length DNA was not detected, demonstrating that the arginine-rich 167RRRSQSPRR175 domain may be critical for efficient viral replication. Five amino acids differing between viral species (underlined above) were tested for replication rescue; R169 and R175 were found to be important. PMID:22911745

  20. The Biotechnological Applications of Recombinant Single-Domain Antibodies are Optimized by the C-Terminal Fusion to the EPEA Sequence (C Tag)

    OpenAIRE

    Djender, Selma; Beugnet, Anne; Schneider, Aurelie; Marco, Ario de

    2014-01-01

    We designed a vector for the bacterial expression of recombinant antibodies fused to a double tag composed of 6xHis and the EPEA amino acid sequence. EPEA sequence (C tag) is tightly bound by a commercial antibody when expressed at the C-term end of a polypeptide. The antigen is released in the presence of 2 M MgCl2. Consequently, constructs fused to the 6xHis-C tags can be purified by two successive and orthogonal affinity steps. Single-domain antibodies were produced either in the periplasm...

  1. TIMP-3 inhibition of ADAMTS-4 (Aggrecanase-1) is modulated by interactions between aggrecan and the C-terminal domain of ADAMTS-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Gareth J; Deng, Su-Jun; Amour, Augustin; Borman, Satty; Matico, Rosalie; Carter, H Luke; Murphy, Gillian

    2007-07-20

    ADAMTS-4 (aggrecanase-1) is a glutamyl endopeptidase capable of generating catabolic fragments of aggrecan analogous to those released from articular cartilage during degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. Efficient aggrecanase activity requires the presence of sulfated glycosaminoglycans attached to the aggrecan core protein, implying the contribution of substrate recognition/binding site(s) to ADAMTS-4 activity. In this study, we developed a sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide assay with a K(m) in the 10 microm range and utilized this assay to demonstrate that inhibition of full-length ADAMTS-4 by full-length TIMP-3 (a physiological inhibitor of metalloproteinases) is enhanced in the presence of aggrecan. Our data indicate that this interaction is mediated largely through the binding of glycosaminoglycans (specifically chondroitin 6-sulfate) of aggrecan to binding sites in the thrombospondin type 1 motif and spacer domains of ADAMTS-4 to form a complex with an improved binding affinity for TIMP-3 over free ADAMTS-4. The results of this study therefore indicate that the cartilage environment can modulate the function of enzyme-inhibitor systems and could have relevance for therapeutic approaches to aggrecanase modulation.

  2. The Biotechnological Applications of Recombinant Single-Domain Antibodies are Optimized by the C-Terminal Fusion to the EPEA Sequence (C Tag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Djender

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We designed a vector for the bacterial expression of recombinant antibodies fused to a double tag composed of 6xHis and the EPEA amino acid sequence. EPEA sequence (C tag is tightly bound by a commercial antibody when expressed at the C-term end of a polypeptide. The antigen is released in the presence of 2 M MgCl2. Consequently, constructs fused to the 6xHis-C tags can be purified by two successive and orthogonal affinity steps. Single-domain antibodies were produced either in the periplasmic or in the cytoplasmic space of E. coli. Surprisingly, the first affinity purification step performed using the EPEA-binding resin already yielded homogeneous proteins. The presence of the C tag did not interfere with the binding activity of the antibodies, as assessed by FACS and SPR analyses, and the C tag was extremely effective for immunoprecipitating HER2 receptor. Finally, the Alexa488-coupled anti-C tag allowed for simplification of FACS and IF analyses. These results show that a tag of minimal dimensions can be effectively used to improve the applicability of recombinant antibodies as reagents. In our hands, C tag was superior to His-tag in affinity purification and pull-down experiments, and practical in any other standard immune technique.

  3. High-level soluble expression of the functional peptide derived from the C-terminal domain of the sea cucumber lysozyme and analysis of its antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Cong

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate that the expressed rSjLys-C is a highly soluble product and has a strong antimicrobial activity. Therefore, gaining a large quantity of biologically active rSjLys-C will be used for further biochemical and structural studies and provide a potential use in aquaculture and medicine.

  4. Clostridium Perfringens Enterotoxin C-terminal domain labeled to fluorescent Dyes for in vivo visualization of micro-metastatic chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Emiliano; Shapiro, Erik M.; Gasparrini, Sara; Lopez, Salvatore; Schwab, Carlton L.; Bellone, Stefania; Bortolomai, Ileana; Sumi, Natalia J.; Bonazzoli, Elena; Nicoletti, Roberta; Deng, Yang; Saltzman, W. Mark; Zeiss, Caroline J.; Centritto, Floriana; Black, Jonathan D.; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Ratner, Elena; Azodi, Masoud; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Schwartz, Peter E.; Pecorelli, Sergio; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of micro-metastatic disease at the time of surgery remains extremely challenging in ovarian cancer patients. We used fluorescence microscopy, an in vivo imaging system and a fluorescence stereo microscope to evaluate fluorescence distribution in claudin-3 and -4 overexpressing ovarian tumors, floating tumor clumps isolated from ascites and healthy organs. To do so, mice harboring chemotherapy-naïve and chemotherapy-resistant human ovarian cancer xenografts or patient-derived xenografts (PDX) were treated with the carboxi-terminal binding domain of the Clostridium Perfringens Enterotoxin (c-CPE) conjugated to FITC (FITC-c-CPE) or the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent tag IRDye CW800 (CW800-c-CPE) either intraperitoneal (IP) or intravenous (IV). We found tumor fluorescence to plateau at 30 minutes after IP injection of both the FITC-c-CPE and the CW800-c-CPE peptides and to be significantly higher than in healthy organs (p<0.01). After IV injection of CW800-c-CPE, tumor fluorescence plateaued at 6 hours while the most favorable tumor to background fluorescence ratio (TBR) was found at 48 hours in both mouse models. Importantly, fluorescent c-CPE was highly sensitive for the in vivo visualization of peritoneal micro-metastatic tumor implants and the identification of ovarian tumor spheroids floating in malignant ascites that were otherwise not detectable by conventional visual observation. The use of the fluorescent c-CPE peptide may represent a novel and effective optical approach at the time of primary debulking surgery for the real-time detection of micro-metastatic ovarian disease overexpressing the claudin-3 and -4 receptors or the identification of residual disease at the time of interval debulking surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment. PMID:26060989

  5. LC8 dynein light chain (DYNLL1) binds to the C-terminal domain of ATM-interacting protein (ATMIN/ASCIZ) and regulates its subcellular localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapali, Peter [Dept. Biochemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Garcia-Mayoral, Maria Flor [Dept. Biological Physical Chemistry, IQFR, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Moreno, Monica [Dept. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Tarnok, Krisztian; Schlett, Katalin [Dept. Physiology and Neurobiology, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Albar, Juan Pablo [Proteomics Facility, CNB, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Bruix, Marta [Dept. Biological Physical Chemistry, IQFR, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Nyitray, Laszlo, E-mail: nyitray@elte.hu [Dept. Biochemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Rodriguez-Crespo, Ignacio, E-mail: nacho@bbm1.ucm.es [Dept. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have screened a human library with dynein light chain DYNLL1 (DLC8) as bait. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynein light chain DYNLL1 binds to ATM-kinase interacting protein (ATMIN). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATMIN has 17 SQ/TQ motifs, a motif frequently found in DYNLL1-binding partners. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two proteins interact in vitro, with ATMIN displaying at least five binding sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction of ATMIN and DYNNL1 in transfected cells can also be observed. -- Abstract: LC8 dynein light chain (now termed DYNLL1 and DYNLL2 in mammals), a dimeric 89 amino acid protein, is a component of the dynein multi-protein complex. However a substantial amount of DYNLL1 is not associated to microtubules and it can thus interact with dozens of cellular and viral proteins that display well-defined, short linear motifs. Using DYNLL1 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart library we identified ATMIN, an ATM kinase-interacting protein, as a DYNLL1-binding partner. Interestingly, ATMIN displays at least 18 SQ/TQ motifs in its sequence and DYNLL1 is known to bind to proteins with KXTQT motifs. Using pepscan and yeast two-hybrid techniques we show that DYNLL1 binds to multiple SQ/TQ motifs present in the carboxy-terminal domain of ATMIN. Recombinant expression and purification of the DYNLL1-binding region of ATMIN allowed us to obtain a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass in gel filtration close to 400 kDa that could bind to DYNLL1 in vitro. The NMR data-driven modelled complexes of DYNLL1 with two selected ATMIN peptides revealed a similar mode of binding to that observed between DYNLL1 and other peptide targets. Remarkably, co-expression of mCherry-DYNLL1 and GFP-ATMIN mutually affected intracellular protein localization. In GFP-ATMIN expressing-cells DNA damage induced efficiently nuclear foci formation, which was partly impeded by the presence of mCherry-DYNLL1

  6. Structure and disulfide bonding pattern of the hevein-like peptide domains from plant class IV chitinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) produce GH family 19 plant class IV chitinases. These chitinases contain two domains: a small N-terminal hevein region, and a C-terminal chitinase. Numerous structures of GH19 chitinase domains have been reported, including the chitinase domain ...

  7. The Lectin Domain of the Polypeptide GalNAc Transferase Family of Glycosyltransferases (ppGalNAc Ts) Acts as a Switch Directing Glycopeptide Substrate Glycosylation in an N- or C-terminal Direction, Further Controlling Mucin Type O-Glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerken, Thomas A; Revoredo, Leslie; Thome, Joseph J C

    2013-01-01

    relative to the nonglycosylated control peptides. This N- and/or C-terminal selectivity is presumably due to weak glycopeptide binding to the lectin domain, whose orientation relative to the catalytic domain is dynamic and isoform-dependent. Such N- or C-terminal glycopeptide selectivity provides......Mucin type O-glycosylation is initiated by a large family of polypeptide GalNAc transferases (ppGalNAc Ts) that add α-GalNAc to the Ser and Thr residues of peptides. Of the 20 human isoforms, all but one are composed of two globular domains linked by a short flexible linker: a catalytic domain...... and a ricin-like lectin carbohydrate binding domain. Presently, the roles of the catalytic and lectin domains in peptide and glycopeptide recognition and specificity remain unclear. To systematically study the role of the lectin domain in ppGalNAc T glycopeptide substrate utilization, we have developed...

  8. Influence of tertiary structure domain properties on the functionality of apolipoprotein A-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masafumi; Koyama, Mao; Dhanasekaran, Padmaja; Nguyen, David; Nickel, Margaret; Lund-Katz, Sissel; Saito, Hiroyuki; Phillips, Michael C

    2008-02-19

    The tertiary structure of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and the contributions of structural domains to the properties of the protein molecule are not well defined. We used a series of engineered human and mouse apoA-I molecules in a range of physical-biochemical measurements to address this issue. Circular dichroism measurements of alpha-helix thermal unfolding and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonic acid binding indicate that removal of the C-terminal 54 amino acid residues from human and mouse apoA-I has similar effects; the molecules are only slightly destabilized, and there is a decrease in hydrophobic surface exposure. These results are consistent with both human and mouse apoA-I adopting a two-domain tertiary structure, comprising an N-terminal antiparallel helix bundle domain and a separate less ordered C-terminal domain. Mouse apoA-I is significantly less resistant than human apoA-I to thermal and chemical denaturation; the midpoint of thermal unfolding of mouse apoA-I at 45 degrees C is 15 degrees C lower and the midpoint of guanidine hydrochloride denaturation (D1/2) occurs at 0.5 M as compared to 1.0 M for human apoA-I. These differences reflect the overall greater stability of the helix bundle formed by residues 1-189 in human apoA-I. Measurements of the heats of binding to egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) small unilamellar vesicles and the kinetics of solubilization of dimyristoyl PC multilamellar vesicles indicate that the more stable human helix bundle interacts poorly with lipids as compared to the equivalent mouse N-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain of human apoA-I is much more hydrophobic than that of mouse apoA-I; in the lipid-free state the human C-terminal domain (residues 190-243) is partially alpha-helical and undergoes cooperative unfolding (D1/2 = 0.3 M) whereas the isolated mouse C-terminal domain (residues 187-240) is disordered in dilute solution. The human C-terminal domain binds to lipid surfaces much

  9. Structural and Regulatory Elements of HCV NS5B Polymerase – β-Loop and C-Terminal Tail – Are Required for Activity of Allosteric Thumb Site II Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Sarah E.; Tirunagari, Neeraj; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Perry, Jason; Wong, Melanie; Kan, Elaine; Lagpacan, Leanna; Barauskas, Ona; Hung, Magdeleine; Fenaux, Martijn; Appleby, Todd; Watkins, William J.; Schmitz, Uli; Sakowicz, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism of action of the HCV NS5B polymerase thumb site II inhibitors has presented a challenge. Current opinion holds that these allosteric inhibitors stabilize the closed, inactive enzyme conformation, but how this inhibition is accomplished mechanistically is not well understood. Here, using a panel of NS5B proteins with mutations in key regulatory motifs of NS5B – the C-terminal tail and β-loop – in conjunction with a diverse set of NS5B allosteric inhibitors, we show that thumb site II inhibitors possess a distinct mechanism of action. A combination of enzyme activity studies and direct binding assays reveals that these inhibitors require both regulatory elements to maintain the polymerase inhibitory activity. Removal of either element has little impact on the binding affinity of thumb site II inhibitors, but significantly reduces their potency. NS5B in complex with a thumb site II inhibitor displays a characteristic melting profile that suggests stabilization not only of the thumb domain but also the whole polymerase. Successive truncations of the C-terminal tail and/or removal of the β-loop lead to progressive destabilization of the protein. Furthermore, the thermal unfolding transitions characteristic for thumb site II inhibitor – NS5B complex are absent in the inhibitor – bound constructs in which interactions between C-terminal tail and β-loop are abolished, pointing to the pivotal role of both regulatory elements in communication between domains. Taken together, a comprehensive picture of inhibition by compounds binding to thumb site II emerges: inhibitor binding provides stabilization of the entire polymerase in an inactive, closed conformation, propagated via coupled interactions between the C-terminal tail and β-loop. PMID:24416288

  10. The C-terminal 20 Amino Acids of Drosophila Topoisomerase 2 Are Required for Binding to a BRCA1 C Terminus (BRCT) Domain-containing Protein, Mus101, and Fidelity of DNA Segregation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-tsung Shane; Wu, Jianhong; Modrich, Paul; Hsieh, Tao-shih

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic topoisomerase 2 (Top2) and one of its interacting partners, topoisomerase IIβ binding protein 1 (TopBP1) are two proteins performing essential cellular functions. We mapped the interacting domains of these two proteins using co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments with truncated or mutant Drosophila Top2 with various Ser-to-Ala substitutions. We discovered that the last 20 amino acids of Top2 represent the key region for binding with Mus101 (the Drosophila homolog of TopBP1) and that phosphorylation of Ser-1428 and Ser-1443 is important for Top2 to interact with the N terminus of Mus101, which contains the BRCT1/2 domains. The interaction between Mus101 and the Top2 C-terminal regulatory domain is phosphorylation-dependent because treatment with phosphatase abolishes their association in pulldown assays. The binding affinity of N-terminal Mus101 with a synthetic phosphorylated peptide spanning the last 25 amino acids of Top2 (with Ser(P)-1428 and Ser(P)-1443) was determined by surface plasmon resonance with a Kd of 0.57 μm. In an in vitro decatenation assay, Mus101 can specifically reduce the decatenation activity of Top2, and dephosphorylation of Top2 attenuates this response. Next, we endeavored to establish a cellular system for testing the biological function of Top2-Mus101 interaction. Top2-silenced S2 cells rescued by Top2Δ20, Top2 with 20 amino acids truncated from the C terminus, developed abnormally high chromosome numbers, which implies that Top2-Mus101 interaction is important for maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:27129233

  11. Two functions of the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli Rob: mediating "sequestration-dispersal" as a novel off-on switch for regulating Rob's activity as a transcription activator and preventing degradation of Rob by Lon protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Kevin L; Fitzpatrick, M Megan; Keen, Edward F; Wolf, Richard E

    2009-05-08

    In Escherichia coli, Rob activates transcription of the SoxRS/MarA/Rob regulon. Previous work revealed that Rob resides in three to four immunostainable foci, that dipyridyl and bile salts are inducers of its activity, and that inducers bind to Rob's C-terminal domain (CTD). We propose that sequestration inactivates Rob by blocking its access to the transcriptional machinery and that inducers activate Rob by mediating its dispersal, allowing interaction with RNA polymerase. To test "sequestration-dispersal" as a new mechanism for regulating the activity of transcriptional activators, we fused Rob's CTD to SoxS and used indirect immunofluorescence microscopy to determine the effect of inducers on SoxS-Rob's cellular localization. Unlike native SoxS, which is uniformly distributed throughout the cell, SoxS-Rob is sequestered without an inducer, but is rapidly dispersed when cells are treated with an inducer. In this manner, Rob's CTD serves as an anti-sigma factor in regulating the co-sigma-factor-like activity of SoxS when fused to it. Rob's CTD also protects its N-terminus from Lon protease, since Lon's normally rapid degradation of SoxS is blocked in the chimera. Accordingly, Rob's CTD has novel regulatory properties that can be bestowed on another E. coli protein.

  12. Small C-terminal Domain Phosphatase 3 Dephosphorylates the Linker Sites of Receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads) to Ensure Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ)-mediated Germ Layer Induction in Xenopus Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guanni; Hu, Zhirui; Min, Zheying; Yan, Xiaohua; Guan, Zhenpo; Su, Hanxia; Fu, Yu; Ma, Xiaopeng; Chen, Ye-Guang; Zhang, Michael Q; Tao, Qinghua; Wu, Wei

    2015-07-10

    Germ layer induction is one of the earliest events shortly after fertilization that initiates body formation of vertebrate embryos. In Xenopus, the maternally deposited transcriptional factor VegT promotes the expression of zygotic Nodal/Activin ligands that further form a morphogen gradient along the vegetal-animal axis and trigger the induction of the three germ layers. Here we found that SCP3 (small C-terminal domain phosphatase 3) is maternally expressed and vegetally enriched in Xenopus embryos and is essential for the timely induction of germ layers. SCP3 is required for the full activation of Nodal/Activin and bone morphogenetic protein signals and functions via dephosphorylation in the linker regions of receptor-regulated Smads. Consistently, the linker regions of receptor-regulated Smads are heavily phosphorylated in fertilized eggs, and this phosphorylation is gradually removed when embryos approach the midblastula transition. Knockdown of maternal SCP3 attenuates these dephosphorylation events and the activation of Nodal/Activin and bone morphogenetic protein signals after midblastula transition. This study thus suggested that the maternal SCP3 serves as a vegetally enriched, intrinsic factor to ensure a prepared status of Smads for their activation by the upcoming ligands during germ layer induction of Xenopus embryos. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Influenza A hemagglutinin C-terminal anchoring peptide: identification and mass spectrometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyukova, Larisa V; Ksenofontov, Aleksander L; Serebryakova, Marina V; Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Fedorova, Natalija V; Ivanova, Valeria T; Baratova, Ludmila A

    2004-08-01

    MALDI-TOF MS and N-terminal amino acid sequencing allowed us to identify several fragments of the C-terminal peptide of Influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) containing transmembrane domains (TMD). These fragments were detected in the organic phase of chloroform-methanol extracts from bromelain-treated virus particles. Heterogeneous fatty acylation of the C-terminus was revealed. Tritium bombardment technique might open an opportunity for 3D structural investigation of the HA TMD in situ.

  14. C-Terminal 23 kDa polypeptide of soybean Gly m Bd 28 K is a potential allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ping; Haas, Eric J; Zeece, Michael G; Markwell, John; Sarath, Gautam

    2004-11-01

    Gly m Bd 28 K is a major soybean (Glycine max Merr.) glycoprotein allergen. It was originally identified as a 28 kDa polypeptide in soybean seed flour. However, the full-length protein is encoded by an open reading frame (ORF) of 473 amino acids, and contains a 23 kDa C-terminal polypeptide of as yet unknown allergenic and structural characteristics. IgE-binding (allergenic potential) of the Gly m Bd 28 K protein including the 23 kDa C-terminal portion as well as shorter fragments derived from the full-length ORF were evaluated using sera from soy-sensitive adults. All of these sera contained IgE that efficiently recognized the C-terminal region. Epitope mapping demonstrated that a dominant linear C-terminal IgE binding epitope resides between residues S256 and A270. Alanine scanning of this dominant epitope indicated that five amino acids, Y260, D261, D262, K264 and D266, contribute most towards IgE-binding. A model based on the structure of the beta subunit of soybean beta-conglycinin revealed that Gly m Bd 28 K contains two cupin domains. The dominant epitope is on the edge of the first beta-sheet of the C-terminal cupin domain and is present on a potentially solvent-accessible loop connecting the two cupin domains. Thus, the C-terminal 23 kDa polypeptide of Gly m Bd 28 K present in soy products is allergenic and apparently contains at least one immunodominant epitope near the edge of a cupin domain. This knowledge could be helpful in the future breeding of hypoallergenic soybeans.

  15. The modular xylanase Xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus is cell-attached, and its C-terminal domain has several putative homologues among cell-attached proteins within the phylum Bacteroidetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Eva Nordberg; Hachem, Maher Abou; Ramchuran, Santosh

    2004-01-01

    Until recently, the function of the fifth domain of the thermostable modular xylanase Xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus was unresolved. A putative homologue to this domain was however identified in a mannanase (Man26A) from the same microorganism which raised questions regarding a common function....... An extensive search of all accessible data-bases as well as the partially sequenced genomes of R. marinus and Cytophaga hutchinsonii showed that homologues of this domain were encoded by multiple genes in microorganisms in the phylum Bacteroidetes. Moreover, the domain occurred invariably at the C......-termini of proteins that were predominantly extra-cellular/cell attached. A primary structure motif of three conserved regions including structurally important glycines and a proline was also identified suggesting a conserved 3D fold. This bioinformatic evidence suggested a possible role of this domain in mediating...

  16. Revised domain structure of ulvan lyase and characterization of the first ulvan binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Rebecca L J; Neumann, Marten; Fuenzalida Werner, Juan Pablo; Gröhn, Franziska; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2017-03-22

    Biomass waste products from green algae have recently been given new life, as these polysaccharides have potential applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine. One such polysaccharide group called ulvans displays many different, potentially useful properties that arise from their structural versatility. Hence, performing structural analyses on ulvan is crucial for future applications. However, chemical reaction-based analysis methods cannot fully characterize ulvan and tend to alter its structure. Thus, better methods require well-characterized ulvan-degrading enzymes. Therefore, we analysed a previously sequenced ulvan lyase (Genebank TM reference number JN104480) and characterized its domains. We suggest that the enzyme consists of a shorter than previously described catalytic domain, a newly identified substrate binding domain, and a C-terminal type 9 secretion system signal peptide. By separately expressing the two domains in E. coli, we confirmed that the binding domain is ulvan specific, having higher affinity for ulvan than most lectins for their ligands (affinity constant: 10 5  M -1 ). To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ulvan-binding domain. Overall, identifying this new binding domain is one step towards engineering ulvan enzymes that can be used to characterize ulvan, e.g. through enzymatic/mass spectrometric fingerprinting analyses, and help unlock its full potential.

  17. Formation of C-terminally truncated version of the Taz1 protein employs cleavage-box structure in mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunisova, Stanislava; Bartosova, Zdenka [Department of Genetics, Comenius University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, 842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kramara, Juraj; Nosek, Jozef [Department of Biochemistry, Comenius University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, 842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Tomaska, Lubomir, E-mail: tomaska@fns.uniba.sk [Department of Genetics, Comenius University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, 842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-02-12

    When expressed in various hosts the taz1{sup +} gene encoding the fission yeast telomere-binding protein produces two forms of polypeptides: full-length (Taz1p) and truncated (Taz1p{Delta}C) version lacking almost entire Myb-domain. Whereas Taz1p binds telomeric DNA in vitro, Taz1p{Delta}C forms long filaments unable of DNA binding. The formation of Taz1p{Delta}C is a result of neither site-specific proteolysis, nor premature termination of transcription. In silico analysis of the taz1{sup +} RNA transcript revealed a stem-loop structure at the site of cleavage (cleavage box; CB). In order to explore whether it possesses inherent destabilizing effects, we cloned CB sequence into the open reading frame (ORF) of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and observed that when expressed in Escherichia coli the engineered gene produced two forms of the reporter protein. The formation of the truncated version of GST was abolished, when CB was replaced with recoded sequence containing synonymous codons thus indicating that the truncation is based on structural properties of taz1{sup +} mRNA.

  18. The C-terminal region of the non-structural protein 2B from Hepatitis A Virus demonstrates lipid-specific viroporin-like activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ashutosh; Dey, Debajit; Banerjee, Kamalika; Nain, Anshu; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2015-10-01

    Viroporins are virally encoded, membrane-active proteins, which enhance viral replication and assist in egress of viruses from host cells. The 2B proteins in the picornaviridae family are known to have viroporin-like properties, and play critical roles during virus replication. The 2B protein of Hepatitis A Virus (2B), an unusual picornavirus, is somewhat dissimilar from its analogues in several respects. HAV 2B is approximately 2.5 times the length of other 2B proteins, and does not disrupt calcium homeostasis or glycoprotein trafficking. Additionally, its membrane penetrating properties are not yet clearly established. Here we show that the membrane interacting activity of HAV 2B is localized in its C-terminal region, which contains an alpha-helical hairpin motif. We show that this region is capable of forming small pores in membranes and demonstrates lipid specific activity, which partially rationalizes the intracellular localization of full-length 2B. Using a combination of biochemical assays and molecular dynamics simulation studies, we also show that HAV 2B demonstrates a marked propensity to dimerize in a crowded environment, and probably interacts with membranes in a multimeric form, a hallmark of other picornavirus viroporins. In sum, our study clearly establishes HAV 2B as a bona fide viroporin in the picornaviridae family.

  19. High-resolution NMR structures of the domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tho1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Julian O. B.; Allen, Mark D.; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Bycroft, Mark, E-mail: mxb@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-23

    In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and the C-terminal RNA-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tho1 have been determined. THO is a multi-protein complex involved in the formation of messenger ribonuclear particles (mRNPs) by coupling transcription with mRNA processing and export. THO is thought to be formed from five subunits, Tho2p, Hpr1p, Tex1p, Mft1p and Thp2p, and recent work has determined a low-resolution structure of the complex [Poulsen et al. (2014 ▸), PLoS One, 9, e103470]. A number of additional proteins are thought to be involved in the formation of mRNP in yeast, including Tho1, which has been shown to bind RNA in vitro and is recruited to actively transcribed chromatin in vivo in a THO-complex and RNA-dependent manner. Tho1 is known to contain a SAP domain at the N-terminus, but the ability to suppress the expression defects of the hpr1Δ mutant of THO was shown to reside in the RNA-binding C-terminal region. In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and C-terminal RNA-binding domain have been determined.

  20. Contribution of the C-terminal regions of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) isoforms II and V to PML nuclear body formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yunyun; Monajembashi, Shamci; Shao, Anwen; Cui, Di; He, Weiyong; Chen, Zhongzhou; Hemmerich, Peter; Tang, Jun

    2012-08-31

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies are dynamic and heterogeneous nuclear protein complexes implicated in various important functions, most notably tumor suppression. PML is the structural component of PML nuclear bodies and has several nuclear splice isoforms that share a common N-terminal region but differ in their C termini. Previous studies have suggested that the coiled-coil motif within the N-terminal region is sufficient for PML nuclear body formation by mediating homo/multi-dimerization of PML molecules. However, it has not been investigated whether any of the C-terminal variants of PML may contribute to PML body assembly. Here we report that the unique C-terminal domains of PML-II and PML-V can target to PML-NBs independent of their N-terminal region. Strikingly, both domains can form nuclear bodies in the absence of endogenous PML. The C-terminal domain of PML-II interacts transiently with unknown binding sites at PML nuclear bodies, whereas the C-terminal domain of PML-V exhibits hyperstable binding to PML bodies via homo-dimerization. This strong interaction is mediated by a putative α-helix in the C terminus of PML-V. Moreover, nuclear bodies assembled from the C-terminal domain of PML-V also recruit additional PML body components, including Daxx and Sp100. These observations establish the C-terminal domain of PML-V as an additional important contributor to the assembly mechanism(s) of PML bodies.

  1. Crystal structure of catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Mohammad, Sarah S.; Pavitt, Graham D.

    , UMIST, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD, UK Eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF2B) is the exchange factor of initiation factor 2 (eIF2) and catalyses the reaction where GDP bound to eIF2 is exchanged for GTP, a crucial step in translation. The crystal structure of the C-terminal catalytic domain of the e...

  2. Structure of the SANT domain from the Xenopus chromatin remodeling factor ISWI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, John R.; Elgar, Stuart J.; Khan, Seema I.; Zhang, Xing; Wade, Paul A.; Cheng, Xiaodong (Emory-MED)

    2008-09-17

    The SANT (Swi3, Ada2, N-Cor, and TFIIIB) module was first described as a putative DNA-binding domain with strong similarity to the helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain of Myb-related proteins. The X-ray structure of the C-terminal one third portion of the ATPase ISWI of Drosophila melangoaster, containing both SANT and SLIDE (SANT-Like ISWI Domain), confirmed the overall helix-turn-helix structural architecture of SANT as well as SLIDE. However, the DNA-contacting residues in Myb are not conserved in SANT and the structurally corresponding residues in the ISWI SANT domain are acidic, and therefore incompatible with DNA interaction. Recent studies suggested that SANT domains might be a histone-tail-binding module, including the DNA binding SANT domain of c-Myb. Here they present the X-ray structure of Xenopus laevis ISWI SANT domain, derived from limited proteolysis of a C-terminal fragment of ISWI protein.

  3. Crystal structure of JHP933 from Helicobacter pylori J99 shows two-domain architecture with a DUF1814 family nucleotidyltransferase domain and a helical bundle domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Lee, Sang Jae; Kim, Do Jin; Lee, Bong-Jin; Yang, Jin Kuk; Suh, Se Won

    2014-09-01

    The jhp0933 gene in the plasticity region of Helicobacter pylori J99 encodes a hypothetical protein (JHP933), which may play some roles in pathogenesis. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of JHP933 at 2.17 Å. It represents the first crystal structure of the DUF1814 protein family. JHP933 consists of two domains: an N-terminal domain of the nucleotidyltransferase (NTase) fold and a C-terminal helix bundle domain. A highly positively charged surface patch exists adjacent to the putative NTP binding site. Structural similarity of JHP933 to known NTases is very remote, suggesting that it may function as a novel NTase. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A C-terminal Membrane Anchor Affects the Interactions of Prion Proteins with Lipid Membranes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Nam K.; Shabbir, Waheed; Bove-Fenderson, Erin; Araman, Can; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Harris, David A.; Becker, Christian F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane attachment via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for conversion of PrPC into pathogenic PrPSc. Therefore the effects of the anchor on PrP structure and function need to be deciphered. Three PrP variants, including full-length PrP (residues 23–231, FL_PrP), N-terminally truncated PrP (residues 90–231, T_PrP), and PrP missing its central hydrophobic region (Δ105–125, ΔCR_PrP), were equipped with a C-terminal membrane anchor via a semisynthesis strategy. Analyses of the interactions of lipidated PrPs with phospholipid membranes demonstrated that C-terminal membrane attachment induces a different binding mode of PrP to membranes, distinct from that of non-lipidated PrPs, and influences the biochemical and conformational properties of PrPs. Additionally, fluorescence-based assays indicated pore formation by lipidated ΔCR_PrP, a variant that is known to be highly neurotoxic in transgenic mice. This finding was supported by using patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of cultured cells. These results provide new evidence for the role of the membrane anchor in PrP-lipid interactions, highlighting the importance of the N-terminal and the central hydrophobic domain in these interactions. PMID:25217642

  5. A C-terminal membrane anchor affects the interactions of prion proteins with lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Nam K; Shabbir, Waheed; Bove-Fenderson, Erin; Araman, Can; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Harris, David A; Becker, Christian F W

    2014-10-24

    Membrane attachment via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for conversion of PrP(C) into pathogenic PrP(Sc). Therefore the effects of the anchor on PrP structure and function need to be deciphered. Three PrP variants, including full-length PrP (residues 23-231, FL_PrP), N-terminally truncated PrP (residues 90-231, T_PrP), and PrP missing its central hydrophobic region (Δ105-125, ΔCR_PrP), were equipped with a C-terminal membrane anchor via a semisynthesis strategy. Analyses of the interactions of lipidated PrPs with phospholipid membranes demonstrated that C-terminal membrane attachment induces a different binding mode of PrP to membranes, distinct from that of non-lipidated PrPs, and influences the biochemical and conformational properties of PrPs. Additionally, fluorescence-based assays indicated pore formation by lipidated ΔCR_PrP, a variant that is known to be highly neurotoxic in transgenic mice. This finding was supported by using patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of cultured cells. These results provide new evidence for the role of the membrane anchor in PrP-lipid interactions, highlighting the importance of the N-terminal and the central hydrophobic domain in these interactions. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Interaction of LDL receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) with postsynaptic scaffold proteins via its C-terminal PDZ domain-binding motif, and its regulation by Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qing-Bao; Suzuki, Tatsuo; Yamauchi, Takashi; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Yoshiyuki; Miyazawa, Shoko; Nakayama, Kohzo; Saitoh, Fuminori; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Lu, Yonghao; Kondo, Hisatake; Endo, Shogo

    2006-06-01

    We cloned here a full-length cDNA of Dem26[Tian et al. (1999)Mol. Brain Res., 72, 147-157], a member of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family from the rat brain. We originally named the corresponding protein synaptic LDL receptor-related protein (synLRP) [Tian et al. (2002) Soc. Neurosci. Abstr., 28, 405] and have renamed it LRP4 to accord it systematic nomenclature (GenBank(TM) accession no. AB073317). LRP4 protein interacted with postsynaptic scaffold proteins such as postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 via its C-terminal tail sequence, and associated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor subunit. The mRNA of LRP4 was localized to dendrites, as well as somas, of neuronal cells, and the full-length protein of 250 kDa was highly concentrated in the brain and localized to various subcellular compartments in the brain, including synaptic fractions. Immunocytochemical study using cultured cortical neurons suggested surface localization in the neuronal cells both in somas and dendrites. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylated the C-terminal cytoplasmic region of LRP4 at Ser1887 and Ser1900, and the phosphorylation at the latter site suppressed the interaction of the protein with PSD-95 and synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97). These findings suggest a postsynaptic role for LRP4, a putative endocytic multiligand receptor, and a mechanism in which CaMKII regulates PDZ-dependent protein-protein interactions and receptor dynamics.

  7. Structuring very large domain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    at a lower level of detail have not been dealt with. This paper aims at filling this gap by reporting personal experiences from a very large scale industrial domain modeling project. There, structuring the logical view turned out to be a critical success factor. We explain the project and its setting......, analyze the role and repercussions of model structuring, and examine the implications model structuring decisions have on other parts of the project. We then explain the model structure abstracted from a very large scale industrial modeling project. Finally, we discuss lessons learned....

