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Sample records for c-reactive protein concentration

  1. C reactive protein concentrations during long distance running.

    OpenAIRE

    Strachan, A F; Noakes, T. D.; Kotzenberg, G; Nel, A E; de Beer, F.C.

    1984-01-01

    Long distance runners competing in events ranging from 15 to 88 km showed a distance related acute phase response as indicated by significantly raised serum C reactive protein concentrations. In trained athletes only a small rise in C reactive protein concentrations was seen after races of less than 21 km. After an 88 km ultramarathon concentrations comparable to those found in patients with small myocardial infarctions were detected. Indomethacin did not affect the increases in C reactive pr...

  2. Serum C-reactive protein and S100A12 concentrations in dogs with hepatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, S M; Fry, J K; Rodrigues Hoffmann, A; Manino, P; Heilmann, R M; Suchodolski, J S; Steiner, J M; Hottinger, H A; Hunter, S L; Lidbury, J A

    2016-09-01

    To describe serum C-reactive protein and S100A12 concentrations in dogs with hepatic disease and to determine whether there is a relationship between the concentration of either and the severity of hepatic necroinflammation. Serum C-reactive protein and S100A12 concentrations were measured in 46 dogs undergoing hepatic biopsy. Dogs were divided into three groups: congenital portosystemic shunts, chronic hepatitis and hepatic neoplasia. The histological severity of hepatic necroinflammation was scored. C-reactive protein and S100A12 concentrations were greater than the upper limit of the reference intervals in 39 and 26% of dogs, respectively. There was no association of disease group with C-reactive protein (P=0·1733) or S100A12 (P=0·1513) concentrations. There was a positive correlation between serum C-reactive protein concentration and hepatic necroinflammatory activity (rs =0·428, P=0·006). Increased serum C-reactive protein and S100A12 concentrations were observed in a subpopulation of dogs with various types of hepatic diseases, suggesting acute-phase inflammation and activation of phagocytic cells, respectively. Dogs with higher hepatic necroinflammatory activity scores tended to have higher serum C-reactive protein concentrations. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding in a larger group of dogs. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  3. Can serum concentration of C-reactive protein, albumin and body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine whether serum concentration of C-reactive protein, serum albumin level and body weight can serve as an index of disease progression and treatment assessment in HIV/AIDS. Methodology: The study investigated 80 subjects (40 subjects on anti-retroviral therapy and 40 not on therapy) and 40 ...

  4. Serum C-reactive protein concentration in preeclamptic women: Effect on pregnancy outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmin Sultana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preeclampsia is a multisystem disorder of unknown etiology characterized by development of hyperten­sion to the extent of 140/90 mm of Hg or more with proteinuria after the 20th gestational week in a previously normoten­sive and non protein uric women. According to the National High blood presure Working group (NHBPEP and Ameri­can college of obstetricans and Gynecologiests (ACOG hypertension in pregnancy is defined as a diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher after 20 weeks of gestation in a woman with previously normal blood pressure (NHBPEP, 2000; ACOG, 2002. If the disease is allowed to progress to the HELLP syndrome or eclampsia, maternal morbidity and mortality increases. The majority of perinatal losses are related to placental insufficiency, which causes intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity associated with preterm delivery, or abruptio placentae. Objectives: This study tried to explore the effect of serum C reactive protein concentration in preeclamptic women and its effect on pregnancy outcome.Methods: This case control study included 60 third trimester pregnant women (30 normotensive and 30 preeclamptic who attended Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, BIRDEM and DMCH, during July 2009 and June 2010. Estimation of serum C reactive protein (CRP concentrations was done by liquid phase immunoprecipitation assay and turbulometry at DMC.Results: Mean (±SD age showed no significant difference between groups; however, BMI, SBP, DBP and CRP were significantly (P<0.001 high in case group. Gravidity and ANC showed no significant variation between groups. CRP concentration was significantly high case group. Gestational age was significantly low in case group resulting in higher preterm delivery. No significant variation was observed regarding fetal outcome; however, birth weight was significantly low and neonatal complication was also significantly high in case group.Conclusion: CRP concentration was high in

  5. Absence of diurnal variation of C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Ewert, H. K.; Ridker, P. M.; Rifai, N.; Price, N.; Dinges, D. F.; Mullington, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) in otherwise healthy subjects has been shown to predict future risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. CRP is synthesized by the liver in response to interleukin-6, the serum concentration of which is subject to diurnal variation. METHODS: To examine the existence of a time-of-day effect for baseline CRP values, we determined CRP concentrations in hourly blood samples drawn from healthy subjects (10 males, 3 females; age range, 21-35 years) during a baseline day in a controlled environment (8 h of nighttime sleep). RESULTS: Overall CRP concentrations were low, with only three subjects having CRP concentrations >2 mg/L. Comparison of raw data showed stability of CRP concentrations throughout the 24 h studied. When compared with cutoff values of CRP quintile derived from population-based studies, misclassification of greater than one quintile did not occur as a result of diurnal variation in any of the subjects studied. Nonparametric ANOVA comparing different time points showed no significant differences for both raw and z-transformed data. Analysis for rhythmic diurnal variation using a method fitting a cosine curve to the group data was negative. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that baseline CRP concentrations are not subject to time-of-day variation and thus help to explain why CRP concentrations are a better predictor of vascular risk than interleukin-6. Determination of CRP for cardiovascular risk prediction may be performed without concern for diurnal variation.

  6. C-reactive protein concentration and risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and mortality: an individual participant meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Lowe, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Associations of C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration with risk of major diseases can best be assessed by long-term prospective follow-up of large numbers of people. We assessed the associations of CRP concentration with risk of vascular and non-vascular outcomes under different circumstances....

  7. Should C-reactive protein concentration at ICU discharge be used as a prognostic marker?

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    Póvoa Pedro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About one third of hospital mortality in critically ill patients occurs after Intensive Care Unit (ICU discharge. Some authors have recently hypothesized that unresolved or latent inflammation and sepsis may be an important factor that contributes to death following successful discharge from the ICU. Aim The aim of our study was to determine the ability of the clinical and inflammatory markers at ICU discharge to predict post-ICU mortality. Methods A prospective observational cohort study was conducted during a 14-month period in an 8 bed polyvalent ICU. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II score, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score, Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System-28 (TISS-28, C-reactive protein (CRP, white cell count (WCC and body temperature of the day of ICU discharge were collected from patients who survived their first ICU admission. Results During this period 156 patients were discharged alive from the ICU. A total of 29 patients (18.6% died after ICU discharge. There were no differences in clinical and demographic characteristics between survivors and nonsurvivors. C-reactive protein levels at ICU discharge were not significantly different between survivors and nonsurvivors. The area under receiver operating characteristics curves of APACHE II, SAPS II, SOFA, TISS-28, CRP, WCC and body temperature at ICU discharge as prognostic markers of hospital death were 0.76 (95% confidence interval (CI 0.67-0.86; 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.85; 0.72 (95% CI 0.62-0.83; 0.64 (95% CI 0.52-0.77; 0.55 (95% CI 0.43-0.67; 0.55 (95% CI 0.42-0.66 and 0.54 (95% CI 0.44-0.67 respectively. The hospital mortality rate of the patients with CRP 10 mg/dL was 15.1%, 16.1% and 33.3% respectively (p = NS. Conclusions At ICU discharge serum CRP concentration was a poor marker of post-ICU prognosis. Post-ICU death appears to be unrelated to the persistent inflammatory

  8. Baseline Plasma C-Reactive Protein Concentrations and Motor Prognosis in Parkinson Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Umemura

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP, a blood inflammatory biomarker, is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease. In animal models of Parkinson disease (PD, systemic inflammatory stimuli can promote neuroinflammation and accelerate dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, the association between long-term systemic inflammations and neurodegeneration has not been assessed in PD patients.To investigate the longitudinal effects of baseline CRP concentrations on motor prognosis in PD.Retrospective analysis of 375 patients (mean age, 69.3 years; mean PD duration, 6.6 years. Plasma concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP were measured in the absence of infections, and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS-III scores were measured at five follow-up intervals (Days 1-90, 91-270, 271-450, 451-630, and 631-900.Change of UPDRS-III scores from baseline to each of the five follow-up periods.Change in UPDRS-III scores was significantly greater in PD patients with CRP concentrations ≥0.7 mg/L than in those with CRP concentrations <0.7 mg/L, as determined by a generalized estimation equation model (P = 0.021 for the entire follow-up period and by a generalized regression model (P = 0.030 for the last follow-up interval (Days 631-900. The regression coefficients of baseline CRP for the two periods were 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-2.61 and 2.62 (95% CI 0.25-4.98, respectively, after adjusting for sex, age, baseline UPDRS-III score, dementia, and incremental L-dopa equivalent dose.Baseline plasma CRP levels were associated with motor deterioration and predicted motor prognosis in patients with PD. These associations were independent of sex, age, PD severity, dementia, and anti-Parkinsonian agents, suggesting that subclinical systemic inflammations could accelerate neurodegeneration in PD.

  9. Pediatric Loss of Control Eating and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Lisa M; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Kelly, Nichole R; Schvey, Natasha A; Marwitz, Shannon E; Mehari, Rim D; Brady, Sheila M; Demidowich, Andrew P; Broadney, Miranda M; Galescu, Ovidiu A; Pickworth, Courtney K; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2017-02-01

    Loss of control (LOC) eating in youth is associated with excess body weight and adiposity. After adjusting for fat mass, youth with LOC eating have higher blood pressure and higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared to youth without LOC eating. Increased inflammation may account for this relationship, although few data have examined this hypothesis. Therefore, this study explored the association between LOC eating and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a marker of inflammation. We investigated hsCRP concentrations in relation to LOC eating in a convenience sample of 194 youth (age 14.3 ± 2.1 years; 63.9% female; BMI-z 1.64 ± 1.06). The presence of LOC eating in the past month was assessed by the Eating Disorder Examination interview. Serum hsCRP was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Adiposity was measured by air displacement plethysmography or dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. We compared hsCRP in those with and without LOC eating in analyses accounting for sex, adiposity, height, depressive symptoms, and eating psychopathology. Youth with LOC eating had significantly greater hsCRP than youth without LOC eating (p = 0.02), after accounting for all covariates. The number of LOC eating episodes in the past month was positively associated with hsCRP (p = 0.01). The relationship between LOC eating and hsCRP was not mediated by depressive symptoms or eating psychopathology (ps > 0.05). Youth with disinhibited eating may manifest increased chronic inflammation. Those with LOC eating may be an important subgroup at risk for adverse health outcomes associated with both chronic inflammation and obesity. Future research should examine whether hsCRP concentrations mediate the relationship between LOC eating and its association with cardiometabolic risk.

  10. Obese Hypertensive Men Have Plasma Concentrations of C-Reactive Protein Similar to That of Obese Normotensive Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Camilla L; Andersen, Ulrik B; Linneberg, Allan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-grade chronic inflammation is a characteristic feature of obesity, the most important lifestyle risk factor for hypertension. Elevated plasma concentrations of the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with an increased risk of hypertension, but elevated p...

  11. C-reactive protein and later preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebelo, Fernanda; Schlüssel, Michael M; Vaz, Juliana S

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether high C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration during pregnancy is associated with later preeclampsia and whether weight status (BMI) is a potential modifier of the relation between CRP and preeclampsia.......This study aims to determine whether high C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration during pregnancy is associated with later preeclampsia and whether weight status (BMI) is a potential modifier of the relation between CRP and preeclampsia....

  12. Serum C-reactive protein concentration as an indicator of remission status in dogs with multicentric lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lise; Toft, Nils; Eckersall, David

    2007-01-01

    -two dogs with untreated multicentric lymphoma. Methods: Prospective observational study. Blood samples were collected at the time of diagnosis, before each chemotherapy session, and at follow-up visits, resulting in 287 serum samples. Results: Before therapy, a statistically significant majority...... in monitoring progression of the disease. Greater reliability in determining remission status might be achieved by combining CRP concentration with other serum markers.......Background: The acute-phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) is used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in humans with various neoplasias, including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Objective: To evaluate if CRP could be used to detect different remission states in dogs with lymphoma. Animals: Twenty...

  13. Increased serum C-reactive protein concentrations in dogs with congestive heart failure due to myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, M. J.; Ljungvall, I.; Hillstrom, A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in humans and dogs is associated with mildly increased circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). Few studies have evaluated associations between circulating CRP and canine myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) and the results reported have been divergent......, disease severity, including left atrial to aortic root ratio (P= 0.0002, adjusted r(2) = 0.07) and left ventricular end diastolic diameter normalised for bodyweight (P = 0.0005, adjusted r(2) = 0.06), were positively associated with CRP concentration...

  14. Does high C-reactive protein concentration increase atherosclerosis? The Whitehall II Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Kivimäki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP, a marker of systemic inflammation, is associated with risk of coronary events and sub-clinical measures of atherosclerosis. Evidence in support of this link being causal would include an association robust to adjustments for confounders (multivariable standard regression analysis and the association of CRP gene polymorphisms with atherosclerosis (Mendelian randomization analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We genotyped 3 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs [+1444T>C (rs1130864; +2303G>A (rs1205 and +4899T>G (rs 3093077] in the CRP gene and assessed CRP and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT, a structural marker of atherosclerosis, in 4941 men and women aged 50-74 (mean 61 years (the Whitehall II Study. The 4 major haplotypes from the SNPs were consistently associated with CRP level, but not with other risk factors that might confound the association between CRP and CIMT. CRP, assessed both at mean age 49 and at mean age 61, was associated both with CIMT in age and sex adjusted standard regression analyses and with potential confounding factors. However, the association of CRP with CIMT attenuated to the null with adjustment for confounding factors in both prospective and cross-sectional analyses. When examined using genetic variants as the instrument for serum CRP, there was no inferred association between CRP and CIMT. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both multivariable standard regression analysis and Mendelian randomization analysis suggest that the association of CRP with carotid atheroma indexed by CIMT may not be causal.

  15. Blood C-reactive protein concentration with ABCD² is a better prognostic tool than ABCD² alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Giovanni; Bottacchi, Edo; Brusa, Adriana; Lia, Chiara; Cordera, Susanna; Giardini, Guido; Pesenti Campagnoni, Massimo; Veronese Morosini, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Increased C-reactive protein (CRP) is a known predictor of vascular events in asymptomatic individuals and stroke patients. Only a few studies included transient ischaemic attack (TIA) patients. We assessed CRP levels in addition to traditional risk factors in a cohort of patients with TIA to examine the relationship of these parameters to the occurrence of ischaemic stroke. This is a prospective, longitudinal clinical evaluation of the efficacy of CRP as a prognostic indicator. CRP levels were measured in 194 TIA patients and in 1,024 asymptomatic individuals (recruited from a project on stroke prevention, the PrATO, which was ongoing at the same time in the Aosta Valley). A clinical risk score was determined using the ABCD² score in TIA patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the significance of the markers as predictors. Two models were evaluated: model 1 used the ABCD² score and model 2 used serum CRP levels in addition to the ABCD²) score. The primary outcome was an ischaemic stroke. Within 2 years ischaemic strokes occurred in 33/194 patients. The Cox proportional hazards models, after adjustments for conventional risk factors, identified CRP levels ≥3 mg/l and ABCD² scores ≥4 as independent predictors of stroke. The corresponding AUCs were 0.565 and 0.636, based on model 1 and model 2, respectively; this represented a statistically significant difference (p = 0.043). The absolute integrated discrimination improvement was 0.0249 (p = 0.007) and the relative integrated discrimination improvement was 2.3710. The net benefit became significant from a predicted probability ≥10% and was 0.077 when based on model 1 and 0.087 when based on model 2. Routine CRP measurements in the acute phase might be a useful tool for identifying TIA patients who are at a higher risk of ischaemic stroke. The additional use of CRP levels for the risk assessment in TIA patients improves risk definition in terms of the

  16. The Analysis of Total Leucocyte, C-Reactive Protein and Fibrinogen Concentrations to Evaluate The Leakage of Enterectomy Result

    OpenAIRE

    Adji, Dhirgo

    2012-01-01

    Enterectomy is an operative method that has very dangerous risk. The purpose of this research was done to see the physiological view after surgery, especially in the total leucocyte, C-reactive protein (CRP) andfibrinogen concentrations. Nine female, healthy local dogs, 10 kgs of body weight were used as experimental study. The dogs were adapted for a week into individual cages and fed commercial dog-food and water adlibitum. In the day of 7, all dogs were fasted 12 hours for anaesthesia prep...