  8. The antibacterial activity of E. coli bacteriophage lysin lysep3 is enhanced by fusing the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens bacteriophage endolysin binding domain D8 to the C-terminal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Gu, Jingmin; Lv, Meng; Guo, Zhimin; Yan, Guangmou; Yu, Ling; Du, Chongtao; Feng, Xin; Han, Wenyu; Sun, Changjiang; Lei, Liancheng

    2017-05-01

    Bacteriophage endolysin is one of the most promising antibiotic substitutes, but in Gram-negative bacteria, the outer membrane prevents the lysin from hydrolyzing peptidoglycans and blocks the development of lysin applications. The prime strategy for new antibiotic substitutes is allowing lysin to access the peptidoglycan from outside of the bacteria by reformation of the lysin. In this study, the novel Escherichia coli (E. coli) phage lyase lysep3, which lacks outside-in catalytic ability, was fused with the N-terminal region of the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens lysin including its cell wall binding domain D8 through the best manner of protein fusion based on the predicted tertiary structure of lysep3-D8 to obtain an engineered lysin that can lyse bacteria from the outside. Our results showed that lysep3-D8 could lyse both Gramnegative and Gram-positive bacteria, whereas lysep3 and D8 have no impact on bacterial growth. The MIC of lysep3-D8 on E. coli CVCC1418 is 60 μg/ml; lysep3-D8 can inhibit the growth of bacteria up to 12 h at this concentration. The bactericidal spectrum of lysep3-D8 is broad, as it can lyse of all of 14 E. coli strains, 3 P. aeruginosa strains, 1 Acinetobacter baumannii strain, and 1 Streptococcus strain. Lysep3-D8 has sufficient bactericidal effects on the 14 E. coli strains tested at the concentration of 100 μg/ml. The cell wall binding domain of the engineered lysin can destroy the integrity of the outer membrane of bacteria, thus allowing the catalytic domain to reach its target, peptidoglycan, to lyse the bacteria. Lysep3-D8 can be used as a preservative in fodder to benefit the health of animals. The method we used here proved to be a successful exploration of the reformation of phage lysin.

  9. Structure-Function Study of the N-terminal Domain of Exocyst Subunit Sec3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Kyuwon; Knödler, Andreas; Lee, Sung Haeng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Orlando, Kelly; Zhang, Jian; Foskett, Trevor J.; Guo, Wei; Dominguez, Roberto (UPENN)

    2010-04-19

    The exocyst is an evolutionarily conserved octameric complex involved in polarized exocytosis from yeast to humans. The Sec3 subunit of the exocyst acts as a spatial landmark for exocytosis through its ability to bind phospholipids and small GTPases. The structure of the N-terminal domain of Sec3 (Sec3N) was determined ab initio and defines a new subclass of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains along with a new family of proteins carrying this domain. Respectively, N- and C-terminal to the PH domain Sec3N presents an additional {alpha}-helix and two {beta}-strands that mediate dimerization through domain swapping. The structure identifies residues responsible for phospholipid binding, which when mutated in cells impair the localization of exocyst components at the plasma membrane and lead to defects in exocytosis. Through its ability to bind the small GTPase Cdc42 and phospholipids, the PH domain of Sec3 functions as a coincidence detector at the plasma membrane.

  10. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans, E-mail: hans.brandstetter@sbg.ac.at [University of Salzburg, Billrothstrasse 11, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  11. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto (IBS); (BBRI); (UPENN-MED)

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  12. Structural model of dodecameric heat-shock protein Hsp21: Flexible N-terminal arms interact with client proteins while C-terminal tails maintain the dodecamer and chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutsdottir, Gudrun; Härmark, Johan; Weide, Yoran; Hebert, Hans; Rasmussen, Morten I; Wernersson, Sven; Respondek, Michal; Akke, Mikael; Højrup, Peter; Koeck, Philip J B; Söderberg, Christopher A G; Emanuelsson, Cecilia

    2017-05-12

    Small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) prevent aggregation of thermosensitive client proteins in a first line of defense against cellular stress. The mechanisms by which they perform this function have been hard to define due to limited structural information; currently, there is only one high-resolution structure of a plant sHsp published, that of the cytosolic Hsp16.9. We took interest in Hsp21, a chloroplast-localized sHsp crucial for plant stress resistance, which has even longer N-terminal arms than Hsp16.9, with a functionally important and conserved methionine-rich motif. To provide a framework for investigating structure-function relationships of Hsp21 and understanding these sequence variations, we developed a structural model of Hsp21 based on homology modeling, cryo-EM, cross-linking mass spectrometry, NMR, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Our data suggest a dodecameric arrangement of two trimer-of-dimer discs stabilized by the C-terminal tails, possibly through tail-to-tail interactions between the discs, mediated through extended IXVXI motifs. Our model further suggests that six N-terminal arms are located on the outside of the dodecamer, accessible for interaction with client proteins, and distinct from previous undefined or inwardly facing arms. To test the importance of the IXVXI motif, we created the point mutant V181A, which, as expected, disrupts the Hsp21 dodecamer and decreases chaperone activity. Finally, our data emphasize that sHsp chaperone efficiency depends on oligomerization and that client interactions can occur both with and without oligomer dissociation. These results provide a generalizable workflow to explore sHsps, expand our understanding of sHsp structural motifs, and provide a testable Hsp21 structure model to inform future investigations. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Target protein interactions of indole-3-carbinol and the highly potent derivative 1-benzyl-I3C with the C-terminal domain of human elastase uncouples cell cycle arrest from apoptotic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronchik, Ida; Chen, Tony; Durkin, Kathleen A; Horwitz, Marshall S; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria N; Bjeldanes, Leonard F; Firestone, Gary L

    2012-11-01

    Elastase is the only currently identified target protein for indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a naturally occurring hydrolysis product of glucobrassicin in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts that induces a cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. In vitro elastase enzymatic assays demonstrated that I3C and at lower concentrations its more potent derivative 1-benzyl-indole-3-carbinol (1-benzyl-I3C) act as non-competitive allosteric inhibitors of elastase activity. Consistent with these results, in silico computational simulations have revealed the first predicted interactions of I3C and 1-benzyl-I3C with the crystal structure of human neutrophil elastase, and identified a potential binding cluster on an external surface of the protease outside of the catalytic site that implicates elastase as a target protein for both indolecarbinol compounds. The Δ205 carboxyterminal truncation of elastase, which disrupts the predicted indolecarbinol binding site, is enzymatically active and generates a novel I3C resistant enzyme. Expression of the wild type and Δ205 elastase in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells demonstrated that the carboxyterminal domain of elastase is required for the I3C and 1-benzyl-I3C inhibition of enzymatic activity, accumulation of the unprocessed form of the CD40 elastase substrate (a tumor necrosis factor receptor family member), disruption of NFκB nuclear localization and transcriptional activity, and induction of a G1 cell cycle arrest. Surprisingly, expression of the Δ205 elastase molecule failed to reverse indolecarbinol stimulated apoptosis, establishing an elastase-dependent bifurcation point in anti-proliferative signaling that uncouples the cell cycle and apoptotic responses in human breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Structural mapping of the coiled-coil domain of a bacterial condensin and comparative analyses across all domains of life suggest conserved features of SMC proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Vincent M; Stanage, Tyler H; Mims, Alexandra; Norden, Ian S; Oakley, Martha G

    2015-06-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins form the cores of multisubunit complexes that are required for the segregation and global organization of chromosomes in all domains of life. These proteins share a common domain structure in which N- and C- terminal regions pack against one another to form a globular ATPase domain. This "head" domain is connected to a central, globular, "hinge" or dimerization domain by a long, antiparallel coiled coil. To date, most efforts for structural characterization of SMC proteins have focused on the globular domains. Recently, however, we developed a method to map interstrand interactions in the 50-nm coiled-coil domain of MukB, the divergent SMC protein found in γ-proteobacteria. Here, we apply that technique to map the structure of the Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) coiled-coil domain. We find that, in contrast to the relatively complicated coiled-coil domain of MukB, the BsSMC domain is nearly continuous, with only two detectable coiled-coil interruptions. Near the middle of the domain is a break in coiled-coil structure in which there are three more residues on the C-terminal strand than on the N-terminal strand. Close to the head domain, there is a second break with a significantly longer insertion on the same strand. These results provide an experience base that allows an informed interpretation of the output of coiled-coil prediction algorithms for this family of proteins. A comparison of such predictions suggests that these coiled-coil deviations are highly conserved across SMC types in a wide variety of organisms, including humans. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  16. Solution structure of the HRDC domain of human Bloom syndrome protein BLM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akiko; Mishima, Masaki; Nagai, Aki; Kim, Sun-Yong; Ito, Yutaka; Hakoshima, Toshio; Jee, Jun-Goo; Kitano, Ken

    2010-10-01

    Bloom syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. The disease is caused by a loss of function of the Bloom syndrome protein (BLM), a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Here we report on the first 3D structure of a BLM fragment, a solution structure of the C-terminal helicase-and-ribonuclease D-C-terminal (HRDC) domain from human BLM. The structure reveals unique features of BLM HRDC that are distinct from the HRDC domain of Werner syndrome protein. In particular, BLM HRDC retains many acidic residues exposed to the solvent, which makes the domain surface extensively electronegative. Consistent with this, fluorescence polarization assays showed an inability of isolated BLM HRDC to interact with DNA substrates. Analyses employing ultracentrifugation, gel-filtration, CD spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering showed that the BLM HRDC domain exists as a stable monomer in solution. The results show that BLM HRDC is a compact, robust and acidic motif which may play a distinct role apart from DNA binding.

  17. The structure of the PERK kinase domain suggests the mechanism for its activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Wenjun; Li, Jingzhi; Ron, David; Sha, Bingdong (UAB); (Cambridge)

    2012-08-31

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR) is comprised of several intracellular signaling pathways that alleviate ER stress. The ER-localized transmembrane kinase PERK is one of three major ER stress transducers. Oligomerization of PERK's N-terminal ER luminal domain by ER stress promotes PERK trans-autophosphorylation of the C-terminal cytoplasmic kinase domain at multiple residues including Thr980 on the kinase activation loop. Activated PERK phosphorylates Ser51 of the {alpha}-subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2{alpha}), which inhibits initiation of protein synthesis and reduces the load of unfolded proteins entering the ER. The crystal structure of PERK's kinase domain has been determined to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The structure resembles the back-to-back dimer observed in the related eIF2{alpha} kinase PKR. Phosphorylation of Thr980 stabilizes both the activation loop and helix {alpha}G in the C-terminal lobe, preparing the latter for eIF2{alpha} binding. The structure suggests conservation in the mode of activation of eIF2{alpha} kinases and is consistent with a 'line-up' model for PERK activation triggered by oligomerization of its luminal domain.

  18. [Genetic analysis of the Hsm3 protein domain structure in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernenkov, A Iu; Ivanova, S V; Koval'tsova, S V; Gracheva, L M; Peshekhonov, V T; Fedorova, I V; Korolev, V G

    2010-06-01

    Gene HSM3 encodes the Hsm3 protein involved in the minor branch in the system responsible for the correction of mismatched bases in DNA structure and controls replicative and reparative spontaneous mutagenesis in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Spontaneous and UV-induced mutagenesis was studied in three mutant alleles of gene HSM3, and repair effectivity of artificial heteroduplexes was assessed in DNA molecule. The resuts of these studies allowed establishment of the protein domain structure of protein Hsm3 and functions of each domain: the N-terminal domain is responsible for binding to mispaired bases, and the C-terminal domain ensures the interaction with other proteins involved in the system of mismatched base correction.

  19. Structural Basis for Binding Specificity between Subclasses of Modular Polyketide Synthase Docking Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Bartley, III, Frank E.; Reynolds, Kevin A.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.; (Michigan); (Portland SU)

    2009-04-02

    Bacterial type I polyketide synthases (PKSs) assemble structurally diverse natural products of significant clinical value from simple metabolic building blocks. The synthesis of these compounds occurs in a processive fashion along a large multiprotein complex. Transfer of the acyl intermediate across interpolypeptide junctions is mediated, at least in large part, by N- and C-terminal docking domains. We report here a comprehensive analysis of the binding affinity and selectivity for the complete set of discrete docking domain pairs in the pikromycin and erythromycin PKS systems. Despite disconnection from their parent module, each cognate pair of docking domains retained exquisite binding selectivity. Further insights were obtained by X-ray crystallographic analysis of the PikAIII/PikAIV docking domain interface. This new information revealed a series of key interacting residues that enabled development of a structural model for the recently proposed H2-T2 class of polypeptides involved in PKS intermodular molecular recognition.

  20. Structure of the two-domain hexameric APS kinase from Thiobacillus denitrificans: structural basis for the absence of ATP sulfurylase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Sean C. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Segel, Irwin H. [Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Fisher, Andrew J., E-mail: fisher@chem.ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2009-10-01

    APS kinase from Thiobacillus denitrificans contains an inactive N-terminal ATP sulfurylase domain. The structure presented unveils the first hexameric assembly for an APS kinase, and reveals that structural changes in the N-terminal domain disrupt the ATP sulfurylase active site thus prohibiting activity. The Tbd-0210 gene of the chemolithotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans is annotated to encode a 60.5 kDa bifunctional enzyme with ATP sulfurylase and APS kinase activity. This putative bifunctional enzyme was cloned, expressed and structurally characterized. The 2.95 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure reported here revealed a hexameric assembly with D{sub 3} symmetry. Each subunit contains a large N-terminal sulfurylase-like domain and a C-terminal APS kinase domain reminiscent of the two-domain fungal ATP sulfurylases of Penicillium chrysogenum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which also exhibit a hexameric assembly. However, the T. denitrificans enzyme exhibits numerous structural and sequence differences in the N-terminal domain that render it inactive with respect to ATP sulfurylase activity. Surprisingly, the C-terminal domain does indeed display APS kinase activity, indicating that this gene product is a true APS kinase. Therefore, these results provide the first structural insights into a unique hexameric APS kinase that contains a nonfunctional ATP sulfurylase-like domain of unknown function.

  1. Biophysical Evidence for Intrinsic Disorder in the C-terminal Tails of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and HER3 Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppel, Theodore R; Sarpong, Kwabena; Murray, Elisa M; Monsey, John; Zhu, Jian; Bose, Ron

    2017-01-13

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases includes oncogenes important in the progression of breast and other cancers, and they are targets for many drug development strategies. Each member of the ErbB family possesses a unique, structurally uncharacterized C-terminal tail that plays an important role in autophosphorylation and signal propagation. To determine whether these C-terminal tails are intrinsically disordered regions, we conducted a battery of biophysical experiments on the EGFR and HER3 tails. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, we measured the conformational dynamics of intracellular half constructs and compared the tails with the ordered kinase domains. The C-terminal tails demonstrate more rapid deuterium exchange behavior when compared with the kinase domains. Next, we expressed and purified EGFR and HER3 tail-only constructs. Results from circular dichroism spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography with multiangle light scattering, dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, and small angle X-ray scattering each provide evidence that the EGFR and HER3 C-terminal tails are intrinsically disordered with extended, non-globular structure in solution. The intrinsic disorder and extended conformation of these tails may be important for their function by increasing the capture radius and reducing the thermodynamic barriers for binding of downstream signaling proteins. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Domain Modeling: NP_055672.3 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_055672.3 chr1 Solution structure of the chimera of the C-terminal PID domain of ...Fe65L and the C-terminal tail peptide of APP p2ysza_ chr1/NP_055672.3/NP_055672.3_apo_116-314.pdb swppa 0 ...

  3. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B (LigB Binds to Both the C-Terminal 23 Amino Acids of Fibrinogen αC Domain and Factor XIII: Insight into the Mechanism of LigB-Mediated Blockage of Fibrinogen α Chain Cross-Linking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Hsieh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The coagulation system provides a primitive but effective defense against hemorrhage. Soluble fibrinogen (Fg monomers, composed of α, β and γ chains, are recruited to provide structural support for the formation of a hemostatic plug. Fg binds to platelets and is processed into a cross-linked fibrin polymer by the enzymatic clotting factors, thrombin and Factor XIII (FXIII. The newly formed fibrin-platelet clot can act as barrier to protect against pathogens from entering the bloodstream. Further, injuries caused by bacterial infections can be confined to the initial wound site. Many pathogenic bacteria have Fg-binding adhesins that can circumvent the coagulation pathway and allow the bacteria to sidestep containment. Fg expression is upregulated during lung infection providing an attachment surface for bacteria with the ability to produce Fg-binding adhesins. Fg binding by leptospira might play a crucial factor in Leptospira-associated pulmonary hemorrhage, the main factor contributing to lethality in severe cases of leptospirosis. The 12th domain of Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB12, a leptospiral adhesin, interacts with the C-terminus of FgαC (FgαCC. In this study, the binding site for LigB12 was mapped to the final 23 amino acids at the C-terminal end of FgαCC (FgαCC8. The association of FgαCC8 with LigB12 (ELISA, KD = 0.76 μM; SPR, KD = 0.96 μM was reduced by mutations of both charged residues (R608, R611 and H614 from FgαCC8; D1061 from LigB12 and hydrophobic residues (I613 from FgαCC8; F1054 and A1065 from LigB12. Additionally, LigB12 bound strongly to FXIII and also inhibited fibrin formation, suggesting that LigB can disrupt coagulation by suppressing FXIII activity. Here, the detailed binding mechanism of a leptospiral adhesin to a host hemostatic factor is characterized for the first time and should provide better insight into the pathogenesis of leptospirosis.

  4. Enhanced functional and structural domain assignments using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ) by Seema Namboori, Natasha Mhatre, Sentivel Sujatha,. Narayanaswamy Srinivasan and Shashi Bhushan Pandit. The three-dimensional structure and subcellular localization of various domains and sub-domains of. Rv1318c, a putative ...

  5. Two Distinct Binding Modes Define the Interaction of Brox with the C-Terminal Tails of CHMP5 and CHMP4B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Ruiling; Dussupt, Vincent; Jiang, Jiansheng; Sette, Paola; Rudd, Victoria; Chuenchor, Watchalee; Bello, Nana F.; Bouamr, Fadila; Xiao, Tsan Sam (NIH)

    2012-05-21

    Interactions of the CHMP protein carboxyl terminal tails with effector proteins play important roles in retroviral budding, cytokinesis, and multivesicular body biogenesis. Here we demonstrate that hydrophobic residues at the CHMP4B C-terminal amphipathic {alpha} helix bind a concave surface of Brox, a mammalian paralog of Alix. Unexpectedly, CHMP5 was also found to bind Brox and specifically recruit endogenous Brox to detergent-resistant membrane fractions through its C-terminal 20 residues. Instead of an {alpha} helix, the CHMP5 C-terminal tail adopts a tandem {beta}-hairpin structure that binds Brox at the same site as CHMP4B. Additional Brox:CHMP5 interface is furnished by a unique CHMP5 hydrophobic pocket engaging the Brox residue Y348 that is not conserved among the Bro1 domains. Our studies thus unveil a {beta}-hairpin conformation of the CHMP5 protein C-terminal tail, and provide insights into the overlapping but distinct binding profiles of ESCRT-III and the Bro1 domain proteins.

  6. Contribution of intracellular calcium and pH in ischemic uncoupling of cardiac gap junction channels formed of connexins 43, 40, and 45: a critical function of C-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giriraj Sahu

    Full Text Available Ischemia is known to inhibit gap junction (GJ mediated intercellular communication. However the detail mechanisms of this inhibition are largely unknown. In the present study, we determined the vulnerability of different cardiac GJ channels formed of connexins (Cxs 43, 40, and 45 to simulated ischemia, by creating oxygen glucose deprived (OGD condition. 5 minutes of OGD decreased the junctional conductance (Gj of Cx43, Cx40 and Cx45 by 53±3%, 64±1% and 85±2% respectively. Reduction of Gj was prevented completely by restricting the change of both intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+]i and pH (pHi with potassium phosphate buffer. Clamping of either [Ca(2+]i or pHi, through BAPTA (2 mM or HEPES (80 mM respectively, offered partial resistance to ischemic uncoupling. Anti-calmodulin antibody attenuated the uncoupling of Cx43 and Cx45 significantly but not of Cx40. Furthermore, OGD could reduce only 26±2% of Gj in C-terminus (CT truncated Cx43 (Cx43-Δ257. Tethering CT of Cx43 to the CT-truncated Cx40 (Cx40-Δ249, and Cx45 (Cx45-Δ272 helped to resist OGD mediated uncoupling. Moreover, CT domain played a significant role in determining the junction current density and plaque diameter. Our results suggest; OGD mediated uncoupling of GJ channels is primarily due to elevated [Ca(2+]i and acidic pHi, though the latter contributes more. Among Cx43, Cx40 and Cx45, Cx43 is the most resistant to OGD while Cx45 is the most sensitive one. CT of Cx43 has major necessary elements for OGD induced uncoupling and it can complement CT of Cx40 and Cx45.

  7. Structural and biochemical characterization of the Clostridium perfringens autolysin catalytic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Eiji; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Goda, Eri; Makihata, Nahomi; Maki, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromi; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial autolysins can partially hydrolyze cell wall peptidoglycans into small sections to regulate cell separation/division and the growth phase. Clostridium perfringens autolysin (Acp) has an N-terminal cell wall-binding domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain with glucosaminidase activity that belongs to the glycoside hydrolase 73 family. Here, we determined the X-ray structure of the Acp catalytic domain (AcpCD) at 1.76 Å resolution. AcpCD has a unique crescent-shaped structure, forming a deep groove for substrate-binding at the center of the protein. The modeling study of the enzyme/substrate complex demonstrated that the length of the substrate-binding groove is closely related to the glucosaminidase activity. Mutagenesis analysis showed that AcpCD likely adopts a neighboring-group mechanism for the catalytic reaction. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. The CRIPTO/FRL-1/CRYPTIC (CFC) domain of human Cripto. Functional and structural insights through disulfide structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Susan F; van Vlijmen, Herman W T; Boynton, Raymond E; Adkins, Heather B; Cheung, Anne E; Singh, Juswinder; Sanicola, Michele; Young, Carmen N; Wen, Dingyi

    2003-09-01

    The disulfide structure of the CRIPTO/FRL-1/CRYPTIC (CFC) domain of human Cripto protein was determined by a combination of enzymatic and chemical fragmentation, followed by chromatographic separation of the fragments, and characterization by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing. These studies showed that Cys115 forms a disulfide bond with Cys133, Cys128 with Cys149, and Cys131 with Cys140. Protein database searching and molecular modeling revealed that the pattern of disulfide linkages in the CFC domain of Cripto is the same as that in PARS intercerebralis major Peptide C (PMP-C), a serine protease inhibitor, and that the EGF-CFC domains of Cripto are predicted to be structurally homologous to the EGF-VWFC domains of the C-terminal extracellular portions of Jagged 1 and Jagged 2. Biochemical studies of the interactions of ALK4 with the CFC domain of Cripto by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis indicate that the CFC domain binds to ALK4 independent of the EGF domain. A molecular model of the CFC domain of Cripto was constructed based on the nuclear magnetic resonance structure of PMP-C. This model reveals a hydrophobic patch in the domain opposite to the presumed ALK4 binding site. This hydrophobic patch may be functionally important for the formation of intra or intermolecular complexes.

  9. On the structure of order domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geil, Olav; Pellikaan, Ruud

    2002-01-01

    The notion of an order domain is generalized. The behaviour of an order domain by taking a subalgebra, the extension of scalars, and the tensor product is studied. The relation of an order domain with valuation theory, Gröbner algebras, and graded structures is given. The theory of Gröbner bases...

  10. Telomere Capping Proteins are Structurally Related to RPA with an additional Telomere-Specific Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelinas, A.; Paschini, M; Reyes, F; Heroux, A; Batey, R; Lundblad, V; Wuttke, D

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  11. Data on structural transitions in domains of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin V. Makarov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This data article is related to the research article entitled “in vitro properties of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes” (Makarov et al., 2015 [1], demonstrating that upon incubation with viral RNA the poa semilatent hordeivirus (PSLV TGB1 protein (the movement 63 K protein encoded by the first gene of the triple gene block in vitro forms RNP structures resembling filamentous virus-like particles and its internal domain (ID performs a major structural role in this process. This article reports the additional results on the structural lability of ID and the structural transitions in the C-terminal NTPase/helicase domain (HELD induced by interaction with tRNA and phosphorylation.

  12. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Soo Hyun [School of Life Sciences, Steitz Center for Structural Biology, and Department of Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, ChangJu, E-mail: cchun1130@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Young Jun, E-mail: imyoungjun@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  13. Crystal Structure of the SPOC Domain of the Arabidopsis Flowering Regulator FPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinglu Zhang

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis protein FPA controls flowering time by regulating the alternative 3'-end processing of the FLOWERING LOCUS (FLC antisense RNA. FPA belongs to the split ends (SPEN family of proteins, which contain N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs and a SPEN paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC domain. The SPOC domain is highly conserved among FPA homologs in plants, but the conservation with the domain in other SPEN proteins is much lower. We have determined the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana FPA SPOC domain at 2.7 Å resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of the SPOC domain in human SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP, although there are also substantial conformational differences between them. Structural and sequence analyses identify a surface patch that is conserved among plant FPA homologs. Mutations of two residues in this surface patch did not disrupt FPA functions, suggesting that either the SPOC domain is not required for the role of FPA in regulating RNA 3'-end formation or the functions of the FPA SPOC domain cannot be disrupted by the combination of mutations, in contrast to observations with the SHARP SPOC domain.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Passenger Domain of the Escherichia coli Autotransporter EspP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Shekeb; Mian, Hira S.; Sandercock, Linda E.; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Pai, Emil F. (Toronto); (OCI)

    2013-03-07

    Autotransporters represent a large superfamily of known and putative virulence factors produced by Gram-negative bacteria. They consist of an N-terminal 'passenger domain' responsible for the specific effector functions of the molecule and a C-terminal '{beta}-domain' responsible for translocation of the passenger across the bacterial outer membrane. Here, we present the 2.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of the passenger domain of the extracellular serine protease EspP, produced by the pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 and a member of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs). Like the previously structurally characterized SPATE passenger domains, the EspP passenger domain contains an extended right-handed parallel {beta}-helix preceded by an N-terminal globular domain housing the catalytic function of the protease. Of note, however, is the absence of a second globular domain protruding from this {beta}-helix. We describe the structure of the EspP passenger domain in the context of previous results and provide an alternative hypothesis for the function of the {beta}-helix within SPATEs.

  15. The Structural Basis of Cyclic Diguanylate Signal Transduction by PilZ Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benach,J.; Swaminathan, S.; Tamayo, R.; Handelman, S.; Folta-Stogniew, E.; Ramos, J.; Forouhar, F.; Neely, H.; Seetharaman, J.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) controls the transition between motile and sessile growth in eubacteria, but little is known about the proteins that sense its concentration. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that PilZ domains bind c-di-GMP and allosterically modulate effector pathways. We have determined a 1.9 Angstroms crystal structure of c-di-GMP bound to VCA0042/PlzD, a PilZ domain-containing protein from Vibrio cholerae. Either this protein or another specific PilZ domain-containing protein is required for V. cholerae to efficiently infect mice. VCA0042/PlzD comprises a C-terminal PilZ domain plus an N-terminal domain with a similar beta-barrel fold. C-di-GMP contacts seven of the nine strongly conserved residues in the PilZ domain, including three in a seven-residue long N-terminal loop that undergoes a conformational switch as it wraps around c-di-GMP. This switch brings the PilZ domain into close apposition with the N-terminal domain, forming a new allosteric interaction surface that spans these domains and the c-di-GMP at their interface. The very small size of the N-terminal conformational switch is likely to explain the facile evolutionary diversification of the PilZ domain.

  16. Enhanced functional and structural domain assignments using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    biology of MTB, yet the functions of many MTB proteins are unknown. We have used sensitive profile-based search procedures to assign functional and structural domains to infer functions of gene products encoded in. MTB. These domain assignments have been made using a compendium of sequence and structural ...

  17. The AvrM Effector from Flax Rust Has a Structured C-Terminal Domain and Interacts Directly with the M Resistance Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Dodds, Peter N; Ve, Thomas; Kobe, Bostjan; Jeffrey G Ellis; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    In plant immunity, recognition of pathogen effectors by plant resistance proteins leads to the activation of plant defenses and a localized cell death response. The AvrM effector from flax rust is a small secreted protein that is recognized by the M resistance protein in flax. Here, we investigate the mechanism of M–AvrM recognition and show that these two proteins directly interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay, and that this interaction correlates with the recognition specificity observed for...

  18. The structure of the XPF-ssDNA complex underscores the distinct roles of the XPF and ERCC1 helix- hairpin-helix domains in ss/ds DNA recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Devashish; Folkers, Gert; van Dijk, Marc; Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Human XPF/ERCC1 is a structure-specific DNA endonuclease that nicks the damaged DNA strand at the 5' end during nucleotide excision repair. We determined the structure of the complex of the C-terminal domain of XPF with 10 nt ssDNA. A positively charged region within the second helix of the first

  19. Structure of the F-spondin Domain of Mindin an Integrin Ligand and Pattern Recognition Molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Li; C Cao; W Jia; L Yu; M Mo; Q Wang; Y Huang; J Lim; M Ishihara; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Mindin (spondin-2) is an extracellular matrix protein of unknown structure that is required for efficient T-cell priming by dendritic cells. Additionally, mindin functions as a pattern recognition molecule for initiating innate immune responses. These dual functions are mediated by interactions with integrins and microbial pathogens, respectively. Mindin comprises an N-terminal F-spondin (FS) domain and C-terminal thrombospondin type 1 repeat (TSR). We determined the structure of the FS domain at 1.8-A resolution. The structure revealed an eight-stranded antiparallel beta-sandwich motif resembling that of membrane-targeting C2 domains, including a bound calcium ion. We demonstrated that the FS domain mediates integrin binding and identified the binding site by mutagenesis. The mindin FS domain therefore represents a new integrin ligand. We further showed that mindin recognizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS) through its TSR domain, and obtained evidence that C-mannosylation of the TSR influences LPS binding. Through these dual interactions, the FS and TSR domains of mindin promote activation of both adaptive and innate immune responses.

  20. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and

  1. Heparan sulfate regulates fibrillin-1 N- and C-terminal interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cain, Stuart A; Baldwin, Andrew K; Mahalingam, Yashithra

    2008-01-01

    in response to soluble PF1. Within domains encoded by exons 59-62 near the fibrillin-1 C terminus are novel conformation-dependent high affinity heparin and tropoelastin binding sites. Heparin disrupted tropoelastin binding but did not disrupt N- and C-terminal fibrillin-1 interactions. Thus, fibrillin-1 N......-terminal interactions with heparin/heparan sulfate directly influence cell behavior, whereas C-terminal interactions with heparin/heparan sulfate regulate elastin deposition. These data highlight how heparin/heparan sulfate controls fibrillin-1 interactions....

  2. Both the Hydrophobicity and a Positively Charged Region Flanking the C-Terminal Region of the Transmembrane Domain of Signal-Anchored Proteins Play Critical Roles in Determining Their Targeting Specificity to the Endoplasmic Reticulum or Endosymbiotic Organelles in Arabidopsis Cells[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junho; Lee, Hyunkyung; Kim, Jinho; Lee, Sumin; Kim, Dae Heon; Kim, Sanguk; Hwang, Inhwan

    2011-01-01

    Proteins localized to various cellular and subcellular membranes play pivotal roles in numerous cellular activities. Accordingly, in eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis of organellar proteins is an essential process requiring their correct localization among various cellular and subcellular membranes. Localization of these proteins is determined by either cotranslational or posttranslational mechanisms, depending on the final destination. However, it is not fully understood how the targeting specificity of membrane proteins is determined in plant cells. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which signal-anchored (SA) proteins are differentially targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or endosymbiotic organelles using in vivo targeting, subcellular fractionation, and bioinformatics approaches. For targeting SA proteins to endosymbiotic organelles, the C-terminal positively charged region (CPR) flanking the transmembrane domain (TMD) is necessary but not sufficient. The hydrophobicity of the TMD in CPR-containing proteins also plays a critical role in determining targeting specificity; TMDs with a hydrophobicity value >0.4 on the Wimley and White scale are targeted primarily to the ER, whereas TMDs with lower values are targeted to endosymbiotic organelles. Based on these data, we propose that the CPR and the hydrophobicity of the TMD play a critical role in determining the targeting specificity between the ER and endosymbiotic organelles. PMID:21515817

  3. The C-terminal polyproline-containing region of ELMO contributes to an increase in the life-time of the ELMO-DOCK complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sévajol, Marion; Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Chouquet, Anne; Pérard, Julien; Ayala, Isabel; Gans, Pierre; Kleman, Jean-Philippe; Housset, Dominique

    2012-03-01

    The eukaryotic Engulfment and CellMotility (ELMO) proteins form an evolutionary conserved family of key regulators which play a central role in Rho-dependent biological processes such as engulfment and cell motility/migration. ELMO proteins interact with a subset of Downstream of Crk (DOCK) family members, a new type of guanine exchange factors (GEF) for Rac and cdc42 GTPases. The physiological function of DOCK is to facilitate actin remodeling, a process which occurs only in presence of ELMO. Several studies have determined that the last 200 C-terminal residues of ELMO1 and the first 180 N-terminal residues of DOCK180 are responsible for the ELMO-DOCK interaction. However, the precise role of the different domains and motifs identified in these regions has remained elusive. Divergent functional, biochemical and structural data have been reported regarding the contribution of the C-terminal end of ELMO, comprising its polyproline motif, and of the DOCK SH3 domain. In the present study, we have investigated the contribution of the C-terminal end of ELMO1 to the interaction between ELMO1 and the SH3 domain of DOCK180 using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Our data presented here demonstrate the ability of the SH3 domain of DOCK180 to interact with ELMO1, regardless of the presence of the polyproline-containing C-terminal end. However, the presence of the polyproline region leads to a significant increase in the half-life of the ELMO1-DOCK180 complex, along with a moderate increase on the affinity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of IQ-motif genes in human cells and ASPM domain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Allen; Kenguele, Hilaire

    2005-01-01

    Genes encoding multiple IQ-motif proteins have been identified in the human genome and may be regulated by calmodulin (CaM). Three genes of unknown function, abnormal spindle-like primary microcephaly (ASPM), KIAA0036, and KIAA1023, were expressed strongly in nearly all transformed human cell lines and in a panel of 16 adult human tissues by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. However, ASPM gene expression was not detected in adult brain or skeletal muscle. To better understand function, the domain structure of ASPM was examined. Abnormal spindle-like primary (ASP) protein (abnormal spindle) of Drosophila spp, an orthologue of ASPM, is involved in mitosis, and mutations lead to abnormal spindles and inhibition of cytokinesis. Studies of ASP have indicated that a microtubule binding region exists on the N-terminal third of the protein. Reiterative searches of the protein database using PSI-BLAST identified a common putative microtubular binding domain of 240 residues designated as MTASP. This nearly "all alpha" domain occurs in >25 related proteins including ASP and ASPM. The major C-terminal region of MTASP is basic with conserved hydrophobic residues and terminates at a flanking actin binding (CH) domain. This region is somewhat similar to other microtubule binding proteins such as MAP1B, MAP2, and tau. Multiple IQ motifs and often a conserved C-terminal domain occur in the remaining sequence. The multidomain structure of ASPM suggests a role in the coordination of cell cycle events. The extensive expression of multiple IQ-motif genes and the absence of ASPM in nondividing adult brain and skeletal muscle also suggest a role in cell division.

  5. Structure and function of the regulatory HRDC domain from human Bloom syndrome protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Mee; Choi, Byong-Seok

    2010-11-01

    The helicase and RNaseD C-terminal (HRDC) domain, conserved among members of the RecQ helicase family, regulates helicase activity by virtue of variations in its surface residues. The HRDC domain of Bloom syndrome protein (BLM) is known as a critical determinant of the dissolution function of double Holliday junctions by the BLM-Topoisomerase IIIα complex. In this study, we determined the solution structure of the human BLM HRDC domain and characterized its DNA-binding activity. The BLM HRDC domain consists of five α-helices with a hydrophobic 3(10)-helical loop between helices 1 and 2 and an extended acidic surface comprising residues in helices 3-5. The BLM HRDC domain preferentially binds to ssDNA, though with a markedly low binding affinity (K(d) ∼100 μM). NMR chemical shift perturbation studies suggested that the critical DNA-binding residues of the BLM HRDC domain are located in the hydrophobic loop and the N-terminus of helix 2. Interestingly, the isolated BLM HRDC domain had quite different DNA-binding modes between ssDNA and Holliday junctions in electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments. Based on its surface charge separation and DNA-binding properties, we suggest that the HRDC domain of BLM may be adapted for a unique function among RecQ helicases--that of bridging protein and DNA interactions.

  6. Low resolution structure of a bacterial SLC26 transporter reveals dimeric stoichiometry and mobile intracellular domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Emma L R; Karinou, Eleni; Naismith, James H; Gabel, Frank; Javelle, Arnaud

    2011-07-29

    The SLC26/SulP (solute carrier/sulfate transporter) proteins are a superfamily of anion transporters conserved from bacteria to man, of which four have been identified in human diseases. Proteins within the SLC26/SulP family exhibit a wide variety of functions, transporting anions from halides to carboxylic acids. The proteins comprise a transmembrane domain containing between 10-12 transmembrane helices followed a by C-terminal cytoplasmic sulfate transporter and anti-sigma factor antagonist (STAS) domain. These proteins are expected to undergo conformational changes during the transport cycle; however, structural information for this family remains sparse, particularly for the full-length proteins. To address this issue, we conducted an expression and detergent screen on bacterial Slc26 proteins. The screen identified a Yersinia enterocolitica Slc26A protein as the ideal candidate for further structural studies as it can be purified to homogeneity. Partial proteolysis, co-purification, and analytical size exclusion chromatography demonstrate that the protein purifies as stable oligomers. Using small angle neutron scattering combined with contrast variation, we have determined the first low resolution structure of a bacterial Slc26 protein without spectral contribution from the detergent. The structure confirms that the protein forms a dimer stabilized via its transmembrane core; the cytoplasmic STAS domain projects away from the transmembrane domain and is not involved in dimerization. Supported by additional biochemical data, the structure suggests that large movements of the STAS domain underlie the conformational changes that occur during transport.

  7. The C-terminal domain of Nrf1 negatively regulates the full-length CNC-bZIP factor and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β; both are also inhibited by the small dominant-negative Nrf1γ/δ isoforms that down-regulate ARE-battery gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiguo; Qiu, Lu; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Chen, Jiayu; Ren, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD, aa 686-741) of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 1 (Nrf1) shares 53% amino acid sequence identity with the equivalent Neh3 domain of Nrf2, a homologous transcription factor. The Neh3 positively regulates Nrf2, but whether the Neh3-like (Neh3L) CTD of Nrf1 has a similar role in regulating Nrf1-target gene expression is unknown. Herein, we report that CTD negatively regulates the full-length Nrf1 (i.e. 120-kDa glycoprotein and 95-kDa deglycoprotein) and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β (55-kDa). Attachment of its CTD-adjoining 112-aa to the C-terminus of Nrf2 yields the chimaeric Nrf2-C112Nrf1 factor with a markedly decreased activity. Live-cell imaging of GFP-CTD reveals that the extra-nuclear portion of the fusion protein is allowed to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane through the amphipathic Neh3L region of Nrf1 and its basic c-tail. Thus removal of either the entire CTD or the essential Neh3L portion within CTD from Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2-C112Nrf1, results in an increase in their transcriptional ability to regulate antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven reporter genes. Further examinations unravel that two smaller isoforms, 36-kDa Nrf1γ and 25-kDa Nrf1δ, act as dominant-negative inhibitors to compete against Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2. Relative to Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β is a weak activator, that is positively regulated by its Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) domain and acidic domain 2 (AD2). Like AD1 of Nrf1, both AD2 and NST domain of LCR-F1/Nrf1β fused within two different chimaeric contexts to yield Gal4D:Nrf1β607 and Nrf1β:C270Nrf2, positively regulate their transactivation activity of cognate Gal4- and Nrf2-target reporter genes. More importantly, differential expression of endogenous ARE-battery genes is attributable to up-regulation by Nrf1 and LCR-F1/Nrf1β and down-regulation by Nrf1γ and Nrf1δ.

  8. [Disordered regions in C-domain structure of influenza virus M1 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontov, A L; Dobrov, E N; Fedorova, N V; Radiukhin, V A; Badun, G A; Arutiunian, A M; Bogacheva, E N; Baratova, L A

    2011-01-01

    Influenza virus matrix M1 protein is one of the main structural components of the virion performing also many different functions in infected cell. X-ray analysis data with 2.08 angstrom resolution were obtained only for the N-terminal part of M1 protein molecule (residues 2-158) but not for its C-terminal domain (159-252). In the present work M1 protein of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) virus strain in acidic solution was investigated with the help of tritium bombardment. Tritium label incorporation into M1 protein domains preferentially labeled the C-domain and inter-domain loops. Analytical centrifugation and dynamic light scattering experiments demonstrated increased hydrodynamic parameters (diameter) that may be explained by low degree of M1 structural organization. Computational analysis of M1 protein by intrinsic disorder predictions methods also demonstrated the presence of unfolded regions mostly in the C-domain and inter-domain loops. It is suggested, that influenza virus M1 polyfunctionality in infected cell is determined by its tertiary structure plasticity which in its turn results from the presence of unstructured regions.

  9. Structure and Misfolding of the Flexible Tripartite Coiled-Coil Domain of Glaucoma-Associated Myocilin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Shannon E.; Nguyen, Elaine; Donegan, Rebecca K.; Patterson-Orazem, Athéna C.; Hazel, Anthony; Gumbart, James C.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2017-11-01

    Glaucoma-associated myocilin is a member of the olfactomedins, a protein family involved in neuronal development and human diseases. Molecular studies of the myocilin N-terminal coiled coil demonstrate a unique tripartite architecture: a Y-shaped parallel dimer-of-dimers with distinct tetramer and dimer regions. The structure of the dimeric C-terminal 7-heptad repeats elucidates an unexpected repeat pattern involving inter-strand stabilization by oppositely charged residues. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal an alternate accessible conformation in which the terminal inter-strand disulfide limits the extent of unfolding and results in a kinked configuration. By inference, full-length myocilin is also branched, with two pairs of C-terminal olfactomedin domains. Selected variants within the N-terminal region alter the apparent quaternary structure of myocilin but do so without compromising stability or causing aggregation. In addition to increasing our structural knowledge of naturally occurring extracellular coiled coils and biomedically important olfactomedins, this work broadens the scope of protein misfolding in the pathogenesis of myocilin-associated glaucoma.

  10. Structure and Misfolding of the Flexible Tripartite Coiled-Coil Domain of Glaucoma-Associated Myocilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Shannon E; Nguyen, Elaine; Donegan, Rebecca K; Patterson-Orazem, Athéna C; Hazel, Anthony; Gumbart, James C; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2017-11-07

    Glaucoma-associated myocilin is a member of the olfactomedins, a protein family involved in neuronal development and human diseases. Molecular studies of the myocilin N-terminal coiled coil demonstrate a unique tripartite architecture: a Y-shaped parallel dimer-of-dimers with distinct tetramer and dimer regions. The structure of the dimeric C-terminal 7-heptad repeats elucidates an unexpected repeat pattern involving inter-strand stabilization by oppositely charged residues. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal an alternate accessible conformation in which the terminal inter-strand disulfide limits the extent of unfolding and results in a kinked configuration. By inference, full-length myocilin is also branched, with two pairs of C-terminal olfactomedin domains. Selected variants within the N-terminal region alter the apparent quaternary structure of myocilin but do so without compromising stability or causing aggregation. In addition to increasing our structural knowledge of naturally occurring extracellular coiled coils and biomedically important olfactomedins, this work broadens the scope of protein misfolding in the pathogenesis of myocilin-associated glaucoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The C-terminal residue of phage Vp16 PDF, the smallest peptide deformylase, acts as an offset element locking the active conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzela, Renata; Nusbaum, Julien; Fieulaine, Sonia; Lavecchia, Francesco; Bienvenut, Willy V; Dian, Cyril; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2017-09-08

    Prokaryotic proteins must be deformylated before the removal of their first methionine. Peptide deformylase (PDF) is indispensable and guarantees this mechanism. Recent metagenomics studies revealed new idiosyncratic PDF forms as the most abundant family of viral sequences. Little is known regarding these viral PDFs, including the capacity of the corresponding encoded proteins to ensure deformylase activity. We provide here the first evidence that viral PDFs, including the shortest PDF identified to date, Vp16 PDF, display deformylase activity in vivo, despite the absence of the key ribosome-interacting C-terminal region. Moreover, characterization of phage Vp16 PDF underscores unexpected structural and molecular features with the C-terminal Isoleucine residue significantly contributing to deformylase activity both in vitro and in vivo. This residue fully compensates for the absence of the usual long C-domain. Taken together, these data elucidate an unexpected mechanism of enzyme natural evolution and adaptation within viral sequences.

  12. C-terminal functionalization of nylon-3 polymers: effects of C-terminal groups on antibacterial and hemolytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jihua; Markiewicz, Matthew J; Mowery, Brendan P; Weisblum, Bernard; Stahl, Shannon S; Gellman, Samuel H

    2012-02-13

    Nylon-3 polymers contain β-amino-acid-derived subunits and can be viewed as higher homologues of poly(α-amino acids). This structural relationship raises the possibility that nylon-3 polymers offer a platform for development of new materials with a variety of biological activities, a prospect that has recently begun to receive experimental support. Nylon-3 homo- and copolymers can be prepared via anionic ring-opening polymerization of β-lactams, and use of an N-acyl-β-lactam as coinitiator in the polymerization reaction allows placement of a specific functional group, borne by the N-acyl-β-lactam, at the N-terminus of each polymer chain. Controlling the unit at the C-termini of nylon-3 polymer chains, however, has been problematic. Here we describe a strategy for specifying C-terminal functionality that is based on the polymerization mechanism. After the anionic ring-opening polymerization is complete, we introduce a new β-lactam, approximately 1 equiv relative to the expected number of polymer chains. Because the polymer chains bear a reactive imide group at their C-termini, this new β-lactam should become attached at this position. If the terminating β-lactam bears a distinctive functional group, that functionality should be affixed to most or all C-termini in the reaction mixture. We use the new technique to compare the impact of N- and C-terminal placement of a critical hydrophobic fragment on the biological activity profile of nylon-3 copolymers. The synthetic advance described here should prove to be generally useful for tailoring the properties of nylon-3 materials.

  13. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit from saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Pavitt, Graham D.; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    Crystal Structure of Catalytic Domain of the Initiation Factor 2B Epsilon Subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Thomas Boesen1, Graham Pavitt2, and Gregers Rom Andersen1* 1Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, DK-8000 Århus C, Denmark 2Department...... Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been determined to 2.3 Å resolution by the multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion technique using selenomethionine substituted protein. The structure consists of two four helix bundles. The N-terminal four helix bundle contain the catalytic part of the domain, whereas the C...... of Biomolecular Sciences, UMIST, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD UK *To whom correspondence should be addressed: grand@imsb.au.dk, Tel: (+45) 8942 5024. Fax: (+45) 8612 3178 Abstract The crystal structure of the C-terminal catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit, residues 544-704, from...

  14. C-terminal hemocyanin from hemocytes of Penaeus vannamei interacts with ERK1/2 and undergoes serine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havanapan, Phattara-orn; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Bourchookarn, Apichai; Krittanai, Chartchai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2009-05-01

    To understand molecular immune response of Penaeus vannamei during Taura syndrome virus (TSV) infection, expression and functional proteomics studies were performed on hemocyanin, which is a major abundant protein in shrimp hemocytes. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed up-regulation of several C-terminal fragments of hemocyanin, whereas the N-terminal fragments were down-regulated during TSV infection. 2-D Western blot analysis showed that the C-terminal hemocyanin fragments had more acidic isoelectric points (pI), whereas the N-terminal fragments had less acidic pI. Further analysis by NetPhos showed a greater number of serine phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal hemocyanin. Additionally, motif scan using Scansite revealed ERK D-domain, which is required for activation of ERK1/2 effector kinase, as a kinase-binding site at the 527th valine in the C-terminal hemocyanin, whereas neither motif nor functional domain was found in the N-terminus. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between the C-terminal hemocyanin and ERK1/2. 1-D Western blot analysis showed that ERK1/2 was also up-regulated during TSV infection. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that ERK1/2 signaling pathway may play an important role in molecular immune response of P. vannamei upon TSV infection through its interaction with the C-terminal hemocyanin.

  15. Structure and function of the interacting domains of Spire and Fmn-family formins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizcarra, Christina L.; Kreutz, Barry; Rodal, Avital A.; Toms, Angela V.; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Wei; Quinlan, Margot E.; Eck, Michael J. (UCLA); (Brandeis); (DFCI)

    2012-07-11

    Evidence for cooperation between actin nucleators is growing. The WH2-containing nucleator Spire and the formin Cappuccino interact directly, and both are essential for assembly of an actin mesh during Drosophila oogenesis. Their interaction requires the kinase noncatalytic C-lobe domain (KIND) domain of Spire and the C-terminal tail of the formin. Here we describe the crystal structure of the KIND domain of human Spir1 alone and in complex with the tail of Fmn2, a mammalian ortholog of Cappuccino. The KIND domain is structurally similar to the C-lobe of protein kinases. The Fmn2 tail is coordinated in an acidic cleft at the base of the domain that appears to have evolved via deletion of a helix from the canonical kinase fold. Our functional analysis of Cappuccino reveals an unexpected requirement for its tail in actin assembly. In addition, we find that the KIND/tail interaction blocks nucleation by Cappuccino and promotes its displacement from filament barbed ends providing insight into possible modes of cooperation between Spire and Cappuccino.

  16. The flexible C-terminal arm of the Lassa arenavirus Z-protein mediates interactions with multiple binding partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Eric R; Armen, Roger S; Mannan, Aristotle M; Brooks, Charles L

    2010-08-01

    The arenavirus genome encodes for a Z-protein, which contains a RING domain that coordinates two zinc ions, and has been identified as having several functional roles at various stages of the virus life cycle. Z-protein binds to multiple host proteins and has been directly implicated in the promotion of viral budding, repression of mRNA translation, and apoptosis of infected cells. Using homology models of the Z-protein from Lassa strain arenavirus, replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) was used to refine the structures, which were then subsequently clustered. Population-weighted ensembles of low-energy cluster representatives were predicted based upon optimal agreement of the chemical shifts computed with the SPARTA program with the experimental NMR chemical shifts. A member of the refined ensemble was identified to be a potential binder of budding factor Tsg101 based on its correspondence to the structure of the HIV-1 Gag late domain when bound to Tsg101. Members of these ensembles were docked against the crystal structure of human eIF4E translation initiation factor. Two plausible binding modes emerged based upon their agreement with experimental observation, favorable interaction energies and stability during MD trajectories. Mutations to Z are proposed that would either inhibit both binding mechanisms or selectively inhibit only one mode. The C-terminal domain conformation of the most populated member of the representative ensemble shielded protein-binding recognition motifs for Tsg101 and eIF4E and represents the most populated state free in solution. We propose that C-terminal flexibility is key for mediating the different functional states of the Z-protein. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Automation of C-terminal sequence analysis of 2D-PAGE separated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P. Moerman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental assignment of the protein termini remains essential to define the functional protein structure. Here, we report on the improvement of a proteomic C-terminal sequence analysis method. The approach aims to discriminate the C-terminal peptide in a CNBr-digest where Met-Xxx peptide bonds are cleaved in internal peptides ending at a homoserine lactone (hsl-derivative. pH-dependent partial opening of the lactone ring results in the formation of doublets for all internal peptides. C-terminal peptides are distinguished as singlet peaks by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS is then used for their identification. We present a fully automated protocol established on a robotic liquid-handling station.

  18. Structural insights into a wildtype domain of the oncoprotein E6 and its interaction with a PDZ domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Mischo

    Full Text Available The high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 interact with key cellular regulators and are etiological agents for tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance in cervical cancer and other malignant conditions. E6 induces degradation of the tumor suppressor p53, activates telomerase and deregulates cell polarity. Analysis of E6 derived from a number of high risk HPV finally yielded the first structure of a wild-type HPV E6 domain (PDB 2M3L representing the second zinc-binding domain of HPV 51 E6 (termed 51Z2 determined by NMR spectroscopy. The 51Z2 structure provides clues about HPV-type specific structural differences between E6 proteins. The observed temperature sensitivity of the well-folded wild-type E6 domain implies a significant malleability of the oncoprotein in vivo. Hence, the structural differences between individual E6 and their malleability appear, together with HPV type-specific surface exposed side-chains, to provide the structural basis for the different interaction networks reported for individual E6 proteins. Furthermore, the interaction of 51Z2 with a PDZ domain of hDlg was analyzed. Human Dlg constitutes a prototypic representative of the large family of PDZ proteins regulating cell polarity, which are common targets of high-risk HPV E6. Nine C-terminal residues of 51Z2 interact with the second PDZ domain of hDlg2. Surface plasmon resonance in conjunction with the NMR spectroscopy derived complex structure (PDB 2M3M indicate that E6 residues N-terminal to the canonical PDZ-BM of E6 significantly contribute to this interaction and increase affinity. The structure of the complex reveals how residues outside of the classical PDZ-BM enhance the affinity of E6 towards PDZ domains. Such mechanism facilitates successful competition of E6 with cellular PDZ-binding proteins and may apply to PDZ-binding proteins of other viruses as well.

  19. NMR structure of the single QALGGH zinc finger domain from the Arabidopsis thaliana SUPERMAN protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isernia, Carla; Bucci, Enrico; Leone, Marilisa; Zaccaro, Laura; Di Lello, Paola; Digilio, Giuseppe; Esposito, Sabrina; Saviano, Michele; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Pedone, Carlo; Pedone, Paolo V; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2003-03-03

    Zinc finger domains of the classical type represent the most abundant DNA binding domains in eukaryotic transcription factors. Plant proteins contain from one to four zinc finger domains, which are characterized by high conservation of the sequence QALGGH, shown to be critical for DNA-binding activity. The Arabidopsis thaliana SUPERMAN protein, which contains a single QALGGH zinc finger, is necessary for proper spatial development of reproductive floral tissues and has been shown to specifically bind to DNA. Here, we report the synthesis and UV and NMR spectroscopic structural characterization of a 37 amino acid SUPERMAN region complexed to a Zn(2+) ion (Zn-SUP37) and present the first high-resolution structure of a classical zinc finger domain from a plant protein. The NMR structure of the SUPERMAN zinc finger domain consists of a very well-defined betabetaalpha motif, typical of all other Cys(2)-His(2) zinc fingers structurally characterized. As a consequence, the highly conserved QALGGH sequence is located at the N terminus of the alpha helix. This region of the domain of animal zinc finger proteins consists of hypervariable residues that are responsible for recognizing the DNA bases. Therefore, we propose a peculiar DNA recognition code for the QALGGH zinc finger domain that includes all or some of the amino acid residues at positions -1, 2, and 3 (numbered relative to the N terminus of the helix) and possibly others at the C-terminal end of the recognition helix. This study further confirms that the zinc finger domain, though very simple, is an extremely versatile DNA binding motif.

  20. Crystal structure of a coiled-coil domain from human ROCK I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqi Tu

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Rho and one of its targets, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, participate in a variety of actin-based cellular processes including smooth muscle contraction, cell migration, and stress fiber formation. The ROCK protein consists of an N-terminal kinase domain, a central coiled-coil domain containing a Rho binding site, and a C-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. Here we present the crystal structure of a large section of the central coiled-coil domain of human ROCK I (amino acids 535-700. The structure forms a parallel α-helical coiled-coil dimer that is structurally similar to tropomyosin, an actin filament binding protein. There is an unusual discontinuity in the coiled-coil; three charged residues (E613, R617 and D620 are positioned at what is normally the hydrophobic core of coiled-coil packing. We speculate that this conserved irregularity could function as a hinge that allows ROCK to adopt its autoinhibited conformation.

  1. Structural Time Domain Identification Toolbox User's Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Brincker, Rune

    This manual describes the Structural Time Domain Identification toolbox for use with MA TLAB. This version of the tool box has been developed using the PC-based MA TLAB version 4.2c, but is compatible with prior versions of MATLAB and UNIX-based versions. The routines of the toolbox are the so...

  2. Enhanced functional and structural domain assignments using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The sequencing of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) H37Rv genome has facilitated deeper insights into the biology of MTB, yet the functions of many MTB proteins are unknown. We have used sensitive profile-based search procedures to assign functional and structural domains to infer functions of gene products ...

  3. Structured hints : extracting and abstracting domain expertise.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hereld, M.; Stevens, R.; Sterling, T.; Gao, G. R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; California Inst. of Tech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ. of Delaware

    2009-03-16

    We propose a new framework for providing information to help optimize domain-specific application codes. Its design addresses problems that derive from the widening gap between the domain problem statement by domain experts and the architectural details of new and future high-end computing systems. The design is particularly well suited to program execution models that incorporate dynamic adaptive methodologies for live tuning of program performance and resource utilization. This new framework, which we call 'structured hints', couples a vocabulary of annotations to a suite of performance metrics. The immediate target is development of a process by which a domain expert describes characteristics of objects and methods in the application code that would not be readily apparent to the compiler; the domain expert provides further information about what quantities might provide the best indications of desirable effect; and the interactive preprocessor identifies potential opportunities for the domain expert to evaluate. Our development of these ideas is progressing in stages from case study, through manual implementation, to automatic or semi-automatic implementation. In this paper we discuss results from our case study, an examination of a large simulation of a neural network modeled after the neocortex.

  4. N- and C-terminal truncations of a GH10 xylanase significantly increase its activity and thermostability but decrease its SDS resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Huang, Jingxuan; Liu, Xingchen; Hu, Hang; Long, Liangkun; Chen, Kaixiang; Ding, Shaojun

    2016-04-01

    XynII from Volvariella volvacea has high sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) resistance, with the potential for industrial applications under harsh conditions. It consists of a single glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10) catalytic domain but contains an additional unique 10 and 4 amino acid residues at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. In this study, five XynII derivatives with N- and/or C-terminus deletions were constructed to determine the effects of these regions on enzyme activity, substrate specificity, thermostability, and SDS resistance. Our results revealed that N- and/or C-terminal truncations significantly increased enzyme activity and thermostability, but reduced SDS resistance. Specifically, the XynIIΔNC4 mutant had 2.53-fold more catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) towards beechwood xylan than wild-type and 3.0-fold more thermostability (t 1/2 [55°C]). XynIIΔNC4 displayed 3.33-, 4.38-, 1.37-, and 1.98-fold more activity against xylotriose, xylotetraose, xylopentaose, and xylohexaose, respectively, than XynII did. However, its half-life (t 1/2) in 4 % SDS was only 1.72 h, while that of XynII was 4.65 h. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that deletion of N- and C-terminal segments caused minor changes in secondary structure. Our observations suggest that the extra N- and C-terminal segments in wild-type XynII evolved to strengthen the interaction between these regions of the protein, making the local structure more rigid and reducing structural flexibility. In this way, N- and C-terminal truncations increased the thermostability and activity of XynII on different xylans and linear xylooligosaccharides, but reduced its resistance to SDS.

  5. Structure of a Spumaretrovirus Gag Central Domain Reveals an Ancient Retroviral Capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Neil J; Nicastro, Giuseppe; Dutta, Moumita; Pollard, Dominic J; Goldstone, David C; Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Ramos, Andres; Müllers, Erik; Stirnnagel, Kristin; Stanke, Nicole; Lindemann, Dirk; Stoye, Jonathan P; Taylor, William R; Rosenthal, Peter B; Taylor, Ian A

    2016-11-01

    The Spumaretrovirinae, or foamy viruses (FVs) are complex retroviruses that infect many species of monkey and ape. Despite little sequence homology, FV and orthoretroviral Gag proteins perform equivalent functions, including genome packaging, virion assembly, trafficking and membrane targeting. However, there is a paucity of structural information for FVs and it is unclear how disparate FV and orthoretroviral Gag molecules share the same function. To probe the functional overlap of FV and orthoretroviral Gag we have determined the structure of a central region of Gag from the Prototype FV (PFV). The structure comprises two all α-helical domains NtDCEN and CtDCEN that although they have no sequence similarity, we show they share the same core fold as the N- (NtDCA) and C-terminal domains (CtDCA) of archetypal orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA). Moreover, structural comparisons with orthoretroviral CA align PFV NtDCEN and CtDCEN with NtDCA and CtDCA respectively. Further in vitro and functional virological assays reveal that residues making inter-domain NtDCEN-CtDCEN interactions are required for PFV capsid assembly and that intact capsid is required for PFV reverse transcription. These data provide the first information that relates the Gag proteins of Spuma and Orthoretrovirinae and suggests a common ancestor for both lineages containing an ancient CA fold.

  6. Structure of a Spumaretrovirus Gag Central Domain Reveals an Ancient Retroviral Capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Ball

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Spumaretrovirinae, or foamy viruses (FVs are complex retroviruses that infect many species of monkey and ape. Despite little sequence homology, FV and orthoretroviral Gag proteins perform equivalent functions, including genome packaging, virion assembly, trafficking and membrane targeting. However, there is a paucity of structural information for FVs and it is unclear how disparate FV and orthoretroviral Gag molecules share the same function. To probe the functional overlap of FV and orthoretroviral Gag we have determined the structure of a central region of Gag from the Prototype FV (PFV. The structure comprises two all α-helical domains NtDCEN and CtDCEN that although they have no sequence similarity, we show they share the same core fold as the N- (NtDCA and C-terminal domains (CtDCA of archetypal orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA. Moreover, structural comparisons with orthoretroviral CA align PFV NtDCEN and CtDCEN with NtDCA and CtDCA respectively. Further in vitro and functional virological assays reveal that residues making inter-domain NtDCEN-CtDCEN interactions are required for PFV capsid assembly and that intact capsid is required for PFV reverse transcription. These data provide the first information that relates the Gag proteins of Spuma and Orthoretrovirinae and suggests a common ancestor for both lineages containing an ancient CA fold.

  7. Regulation of fibrinolysis by C-terminal lysines operates through plasminogen and plasmin but not tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M M C G; Thelwell, C; Williams, S C; Longstaff, C

    2012-11-01

    Binding of tissue-type plasminogen (Pgn) activator (t-PA) and Pgn to fibrin regulates plasmin generation, but there is no consistent, quantitative understanding of the individual contribution of t-PA finger and kringle 2 domains to the regulation of fibrinolysis. Kringle domains bind to lysines in fibrin, and this interaction can be studied by competition with lysine analogs and removal of C-terminal lysines by carboxypeptidase B (CPB). High-throughput, precise clot lysis assays incorporating the lysine analog tranexamic acid (TA) or CPB and genetically engineered variants of t-PA were performed. In particular, wild-type (WT) t-PA (F-G-K1-K2-P) and a domain-switched variant K1K1t-PA (F-G-K1-K1-P) that lacks kringle 2 but retains normal t-PA structure were compared to probe the importance of fibrin lysine binding by t-PA kringle 2. WT t-PA showed higher rates of fibrinolysis than K1K1t-PA, but the inhibitory effects of TA or CPB were very similar for WT t-PA and the variant t-PA (fibrinolysis was also inhibited by TA, even though Pgn activation could be stimulated. Fibrin treated with factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) generates crosslinked degradation products, but these did not affect the results obtained with WT t-PA and K1K1t-PA. t-PA kringle 2 has a minor role in the initial interaction of t-PA and fibrin, but stimulation of fibrinolysis by C-terminal lysines (or inhibition by carboxypeptidases or TA) operates through Pgn and plasmin binding, not through t-PA. This is also true when fibrin is crosslinked by treatment with FXIIIa. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. The RST and PARP-like domain containing SRO protein family: analysis of protein structure, function and conservation in land plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salojärvi Jarkko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SROs (SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE are a group of plant-specific proteins which have important functions in stress adaptation and development. They contain the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP domain and a C-terminal RST (RCD-SRO-TAF4 domain. In addition to these domains, several, but not all, SROs contain an N-terminal WWE domain. Results SROs are present in all analyzed land plants and sequence analysis differentiates between two structurally distinct groups; cryptogams and monocots possess only group I SROs whereas eudicots also contain group II. Group I SROs possess an N-terminal WWE domain (PS50918 but the WWE domain is lacking in group II SROs. Group I domain structure is widely represented in organisms as distant as humans (for example, HsPARP11. We propose a unified nomenclature for the SRO family. The SROs are able to interact with transcription factors through the C-terminal RST domain but themselves are generally not regulated at the transcriptional level. The most conserved feature of the SROs is the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PS51059 domain. However, bioinformatic analysis of the SRO PARP domain fold-structure and biochemical assays of AtRCD1 suggested that SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Conclusions The SROs are a highly conserved family of plant specific proteins. Sequence analysis of the RST domain implicates a highly preserved protein structure in that region. This might have implications for functional conservation. We suggest that, despite the presence of the catalytic core of the PARP domain, the SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Nevertheless, the function of SROs is critical for plants and might be related to transcription factor regulation and complex formation.

  9. Structural Analysis of the G-Box Domain of the Microcephaly Protein CPAP Suggests a Role in Centriole Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzopoulos, Georgios N.; Erat, Michèle C.; Cutts, Erin; Rogala, Kacper B.; Slater, Leanne M.; Stansfeld, Philip J.; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Summary Centrioles are evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic organelles composed of a protein scaffold surrounded by sets of microtubules organized with a 9-fold radial symmetry. CPAP, a centriolar protein essential for microtubule recruitment, features a C-terminal domain of unknown structure, the G-box. A missense mutation in the G-box reduces affinity for the centriolar shuttling protein STIL and causes primary microcephaly. Here, we characterize the molecular architecture of CPAP and determine the G-box structure alone and in complex with a STIL fragment. The G-box comprises a single elongated β sheet capable of forming supramolecular assemblies. Structural and biophysical studies highlight the conserved nature of the CPAP-STIL complex. We propose that CPAP acts as a horizontal “strut” that joins the centriolar scaffold with microtubules, whereas G-box domains form perpendicular connections. PMID:24076405

  10. Physical association of GPR54 C-terminal with protein phosphatase 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barry J; Wang, Zixuan; Mobley, La'Tonya; Khosravi, Davood; Fujii, Nobutaka; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Peiper, Stephen C

    2008-12-26

    KiSS1 was discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene and subsequently found to encode kisspeptins (KP), ligands for a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR54. This ligand-receptor pair was later shown to play a critical role in the neuro-endocrine regulation of puberty. The C-terminal cytoplasmic (C-ter) domain of GPR54 contains a segment rich in proline and arginine residues that corresponds to the primary structure of four overlapping SH3 binding motifs. Yeast two hybrid experiments identified the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-C) as an interacting protein. Pull-down experiments with GST fusion proteins containing the GPR54 C-ter confirmed binding to PP2A-C in cell lysates and these complexes contained phosphatase activity. The proline arginine rich segment is necessary for these interactions. The GPR54 C-ter bound directly to purified recombinant PP2A-C, indicating the GPR54 C-ter may form complexes involving the catalytic subunit of PP2A that regulate phosphorylation of critical signaling intermediates.

  11. Functional analysis reveals the possible role of the C-terminal sequences and PI motif in the function of lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) orthologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Kun; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Two lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) genes, Lily MADS Box Gene 8 and 9 (LMADS8/9), were characterized. LMADS9 lacked 29 C-terminal amino acids including the PI motif that was present in LMADS8. Both LMADS8/9 mRNAs were prevalent in the first and second whorl tepals during all stages of development and were expressed in the stamen only in young flower buds. LMADS8/9 could both form homodimers, but the ability of LMADS8 homodimers to bind to CArG1 was relatively stronger than that of LMADS9 homodimers. 35S:LMADS8 completely, and 35S:LMADS9 only partially, rescued the second whorl petal formation and partially converted the first whorl sepal into a petal-like structure in Arabidopsis pi-1 mutants. Ectopic expression of LMADS8-C (with deletion of the 29 amino acids of the C-terminal sequence) or LMADS8-PI (with only the PI motif deleted) only partially rescued petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS9/pi plants. In contrast, 35:LMADS9+L8C (with the addition of the 29 amino acids of the LMADS8 C-terminal sequence) or 35S:LMADS9+L8PI (with the addition of the LMADS8 PI motif) demonstrated an increased ability to rescue petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS8/pi plants. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LMADS8-M (with the MADS domain truncated) generated more severe dominant negative phenotypes than those seen in 35S:LMADS9-M flowers. These results revealed that the 29 amino acids including the PI motif in the C-terminal region of the lily PI orthologue are valuable for its function in regulating perianth organ formation. PMID:22068145

  12. Structural characterization of minor ampullate spidroin domains and their distinct roles in fibroin solubility and fiber formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenwei Gao

    Full Text Available Spider silk is protein fibers with extraordinary mechanical properties. Up to now, it is still poorly understood how silk proteins are kept in a soluble form before spinning into fibers and how the protein molecules are aligned orderly to form fibers. Minor ampullate spidroin is one of the seven types of silk proteins, which consists of four types of domains: N-terminal domain, C-terminal domain (CTD, repetitive domain (RP and linker domain (LK. Here we report the tertiary structure of CTD and secondary structures of RP and LK in aqueous solution, and their roles in protein stability, solubility and fiber formation. The stability and solubility of individual domains are dramatically different and can be explained by their distinct structures. For the tri-domain miniature fibroin, RP-LK-CTD(Mi, the three domains have no or weak interactions with one another at low protein concentrations (<1 mg/ml. The CTD in RP-LK-CTD(Mi is very stable and soluble, but it cannot stabilize the entire protein against chemical and thermal denaturation while it can keep the entire tri-domain in a highly water-soluble state. In the presence of shear force, protein aggregation is greatly accelerated and the aggregation rate is determined by the stability of folded domains and solubility of the disordered domains. Only the tri-domain RP-LK-CTD(Mi could form silk-like fibers, indicating that all three domains play distinct roles in fiber formation: LK as a nucleation site for assembly of protein molecules, RP for assistance of the assembly and CTD for regulating alignment of the assembled molecules.

  13. Solution structure and DNA binding of the zinc-finger domain from DNA ligase IIIalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W; Yang, Ji-Chun; Neuhaus, David

    2004-08-13

    DNA ligase IIIalpha carries out the final ligation step in the base excision repair (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR) mechanisms of DNA repair. The enzyme recognises single-strand nicks and other damage features in double-stranded DNA, both through the catalytic domain and an N-terminal domain containing a single zinc finger. The latter is homologous to other zinc fingers that recognise damaged DNA, two in the N terminus of poly(adenosine-ribose)polymerase and three in the N terminus of the Arabidopsis thaliana nick-sensing DNA 3'-phosphoesterase. Here, we present the solution structure of the zinc-finger domain of human DNA ligase IIIalpha, the first structure of a finger from this group. It is related to that of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1, but has an additional N-terminal beta-strand and C-terminal alpha-helix. Chemical shift mapping using a DNA ligand containing a single-stranded break showed that the DNA-binding surface of the DNA-ligase IIIalpha zinc finger is substantially different from that of GATA-1, consistent with the fact that the two proteins recognise very different features in the DNA. Likely implications for DNA binding are discussed.