  17. Evaluation of the use of serum C-reactive protein concentration to predict outcome in puppies infected with canine parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McClure, Vanessa; van Schoor, Mirinda; Thompson, Peter N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective-To evaluate associations of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration with duration of hospitalization and with outcome in puppies with canine parvoviral enteritis. Design-Prospective observational study. Animals-79 client-owned puppies with naturally acquired canine parvovirus...... infection. Procedures-All puppies received supportive care. Serum CRP concentration was measured at the time of admission, approximately every 10 to 12 hours for the first 48 hours, and then every 24 hours until discharge from the hospital or death. Associations between outcome and CRP concentration...... at various time points or changes in CRP concentration over time were assessed via multiple logistic regression. Associations of CRP concentration with survival time and duration of hospitalization among survivors were estimated with Cox proportional hazards regression. Use of CRP concentration to predict...

  18. Serum C-reactive protein concentrations in Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers with immune-mediated rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Hanna Dorotea; Hillström, Anna; Kånåhols, Malin; Hagman, Ragnvi; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene

    2017-04-17

    Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers (NSDTRs) are a dog breed often affected by immune-mediated rheumatic disease (IMRD), a disorder characterised by chronic stiffness and joint pain. Most, but not all, dogs with IMRD, have antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which are also commonly present in the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The clinical and diagnostic findings of IMRD indicate that it is an SLE-related disorder. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase protein, is a quantitative marker of inflammation for many diseases and is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammation in both humans and dogs. However, in human SLE, CRP concentrations are often elevated but correlate poorly with disease activity; they can be low in individual patients with active disease. The aim of the study was to investigate CRP in a group of NSDTRs with the SLE-related disorder IMRD. The hypothesis was that CRP concentrations would be increased in dogs with IMRD compared to healthy dogs, but that the increase would be mild. Serum CRP concentrations were measured in 18 IMRD-affected NSDTRs and 19 healthy control NSDTRs using two different canine-specific CRP assays. Dogs with IMRD and ANA had higher CRP concentrations than the control dogs, but the concentrations were below the clinical decision limit for systemic inflammation for most of the IMRD dogs. These results indicate that CRP concentrations were increased in dogs with IMRD and ANA, but the increase was mild, similar to what has been observed in human SLE.

  19. Resting Serum Concentration of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    F. A. Niyi-Odumosu1, O. A. Bello1, S. A. Biliaminu2, B. V. Owoyele1, T. O. Abu3,. O. L. Dominic4. Departments of 1Physiology, 2Chemical Pathology, 3Chemistry and 4 Human Kinetics Education, University of. Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria. Summary: There is an inverse relationship between regular physical activity and concentration ...

  20. Maternal C-Reactive Protein Concentration in Early Pregnancy and Child Autistic Traits in the General Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Koks (Natasja); A. Ghassabian (Akhgar); K. Greaves-Lord (Kirstin); A. Hofman (Albert); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground Exposure to elevated levels of inflammatory markers during pregnancy has been suggested as possible aetiologic factor in the occurrence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In this study, we investigated the prospective relation between maternal C-reactive protein (CRP) during

  1. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... 003356.htm . Accessed October 2011. (© 1995–2011). Unit Code 9731: C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Serum. Mayo Clinic ...

  2. Recreational Exercise Before and During Pregnancy in Relation to Plasma C-Reactive Protein Concentrations in Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Cupul-Uicab, Lea A; Rogan, Walter J; Eggesbo, Merete; Travlos, Gregory; Wilson, Ralph; Longnecker, Matthew P

    2015-06-01

    Pregnant women who are physically active have a lower risk of preeclampsia and gestational diabetes than women who are less active. One possible mechanism is a reduction in low-grade inflammation, as measured by plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). The association between exercise and CRP in pregnant women, however, has not been adequately investigated. A total of 537 pregnant women, enrolled around the 17th week of gestation in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study in 2003 to 2004, were studied. Self-reported recreational exercise was recalled for both 3 months before pregnancy and early pregnancy. The total energy expenditure from recreational exercise (total recreational exercise, metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-hr/week) was estimated, and low-, moderate- and vigorous-intensity exercise was defined. Plasma CRP concentrations were measured during pregnancy. In adjusted linear regression models, mean CRP concentration was 1.0% lower [95% CI = -1.9% to 0.2%] with each 1 MET-hr/week of total recreational exercise before pregnancy. In addition, vigorous-intensity exercise before pregnancy was more strongly related to a reduction in CRP levels than low- or moderate-intensity exercise. However, we observed no association between recreational exercise during pregnancy and plasma CRP levels. Recreational exercise before pregnancy, especially vigorous exercise, may reduce the risk of maternal inflammation during pregnancy.

  3. Effect of Nutritional Status and Dietary Patterns on Human Serum C-Reactive Protein and Interleukin-6 Concentrations12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidowicz, Angelika; Regula, Julita

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, and metabolic syndrome. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are widely tested inflammatory markers involved in the development of these diseases. Several studies indicate a relation between nutritional status and the concentrations of human high-sensitivity CRP and IL-6. Similarly, the role of diet in reducing inflammation and thereby modulating the risk of non-communicable diseases is supported by numerous studies. This review focuses on the effects of the selected nutrition models in humans on the concentrations of CRP and IL-6. It seems that the Mediterranean diet model is most effective in inhibiting inflammation. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension model and the plant nutrition model also have proven to be beneficial. The data on low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets are inconclusive. Comprehensive studies are necessary, taking into account the cumulative effect of dietary and other factors on the inflammatory process. PMID:26567198

  4. Effect of nutritional status and dietary patterns on human serum C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidowicz, Angelika; Regula, Julita

    2015-11-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, and metabolic syndrome. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are widely tested inflammatory markers involved in the development of these diseases. Several studies indicate a relation between nutritional status and the concentrations of human high-sensitivity CRP and IL-6. Similarly, the role of diet in reducing inflammation and thereby modulating the risk of non-communicable diseases is supported by numerous studies. This review focuses on the effects of the selected nutrition models in humans on the concentrations of CRP and IL-6. It seems that the Mediterranean diet model is most effective in inhibiting inflammation. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension model and the plant nutrition model also have proven to be beneficial. The data on low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets are inconclusive. Comprehensive studies are necessary, taking into account the cumulative effect of dietary and other factors on the inflammatory process. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Increased serum C-reactive protein concentrations in dogs with congestive heart failure due to myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, M J; Ljungvall, I; Hillström, A; Møller, J E; Hagman, R; Falk, T; Höglund, K; Häggström, J; Olsen, L H

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease in humans and dogs is associated with mildly increased circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). Few studies have evaluated associations between circulating CRP and canine myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) and the results reported have been divergent. The aim of this study was to investigate whether serum concentrations of CRP, determined using a novel automated canine-specific high-sensitivity CRP assay (Gentian hsCRP), were associated with severity of MMVD and selected clinical variables in dogs. The study included 188 client-owned dogs with different severities of MMVD. Dogs were classified based on ACVIM consensus statement guidelines (group A, n = 58; group B1, n = 56; group B2, n = 38; group C, n = 36). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis. Dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF; group C) had significantly higher CRP concentrations (median, 2.65 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, 1.09-5.09) compared to dogs in groups A (median, 0.97 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, disease severity, including left atrial to aortic root ratio (P = 0.0002, adjusted r(2) = 0.07) and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter normalised for bodyweight (P = 0.0005, adjusted r(2) = 0.06), were positively associated with CRP concentration, but the association disappeared if dogs with CHF were excluded from analysis. In conclusion, slightly higher CRP concentrations were found in dogs with CHF whereas severity of asymptomatic MMVD showed no association with CRP concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Traffic exposure in a population with high prevalence type 2 diabetes - Do medications influence concentrations of C-reactive protein?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioux, Christine L., E-mail: christine.rioux@tufts.edu [Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Tucker, Katherine L. [Department of Health Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States); Brugge, Doug [Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Gute, David M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States); Mwamburi, Mkaya [Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) and particulate air pollution are associated with inflammatory dysregulation. We assessed the modifying effects of diabetes medications on the association of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and traffic exposure in adults with T2D (n = 379). CRP concentrations were significantly positively associated with residence {<=}100 m of a roadway, >100 m and {<=}200 m of a roadway and increased traffic density for individuals using insulin. For individuals using oral hypoglycemic medications (OHAs), CRP was significantly negatively associated with residence >100 m - {<=}200 m of a roadway and multiple roadway exposure in an interaction model. Among people with diabetes, individuals on insulin appear to be most vulnerable to the effects of traffic exposure. Disease severity among insulin users may promote the pro-inflammatory response to traffic exposure, though diabetes medications may also modify the response. Possible anti-inflammatory effects of OHAs with traffic exposure merit further evaluation. - Highlights: >We examine traffic exposure in a population with high rates of Type 2 Diabetes. >Differences in CRP were evaluated by traffic levels, medication use and type. >Those on insulin had significantly higher CRP with traffic exposure. >Interaction models demonstrated lower CRP with traffic exposure and OHA use. >Diabetes medications may modify the response to traffic exposure. - Among people with diabetes, individuals on insulin appear to be most vulnerable to the effects of traffic exposure. Diabetes medications may modify the response to traffic.

  7. Dietary fiber is associated with circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein in breast cancer survivors: the HEAL study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor, Adriana; Ambs, Anita; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Neuhouser, Marian L.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a suspected risk factor for breast cancer and its subsequent prognosis. The extent to which dietary and lifestyle factors might influence inflammation is important to examine. Specifically, dietary fiber may reduce systemic inflammation, but this relationship has not been examined among breast cancer survivors. We examined associations between dietary fiber and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid-A (SAA), among 698 female breast cancer survivors from the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) Study. Data are from interviews and clinical visits conducted 24 months post-study enrollment. Multivariate-adjusted linear regression estimated associations of total, soluble and insoluble fiber with serum concentrations of CRP and SAA. Logistic regression estimated the odds of elevated CRP (defined as >3.0 mg/L) across tertiles of dietary fiber intake. Mean total dietary fiber intake was 13.9 ± 6.4 g/day. Mean CRP and SAA were 3.32 ± 3.66 mg/L and 7.73 ± 10.23 mg/L, respectively. We observed a multivariate-adjusted inverse association between total dietary fiber intake and CRP concentrations (β, −0.029; 95% CI, −0.049, −0.008). Results for insoluble fiber were similar (β, −0.039; 95% CI, −0.064, −0.013). Among survivors who consumed >15.5 g/day of insoluble dietary fiber, a 49% reduction in the likelihood of having elevated CRP concentrations (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27, 0.95) was observed compared to those who consumed fiber may benefit breast cancer survivors via reductions in systemic inflammation; elevated inflammation may be prognostic for reduced survival. PMID:21455669

  8. Pre-Pregnancy Body Mass Index Is Associated with Dietary Inflammatory Index and C-Reactive Protein Concentrations during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dayeon; Hur, Junguk; Cho, Eun-Hee; Chung, Hae-Kyung; Shivappa, Nitin; Wirth, Michael D; Hébert, James R; Lee, Kyung Won

    2017-04-01

    There have been a limited number of studies examining the association between pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and dietary inflammation during pregnancy. Our aim is to examine the association between pre-pregnancy BMI and the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII)™ and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations during pregnancy. The study included 631 pregnant American women from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cross-sectional examinations from 2003 to 2012. Pre-pregnancy BMI was calculated based on self-reported pre-pregnancy weight and measured height. The cut-offs of index to assess the inflammatory properties of diet, was estimated based on a one-day 24-h recall. Multivariable linear and logistic regressions were performed to estimate beta coefficients and the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) on the association of pre-pregnancy BMI categories with the DII and CRP concentrations during pregnancy. After controlling for variables including: race/ethnicity, family poverty income ratio, education, marital status, month in pregnancy, and smoking status during pregnancy; women who were obese before pregnancy (n = 136) had increased odds for being in the highest tertile of the DII and CRP concentrations compared to women with normal weight (AORs 2.40, 95% CIs 1.01-5.71; AORs 24.84, 95% CIs 6.19-99.67, respectively). These findings suggest that women with pre-pregnancy obesity had greater odds of reporting higher DII and having elevated CRP. In conclusion, high pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with increased odds of pro-inflammatory diet and elevated CRP levels during pregnancy in the USA.

  9. Intake of n-3 fatty acids from fish does not lower serum concentrations of C-reactive protein in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, Anouk; Brouwer, I. A.; Schouten, E. G.; Kluft, C.; Katan, M. B.; Zock, Peter L

    2004-01-01

    Objective: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular risk. We hypothesised that n-3 fatty acids reduce underlying inflammatory processes and consequently CRP concentrations in healthy middle-aged subjects. Design:

  10. Magnetic permeability based diagnostic test for the determination of the canine C-reactive protein concentration in undiluted whole blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibraimi, Filiz; Kriz, Kirstin [Department of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); LifeAssays AB, IDEON Science Park, SE-223 70 Lund (Sweden); Merin, Henrik [Malmoe Animal Hospital, P.O. Box 9090, SE-213 63 Malmoe (Sweden); Kriz, Dario [Department of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); LifeAssays AB, IDEON Science Park, SE-223 70 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: dario.kriz@euris.org

    2009-05-15

    We describe an one-step 11-min magnetic permeability based two-site immunoassay for C-reactive protein (CRP) utilizing polyclonal anti-canine CRP antibody conjugated dextran iron oxide nanoparticles (79 nm) as superparamagnetic labels and polyclonal anti-canine CRP conjugated silica microparticles (15 to 40 {mu}m) as carriers. An inductance based magnetic permeability reader was used to detect the target analyte, CRP, in 10 {mu}L whole blood samples, by measuring the magnetic permeability increase of the silica microparticle sediment due to immuno complex superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Measurements on standards showed a linear response between 0 and 17.5 mg/L CRP. Measurements performed on 16 whole blood samples from mixed breeds showed good correlation with a commercially available ELISA assay.

  11. 91 - 96 Ojo C-reactive protein

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    ABSTRACT. This study was conducted to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and the follow-up therapeutic response to tuberculosis (TB) among patients aged 19-68 years attending out-patient clinics of two hospitals in Abeokuta ...

  12. Concentrations of C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, and haptoglobin in uterine arterial and peripheral blood in bitches with pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Roman; Kostro, Krzysztof; Szczubiał, Marek

    2013-09-15

    Pyometra is a life-threatening reproductive disorder that affects the uterus of female dogs. This study was designed to identify the possible indicators of uterine inflammation by comparing C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and haptoglobin (Hp) concentrations in uterine arterial and peripheral venous blood in bitches with open- and closed-cervix pyometra. CRP, SAA, and Hp concentrations were higher in bitches with closed-cervix pyometra irrespective of the site of blood collection. Higher acute-phase protein concentrations were observed in peripheral compared with uterine arterial blood in bitches with closed-cervix pyometra, whereas the levels were comparable in dogs with open-cervix pyometra. Our results indicate that mean acute-phase protein concentrations differ according to pyometra type/severity and blood source and suggest the possible use of peripheral blood levels of CRP, SAA, and Hp to monitor inflammation during the course of pyometra. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effect of Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations on Elevated Serum C-Reactive Protein Concentrations in Normal Weight, Overweight and Obese Participants of a Preventive Health Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara S. B. S. Mastroeni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesized effect of vitamin D on C-reactive protein (CRP has received substantial attention as a potential means to alleviate the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, observational studies have been inconsistent in their reporting of associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD and CRP concentrations, and trials and meta analyses have been inconsistent in their conclusions regarding the effect of vitamin D supplementation on CRP concentrations. These supplementation trials were mostly conducted among patients with more or less inflammatory complications and did not consider potential distinctive effects by weight status. To further our understanding of the potential influences of vitamin D on CRP, we analyzed longitudinal observations of 6755 participants of a preventative health program. On average, serum 25(OHD concentrations increased from 88.3 to 121.0 nmol/L and those of CRP decreased from 1.7 to 1.6 mg/L between baseline and follow up. Relative to obese participants without temporal increases in 25(OHD, those who showed improvements of <25, 25–50, 50–75, and more than 75 nmol/L at follow up were 0.57 (95% confidence interval: 0.37–0.88, 0.54 (0.34–0.85, 0.49 (0.30–0.80, and 0.48 (0.29–0.78 times as likely to have elevated CRP concentrations (≥1 mg/L, respectively. These associations were less pronounced and not statistically significant for normal weight and overweight participants. Herewith, the findings suggest that promotion of adequate serum 25(OHD concentrations among obese individuals along with healthy lifestyles may alleviate the public health burden associated with cardiovascular disease.