  14. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are Representative of a Widely Distributed Protein Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Barb; J Cort; J Seetharaman; S Lew; H Lee; T Acton; L Tong; G Montelione; J Prestegard; et al.

    2011-12-31

    YbbR domains are widespread throughout Eubacteria and are expressed as monomeric units, linked in tandem repeats or cotranslated with other domains. Although the precise role of these domains remains undefined, the location of the multiple YbbR domain-encoding ybbR gene in the Bacillus subtilis glmM operon and its previous identification as a substrate for a surfactin-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase suggests a role in cell growth, division, and virulence. To further characterize the YbbR domains, structures of two of the four domains (I and IV) from the YbbR-like protein of Desulfitobacterium hafniense Y51 were solved by solution nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. The structures show the domains to have nearly identical topologies despite a low amino acid identity (23%). The topology is dominated by {beta}-strands, roughly following a 'figure 8' pattern with some strands coiling around the domain perimeter and others crossing the center. A similar topology is found in the C-terminal domain of two stress-responsive bacterial ribosomal proteins, TL5 and L25. Based on these models, a structurally guided amino acid alignment identifies features of the YbbR domains that are not evident from naive amino acid sequence alignments. A structurally conserved cis-proline (cis-Pro) residue was identified in both domains, though the local structure in the immediate vicinities surrounding this residue differed between the two models. The conservation and location of this cis-Pro, plus anchoring Val residues, suggest this motif may be significant to protein function.

  15. Time Domain Diffraction by Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Frongillo, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    Time domain (TD) diffraction problems are receiving great attention because of the widespread use of ultra wide band (UWB) communication and radar systems. It is commonly accepted that, due to the large bandwidth of the UWB signals, the analysis of the wave propagation mechanisms in the TD framework is preferable to the frequency domain (FD) data processing. Furthermore, the analysis of transient scattering phenomena is also of importance for predicting the effects of electromagnetic pulses on civil structures. Diffraction in the TD framework represents a challenging problem and numerical discretization techniques can be used to support research and industry activities. Unfortunately, these methods become rapidly intractable when considering excitation pulses with high frequency content. This contribution deals with the TD diffraction phenomenon related to composite structures containing a dielectric wedge with arbitrary apex angle when illuminated by a plane wave. The approach is the same used in [1]-[3]. The transient diffracted field originated by an arbitrary function plane wave is evaluated via a convolution integral involving the TD diffraction coefficients, which are determined in closed form starting from the knowledge of the corresponding FD counterparts. In particular, the inverse Laplace transform is applied to the FD Uniform Asymptotic Physical Optics (FD-UAPO) diffraction coefficients available for the internal region of the structure and the surrounding space. For each observation domain, the FD-UAPO expressions are obtained by considering electric and magnetic equivalent PO surface currents located on the interfaces. The surface radiation integrals using these sources is assumed as starting point and manipulated for obtaining integrals able to be solved by means of the Steepest Descent Method and the Multiplicative Method. [1] G. Gennarelli and G. Riccio, "Time domain diffraction by a right-angled penetrable wedge," IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., Vol

  16. Functional insight into the C-terminal extension of halolysin SptA from haloarchaeon Natrinema sp. J7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisheng Xu

    Full Text Available Halolysin SptA from haloarchaeon Natrinema sp. J7 consists of a subtilisin-like catalytic domain and a C-terminal extension (CTE containing two cysteine residues. In this report, we have investigated the function of the CTE using recombinant enzymes expressed in Haloferax volcanii WFD11. Deletion of the CTE greatly reduced but did not abolish protease activity, which suggests that the CTE is not essential for enzyme folding. Mutational analysis suggests that residues Cys303 and Cys338 within the CTE form a disulfide bond that make this domain resistant to autocleavage and proteolysis under hypotonic conditions. Characterization of full-length and CTE-truncation enzymes indicates the CTE not only confers extra stability to the enzyme but also assists enzyme activity on protein substrates by facilitating binding at high salinities. Interestingly, homology modeling of the CTE yields a β-jelly roll-like structure similar to those seen in Claudin-binding domain of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (clostridial C-CPE and collagen binding domain (CBD, and the CTE also possesses collagen-binding activity, making it a potential candidate as an anchoring unit in drug delivery systems.

  17. Promiscuous and specific phospholipid binding by domains in ZAC, a membrane-associated Arabidopsis protein with an ARF GAP zinc finger and a C2 domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; Lykke-Andersen, K; Frandsen, G I

    2000-01-01

    Arabidopsis proteins were predicted which share an 80 residue zinc finger domain known from ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating proteins (ARF GAPs). One of these is a 37 kDa protein, designated ZAC, which has a novel domain structure in which the N-terminal ARF GAP domain and a C-terminal C...

  18. Synaptic Vesicle Tethering and the CaV2.2 Distal C-terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona K Wong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available . Evidence that synaptic vesicles (SVs can be gated by a single voltage sensitive calcium channel (CaV2.2 predict a molecular linking mechanism or ‘tether’[Stanley 1993]. Recent studies have proposed that the SV binds to the distal C-terminal on the CaV2.2 calcium channel [Kaeser et al. 2011;Wong, Li, and Stanley 2013] while genetic analysis proposed a double tether mechanism via RIM: directly to the C terminus PDZ ligand domain or indirectly via a more proximal proline rich site [Kaeser et al. 2011]. Using a novel in vitro SV-PD binding assay, we reported that SVs bind to a fusion protein comprising the C-terminal distal third (C3, aa 2137-2357 [Wong, Li, and Stanley 2013]. Here we limit the binding site further to the last 58 aa, beyond the proline rich site, by the absence of SV capture by a truncated C3 fusion protein (aa 2137-2299. To test PDZ-dependent binding we generated two C terminus-mutant C3 fusion proteins and a mimetic blocking peptide (H-WC, aa 2349-2357 and validated these by elimination of MINT-1 or RIM binding. Persistence of SV capture with all three fusion proteins or with the full length C3 protein but in the presence of the blocking peptide, demonstrated that SVs can bind to the distal C-terminal via a PDZ-independent mechanism. These results were supported in situ by normal SV turnover in H-WC-loaded synaptosomes, as assayed by a novel peptide cryoloading method. Thus, SVs tether to the CaV2.2 C-terminal within a 49 aa region immediately prior to the terminus PDZ ligand domain. Long tethers that could reflect extended C termini were imaged by electron microscopy of synaptosome ghosts. To fully account for SV tethering we propose a model where SVs are initially captured, or ‘grabbed’, from the cytoplasm by a binding site on the distal region of the channel C-terminal and are then retracted to be ‘locked’ close to the channel by a second attachment mechanism in preparation for single channel domain gating.

  19. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E.; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-01-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies.

  20. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-09-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Presence and expression of hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidases in cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindblad Peter

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrogenases catalyze the simplest of all chemical reactions: the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen or vice versa. Cyanobacteria can express an uptake, a bidirectional or both NiFe-hydrogenases. Maturation of those depends on accessory proteins encoded by hyp-genes. The last maturation step involves the cleavage of a ca. 30 amino acid long peptide from the large subunit by a C-terminal endopeptidase. Until know, nothing is known about the maturation of cyanobacterial NiFe-hydrogenases. The availability of three complete cyanobacterial genome sequences from strains with either only the uptake (Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133/PCC 73102, only the bidirectional (Synechocystis PCC 6803 or both NiFe-hydrogenases (Anabaena PCC 7120 prompted us to mine these genomes for hydrogenase maturation related genes. In this communication we focus on the presence and the expression of the NiFe-hydrogenases and the corresponding C-terminal endopeptidases, in the three strains mentioned above. Results We identified genes encoding putative cyanobacterial hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidases in all analyzed cyanobacterial genomes. The genes are not part of any known hydrogenase related gene cluster. The derived amino acid sequences show only low similarity (28–41% to the well-analyzed hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidase HybD from Escherichia coli, the crystal structure of which is known. However, computational secondary and tertiary structure modeling revealed the presence of conserved structural patterns around the highly conserved active site. Gene expression analysis shows that the endopeptidase encoding genes are expressed under both nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing conditions. Conclusion Anabaena PCC 7120 possesses two NiFe-hydrogenases and two hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidases but only one set of hyp-genes. Thus, in contrast to the Hyp-proteins, the C-terminal endopeptidases are the only known

  2. Structure of the EMMPRIN N-terminal domain 1: Dimerization via [beta]-strand swapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jinquan; Teplyakov, Alexey; Obmolova, Galina; Malia, Thomas; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Beil, Eric; Baker, Audrey; Swencki-Underwood, Bethany; Zhao, Yonghong; Sprenkle, Justin; Dixon, Ken; Sweet, Raymond; Gilliland, Gary L.; (Centocor)

    2010-09-27

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), also known as Hab18G, CD147, Basigin, M6, and neurothelin, is a membrane glycoprotein expressed on the surface of various cell types and many cancer cells. EMMPRIN stimulates adjacent fibroblasts and tumor cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases and plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, spermatogensis and fertilization, cell-cell adhesion and communication, and other biological processes (reviewed in Ref. 1 and references therein). It was demonstrated that the EMMPRIN extracellular domain (ECD), which structurally belongs to the IgG superfamily, can form homo-oligomers in a cis dependent manner and the N-terminal domain 1 (residues 22-101) was necessary and sufficient to mediate this interaction. The crystal structure of the ECD of recombinant human EMMPRIN (Hab18G/CD147) expressed in E. coli was reported at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution (Yu et al. 2008). The construct consists of residues 22-205 of the mature protein and has both an N-terminal IgC2 domain (ND1, residues 22-101) and a C-terminal IgC2 domain (ND2, residues 107-205). The two domains are joined by a five amino acid residue linker that constitutes a flexible hinge between the two domains. The crystal form has four copies of the molecule in the asymmetric unit, each of which has a different inter-domain angle that varies from 121{sup o} to 144{sup o}. The two domains each have a conserved disulfide bridge and both are comprised of two {beta}-sheets formed by strands EBA and GFCC, and DEBA and AGFCC for ND1 and ND2, respectively. Based on the crystal packing in this structure, the authors proposed that lateral packing between the two IgG domains of EMMPRIN ECD represents a potential mechanism for cell adhesion. Here we report the 2.0-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of EMMPRIN ECD (ND1) expressed in mammalian cells. The overall structure of the domain is very similar to that in the full length

  3. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison A Williams

    Full Text Available Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X, a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80 and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2.

  4. Relationship of structure and function of DNA-binding domain in vitamin D receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lin-Yan; Zhang, Yan-Qiong; Chen, Meng-Di; Liu, Chang-Bai; Wu, Jiang-Feng

    2015-07-07

    While the structure of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) has been determined in great detail, the roles of its domains and how to bind the motif of its target genes are still under debate. The VDR DBD consists of two zinc finger modules and a C-terminal extension (CTE), at the end of the C-terminal of each structure presenting α-helix. For the first zinc finger structure, N37 and S-box take part in forming a dimer with 9-cis retinoid X receptor (RXR), while V26, R50, P-box and S-box participate in binding with VDR response elements (VDRE). For the second zinc finger structure, P61, F62 and H75 are essential in the structure of the VDR homodimer with the residues N37, E92 and F93 of the downstream of partner VDR, which form the inter-DBD interface. T-box of the CTE, especially the F93 and I94, plays a critical role in heterodimerization and heterodimers-VDRE binding. Six essential residues (R102, K103, M106, I107, K109, and R110) of the CTE α-helix of VDR construct one interaction face, which packs against the DBD core of the adjacent symmetry mate. In 1,25(OH)2D3-activated signaling, the VDR-RXR heterodimer may bind to DR3-type VDRE and ER9-type VDREs of its target gene directly resulting in transactivation and also bind to DR3-liked nVDRE of its target gene directly resulting in transrepression. Except for this, 1α,25(OH)2D3 ligand VDR-RXR may bind to 1αnVDRE indirectly through VDIR, resulting in transrepression of the target gene. Upon binding of 1α,25(OH)2D3, VDR can transactivate and transrepress its target genes depending on the DNA motif that DBD binds.

  5. Relationship of Structure and Function of DNA-Binding Domain in Vitamin D Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Yan Wan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While the structure of the DNA-binding domain (DBD of the vitamin D receptor (VDR has been determined in great detail, the roles of its domains and how to bind the motif of its target genes are still under debate. The VDR DBD consists of two zinc finger modules and a C-terminal extension (CTE, at the end of the C-terminal of each structure presenting α-helix. For the first zinc finger structure, N37 and S-box take part in forming a dimer with 9-cis retinoid X receptor (RXR, while V26, R50, P-box and S-box participate in binding with VDR response elements (VDRE. For the second zinc finger structure, P61, F62 and H75 are essential in the structure of the VDR homodimer with the residues N37, E92 and F93 of the downstream of partner VDR, which form the inter-DBD interface. T-box of the CTE, especially the F93 and I94, plays a critical role in heterodimerization and heterodimers–VDRE binding. Six essential residues (R102, K103, M106, I107, K109, and R110 of the CTE α-helix of VDR construct one interaction face, which packs against the DBD core of the adjacent symmetry mate. In 1,25(OH2D3-activated signaling, the VDR-RXR heterodimer may bind to DR3-type VDRE and ER9-type VDREs of its target gene directly resulting in transactivation and also bind to DR3-liked nVDRE of its target gene directly resulting in transrepression. Except for this, 1α,25(OH2D3 ligand VDR-RXR may bind to 1αnVDRE indirectly through VDIR, resulting in transrepression of the target gene. Upon binding of 1α,25(OH2D3, VDR can transactivate and transrepress its target genes depending on the DNA motif that DBD binds.

  6. Oligomerization-induced conformational change in the C-terminal region of Nel-like molecule 1 (NELL1) protein is necessary for the efficient mediation of murine MC3T3-E1 cell adhesion and spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoko; Hasebe, Ai; Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D; Ting, Kang; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2014-04-04

    NELL1 is a large oligomeric secretory glycoprotein that functions as an osteoinductive factor. NELL1 contains several conserved domains, has structural similarities to thrombospondin 1, and supports osteoblastic cell adhesion through integrins. To define the structural requirements for NELL1-mediated cell adhesion, we prepared a series of recombinant NELL1 proteins (intact, deleted, and cysteine-mutant) from a mammalian expression system and tested their activities. A deletion analysis demonstrated that the C-terminal cysteine-rich region of NELL1 is critical for the cell adhesion activity of NELL1. Reducing agent treatment decreased the cell adhesion activity of full-length NELL1 but not of its C-terminal fragments, suggesting that the intramolecular disulfide bonds within this region are not functionally necessary but that other disulfide linkages in the N-terminal region of NELL1 may be involved in cell adhesion activity. By replacing cysteine residues with serines around the coiled-coil domain of NELL1, which is responsible for oligomerization, we created a mutant NELL1 protein that was unable to form homo-oligomers, and this monomeric mutant showed substantially lower cell adhesion activity than intact NELL1. These results suggest that an oligomerization-induced conformational change in the C-terminal region of NELL1 is important for the efficient mediation of cell adhesion and spreading by NELL1.

  7. Oligomerization-induced Conformational Change in the C-terminal Region of Nel-like Molecule 1 (NELL1) Protein Is Necessary for the Efficient Mediation of Murine MC3T3-E1 Cell Adhesion and Spreading*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoko; Hasebe, Ai; Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ting, Kang; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    NELL1 is a large oligomeric secretory glycoprotein that functions as an osteoinductive factor. NELL1 contains several conserved domains, has structural similarities to thrombospondin 1, and supports osteoblastic cell adhesion through integrins. To define the structural requirements for NELL1-mediated cell adhesion, we prepared a series of recombinant NELL1 proteins (intact, deleted, and cysteine-mutant) from a mammalian expression system and tested their activities. A deletion analysis demonstrated that the C-terminal cysteine-rich region of NELL1 is critical for the cell adhesion activity of NELL1. Reducing agent treatment decreased the cell adhesion activity of full-length NELL1 but not of its C-terminal fragments, suggesting that the intramolecular disulfide bonds within this region are not functionally necessary but that other disulfide linkages in the N-terminal region of NELL1 may be involved in cell adhesion activity. By replacing cysteine residues with serines around the coiled-coil domain of NELL1, which is responsible for oligomerization, we created a mutant NELL1 protein that was unable to form homo-oligomers, and this monomeric mutant showed substantially lower cell adhesion activity than intact NELL1. These results suggest that an oligomerization-induced conformational change in the C-terminal region of NELL1 is important for the efficient mediation of cell adhesion and spreading by NELL1. PMID:24563467

  8. Crystal structures, metal activation, and DNA-binding properties of two-domain IdeR from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Chou, C James; Wu, Meiting; Roach, Claudia; Rice, Adrian E; Holmes, Randall K; Beeson, Craig; Hol, Wim G J

    2007-01-16

    The iron-dependent regulator IdeR is a key transcriptional regulator of iron uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In order to increase our insight into the role of the SH3-like third domain of this essential regulator, the metal-binding and DNA-binding properties of two-domain IdeR (2D-IdeR) whose SH3-like domain has been truncated were characterized. The equilibrium dissociation constants for Co2+ and Ni2+ activation of 2D-IdeR for binding to the fxbA operator and the DNA-binding affinities of 2D-IdeR in the presence of excess metal ions were estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy. 2D-IdeR binds to fxbA operator DNA with similar affinity as full-length IdeR in the presence of excess metal ion. However, the Ni2+ concentrations required to activate 2D-IdeR for DNA binding appear to be smaller than that for full-length IdeR while the concentration of Co2+ required for activation remains the same. We have determined the crystal structures of Ni2+-activated 2D-IdeR at 1.96 A resolution and its double dimer complex with the mbtA-mbtB operator DNA in two crystal forms at 2.4 A and 2.6 A, the highest resolutions for DNA complexes for any structures of iron-dependent regulator family members so far. The 2D-IdeR-DNA complex structures confirm the specificity of Ser37 and Pro39 for thymine bases and suggest preferential contacts of Gln43 to cytosine bases of the DNA. In addition, our 2D-IdeR structures reveal a remarkable property of the TEV cleavage sequence remaining after removal of the C-terminal His6. This C-terminal tail promotes crystal contacts by forming a beta-sheet with the corresponding tail of neighboring subunits in two unrelated structures of 2D-IdeR, one with and one without DNA. The contact-promoting properties of this C-terminal TEV cleavage sequence may be beneficial for crystallizing other proteins.

  9. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  10. Characterization of two novel bacterial type A exo-chitobiose hydrolases having C-terminal 5/12-type carbohydrate-binding modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binti Jamek, Shariza; Nyffenegger, Christian; Muschiol, Jan

    2017-01-01

    "exo-chitobiose hydrolases." In this study, the chitinase type A from Serratia marcescens (SmaChiA) was used as a template for identifying two novel exo-chitobiose hydrolase type A enzymes, FbalChi18A and MvarChi18A, originating from the marine organisms Ferrimonas balearica and Microbulbifer....../α barrel domain of each of the new enzymes showed individual differences, but ~69% identity of each to that of SmaChiA and highly conserved active site residues. Superposition of a model substrate on 3D structural models of the catalytic domain of the enzymes corroborated exo-chitobiose hydrolase type...... A activity for FbalChi18A and MvarChi18A, i.e., substrate attack from the reducing end. A main feature of both of the new enzymes was the presence of C-terminal 5/12 type carbohydrate-binding modules (SmaChiA has no C-terminal carbohydrate binding module). These new enzymes may be useful tools...

  11. Phase transitions and domain structures in multiferroics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Eftihia

    2011-12-01

    Thin film ferroelectrics and multiferroics are two important classes of materials interesting both from a scientific and a technological prospective. The volatility of lead and bismuth as well as environmental issues regarding the toxicity of lead are two disadvantages of the most commonly used ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) materials such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and SrBi2Ta2O9. Therefore lead-free thin film ferroelectrics are promising substitutes as long as (a) they can be grown on technologically important substrates such as silicon, and (b) their T c and Pr become comparable to that of well established ferroelectrics. On the other hand, the development of functional room temperature ferroelectric ferromagnetic multiferroics could lead to very interesting phenomena such as control of magnetism with electric fields and control of electrical polarization with magnetic fields. This thesis focuses on the understanding of material structure-property relations using nonlinear optical spectroscopy. Nonlinear spectroscopy is an excellent tool for probing the onset of ferroelectricity, and domain dynamics in strained ferroelectrics and multiferroics. Second harmonic generation was used to detect ferroelectricity and the antiferrodistortive phase transition in thin film SrTiO3. Incipient ferroelectric CaTiO3 has been shown to become ferroelectric when strained with a combination of SHG and dielectric measurements. The tensorial nature of the induced nonlinear polarization allows for probing of the BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 polarization contributions in nanoscale BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices. In addition, nonlinear optics was used to demonstrate ferroelectricity in multiferroic EuTiO3. Finally, confocal SHG and Raman microscopy were utilized to visualize polar domains in incipient ferroelectric and ferroelastic CaTiO3.

  12. Structure and Specificity of a Binary Tandem Domain F-Lectin from Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchet, M.; Odom, E; Vasta, J; Amzel, M

    2010-01-01

    The plasma of the striped bass Morone saxatilis contains a fucose-specific lectin (MsaFBP32) that consists of two F-type carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in tandem. The crystal structure of the complex of MsaFBP32 with l-fucose reported here shows a cylindrical 81-A-long and 60-A-wide trimer divided into two globular halves: one containing N-terminal CRDs (N-CRDs) and the other containing C-terminal CRDs (C-CRDs). The resulting binding surfaces at the opposite ends of the cylindrical trimer have the potential to cross-link cell surface or humoral carbohydrate ligands. The N-CRDs and C-CRDs of MsaFBP32 exhibit significant structural differences, suggesting that they recognize different glycans. Analysis of the carbohydrate binding sites provides the structural basis for the observed specificity of MsaFBP32 for simple carbohydrates and suggests that the N-CRD recognizes more complex fucosylated oligosaccharides and with a relatively higher avidity than the C-CRD. Modeling of MsaFBP32 complexed with fucosylated glycans that are widely distributed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes rationalizes the observation that binary tandem CRD F-type lectins function as opsonins by cross-linking 'non-self' carbohydrate ligands and 'self' carbohydrate ligands, such as sugar structures displayed by microbial pathogens and glycans on the surface of phagocytic cells from the host.

  13. Post-translational modifications of the intrinsically disordered terminal domains of histone H1: effects on secondary structure and chromatin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, A; Ponte, I; Suau, P

    2017-02-01

    H1 linker histones are involved both in the maintenance of chromatin higher-order structure and in gene regulation. H1 binds to linker DNA regions on the surface of the nucleosome. In higher eukaryotes, H1 contains three distinct domains: a short N-terminal domain (NTD), a central globular domain, and a long C-terminal domain (CTD). Terminal domains determine subtype specificity and to a large extent the linker DNA binding and chromatin condensing properties of histone H1. This review is focused on the recent numerous studies that have provided insights in the role of H1 terminal domains in chromatin dynamics. The N- and C-terminal domains behave as intrinsically disordered proteins with coupled binding and folding. We examine the potential kinetic advantages of intrinsic disorder in the recognition of the specific H1 binding sites in chromatin. As typical intrinsically disordered regions, H1 terminal domains are post-translationally modified. Post-translational modifications in the NTD determine the interaction of histone H1 with other proteins involved in heterochromatin formation and transcriptional regulation, while phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinases modulates the secondary structure of the CTD and chromatin condensation. We review the arguments in favor of the involvement of H1 hyperphosphorylation in metaphase chromatin condensation and of partial phosphorylation in interphase chromatin relaxation. In addition, the interplay of histone H1 and other chromatin architectural proteins, such as proteins of the high-mobility group, protamines, and MeCP2, is associated with changes in chromatin structure.

  14. Domain wall structure of weak ferromagnets according to Raman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenko, A.P., E-mail: apk3527@mail.ru [South-West State University (Russian Federation); Abakumov, P.V. [South-West State University (Russian Federation); Dobromyslov, M.B. [Pacific State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    Visualizing the domain structure and the fine structure of domain walls in orthoferrites based on Raman was proposed. The Raman mapping imaging was obtained for the straight and curved domain wall at line 221 cm{sup -1}. The parameters of the domain structure and wall obtained by Raman are consistent with magnetooptical measurements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Visualizing the fine structure of domain walls in YFeO{sub 3} by Raman was proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One was obtained for the straight and curved domain wall at line 221 cm{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The parameters of the domain structure and wall obtained are in accordance with other measurements.

  15. Discovering Structure in the Moral Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Chakroff, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    Early moral psychologists identified the moral domain with a class of actions that negatively impacted the wellbeing of others or violated their rights. However, anthropological work suggested that this view failed to capture the full extent of the moral domain, which can include victimless actions (e.g., food taboos), especially among socially conservative or non-Western individuals. Which kinds of acts are included in the moral domain? Along which dimensions do the acts differ from one anot...

  16. Low resolution solution structure of HAMLET and the importance of its alpha-domains in tumoricidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C S James; Rydstrom, Anna; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is the first member in a new family of protein-lipid complexes with broad tumoricidal activity. Elucidating the molecular structure and the domains crucial for HAMLET formation is fundamental for understanding its tumoricidal function. Here we present the low-resolution solution structure of the complex of oleic acid bound HAMLET, derived from small angle X-ray scattering data. HAMLET shows a two-domain conformation with a large globular domain and an extended part of about 2.22 nm in length and 1.29 nm width. The structure has been superimposed into the related crystallographic structure of human α-lactalbumin, revealing that the major part of α-lactalbumin accommodates well in the shape of HAMLET. However, the C-terminal residues from L105 to L123 of the crystal structure of the human α-lactalbumin do not fit well into the HAMLET structure, resulting in an extended conformation in HAMLET, proposed to be required to form the tumoricidal active HAMLET complex with oleic acid. Consistent with this low resolution structure, we identified biologically active peptide epitopes in the globular as well as the extended domains of HAMLET. Peptides covering the alpha1 and alpha2 domains of the protein triggered rapid ion fluxes in the presence of sodium oleate and were internalized by tumor cells, causing rapid and sustained changes in cell morphology. The alpha peptide-oleate bound forms also triggered tumor cell death with comparable efficiency as HAMLET. In addition, shorter peptides corresponding to those domains are biologically active. These findings provide novel insights into the structural prerequisites for the dramatic effects of HAMLET on tumor cells.

  17. Modular toxin from the lynx spider Oxyopes takobius: Structure of spiderine domains in solution and membrane-mimicking environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadezhdin, Kirill D; Romanovskaia, Daria D; Sachkova, Maria Y; Oparin, Peter B; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Grishin, Eugene V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2017-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a common phenomenon in evolution of spider venom composition is the emergence of so-called modular toxins consisting of two domains, each corresponding to a "usual" single-domain toxin. In this article, we describe the structure of two domains that build up a modular toxin named spiderine or OtTx1a from the venom of Oxyopes takobius. Both domains were investigated by solution NMR in water and detergent micelles used to mimic membrane environment. The N-terminal spiderine domain OtTx1a-AMP (41 amino acid residues) contains no cysteines. It is disordered in aqueous solution but in micelles, it assumes a stable amphiphilic structure consisting of two α-helices separated by a flexible linker. On the contrary, the C-terminal domain OtTx1a-ICK (59 residues) is a disulfide-rich polypeptide reticulated by five S-S bridges. It presents a stable structure in water and its core is the inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) or knottin motif that is common among single-domain neurotoxins. OtTx1a-ICK structure is the first knottin with five disulfide bridges and it represents a good reference for the whole oxytoxin family. The affinity of both domains to membranes was measured with NMR using titration by liposome suspensions. In agreement with biological tests, OtTx1a-AMP was found to show high membrane affinity explaining its potent antimicrobial properties. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  18. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape.

  19. C-terminal moiety of Tudor contains its in vivo activity in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Anne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In early Drosophila embryos, the germ plasm is localized to the posterior pole region and is partitioned into the germline progenitors, known as pole cells. Germ plasm, or pole plasm, contains the polar granules which form during oogenesis and are required for germline development. Components of these granules are also present in the perinuclear region of the nurse cells, the nuage. One such component is Tudor (Tud which is a large protein containing multiple Tudor domains. It was previously reported that specific Tudor domains are required for germ cell formation and Tud localization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to better understand the function of Tud the distribution and functional activity of fragments of Tud were analyzed. These fragments were fused to GFP and the fusion proteins were synthesized during oogenesis. Non-overlapping fragments of Tud were found to be able to localize to both the nuage and pole plasm. By introducing these fragments into a tud mutant background and testing their ability to rescue the tud phenotype, I determined that the C-terminal moiety contains the functional activity of Tud. Dividing this fragment into two parts reduces its localization in pole plasm and abolishes its activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: I conclude that the C-terminal moiety of Tud contains all the information necessary for its localization in the nuage and pole plasm and its pole cell-forming activity. The present results challenge published data and may help refining the functional features of Tud.

  20. A Nonoligomerizing Mutant Form of Helicobacter pylori VacA Allows Structural Analysis of the p33 Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rivera, Christian; Campbell, Anne M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Pyburn, Tasia M; Foegeding, Nora J; Barke, Theresa L; Spiller, Benjamin W; McClain, Mark S; Ohi, Melanie D; Lacy, D Borden; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori secretes a pore-forming VacA toxin that has structural features and activities substantially different from those of other known bacterial toxins. VacA can assemble into multiple types of water-soluble flower-shaped oligomeric structures, and most VacA activities are dependent on its capacity to oligomerize. The 88-kDa secreted VacA protein can undergo limited proteolysis to yield two domains, designated p33 and p55. The p33 domain is required for membrane channel formation and intracellular toxic activities, and the p55 domain has an important role in mediating VacA binding to cells. Previous studies showed that the p55 domain has a predominantly β-helical structure, but no structural data are available for the p33 domain. We report here the purification and analysis of a nonoligomerizing mutant form of VacA secreted by H. pylori The nonoligomerizing 88-kDa mutant protein retains the capacity to enter host cells but lacks detectable toxic activity. Analysis of crystals formed by the monomeric protein reveals that the β-helical structure of the p55 domain extends into the C-terminal portion of p33. Fitting the p88 structural model into an electron microscopy map of hexamers formed by wild-type VacA (predicted to be structurally similar to VacA membrane channels) reveals that p55 and the β-helical segment of p33 localize to peripheral arms but do not occupy the central region of the hexamers. We propose that the amino-terminal portion of p33 is unstructured when VacA is in a monomeric form and that it undergoes a conformational change during oligomer assembly. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Structural organization of the regulatory domain of human 5-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, John B; Brock, Thomas G

    2005-04-01

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) initiates the synthesis of leukotrienes. For this reason, 5-LO activity is important for immune defense, whereas improper regulation contributes to pathogenesis, including chronic inflammation, asthma and atherosclerosis. Like all lipoxygenases, the 5-LO protein consists of two domains, a regulatory domain and a catalytic domain. Naturally, the regulatory domain determines catalytic activity and controls leukotriene synthesis. This domain shares features with classical C2 domains in that it has a beta-sandwich structure and binds calcium, nucleotides and phospholipids. However, important structural features place this domain in a distinct family, the PLATs (for Polycystin-1, Lipoxygenase, alpha-Toxin). In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the three dimensional organization of this important component of the 5-LO molecule. In addition, we point to findings from structural analyses of related proteins to suggest further details relating 5-LO structure to function.

  2. Domain analysis of 3 Keto Acyl-CoA synthase for structural variations in Vitis vinifera and Oryza brachyantha using comparative modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Mamta; Pandey, Neetesh; Qamar, Naseha; Singh, Brijendra; Shukla, Akanksha

    2015-03-01

    The long chain fatty acids incorporated into plant lipids are derived from the iterative addition of C2 units which is provided by malonyl-CoA to an acyl-CoA after interactions with 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), found in several plants. This study provides functional characterization of three 3 ketoacyl CoA synthase like proteins in Vitis vinifera (one) and Oryza brachyantha (two proteins). Sequence analysis reveals that protein of Oryza brachyantha shows 96% similarity to a hypothetical protein in Sorghum bicolor; total 11 homologs were predicted in Sorghum bicolor. Conserved domain prediction confirm the presence of FAE1/Type III polyketide synthase-like protein, Thiolase-like, subgroup; Thiolase-like and 3-Oxoacyl-ACP synthase III, C-terminal and chalcone synthase like domain but very long chain 3-keto acyl CoA domain is absent. All three proteins were found to have Chalcone and stilbene synthases C terminal domain which is similar to domain of thiolase and β keto acyl synthase. Its N terminal domain is absent in J3M9Z7 protein of Oryza brachyantha and F6HH63 protein of Vitis vinifera. Differences in N-terminal domain is responsible for distinguish activity. The J3MF16 protein of Oryza brachyantha contains N terminal domain and C terminal domain and characterized using annotation of these domains. Domains Gcs (streptomyces coelicolor) and Chalcone-stilbene synthases (KAS) in 2-pyrone synthase (Gerbera hybrid) and chalcone synthase 2 (Medicago sativa) were found to be present in three proteins. This similarity points toward anthocyanin biosynthetic process. Similarity to chalcone synthase 2 reveals its possible role in Naringenine and Chalcone synthase like activity. In 3 keto acyl CoA synthase of Oryza brachyantha. Active site residues C-240, H-407, N-447 are present in J3MF16 protein that are common in these three protein at different positions. Structural variations among dimer interface, product binding site, malonyl-CoA binding sites, were predicted in

  3. Effect of domains configuration on crystal structure in ferroelectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-09

    Sep 9, 2017 ... structure in ferroelectric ceramics. Keywords. Electronic ceramics; ferroelectricity; piezoelectricity. 1. Introduction. It is well known that ferroelectric domains and crystal structure control the physical properties of ferroelectrics. [1–5]. Therefore, intensive studies have focused on domain structures and the ...

  4. Structural transitions in conserved, ordered Beclin 1 domains essential to regulating autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, Karen; Li, Yue; Mukhopadhyay, Shreya; Leuthner, Zoe; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Colbert, Christopher L.; Sinha, Sangita C. (NDSU); (IIT)

    2017-08-10

    Beclin 1 (BECN1) is a key regulator of autophagy, a critical catabolic homeostasis pathway that involves sequestration of selected cytoplasmic components by multilayered vesicles called autophagosomes, followed by lysosomal fusion and degradation. BECN1 is a core component of class III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase complexes responsible for autophagosome nucleation. Without heterologous binding partners, BECN1 forms an antiparallel homodimer via its coiled-coil domain (CCD). However, the last 16 CCD residues, composing an “overlap helix” (OH), have been crystallized in two mutually exclusive states: either as part of the CCD or packed against the C-terminal β-α repeated, autophagy-specific domain (BARAD). Here, using CD spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and small-angle X-ray scattering, we show that in the homodimeric state, the OH transitions between these two different packing states, with the predominant state comprising the OH packed against the BARAD, contrary to expectations based on known BECN1 interactions with heterologous partners. We confirmed this observation by comparing the impact of mutating four residues that mediate packing of the OH against both the CCD and BARAD on structure and stability of the CCD, the OH+BARAD, and the two-domain CCD–BARAD. Last, we used cellular assays to demonstrate that mutation of these OH-interface residues abrogates starvation-induced up-regulation of autophagy but does not affect basal autophagy. In summary, we have identified a BECN1 helical region that transitions between packing as part of either one of two conserved domains (i.e. the CCD or the BARAD). Our findings have important implications for the relative stability of autophagy-inactive and autophagy-active BECN1 complexes.

  5. Solution structure of leptospiral LigA4 Big domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Song; Zhang, Jiahai [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Xuecheng [School of Life Sciences, Anhui University, Hefei, Anhui 230039 (China); Tu, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmtu@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-11-13

    Pathogenic Leptospiraspecies express immunoglobulin-like proteins which serve as adhesins to bind to the extracellular matrices of host cells. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein A (LigA), a surface exposed protein containing tandem repeats of bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, has been proved to be involved in the interaction of pathogenic Leptospira with mammalian host. In this study, the solution structure of the fourth Big domain of LigA (LigA4 Big domain) from Leptospira interrogans was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The structure of LigA4 Big domain displays a similar bacterial immunoglobulin-like fold compared with other Big domains, implying some common structural aspects of Big domain family. On the other hand, it displays some structural characteristics significantly different from classic Ig-like domain. Furthermore, Stains-all assay and NMR chemical shift perturbation revealed the Ca{sup 2+} binding property of LigA4 Big domain. - Highlights: • Determining the solution structure of a bacterial immunoglobulin-like domain from a surface protein of Leptospira. • The solution structure shows some structural characteristics significantly different from the classic Ig-like domains. • A potential Ca{sup 2+}-binding site was identified by strains-all and NMR chemical shift perturbation.

  6. Molecular Details of Olfactomedin Domains Provide Pathway to Structure-Function Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon E Hill

    Full Text Available Olfactomedin (OLF domains are found within extracellular, multidomain proteins in numerous tissues of multicellular organisms. Even though these proteins have been implicated in human disorders ranging from cancers to attention deficit disorder to glaucoma, little is known about their structure(s and function(s. Here we biophysically, biochemically, and structurally characterize OLF domains from H. sapiens olfactomedin-1 (npoh-OLF, also called noelin, pancortin, OLFM1, and hOlfA, and M. musculus gliomedin (glio-OLF, also called collomin, collmin, and CRG-L2, and compare them with available structures of myocilin (myoc-OLF recently reported by us and R. norvegicus glio-OLF and M. musculus latrophilin-3 (lat3-OLF by others. Although the five-bladed β-propeller architecture remains unchanged, numerous physicochemical characteristics differ among these OLF domains. First, npoh-OLF and glio-OLF exhibit prominent, yet distinct, positive surface charges and copurify with polynucleotides. Second, whereas npoh-OLF and myoc-OLF exhibit thermal stabilities typical of human proteins near 55°C, and most myoc-OLF variants are destabilized and highly prone to aggregation, glio-OLF is nearly 20°C more stable and significantly more resistant to chemical denaturation. Phylogenetically, glio-OLF is most similar to primitive OLFs, and structurally, glio-OLF is missing distinguishing features seen in OLFs such as the disulfide bond formed by N- and C- terminal cysteines, the sequestered Ca2+ ion within the propeller central hydrophilic cavity, and a key loop-stabilizing cation-π interaction on the top face of npoh-OLF and myoc-OLF. While deciphering the explicit biological functions, ligands, and binding partners for OLF domains will likely continue to be a challenging long-term experimental pursuit, we used structural insights gained here to generate a new antibody selective for myoc-OLF over npoh-OLF and glio-OLF as a first step in overcoming the impasse in

  7. Novel structural features in two ZHX homeodomains derived from a systematic study of single and multiple domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owens Raymond J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zhx1 to 3 (zinc-fingers and homeoboxes form a set of paralogous genes encoding multi-domain proteins. ZHX proteins consist of two zinc fingers followed by five homeodomains. ZHXs have biological roles in cell cycle control by acting as co-repressors of the transcriptional regulator Nuclear Factor Y. As part of a structural genomics project we have expressed single and multi-domain fragments of the different human ZHX genes for use in structure determination. Results A total of 30 single and multiple domain ZHX1-3 constructs selected from bioinformatics protocols were screened for soluble expression in E. coli using high throughput methodologies. Two homeodomains were crystallized leading to structures for ZHX1 HD4 and ZHX2 HD2. ZHX1 HD4, although closest matched to homeodomains from 'homez' and 'engrailed', showed structural differences, notably an additional C-terminal helix (helix V which wrapped over helix I thereby making extensive contacts. Although ZHX2 HD2-3 was successfully expressed and purified, proteolysis occurred during crystallization yielding crystals of just HD2. The structure of ZHX2 HD2 showed an unusual open conformation with helix I undergoing 'domain-swapping' to form a homodimer. Conclusions Although multiple-domain constructs of ZHX1 selected by bioinformatics studies could be expressed solubly, only single homeodomains yielded crystals. The crystal structure of ZHX1 HD4 showed additional hydrophobic interactions relative to many known homeodomains via extensive contacts formed by the novel C-terminal helix V with, in particular, helix I. Additionally, the replacement of some charged covariant residues (which are commonly observed to form salt bridges in non-homeotherms such as the Drosophila 'engrailed' homeodomain, by apolar residues further increases hydrophobic contacts within ZHX1 HD4, and potentially stability, relative to engrailed homeodomain. ZHX1 HD4 helix V points away from the normally

  8. The Structure of Treponema pallidum Tp0624 Reveals a Modular Assembly of Divergently Functionalized and Previously Uncharacterized Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michelle L; Houston, Simon; Wetherell, Charmaine; Cameron, Caroline E; Boulanger, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, multistage, systemic infection that remains a major global health concern. The molecular mechanisms underlying T. pallidum pathogenesis are incompletely understood, partially due to the phylogenetic divergence of T. pallidum. One aspect of T. pallidum that differentiates it from conventional Gram-negative bacteria, and is believed to play an important role in pathogenesis, is its unusual cell envelope ultrastructure; in particular, the T. pallidum peptidoglycan layer is chemically distinct, thinner and more distal to the outer membrane. Established functional roles for peptidoglycan include contributing to the structural integrity of the cell envelope and stabilization of the flagellar motor complex, which are typically mediated by the OmpA domain-containing family of proteins. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that govern peptidoglycan binding and cell envelope biogenesis in T. pallidum we report here the structural characterization of the putative OmpA-like domain-containing protein, Tp0624. Analysis of the 1.70 Å resolution Tp0624 crystal structure reveals a multi-modular architecture comprised of three distinct domains including a C-terminal divergent OmpA-like domain, which we show is unable to bind the conventional peptidoglycan component diaminopimelic acid, and a previously uncharacterized tandem domain unit. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analysis indicates that the three domains together are found in all orthologs from pathogenic treponemes, but are not observed together in genera outside Treponema. These findings provide the first structural insight into a multi-modular treponemal protein containing an OmpA-like domain and its potential role in peptidoglycan coordination and stabilization of the T. pallidum cell envelope.

  9. The Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli Group 4 Capsule Protein GfcC Reveals a Domain Organization Resembling That of Wza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Mills, Erez; Franzmann, Titus M.; Rosenshine, Ilan; Saper, Mark A. (Michigan); (Hebrew)

    2012-03-15

    We report the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli GfcC, a periplasmic protein encoded by the gfc operon, which is essential for assembly of group 4 polysaccharide capsule (O-antigen capsule). Presumed gene orthologs of gfcC are present in capsule-encoding regions of at least 29 genera of Gram-negative bacteria. GfcC, a member of the DUF1017 family, is comprised of tandem {beta}-grasp (ubiquitin-like) domains (D2 and D3) and a carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix, a domain arrangement reminiscent of that of Wza that forms an exit pore for group 1 capsule export. Unlike the membrane-spanning C-terminal helix from Wza, the GfcC C-terminal helix packs against D3. Previously unobserved in a {beta}-grasp domain structure is a 48-residue helical hairpin insert in D2 that binds to D3, constraining its position and sequestering the carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix. A centrally located and invariant Arg115 not only is essential for proper localization but also forms one of two mostly conserved pockets. Finally, we draw analogies between a GfcC protein fused to an outer membrane {beta}-barrel pore in some species and fusion proteins necessary for secreting biofilm-forming exopolysaccharides.

  10. One-step refolding and purification of disulfide-containing proteins with a C-terminal MESNA thioester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkx Maarten

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression systems based on self-cleavable intein domains allow the generation of recombinant proteins with a C-terminal thioester. This uniquely reactive C-terminus can be used in native chemical ligation reactions to introduce synthetic groups or to immobilize proteins on surfaces and nanoparticles. Unfortunately, common refolding procedures for recombinant proteins that contain disulfide bonds do not preserve the thioester functionality and therefore novel refolding procedures need to be developed. Results A novel redox buffer consisting of MESNA and diMESNA showed a refolding efficiency comparable to that of GSH/GSSG and prevented loss of the protein's thioester functionality. Moreover, introduction of the MESNA/diMESNA redox couple in the cleavage buffer allowed simultaneous on-column refolding of Ribonuclease A and intein-mediated cleavage to yield Ribonuclease A with a C-terminal MESNA-thioester. The C-terminal thioester was shown to be active in native chemical ligation. Conclusion An efficient method was developed for the production of disulfide bond containing proteins with C-terminal thioesters. Introduction of a MESNA/diMESNA redox couple resulted in simultaneous on-column refolding, purification and thioester generation of the model protein Ribonuclease A.

  11. Structure of Human Synaptotagmin 1 C2AB in the Absence of Ca**2+ Reveals a Novel Domain Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuson, K.L.; Montes, M.; Robert, J.J.; Sutton, R.B.

    2009-06-01

    Release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles requires the Ca{sup 2+}/phospholipid-binding protein synaptotagmin 1. There is considerable evidence that cooperation between the tandem C2 domains of synaptotagmin is a requirement of regulated exocytosis; however, high-resolution structural evidence for this interaction has been lacking. The 2.7 A crystal structure of the cytosolic domains of human synaptotagmin 1 in the absence of Ca{sup 2+} reveals a novel closed conformation of the protein. The shared interface between C2A and C2B is stabilized by a network of interactions between residues on the C-terminal alpha-helix of the C2B domain and residues on loops 1-3 of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding region of C2A. These interactions alter the overall shape of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding pocket of C2A, but not that of C2B. Thus, synaptotagmin 1 C2A-C2B may utilize a novel regulatory mechanism whereby one C2 domain could regulate the other until an appropriate triggering event decouples them.

  12. Reuse of structural domain–domain interactions in protein networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster-Böckler, Benjamin; Bateman, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein interactions are thought to be largely mediated by interactions between structural domains. Databases such as iPfam relate interactions in protein structures to known domain families. Here, we investigate how the domain interactions from the iPfam database are distributed in protein interactions taken from the HPRD, MPact, BioGRID, DIP and IntAct databases. Results We find that known structural domain interactions can only explain a subset of 4–19% of the available protein interactions, nevertheless this fraction is still significantly bigger than expected by chance. There is a correlation between the frequency of a domain interaction and the connectivity of the proteins it occurs in. Furthermore, a large proportion of protein interactions can be attributed to a small number of domain interactions. We conclude that many, but not all, domain interactions constitute reusable modules of molecular recognition. A substantial proportion of domain interactions are conserved between E. coli, S. cerevisiae and H. sapiens. These domains are related to essential cellular functions, suggesting that many domain interactions were already present in the last universal common ancestor. Conclusion Our results support the concept of domain interactions as reusable, conserved building blocks of protein interactions, but also highlight the limitations currently imposed by the small number of available protein structures. PMID:17640363

  13. Crystal structure and DNA-binding property of the ATPase domain of bacterial mismatch repair endonuclease MutL from Aquifex aeolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kenji; Iino, Hitoshi; Baba, Seiki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yano, Takato

    2017-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system corrects mismatched bases that are generated mainly by DNA replication errors. The repair system excises the error-containing single-stranded region and enables the re-synthesis of the strand. In the early reactions of MMR, MutL endonuclease incises the newly-synthesized/error-containing strand of the duplex to initiate the downstream excision reaction. MutL endonuclease consists of the N-terminal ATPase and C-terminal endonuclease domains. In this study, we report the crystal structure of the ATPase domain of MutL endonuclease from Aquifex aeolicus. The overall structure of the domain was similar to those of human MutL homologs and Escherichia coli MutL, although E. coli MutL has no endonuclease activity. The ATPase domain was comprised of two subdomains: the N-terminal ATP-binding subdomain and the C-terminal α-β sandwich subdomain. Site-directed mutagenesis experiment identified DNA-interacting eight basic amino acid residues, which were distributed across both the two subdomains and formed a DNA-binding cleft. Docking simulation between the structures of the ATPase and endonuclease domains generated a reliable model structure for the full-length A. aeolicus MutL, which satisfies our previous result of small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. On the basis of the model structure and further experimental results, we concluded that the two separate DNA-binding sites in the full-length A. aeolicus MutL simultaneously bind a dsDNA molecule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Epimerization-free C-terminal peptide activation, elongation and cyclization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popović, S.

    2015-01-01

    C-terminal peptide activation and cyclization reactions are generally accompanied with epimerization (partial loss of C‐terminal stereointegrity). Therefore, the focus of this thesis was to develop epimerization-free methods for C-terminal peptide activation to enable C-terminal peptide elongation

  15. The spt5 C-terminal region recruits yeast 3' RNA cleavage factor I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Andreas; Schreieck, Amelie; Lidschreiber, Michael; Leike, Kristin; Martin, Dietmar E; Cramer, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    During transcription elongation, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) binds the general elongation factor Spt5. Spt5 contains a repetitive C-terminal region (CTR) that is required for cotranscriptional recruitment of the Paf1 complex (D. L. Lindstrom et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 23:1368-1378, 2003; Z. Zhang, J. Fu, and D. S. Gilmour, Genes Dev. 19:1572-1580, 2005). Here we report a new role of the Spt5 CTR in the recruitment of 3' RNA-processing factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that the Spt5 CTR is required for normal recruitment of pre-mRNA cleavage factor I (CFI) to the 3' ends of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes. RNA contributes to CFI recruitment, as RNase treatment prior to ChIP further decreases CFI ChIP signals. Genome-wide ChIP profiling detected occupancy peaks of CFI subunits around 100 nucleotides downstream of the polyadenylation (pA) sites of genes. CFI recruitment to this defined region may result from simultaneous binding to the Spt5 CTR, to nascent RNA containing the pA sequence, and to the elongating Pol II isoform that is phosphorylated at serine 2 (S2) residues in its C-terminal domain (CTD). Consistent with this model, the CTR interacts with CFI in vitro but is not required for pA site recognition and transcription termination in vivo.

  16. Determination of C-Terminal δ-Catenin Responsible for Inducing Dendritic Morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Bin; He, Yongfeng; Yang, Gyeong-Su; Oh, Jin-A; Ha, Ji-Seon; Song, Oh-Hyuen; Lee, Do-Jin; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Kyung Keun; Kim, Kwonseop; Kim, Hangun

    2015-08-01

    δ-Catenin induces dendritic morphogenesis in several cells and it was reported that deletion of C-terminal 207 amino acid of δ-catenin completely abolished the dendritic morphogenesis. However, exact domain responsible for inducing dendritic morphogenesis in C-terminus of δ-catenin was not mapped. Here, we report that expression of ΔC47 (lacking 47 amino acid of C-terminus: 1-1200), ΔC77 (lacking 77 amino acid of C-terminus: 1-1170) deletion mutants of δ-catenin induced the dendritic morphogenesis of HEK293T and NIH3T3 cells as full-length δ-catenin did. In agreement with previous report, ΔC207 deletion mutant did not show the dendritic morphogenesis of the cells. Interestingly, introducing 107 amino acid deletion of C-terminus (ΔC107 mutant: 1-1140) and 177 amino acid deletion of C-terminus (ΔC177 mutant: 1-1070) showed limited primary and secondary dendritic process and notable spine-like process formation. These results suggest that 1140-1170 amino acid of C-terminal δ-catenin is required for primary and secondary dendrite-like process formation.

  17. Paramembranous densities of 'C' terminal-motoneuron synapses in the spinal cord of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1979-01-01

    A category of large boutons forming synapses with the soma and proximal dendrites of spinal motoneurons was studied in glutaraldehyde-fixed, non-osmicated tissue stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate. The identity of these boutons with 'C' boutons was indicated by their shape, frequency...... and distribution as well as by the ultrastructural characteristics of the boutons and the associated postsynaptic structures. In contrast to previous descriptions based on osmicated tissue, this study demonstrates that paramembranous densities are a feature of 'C' terminal-motoneuron synapses....

  18. Structural specializations of A2, a force-sensing domain in the ultralarge vascular protein von Willebrand factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qing; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Zhang, Xiaohui; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A.; Harvard-Med

    2009-06-30

    The lengths of von Willebrand factor (VWF) concatamers correlate with hemostatic potency. After secretion in plasma, length is regulated by hydrodynamic shear force-dependent unfolding of the A2 domain, which is then cleaved by a specific protease. The 1.9-{angstrom} crystal structure of the A2 domain demonstrates evolutionary adaptations to this shear sensor function. Unique among VWF A (VWA) domains, A2 contains a loop in place of the {alpha}4 helix, and a cis-proline. The central {beta}4-strand is poorly packed, with multiple side-chain rotamers. The Tyr-Met cleavage site is buried in the {beta}4-strand in the central hydrophobic core, and the Tyr structurally links to the C-terminal {alpha}6-helix. The {alpha}6-helix ends in 2 Cys residues that are linked by an unusual vicinal disulfide bond that is buried in a hydrophobic pocket. These features may narrow the force range over which unfolding occurs and may also slow refolding. Von Willebrand disease mutations, which presumably lower the force at which A2 unfolds, are illuminated by the structure.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Frizzled-Like Cysteine-Rich Domain of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiegler, A.; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2009-01-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is an essential receptor tyrosine kinase for the establishment and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Activation of MuSK by agrin, a neuronally derived heparan-sulfate proteoglycan, and LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4), the agrin receptor, leads to clustering of acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic side of the NMJ. The ectodomain of MuSK comprises three immunoglobulin-like domains and a cysteine-rich domain (Fz-CRD) related to those in Frizzled proteins, the receptors for Wnts. Here, we report the crystal structure of the MuSK Fz-CRD at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals a five-disulfide-bridged domain similar to CRDs of Frizzled proteins but with a divergent C-terminal region. An asymmetric dimer present in the crystal structure implicates surface hydrophobic residues that may function in homotypic or heterotypic interactions to mediate co-clustering of MuSK, rapsyn, and acetylcholine receptors at the NMJ.

  20. A mixed domain structure in magnetic films with large anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, M. L.; Polyakov, P. A.; Rusakova, N. E.

    2018-01-01

    Influence of anisotropy on a bending of a magnetic stripe domain wall due to a magnetostatic stray field of a cylindrical magnetic domain (CMD) that is located within the stripe one is under investigation. It is revealed that for a specific set of physical parameters of the domain structure, energy of domain wall bending anisotropy can suppress the bending. An analytical expression for the bending shape is obtained on account of a change of both magnetostatic energy of the configuration and energy of anisotropy of the domain wall.

  1. X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of plasmid encoded toxin(Pet), an autotransporter enterotoxin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo Meza-Aguilar, J. [Departamento de Salud Pública Facultad de Medicina UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Laboratorio de Patogenicidad Bacteriana, Unidad de Hemato Oncología e Investigación, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez 06720, D.F. (Mexico); Fromme, Petra [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Physical Sciences BLDG D-102, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Torres-Larios, Alfredo [Instituto de Fisiología Celular UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo [Instituto de Química UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F (Mexico); Hernandez-Chiñas, Ulises [Departamento de Salud Pública Facultad de Medicina UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Laboratorio de Patogenicidad Bacteriana, Unidad de Hemato Oncología e Investigación, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez 06720, D.F. (Mexico); Arreguin-Espinosa de los Monteros, Roberto A. [Instituto de Química UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F (Mexico); and others

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of Plasmid encoded toxin at 2.3 Å. • Structural differences between Pet passenger domain and EspP protein are described. • High flexibility of the C-terminal beta helix is structurally assigned. - Abstract: Autotransporters (ATs) represent a superfamily of proteins produced by a variety of pathogenic bacteria, which include the pathogenic groups of Escherichia coli (E. coli) associated with gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections. We present the first X-ray structure of the passenger domain from the Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) a 100 kDa protein at 2.3 Å resolution which is a cause of acute diarrhea in both developing and industrialized countries. Pet is a cytoskeleton-altering toxin that induces loss of actin stress fibers. While Pet (pdb code: 4OM9) shows only a sequence identity of 50% compared to the closest related protein sequence, extracellular serine protease plasmid (EspP) the structural features of both proteins are conserved. A closer structural look reveals that Pet contains a β-pleaded sheet at the sequence region of residues 181–190, the corresponding structural domain in EspP consists of a coiled loop. Secondary, the Pet passenger domain features a more pronounced beta sheet between residues 135 and 143 compared to the structure of EspP.

  2. Structural properties of PAS domains from the KCNH potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaixo, Ricardo; Harley, Carol A; Castro-Rodrigues, Artur F; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2013-01-01

    KCNH channels form an important family of voltage gated potassium channels. These channels include a N-terminal Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain with unknown function. In other proteins PAS domains are implicated in cellular responses to environmental queues through small molecule binding or involvement in signaling cascades. To better understand their role we characterized the structural properties of several channel PAS domains. We determined high resolution structures of PAS domains from the mouse EAG (mEAG), drosophila ELK (dELK) and human ERG (hERG) channels and also of the hERG domain without the first nine amino acids. We analyzed these structures for features connected to ligand binding and signaling in other PAS domains. In particular, we have found cavities in the hERG and mEAG structures that share similarities with the ligand binding sites from other PAS domains. These cavities are lined by polar and apolar chemical groups and display potential flexibility in their volume. We have also found that the hydrophobic patch on the domain β-sheet is a conserved feature and appears to drive the formation of protein-protein contacts. In addition, the structures of the dELK domain and of the truncated hERG domain revealed the presence of N-terminal helices. These helices are equivalent to the helix described in the hERG NMR structures and are known to be important for channel function. Overall, these channel domains retain many of the PAS domain characteristics known to be important for cell signaling.

  3. C-Terminal Truncated α-Synuclein Fibrils Contain Strongly Twisted β-Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Aditya; Roeters, Steven J; Kogan, Vladimir; Woutersen, Sander; Claessens, Mireille M A E; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2017-11-01

    C-terminal truncations of monomeric wild-type alpha-synuclein (henceforth WT-αS) have been shown to enhance the formation of amyloid aggregates both in vivo and in vitro and have been associated with accelerated progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). The correlation with PD may not solely be a result of faster aggregation, but also of which fibril polymorphs are preferentially formed when the C-terminal residues are deleted. Considering that different polymorphs are known to result in distinct pathologies, it is important to understand how these truncations affect the organization of αS into fibrils. Here we present high-resolution microscopy and advanced vibrational spectroscopy studies that indicate that the C-terminal truncation variant of αS, lacking residues 109-140 (henceforth referred to as 1-108-αS), forms amyloid fibrils with a distinct structure and morphology. The 1-108-αS fibrils have a unique negative circular dichroism band at ∼230 nm, a feature that differs from the canonical ∼218 nm band usually observed for amyloid fibrils. We show evidence that 1-108-αS fibrils consist of strongly twisted β-sheets with an increased inter-β-sheet distance and a higher solvent exposure than WT-αS fibrils, which is also indicated by the pronounced differences in the 1D-IR (FTIR), 2D-IR, and vibrational circular dichroism spectra. As a result of their distinct β-sheet structure, 1-108-αS fibrils resist incorporation of WT-αS monomers.

  4. Solution structure of Atg8 reveals conformational polymorphism of the N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarten, Melanie, E-mail: m.schwarten@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Strukturbiologie und Biophysik, ISB-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Biologie und BMFZ, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Stoldt, Matthias, E-mail: m.stoldt@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Strukturbiologie und Biophysik, ISB-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Biologie und BMFZ, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Mohrlueder, Jeannine, E-mail: j.mohrlueder@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Strukturbiologie und Biophysik, ISB-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Willbold, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.willbold@uni-duesseldorf.de [Institut fuer Strukturbiologie und Biophysik, ISB-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Biologie und BMFZ, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-05-07

    During autophagy a crescent shaped like membrane is formed, which engulfs the material that is to be degraded. This membrane grows further until its edges fuse to form the double membrane covered autophagosome. Atg8 is a protein, which is required for this initial step of autophagy. Therefore, a multistage conjugation process of newly synthesized Atg8 to phosphatidylethanolamine is of critical importance. Here we present the high resolution structure of unprocessed Atg8 determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Its C-terminal subdomain shows a well-defined ubiquitin-like fold with slightly elevated mobility in the pico- to nanosecond timescale as determined by heteronuclear NOE data. In comparison to unprocessed Atg8, cleaved Atg8{sup G116} shows a decreased mobility behaviour. The N-terminal domain adopts different conformations within the micro- to millisecond timescale. The possible biological relevance of the differences in dynamic behaviours between both subdomains as well as between the cleaved and uncleaved forms is discussed.

  5. Short consensus repeat domains extend the E-selectin structure in order to grab cells out of flow

    KAUST Repository

    Aleisa, Fajr A

    2017-01-08

    Selectins are key adhesion molecules responsible for initiating a multistep process that leads a cell out of the blood circulation and into a tissue or organ. They are composed of an N-terminal extracellular C-type lectin like domain, followed by an Endothelial Growth Factor like domain (EGF), a defined number of short consensus repeats SCR (also called “sushi” domains), a transmembrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. The adhesion of cells (expressing ligands) to the endothelium (expressing the selection i.e., E-selectin) occurs through the interaction between the lectin domain of selectins and sLeX presenting ligands. Structural/function studies to date have mainly focused on investigating the influence of the lectin domain of E-selectin on its ability to bind its ligands while other domains received less atention. We prepared a number of different recombinant E-selectin proteins with changes in the SCR units. Specifically we generated wild-type E-selectin proteins as monomeric or dimeric structures, mutant proteins with varied numbers of SCRs as well as proteins where strategic residues were mutated to change the conformation of the selectin. Using a novel real time immunoprecipitation surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based in vitro binding study developed in our lab, the interaction of recombinant E-selectin proteins with immunoprecipitated endogenous ligands (i.e. CD44) captured on a CM-5 chip was assessed. These studies provided quantitative binding kinetics with on and off rates of selectin-ligand interactions and suggested that robust binding is dependent on the presence of the SCRs and oligomerization. These results provide significant implications on the functional mechanism of E-selectin binding to its ligands.

  6. Crystal structure of the enzyme CapF of Staphylococcus aureus reveals a unique architecture composed of two functional domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyafusa, Takamitsu; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2012-05-01

    CP (capsular polysaccharide) is an important virulence factor during infections by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. The enzyme CapF is an attractive therapeutic candidate belonging to the biosynthetic route of CP of pathogenic strains of S. aureus. In the present study, we report two independent crystal structures of CapF in an open form of the apoenzyme. CapF is a homodimer displaying a characteristic dumb-bell-shaped architecture composed of two domains. The N-terminal domain (residues 1-252) adopts a Rossmann fold belonging to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family of proteins. The C-terminal domain (residues 252-369) displays a standard cupin fold with a Zn2+ ion bound deep in the binding pocket of the β-barrel. Functional and thermodynamic analyses indicated that each domain catalyses separate enzymatic reactions. The cupin domain is necessary for the C3-epimerization of UDP-4-hexulose. Meanwhile, the N-terminal domain catalyses the NADPH-dependent reduction of the intermediate species generated by the cupin domain. Analysis by ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry) revealed a fascinating thermodynamic switch governing the attachment and release of the coenzyme NADPH during each catalytic cycle. These observations suggested that the binding of coenzyme to CapF facilitates a disorder-to-order transition in the catalytic loop of the reductase (N-terminal) domain. We anticipate that the present study will improve the general understanding of the synthesis of CP in S. aureus and will aid in the design of new therapeutic agents against this pathogenic bacterium.

  7. The C-terminal region Mesd peptide mimics full-length Mesd and acts as an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuihong Lin

    Full Text Available While Mesd was discovered as a specialized molecular endoplasmic reticulum chaperone for the Wnt co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6, recombinant Mesd protein is able to bind to mature LRP5 and LRP6 on the cell surface and acts as a universal antagonist of LRP5/6 modulators. In our previous study, we found that the C-terminal region of Mesd, which is absent in sequences from invertebrates, is necessary and sufficient for binding to mature LRP6 on the cell surface. In the present studies, we further characterized the interaction between the C-terminal region Mesd peptide and LRP5/6. We found that Mesd C-terminal region-derived peptides block Mesd binding to LRP5 at the cell surface too. We also showed that there are two LRP5/6 binding sites within Mesd C-terminal region which contain several positively charged residues. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Mesd C-terminal region peptide, like the full-length Mesd protein, blocked Wnt 3A- and Rspodin1-induced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in LRP5- and LRP6- expressing cells, suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human breast HS578T cells and prostate cancer PC-3 cells, and inhibited cancer cell proliferation, although the full-length Mesd protein is more potent than its peptide. Finally, we found that treatment of the full-length Mesd protein and its C-terminal region peptide significantly increased chemotherapy agent Adriamycin-induced cytotoxicity in HS578T and PC-3 cells. Together, our results suggest that Mesd C-terminal region constitutes the major LRP5/6-binding domain, and that Mesd protein and its C-terminal region peptide have a potential therapeutic value in cancer.

  8. Structural determinants for high-affinity binding in a Nedd4 WW3* domain-Comm PY motif complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanelis, Voula; Bruce, M Christine; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R; Rotin, Daniela; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2006-03-01

    Interactions between the WW domains of Drosophila Nedd4 (dNedd4) and Commissureless (Comm) PY motifs promote axon crossing at the CNS midline and muscle synaptogenesis. Here we report the solution structure of the dNedd4 WW3* domain complexed to the second PY motif (227'TGLPSYDEALH237') of Comm. Unexpectedly, there are interactions between WW3* and ligand residues both N- and C-terminal to the PY motif. Residues Y232'-L236' form a helical turn, following the PPII helical PY motif. Mutagenesis and binding studies confirm the importance of these extensive contacts, not simultaneously observed in other WW domain complexes, and identify a variable loop in WW3* responsible for its high-affinity interaction. These studies expand our general understanding of the molecular determinants involved in WW domain-ligand recognition. In addition, they provide insights into the specific regulation of dNedd4-mediated ubiquitination of Comm and subsequent internalization of Comm or the Comm/Roundabout complex, critical for CNS and muscle development.

  9. Morphological transitions of elastic domain structures in constrained layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsker, J.; Artemev, A.; Roytburd, A. L.

    2002-06-01

    The phase transformation in a constrained layer is the subject of this article. The formation and evolution of polydomain microstructure under external stress in the constrained layer are investigated by phase-field simulation and analytically using homogeneous approximation. As a result of simulation, it has been shown that the three-domain hierarchical structure can be formed in the epitaxial films. Under external stress there are two types of morphological transitions: from the three-domain structure to the two-domain one and from the hierarchical three-domain structure to the cellular three-domain structure. The results of phase-field simulation are compared with conclusions of homogenous theory and with available experimental data.

  10. Chemical and thermal unfolding of a global staphylococcal virulence regulator with a flexible C-terminal end.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avisek Mahapa

    Full Text Available SarA, a Staphylococcus aureus-specific dimeric protein, modulates the expression of numerous proteins including various virulence factors. Interestingly, S. aureus synthesizes multiple SarA paralogs seemingly for optimizing the expression of its virulence factors. To understand the domain structure/flexibility and the folding/unfolding mechanism of the SarA protein family, we have studied a recombinant SarA (designated rSarA using various in vitro probes. Limited proteolysis of rSarA and the subsequent analysis of the resulting protein fragments suggested it to be a single-domain protein with a long, flexible C-terminal end. rSarA was unfolded by different mechanisms in the presence of different chemical and physical denaturants. While urea-induced unfolding of rSarA occurred successively via the formation of a dimeric and a monomeric intermediate, GdnCl-induced unfolding of this protein proceeded through the production of two dimeric intermediates. The surface hydrophobicity and the structures of the intermediates were not identical and also differed significantly from those of native rSarA. Of the intermediates, the GdnCl-generated intermediates not only possessed a molten globule-like structure but also exhibited resistance to dissociation during their unfolding. Compared to the native rSarA, the intermediate that was originated at lower GdnCl concentration carried a compact shape, whereas, other intermediates owned a swelled shape. The chemical-induced unfolding, unlike thermal unfolding of rSarA, was completely reversible in nature.

  11. Structural Insights into the Functional Role of the Hcn Sub-domain of the Receptor-Binding Domain of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Mosaic Serotype C/D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gardberg, Anna; Edwards, Tom E.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.; Buchko, Garry W.

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the causative agent of the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism, is the most poisonous protein known for humans. Produced by different strains of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum, BoNT effects cellular intoxication via a multistep mechanism executed by the three modules of the activated protein. Endocytosis, the first step of cellular intoxication, is triggered by the ~50 kDa, heavy-chain receptor-binding module (HCR) that is specific for a ganglioside and a protein receptor on neuronal cell surfaces. This dual receptor recognition mechanism between BoNT and the host cell’s membrane is well documented and occurs via specific intermolecular interactions with the C-terminal sub-domain, Hcc, of BoNT-HCR. The N-terminal sub-domain of BoNT-HCR, Hcn, comprises ~50% of BoNT-HCR and adopts a B-sheet jelly roll fold. While suspected in assisting cell surface recognition, no unambiguous function for the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT has been indentified. To obtain insights into the potential function of the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT, the first crystal structure of a BoNT with an organic ligand bound to the Hcn sub-domain has been obtained. Here, we describe the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR determined at 1.70 Å resolution with a tetraethylene glycol (PG4) molecule bound in an hydrophobic cleft between B-strands in the B-sheet jelly fold roll of the Hcn sub-domain. The molecule is completely engulfed in the cleft, making numerous hydrophobic (Y932, S959, W966, and D1042) and hydrophilic (S935, W977, L979, N1013, and I1066) contacts with the protein’s side chain and backbone that may mimic in vivo interactions with the phospholipid membranes on neuronal cell surfaces. A sulfate ion was also observed bound to residues T1176, D1177, K1196, and R1243 in the Hcc sub-domain of BoNT/CD-HCR. In the crystal structure of a similar protein, BoNT/D-HCR, a sialic acid

  12. Three-dimensional isotropic metamaterial consisting of domain-structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Boyi; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2012-03-01

    Whether an artificially designed negative-index structure could be regarded as a homogeneous medium or not rests with the ratio of its structural unit (man-made atom) over the operation wavelength. However, this definition is ambiguous, and usually the ratio is too large to rigorously meet the effective medium theory. In this paper a three-dimensional (3D) isotropic structure is presented which is obtained from a two-dimensional (2D) isotropic structure rotating on its axis for a circle, and the material is silver. Numerical studies confirm that both the 2D and 3D structures can realize a negative refractive index at microwave wavelengths. Observing the monitored surface current distributions and analogizing the molecular current and the magnetic domain, we suggest a new concept of domain-structure to explain the interior structure of this metamaterial, and finally conclude that the 3D structure is a kind of domain-structured and isotropic metamaterial.