  14. C-reactive protein and bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Jørgensen, P E; Nexø, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review published articles on the diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests with cerebrospinal fluid and serum in diagnosing bacterial meningitis. The literature from 1980 and onwards was searched using the electronic databases of MEDLINE, and we used summary...... measured in serum, and 4 in which it had been measured in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum. The odds ratio for bacterial meningitis versus aseptic meningitis for a positive CRP test with cerebrospinal fluid was estimated at 241 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 59-980), and the central tendencies.......06-0.08, respectively, the post-test probability of not having bacterial meningitis given a negative test is very high (> or = 97%), in the range of a pre-test probability (prevalence of bacterial meningitis) from 10 to 30%, whereas the post-test probability of bacterial meningitis given a positive test is considerably...

  15. Measurement of C-reactive protein and prostaglandin F2α metabolite concentrations in differentiation of canine pyometra and cystic endometrial hyperplasia/mucometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enginler, S O; Ateş, A; Diren Sığırcı, B; Sontaş, B H; Sönmez, K; Karaçam, E; Ekici, H; Evkuran Dal, G; Gürel, A

    2014-08-01

    Canine pyometra is a dioestrus period disease in which systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a common outcome due to the response of the body to the bacterial infection. The purpose of this study was i) to differentiate canine pyometra and cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH)/mucometra by measuring serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and prostaglandin F2α metabolite (PGFM) concentrations in blood and ii) to compare serum concentrations of CRP and PGFM in bitches with a pathological uterus (pyometra or CEH/mucometra) to concentrations in bitches with a healthy uterus. Mean CRP concentrations were found significantly higher (p pyometra compared to those with CEH/mucometra or healthy uterus. However, no statistical difference could be detected between the groups for mean PGFM concentrations. Mean white blood cell count (WBC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total protein concentrations were found significantly higher (p pyometra. Escherichia coli was the most frequently isolated microorganism from dogs with pyometra (64.3%). Edwardsiella spp. was detected in a single case of pyometra for the first time. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that serum CRP concentrations were increased in dogs with pyometra and thus we conclude that serum CRP concentration but not PGFM might be useful as a marker to differentiate a case of CEH/mucometra from pyometra in female dogs. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report in which Edwardsiella spp. has been isolated in the canine uterus. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Effects of supplementation with green tea catechins on plasma C-reactive protein concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Corina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Antal, Diana; Ursoniu, Sorin; Banach, Maciej

    2015-09-01

    Promising experimental and clinical trials suggest that green tea decreases the inflammatory process in cardiometabolic diseases, but evidence from epidemiologic studies about the effects on plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) seems inconsistent and ambiguous. Therefore, the aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of green tea supplementation on plasma CRP concentrations. We searched selected database up to October 26, 2014 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of green tea supplementation on plasma CRP concentrations. Two independent reviewers extracted data on study characteristics, methods, and outcomes. Meta-analysis of data from 11 RCTs arms did not indicate a significant effect of supplementation with green tea catechins on plasma CRP concentrations (weighted mean difference [WMD], 0.085 mg/L; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.225 to 0.395; P = 0.592). This effect size was robust in sensitivity analysis and omission of each individual study did not have a significant effect. The nonsignificant effects of green tea catechins on plasma CRP concentrations were also observed in subgroups of studies with green tea supplementation with a duration of catechins doses catechins on plasma CRP concentrations. Furthermore, well-designed trials are necessary to validate these results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasma concentrations of copeptin, C-reactive protein and procalcitonin are positively correlated with APACHE II scores in patients with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Feng, Bing; Gao, Dongna; Zhang, Yu

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the correlation between Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score and plasma concentrations of copeptin, C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin in patients with sepsis. Patients with sepsis were prospectively enrolled. APACHE II scores were determined during the first 24 h after admission to the intensive care unit. Plasma copeptin, CRP and procalcitonin were quantified at admission, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Survival at 28 days after admission was recorded. APACHE II score was significantly positively correlated with plasma copeptin, CRP and procalcitonin concentrations. Survivors (n = 15) had significantly lower APACHE II scores and copeptin, CRP and procalcitonin concentrations than nonsurvivors (n = 26). APACHE II score, copeptin at 72 h, CRP at 48 h and procalcitonin at 24 h were independent risk factors for death. Plasma copeptin, CRP and procalcitonin concentrations were positively correlated with APACHE II score in patients with sepsis, and reflected disease severity. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Relationship between C-reactive protein concentration, bone mineral density and cardiovascular disturbances in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Gavva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study relationship between serum level of hs-CRP, bone mineral density (BMD and cardiovascular disturbances in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods. 132 pts with RA with mean age 50 years (45-53 years and mean disease duration 132 months (48-216 months were examined. BMD was evaluated by dichroic X-ray densitometry in femur neck with Gologic apparatus. CRP concentration was assessed by high sensitivity nephelometric immunoassay with latex amplification with BN 100 analyzer (Dade Behring, Germany. Results. Mean BMD value in pts with RA was lower than in control group —1,4 SD and -0,45 SD respectively (p=0,00001. Normal BMD, osteoporosis and osteopenia were revealed in 38%, 47% and 15% of pts respectively. Clinical and subclinical signs of atherosclerosis in RA were more frequent than in control: coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke (ST in 25% and in 6% respectively (p=0,004, plaques (P and intima-media complex (IMC thickening in 65% and 35% respectively (p=0,003. In groups with osteopenia and osteoporosis ST and CHD revealed after RA development were more frequent, (p<0,05, RA duration was longer (p=0,02, hs CRP concentration was higher (p=0.001. Frequency of subclinical signs of atherosclerosis (P and IMC thickening in groups with normal and decreased BMD was similar. Pts with combination of osteopenia and osteoporosis (n=81 had higher frequency of CHD and high hs-CRP than pts with normal BMD (p<0,05. Mean hs-CRP level in RA was significantly higher than in control. Mean hs-CRP values in normal BMD, osteopenia and osteoporosis were 7,02 (2,4-14,5 mg/1, 9,3 (4,4-22 mg/1, 15,3 (8,6-36,2 mg/l respectively (p=0,001. 65 pts with mean hs- CRP level 3,9 (1,8-7,02 mg/l had higher BMD value than 67 pts with mean hs-CRP level 22 (12,6-34 mg/l (-1,75 SD and -1,0 SD respectively, p=0,016. Frequency of clinical, subclinical signs of atherosclerosis and traditional risk factors did not differ in different groups. The

  19. Effects of supplementation with pomegranate juice on plasma C-reactive protein concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Gurban, Camelia; Serban, Alexandru; Andrica, Florina; Serban, Maria-Corina

    2016-10-15

    Pomegranate juice (PJ) has a high content of antioxidants and bioactive polyphenols, being widely used for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive effects. The objective of this meta-analysis consisted in investigating the impact of PJ on plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. The search included SCOPUS, Medline and two Iranian bibliographic databases namely MagIran and Scientific Information Database (from inception to December 09, 2014) to identify prospective trials for investigating the impact of pomegranate preparations on serum concentrations of CRP. Two independent reviewers extracted data on study characteristics, methods and outcomes. Among 427 participants in the selected studies, 216 were allocated to PJ groups, and 211 to control group. Meta-analysis of data from 5 eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) arms did not provide compelling evidence as to a significant CRP-lowering effect of supplementation with pomegranate juice (WMD: -0.22 mg/l, 95% CI: -0.45, 0.01, p = 0.061). The impact of pomegranate juice on plasma CRP levels was found to be independent of duration of supplementation (slope: 0.003; 95% CI: -0.005, 0.011; p = 0.444). In conclusion, this meta-analysis of data from 5 prospective trials did not indicate a significant effect of PJ on plasma CRP levels, and this effect was independent of duration of supplementation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. A three-line lateral flow assay strip for the measurement of C-reactive protein covering a broad physiological concentration range in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Kyoung; Joung, Hyou-Arm; Han, Hyung Soo; Suk, Ho-Jun; Kim, Min-Gon

    2014-11-15

    The lateral flow assay (LFA) strip sensor possesses many advantages as a diagnostic device, including the capabilities of rapid, one-step assay performance, and high throughput production. A major limitation of the sensor, however, is its difficulty in measuring a broad concentration range of target proteins, including C-reactive protein (CRP), due to the "hook effect." In this study, we report the use of a three-line LFA strip sensor, adding an antigen line to the conventional two-line LFA sensor, for detecting CRP within a broad concentration range in human sera. We introduced an antigen line between test and control lines in the LFA sensor. The antigen line was formed by dispensing a CRP antibody solution followed by a CRP solution in nitrocellulose membrane. All other conditions were identical to those applied to the conventional LFA strip sensor. The CRP level in test samples was generated by data processing from the intensities of three lines. The strip sensor measured a linear detection range of CRP concentration from 1 ng/mL to 500 μg/mL within 10 min, with a calculated detection range of 0.69 ng/mL-1.02 mg/mL. Using the developed three-line LFA sensor, 50 clinical samples were measured at a detection range of 0.4-84.7 μg/mL. This novel and easy-to-use CRP sensor can be a useful tool for rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective detection of a broad physiological concentration range of CRP capabilities that are vital for various diagnostic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Is there an effect of folic acid supplementation on the coagulation factors and C-reactive protein concentrations in subjects with atherosclerosis risk factors? 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Mierzecki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Folic acid (FA may delay the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. Increased plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF are observed in cardiovascular disease, which leads to higher risk of thrombosis. Fibrinogen (Fb is a well-documented risk factor of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of FA supplementation on the Fb, VWF and C-reactive protein (CRP plasma concentrations in subjects with atherosclerosis risk factors.Material/Methods:The study enrolled 124 Caucasian individuals (60 M, 64 F with atherosclerosis risk factors – family history of premature ischaemic stroke, arterial hypertension, dyslipidaemia, overweight and obesity, cigarette smoking and low physical activity. The participants were asked to take FA in the low dose of 0.4 mg/24 h for three months.Results:After FA supplementation a significant reduction of the VWF concentrations in females (76.6 vs 72.3�20p=0.028 and in males (75.5 vs 66.9�20p=0.001 was observed. Among women and men with dyslipidaemia concentrations of VWF decreased after FA supplementation (76.8�0vs 69.6�20p=0.003 and 76.7�0vs 67.8�20p=0.001 respectively. Among females and males with BMI ≥25 kg/m2 concentrations of VWF decreased only in men (77.6�0vs 66.5�20p=0.001. In female and male smokers supplementation of FA decreased VWF concentrations (82.5�0vs 74.4�20p=0.012 and 76.6�0vs 69.5�20p=0.036 respectively.Discussion:The results of our study suggest that there is an effect of FA supplementation on VWF concentrations in subjects with atherosclerosis risk factors. 

  2. C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and cardiovascular disease prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Pennells, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events.......There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events....

  3. Serum insulin-like growth factor-1 and C-reactive protein concentrations before and after ovariohysterectomy in bitches with pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Roman; Szczubiał, Marek; Kostro, Krzysztof; Wawron, Władysław; Ceron, Jose J; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2015-03-01

    Pyometra is one of the most common diseases of the reproductive system in bitches. The inflammatory processes occurring in the uterus result in changes in concentrations of numerous serum biomarkers, which are used for monitoring the postoperative period. The aim of the present report was to study the evolution of serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in bitches suffered from pyometra and after ovariohysterectomy in comparison with the control group of healthy dogs submitted to the surgery. Our results indicate that the serum level of IGF-1 is decreased (101.6 ng/mL [73.8-177.8 ng/mL]), whereas CRP is increased (114.6 μg/mL [95.3-131.6 μg/mL]) during severe inflammation. When inflammation caused by pyometra and surgery is resolved, the level of IGF-1 is increased (186.0 ng/mL [94.6-344.3 ng/mL], P < 0.05) and CRP decreased (23.3 μg/mL [9.9-77.0 μg/mL], P < 0.01), suggesting that these markers could be useful for assessment of the postoperative period in bitches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of Probiotic Administration on Serum C-Reactive Protein Concentrations: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Control Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mazidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies to determine the effect of probiotic administration on serum C-reactive protein (CRP concentrations. We searched PubMed-Medline, Web of Science, the Cochrane, and Google Scholar databases (until May 2016 to identify prospective studies evaluating the impact of probiotic administration on CRP. We used a random effects models and generic inverse variance methods to synthesize quantitative data, followed by a leave-one-out method for sensitivity analysis. The systematic review registration number was: CRD42016039457. From a total of 425 entries identified via searches, 20 studies were included in the final analysis. The meta-analysis indicated a significant reduction in serum CRP following probiotic administration with a weighted mean difference (WMD of −1.35 mg/L, (95% confidence interval (CI −2.15 to −0.55, I2 65.1%. The WMDs for interleukin 10 (IL10 was −1.65 pg/dL, (95% CI −3.45 to 0.14, I2 3.1%, and −0.45 pg/mL, (95% CI −1.38 to 0.48, I2 10.2% for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. These findings were robust in sensitivity analyses. This meta-analysis suggests that probiotic administration may significantly reduce serum CRP while having no significant effect on serum IL10 and TNF-α.

  5. Serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and C-reactive protein in a group of Norwegian sled dogs during training and after endurance racing: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergestad, Marte Ekeland; Jahr, Tuva Holt; Krontveit, Randi I; Skancke, Ellen

    2016-04-26

    High incidences of gastritis and gastric ulceration are observed in sled dogs participating in endurance races. Exercise-induced increases in hormones like gastrin and cortisol have been suggested as possible contributing factors. An increase in C-reactive protein (CRP) has also been observed in canines during physical exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of long distance racing on the serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and CRP in a group of sled dogs, by comparing the results achieved early in the training season and after participating in a long distance race; "Femundløpet". Dogs that only trained to the race, but did not compete in the race, were used as control dogs. Sixty-five sled dogs participated in the study; 46 competing dogs (25 completing and 21 non-completing the race) and 19 non-racing dogs (control dogs). The blood samples were collected in October 2012 and February 2013. The post-race serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and CRP was significantly elevated in sled dogs participating in the race (both completing and non-completing dogs) when compared to the results from training. However, no significant differences were observed between the two sampling dates in the control dogs. Post-race results for completing and non-completing dogs were also compared. This demonstrated a significant elevation in gastrin in non-completing versus completing dogs, and a significant elevation in cortisol in completing compared to non-completing dogs. Participation in a long distance race was associated with a significant increase in serum gastrin, cortisol and CRP in sled dogs.

  6. Association of increased serum heat shock protein 70 and C-reactive protein concentrations and decreased serum alpha(2)-HS glycoprotein concentration with the syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molvarec, Attila; Prohászka, Zoltán; Nagy, Bálint; Kalabay, László; Szalay, János; Füst, Georg; Karádi, István; Rigó, János

    2007-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine serum Hsp70 concentrations in HELLP syndrome. We measured also the serum concentrations of three acute phase proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha(2)-macroglobulin (AMG) and alpha(2)-HS glycoprotein (AHSG). Ten severe preeclamptic patients with HELLP syndrome, 20 severe preeclamptic patients without HELLP syndrome and 20 normotensive, healthy pregnant women were included in this case-control study. Serum concentrations of Hsp70, CRP, AMG and AHSG were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Hsp70), particle-enhanced immunoturbidimetric assay (CRP) and radial immunodiffusion (AMG, AHSG). The serum Hsp70 and CRP concentrations were significantly higher, whereas the serum AHSG concentration was significantly lower in the HELLP group (H) than the severe preeclamptic (P) and control (C) groups (median (25-75 percentile); Hsp70: 2.02 ng/ml (0.76-2.23) (H) versus 0.54 ng/ml (0.47-0.79) (P), pAHSG: 588 microg/ml (492-660) (H) versus 654 microg/ml (576-768) (P), pAHSG concentration is decreased, in HELLP syndrome. The maternal systemic inflammation seems to be more pronounced in HELLP syndrome than preeclampsia without HELLP syndrome, as suggested by the alterations in serum CRP and AHSG levels. However, it requires further investigation to determine whether these changes are causes or consequences of the disease.

  7. C reactive protein and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Vestbo, Jørgen; Zacho, Jeppe

    2011-01-01

    It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design.......It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design....