  13. Domain swapping in the low-similarity isomerase/hydratase superfamily: the crystal structure of rat mitochondrial Delta3, Delta2-enoyl-CoA isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Paul A; Yu, Wenfeng; Schulz, Horst; Kim, Jung-Ja P

    2005-06-01

    Two monofunctional Delta(3), Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerases, one in mitochondria (mECI) and the other in both mitochondria and peroxisomes (pECI), belong to the low-similarity isomerase/hydratase superfamily. Both enzymes catalyze the movement of a double bond from C3 to C2 of an unsaturated acyl-CoA substrate for re-entry into the beta-oxidation pathway. Mutagenesis has shown that Glu165 of rat mECI is involved in catalysis; however, the putative catalytic residue in yeast pECI, Glu158, is not conserved in mECI. To elucidate whether Glu165 of mECI is correctly positioned for catalysis, the crystal structure of rat mECI has been solved. Crystal packing suggests the enzyme is trimeric, in contrast to other members of the superfamily, which appear crystallographically to be dimers of trimers. The polypeptide fold of mECI, like pECI, belongs to a subset of this superfamily in which the C-terminal domain of a given monomer interacts with its own N-terminal domain. This differs from that of crotonase and 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphtoyl-CoA synthase, whose C-terminal domains are involved in domain swapping with an adjacent monomer. The structure confirms Glu165 as the putative catalytic acid/base, positioned to abstract the pro-R proton from C2 and reprotonate at C4 of the acyl chain. The large tunnel-shaped active site cavity observed in the mECI structure explains the relative substrate promiscuity in acyl-chain length and stereochemistry. Comparison with the crystal structure of pECI suggests the catalytic residues from both enzymes are spatially conserved but not in their primary structures, providing a powerful reminder of how catalytic residues cannot be determined solely by sequence alignments.

  14. Domain structure and the location of tyrosine-O-sulfate in secreted fibronectin from rat embryo fibroblasts, line 3Y1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M.C.; Suiko, M.; Lipmann, F.

    1986-05-01

    Domain structure of the secreted fibronectin from 3Y1 rat embryo fibroblasts was studied using limited protoelysis technique. Proteolytic fragments were fractionated by a small scale affinity separation procedure employing gelatin-Sepharose, heparin-Agarose and protein A-Sepharose. The three affinity fractions, gelatin-binding, heparin-binding and antibody-precipitated, were then subjected to SDS-PAGE. Domain structure of the secreted fibronectin deduced from the electrophoretic pattern of different binding fragments seemed to comply with the one generally found for other fibronectins which consists of, from N-terminus, Hep-1, Gel, cell-binding, Hep-2 and a C-terminal piece containing interchain disulfide bond(s). Examination of (/sup 35/S)sulfate-labeled fibronectin by the same procedure using trypsin as the protease showed that a 17K and a 40K radioactive band containing tyrosine-O-sulfate (TyS) were present when SDS-PAGE was performed under reducing conditions. Under non-reducing conditions, TyS-containing radioactive bands at 57K and 80K positions were observed indicating the two smaller peptides to be linked through a disulfide bridge. These results suggested that tyrosine-O-sulfate in the 3Y1 secreted fibronectin is located near the C- terminal region, being as close as to within 17K from the C-terminus end.

  15. Domain Modeling: NP_542414.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_542414.1 chr4 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE C-TERMINAL DOMAIN OF BCLA, THE MAJOR ANTI...GEN OF THE EXOSPORIUM OF THE BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORE. p1wcka_ chr4/NP_542414.1/NP_542414.1_holo_1651-1785.pdb swppa 1651S,1654D,1706T,1782E,1784E CAC 0 ...

  16. Domain Modeling: NP_055059.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_055059.2 chr5 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE C-TERMINAL DOMAIN OF BCLA, THE MAJOR ANTI...GEN OF THE EXOSPORIUM OF THE BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORE. p1wcka_ chr5/NP_055059.2/NP_055059.2_holo_1071-1206.pdb swppa 1074E,1128V,1202M CAC 0 ...

  17. Domain Modeling: NP_036389.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_036389.2 chr7 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE C-TERMINAL DOMAIN OF BCLA, THE MAJOR ANTI...GEN OF THE EXOSPORIUM OF THE BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORE. p1wcka_ chr7/NP_036389.2/NP_036389.2_holo_62-197.pdb swppa 62L,117I,193S,195L CAC 0 ...

  18. Domain Modeling: NP_001020539.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001020539.2 chr6 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE C-TERMINAL DOMAIN OF BCLA, THE MAJOR A...NTIGEN OF THE EXOSPORIUM OF THE BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORE. p1wcka_ chr6/NP_001020539.2/NP_001020539.2_holo_39-197.pdb swppa 104E,193A,195L CAC 0 ...

  19. Domain Modeling: NP_079148.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_079148.1 chr5 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE C-TERMINAL DOMAIN OF BCLA, THE MAJOR ANTI...GEN OF THE EXOSPORIUM OF THE BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORE. p1wcka_ chr5/NP_079148.1/NP_079148.1_holo_343-489.pdb swppa 400N,401L,402C,478L,485E CAC 0 ...

  20. Crystal Structure of a Full-Length β-Catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yi; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Liu, Jing; Berndt, Jason D.; Zheng, Jie J.; Moon, Randall T.; Xu, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY β-catenin plays essential roles in cell adhesion and Wnt signaling, while deregulation of β-catenin is associated with multiple diseases including cancers. Here, we report the crystal structures of full-length zebrafish β-catenin and a human β-catenin fragment that contains both the armadillo repeat and the C-terminal domains. Our structures reveal that the N-terminal region of the C-terminal domain, a key component of the C-terminal transactivation domain, forms a long α helix that packs on the C-terminal end of the armadillo repeat domain, and thus forms part of the β-catenin superhelical core. The existence of this helix redefines our view of interactions of β-catenin with some of its critical partners, including ICAT and Chibby, which may form extensive interactions with this C-terminal domain α helix. Our crystallographic and NMR studies also suggest that the unstructured N-terminal and C-terminal tails interact with the ordered armadillo repeat domain in a dynamic and variable manner. PMID:18334222

  1. Structure of synaptophysin: a hexameric MARVEL-domain channel protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Christopher P; Stowell, Michael H B

    2007-06-01

    Synaptophysin I (SypI) is an archetypal member of the MARVEL-domain family of integral membrane proteins and one of the first synaptic vesicle proteins to be identified and cloned. Most all MARVEL-domain proteins are involved in membrane apposition and vesicle-trafficking events, but their precise role in these processes is unclear. We have purified mammalian SypI and determined its three-dimensional (3D) structure by using electron microscopy and single-particle 3D reconstruction. The hexameric structure resembles an open basket with a large pore and tenuous interactions within the cytosolic domain. The structure suggests a model for Synaptophysin's role in fusion and recycling that is regulated by known interactions with the SNARE machinery. This 3D structure of a MARVEL-domain protein provides a structural foundation for understanding the role of these important proteins in a variety of biological processes.

  2. Crystal structure of the PEG-bound SH3 domain of myosin IB from Entamoeba histolytica reveals its mode of ligand recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Gunjan; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Pandey, Preeti; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2017-08-01

    The versatility in the recognition of various interacting proteins by the SH3 domain drives a variety of cellular functions. Here, the crystal structure of the C-terminal SH3 domain of myosin IB from Entamoeba histolytica (EhMySH3) is reported at a resolution of 1.7 Å in native and PEG-bound states. Comparisons with other structures indicated that the PEG molecules occupy protein-protein interaction pockets similar to those occupied by the peptides in other peptide-bound SH3-domain structures. Also, analysis of the PEG-bound EhMySH3 structure led to the recognition of two additional pockets, apart from the conventional polyproline and specificity pockets, that are important for ligand interaction. Molecular-docking studies combined with various comparisons revealed structural similarity between EhMySH3 and the SH3 domain of β-Pix, and this similarity led to the prediction that EhMySH3 preferentially binds targets containing type II-like PXXP motifs. These studies expand the understanding of the EhMySH3 domain and provide extensive structural knowledge, which is expected to help in predicting the interacting partners which function together with myosin IB during phagocytosis in E. histolytica infections.

  3. Structural and functional analysis of multi-interface domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhao

    Full Text Available A multi-interface domain is a domain that can shape multiple and distinctive binding sites to contact with many other domains, forming a hub in domain-domain interaction networks. The functions played by the multiple interfaces are usually different, but there is no strict bijection between the functions and interfaces as some subsets of the interfaces play the same function. This work applies graph theory and algorithms to discover fingerprints for the multiple interfaces of a domain and to establish associations between the interfaces and functions, based on a huge set of multi-interface proteins from PDB. We found that about 40% of proteins have the multi-interface property, however the involved multi-interface domains account for only a tiny fraction (1.8% of the total number of domains. The interfaces of these domains are distinguishable in terms of their fingerprints, indicating the functional specificity of the multiple interfaces in a domain. Furthermore, we observed that both cooperative and distinctive structural patterns, which will be useful for protein engineering, exist in the multiple interfaces of a domain.

  4. C-terminal diversity within the p53 family accounts for differences in DNA binding and transcriptional activity

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Markus; Bretz, Anne Catherine; Beinoraviciute-Kellner, Rasa; Beitzinger, Michaela; Burek, Christof; Rosenwald, Andreas; Harms, Gregory S.; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    The p53 family is known as a family of transcription factors with functions in tumor suppression and development. Whereas the central DNA-binding domain is highly conserved among the three family members p53, p63 and p73, the C-terminal domains (CTDs) are diverse and subject to alternative splicing and post-translational modification. Here we demonstrate that the CTDs strongly influence DNA binding and transcriptional activity: while p53 and the p73 isoform p73γ have basic CTDs and form weak ...

  5. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Stricher, Francois; Serrano, Luis; Schymkowitz, Joost W H; Rousseau, Frederic

    2008-10-08

    Efficient communication between distant sites within a protein is essential for cooperative biological response. Although often associated with large allosteric movements, more subtle changes in protein dynamics can also induce long-range correlations. However, an appropriate formalism that directly relates protein structural dynamics to information exchange between functional sites is still lacking. Here we introduce a method to analyze protein dynamics within the framework of information theory and show that signal transduction within proteins can be considered as a particular instance of communication over a noisy channel. In particular, we analyze the conformational correlations between protein residues and apply the concept of mutual information to quantify information exchange. Mapping out changes of mutual information on the protein structure then allows visualizing how distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located in the phosphopeptide and specificity binding sites and a number of residues at the other side of the domain near the linkers that connect the SH2 domain to the SH3 and kinase domains. We find that for this particular domain, communication is affected by a series of contiguous residues that connect distal sites by crossing the core of the SH2 domain. As a result, our method provides a means to directly map the exchange of biological information on the structure of protein domains, making it clear how binding triggers conformational changes in the protein structure. As such it provides a structural road, next to the existing attempts at sequence level, to predict long-range interactions within protein structures.

  6. Structural characterization of thyroglobulin type-1 domains of equistatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galesa, K.; Pain, R.; Jongsma, M.A.; Turk, V.; Lenarci, B.

    2003-01-01

    Equistatin is a protein composed of three thyroglobulin type-1 domains. It inhibits papain-like cysteine proteinases and the aspartic proteinase, cathepsin D. To determine the structural basis for this inhibition we cloned and expressed the separated domains (eq d-1, eq d-2, eq d-3) in Pichia

  7. Three-dimensional structure of N-terminal domain of DnaB helicase and helicase-primase interactions in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Kashav

    Full Text Available Replication initiation is a crucial step in genome duplication and homohexameric DnaB helicase plays a central role in the replication initiation process by unwinding the duplex DNA and interacting with several other proteins during the process of replication. N-terminal domain of DnaB is critical for helicase activity and for DnaG primase interactions. We present here the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD of H. pylori DnaB (HpDnaB helicase at 2.2 A resolution and compare the structural differences among helicases and correlate with the functional differences. The structural details of NTD suggest that the linker region between NTD and C-terminal helicase domain plays a vital role in accurate assembly of NTD dimers. The sequence analysis of the linker regions from several helicases reveals that they should form four helix bundles. We also report the characterization of H. pylori DnaG primase and study the helicase-primase interactions, where HpDnaG primase stimulates DNA unwinding activity of HpDnaB suggesting presence of helicase-primase cohort at the replication fork. The protein-protein interaction study of C-terminal domain of primase and different deletion constructs of helicase suggests that linker is essential for proper conformation of NTD to interact strongly with HpDnaG. The surface charge distribution on the primase binding surface of NTDs of various helicases suggests that DnaB-DnaG interaction and stability of the complex is most probably charge dependent. Structure of the linker and helicase-primase interactions indicate that HpDnaB differs greatly from E.coli DnaB despite both belong to gram negative bacteria.

  8. Interactions between the structural domains of the RNA replication proteins of plant-infecting RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, E K; Wang, Z; French, R; Kao, C C

    1998-09-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, encodes two replication proteins: the 2a protein, which contains polymerase-like sequences, and the 1a protein, with N-terminal putative capping and C-terminal helicase-like sequences. These two proteins are part of a multisubunit complex which is necessary for viral RNA replication. We have previously shown that the yeast two-hybrid assay consistently duplicated results obtained from in vivo RNA replication assays and biochemical assays of protein-protein interaction, thus permitting the identification of additional interacting domains. We now map an interaction found to take place between two 1a proteins. Using previously characterized 1a mutants, a perfect correlation was found between the in vivo phenotypes of these mutants and their abilities to interact with wild-type 1a (wt1a) and each other. Western blot analysis revealed that the stabilities of many of the noninteracting mutant proteins were similar to that of wt1a. Deletion analysis of 1a revealed that the N-terminal 515 residues of the 1a protein are required and sufficient for 1a-1a interaction. This intermolecular interaction between the putative capping domain and itself was detected in another tripartite RNA virus, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), suggesting that the 1a-1a interaction is a feature necessary for the replication of tripartite RNA viruses. The boundaries for various activities are placed in the context of the predicted secondary structures of several 1a-like proteins of members of the alphavirus-like superfamily. Additionally, we found a novel interaction between the putative capping and helicase-like portions of the BMV and CMV 1a proteins. Our cumulative data suggest a working model for the assembly of the BMV RNA replicase.

  9. Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) Toolbox for Use with MATLAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune

    1997-01-01

    The Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) toolbox for use with MATLABTM is developed at Aalborg University, Denmark, based on the system identification research performed during recent years. By now, a reliable set of functions offers a wide spectrum of services for all the important steps...... of multivariate time domain system identification of time-variant as well as time-invariant civil engineering structures from ambient testing data. A graphical user interface (GUI) is also developed to make the toolbox more user friendly....

  10. Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) Toolbox for Use with MATLAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune

    The Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) toolbox for use with MATLABTM is developed at Aalborg University, Denmark, based on the system identification research performed during recent years. By now, a reliable set of functions offers a wide spectrum of services for all the important steps...... of multivariate time domain system identification of time-variant as well as time-invariant civil engineering structures from ambient testing data. A graphical user interface (GUI) is also developed to make the toolbox more user friendly....

  11. Structure-function analysis of Escherichia coli DNA helicase I reveals non-overlapping transesterase and helicase domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Devon R; Sampson, Juliana K; Ragonese, Heather M; Matson, Steven W

    2002-11-08

    TraI (DNA helicase I) is an Escherichia coli F plasmid-encoded protein required for bacterial conjugative DNA transfer. The protein is a sequence-specific DNA transesterase that provides the site- and strand-specific nick required to initiate DNA strand transfer and a 5' to 3' DNA helicase that unwinds the F plasmid to provide the single-stranded DNA that is transferred from donor to recipient. Sequence comparisons with other transesterases and helicases suggest that these activities reside in the N- and C-terminal regions of TraI, respectively. Computer-assisted secondary structure probability analysis identified a potential interdomain region spanning residues 304-309. Proteins encoded by segments of traI, whose N or C terminus either flanked or coincided with this region, were purified and assessed for catalytic activity. Amino acids 1-306 contain the transesterase activity, whereas amino acids 309-1504 contain the helicase activity. The C-terminal 252 amino acids of the 1756-amino acid TraI protein are not required for either helicase or transesterase activity. Protein and nucleic acid sequence similarity searches indicate that the occurrence of both transesterase- and helicase-associated motifs in a conjugative DNA transfer initiator protein is rare. Only two examples (other than R100 plasmid TraI) were found: R388 plasmid TrwC and R46 plasmid (pKM101) TraH, belonging to the IncW and IncN groups of broad host range conjugative plasmids, respectively. The most significant structural difference between these proteins and TraI is that TraI contains an additional region of approximately 650 residues between the transesterase domain and the helicase-associated motifs. This region is required for helicase activity.

  12. Crystal structure of the gamma-2 herpesvirus LANA DNA binding domain identifies charged surface residues which impact viral latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Correia

    Full Text Available Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA mediates γ2-herpesvirus genome persistence and regulates transcription. We describe the crystal structure of the murine gammaherpesvirus-68 LANA C-terminal domain at 2.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals an alpha-beta fold that assembles as a dimer, reminiscent of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA1. A predicted DNA binding surface is present and opposite this interface is a positive electrostatic patch. Targeted DNA recognition substitutions eliminated DNA binding, while certain charged patch mutations reduced bromodomain protein, BRD4, binding. Virus containing LANA abolished for DNA binding was incapable of viable latent infection in mice. Virus with mutations at the charged patch periphery exhibited substantial deficiency in expansion of latent infection, while central region substitutions had little effect. This deficiency was independent of BRD4. These results elucidate the LANA DNA binding domain structure and reveal a unique charged region that exerts a critical role in viral latent infection, likely acting through a host cell protein(s.

  13. Characterization of the domains of E. coli initiation factor IF2 responsible for recognition of the ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Egebjerg Kristensen, Janni

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the interactions between the ribosome and the domains of Escherichia coli translation initiation factor 2, using an in vitro ribosomal binding assay with wild-type forms, N- and C-terminal truncated forms of IF2 as well as isolated structural domains. A deletion mutant of the factor...

  14. Characterization of Multiferroic Domain Structures in Multiferroic Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiferroic oxides have been received much attention due to that these materials exhibit multiple ferroic order parameters (e.g., electric polarization in ferroelectrics, magnetization in ferromagnetics, or spontaneous strain in ferroelastics simultaneously in the same phase in a certain temperature range, which offer an exciting way of coupling between the ferroic order parameters. Thus, this provides a possibility for constructing new type of multifunctional devices. The multiferroic domain structures in these materials are considered to be an important factor to improve the efficiency and performance of future multiferroic devices. Therefore, the domain structures in multiferroic oxides are widely investigated. Recent developments in domain characterization techniques, particularly the aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM, have enabled us to determine the domain structures at subangstrom scale, and the recent development of in situ TEM techniques allows ones to study the dynamic behaviors of multiferroic domains under applied fields or stress while the atomic structure is imaged directly. This paper provides a review of recent advances on the characterization of multiferroic domain structures in multiferroic oxides, which have been achieved by the notable advancement of aberration-corrected TEM.

  15. C-terminal Src kinase-mediated EPIYA phosphorylation of Pragmin creates a feed-forward C-terminal Src kinase activation loop that promotes cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Yoshie; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-07-01

    Pragmin is one of the few mammalian proteins containing the Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) tyrosine-phosphorylation motif that was originally discovered in the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein. Following delivery into gastric epithelial cells by type IV secretion and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation at the EPIYA motifs, CagA serves as an oncogenic scaffold/adaptor that promiscuously interacts with SH2 domain-containing mammalian proteins such as the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) and the C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), a negative regulator of Src family kinases. Like CagA, Pragmin also forms a physical complex with Csk. In the present study, we found that Pragmin directly binds to Csk by the tyrosine-phosphorylated EPIYA motif. The complex formation potentiates kinase activity of Csk, which in turn phosphorylates Pragmin on tyrosine-238 (Y238), Y343, and Y391. As Y391 of Pragmin comprises the EPIYA motif, Pragmin-Csk interaction creates a feed-forward regulatory loop of Csk activation. Together with the finding that Pragmin and Csk are colocalized to focal adhesions, these observations indicate that the Pragmin-Csk interaction, triggered by Pragmin EPIYA phosphorylation, robustly stimulates the kinase activity of Csk at focal adhesions, which direct cell-matrix adhesion that regulates cell morphology and cell motility. As a consequence, expression of Pragmin and/or Csk in epithelial cells induces an elongated cell shape with elevated cell scattering in a manner that is mutually dependent on Pragmin and Csk. Deregulation of the Pragmin-Csk axis may therefore induce aberrant cell migration that contributes to tumor invasion and metastasis. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Structure, dynamics and folding of an immunoglobulin domain of the gelation factor (ABP-120) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Cabrita, Lisa D; Fucini, Paola; Dobson, Christopher M; Christodoulou, John

    2009-05-15

    We have carried out a detailed structural and dynamical characterisation of the isolated fifth repeat of the gelation factor (ABP-120) from Dictyostelium discoideum (ddFLN5) by NMR spectroscopy to provide a basis for studies of co-translational folding on the ribosome of this immunoglobulin-like domain. The isolated ddFLN5 can fold autonomously in solution into a structure that resembles very closely the crystal structure of the domain in a construct in which the adjacent sixth repeat (ddFLN6) is covalently linked to its C-terminus in tandem but deviates locally from a second crystal structure in which ddFLN5 is flanked by ddFLN4 and ddFLN6 at both N- and C-termini. Conformational fluctuations were observed via (15)N relaxation methods and are primarily localised in the interstrand loops that encompass the C-terminal hemisphere. These fluctuations are distinct in location from the region where line broadening is observed in ddFLN5 when attached to the ribosome as part of a nascent chain. This observation supports the conclusion that the broadening is associated with interactions with the ribosome surface [Hsu, S. T. D., Fucini, P., Cabrita, L. D., Launay, H., Dobson, C. M. & Christodoulou, J. (2007). Structure and dynamics of a ribosome-bound nascent chain by NMR spectroscopy. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 104, 16516-16521]. The unfolding of ddFLN5 induced by high concentrations of urea shows a low population of a folding intermediate, as inferred from an intensity-based analysis, a finding that differs from that of ddFLN5 as a ribosome-bound nascent chain. These results suggest that interesting differences in detail may exist between the structure of the domain in isolation and when linked to the ribosome and between protein folding in vitro and the folding of a nascent chain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  17. Cell surface expression level variation between two common Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles, HLA-A2 and HLA-B8, is dependent on the structure of the C terminal part of the alpha 2 and the alpha 3 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Nehlin, Jan O; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    expressed, and demonstrate here that this is also the case for the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T. Using quantitative flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction we found expression levels of endogenous HLA-A3 (median 71,204 molecules per cell) 9.2-fold higher than the expression of...

  18. Mutations in the C-terminal region affect subcellular localization of crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) GPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Gui, Lang; Chen, Zong-Yan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known as seven transmembrane domain receptors and consequently can mediate diverse biological functions via regulation of their subcellular localization. Crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) was recently isolated from infected fish with acute gill hemorrhage. CaHV GPCR of 349 amino acids (aa) was identified based on amino acid identity. A series of variants with truncation/deletion/substitution mutation in the C-terminal (aa 315-349) were constructed and expressed in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. The roles of three key C-terminal regions in subcellular localization of CaHV GPCR were determined. Lysine-315 (K-315) directed the aggregation of the protein preferentially at the nuclear side. Predicted N-myristoylation site (GGGWTR, aa 335-340) was responsible for punctate distribution in periplasm or throughout the cytoplasm. Predicted phosphorylation site (SSR, aa 327-329) and GGGWTR together determined the punctate distribution in cytoplasm. Detection of organelles localization by specific markers showed that the protein retaining K-315 colocalized with the Golgi apparatus. These experiments provided first evidence that different mutations of CaHV GPCR C-terminals have different affects on the subcellular localization of fish herpesvirus-encoded GPCRs. The study provided valuable information and new insights into the precise interactions between herpesvirus and fish cells, and could also provide useful targets for antiviral agents in aquaculture.

  19. Crystal structure of the lytic CHAP(K) domain of the endolysin LysK from Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Gaitero, Marta; Keary, Ruth; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Coffey, Aidan; van Raaij, Mark J

    2014-07-26

    Bacteriophages encode endolysins to lyse their host cell and allow escape of their progeny. Endolysins are also active against Gram-positive bacteria when applied from the outside and are thus attractive anti-bacterial agents. LysK, an endolysin from staphylococcal phage K, contains an N-terminal cysteine-histidine dependent amido-hydrolase/peptidase domain (CHAP(K)), a central amidase domain and a C-terminal SH3b cell wall-binding domain. CHAP(K) cleaves bacterial peptidoglycan between the tetra-peptide stem and the penta-glycine bridge. The CHAP(K) domain of LysK was crystallized and high-resolution diffraction data was collected both from a native protein crystal and a methylmercury chloride derivatized crystal. The anomalous signal contained in the derivative data allowed the location of heavy atom sites and phase determination. The resulting structures were completed, refined and analyzed. The presence of calcium and zinc ions in the structure was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Zymogram analysis was performed on the enzyme and selected site-directed mutants. The structure of CHAP(K) revealed a papain-like topology with a hydrophobic cleft, where the catalytic triad is located. Ordered buffer molecules present in this groove may mimic the peptidoglycan substrate. When compared to previously solved CHAP domains, CHAP(K) contains an additional lobe in its N-terminal domain, with a structural calcium ion, coordinated by residues Asp45, Asp47, Tyr49, His51 and Asp56. The presence of a zinc ion in the active site was also apparent, coordinated by the catalytic residue Cys54 and a possible substrate analogue. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to demonstrate that residues involved in calcium binding and of the proposed active site were important for enzyme activity. The high-resolution structure of the CHAP(K) domain of LysK was determined, suggesting the location of the active site, the substrate-binding groove and revealing the presence of a

  20. Crystal structure of the lytic CHAPK domain of the endolysin LysK from Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage K

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteriophages encode endolysins to lyse their host cell and allow escape of their progeny. Endolysins are also active against Gram-positive bacteria when applied from the outside and are thus attractive anti-bacterial agents. LysK, an endolysin from staphylococcal phage K, contains an N-terminal cysteine-histidine dependent amido-hydrolase/peptidase domain (CHAPK), a central amidase domain and a C-terminal SH3b cell wall-binding domain. CHAPK cleaves bacterial peptidoglycan between the tetra-peptide stem and the penta-glycine bridge. Methods The CHAPK domain of LysK was crystallized and high-resolution diffraction data was collected both from a native protein crystal and a methylmercury chloride derivatized crystal. The anomalous signal contained in the derivative data allowed the location of heavy atom sites and phase determination. The resulting structures were completed, refined and analyzed. The presence of calcium and zinc ions in the structure was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Zymogram analysis was performed on the enzyme and selected site-directed mutants. Results The structure of CHAPK revealed a papain-like topology with a hydrophobic cleft, where the catalytic triad is located. Ordered buffer molecules present in this groove may mimic the peptidoglycan substrate. When compared to previously solved CHAP domains, CHAPK contains an additional lobe in its N-terminal domain, with a structural calcium ion, coordinated by residues Asp45, Asp47, Tyr49, His51 and Asp56. The presence of a zinc ion in the active site was also apparent, coordinated by the catalytic residue Cys54 and a possible substrate analogue. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to demonstrate that residues involved in calcium binding and of the proposed active site were important for enzyme activity. Conclusions The high-resolution structure of the CHAPK domain of LysK was determined, suggesting the location of the active site, the substrate-binding groove and

  1. Nucleation process of a fibril precursor in the C-terminal segment of amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Pietrucci, Fabio; Biarnés, Xevi; Laio, Alessandro

    2013-04-19

    By extended atomistic simulations in explicit solvent and bias-exchange metadynamics, we study the aggregation process of 18 chains of the C-terminal segment of amyloid-β, an intrinsically disordered protein involved in Alzheimer's disease and prone to form fibrils. Starting from a disordered aggregate, we are able to observe the formation of an ordered nucleus rich in beta sheets. The rate limiting step in the nucleation pathway involves crossing a barrier of approximately 40 kcal/mol and is associated with the formation of a very specific interdigitation of the side chains belonging to different sheets. This structural pattern is different from the one observed experimentally in a microcrystal of the same system, indicating that the structure of a "nascent" fibril may differ from the one of an "extended" fibril.

  2. Structure and Function of Interacting IcmR-IcmQ Domains from a Type IVb Secretion System in Legionella pneumophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raychaudhury, S.; Farelli, J; Montminy, T; Matthews, M; Menetret, J; Dumenil, G; Roy, C; Head, J; Isberg, R; Akey, C

    2009-01-01

    During infection, Legionella pneumophila creates a replication vacuole within eukaryotic cells and this requires a Type IVb secretion system (T4bSS). IcmQ plays a critical role in the translocase and associates with IcmR. In this paper, we show that the N-terminal domain of IcmQ (Qn) mediates self-dimerization, whereas the C-terminal domain with a basic linker promotes membrane association. In addition, the binding of IcmR to IcmQ prevents self-dimerization and also blocks membrane permeabilization. However, IcmR does not completely block membrane binding by IcmQ. We then determined crystal structures of Qn with the interacting region of IcmR. In this complex, each protein forms an ?-helical hairpin within a parallel four-helix bundle. The amphipathic nature of helices in Qn suggests two possible models for membrane permeabilization by IcmQ. The Rm-Qn structure also suggests how IcmR-like proteins in other L. pneumophila species may interact with their IcmQ partners.

  3. Structural and dynamic interfacial properties of the lipoprotein initiating domain of apolipoprotein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Aubrey S; Cook, Victoria A; Shelness, Gregory S; Weinberg, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    To better understand the earliest steps in the assembly of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins, we compared the biophysical and interfacial properties of two closely related apolipoprotein B (apoB) truncation mutants, one of which contains the complete lipoprotein initiating domain (apoB20.1; residues 1-912), and one of which, by virtue of a 50 amino acid C-terminal truncation, is incapable of forming nascent lipoproteins (apoB19; residues 1-862). Spectroscopic studies detected no major differences in secondary structure, and only minor differences in conformation and thermodynamic stability, between the two truncation mutants. Monolayer studies revealed that both apoB19 and apoB20.1 bound to and penetrated egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) monolayers; however, the interfacial exclusion pressure of apoB20.1 was higher than apoB19 (25.1 mN/m vs. 22.8 mN/m). Oil drop tensiometry revealed that both proteins bound rapidly to the hydrophobic triolein/water interface, reducing interfacial tension by approximately 20 mN/m. However, when triolein drops were first coated with phospholipids (PL), apoB20.1 bound with faster kinetics than apoB19 and also displayed greater interfacial elasticity (26.9 +/- 0.8 mN/m vs. 22.9 +/- 0.8 mN/m). These data establish that the transition of apoB to assembly competence is accompanied by increases in surface activity and elasticity, but not by significant changes in global structure.

  4. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasily F. Shabanov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface.

  5. Ferromagnetic domain structures and spin configurations measured in doped manganite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, J.Q.; Volkov, V.V.; Beleggia, Marco

    2010-01-01

    orientations from the expected 90 degrees head-to-tail configuration across the domain walls was attributed to the variation in the domains' aspect ratios as a result of the demagnetization field. Our study provides important insight on how the spin configuration coupled with the magnetic structure......We report on measurements of the spin configuration across ferromagnetic domains in La0.325Pr0.3Ca0.375MnO3 films obtained by means of low-temperature Lorentz electron microscopy with in situ magnetizing capabilities. Due to the particular crystal symmetry of the material, we observe two sets...... of independent ferromagnetic twin variants, one of which was pinned by crystallographic twinning. The spin orientation and configuration of the domains were measured quantitatively using electron diffraction and electron holography, and verified with structural modeling. The observed deviation of spin...

  6. Structural Dynamics of the GW182 Silencing Domain Including its RNA Recognition motif (RRM) Revealed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak-Rotowska, Maja K.; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Rubin, Marcin; Fabian, Marc R.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Dadlez, Michal; Niedzwiecka, Anna

    2017-10-01

    The human GW182 protein plays an essential role in micro(mi)RNA-dependent gene silencing. miRNA silencing is mediated, in part, by a GW182 C-terminal region called the silencing domain, which interacts with the poly(A) binding protein and the CCR4-NOT deadenylase complex to repress protein synthesis. Structural studies of this GW182 fragment are challenging due to its predicted intrinsically disordered character, except for its RRM domain. However, detailed insights into the properties of proteins containing disordered regions can be provided by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX/MS). In this work, we applied HDX/MS to define the structural state of the GW182 silencing domain. HDX/MS analysis revealed that this domain is clearly divided into a natively unstructured part, including the CCR4-NOT interacting motif 1, and a distinct RRM domain. The GW182 RRM has a very dynamic structure, since water molecules can penetrate the whole domain in 2 h. The finding of this high structural dynamics sheds new light on the RRM structure. Though this domain is one of the most frequently occurring canonical protein domains in eukaryotes, these results are - to our knowledge - the first HDX/MS characteristics of an RRM. The HDX/MS studies show also that the α2 helix of the RRM can display EX1 behavior after a freezing-thawing cycle. This means that the RRM structure is sensitive to environmental conditions and can change its conformation, which suggests that the state of the RRM containing proteins should be checked by HDX/MS in regard of the conformational uniformity. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Structure and activation of the TSH receptor transmembrane domain

    OpenAIRE

    N??ez Miguel, Ricardo; Sanders, Jane; Furmaniak, Jadwiga; Smith, Bernard Rees

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the target autoantigen for TSHR-stimulating autoantibodies in Graves? disease. The TSHR is composed of: a leucine-rich repeat domain (LRD), a hinge region or cleavage domain (CD) and a transmembrane domain (TMD). The binding arrangements between the TSHR LRD and the thyroid-stimulating autoantibody M22 or TSH have become available from the crystal structure of the TSHR LRD?M22 complex and a comparative model of the TSHR LRD in complex...

  8. Magnetic domain structure in thin CoPt perpendicular magnetic anisotropy films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komine T.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation between thickness and domain structure of Co80Pt20 perpendicular magnetic anisotropy films was investigated through experiments and micromagnetic simulation. The films with thickness over 10 nm exhibited clear maze domain structure, while for the films thinner than 10 nm the domain structure abruptly changed from maze domain to irregular and large domain as the thickness became thinner. The irregular domain had narrower domain wall width than maze domain.