  8. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increases with serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration in individuals without a history of cardiovascular disease: a report from a large Persian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi-Bajestani, Seyyed Mr; Tayefi, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Heidari-Bakavoli, Ali R; Moohebati, Mohsen; Parizadeh, Seyyed Mr; Esmaeili, Habibollah; Ferns, Gordon Aa; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid

    2017-11-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is defined by a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and is associated with a heightened inflammatory state. A raised serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation, is also known to associate with cardiovascular risk. We have investigated the relationship between the presence of metabolic syndrome and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration in a large representative Persian population cohort without a history of cardiovascular disease. Methods The MASHAD study population cohort comprised 9778 subjects, who were recruited from the city of Mashhad, Iran, between 2007 and 2008. Several cardiovascular risk factors were measured in this population without cardiovascular disease. Individuals were categorized into quartiles of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration: first quartile - 0.72 (0.59-0.85) (median [range]) mg/L, second quartile - 1.30 (1.14-1.4) mg/L, third quartile - 2.29 (1.92-2.81) mg/L and fourth quartile - 6.63 (4.61-11.95) mg/L, respectively. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in each quartile was determined using either International Diabetes Federation or Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was highest in the fourth quartile for serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (1220 subjects [50.0%]), and significantly higher than that in the first quartile (reference group) (634 subjects [25.9%]) ( P cardiovascular disease in our Persian cohort.

  9. C-Reactive Protein Levels in the Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimé Bonny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation in the Brugada syndrome (BrS and its clinical implication have been little studied. Aims. To assess the level of inflammation in BrS patients. Methods. All studied BrS patients underwent blood samples drawn for C-reactive protein (CRP levels at admission, prior to any invasive intervention. Patients with a previous ICD placement were controlled to exclude those with a recent (<14 days shock. We divided subjects into symptomatic (syncope or aborted sudden death and asymptomatic groups. In a multivariable analysis, we adjusted for significant variables (age, CRP ≥ 2 mg/L. Results. Fifty-four subjects were studied (mean age 45 ± 13 years, 49 (91% male. Twenty (37% were symptomatic. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean CRP level was 1,4 ± 0,9 mg/L in asymptomatic and 2,4 ± 1,4 mg/L in symptomatic groups (P = .003. In the multivariate model, CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L remained an independent marker for being symptomatic (P = .018; 95% CI: 1.3 to 19.3. Conclusion. Inflammation seems to be more active in symptomatic BrS. C-reactive protein concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L might be associated with the previous symptoms in BrS. The value of inflammation as a risk factor of arrhythmic events in BrS needs to be studied.

  10. Measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and nerve-growth-factor (NGF) concentrations in serum and urine samples of dogs with neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordass, Ulrike; Carlson, Regina; Stein, Veronika Maria; Tipold, Andrea

    2016-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to prove the hypothesis that C-reactive protein (CRP) and nerve growth factor (NGF) may be potential biomarkers for lower urinary tract disorders and may be able to distinguish between micturition dysfunctions of different origin in dogs with spinal cord diseases. NGF- and CRP- concentrations were measured in serum and urine samples using specific ELISA-Kits. Results in urine were standardized by urine-creatinine levels. CRP in serum was detectable in 32/76 and in urine samples in 40/76 patients. NGF could be measured in all serum and in 70/76 urine samples. Urinary CRP concentrations were significantly higher in dogs with micturition dysfunction (p = 0.0009) and in dogs with different neurological diseases (p = 0.0020) compared to the control group. However, comparing dogs with spinal cord disorders with and without associated micturition dysfunction no significant difference could be detected for NGF and CRP values in urine or serum samples. Additionally, levels did not decrease significantly, when measured at the time when the dogs regained the ability to urinate properly (urinary NGF p = 0.7962; urinary CRP p = 0.078). Urine samples with bacteria and/or leukocytes had no significant increase in urinary NGF (p = 0.1112) or CRP (p = 0.0534) concentrations, but higher CRP-levels in urine from dogs with cystitis were found compared to dogs without signs of cystitis. From these data we conclude that neither CRP nor NGF in urine or serum can be considered as reliable biomarkers for micturition disorders in dogs with spinal cord disorders in a clinical setting, but their production might be part of the pathogenesis of such disorders. Significantly higher levels of CRP could be found in the urine of dogs with micturition dysfunctions compared to control dogs. This phenomenon could potentially be explained by unspecific extrahepatic CRP production by smooth muscle cells in the dilated bladder.

  11. C-reactive protein: An inflammatory biomarker in oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Kumar Mengji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is a plasma phase protein that takes part in systemic responses to inflammatory reactions. Its serum concentration can increase up to 1000 folds or more in relation to acute stimuli due to infections, tissue injuries, and malignant disorders. It is highly resistant to proteolysis, principally synthesized in the liver in response to proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. interleukin (IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor. These cytokines are seen to be related to neoplastic disorders. It forms an integral component of innate immunity and serves primarily to recognize potential pathogens and damaged cells. The present article summarizes the importance of CRP and its significance in oral cancer and associated disorders. It was found that a lowered CRP level may prove to be beneficial in prevention and treatment of oral cavity cancer.

  12. Capacitive immunosensor for C-reactive protein quantification

    KAUST Repository

    Sapsanis, Christos

    2015-08-02

    We report an agglutination-based immunosensor for the quantification of C-reactive protein (CRP). The developed immunoassay sensor requires approximately 15 minutes of assay time per sample and provides a sensitivity of 0.5 mg/L. We have measured the capacitance of interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) and quantified the concentration of added analyte. The proposed method is a label free detection method and hence provides rapid measurement preferable in diagnostics. We have so far been able to quantify the concentration to as low as 0.5 mg/L and as high as 10 mg/L. By quantifying CRP in serum, we can assess whether patients are prone to cardiac diseases and monitor the risk associated with such diseases. The sensor is a simple low cost structure and it can be a promising device for rapid and sensitive detection of disease markers at the point-of-care stage.

  13. The effects of probiotic yoghurt on C-Reactive Protein in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hanoyesadat Ejtahed

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Consumption of probiotic yoghurt improved C-Reactive Protein concentration in type 2 diabetic patients. Probiotic yoghurt consumption is recommended as auxiliary therapy in type 2 diabetic patients.

  14. c-reactive protein — biological functions, cardiovascular disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CRP are indicative of biological ageing, a non-inflammatory condition.19. Biological properties and functions of cRP. Recognition of pathogens and damaged cells. As part of the acute-phase response, ..... C-reactive protein: a critical update. J Clin Invest 2003;. 111:1805-12. 35. Pepys MB, Baltz ML. Acute phase proteins ...

  15. Comparative study of C-Reactive Protein and other biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum levels of C-reactive proteins (CRP), Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total protein, albumin and globulins were investigated using high sensitivity Immunoturbidometric and colorimetric techniques in individuals with hepatitis (n=50), Malaria (n=50) and 40 control subjects in age ...

  16. Rat C-reactive protein activates the autologous complement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz Padilla, Niubel; Bleeker, Wim K.; Lubbers, Yvonne; Rigter, Gemma M. M.; van Mierlo, Gerard J.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Hack, C. Erik

    2003-01-01

    Activation of complement is a biological function of human C-reactive protein (hCRP), whereas rat CRP (rCRP) has been claimed to be unable to activate complement. As important biological functions of proteins are probably conserved among species, we re-evaluated, using various ligands, the

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLES The correlation between C-reactive protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. 442 July 2010, Vol. 100, No. 7 SAMJ. The correlation between C-reactive protein and toxic ... at a pH of 7.3 The formation of toxic granulated neutrophils. (TGN) is induced ... sensitivity (80%) for predicting infection.16 A combination of ... Pretoria, we examined 357 consecutive peripheral blood slides,.

  18. C- Reactive Protein in Tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and the follow-up therapeutic response to tuberculosis (TB) among patients aged 19-68 years attending out-patient clinics of two hospitals in Abeokuta, Southwestern ...

  19. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipid profile, malondialdehyde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipid profile, malondialdehyde and total antioxidant capacity in psoriasis. ... Abstract. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by epidermal hyperproliferation and lymphocytic infiltration. The ongoing inflammatory process in psoriasis affects the arterial wall promoting ...

  20. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walka...

  1. C-Reactive Protein in Healthy Adult Nigerians | Baba | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant produced in the liver in response to tissue injury or systemic inflammation, its release is stimulated by cytokines (interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha). Elevated CRP levels have been linked to an increased risk of later development of diabetes ...

  2. Predictive value of C-reactive protein in critically ill patients after abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sapin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The development of sepsis after abdominal surgery is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to inflammation, it may be difficult to diagnose infection when it occurs, but measurement of C-reactive protein could facilitate this diagnosis. In the present study, we evaluated the predictive value and time course of C-reactive protein in relation to outcome in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU after abdominal surgery. METHODS: We included patients admitted to the ICU after abdominal surgery over a period of two years. The patients were divided into two groups according to their outcome: favorable (F; left the ICU alive, without modification of the antibiotic regimen and unfavorable (D; death in the ICU, surgical revision with or without modification of the antibiotic regimen or just modification of the regimen. We then compared the highest C-reactive protein level on the first day of admission between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 308 patients were included: 86 patients had an unfavorable outcome (group D and 222 had a favorable outcome (group F. The groups were similar in terms of leukocytosis, neutrophilia, and platelet count. C-reactive protein was significantly higher at admission in group D and was the best predictor of an unfavorable outcome, with a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 72% for a threshold of 41 mg/L. No changes in C-reactive protein, as assessed based on the delta C-reactive protein, especially at days 4 and 5, were associated with a poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: A C-reactive protein cut-off of 41 mg/L during the first day of ICU admission after abdominal surgery was a predictor of an adverse outcome. However, no changes in the C-reactive protein concentration, especially by day 4 or 5, could identify patients at risk of death.

  3. Level of C - reactive protein as an indicator for prognosis of premature uterine contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najat Nakishbandy, Bayar M; Barawi, Sabat A M

    2014-01-01

    high concentrations of maternal C-reactive protein have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, and premature uterine contraction may be predicted by elevated levels of C-reactive protein. This may ultimately be simple and cost-effective enough to introduce as a low-risk screening program. an observational case control study was performed from May 1st, 2010 to December 1st, 2010 at Maternity Teaching Hospital-Erbil/ Kurdistan Region/ Iraq. The sample size was (200) cases. Hundred of them were presented with premature uterine contractions at 24(+0)-36(+6) weeks. The other hundred were control group at same gestational ages. The level of C-reactive protein was determined in both groups and both groups were followed till delivery. (93) out of (100) women with premature uterine contractions had elevated level of C-Reactive protein and 91% delivered prematurely while in the control group only (9) out of (100) women had elevated level of C-reactive protein and only 8% of them delivered preterm. Differences were statistically highly significant. C-reactive protein can be used as a biomarker in prediction of premature delivery when it is associated with premature uterine contractions. As well it can be used as a screening test to detect cases that are at risk of premature delivery.

  4. Association between C reactive protein and coronary heart disease: mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wensley, Frances; Gao, Pei; Burgess, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease.......To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease....

  5. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Michael

    2015-06-01

    C-reactive protein is a better indicator of inflammation than the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It is more sensitive and responds more quickly to changes in the clinical situation. False negative and false positive results are more common when measuring the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Renal disease, female sex and older age increase the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate has value in detecting low-grade bone infection, and in monitoring some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

  6. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentrations and Association of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Concentrations With Incident Coronary Heart Disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gen-Min; Liu, Kiang; Colangelo, Laura A; Lakoski, Susan G; Tracy, Russell P; Greenland, Philip

    2016-01-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has been associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) in numerous but not all observational studies, and whether low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) alter this association is unknown. In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2000-2012), we prospectively assessed the association of hs-CRP concentrations with incident CHD in participants who did not receive lipid-lowering therapy, as well as in those with LDL-C concentrations less than 130 mg/dL (n = 3,106) and those with LDL-C concentrations of 130 mg/dL or greater (n = 1,716) at baseline (2000-2002). Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to assess the associations after adjustment for socioeconomic status, traditional risk factors, body mass index, diabetes, aspirin use, kidney function, and coronary artery calcium score. Loge hs-CRP was associated with incident CHD in participants with LDL-C concentrations of 130 mg/dL or higher (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 1.60) but not in those with LDL-C concentrations less than 130 mg/dL (HR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.74, 1.05; P for interaction = 0.003). As a whole, loge hs-CRP was not associated with incident CHD in participants who had not received lipid-lowering therapy at baseline (HR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.20) and who had mean LDL-C concentrations less than 130 mg/dL. These findings suggest that LDL-C concentrations might be a moderator of the contribution of hs-CRP to CHD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. C-reactive protein and risk of atrial fibrillation in East Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chang Hee; Kang, Jung Gyu; Lee, Hyun Jong; Kim, Nan Hee; Sung, Joo-Wook; Cheong, EunSun; Sung, Ki-Chul

    2017-10-01

    Inflammation has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). It is uncertain whether C-reactive protein, a robust inflammatory marker, is associated with AF incidence in Asians with lower levels of C-reactive protein compared with western population. This study aimed to determine the association between C-reactive protein and risk of AF in a large population of Koreans. A total of 402 946 Koreans were enrolled in a health screening programme from January 2002 to December 2013. Among them, 210 208 subjects were analysed during the mean follow-up of 4.59 years (1 062 513 person-years). Atrial fibrillation was identified by electrocardiography at every visits. Atrial fibrillation was identified in 561 subjects (0.1%) at baseline. The median (inter-quartile) baseline C-reactive protein levels were higher in subject with AF than in those without AF [0.9 mg/L (0.4-0.9) vs. 0.4 mg/L (0.2-1.0), P C-reactive protein had more AF than those in the lowest quartile [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.45-2.81; PC-reactive protein had a 1.68-fold (95% CI 1.06-2.67) increased risk of AF than the lowest quartile in multivariate Cox regression analysis. Baseline C-reactive protein levels are significantly associated with the prevalence of AF and the risk of AF in Korean populations even C-reactive protein concentrations are substantially lower than reported in white populations.

  8. Quantitative analysis of C-reactive protein in potentially malignant disorders: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srilalitha Kaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent advances in understanding complex tumor interactions have led to the discovery of an association between inflammation and cancer. An abundance of pro - inflammatory cytokines in a tumor micro-environment can lead to angiogenesis, thus favoring neoplastic growth. Serum C reactive protein is a sensitive marker of inflammation and may have significant prognostic value as early biomarker for cancer diagnostics. Aims and Objectives: This was a pilot study done to assess the serum C reactive protein levels in potentially malignant disorders (PMDS and to evaluate their role as prognostic marker. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 20 cases of oral potentially malignant disorders (10 each of Leukoplakia, Oral Sub mucous fibrosis confirmed by histopathological examination and 10 controls. All the samples were subjected to C - reactive protein analysis by immunoturbidometery. Results were subjected to Statistical analysis. Statistical analysis: Data was entered in data base management of the software SPSS version 20.0. Comparison of three groups with respect to C reactive protein levels was done by one way ANOVA. Pair wise comparison of three groups was done by Turkeys multiple post hoc procedure. Results: Mean C reactive protein levels in leukoplakia was 0.33±0.17, in oral submucous fibrosis was 0.58±0.83 where as in controls it was 0.26±0.05. In potentially malignant disorders, C reactive protein was slightly elevated when compared with the controls. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that serum C reactive protein concentration is associated with subsequent development of oral cancer and could serve as a potential prognostic biomarker.

  9. Milk C-reactive protein in canine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiu, Iosif; Dąbrowski, Roman; Martinez-Subiela, Silvia; Ceron, Jose J; Wdowiak, Anna; Pop, Raul Alexandru; Brudaşcă, Florinel Gheorghe; Pastor, Josep; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2017-04-01

    Presence of mastitis in lactating bitches can become life threatening for both the bitch and pups. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) in both milk and serum for canine mastitis diagnosis. Our study showed that milk CRP levels ranged between 0.1 and 4.9μg/mL and from 0.3 to 40.0μg/mL in healthy and diseased bitches (Pmastitis when compared with healthy controls (Pmastitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of plasma adiponectin /C-reactive protein ratio in obesity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obesity is a modifiable risk factor for hypertension and T2D. Objective(s): We examined relations between fasting plasma adiponectin (ADIP), C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations and markers of T2D in African Americans (AA). Methods: Fasting plasma ADIP, CRP, Insulin (IN), HOMA-IR, lipid profiles, body ...

  11. Association between Depression and C-Reactive Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Ma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Depression has been associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, and a depression-related elevation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP has been proposed as a possible mechanism. The objective of this paper is to examine association between depression and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP. Methods. Subjects consisted of 508 healthy adults (mean age 48.5 years; 49% women, 88% white residing in central Massachusetts. Data were collected at baseline and at quarterly intervals over a one-year period per individual. Multivariable linear mixed models were used to assess the association for the entire sample and by gender. Results. The mean Beck Depression Inventory score was 5.8 (standard deviation (SD 5.4; median 4.3, and average serum hs-CRP was 1.8 mg/L (SD 1.7; median 1.2. Results from the multivariable linear mixed models show that individuals with higher depression scores have higher levels of hs-CRP. Analyses by gender show persistence of an independent association among women, but not among men. Body mass index (BMI = weight(kg/height(m2 appears to be a partial mediator of this relationship. Conclusion. Depression score was correlated to hs-CRP levels in women. Further studies are required to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying these associations and their implications.

  12. Rosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridker, Paul M.; Danielson, Eleanor; Fonseca, Francisco A. H.; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J.; Macfadyen, Jean G.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T.; Glynn, Robert J.; Ridker, P. M.; Fonseca, F. A. H.; Genest, J.; Gotto, A. M.; Koenig, W.; Libby, P.; Lorenzatti, A. J.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Shepherd, J.; Willerson, J. T.; Danielson, E.; Glynn, R. J.; MacFadyen, J. G.; Mora, S.; Collins, R.; Bailey, K.; Gersh, B.; Lamas, G.; Smith, S.; Vaughan, D.; Mahaffey, K.; Brown, P.; Montgomery, D.; Wilson, M.; Wood, F.; Altamirano, J.; Boskis, P.; Colombo, H.; Cuneo, C.; Diaz, M.; Esper, R.; Fernandez, A.; Foye, R.; Hershson, A.; Kuschnir, E.; La Greca, R.; Lorenzatti, A.; Lozada, A.; Luciardi, H.; Luquez, H.; Maffei, L.; Majul, C.; Marin, M.; Muntaner, J.; Nul, D.; Paolasso, E.; Rey, R.; Rodenas, P.; Rodriguez, P.; Rojas, C.; Telsolin, P.; Vita, N.; Adrianes, G.; Argento, O.; Bacart, P.; Baeck, L.; Baguet, J.; Balthazar, Y.; Battello, G.; Behets, J.; Beke, P.; Berwouts, P.; Boermans, P.; Bolly, F.; Borms, J.; Boulad, M.; Boulanger, L.; Bous, J.; van Boxstael, R.; Brands, Y.; Buyse, L.; Calozet, Y.; Camps, K.; Capiau, L.; Celis, H.; Coucke, F.; D'Argent, F.; Op de Beeck, G.; de Meulemeester, M.; de Praeter, K.; de Rouck, S.; Delcourt, A.; Delvaux, J.; Demanet, E.; Dendale, P.; Derijcke, M.; Deruyck, C.; Devaux, J.; Dupont, C.; van Duyse, J.; Erpicum, L.; Gilio, C.; Gillet, A.; Grosjean, J.; Heeren, J.; Henry, G.; Heyvaert, F.; Hollanders, G.; Hutsebaut, A.; Janssens, P.; Lannoy, H.; Ledoux, C.; Legros, P.; Leliaert, R.; Martens, R.; Maury, O.; Mehuys, G.; Michaux, J.; Migeotte, A.; Mortelmans, J.; van Mulders, N.; van Parijs, P.; van Peer, W.; Pieters, E.; Reynders, P.; van Riet, D.; Robert, P.; van Stee, J.; Teheux, J.; Teuwen, J.; Thoeng, J.; Timmermans, B.; Tshinkulu, M.; Vanden Bemden, S.; Vantroyen, D.; Veevaete, M.; Vercruysse, K.; Vereecken, G.; Vermeersch, L.; Vernijns, J.; Verspecht, E.; Vinck, G.; Vrancken, F.; Watté, G.; Weymans, J.; Windmolders, S.; Albuquerque, D. C.; Barbosa, E. C. D.; Bertolami, M. C.; Blacher, C.; Brasileiro, A. L. S.; Costa e Forti, A.; Eliaschewitz, F. G.; Esteves, J. P.; Feitosa, G. S.; Francischetti, E. A.; Franco, R. J. S.; Gomes, M. A.; Gross, J. L.; Jardim, P. C.; Kohlmann, O.; Loures-Vale, A. A.; Magalhães, M. E. C.; Maia, L. N.; Moriguchi, E. H.; Nogueira, P. R.; Oigman, W.; Repetto, G.; Santos, R. D.; Saraiva, J. F. K.; Xavier, H. T.; Benov, H.; Chompalova, B.; Donova, T.; Gocheva, N.; Goudev, A.; Grigorov, M.; Gruev, T.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Marchev, S.; Mihov, A.; Pasheva, V.; Penev, A.; Popov, A.; Raev, D.; Sirakova, V.; Slavcheva, A.; Stoikov, A.; Stoilov, R.; Tisheva, S.; Todorov, G.; Torbova, S.; Uzunangelov, J.; Achyuthan, G.; Akhras, R.; Barriere, G.; Bartlett, J.; Behiels, S.; Bell, A.; Bergeron, J.; Berlingieri, J.; Bhamjee, H.; Bodok-Nutzati, R.; Booth, W.; Boyd, C.; Brault, S.; Bruckswaiger, D.; Bukovy, B.; Campbell, G.; Carlson, B.; Cha, J.; Chehayeb, R.; Cheng, W.; Chilvers, M.; Chouinard, G.; Chow, W.; Conter, H.; Conway, J.; Craig, B.; Craig, D.; Dattani, I.; del Grande, R.; Dharamshi, S.; Dickson, M.; Dion, D.; Dowell, A.; Drexler, J.; Dube, S.; Dupont, A.; Dworkin, B.; Fields, L.; Filteau, P.; Gardiner, E.; Gervais, B.; Gillis, G.; Girard, R.; Goldman, H.; Gorfinkel, I.; Goulet, S.; Greenspoon, A.; Gritter, R.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M.; Habib, N.; Harding, R.; Hart, R.; Henein, S.; Henry, D.; Hirsch, Axxx; Ho, K.; Hoag, G.; Houde, D.; Howlett, E.; Ing, G.; Jadd, J.; Janes, J.; Jardine, F.; Johnston, T.; Kanani, S.; Kazimirski, M.; Kelly, A.; Klajner, F.; Kooy, J.; Lalani, A.; Lam, S.; Laranjeiro, J.; LaRose, D.; Leiter, L.; Leung, W.; Li, J.; Lowe, D.; Luces, K.; Ma, P.; MacKinnon, R.; Martinho, V.; Matangi, M.; McCrossin, M.; McIsaac, H.; McMullen, W.; Mehta, P.; Meunier, M.; Misik, K.; Nayar, A.; Ng, A.; Nigro, F.; Noronha, L.; O'Mahony, W.; Pandey, S.; Papp, E.; Patel, V.; Patrick, L.; Peddle, C.; Pinsky, N.; Poirier, P.; Powell, C.; Price, J.; Rolfe, A.; Saliba, N.; Sawkiw, R.; Senior, R.; Shu, D.; Smith, R.; Somani, R.; Soowamber, M.; Stakiw, K.; Talbot, P.; Taliano, J.; Tan, K.; Teitelbaum, I.; Threoux, P.; Tremblay, G.; Turcotte, C.; Tytus, R.; Walsh, P.; Webb, G.; Willoughby, P.; Woo, V.; Woodland, R.; Yee, G.; Acevedo, M.; Caorsi, C.; Cardenas, N.; Gonzalez, B.; Gutierrez, M.; Prieto, J.; Stockins, B.; Valerta, P.; Vejar, M.; Ardila, W.; Aschner, P.; Botero, J.; Botero, R.; Calderon, C.; Casas, L.; Castellanos, R.; Cure, C.; Escobar, I.; Fortich, A.; Garcia, L.; Hernandez, E.; Isaza, D.; Jaramillo, N.; Jiménez, C.; Kattah, W.; Luengas, C.; Matiz, C.; Perez, M.; Quintero, A.; Rizcala, A.; Ruiz, A.; Urina, M.; Valenzuela, A.; Cob-Sanchez, A.; Gutreiman-Golberg, M.; Lainez-Ventosilla, A.; Ramirez-Zamora, L.; Slon-Hitti, C.; Speranza-Sánchez, M.; Vinocour-Fornieri, M.; Hansen, H.; Nordestgaard, B.; Steffensen, R.; Stender, S.; Alvarado-Renderos, J.; Rivera-Ochoa, L.; Villarroel-Abrego, H.; Eha, J.; Jaanson, E.; Kaasik, U.; Keba, E.; Mäeots, E.; Petersen, M.; Reinmets, S.; Roostalu, U.; Vahula, V.; Veidrik, K.; Bellmann, R.; Hanefeld, M.; Horacek, T.; Klein, C.; Knels, R.; Laus, S.; Meissner, G.; Mondrof, C.; Schell, E.; Schuster, H.; Sehnert, W.; Stahl, H.; Szelazek, G.; Winkelmann, B.; Witczak, E.; Elis, A.; Gavish, A.; Grossman, E.; Harats, D.; Keidar, S.; Levy, Y.; Osamah, H.; Shapiro, I.; Shveydel, E.; Wolfovitz, E.; Yogev, R.; Zeltser, D.; Arenas, J. L.; Cardona-Muñoz, E.; Cervantes, J. L.; Flores-Lozano, F.; Gonzalez, Clicerio; Gonzalez-Galvez, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gutierrez-Fajardo, P.; Morales, E.; de los Rios, M.; Romero-Zazueta, A.; Talavera, J. O.; Velasco-Sanchez, R.; Vergara-Takahashi, H.; Zúñiga-Guajardo, S.; Agous, I.; Bak, A.; Bartels, G.; Basart, D.; Cornel, J.; de Schipper, L.; Holwerda, N.; Jonker, J.; Köse, V.; Lok, D.; Lokhorst, B.; Mosterd, A.; Nierop, P.; Oude Ophuis, A.; Somer, S.; Tiebesl, J.; Trip, M.; van Hessen, M.; van Kempen, W.; Andersen, M.; Berz, A.; Bjurstrom, M.; Bo, P.; Brunstad, O.; Daae-Johansen, T.; Elle, S.; Fauske, J.; Fossdal, B.; Gjefsen, O.; Hallaraker, A.; Haugen, J.; Helberg, S.; Holm-Johnsen, S.; Istad, H.; Jacobsen, T.; Johansen, R.; Jorstad, T.; Jorum, I.; Kjorlaug, K.; Kontny, F.; Langaker, K.; Larsen, B.; Lonning, S.; Loraas, A.; Mansilla-Tinoco, R.; Medhus, R.; Meyer, I.; Nasrala, S.; Ofjord, E.; Ose, L.; Palmas, J.; Risberg, K.; Sandberg, A.; Sirnes, P.; Skjegstad, E.; Skjelvan, G.; Solnor, L.; Storm-Larsen, A.; Tandberg, A.; Tomala, T.; Torkelsen, A.; Ursin, A.; Valnes, K.; Walaas, K.; Binns-Halman, R.; Delgado-Paredes, A.; Lombana-Vasquez, B.; Noriega-Aguirre, L.; Trujillo-Sagel, R.; Kowalczyk-Kram, M.; Artemiuk, E.; Asankowicz-Bargiel, B.; Banas, I.; Baranska, E.; Baranski, M.; Bijata-Bronisz, R.; Sikorska, A.; Blaszczyk, B.; Bolanowski, J.; Brokl-Stolarczyk, B.; Brzecki, K.; Buczkowski, K.; Chmielewski, T.; Chojnowska-Jezierska, J.; Chwist-Novak, A.; Cygan, W.; Czajkowska-Kaczmarek, E.; Dargiewicz, A.; Dluzniewski, M.; Dudka, C.; Fares, I.; Flasinska, J.; Gadzinski, W.; Gaszczyk, G.; Golebiowski, G.; Gozdur, W.; Grudzien, K.; Sobieska, E.; Kalamarz, J.; Kalinowska, A.; Kornacewicz-Jach, Z.; Korol, M.; Korycka, W.; Kostka, T.; Kostrzewska, A.; Kot, A.; Kowalska-Werbowy, B.; Krupinska, G.; Lotocka, E.; Luberda-Heynar, Z.; Lukas, W.; Lysek, R.; Machyna-Dybala, A.; Mlynarczyk-Jeremicz, K.; Mocarska-Gorna, B.; Niedbal-Yahfouf, I.; Pasternak, D.; Potakowska, I.; Ramian, U.; Roleder, M.; Rosinska-Migda, J.; Sidorowicz-Bialynicka, A.; Skierkowska, J.; Skorinko, I.; Slaboszewska, J.; Sleziak-Barglik, K.; Stachlewski, P.; Superson-Byra, E.; Tissler-Nahorska, G.; Turbak, R.; Uzunow, A.; Wasowicz, D.; Wodniecki, J.; Wojnowski, L.; Wrzol, A.; Zdrojewska, J.; Zurakowska-Krzywonos, A.; Zurowska-Gebala, M.; Ablachim, T.; Abobului, M.; Balanescu, S.; Bobescu, E.; Bojinca, M.; Cristea, M.; Gaita, D.; Stoicovici, R.; Tataru, R.; Tudose, A.; Ardashev, V.; Arutyunov, G.; Azarin, O.; Barbarash, O.; Bondarev, S.; Borisov, M.; Boyarkin, M.; Burova, N.; Chazova, I.; Dovgalevsky, P.; Duplyakov, D.; Egorova, L.; Goloshchekin, B.; Gratsianskiy, N.; Ivleva, A.; Karpov, R.; Karpov, Y. A.; Karpov, Y. 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Dao, L.; Darwin, C.; Dauber, I.; Davidson, M.; Davis, P.; Degarmo, R.; Degoma, R.; Dempsey, M.; Denny, D.; Denyer, G.; Desai, V.; Despot, J.; Dewan, M.; Dickert, J.; Diederich, C.; Doben, S.; Dobratz, D.; Douglas, B.; Drehobl, M.; Dresner, J.; Dreyfus, J.; Drummond, W.; Dunbar, W.; Dunlap, J.; Dunmyer, S.; Eaton, C.; Ecker, A.; Edris, M.; Egbujiobi, L.; Elkind, A.; Ellis, J.; Ellison, H.; Engeron, E.; Erdy, G.; Ervin, W.; Eshowsky, S.; Estock, D.; Fang, C.; Fanning, J.; Feinberg, B.; Feld, L.; Fenton, I.; Fernandez, E.; Ferrera, R.; Fiacco, P.; Fierer, R.; Finneran, M.; Fintel, D.; Fischer, M.; Flippo, G.; Flores, A.; Folkherth, S.; Forbes, R.; Fowler, R.; Francis, P.; Franco, M.; Frank, A.; Fraser, N.; Fuchs, R.; Gabriel, J.; Gaddam, S.; Gaffney, M.; Gamponia, M.; Gandhi, D.; Ganzman, H.; Gaona, R.; Garibian, G.; Garofalo, J.; Gatewood, R.; Gazda, S.; Geiger, R.; Geller, M.; Germino, W.; Gibbs, R.; Gifford, C.; Gilhooley, N.; Gill, S.; Gillespie, E.; Godwin, D.; Goldberg, M.; Goldberg, R.; Goldstein, M.; Gonzalez-Ortiz, E.; Goodman, D.; Gordon, G.; Gordon, M.; Goswami, A.; Gottlieb, D.; Gottschlich, G.; Graham, D.; Gray, J.; Gray, W.; Green, S.; Greenberg, R.; Greenspan, M.; Greenwald, M.; Grover, D.; Gupta, R.; Gupta-Bala, S.; Guthrie, R.; Gutmann, J.; Gvora, T.; Habib, G.; Hack, T.; Haidar, A.; Hamdy, O.; Hansen, M.; Hanshaw, C.; Hargrove, J.; Harris, H.; Harrison, B.; Hart, T.; Heacock, J.; Head, D.; Headley, D.; Henderson, D.; Herman, L.; Herrera, C.; Hershberger, V.; Hershon, K.; Heym, H.; Hill, G.; Hippert, R.; Hnatiuk, G.; Hoekstra, J.; Holt, W.; Homan, J.; Honsinger, R.; Howard, J.; Howard, V.; Howard, W.; Huling, R.; Imburgia, M.; Isajiw, G.; Ison, R.; Iverson, W.; Jacks, R.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, K.; Jacobs, J.; Jacobson, E.; James, A.; Jayanty, V.; Johary, A.; Johnson, G.; Jones, P.; Jones, T.; Joseph, J.; Julien, C.; Kahn, Z.; Kalvaria, I.; Kang, J.; Kaplan, I.; Karns, R.; Kashi, K.; Kaster, S.; Kaufman, A.; Kawley, F.; Keller, R.; Kenton, D.; Kerlin, J.; Kern, J.; Kerwin, E.; Kerzner, B.; Ketchum, J.; Khan, J.; Khan, S.; Khawar, M.; Khera, A.; Kinstrey, T.; Klein, B.; Klein, E.; Klein, S.; Klein, T.; Kleinsteuber, K.; Klementowicz, P.; Knopp, R.; Knutson, T.; Koch, S.; Kramer, M.; Krause, R.; Krisciunas, V.; Krueger, C.; Kruszewski, D.; Kumar, R.; Kunst, E.; Kuo, D.; Kuritsky, L.; Kushner, P.; Kutner, M.; Kwiterovich, P.; Kwong, S.; Lanese, J.; Lang, B.; Lary, J.; Lasalle, J.; Lasater, S.; Lasser, N.; Laughlin, D.; Lawless, J.; Lawlor, D.; Ledbetter, J.; Ledesma, G.; Lee, D.; Lemanski, P.; Levinson, G.; Levinson, L.; Lewis, D.; Lewis, L.; Lewis, S.; Linden, D.; Loh, I.; Look, M.; Lopez, D.; Loskovitz, L.; Lubin, B.; Lucas, M.; MacAdams, M.; Madden, B.; Magee, P.; Maggiacomo, F.; Magier, D.; Magnuson, S.; Mahaffey, R.; Makowski, D.; Maletz, L.; Mally, A.; Maloney, R.; Mancha, V.; Manolukas, P.; Marple, R.; Masri, A.; Masri, B.; Mattingly, G.; Mayer, N.; McCain, A.; McCall Bundy, J.; McCartney, M.; Mcclain, D.; McConn, M.; Mccullum, K.; Mcdavid, R.; McGettigan, J.; McIvor, M.; McNeff, J.; Mendolla, M.; Mercado, A.; Mersey, J.; Milam, J.; Milko, T.; Miller, M.; Miller, R.; Miller, S.; Mobley, D.; Modi, T.; Modiano, M.; Mollen, M.; Montgomery, R.; Moran, J.; Morelli, J.; Morin, D.; Moskow, H.; Moursi, M.; Mueller, N.; Mullins, M.; Myers, E.; Nadar, V.; Naiser, J.; Nash, S.; Natarajan, S.; Neft, M.; Neuman, D.; Nevins, B.; Newman, J.; Newman, R.; Newman, S.; Nolen, T.; Nwasuruba, C.; Oberoi, M.; Odom, A.; Ong, Y.; Oppy, J.; Owen, S.; Pampe, E.; Pangtay, D.; Parker, R.; Patel, B.; Patel, J.; Patel, M.; Patel, R.; Paul, A.; Pearlstein, R.; Penepent, P.; Peniston, J.; Perlman, M.; Persson, D.; Peters, P.; Peterson, G.; Peterson, J.; Pettyjohn, F.; Phillips, A.; Phillips, D.; Piel, M.; Pillai, T.; Pi-Sunyer, F.; Pollack, A.; Pond, M.; Pongonis, J.; Porras, C.; Portnoy, E.; Potos, W.; Powers, J.; Prasad, J.; Pritchett, K.; Pudi, K.; Pullman, J.; Purdy, A.; Quinones, Y.; Raad, G.; Radbill, M.; Radin, D.; Rai, K.; Raikhel, M.; Raine, C.; Ramanujan, R.; Ramirez, G.; Ramos-Santana, Z.; Rapo, S.; Ravin, S.; Rawtani, P.; Reeves, R.; Reeves, W.; Reiter, W.; Rendell, M.; Resnick, H.; Reynolds, W.; Rhudy, J.; Rice, L.; Rictor, K.; Ringrose, R.; Riser, J.; Rizvi, M.; Rizzo, W.; Robinson, J.; Robison, W.; Rogers, W.; Rohlf, J.; Rosen, R.; Ross, E.; Roth, E.; Rovner, S.; Rucki, P.; Runde, M.; Ryan, W.; Rybicki, J.; Saleem, T.; Salvato, P.; Santram, D.; Scharf, B.; Schear, M.; Schectman, G.; Schmidt, J.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, P.; Schneider, R.; Schoenfelder, S.; Schussheim, A.; Schwartz, R.; Schwartz, S.; Schwarze, M.; Scott, C.; Segal, S.; Settipane, R.; Shah, M.; Shamim, T.; Shanes, J.; Shapero, P.; Shapiro, J.; Shealy, N.; Shepard, M.; Shepherd, A.; Sheta, M.; Shrivastava, R.; Shusman, R.; Siddiqui, M.; Sidney, A.; Silvers, D.; Simek, C.; Simpson, C.; Sinatra, L.; Singh, S.; Singson, D.; Slabic, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.; Smith, T.; Snell, P.; Specter, J.; Speer, J.; Spees, R.; Sperling, M.; Spuhler, W.; Staab, P.; Stafford, J.; Stanton, D.; Stein, E.; Stern, S.; Stocks, T.; Stone, A.; Strader, W.; Strout, C.; Strzinek, R.; Subich, D.; Suen, J.; Sugimoto, D.; Sulman, S.; Suresh, D.; Sweeney, G.; Szatkowski, A.; Szeto, J.; Szewczak, S.; Szulawski, I.; Taber, L.; Taghizadeh, B.; Tague, R.; Tambunan, D.; Tannoury, G.; Tavaez Valle, J.; Thieneman, A.; Thigpen, D.; Thompson, P.; Tidman, R.; Tilton, G.; Tokatlian, E.; Topkis, R.; Torelli, M.; Tortorice, F.; Toth, P.; Touger, M.; Treat, S.; Trevino, M.; Trupin, S.; Turner, A.; Turner, M.; Tweel, C.; Ugarte, J.; Ulmer, E.; Urbach, D.; Vacker, M.; Vallecillo, J.; van de Beek, M.; Vargas, L.; Vazquez Tanus, J.; Verma, A.; Vijayaraghavan, K.; Wade, P.; Wade, T.; Wagner, S.; Wahle, J.; Walker, J.; Walker, M.; Weinstein, R.; Weisbrot, A.; Weiss, R.; West, P.; White, A.; Wickemeyer, W.; Wieskopf, B.; Wiggins, M.; Williams, H.; Wiseman, J.; Yataco, A.; Yates, S.; Zamarra, J.; Zamora, B.; Zawada, E.; Zemel, L.; Zigrang, W.; Zusman, R.; Aguiton, M.; Arroyo-Parejo, M.; Beaujon Sierralta, J.; Berrizbeitia, M.; Carrizales de Marlin, Y.; Colan Parraga, J.; Fernandez, C.; Fuenmayor, N.; Giesen, G.; Gonzalez Gomez, C.; Guaipo, A.; Herrera Rivera, C.; Jaua, L.; Lopez, N.; Lopez Nouel, R.; Marulanda, M.; Morr, I.; Nass, A.; Palmucci, G.; Perez, L.; Ponte, C.; Rivas, I.; de Roa, E.; Figarella Salazar, G.; Sanchez, F.; Siriti, U.; Viloria, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased levels of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein predict cardiovascular events. Since statins lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as well as cholesterol, we hypothesized that people with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels

  13. C-reactive protein in patients with aggressive periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mysak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the systemic levels of C-reactive protein (CRP in peripheral blood samples of patients with aggressive periodontitis during the first twelve months of periodontal treatment, at exactly six month interval measurements, and compare them with clinical periodontal parameters. Materials and methods: All patients (N = 45 were examined prior to the initiation of periodontal treatment. Patients were divided into two groups GAgP (Generalised form of aggressive periodontitis, N = 23 and group LAgP (Localised form of aggressive periodontitis, N = 22. Control group (CON included 60 individuals with healthy periodontium. The levels of CRP were determined in both groups GAgP and LAgP three times in 6 month intervals during the periodontal treatment. Results: CRP is a plasma protein that reflects the extent of the acute phase response to inflammation and is one of the markers of choice for monitoring this response. In our study, CRP levels decreased in course of periodontal treatment in both groups (GAgP and LAgP in a similar way as bleeding on probing (BOP and probing pocket depth (PPD indices. Conclusion: Our study results showed that CRP levels, as well as bleeding on probing (BOP and probing pocket depth (PPD, indices decreased in course of periodontal treatment in patients with generalised and localised aggressive periodontitis. Therefore this marker might be exploitable as a means to evaluate periodontal health in patients with aggressive periodontitis. Keywords: aggressive periodontitis, C-reactive protein, periodontal index, cardiovascular diseases

  14. C-reactive protein (CRP) in cerebro-vascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canova, C R; Courtin, C; Reinhart, W H

    1999-11-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a useful prognostic factor in coronary heart disease. It has not been previously studied in acute cerebro-vascular events, which was the topic of the present study. Patients admitted to the hospital for an acute cerebro-vascular event were prospectively investigated. C-reactive protein was determined nephelometrically. Infection or inflammation were excluded clinically and with an erythrocyte sedimentation rate brain was performed. According to initial brain imaging and the clinical course the 138 patients were divided into five groups: 20 with transient ischemic attack, 20 with reversible neurological deficit lasting less than 2 weeks, 61 with completed stroke and restitution, 16 with stroke without restitution and 21 with cerebral hemorrhage. Median CRP values (range) were 3.2 (2.4-13.5), 3.3 (2.4-39.4), 4.2 (2.4-73. 4), 3.4 (3.2-44.0) and 3.5 (2.4-104.0 mg/l), respectively with no significant differences between groups in a non-parametric test (Kruskal-Wallis). Risk factors for vascular disease in general and stroke in particular had no visible influence on CRP levels. No relationship was found between time interval since onset of symptoms and CRP measurement, suggesting that an acute cerebro-vascular event has little influence on CRP values. CRP is not a useful marker to predict the outcome of an acute cerebro-vascular event on hospital admission. This is in contrast to acute coronary events.

  15. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis

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    Imed Helal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD, as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP. We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS; INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001. Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94 and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027 and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028 remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%. Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03 and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009 and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001 were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries.

  16. C-reactive protein, inflammation and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Shrivastava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is widely considered to be an important contributing factor of the pathophysiology of coronary heart disease (CHD, and the inflammatory cascade is particularly important in the atherosclerotic process. In consideration of the important role that inflammatory processes play in CHD, recent work has been focused on whether biomarkers of inflammation may help to improve risk stratification and identify patient groups who might benefit from particular treatment strategies. Of these biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP has emerged as one of the most important novel inflammatory markers. CRP an acute phase protein is synthesized by hepatocytes in response to proinflammatory cytokines, in particular interleukin-6. Many large-scale prospective studies demonstrate that CRP strongly and independently predicts adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death in individuals both with and without overt CHD. CRP is believed to be both a marker and a mediator of atherosclerosis and CHD. CRP plays a pivotal role in many aspects of atherogenesis including, activation of complement pathway, lipids uptake by macrophage, release of proinflammatory cytokines, induces the expression of tissue factor in monocytes, promotes the endothelial dysfunction and inhibits nitric oxide production. The commercial availability of CRP high sensitive assays has made screening for this marker simple, reliable, and reproducible and can be used as a clinical guide to diagnosis, management, and prognosis of CHD.

  17. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  18. C-reactive protein as a predictor of chorioamnionitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erik J; Muller, Corinna L; Sartorius, Jennifer A; White, David R; Maslow, Arthur S

    2012-10-01

    Chorioamnionitis (CAM) affects many pregnancies complicated by preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Finding a serum factor that could accurately predict the presence of CAM could potentially lead to more efficient management of PPROM and improved neonatal outcomes. To determine if C-reactive protein (CRP) is an effective early marker of CAM in patients with PPROM. A retrospective evaluation of pregnant women with PPROM at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania, between January 2005 and January 2009. Nonparametric statistical tests (ie, Wilcoxon rank sum and Spearman rank correlation) were used to compare distributions that were skewed. Characteristics of the study population were compared using 2-sample t tests for continuous variables and Fisher exact tests for discrete variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to generate receiver operating characteristic curves and obtain area under the curve estimates in stepwise fashion for predicting histologic CAM. A secondary analysis compared the characteristics among patients with clinical CAM, histologic CAM, or non-CAM. The total population of 73 women was subdivided into patients with histologic CAM (n=26) and patients without histologic CAM (ie, no evidence of CAM on placental pathology; n=47). There was no difference between groups in CRP levels, days of pregnancy latency, white blood cell count, smoking status, antibiotic administration, or steroid benefit. The group with histologic CAM delivered at earlier gestational ages: mean (standard deviation) age was 29.5 (4.4) weeks vs 31.9 (3.5) weeks (P=.02). For our primary analysis, we found no difference in CRP levels (P=.32). Receiver operating characteristic curve plots of CRP levels, temperature at delivery, and white blood cell count resulted in an area under the curve estimate of 0.696, which was 70% predictive of histologic CAM. In the secondary analysis, after adjusting for gestational age, the estimated hazard ratio for CRP change

  19. Positive maternal C-reactive protein predicts neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ji Hyun; Namgung, Ran; Park, Min Soo; Park, Koo In; Lee, Chul

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of maternal inflammatory marker: C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting early onset neonatal sepsis (that occurring within 72 hours after birth). 126 low birth weight newborns (gestation 32±3.2 wk, birth weight 1887±623 g) and their mothers were included. Neonates were divided into sepsis group (n=51) including both proven (positive blood culture) and suspected (negative blood culture but with more than 3 abnormal clinical signs), and controls (n=75). Mothers were subgrouped into CRP positive ≥1.22 mg/dL (n=48) and CRP negative neonatal sepsis according to maternal condition. Maternal CRP was significantly higher in neonatal sepsis group than in control (3.55±2.69 vs. 0.48±0.31 mg/dL, p=0.0001). Maternal CRP (cutoff value >1.22 mg/dL) had sensitivity 71% and specificity 84% for predicting neonatal sepsis. Maternal CRP positive group had more neonatal sepsis than CRP negative group (71% vs. 29%, pneonatal sepsis in maternal CRP positive group versus CRP negative group was 10.68 (95% confidence interval: 4.313-26.428, pneonatal sepsis significantly increased in the case of positive maternal CRP (≥1.22 mg/dL). In newborn of CRP positive mother, the clinician may be alerted to earlier evaluation for possible neonatal infection prior to development of sepsis.

  20. Dietary glycemic index, dietary glycemic load, blood lipids, and C-reactive protein

    OpenAIRE

    Levitan, Emily B.; Cook, Nancy R.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Ridker, Paul M; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Buring, Julie E.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Liu, Simin

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrate quantity and quality may influence risk of cardiovascular disease through blood lipid concentrations and inflammation. We measured dietary glycemic index (GI) and dietary glycemic load (GL) among 18,137 healthy women ≥ 45 years old without diagnosed diabetes using a food-frequency questionnaire. We assayed fasting total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol, LDL:HDL cholesterol ratio, triacylglycerols (TG), and C-reactive protein (CRP). We evaluated associations with dietary GI and GL using ...

  1. Effects of products made from a high-palmitic acid, trans-free semiliquid fat or a high-oleic acid, low-trans semiliquid fat on the serum lipoprotein profile and on C-reactive protein concentrations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensink, R P

    2008-05-01

    Many studies have shown that trans fatty acids have unfavorable effects on the serum lipoprotein profile. In general, however, fats were compared with different functional characteristics, which lower the practical applications of the results. The major aim of this study was to compare the effects of a high-palmitic acid, trans-free semiliquid fat with those of a high-oleic acid, low-trans semiliquid fat on the serum lipoprotein profile of healthy subjects. Forty-four subjects (33 women and 11 men) consumed, in random order, two experimental diets, each for 3 weeks. Diets provided 40 energy percent (En%) from fat, while 15 En% was supplied by the experimental fats. At the end of each intervention period, concentrations of serum lipoproteins, C-reactive protein, glucose and insulin were measured. When subjects consumed the high-oleic acid, low-trans semiliquid fat, intakes of stearic acid (+1.3 En%), oleic acid (+2.9 En%), alpha-linolenic acid (+0.1 En%) and trans fatty acids (+0.6 En%) were higher and that of palmitic acid (-4.2 En%) lower. Serum concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased by 0.34+/-0.39 mmol/l (mean+/-s.d.; 95% confidence interval (CI), -0.46 to -0.23 mmol/l; Ptrans semiliquid fat has a more favorable effect on the serum lipoprotein profile than a trans-free semiliquid fat with comparable functional characteristics, but high in palmitic acid.