  9. The C-terminal Region and SUMOylation of Cockayne Syndrome Group B Protein Play Critical Roles in Transcription-coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yooksil; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Saijo, Masafumi

    2016-01-15

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a recessive disorder that results in deficiencies in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair, and cells from CS patients exhibit hypersensitivity to UV light. CS group B protein (CSB), which is the gene product of one of the genes responsible for CS, belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 DNA-dependent ATPase family and has an ATPase domain and an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) in the central region and the C-terminal region, respectively. The C-terminal region containing the UBD is essential for the functions of CSB. In this study, we generated several CSB deletion mutants and analyzed the functions of the C-terminal region of CSB in TC-NER. Not only the UBD but also the C-terminal 30-amino acid residues were required for UV light resistance and TC-NER. This region was needed for the interaction of CSB with RNA polymerase II, the translocation of CS group A protein to the nuclear matrix, and the association of CSB with chromatin after UV irradiation. CSB was modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier 2/3 in a UV light-dependent manner. This modification was abolished in a CSB mutant lacking the C-terminal 30 amino acid residues. However, the substitution of lysine residues in this region with arginine did not affect SUMOylation or TC-NER. By contrast, substitution of a lysine residue in the N-terminal region with arginine decreased SUMOylation and resulted in cells with defects in TC-NER. These results indicate that both the most C-terminal region and SUMOylation are important for the functions of CSB in TC-NER. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. The C-terminal Region and SUMOylation of Cockayne Syndrome Group B Protein Play Critical Roles in Transcription-coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yooksil; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Saijo, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a recessive disorder that results in deficiencies in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair, and cells from CS patients exhibit hypersensitivity to UV light. CS group B protein (CSB), which is the gene product of one of the genes responsible for CS, belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 DNA-dependent ATPase family and has an ATPase domain and an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) in the central region and the C-terminal region, respectively. The C-terminal region containing the UBD is essential for the functions of CSB. In this study, we generated several CSB deletion mutants and analyzed the functions of the C-terminal region of CSB in TC-NER. Not only the UBD but also the C-terminal 30-amino acid residues were required for UV light resistance and TC-NER. This region was needed for the interaction of CSB with RNA polymerase II, the translocation of CS group A protein to the nuclear matrix, and the association of CSB with chromatin after UV irradiation. CSB was modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier 2/3 in a UV light-dependent manner. This modification was abolished in a CSB mutant lacking the C-terminal 30 amino acid residues. However, the substitution of lysine residues in this region with arginine did not affect SUMOylation or TC-NER. By contrast, substitution of a lysine residue in the N-terminal region with arginine decreased SUMOylation and resulted in cells with defects in TC-NER. These results indicate that both the most C-terminal region and SUMOylation are important for the functions of CSB in TC-NER. PMID:26620705

  11. Structural basis of thrombin-mediated factor V activation: the Glu666-Glu672 sequence is critical for processing at the heavy chain–B domain junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Rodríguez, María Ángeles; Bock, Paul E.; Hernández-Carvajal, Erick; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Thrombin-catalyzed activation of coagulation factor V (FV) is an essential positive feedback reaction within the blood clotting system. Efficient processing at the N- (Arg709-Ser710) and C-terminal activation cleavage sites (Arg1545-Ser1546) requires initial substrate interactions with 2 clusters of positively charged residues on the proteinase surface, exosites I and II. We addressed the mechanism of activation of human factor V (FV) using peptides that cover the entire acidic regions preceding these cleavage sites, FV (657-709)/ (FVa2) and FV(1481-1545)/(FVa3). FVa2 appears to interact mostly with exosite I, while both exosites are involved in interactions with the C-terminal linker. The 1.7-Å crystal structure of irreversibly inhibited thrombin bound to FVa2 unambiguously reveals docking of FV residues Glu666-Glu672 to exosite I. These findings were confirmed in a second, medium-resolution structure of FVa2 bound to the benzamidine-inhibited proteinase. Our results suggest that the acidic A2-B domain linker is involved in major interactions with thrombin during cofactor activation, with its more N-terminal hirudin-like sequence playing a critical role. Modeling experiments indicate that FVa2, and likely also FVa3, wrap around thrombin in productive thrombin·FV complexes that cover a large surface of the activator to engage the active site. PMID:21555742

  12. Selective enzymatic hydrolysis of C-terminal tert-butyl esters of peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggen, I.F.; Boeriu, C.G.

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for the selective enzymatic hydrolysis of C-terminal esters of peptide substrates in the synthesis of peptides, comprising hydrolysing C-terminal tert-butyl esters using the protease subtilisin. This process is useful in the production of protected or

  13. Selective enzymatic hydrolysis of C-terminal tert-butyl esters of peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Eggen, I.F.; Boeriu, C.G.

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for the selective enzymatic hydrolysis of C-terminal esters of peptide substrates in the synthesis of peptides, comprising hydrolysing C-terminal tert-butyl esters using the protease subtilisin. This process is useful in the production of protected or unprotected peptides.

  14. Neutron dark field imaging of domain structures in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimann, Tommy; Schulz, Michael [TU Muenchen, Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier Leibnitz (FRM II), 85747 Garching (Germany); Physik Department E21, TU Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Gruenzweig, Christian [Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Muehlbauer, Sebastian [TU Muenchen, Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier Leibnitz (FRM II), 85747 Garching (Germany); Boeni, Peter [Physik Department E21, TU Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In the intermediate mixed state (IMS) of a type II superconductor (SC), the sample splits up into field-free Meissner domains and Shubnikov domains which carry the vortex lattice. The IMS is analog to the intermediate state (IS) of a type-I superconductor with normal and superconducting domains. Experiments on the topology of both states show a variety of different patterns including striped, dendritic and bubble phases, which represent typical domain morphologies also seen in various other physical contexts. A detailed investigation of domain patterns offers the possibility to study general characteristics of domain nucleation and morphology as well as the physical properties of vortex-vortex interactions. Domain structures in SC are typically investigated by surface sensitive techniques such as magneto optical imaging, but flux pinning as well as Landau branching can significantly hamper the deduction of bulk properties. In this talk we show how neutron grating interferometry (nGI) can be used as a tool for the unambiguous identification of bulk properties. The capability of this unique technique will be demonstrated on Pb and Nb single crystals, which are classical representatives of type I and type II SC respectively.

  15. PrPSc-Specific Antibody Reveals C-Terminal Conformational Differences between Prion Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Eri; Hughson, Andrew G; Raymond, Gregory J; Suzuki, Akio; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Caughey, Byron

    2016-05-15

    Understanding the structure of PrP(Sc) and its strain variation has been one of the major challenges in prion disease biology. To study the strain-dependent conformations of PrP(Sc), we purified proteinase-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP(RES)) from mouse brains with three different murine-adapted scrapie strains (Chandler, 22L, and Me7) and systematically tested the accessibility of epitopes of a wide range of anti-PrP and anti-PrP(Sc) specific antibodies by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that epitopes of most anti-PrP antibodies were hidden in the folded structure of PrP(RES), even though these epitopes are revealed with guanidine denaturation. However, reactivities to a PrP(Sc)-specific conformational C-terminal antibody showed significant differences among the three different prion strains. Our results provide evidence for strain-dependent conformational variation near the C termini of molecules within PrP(Sc) multimers. It has long been apparent that prion strains can have different conformations near the N terminus of the PrP(Sc) protease-resistant core. Here, we show that a C-terminal conformational PrP(Sc)-specific antibody reacts differently to three murine-adapted scrapie strains. These results suggest, in turn, that conformational differences in the C terminus of PrP(Sc) also contribute to the phenotypic distinction between prion strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Crystal structure of the Ig1 domain of the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM2 displays domain swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kim Krighaar; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Kristensen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of the first immunoglobulin (Ig1) domain of neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM) is presented at a resolution of 2.7 A. NCAM2 is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (IgCAMs). In the structure, two Ig domains interact by domain...

  17. A novel tetrameric PilZ domain structure from xanthomonads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tso-Ning Li

    Full Text Available PilZ domain is one of the key receptors for the newly discovered secondary messenger molecule cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP. To date, several monomeric PilZ domain proteins have been identified. Some exhibit strong c-di-GMP binding activity, while others have barely detectable c-di-GMP binding activity and require an accessory protein such as FimX to indirectly respond to the c-di-GMP signal. We now report a novel tetrameric PilZ domain structure of XCC6012 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc. It is one of the four PilZ domain proteins essential for Xcc pathogenicity. Although the monomer adopts a structure similar to those of the PilZ domains with very weak c-di-GMP binding activity, it is nevertheless interrupted in the middle by two extra long helices. Four XCC6012 proteins are thus self-assembled into a tetramer via the extra heptad repeat α3 helices to form a parallel four-stranded coiled-coil, which is further enclosed by two sets of inclined α2 and α4 helices. We further generated a series of XCC6012 variants and measured the unfolding temperatures and oligomeric states in order to investigate the nature of this novel tetramer. Discovery of this new PilZ domain architecture increases the complexity of c-di-GMP-mediated regulation.

  18. A frequency domain analysis for damped space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for the analysis of damped structural systems in which the structural components are represented by impedance models and analyzed in the frequency domain. Methods are presented to assemble and condense system impedance matrices, and then to identify approximate mass, stiffness, and damping matrices for systems whose impedances are complicated functions of frequency. Formulas are derived for determination of approximate values for system natural frequencies and damping using frequency domain quantities. The sensitivities of these approximate values to system parameter changes are analyzed. The implementation of these analysis tools is discussed and applied to a simple mechanical system.

  19. Modeling Microwave Structures in Time Domain Using Laguerre Polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Raida

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on time domain modeling of microwave structures by the method of moments. Two alternative schemes with weighted Laguerre polynomials are presented. Thanks to their properties, these schemes are free of late time oscillations. Further, the paper is aimed to effective and accurate evaluation of Green's functions integrals within these schemes. For this evaluation, a first- and second-order polynomial approximation is developed. The last part of the paper deals with modeling microstrip structures in the time domain. Conditions of impedance matching are derived, and the proposed approach is verified by modeling a microstrip filter.

  20. PSI-2: structural genomics to cover protein domain family space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessailly, Benoît H; Nair, Rajesh; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Fajardo, J Eduardo; Kouranov, Andrei; Lee, David; Fiser, Andras; Godzik, Adam; Rost, Burkhard; Orengo, Christine

    2009-06-10

    One major objective of structural genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), has been to increase the structural coverage of protein sequence space. Here, we present the target selection strategy used during the second phase of PSI (PSI-2). This strategy, jointly devised by the bioinformatics groups associated with the PSI-2 large-scale production centers, targets representatives from large, structurally uncharacterized protein domain families, and from structurally uncharacterized subfamilies in very large and diverse families with incomplete structural coverage. These very large families are extremely diverse both structurally and functionally, and are highly overrepresented in known proteomes. On the basis of several metrics, we then discuss to what extent PSI-2, during its first 3 years, has increased the structural coverage of genomes, and contributed structural and functional novelty. Together, the results presented here suggest that PSI-2 is successfully meeting its objectives and provides useful insights into structural and functional space.

  1. Structural Evidence for Direct Interactions Between the BRCT Domains of Human BRCA1 and a Phospho-Peptide from Human ACC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen,Y.; Tong, L.

    2008-01-01

    The tandem BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domains are phospho-serine/threonine recognition modules essential for the function of BRCA1. Recent studies suggest that acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), an enzyme with crucial roles in de novo fatty acid biosynthesis and lipogenesis and essential for cancer cell survival, may be a novel binding partner for BRCA1, through interactions with its BRCT domains. We report here the crystal structure at 3.2 Angstroms resolution of human BRCA1 BRCT domains in complex with a phospho-peptide from human ACC1 (p-ACC1 peptide, with the sequence 1258-DSPPQ-pS-PTFPEAGH-1271), which provides molecular evidence for direct interactions between BRCA1 and ACC1. The p-ACC1 peptide is bound in an extended conformation, located in a groove between the tandem BRCT domains. There are recognizable and significant structural differences to the binding modes of two other phospho-peptides to these domains, from BACH1 and CtIP, even though they share a conserved pSer-Pro-(Thr/Val)-Phe motif. Our studies establish a framework for understanding the regulation of lipid biosynthesis by BRCA1 through its inhibition of ACC1 activity, which could be a novel tumor suppressor function of BRCA1.

  2. Coiled-coil domain-dependent homodimerization of intracellular barley immune receptors defines a minimal functional module for triggering cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maekawa, T.; Cheng, W.; Spiridon, L.N.; Töller, A.; Lukasik, E.; Saijo, Y.; Liu, P.; Shen, Q.H.; Micluta, M.A.; Somssich, I.E.; Takken, F.L.W.; Petrescu, A.J.; Chai, J.; Schulze-Lefert, P.

    2011-01-01

    Plants and animals have evolved structurally related innate immune sensors, designated NLRs, to detect intracellular nonself molecules. NLRs are modular, consisting of N-terminal coiled-coil (CC) or TOLL/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains, a central nucleotide-binding (NB) domain, and C-terminal

  3. Structural Basis for Endosomal Targeting by the Bro1 Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaewon; Sitaraman, Sujatha; Hierro, Aitor; Beach, Bridgette M.; Odorizzi, Greg; Hurley, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Proteins delivered to the lysosome or the yeast vacuole via late endosomes are sorted by the ESCRT complexes and by associated proteins, including Alix and its yeast homolog Bro1. Alix, Bro1, and several other late endosomal proteins share a conserved 160 residue Bro1 domain whose boundaries, structure, and function have not been characterized. The crystal structure of the Bro1 domain of Bro1 reveals a folded core of 367 residues. The extended Bro1 domain is necessary and sufficient for binding to the ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 and for the recruitment of Bro1 to late endosomes. The structure resembles a boomerang with its concave face filled in and contains a triple tetratricopeptide repeat domain as a substructure. Snf7 binds to a conserved hydrophobic patch on Bro1 that is required for protein complex formation and for the protein-sorting function of Bro1. These results define a conserved mechanism whereby Bro1 domain-containing proteins are targeted to endosomes by Snf7 and its orthologs. PMID:15935782

  4. C-terminal in Sp1-like artificial zinc-finger proteins plays crucial roles in determining their DNA binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baozhen; Xiang, Shengyan; Yin, Yanru; Gu, Liankun; Deng, Dajun

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that the C-terminal zinc-finger-3 in transcription factor Sp1 contributes more than the N-terminal zinc-finger-1 in determining Sp1's DNA binding capacity. Sp1-like artificial poly-zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs) are powerful biotechnological tools for gene-specific recognization and manipulation. It is important to understand whether the C-terminal fingers in the Sp1-like artificial ZFPs remain crucial for their DNA binding ability. Recently, a set of p16 promoter-specific seven-ZFPs (7ZFPs) has been constructed to reactivate the expression of methylation-silenced p16. These 7ZFPs contain one N-terminal three-zinc-finger domain of Sp1 (3ZF), two Sp1-like two-zinc-finger domains derived from the Sp1 finger-2 and finger-3 (2ZF) in the middle and C-terminal regions. In the present study, sets of variants for several representative 7ZFPs with the p16-binding affinity were further constructed. This was accomplished through finger replacements and key amino acid mutations in the N-terminal fingers, C-terminal fingers, and linker peptide, respectively. Their p16-binding activity was analysed using gel mobility shift assays. Results showed that the motif replacement or a key amino acid mutation (S > R) at position +2 of the α-helix in the C-terminal 2ZF domain completely abolished their p16-binding affinity. Deletion of three amino acids in a consensus linker (TGEKP > TG) between finger-7 and the 6 × Histidine-tag in the C-terminal also dramatically abolished their binding affinity. In contrast, the replacement of the finger-3 in the N-terminal 3ZF domain did not affect their binding affinity, but decreased their binding stability. Altogether, the present study show that the C-terminal region may play crucial roles in determining the DNA binding affinity of Sp1-like artificial ZFPs.

  5. Contribution of the C-terminal tri-lysine regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase for efficient reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowke Keith R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to mediating the integration process, HIV-1 integrase (IN has also been implicated in different steps during viral life cycle including reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import. Although the karyophilic property of HIV-1 IN has been well demonstrated using a variety of experimental approaches, the definition of domain(s and/or motif(s within the protein that mediate viral DNA nuclear import and its mechanism are still disputed and controversial. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses to investigate the contribution of different regions in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN to protein nuclear localization as well as their effects on virus infection. Results Our analysis showed that replacing lysine residues in two highly conserved tri-lysine regions, which are located within previously described Region C (235WKGPAKLLWKGEGAVV and sequence Q (211KELQKQITK in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN, impaired protein nuclear accumulation, while mutations for RK263,4 had no significant effect. Analysis of their effects on viral infection in a VSV-G pseudotyped RT/IN trans-complemented HIV-1 single cycle replication system revealed that all three C-terminal mutant viruses (KK215,9AA, KK240,4AE and RK263,4AA exhibited more severe defect of induction of β-Gal positive cells and luciferase activity than an IN class 1 mutant D64E in HeLa-CD4-CCR5-β-Gal cells, and in dividing as well as non-dividing C8166 T cells, suggesting that some viral defects are occurring prior to viral integration. Furthermore, by analyzing viral DNA synthesis and the nucleus-associated viral DNA level, the results clearly showed that, although all three C-terminal mutants inhibited viral reverse transcription to different extents, the KK240,4AE mutant exhibited most profound effect on this step, whereas KK215,9AA significantly impaired viral DNA nuclear import. In addition, our analysis could not detect viral DNA integration in each C-terminal

  6. Structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn{sup 2+}-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David R. [Integrated Center for Structure-Function Innovation, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Grossoehme, Nickolas E. [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7102 (United States); Yu, Minmin [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS4R0230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS4R0230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Physics Division, MS D454, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Cieslik, Marcin; Derewenda, Urszula [Integrated Center for Structure-Function Innovation, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Lesley, Scott A. [The Scripps Research Institute, North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Wilson, Ian A. [The Scripps Research Institute, North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Giedroc, David P. [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7102 (United States); Derewenda, Zygmunt S., E-mail: zsd4n@virginia.edu [Integrated Center for Structure-Function Innovation, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged-helix DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal regulatory domains which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all-α-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR-C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of FadR-family members, those of Escherichia coli FadR protein and LldR from Corynebacterium glutamicum, have been described to date in the literature. Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator and contains a buried metal-binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, it is shown that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions but that it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub d} < 70 nM. It is concluded that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal and that it may perform either structural or regulatory roles or both. Finally, the TM0439 structure is compared with two other FadR-family structures recently deposited by structural genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  7. Characteristic NH3 and CO losses from sodiated peptides C-terminated by glutamine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xinshu; Wang, Bing; Wang, Huixin; Liu, Jinrong; Li, Ying; Guo, Xinhua

    2017-04-15

    Under certain conditions some amino acid (AA) residues undergo special reactions in the gas phase, generating characteristic neutral losses and product ions. Taking these special fragments into account and understanding the effect of AA residues on peptide cleavages will consummate database search algorithms and manual data interpretation in peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry (MS). In this study, the details of the characteristic NH3 and CO losses of glutamine (Gln) residues located at the C-terminus of peptides are presented. A number of selected peptides were fragmented under collision-induced dissociation (CID) in electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QTOF-MS). Density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical calculations at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level were carried out to optimize the geometry of peptide ions and provide energy barriers of ions in each step during fragmentations. Two characteristic peaks appear near the precursor ions of sodiated Gln C-terminated peptides, suggesting the loss of neutral NH3 and CO via a two-step process. The proposed mechanism of their formation is as follows: after losing NH3 , a non-classical bn   * ion is formed with a glutaric anhydride structure that further dissociates to lose CO. The sodiated peptides show more intensive peaks corresponding to the loss of neutral molecules than the protonated ones. This type of neutral loss can also occur at the Gln residue that is rearranged to the C-terminus of sodiated peptides. The experiments and calculations suggest that the two-step characteristic NH3 and CO loss of sodiated peptides is energetically favored, and can be applied to identify C-terminated Gln residues. This study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of sodium ion during peptide fragmentation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Effect of domains configuration on crystal structure in ferroelectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 6. Effect of domains configuration on crystal structure in ferroelectric ceramics as revealed by XRD and dielectric spectrum. JIWEN XU WEIDONG ZENG QINGNING LI LING YANG CHANGRONG ZHOU. Volume 40 Issue 6 October 2017 pp 1159-1163 ...

  9. Time-domain seismic reliability of nonlinear structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A novel reliability analysis technique is presented to estimate the reli- ability of real structural systems. Its unique feature is that the dynamic loadings can be applied in time domain. It is a nonlinear stochastic finite element logarithm combined with the response surface method (RSM). It generates the response sur-.

  10. The C-terminal part of microcin B is crucial for DNA gyrase inhibition and antibiotic uptake by sensitive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkundina, Irina; Serebryakova, Marina; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Microcin B (McB) is a ribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptide. It contains up to nine oxazole and thiazole heterocycles that are introduced posttranslationally and are required for activity. McB inhibits the DNA gyrase, a validated drug target. Previous structure-activity analyses indicated that two fused heterocycles located in the central part of McB are important for antibacterial action and gyrase inhibition. Here, we used site-specific mutagenesis of the McB precursor gene to assess the functional significance of the C-terminal part of McB that is located past the second fused heterocycle and contains two single heterocycles as well as an unmodified four-amino-acid C-terminal tail. We found that removal of unmodified C-terminal amino acids of McB, while having no effect on fused heterocycles, has a very strong negative effect on activity in vivo and in vitro. In fact, even nonconservative point substitutions in the last McB amino acid have a very strong effect by simultaneously decreasing uptake and ability to inhibit the gyrase. The results highlight the importance of unmodified McB amino acids for function and open the way for creation of recombinant McB derivatives with an altered or expanded spectrum of antibacterial action.

  11. Structure and activation of the TSH receptor transmembrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez Miguel, Ricardo; Sanders, Jane; Furmaniak, Jadwiga; Smith, Bernard Rees

    2017-12-01

    The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the target autoantigen for TSHR-stimulating autoantibodies in Graves' disease. The TSHR is composed of: a leucine-rich repeat domain (LRD), a hinge region or cleavage domain (CD) and a transmembrane domain (TMD). The binding arrangements between the TSHR LRD and the thyroid-stimulating autoantibody M22 or TSH have become available from the crystal structure of the TSHR LRD-M22 complex and a comparative model of the TSHR LRD in complex with TSH, respectively. However, the mechanism by which the TMD of the TSHR and the other glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs) becomes activated is unknown. We have generated comparative models of the structures of the inactive (TMD_In) and active (TMD_Ac) conformations of the TSHR, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) TMDs. The structures of TMD_Ac and TMD_In were obtained using class A GPCR crystal structures for which fully active and inactive conformations were available. Most conserved motifs observed in GPCR TMDs are also observed in the amino acid sequences of GPHR TMDs. Furthermore, most GPCR TMD conserved helix distortions are observed in our models of the structures of GPHR TMDs. Analysis of these structures has allowed us to propose a mechanism for activation of GPHR TMDs. Insight into the mechanism of activation of the TSHR by both TSH and TSHR autoantibodies is likely to be useful in the development of new treatments for Graves' disease.

  12. ASH structure alignment package: Sensitivity and selectivity in domain classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toh Hiroyuki

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structure alignment methods offer the possibility of measuring distant evolutionary relationships between proteins that are not visible by sequence-based analysis. However, the question of how structural differences and similarities ought to be quantified in this regard remains open. In this study we construct a training set of sequence-unique CATH and SCOP domains, from which we develop a scoring function that can reliably identify domains with the same CATH topology and SCOP fold classification. The score is implemented in the ASH structure alignment package, for which the source code and a web service are freely available from the PDBj website http://www.pdbj.org/ASH/. Results The new ASH score shows increased selectivity and sensitivity compared with values reported for several popular programs using the same test set of 4,298,905 structure pairs, yielding an area of .96 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. In addition, weak sequence homologies between similar domains are revealed that could not be detected by BLAST sequence alignment. Also, a subset of domain pairs is identified that exhibit high similarity, even though their CATH and SCOP classification differs. Finally, we show that the ranking of alignment programs based solely on geometric measures depends on the choice of the quality measure. Conclusion ASH shows high selectivity and sensitivity with regard to domain classification, an important step in defining distantly related protein sequence families. Moreover, the CPU cost per alignment is competitive with the fastest programs, making ASH a practical option for large-scale structure classification studies.

  13. Mapping small molecule binding data to structural domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Felix A; Rostom, Raghd; Overington, John P

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale bioactivity/SAR Open Data has recently become available, and this has allowed new analyses and approaches to be developed to help address the productivity and translational gaps of current drug discovery. One of the current limitations of these data is the relative sparsity of reported interactions per protein target, and complexities in establishing clear relationships between bioactivity and targets using bioinformatics tools. We detail in this paper the indexing of targets by the structural domains that bind (or are likely to bind) the ligand within a full-length protein. Specifically, we present a simple heuristic to map small molecule binding to Pfam domains. This profiling can be applied to all proteins within a genome to give some indications of the potential pharmacological modulation and regulation of all proteins. In this implementation of our heuristic, ligand binding to protein targets from the ChEMBL database was mapped to structural domains as defined by profiles contained within the Pfam-A database. Our mapping suggests that the majority of assay targets within the current version of the ChEMBL database bind ligands through a small number of highly prevalent domains, and conversely the majority of Pfam domains sampled by our data play no currently established role in ligand binding. Validation studies, carried out firstly against Uniprot entries with expert binding-site annotation and secondly against entries in the wwPDB repository of crystallographic protein structures, demonstrate that our simple heuristic maps ligand binding to the correct domain in about 90 percent of all assessed cases. Using the mappings obtained with our heuristic, we have assembled ligand sets associated with each Pfam domain. Small molecule binding has been mapped to Pfam-A domains of protein targets in the ChEMBL bioactivity database. The result of this mapping is an enriched annotation of small molecule bioactivity data and a grouping of activity classes

  14. C-terminals in the mouse branchiomotor nuclei originate from the magnocellular reticular formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Toshiyasu; Hongo, Yu; Haizuka, Yoshinori; Kaida, Kenichi; Matsumura, George; Martin, Donna M; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2013-08-26

    Large cholinergic synaptic boutons called "C-terminals" contact motoneurons and regulate their excitability. C-terminals in the spinal somatic motor nuclei originate from cholinergic interneurons in laminae VII and X that express a transcription factor Pitx2. Cranial motor nuclei contain another type of motoneuron: branchiomotor neurons. Although branchiomotor neurons receive abundant C-terminal projections, the neural source of these C-terminals remains unknown. In the present study, we first examined whether cholinergic neurons express Pitx2 in the reticular formation of the adult mouse brainstem, as in the spinal cord. Although Pitx2-positive cholinergic neurons were observed in the magnocellular reticular formation and region around the central canal in the caudal medulla, none was present more rostrally in the brainstem tegmentum. We next explored the origin of C-terminals in the branchiomotor nuclei by using biotinylated dextran amine (BDA). BDA injections into the magnocellular reticular formation of the medulla and pons resulted in the labeling of numerous C-terminals in the branchiomotor nuclei: the ambiguous, facial, and trigeminal motor nuclei. Our results revealed that the origins of C-terminals in the branchiomotor nuclei are cholinergic neurons in the magnocellular reticular formation not only in the caudal medulla, but also at more rostral levels of the brainstem, which lacks Pitx2-positive neurons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Age-dependent loss of the C-terminal amino acid from alpha crystallin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, T.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum made against the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin was used to monitor the purification of a tryptic peptide containing the C-terminus of the molecule from fetal versus adult bovine lenses. Mass spectral analysis of the peptide preparations obtained from these lenses demonstrated the presence of a peptide (T20) containing an intact C-terminus from fetal lenses and the presence of an additional peptide (T20') from older lenses that contained a cleaved C-terminal serine. These results demonstrate an age-dependent processing of alpha-A crystallin in the bovine lens, resulting in removal of the C-terminal amino acid residue.

  16. Identification of frequency domain and time domain aeroelastic parameters for flutter analysis of flexible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Arindam Gan

    Flutter analysis of structures is usually done in frequency domain. Alternately, time-domain methods have been suggested. For frequency-domain flutter analysis, flutter derivatives are used that can be identified from section model testing in the wind tunnel. In time-domain analysis, the frequency-dependent aerodynamic self-excited forces expressed in flutter derivatives acting on the structure can be approximated in the Laplace domain by Rational functions. The art of efficient extraction of these aeroelastic parameters requires an elastic suspension system to capture coupled displacement and aerodynamic force time histories from wind tunnel testing of section models. A novel three-degree-of-freedom (DOF) suspension system has been developed for the wind-tunnel section model study of wind-excited vibrations of flexible structures. The extraction of flutter derivatives becomes more challenging when the number of DOF of section model increases from two to three. Since the work in the field of identifying all eighteen flutter derivatives has been limited, it has motivated the development of a new system identification method (Iterative least squares method or ILS method) to efficiently extract the flutter derivatives using a section model suspended by the three-DOF elastic suspension system. All eighteen flutter derivatives for a streamlined bridge deck and an airfoil section model were identified by using ILS approach. Flutter derivatives related to the lateral DOF were emphasized. For time-domain flutter analysis, Rational function approximation (RFA) approach involves approximation of the experimentally obtained flutter derivatives through 'multilevel linear and nonlinear optimization' procedure. This motivated the formulation of a system identification technique (Experimental extraction of Rational function coefficients or E2RFC) to directly extract the Rational function coefficients from wind tunnel testing. The current formulation requires testing of the model

  17. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein SA1388 from S. aureus reveals a capped hexameric toroid with two PII domain lids and a dinuclear metal center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Zhang, Xuejun; Kinch, Lisa; Leybourne, Matthew; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong (Texas-D); (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2009-01-26

    The protein encoded by the SA1388 gene from Staphylococcus aureus was chosen for structure determination to elucidate its domain organization and confirm our earlier remote homology based prediction that it housed a nitrogen regulatory PII protein-like domain. SA1388 was predicted to contain a central PII-like domain and two flanking regions, which together belong to the NIF3-like protein family. Proteins like SA1388 remain a poorly studied group and their structural characterization could guide future investigations aimed at understanding their function. The structure of SA1388 has been solved to 2.0{angstrom} resolution by single wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method using selenium anomalous signals. It reveals a canonical NIF3-like fold containing two domains with a PII-like domain inserted in the middle of the polypeptide. The N and C terminal halves of the NIF3-like domains are involved in dimerization, while the PII domain forms trimeric contacts with symmetry related monomers. Overall, the NIF3-like domains of SA1388 are organized as a hexameric toroid similar to its homologs, E. coli ybgI and the hypothetical protein SP1609 from Streptococcus pneumoniae. The openings on either side of the toroid are partially covered by trimeric 'lids' formed by the PII domains. The junction of the two NIF3 domains has two zinc ions bound at what appears to be a histidine rich active site. A well-defined electron density corresponding to an endogenously bound ligand of unknown identity is observed in close proximity to the metal site. SA1388 is the third member of the NIF3-like family of proteins to be structurally characterized, the other two also being hypothetical proteins of unknown function. The structure of SA1388 confirms our earlier prediction that the inserted domain that separates the two NIF3 domains adopts a PII-like fold and reveals an overall capped toroidal arrangement for the protein hexamer. The six PII-like domains form two trimeric

  18. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Stricher, Francois

    2008-01-01

    Background: Efficient communication between distant sites within a protein is essential for cooperative biological response. Although often associated with large allosteric movements, more subtle changes in protein dynamics can also induce long-range correlations. However, an appropriate formalism...... that directly relates protein structural dynamics to information exchange between functional sites is still lacking. Results: Here we introduce a method to analyze protein dynamics within the framework of information theory and show that signal transduction within proteins can be considered as a particular...... distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located...

  19. Versatile Peptide C-Terminal Functionalization via a Computationally Engineered Peptide Amidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Bian; Wijma, Hein J.; Song, Lu; Rozeboom, Henriette J.; Poloni, Claudia; Tian, Yue; Arif, Muhammad I.; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J. L. M.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L.; Janssen, Dick B.

    The properties of synthetic peptides, including potency, stability, and bioavailability, are strongly influenced by modification of the peptide chain termini. Unfortunately, generally applicable methods for selective and mild C-terminal peptide functionalization are lacking. In this work, we

  20. Co-expression of the C-terminal domain of Yersinia enterocolitica ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-11

    Jan 11, 2015 ... infection and persistent infection), which causes great eco- nomic losses to livestock (Moennig 2000). ... targeting delivery of antigen to the lymphatic tissues (Clark et al. 1998). This characteristic is used to ... kidney cell line PK-15. The virulent CSFV. 'Shimen' strain was provided by the Control Institute of.

  1. Co-expression of the C-terminal domain of Yersinia enterocolitica ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Helin Li1 Pengbo Ning1 Zhi Lin1 Wulong Liang1 Kai Kang1 Lei He2 Yanming Zhang1. College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A & F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi, China; College of Animal Science & Technology, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023, Henan, China ...

  2. C-terminal engineering of CXCL12 and CCL5 chemokines: functional characterization by electrophysiological recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Picciocchi

    Full Text Available Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines comprised of 70-100 amino acids. The chemokines CXCL12 and CCL5 are the endogenous ligands of the CXCR4 and CCR5 G protein-coupled receptors that are also HIV co-receptors. Biochemical, structural and functional studies of receptors are ligand-consuming and the cost of commercial chemokines hinders their use in such studies. Here, we describe methods for the expression, refolding, purification, and functional characterization of CXCL12 and CCL5 constructs incorporating C-terminal epitope tags. The model tags used were hexahistidines and Strep-Tag for affinity purification, and the double lanthanoid binding tag for fluorescence imaging and crystal structure resolution. The ability of modified and purified chemokines to bind and activate CXCR4 and CCR5 receptors was tested in Xenopus oocytes expressing the receptors, together with a Kir3 G-protein activated K(+ channel that served as a reporter of receptor activation. Results demonstrate that tags greatly influence the biochemical properties of the recombinant chemokines. Besides, despite the absence of any evidence for CXCL12 or CCL5 C-terminus involvement in receptor binding and activation, we demonstrated unpredictable effects of tag insertion on the ligand apparent affinity and efficacy or on the ligand dissociation. These tagged chemokines should constitute useful tools for the selective purification of properly-folded chemokines receptors and the study of their native quaternary structures.

  3. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  4. Solution structure of the first immunoglobulin domain of human myotilin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkinen, Outi [University of Helsinki, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry (Finland)], E-mail: Outi.K.Heikkinen@helsinki.fi; Permi, Perttu [University of Helsinki, Program in Structural Biology and Biophysics, Institute of Biotechnology (Finland); Koskela, Harri [University of Helsinki, Finnish Institute for Verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (VERIFIN) (Finland); Carpen, Olli [University of Helsinki, Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience Program, Biomedicum (Finland); Ylaenne, Jari [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Nanoscience Center (Finland); Kilpelaeinen, Ilkka [University of Helsinki, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    Myotilin is a 57 kDa actin-binding and -bundling protein that consists of a unique serine-rich amino-terminus, two Ig-domains and a short carboxy-terminus with a PDZ-binding motif. Myotilin localizes in sarcomeric Z-discs, where it interacts with several sarcomeric proteins. Point mutations in myotilin cause muscle disorders morphologically highlighted by sarcomeric disarray and aggregation. The actin-binding and dimerization propensity of myotilin has been mapped to the Ig-domains. Here we present high-resolution structure of the first Ig-domain of myotilin (MyoIg1) determined with solution state NMR spectroscopy. Nearly complete chemical shift assignments of MyoIg1 were achieved despite several missing backbone {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N-HSQC signals. The structure derived from distance and dihedral angle restraints using torsion angle dynamics was further refined using molecular dynamics. The structure of MyoIg1 exhibits I-type Ig-fold. The absence of several backbone {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N-HSQC signals can be explained by conformational exchange taking place at the hydrophobic core of the protein.

  5. Crystal structure of the inactive state of the receiver domain of Spo0A from Paenisporosarcina sp. TG-14, a psychrophilic bacterium isolated from an Antarctic glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Park, Sun-Ha; Lee, Sung Gu; Shin, Seung Chul; Han, Se Jong; Kim, Han-Woo; Park, Hyun Ho; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Hak Jun; Park, Hyun; Park, HaJeung; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2017-06-01

    The two-component phosphorelay system is the most prevalent mechanism for sensing and transducing environmental signals in bacteria. Spore formation, which relies on the two-component phosphorelay system, enables the long-term survival of the glacial bacterium Paenisporosarcina sp. TG-14 in the extreme cold environment. Spo0A is a key response regulator of the phosphorelay system in the early stage of spore formation. The protein is composed of a regulatory N-terminal phospho-receiver domain and a DNA-binding C-terminal activator domain. We solved the three-dimensional structure of the unphosphorylated (inactive) form of the receiver domain of Spo0A (PaSpo0A-R) from Paenisporosarcina sp. TG-14. A structural comparison with phosphorylated (active form) Spo0A from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BsSpo0A) showed minor notable differences. A molecular dynamics study of a model of the active form and the crystal structures revealed significant differences in the α4 helix and the preceding loop region where phosphorylation occurs. Although an oligomerization study of PaSpo0A-R by analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) has shown that the protein is in a monomeric state in solution, both crosslinking and crystal-packing analyses indicate the possibility of weak dimer formation by a previously undocumented mechanism. Collectively, these observations provide insight into the mechanism of phosphorylation-dependent activation unique to Spo0A.

  6. Structural Basis for Viral Late-Domain Binding to Alix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee,S.; Joshi, A.; Nagashima, K.; Freed, E.; Hurley, J.

    2007-01-01

    The modular protein Alix is a central node in endosomal-lysosomal trafficking and the budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. The Gag p6 protein of HIV-1 contains a LYPx{sub n}LxxL motif that is required for Alix-mediated budding and binds a region of Alix spanning residues 360-702. The structure of this fragment of Alix has the shape of the letter 'V' and is termed the V domain. The V domain has a topologically complex arrangement of 11 {alpha}-helices, with connecting loops that cross three times between the two arms of the V. The conserved residue Phe676 is at the center of a large hydrophobic pocket and is crucial for binding to a peptide model of HIV-1 p6. Overexpression of the V domain inhibits HIV-1 release from cells. This inhibition of release is reversed by mutations that block binding of the Alix V domain to p6.

  7. Structural and functional analyses of minimal phosphopeptides targeting the polo-box domain of polo-like kinase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Sang-Moon; Moulaei, Tinoush; Lim, Dan; Bang, Jeong K.; Park, Jung-Eun; Shenoy, Shilpa R.; Liu, Fa; Kang, Young H.; Liao, Chenzhong; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Lee, Sunhee; Yoon, Do-Young; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Dong-Hee; Otaka, Akira; Appella, Ettore; McMahon, James B.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Burke, Jr., Terrence R.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Lee, Kyung S.; (MIT); (Konkuk); (Korea Basic Science Institute); (SAIC); (NCI); (University of Tokushima)

    2009-09-14

    Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1) has a pivotal role in cell proliferation and is considered a potential target for anticancer therapy. The noncatalytic polo-box domain (PBD) of Plk1 forms a phosphoepitope binding module for protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification of minimal phosphopeptides that specifically interact with the PBD of human PLK1, but not those of the closely related PLK2 and PLK3. Comparative binding studies and analyses of crystal structures of the PLK1 PBD in complex with the minimal phosphopeptides revealed that the C-terminal SpT dipeptide functions as a high-affinity anchor, whereas the N-terminal residues are crucial for providing specificity and affinity to the interaction. Inhibition of the PLK1 PBD by phosphothreonine mimetic peptides was sufficient to induce mitotic arrest and apoptotic cell death. The mode of interaction between the minimal peptide and PBD may provide a template for designing therapeutic agents that target PLK1.

  8. Expression of the C-terminal family 22 carbohydratebinding module ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbohydrate-binding modules have been shown to alter plant cell wall structural architecture. Hence, they have the potential application of being used to engineer the plant to produce tailor-made natural fibers in the cell wall. The Clostridium thermocellum xylanase, Xyn10B, contains two CBMs that belong to family 22 ...

  9. Asparagine 326 in the extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 is essential for the cell survival after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanotayan, Rujira; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa, E-mail: yoshim@nr.titech.ac.jp

    2015-02-20

    XRCC4 is one of the crucial proteins in the repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). As XRCC4 consists of 336 amino acids, N-terminal 200 amino acids include domains for dimerization and for association with DNA ligase IV and XLF and shown to be essential for XRCC4 function in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. On the other hand, the role of the remaining C-terminal region of XRCC4 is not well understood. In the present study, we noticed that a stretch of ∼20 amino acids located at the extreme C-terminus of XRCC4 is highly conserved among vertebrate species. To explore its possible importance, series of mutants in this region were constructed and assessed for the functionality in terms of ability to rescue radiosensitivity of M10 cells lacking XRCC4. Among 13 mutants, M10 transfectant with N326L mutant (M10-XRCC4{sup N326L}) showed elevated radiosensitivity. N326L protein showed defective nuclear localization. N326L sequence matched the consensus sequence of nuclear export signal. Leptomycin B treatment accumulated XRCC4{sup N326L} in the nucleus but only partially rescued radiosensitivity of M10-XRCC4{sup N326L}. These results collectively indicated that the functional defects of XRCC4{sup N326L} might be partially, but not solely, due to its exclusion from nucleus by synthetic nuclear export signal. Further mutation of XRCC4 Asn326 to other amino acids, i.e., alanine, aspartic acid or glutamine did not affect the nuclear localization but still exhibited radiosensitivity. The present results indicated the importance of the extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 and, especially, Asn326 therein. - Highlights: • Extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 is highly conserved among vertebrate species. • XRCC4 C-terminal point mutants, R325F and N326L, are functionally deficient in terms of survival after irradiation. • N326L localizes to the cytoplasm because of synthetic nuclear export signal. • Leptomycin B restores the

  10. Crystal structure of calpain-3 penta-EF-hand (PEF) domain - a homodimerized PEF family member with calcium bound at the fifth EF-hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partha, Sarathy K; Ravulapalli, Ravikiran; Allingham, John S; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    Calpains are Ca(2+) dependent intracellular cysteine proteases that cleave a wide range of protein substrates to help implement Ca(2+) signaling in the cell. The major isoforms of this enzyme family, calpain-1 and calpain-2, are heterodimers of a large and a small subunit, with the main dimer interface being formed through their C-terminal penta-EF hand (PEF) domains. Calpain-3, or p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific isoform that is genetically linked to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Biophysical and modeling studies with the PEF domain of calpain-3 support the suggestion that full-length calpain-3 exists as a homodimer. Here, we report the crystallization of calpain-3's PEF domain and its crystal structure in the presence of Ca(2+) , which provides evidence for the homodimer architecture of calpain-3 and supports the molecular model that places a protease core at either end of the elongated dimer. Unlike other calpain PEF domain structures, the calpain-3 PEF domain contains a Ca(2+) bound at the EF5-hand used for homodimer association. Three of the four Ca(2+) -binding EF-hands of the PEF domains are concentrated near the protease core, and have the potential to radically change the local charge within the dimer during Ca(2+) signaling. Examination of the homodimer interface shows that there would be steric clashes if the calpain-3 large subunit were to try to pair with a calpain small subunit. Database Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank database under accession number 4OKH. © 2014 FEBS.

  11. The C-terminal extension of human telomerase reverse transcriptase is necessary for high affinity binding to telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Holien, Jessica K; Mathias, Jordan A T; Parker, Michael W; Bryan, Tracy M

    2016-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase maintains telomeres and is essential for cellular immortality in most cancers. Insight into the telomerase mechanism can be gained from short telomere syndromes, in which mutation of telomerase components manifests in telomere dysfunction. We carried out detailed kinetic analyses and molecular modelling of a disease-associated mutant in the C-terminal extension of the reverse transcriptase subunit of human telomerase. The kinetic analyses revealed that the mutation substantially impacts the affinity of telomerase for telomeric DNA, but the magnitude of this impact varies for primers with different 3' ends. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate this finding, revealing that the mutation results in greater movement of a nearby loop, impacting the DNA-RNA helix differentially with different DNA primers. Thus, the data indicate that this region is the location of one of the enzyme conformational changes responsible for the long-standing observation that off-rates of telomerase vary with telomeric 3' end sequence. Our data provide a molecular basis for a disease-associated telomerase mutation, and the first direct evidence for a role of the C-terminal extension in DNA binding affinity, a function analogous to the "thumb" domain of retroviral reverse transcriptases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. PCSK9-mediated degradation of the LDL receptor generates a 17 kDa C-terminal LDL receptor fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveten, Kristian; Strøm, Thea Bismo; Berge, Knut Erik; Leren, Trond P

    2013-06-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds to the LDL receptor (LDLR) at the cell surface and reroutes the internalized LDLR to intracellular degradation. In this study, we have shown that PCSK9-mediated degradation of the full-length 160 kDa LDLR generates a 17 kDa C-terminal LDLR fragment. This fragment was not generated from mutant LDLRs resistant to PCSK9-mediated degradation or when degradation was prevented by chemicals such as ammonium chloride or the cysteine cathepsin inhibitor E64d. The observation that the 17 kDa fragment was only detected when the cells were cultured in the presence of the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT indicates that this 17 kDa fragment undergoes γ-secretase cleavage within the transmembrane domain. The failure to detect the complementary 143 kDa ectodomain fragment is likely to be due to its rapid degradation in the endosomal lumen. The 17 kDa C-terminal LDLR fragment was also generated from a Class 5 mutant LDLR undergoing intracellular degradation. Thus, one may speculate that an LDLR with bound PCSK9 and a Class 5 LDLR with bound LDL are degraded by a similar mechanism that could involve ectodomain cleavage in the endosome.

  13. Crystal Structure of the Marburg Virus VP35 Oligomerization Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Urata, Sarah M.; Li, Sheng; Tickle, Ian J.; Bricogne, Gérard; Saphire, Erica Ollmann (Scripps); (Globel Phasing); (UCSD)

    2016-11-09

    ABSTRACT

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that is classified in a genus distinct from that of Ebola virus (EBOV) (generaMarburgvirusandEbolavirus, respectively). Both viruses produce a multifunctional protein termed VP35, which acts as a polymerase cofactor, a viral protein chaperone, and an antagonist of the innate immune response. VP35 contains a central oligomerization domain with a predicted coiled-coil motif. This domain has been shown to be essential for RNA polymerase function. Here we present crystal structures of the MARV VP35 oligomerization domain. These structures and accompanying biophysical characterization suggest that MARV VP35 is a trimer. In contrast, EBOV VP35 is likely a tetramer in solution. Differences in the oligomeric state of this protein may explain mechanistic differences in replication and immune evasion observed for MARV and EBOV.

    IMPORTANCEMarburg virus can cause severe disease, with up to 90% human lethality. Its genome is concise, only producing seven proteins. One of the proteins, VP35, is essential for replication of the viral genome and for evasion of host immune responses. VP35 oligomerizes (self-assembles) in order to function, yet the structure by which it assembles has not been visualized. Here we present two crystal structures of this oligomerization domain. In both structures, three copies of VP35 twist about each other to form a coiled coil. This trimeric assembly is in contrast to tetrameric predictions for VP35 of Ebola virus and to known structures of homologous proteins in the measles, mumps, and Nipah viruses. Distinct oligomeric states of the Marburg and Ebola virus VP35 proteins may explain differences between them in polymerase function and immune evasion. These findings may provide a more accurate understanding of the

  14. Conserved structural domains in FoxD4L1, a neural forkhead box transcription factor, are required to repress or activate target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Klein

    Full Text Available FoxD4L1 is a forkhead transcription factor that expands the neural ectoderm by down-regulating genes that promote the onset of neural differentiation and up-regulating genes that maintain proliferative neural precursors in an immature state. We previously demonstrated that binding of Grg4 to an Eh-1 motif enhances the ability of FoxD4L1 to down-regulate target neural genes but does not account for all of its repressive activity. Herein we analyzed the protein sequence for additional interaction motifs and secondary structure. Eight conserved motifs were identified in the C-terminal region of fish and frog proteins. Extending the analysis to mammals identified a high scoring motif downstream of the Eh-1 domain that contains a tryptophan residue implicated in protein-protein interactions. In addition, secondary structure prediction programs predicted an α-helical structure overlapping with amphibian-specific Motif 6 in Xenopus, and similarly located α-helical structures in other vertebrate FoxD proteins. We tested functionality of this site by inducing a glutamine-to-proline substitution expected to break the predicted α-helical structure; this significantly reduced FoxD4L1's ability to repress zic3 and irx1. Because this mutation does not interfere with Grg4 binding, these results demonstrate that at least two regions, the Eh-1 motif and a more C-terminal predicted α-helical/Motif 6 site, additively contribute to repression. In the N-terminal region we previously identified a 14 amino acid motif that is required for the up-regulation of target genes. Secondary structure prediction programs predicted a short β-strand separating two acidic domains. Mutant constructs show that the β-strand itself is not required for transcriptional activation. Instead, activation depends upon a glycine residue that is predicted to provide sufficient flexibility to bring the two acidic domains into close proximity. These results identify conserved predicted

  15. Crystal structure of the Habc domain of neuronal syntaxin from the squid Loligo pealei reveals conformational plasticity at its C-terminus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracher Andreas

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular membrane fusion processes are mediated by the spatial and temporal control of SNARE complex assembly that results in the formation of a four-helical bundle, composed of one vesicle SNARE and three target membrane SNARE polypeptide chains. Syntaxins are essential t-SNAREs and are characterized by an N-terminal Habc domain, a flexible linker region, a coiled-coil or SNARE motif and a membrane anchor. The N-terminal Habc domain fulfills important regulatory functions while the coiled-coil motif, present in all SNAREs, is sufficient for SNARE complex formation, which is thought to drive membrane fusion. Results Here we report the crystal structure of the Habc domain of neuronal syntaxin from the squid Loligo pealei, s-syntaxin. Squid Habc crystallizes as a dimer and the monomer structure consists of a three-helical bundle. One molecule is strikingly similar to mammalian syntaxin 1A while the second one shows a structural deviation from the common fold in that the C-terminal part of helix C unwinds and adopts an extended conformation. Conclusion Conservation of surface residues indicates that the cytosolic part of s-syntaxin can adopt an auto-inhibitory closed conformation that may bind squid neuronal Sec1, s-Sec1, in the same manner as observed in structure of the rat nSec1/syntaxin 1A complex. Furthermore, despite the overall structural similarity, the observed changes at the C-terminus of one molecule indicate structural plasticity in neuronal syntaxin. Implications of the structural conservation and the changes are discussed with respect to potential Habc domain binding partners such as Munc13, which facilitates the transition from the closed to the open conformation.

  16. Structural eigenfrequency optimization based on local sub-domain "frequencies"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pauli; Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2013-01-01

    eigenfrequencies may also be controlled in this manner.The presented examples are based on 2D finite element models with the use of subspace iteration for analysis and a recursive design procedure based on the derived optimality condition. The design that maximize a frequency depend on the total amount......The engineering approach of fully stressed design is a practical tool with a theoretical foundation. The analog approach to structural eigenfrequency optimization is presented here with its theoretical foundation. A numerical redesign procedure is proposed and illustrated with examples.......For the ideal case, an optimality criterion is fulfilled if the design have the same sub-domain ”frequency” (local Rayleigh quotient). Sensitivity analysis shows an important relation between squared system eigenfrequency and squared local sub-domain frequency for a given eigenmode. Higher order...

  17. The structure of the oligomerization domain of Lsr2 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals a mechanism for chromosome organization and protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L Summers

    Full Text Available Lsr2 is a small DNA-binding protein present in mycobacteria and related actinobacteria that regulates gene expression and influences the organization of bacterial chromatin. Lsr2 is a dimer that binds to AT-rich regions of chromosomal DNA and physically protects DNA from damage by reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI. A recent structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of Lsr2 provides a rationale for its interaction with the minor groove of DNA, its preference for AT-rich tracts, and its similarity to other bacterial nucleoid-associated DNA-binding domains. In contrast, the details of Lsr2 dimerization (and oligomerization via its N-terminal domain, and the mechanism of Lsr2-mediated chromosomal cross-linking and protection is unknown. We have solved the structure of the N-terminal domain of Lsr2 (N-Lsr2 at 1.73 Å resolution using crystallographic ab initio approaches. The structure shows an intimate dimer of two ß-ß-a motifs with no close homologues in the structural databases. The organization of individual N-Lsr2 dimers in the crystal also reveals a mechanism for oligomerization. Proteolytic removal of three N-terminal residues from Lsr2 results in the formation of an anti-parallel β-sheet between neighboring molecules and the formation of linear chains of N-Lsr2. Oligomerization can be artificially induced using low concentrations of trypsin and the arrangement of N-Lsr2 into long chains is observed in both monoclinic and hexagonal crystallographic space groups. In solution, oligomerization of N-Lsr2 is also observed following treatment with trypsin. A change in chromosomal topology after the addition of trypsin to full-length Lsr2-DNA complexes and protection of DNA towards DNAse digestion can be observed using electron microscopy and electrophoresis. These results suggest a mechanism for oligomerization of Lsr2 via protease-activation leading to chromosome compaction and protection, and concomitant down-regulation of large numbers

  18. Structure-function analysis of Rgs1 in Magnaporthe oryzae: role of DEP domains in subcellular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Yishi, Xu; Liu, Hao; Naqvi, Naweed I

    2012-01-01

    Rgs1, a prototypical Regulator of G protein Signaling, negatively modulates the cyclic AMP pathway thereby influencing various aspects of asexual development and pathogenesis in the rice-blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Rgs1 possesses tandem DEP motifs (termed DEP-A and DEP-B; for Dishevelled, Egl-10, Pleckstrin) at the N-terminus, and a Gα-GTP interacting RGS catalytic core domain at the C-terminus. In this study, we focused on gaining further insights into the mechanisms of Rgs1 regulation and subcellular localization by characterizing the role(s) of the individual domains and the full-length protein during asexual development and pathogenesis in Magnaporthe. Utilizing western blot analysis and specific antisera against the N- and C-terminal halves of Rgs1, we identify and report the in vivo endoproteolytic processing/cleavage of full-length Rgs1 that yields an N-terminal DEP and a RGS core domain. Independent expression of the resultant DEP-DEP half (N-Rgs1) or RGS core (C-Rgs1) fragments, failed to complement the rgs1Δ defects in colony morphology, aerial hyphal growth, surface hydrophobicity, conidiation, appressorium formation and infection. Interestingly, the full-length Rgs1-mCherry, as well as the tagged N-terminal DEP domains (individually or in conjunction) localized to distinct punctate vesicular structures in the cytosol, while the catalytic RGS core motif was predominantly vacuolar. Based on our data from sequence alignments, immuno-blot and microscopic analysis, we propose that the post-translational proteolytic processing of Rgs1 and the vacuolar sequestration of the catalytic RGS domain represents an important means of down regulating Rgs1 function and thus forming an additional and alternative means of regulating G protein signaling in Magnaporthe. We further hypothesize the prevalence of analogous mechanisms functioning in other filamentous fungi. Furthermore, we conclusively assign a specific vesicular/membrane targeting function for the N

  19. Structure-function analysis of Rgs1 in Magnaporthe oryzae: role of DEP domains in subcellular targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikrishna Ramanujam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rgs1, a prototypical Regulator of G protein Signaling, negatively modulates the cyclic AMP pathway thereby influencing various aspects of asexual development and pathogenesis in the rice-blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Rgs1 possesses tandem DEP motifs (termed DEP-A and DEP-B; for Dishevelled, Egl-10, Pleckstrin at the N-terminus, and a Gα-GTP interacting RGS catalytic core domain at the C-terminus. In this study, we focused on gaining further insights into the mechanisms of Rgs1 regulation and subcellular localization by characterizing the role(s of the individual domains and the full-length protein during asexual development and pathogenesis in Magnaporthe. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Utilizing western blot analysis and specific antisera against the N- and C-terminal halves of Rgs1, we identify and report the in vivo endoproteolytic processing/cleavage of full-length Rgs1 that yields an N-terminal DEP and a RGS core domain. Independent expression of the resultant DEP-DEP half (N-Rgs1 or RGS core (C-Rgs1 fragments, failed to complement the rgs1Δ defects in colony morphology, aerial hyphal growth, surface hydrophobicity, conidiation, appressorium formation and infection. Interestingly, the full-length Rgs1-mCherry, as well as the tagged N-terminal DEP domains (individually or in conjunction localized to distinct punctate vesicular structures in the cytosol, while the catalytic RGS core motif was predominantly vacuolar. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our data from sequence alignments, immuno-blot and microscopic analysis, we propose that the post-translational proteolytic processing of Rgs1 and the vacuolar sequestration of the catalytic RGS domain represents an important means of down regulating Rgs1 function and thus forming an additional and alternative means of regulating G protein signaling in Magnaporthe. We further hypothesize the prevalence of analogous mechanisms functioning in other filamentous fungi. Furthermore

  20. Molecular and structural characterisation of the human sodium/iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) C-terminus and the implication of this domain in the transporter regulation; Caracterisation moleculaire et structurale de l'extremite C-Terminale du co-transporteur sodium/iode humain (h N.I.S.): Implication de ce domaine dans la regulation du transporteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huc, S

    2007-12-15

    The human natrium iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) is an intrinsic membrane protein expressed in thyroid cells where it allows iodide uptake and accumulation. It is composed of thirteen transmembrane helices and its ninety- three amino acids long cytosolic C-terminus presents many potential post-translational regulatory sites. A first part of the PhD work has been dedicated to the expression in a bacterial system and to the purification of the cytosolic C-terminal fragment. Biochemical and structural characterisation have revealed that this C-terminus is very flexible but prone to dimerization. The fragment has also been used as a bait to test the interactions with PDZ domain proteins spotted on a membrane. Several proteins interacting with the (natrium/iodide symporter) N.I.S. C-terminus have thus been identified and the study of their implication in the protein regulation has been initiated. A second part of the work has underlined the existence of a N.I.S. fragment co-purified with the entire protein. This fragment has been found in cells in culture stably expressing N.I.S. and also in human thyroid extracts and in rodent thyroid cells. We observed that this fragment is spontaneously associated with the entire protein. It is composed of the last 131 amino acid of the protein and so comprises the last transmembrane domain and the C-terminal extremity. The expression of a truncated form of h N.I.S., lacking the last 131 amino acids, shows that this protein is not correctly addressed to the cell membrane and cells expressing this mutated symporter cannot accumulate iodide. However, our results show that the co-expression of the two N.I.S. parts, the truncated form lacking the last 131 amino acid, and the complementary C-terminal fragment, leads to cells presenting 10 % of the activity of cells expressing the whole N.I.S.. (author)

  1. A crystal structure of the Dengue virus NS5 protein reveals a novel inter-domain interface essential for protein flexibility and virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqian Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Flavivirus RNA replication occurs within a replication complex (RC that assembles on ER membranes and comprises both non-structural (NS viral proteins and host cofactors. As the largest protein component within the flavivirus RC, NS5 plays key enzymatic roles through its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase and C-terminal RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp domains, and constitutes a major target for antivirals. We determined a crystal structure of the full-length NS5 protein from Dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3 at a resolution of 2.3 Å in the presence of bound SAH and GTP. Although the overall molecular shape of NS5 from DENV3 resembles that of NS5 from Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, the relative orientation between the MTase and RdRp domains differs between the two structures, providing direct evidence for the existence of a set of discrete stable molecular conformations that may be required for its function. While the inter-domain region is mostly disordered in NS5 from JEV, the NS5 structure from DENV3 reveals a well-ordered linker region comprising a short 310 helix that may act as a swivel. Solution Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS analysis reveals an increased mobility of the thumb subdomain of RdRp in the context of the full length NS5 protein which correlates well with the analysis of the crystallographic temperature factors. Site-directed mutagenesis targeting the mostly polar interface between the MTase and RdRp domains identified several evolutionarily conserved residues that are important for viral replication, suggesting that inter-domain cross-talk in NS5 regulates virus replication. Collectively, a picture for the molecular origin of NS5 flexibility is emerging with profound implications for flavivirus replication and for the development of therapeutics targeting NS5.

  2. Structure prediction and validation of the ERK8 kinase domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Strambi

    Full Text Available Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 8 (ERK8 has been already implicated in cell transformation and in the protection of genomic integrity and, therefore, proposed as a novel potential therapeutic target for cancer. In the absence of a crystal structure, we developed a three-dimensional model for its kinase domain. To validate our model we applied a structure-based virtual screening protocol consisting of pharmacophore screening and molecular docking. Experimental characterization of the hit compounds confirmed that a high percentage of the identified scaffolds was able to inhibit ERK8. We also confirmed an ATP competitive mechanism of action for the two best-performing molecules. Ultimately, we identified an ERK8 drug-resistant "gatekeeper" mutant that corroborated the predicted molecular binding mode, confirming the reliability of the generated structure. We expect that our model will be a valuable tool for the development of specific ERK8 kinase inhibitors.

  3. Generation of the beta-amyloid peptide and the amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragment gamma are potentiated by FE65L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yang; Tesco, Giuseppina; Jeong, William J; Lindsley, Loren; Eckman, Elizabeth A; Eckman, Christopher B; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Guénette, Suzanne Y

    2003-12-19

    Members of the FE65 family of adaptor proteins, FE65, FE65L1, and FE65L2, bind the C-terminal region of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Overexpression of FE65 and FE65L1 was previously reported to increase the levels of alpha-secretase-derived APP (APPs alpha). Increased beta-amyloid (A beta) generation was also observed in cells showing the FE65-dependent increase in APPs alpha. To understand the mechanism for the observed increase in both A beta and APPs alpha given that alpha-secretase cleavage of a single APP molecule precludes A beta generation, we examined the effects of FE65L1 overexpression on APP C-terminal fragments (APP CTFs). Our data show that FE65L1 potentiates gamma-secretase processing of APP CTFs, including the amyloidogenic CTF C99, accounting for the ability of FE65L1 to increase generation of APP C-terminal domain and A beta 40. The FE65L1 modulation of these processing events requires binding of FE65L1 to APP and APP CTFs and is not because of a direct effect on gamma-secretase activity, because Notch intracellular domain generation is not altered by FE65L1. Furthermore, enhanced APP CTF processing can be detected in early endosome vesicles but not in endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi membranes, suggesting that the effects of FE65L1 occur at or near the plasma membrane. Finally, although FE65L1 increases APP C-terminal domain production, it does not mediate the APP-dependent transcriptional activation observed with FE65.

  4. Evolutionary origins of C-terminal (GPPn 3-hydroxyproline formation in vertebrate tendon collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Hudson

    Full Text Available Approximately half the proline residues in fibrillar collagen are hydroxylated. The predominant form is 4-hydroxyproline, which helps fold and stabilize the triple helix. A minor form, 3-hydroxyproline, still has no clear function. Using peptide mass spectrometry, we recently revealed several previously unknown molecular sites of 3-hydroxyproline in fibrillar collagen chains. In fibril-forming A-clade collagen chains, four new partially occupied 3-hydroxyproline sites were found (A2, A3, A4 and (GPPn in addition to the fully occupied A1 site at Pro986. The C-terminal (GPPn motif has five consecutive GPP triplets in α1(I, four in α2(I and three in α1(II, all subject to 3-hydroxylation. The evolutionary origins of this substrate sequence were investigated by surveying the pattern of its 3-hydroxyproline occupancy from early chordates through amphibians, birds and mammals. Different tissue sources of type I collagen (tendon, bone and skin and type II collagen (cartilage and notochord were examined by mass spectrometry. The (GPPn domain was found to be a major substrate for 3-hydroxylation only in vertebrate fibrillar collagens. In higher vertebrates (mouse, bovine and human, up to five 3-hydroxyproline residues per (GPPn motif were found in α1(I and four in α2(I, with an average of two residues per chain. In vertebrate type I collagen the modification exhibited clear tissue specificity, with 3-hydroxyproline prominent only in tendon. The occupancy also showed developmental changes in Achilles tendon, with increasing 3-hydroxyproline levels with age. The biological significance is unclear but the level of 3-hydroxylation at the (GPPn site appears to have increased as tendons evolved and shows both tendon type and developmental variations within a species.

  5. C-terminal Amidation of an Osteocalcin-derived Peptide Promotes Hydroxyapatite Crystallization*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Samaneh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Mountassif, Driss; Cerruti, Marta; Vali, Hojatollah; Faghihi, Shahab

    2013-01-01

    Genesis of natural biocomposite-based materials, such as bone, cartilage, and teeth, involves interactions between organic and inorganic systems. Natural biopolymers, such as peptide motif sequences, can be used as a template to direct the nucleation and crystallization of hydroxyapatite (HA). In this study, a natural motif sequence consisting of 13 amino acids present in the first helix of osteocalcin was selected based on its calcium binding ability and used as substrate for nucleation of HA crystals. The acidic (acidic osteocalcin-derived peptide (OSC)) and amidic (amidic osteocalcin-derived peptide (OSN)) forms of this sequence were synthesized to investigate the effects of different C termini on the process of biomineralization. Electron microscopy analyses show the formation of plate-like HA crystals with random size and shape in the presence of OSN. In contrast, spherical amorphous calcium phosphate is formed in the presence of OSC. Circular dichroism experiments indicate conformational changes of amidic peptide to an open and regular structure as a consequence of interaction with calcium and phosphate. There is no conformational change detectable in OSC. It is concluded that HA crystal formation, which only occurred in OSN, is attributable to C-terminal amidation of a natural peptide derived from osteocalcin. It is also proposed that natural peptides with the ability to promote biomineralization have the potential to be utilized in hard tissue regeneration. PMID:23362258

  6. C-terminal amidation of an osteocalcin-derived peptide promotes hydroxyapatite crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Samaneh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Mountassif, Driss; Cerruti, Marta; Vali, Hojatollah; Faghihi, Shahab

    2013-03-15

    Genesis of natural biocomposite-based materials, such as bone, cartilage, and teeth, involves interactions between organic and inorganic systems. Natural biopolymers, such as peptide motif sequences, can be used as a template to direct the nucleation and crystallization of hydroxyapatite (HA). In this study, a natural motif sequence consisting of 13 amino acids present in the first helix of osteocalcin was selected based on its calcium binding ability and used as substrate for nucleation of HA crystals. The acidic (acidic osteocalcin-derived peptide (OSC)) and amidic (amidic osteocalcin-derived peptide (OSN)) forms of this sequence were synthesized to investigate the effects of different C termini on the process of biomineralization. Electron microscopy analyses show the formation of plate-like HA crystals with random size and shape in the presence of OSN. In contrast, spherical amorphous calcium phosphate is formed in the presence of OSC. Circular dichroism experiments indicate conformational changes of amidic peptide to an open and regular structure as a consequence of interaction with calcium and phosphate. There is no conformational change detectable in OSC. It is concluded that HA crystal formation, which only occurred in OSN, is attributable to C-terminal amidation of a natural peptide derived from osteocalcin. It is also proposed that natural peptides with the ability to promote biomineralization have the potential to be utilized in hard tissue regeneration.

  7. Domain structure and magnetotransport in epitaxial colossal magnetoresistance thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Yuri; Wu, Yan; Yu, Jun; Rüdiger, Ulrich; Kent, Andrew D.; Nath, Tapan K.; Eom, Chang-Beom

    2000-01-01

    Our studies of compressively strained La0.7 Sr0.3 MnO7 (LSMO) thin films reveal the importance of domain structure and strain effects in the magnetization reversal and magnetotransport. Normal and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction indicate that the compressive strain on these LSMO thin films on (100) LaAlO3 is not completely relaxed up to thicknesses on the order of 1000 Å. The effect of the compressive strain is evident in the shape of the magnetization loops and the magnetotransport measu...

  8. Human Δ³,Δ²-enoyl-CoA isomerase, type 2: a structural enzymology study on the catalytic role of its ACBP domain and helix-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwukwe, Goodluck U; Kursula, Petri; Koski, M Kristian; Schmitz, Werner; Wierenga, Rik K

    2015-02-01

    The catalytic domain of the trimeric human Δ(3),Δ(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase, type 2 (HsECI2), has the typical crotonase fold. In the active site of this fold two main chain NH groups form an oxyanion hole for binding the thioester oxygen of the 3E- or 3Z-enoyl-CoA substrate molecules. A catalytic glutamate is essential for the proton transfer between the substrate C2 and C4 atoms for forming the product 2E-enoyl-CoA, which is a key intermediate in the β-oxidation pathway. The active site is covered by the C-terminal helix-10. In HsECI2, the isomerase domain is extended at its N terminus by an acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) domain. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis of HsECI2 shows that the ACBP domain protrudes out of the central isomerase trimer. X-ray crystallography of the isomerase domain trimer identifies the active site geometry. A tunnel, shaped by loop-2 and extending from the catalytic site to bulk solvent, suggests a likely mode of binding of the fatty acyl chains. Calorimetry data show that the separately expressed ACBP and isomerase domains bind tightly to fatty acyl-CoA molecules. The truncated isomerase variant (without ACBP domain) has significant enoyl-CoA isomerase activity; however, the full-length isomerase is more efficient. Structural enzymological studies of helix-10 variants show the importance of this helix for efficient catalysis. Its hydrophobic side chains, together with residues from loop-2 and loop-4, complete a hydrophobic cluster that covers the active site, thereby fixing the thioester moiety in a mode of binding competent for efficient catalysis. © 2014 FEBS.

  9. X-ray structure of a protease-resistant mutant form of human galectin-9 having two carbohydrate recognition domains with a metal-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Nishi, Nozomu; Wada, Kenji; Nakamura, Takanori; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Kuwabara, Naoyuki; Kato, Ryuichi; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2017-09-02

    Galectin-9 (G9) is a tandem-repeat type β-galactoside-specific animal lectin having N-terminal and C-terminal carbohydrate recognition domains (N-CRD and C-CRD, respectively) joined by a linker peptide that is involved in the immune system. G9 is divalent in glycan binding, and structural information about the spatial arrangement of the two CRDs is very important for elucidating its biological functions. As G9 is protease sensitive due to the long linker, the protease-resistant mutant form of G9 (G9Null) was developed by modification of the linker peptide, while retaining its biological functions. The X-ray structure of a mutant form of G9Null with the replacement of Arg221 by Ser (G9Null_R221S) having two CRDs was determined. The structure of G9Null_R221S was compact to associate the two CRDs in the back-to-back orientation with a large interface area, including hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. A metal ion was newly found in the galectin structure, possibly contributing to the stable structure of protein. The presented X-ray structure was thought to be one of the stable structures of G9, which likely occurs in solution. This was supported by structural comparisons with other tandem-repeated galectins and the analyses of protein thermostability by CD spectra measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Crystal structure of calpain-3 penta-EF-hand (PEF) domain - a homodimerized PEF family member with calcium bound at the fifth EF-hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partha, Sarathy K.; Ravulapalli, Ravikiran; Allingham, John S.; Campbell, Robert L.; Davies, Peter L. [Queens

    2014-08-21

    Calpains are Ca2+dependent intracellular cysteine proteases that cleave a wide range of protein substrates to help implement Ca2+ signaling in the cell. The major isoforms of this enzyme family, calpain-1 and calpain-2, are heterodimers of a large and a small subunit, with the main dimer interface being formed through their C-terminal penta-EF hand (PEF) domains. Calpain-3, or p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific isoform that is genetically linked to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Biophysical and modeling studies with the PEF domain of calpain-3 support the suggestion that full-length calpain-3 exists as a homodimer. Here, we report the crystallization of calpain-3's PEF domain and its crystal structure in the presence of Ca2+, whic