  2. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... C-reactive protein and TC (R = 0.19), TG (R = 0.29), BMI (R = 0.32), glucose (R = 0.11), and uric acid (R = 0.14) (all P ... concentrations in subjects grouped according to the presence of 0-1, 2-3, and > or =4 features of the metabolic syndrome were 1.11, 1.27, and 2.16 mg/l, respectively, with a statistically highly significant trend (P metabolic syndrome...

  3. Serum C-Reactive Protein in Nigerians With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum C-Reactive Protein in Nigerians With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. MM Baba, BA Kolawole, RT Ikem, FA Arogundade, H Yusuph, ID Gezawa. Abstract. Background: C-reactive protein is an acute-phase proteins, produce in the liver, its release is stimulated by cytokines (interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha).

  4. Relationship between C-Reactive Protein and Body Mass Index in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. C-reactive protein is an acute-phase protein synthesized in the liver and its release is stimulated by cytokines (interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha). Baseline levels of C-reactive protein in apparently healthy men and women predict long-term risk of a first myocardial infarction. In older men and ...

  5. Evaluation of C-reactive Protein Levels in Nigerian Dialysis Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, assessment of C-reactive protein (CRP) values in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is important due to the known role of high levels of CRP in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis. This cross-sectional study evaluates the levels of C-reactive protein in Nigerian dialysis patients. Fifty seven dialysis patients ...

  6. Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the C-reactive protein level in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Simon; Bartels, Else M; Bliddal, Henning

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs.......To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs....

  7. [C-reactive protein changes with antihypertensive and statin treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Enrique; Gómez-Belda, Ana; Costa, José A; Aragó, Miriam; Miralles, Amparo; González, Carmen; Pascual, José M

    2005-10-29

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the modifications of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) with antihypertensive and statin treatment in a hypertensive population with a wide range of coronary risks (CR). Retrospective follow-up study in 665 hypertensive patients: 556 (52% male) without dyslipidemia and CR (Framingham at 10 years) of 8.3 (7.6) as a control group (C) and 109 (61% male) with dyslipidemia and CR of 13.1 (8.8) who were treated with statins (T). Statins treatment was established according to NCEP-ATP-III. In both groups, the antihypertensive treatment was optimized in order to achieve blood pressure (BP) control (< 140/90 mmHg). A lipid profile and high sensitivity CRP (analyzed by nephelometry) was performed at the beginning and at the end of follow up [14.3 (3.6) months]. CRP levels were reduced in the T group -0.17 (0.2) mg/L vs. 0.14 (0.09) mg/L (p = 0.003, Mann-Whitney) in C. The lessening of CRP was not related to the reduction of lipids levels: total cholesterol (r = 0.06; p = 0.49), LDL-C (r = 0.11; p = 0.24), triglycerides (r = -0.02; p = 0.81) (Spearman), or to the reduction of systolic BP (r = -0.07; p = 0.44) and diastolic BP (r = -0.121; p = 0.21). The T group was treated with more antihypertensive drugs than C (2.2 [2.3] vs. 2.5 [1.2]; p = 0.02). Patients treated with ECA inhibitors or angiotensin II antagonist showed a tendency to decreasing the CRP levels more (p = 0.08). In hypertensive populations, statins induce a reduction of CRP levels. The reduction is not related to the lowering of lipids levels or BP values. The effect of statins on the reduction of CRP in hypertensive patients is not related to the lowering of lipids or BP.

  8. C-Reactive Protein and Cytokines in Polytrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K Gumanenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the association of C-reactive protein (CRP with cytokines in polytrauma.Subjects and methods. Eighty-four victims with severe concomitant injury were examined. Twenty-five (29.7% patients developed sepsis, death being observed in 83.3%. CRP was daily determined in the sera of the victims, by using CRP latex test kits (HUMATEX, Germany. On days 1, 3, 7, 10, and 15 after injury, serum and lymphocytic culture IL-2, IL-4, TNF-a, IFN-y, and HLA-DR were studied on an automatic Elx 800 Universal Microplate Reader enzyme immunoassay analyzer (BIO-TEK INSTRUMENTS, Inc., USA, by applying enzyme immunoassay systems (OOO «Cytokine», Saint Petersburg, Russia.Results. No complications were observed with a CRP level of 40 mg/l on day 1 and its further reduction. The CRP level of 40 mg/l on day 1 (without use of glucocorticoids and its prolonged increase were determined in visceral inflammatory and infectious complications. The CRP level of 120 mg/l within the first 7 days was noted in subsequently developed sepsis. Glucocorticoids and specific immune drugs resulted in a reduction or complete disappearance of CRP. When the latter were discontinued, CRP appeared in the quantity reflecting the effect of treatment. In the absence of multiple organ dysfunctions, the level of CRP decreased as the infectious process diminished. The low level of CRP and the activation of an infectious process suggest the areactivity of an organism. With the CRP level of 40 mg/l, the spontaneous production and level of blood IL-4 increased less significantly, whereas those of IFN-y rose more substantially; the induced activity of TNF-a also more drastically decreased (by 10 times versus 2.2 with a CRP level of 40 mg/l. Irrespective of the level of CRP, the induced activity of IL-4 decreased by 59%, suggesting immunosuppression. There was no association of CRP with IL-2 and HLA-DR.Conclusion. Daily blood CRP analysis in injury makes it possible to predict visceral

  9. Human serum protein and C-reactive protein levels among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human serum protein and C-reactive protein levels were determined among HIV patients visiting St Camillus Hospital, Uromi, Edo State, Nigeria, between January to March, 2013. Fifty (50) HIV patients (20 males; 30 females) and 50 control subjects (24 males; 26 females) were enrolled for this study. The clinical status of ...

  10. Concentrations of the acute phase reactants high-sensitive C-reactive protein and YKL-40 and of interleukin-6 before and after treatment in patients with acromegaly and growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Vestergaard, Henrik; Kristensen, Lars Østergaard

    2007-01-01

    Acromegaly is accompanied by increased cardiovascular mortality and a cluster of proatherogenic risk factors. In the general population, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is associated with elevated levels of inflammatory markers. The acute phase reactant (APR) C-reactive protein (CRP) has been...... reported to be reduced in acromegaly and increase after treatment, suggesting that excess of GH/IGF-I could have anti-inflammatory effects. This is in accordance with results obtained in patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), where increased levels of CRP have been reported....

  11. Salivary C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume and neutrophil lymphocyte ratio as diagnostic markers for neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Ahmed; Maaroof, Abdallah; Saleh, Mai H; Abdelwahab, Amina

    To assess the applicability of salivary C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, and platelet lymphocyte ratio in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Prospective case-control study of 70 full-term neonates, 35 with sepsis (20 with proven sepsis and 15 with clinical sepsis) and 35 healthy controls. Serum and salivary C-reactive protein concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay while mean platelet volume, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, and platelet lymphocyte ratio were measured by automated blood cell counter. This study showed statistically significant difference of mean salivary C-reactive protein between septic neonates and controls (12.0±4.6ng/L vs. 2.8±1.2ng/L) respectively. At a cut-off point of 3.48ng/L, salivary C-reactive protein showed 94.3% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Salivary C-reactive protein also showed good predictive accuracy for predicting elevated serum C-reactive protein values in septic neonates. Mean platelet volume and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio showed significant difference between septic neonates and controls (10.2±1.2fL vs.8.0±0.5fL; 2.9±1.7 vs. 1.6±0.4, respectively). At a cut-off point of 10.2fL, mean platelet volume presented 80% sensitivity and specificity. At a cut-off point of 2.7, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio presented 80% sensitivity and 57.1% specificity. This study provides support for further studies on the usefulness of salivary C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume, and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio as diagnostic markers for neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiac troponin I is associated with severity of myxomatous mitral valve disease, age, and C-reactive protein in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungvall, L.; Höglund, K.; Tidholm, A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concentrations of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) might be associated with cardiac remodeling in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). Age- and sex-dependent variations in cTnI concentration have been described. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether plas...

  13. Association of C-reactive protein (CRP) gene polymorphisms, serum CRP levels and cervical cancer prognosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polterauer, Stephan; Grimm, Christoph; Zeillinger, Robert; Heinze, Georg; Tempfer, Clemens; Reinthaller, Alexander; Hefler, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the prototypical biomarker of inflammation. Genetic variations within the CRP gene have been shown to be associated with alterations of CRP expression and prognosis in cancer patients...

  14. C-reactive protein modifies the relationship between blood pressure and microalbuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuveling, EM; Bakker, SJL; Hillege, HL; Burgerhof, JGM; de Jong, PE; Gans, ROB; de Zeeuw, D

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and microalbuminuria reflect intimately related components of the atherosclerotic disease process. Epidemiological studies found only modest associations between CRP and microalbuminuria. Blood pressure, one of the components of the metabolic syndrome in the general

  15. C-reactive protein and risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Jeppe; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2010-01-01

    To examine the robustness of the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and to examine whether genetically elevated CRP levels cause VTE....

  16. Concentraciones de proteína C reactiva en adultos mexicanos: alta prevalencia de un factor de riesgo cardiovascular C-reactive protein concentrations in Mexican men and women: high prevalence of a cardiovascular risk factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Flores

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Examinar la distribución y variables relacionadas con las concentraciones de proteína C reactiva (CRP en adultos mexicanos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se estudió a 2 194 adultos que participaron en la ENSA 2000. La concentración de CRP en suero se midió por un método de alta sensibilidad. Se obtuvo información sobre características sociodemográficas, enfermedad crónica y hábitos. Se midieron glucosa en ayuno, presión arterial, peso, talla y circunferencia de cintura. RESULTADOS: Se estudió a 730 hombres y 1 464 mujeres no embarazadas. La edad promedio fue de 38.3±15.2 años. Los límites de CRP se hallaron entre 0.19 y 255 mg/l (mediana: 2.26; rango intercuartil (RI: 0.96, 5.83 mg/l. La concentración de CRP fue mayor en mujeres (mediana: 2.86; RI: 1.11, 6.68 mg/l en comparación con los hombres (mediana: 1.63; RI: 0.8, 3.87 mg/l; p3.0-10 mg/l. En el análisis multivariado de regresión probit, la edad, el IMC, la circunferencia de cintura, la diabetes mellitus, la microalbuminuria y el uso de anticonceptivos hormonales se vincularon de forma positiva con el riesgo de concentraciones de CRP >1 mg/l. El sexo masculino y el consumo moderado de alcohol se relacionaron de modo negativo con el riesgo de concentraciones de CRP >3 mg/l (p3.0-10 mg/l en adultos mexicanos, lo que indica una considerable proporción de individuos con alto riesgo cardiovascular, al margen de otros factores de riesgo.OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution and correlates of C-reactive protein (CRP concentrations in Mexican adults. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data was analyzed from 2 194 Mexican adults who participated in the 2000 National Health Survey (ENSA-2000. CRP concentrations were measured with a high-sensitivity assay. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, chronic disease and habits was obtained. Fasting blood glucose, blood pressure, weight, height and waist circumference were measured. RESULTS: A total of 730 men and 1 464 non-pregnant women

  17. Serum C-reactive protein levels and body mass index in children and adolescents with CHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Maíra Ribas; Schuh, Daniela Schneid; Moraes, David W; Barbiero, Sandra Mari; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2017-08-01

    The prevalence of overweight in children with CHD is about 26.9%. Increase in adipose tissue is related to the secretion of proinflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein. Assuming that children with CHD are exposed to other inherent risk factors for heart disease, our objective was to evaluate the correlation between levels of C-reactive protein and body mass index in children and adolescents with CHD. A cross-sectional study with 377 children and adolescents with CHD in a clinical setting of a reference hospital was carried out. C-reactive protein data were collected after 12 hours of fasting. Nutritional status was classified according to body mass index. The patients were divided into three groups: cyanotic, acyanotic, and minimal heart defects (controls). The mean age was 9.9±4.2 years, and 53.6% of the sample included males. The cyanotic group represented 22.3%, acyanotic 42.2%, and minimal defects 35.5% of the sample. The average body mass index percentile was 57.23±32.06. The median values of C-reactive protein were as follows: cyanotic 0.340, acyanotic with clinical repercussion 0.203, and minimal defects 0.128. There was a significant difference between the minimal defects and the cyanotic groups (p=0.023). There was a significant correlation between C-reactive protein and body mass index percentile (r=0.293, p<0.01). C-reactive protein levels were higher in girls (p=0.034). There were no significant correlations between C-reactive protein and age or birth weight. The correlation between body mass index percentile and C-reactive protein was confirmed in this population. The prevention of overweight is paramount to avoid overlapping modifiable risk factors to those already inherent to the CHD.

  18. Impact of vitamin D status and obesity on C-reactive protein in kidney-transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewers, Bettina; Gasbjerg, Ane; Zerahn, Bo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We examined whether vitamin D status and obesity are associated with low-grade systemic inflammation, as assessed by serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in an adult population of kidney-transplant patients. DESIGN: This was a single-center, cross-sectional study. SETTING A...

  19. Impact of vitamin D status and obesity on C-reactive protein in kidney-transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewers, B.; Gasbjerg, A.; Zerahn, B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We examined whether vitamin D status and obesity are associated with low-grade systemic inflammation, as assessed by serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in an adult population of kidney-transplant patients. Design: This was a single-center, cross-sectional study. Setting a...

  20. Canine serum C-reactive protein as a quantitative marker of the inflammatory stimulus of aseptic elective soft tissue surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Strøm, Henriette; Mikkelsen, Lars F.

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an established serum marker for the presence of systemic inflammation in dogs. Results from previous experimental and clinical studies suggest that CRP concentrations also quantitatively reflect the degree and progress of an inflammatory process, suggesting its use...

  1. Detection of C-reactive protein in evanescent wave field using microparticle-tracking velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yu-Jui; Sheen, Horn-Jiunn; Liu, Yi-Hsing; Tsai, Jing-Fa; Wu, Tzu-Heng; Wu, Kuang-Chong; Lin, Shiming

    2010-09-07

    A new technique is developed to measure the nanoparticles' brownian motions by employing microparticle-tracking velocimetry (micro-PTV) in evanescent wave field, which can provide high signal-to-noise ratio images for analyzing nanoparticles' movements. This method enables real-time detection of C-reactive proteins (CRPs) during the rapid interaction between CRPs and anti-CRP-coated nanobeads as CRP concentrations are related to the nanobeads' brownian velocity in the equilibrium state. The smallest observable nanobeads with 185 nm were utilized in this experiment to detect CRP concentrations as low as 0.1 microg/mL even in a high-viscosity solution. Further, the dissociation constant, K(D), can be evaluated based on the experimental results.

  2. Is C-reactive protein testing useful to predict outcome in patients with acute bronchitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llor, Carl; Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Moragas, Ana; Bayona, Carolina; Morros, Rosa; Pera, Helena; Miravitlles, Marc

    2014-10-01

    A recent clinical trial could not find differences between anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and placebo in shortening the duration of symptoms in acute bronchitis. To investigate if C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations at presentation are predictive of symptom resolution in these patients. We performed a secondary analysis of the data from a placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial carried out in primary care. Patients from 18 to 70 years of age presenting a respiratory tract infection of 20 mg/l (95% CI: 9-12) (P = 0.337). Among patients with uncomplicated acute bronchitis and discoloured sputum, the CRP concentrations at presentation are not helpful for predicting symptom resolution. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A high sensitivity assay for the inflammatory marker C-Reactive protein employing acoustic biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Matthew A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract C-Reactive Protein (CRP is an acute phase reactant routinely used as a biomarker to assess either infection or inflammatory processes such as autoimmune diseases. CRP also has demonstrated utility as a predictive marker of future risk of cardiovascular disease. A new method of immunoassay for the detection of C-Reactive Protein has been developed using Resonant Acoustic Profiling™ (RAP™ with comparable sensitivity to a high sensitivity CRP ELISA (hsCRP but with considerable time efficiency (12 minutes turnaround time to result. In one method, standard solutions of CRP (0 to 231 ng/mL or diluted spiked horse serum sample are injected through two sensor channels of a RAP™ biosensor. One contains a surface with sheep antibody to CRP, the other a control surface containing purified Sheep IgG. At the end of a 5-minute injection the initial rate of change in resonant frequency was proportional to CRP concentration. The initial rates of a second sandwich step of anti-CRP binding were also proportional to the sample CRP concentration and provided a more sensitive method for quantification of CRP. The lower limit of detection for the direct assay and the homogenous sandwich assay were both 20 ng/mL whereas for the direct sandwich assay the lower limit was 3 ng/mL. In a step towards a rapid clinical assay, diluted horse blood spiked with human CRP was passed over one sensor channel whilst a reference standard solution at the borderline cardiovascular risk level was passed over the other. A semi-quantities ratio was thus obtained indicative of sample CRP status. Overall, the present study revealed that CRP concentrations in serum that might be expected in both normal and pathological conditions can be detected in a time-efficient, label-free immunoassay with RAP™ detection technology with determined CRP concentrations in close agreement with those determined using a commercially available high sensitivity ELISA.

  4. The physiological structure of human C-reactive protein and its complex with phosphocholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D; Pepys, M B; Wood, S P

    1999-02-15

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) is the classical acute phase reactant, the circulating concentration of which rises rapidly and extensively in a cytokine-mediated response to tissue injury, infection and inflammation. Serum CRP values are routinely measured, empirically, to detect and monitor many human diseases. However, CRP is likely to have important host defence, scavenging and metabolic functions through its capacity for calcium-dependent binding to exogenous and autologous molecules containing phosphocholine (PC) and then activating the classical complement pathway. CRP may also have pathogenic effects and the recent discovery of a prognostic association between increased CRP production and coronary atherothrombotic events is of particular interest. The X-ray structures of fully calcified C-reactive protein, in the presence and absence of bound PC, reveal that although the subunit beta-sheet jellyroll fold is very similar to that of the homologous pentameric protein serum amyloid P component, each subunit is tipped towards the fivefold axis. PC is bound in a shallow surface pocket on each subunit, interacting with the two protein-bound calcium ions via the phosphate group and with Glu81 via the choline moiety. There is also an unexpected hydrophobic pocket adjacent to the ligand. The structure shows how large ligands containing PC may be bound by CRP via a phosphate oxygen that projects away from the surface of the protein. Multipoint attachment of one planar face of the CRP molecule to a PC-bearing surface would leave available, on the opposite exposed face, the recognition sites for C1q, which have been identified by mutagenesis. This would enable CRP to target physiologically and/or pathologically significant complement activation. The hydrophobic pocket adjacent to bound PC invites the design of inhibitors of CRP binding that may have therapeutic relevance to the possible role of CRP in atherothrombotic events.

  5. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Selected Nutritional Indices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Caesarean Section (CS) is a major surgical procedure, often performed when a vaginal delivery is considered unsafe. Objective: This study was carried out to understand the interaction between acute phase proteins and nutritional factors consequent to caesarean section. The knowledge of this interaction is ...

  6. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay for C-Reactive Protein Using Colloidal Semiconducting Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Hänninen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Besides the typical short-lived fluorescence with decay times in the nanosecond range, colloidal II/VI semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in buffer also possess a long-lived fluorescence component with decay times in the microsecond range. Here, the signal intensity of the long-lived luminescence at microsecond range is shown to increase 1,000-fold for CdTe nanoparticles in PBS buffer. This long-lived fluorescence can be conveniently employed for time-gated fluorescence detection, which allows for improved signal-to-noise ratio and thus the use of low concentrations of nanoparticles. The detection principle is demonstrated with a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP using CdSe-ZnS nanoparticles and green light excitation.

  7. Association of serum leptin with serum C-reactive protein in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastegari Ebrahim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent investigations have shown that leptin is cleared principally by the kidney. Objectives: To examine whether and how in patients on hemodialysis the level of C-reactive protein level correlate with serum leptin. Patients and Methods: The total patients were 36. The mean patients’ age were 46 (16 years. The median length of the time patients were on hemodialysis were 19 months. Results: The mean serum C-reactive protein was 8.7 (6.6 mg/l (median: 8 mg/l. The mean serum leptin was 9.4 (14 ng/ml (median: 5.75 ng/ml. In this study we found a significant inverse correlation of serum leptin with serum C-reactive protein (r= -0.57, p= 0.041 was seen. Conclusion: Our data supports, the positive effect of leptin on nutrition and support the theory of protective effects (reverse epidemiology of leptin in hemodialysis patients.

  8. The routine use of C-reactive protein in forensic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, B S; Thomsen, Jørgen Lange

    2007-01-01

    of blood available for analysis is a common problem in forensic investigation, and in response to this we have developed a method using liver as a source. In 50 consecutive autopsy cases, we have evaluated method, validated results and discussed their interpretation. In three cases the analysis......In clinical medicine, C-reactive protein (CRP) is extensively used as a general marker for immune system activation, and post-mortem applicability has been established [M.Q. Fujita, B.L. Zhu, K. Ishida, L. Quan, S. Oritani, H. Maeda, Serum C-reactive protein levels in postmortem blood-an analysis...... with special reference to the cause of death and survival time, Forensic Sci. Int. 130 (2002) 160-166; L. Uhlin-Hansen, C-reactive protein (CRP), a comparison of pre- and post-mortem blood levels, Forensic Sci. Int. 124 (2001) 32-35]. We have analysed the routine use of CRP in non-selected cases. Scarcity...

  9. Increased Body Mass Index, Elevated C-reactive Protein, and Short Telomere Length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Weischer, Maren

    2014-01-01

    -reactive protein. SETTING AND DESIGN: We studied 45,069 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study with measurements of leukocyte telomere length, BMI, and C-reactive protein in a Mendelian randomization study. Using the three obesity-associated polymorphisms FTO rs9939609, MC4R rs17782313, and TMEM...

  10. Selection of symptomatic patients with Crohn's disease for abdominopelvic computed tomography: role of serum C-reactive protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, Alan N

    2012-11-01

    Results of previous studies have shown that repeated abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations can lead to substantial cumulative diagnostic radiation exposure in patients with Crohn\\'s disease (CD). Improved selection of patients referred for CT will reduce unnecessary radiation exposure. This study examines if serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration predicts which symptomatic patients with CD are likely to have significant disease activity or disease complications (such as abscess) detected on abdominopelvic CT.

  11. C-reactive protein and microalbuminuria differ in their associations with various domains of vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuveling, EM; Hillege, HL; Bakker, SJL; Asselbergs, FW; de Jong, PE; Gans, ROB; de Zeeuw, D

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and microalbuminuria (MA) have been identified as risk markers for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We questioned whether CRP and MA are similar markers of vascular disease in different regions of the vascular tree like the heart, kidneys and extremities or if they differ in

  12. C-reactive Protein and Disease Outcome in Nigerian Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evidence suggests that sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a chronic inflammatory state. C.reactive protein (CRP) is known to modulate inflammation. Its role in the chronic inflammation of SCD may make it valuable as a therapeutic target. Aim: The aim was to determine CRP levels in SCD subjects in ...

  13. Elevated C-Reactive Protein Levels, Psychological Distress, and Depression in 73 131 Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT The pathogenesis of depression is not fully understood, but studies suggest that low-grade systemic inflammation contributes to the development of depression. OBJECTIVE To test whether elevated plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with psychological distress and depres...

  14. Total anti-oxidant status and C-reactive protein values in Nigerians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case-control study was aimed at investigating the influence of age; body mass index, total antioxidant status (an indirect measure of total free radicals) and c-reactive protein (an acute phase reactant) on symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee. Thirty five subjects with clinical and radiological features of osteoarthritis of ...

  15. Serum levels of copeptin, C-reactive protein and cortisol in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Serum levels of copeptin, C-reactive protein and cortisol in different severity groups of sickle cell anaemia. Akinlade K.S.. 1. , Atere A.D.. 1. , Rahamon S.K.. 1 and Olaniyi J.A.. 2. Departments of 1Chemical Pathology and 2Haematology, University of Ibadan/University College Hospital,. Ibadan, Nigeria. Summary: It is well ...

  16. complement C3, Complement C4 and C-reactive protein

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... Perlstein TS, Lee RT (2006). Smoking, Metalloproteinases, and. Vascular Disease. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 26(2): 250-256. Pinto-Plata VM, Mullerova H, Toso JF, Feudjo- Tepie M, Soriano JB,. Vessey RS, Celli BR (2006). C-reactive protein in patients with. COPD, control smokers and non-smokers ...

  17. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of hospitalization and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). C- reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. CKD patients with elevated CRP should be identified early with institution of measures to treat ...

  18. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-01

    Mar 1, 2016 ... SUMMARY. Background: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of hospitalization and mortality in chronic kidney disease. (CKD). C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. CKD patients with elevated CRP should be identified early with ...

  19. Hepatotoxic effects of fenofibrate in spontaneously hypertensive rats expressing human C-reactive protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škop, V.; Trnovská, J.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Marková, I.; Malínská, H.; Kazdová, L.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Kůdela, M.; Pravenec, Michal; Šilhavý, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 6 (2016), s. 891-899 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14325 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : fenofibrate * rosuvastatin * C-reactive protein * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat * inflammation * hepatotoxic Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  20. Plasma high sensitivity C-reactive protein as a marker of severity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    activation during DKA and its treatment.10. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a type I acute phase response ... pancreatitis or acute/chronic infection. Acute infection was ruled out after a thorough medical history and clinical examination by the pediatrician as well as a sequential evaluation in the pediatric department after the ...

  1. Diagnostic properties of C-reactive protein for detecting pneumonia in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.J.; Broekhuizen, B.D.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821306; Minnaard, M.C.; Balemans, W.A.; Hopstaken, R.M.; de Jong, P.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/287955672; Verheij, Th.J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126027668

    BACKGROUND: The diagnostic value of C-reactive protein (CRP) level for pneumonia in children is unknown. As a first step in the assessment of the value of CRP, a diagnostic study was performed in children at an emergency department (ED). METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, data were

  2. Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein as prognostic biomarkers in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria; Kersten, Christian; Sorbye, Halfdan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to explore the prognostic significance of IL-6 and markers of systemic inflammatory response (SIR), in particular C-reactive protein (CRP), in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, in the total study population and according to RAS and BRAF mutation status. Results...

  3. C-reactive protein is associated with renal function abnormalities in a non-diabetic population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuveling, EM; Hillege, HL; Bakker, SJL; Gans, ROB; de Jong, PE; de Zeeuw, D

    Background. C-reactive protein (CRP) has recently been introduced in cardiovascular medicine as a predictor of myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral artery disease in different populations. We hypothesized that elevated CRP levels are associated with renal function abnormalities. Methods. To

  4. Pretransplant C-reactive protein as a prognostic marker in allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Karina Kwi Im; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Heilmann, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the prognostic role of baseline levels of C-reactive Protein (CRP) as well as CRP levels during conditioning in patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Furthermore, we studied the impact of baseline clinical factors and conditioning regimens on CRP...

  5. predictors of c-reactive protein response in children infected with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... towards its control. The pathophysiological response of individuals to malaria is highly variable. It depends on several factors including previously acquired immunity and the production of cytokines (1,2). Host immune markers of inflammation like C-reactive protein (CRP) which is a non-specific acute phase.

  6. Atherosclerosis, C-reactive protein, and risk for open-angle glaucoma : The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogd, Simone; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.

    PURPOSE. To test the hypotheses that atherosclerosis and elevated serum C-reactive protein ( CRP) levels are risk factors for open-angle glaucoma ( OAG). METHODS. In a prospective, population-based cohort study, all participants 55 years and older and at risk for incident OAG underwent, at baseline

  7. Atherosclerosis, C-reactive protein, and risk for open-angle glaucoma: The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Voogd (Simone); R.C.W. Wolfs (Roger); N.M. Jansonius (Nomdo); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. To test the hypotheses that atherosclerosis and elevated serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are risk factors for open-angle glaucoma (OAG). METHODS. In a prospective, population-based cohort study, all participants 55 years and older and at risk for incident OAG underwent, at

  8. Atherosclerosis, C-reactive protein, and risk for open-angle glaucoma: the Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogd, Simone; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.

    2006-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that atherosclerosis and elevated serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are risk factors for open-angle glaucoma (OAG). In a prospective, population-based cohort study, all participants 55 years and older and at risk for incident OAG underwent, at baseline (1990-1993) and at

  9. Chlamydia pneumoniae Antibodies and C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sharif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The study aim was to assess the relationship between the presence of antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA incidence. Patients and Methods. Consecutive AAA patients and AAA-free controls were recruited prospectively. Serum samples from both groups were examined to determine Immunoglobulin (Ig A and IgG titres against Chlamydia pneumoniae by ELISA and C-reactive protein (CRP concentrations. Results were expressed as mean (SD or median (IQR and compared using χ2 and Mann-Whitney U tests. A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. Each study group (AAA/nAAA comprised 250 patients. 196 (78.7% AAA patients had positive IgA antichlamydial antibody titres, compared to 181 (72.4% in the control group (P=0.008, OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.5. However, positive IgG antibody titres were similar (191 versus 203; P=0.222, OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.4–1.3. Average CRP concentrations were higher in AAA individuals. IgA or IgG antibody titres were not related to CRP concentrations. Conclusions. These results demonstrated that the frequent incidence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies within the general population makes it difficult to relate its presence to AAA development, despite the high IgA antibody titres. In addition, raised CRP concentrations in AAA patients are not related to the presence of antichlamydial antibodies.

  10. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts target organ damage in Chinese patients with metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Nie, Hai; He, Hongbo

    2007-01-01

    with metabolic syndrome. A total of 1082 consecutive patients of Chinese origin were screened for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and target organ damage, including cardiac hypertrophy...... with the elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein had a higher percentage of target organ damage than those with lower high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Stepwise multiple logistic regression confirmed that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was significantly associated with cardiac hypertrophy, carotid...

  11. An Evaluation of Serum Procalcitonin and C-Reactive Protein Levels as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers of Severe Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szederjesi Janos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recommendations have been made, following the multicenter Surviving Sepsis Campaign study, to standardize the definition of severe sepsis with reference to several parameters such as haemodynamic stability, acid-base balance, bilirubin, creatinine, International Normalized Ratio (INR, urine output and pulmonary functional value of the ratio between arterial oxigen partial pressure and inspiratory oxigen concentration. Procalcitonin (PCT is considered to be a gold standard biomarker for the inflammatory response, and recent studies have shown that it may help to discover whether a seriously ill person is developing sepsis. C-reactive protein (CRP is also used as a marker of inflammation in the body, as its blood levels increase if there is any inflammation in the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein levels as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of severe sepsis.

  12. C-reactive protein, marker for evaluation of systemic inflammatory response in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihu, D; Costin, N; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela; Blaga, Ligia Daniela; Pop, Raluca Bogdana

    2008-01-01

    Determination by a high sensitivity technique of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), a sensitive marker of inflammation in women with preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy and investigation of the relationship between CRP and the severity of the preeclamptic syndrome. The study included 40 women with preeclampsia and 40 control subjects with normal pregnancies in the last trimester of pregnancy. The serum CRP concentration was determined using the universal high sensitivity immunoturbidimetric assay. The serum CRP concentration was significantly higher (p preclampsia (5.69 +/- 1.8 mg/L) compared to normal pregnancy (2.89 +/- 1.2 mg/L). In women with preeclampsia, CRP correlated positively and significantly with diastolic blood pressure, proteinuria and uric acid levels. Maternal CRP values also correlated negatively and significantly with fetal weight at birth. Our results demonstrate that serum CRP is increased in preeclampsia and represents a marker of the severity of the preeclamptic syndrome and of fetal weight at birth. Taking into consideration these observations and the fact that CRP testing is rapid and relatively inexpensive, we recommend the use of this acute phase reagent in clinical practice, in all women with preeclampsia in order to establish the prognosis of the disease.

  13. Polygenic Overlap Between C-Reactive Protein, Plasma Lipids, and Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desikan, Rahul S; Schork, Andrew J; Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K; Dehghan, Abbas; Ridker, Paul M; Chasman, Daniel I; McEvoy, Linda K; Holland, Dominic; Chen, Chi-Hua; Karow, David S; Brewer, James B; Hess, Christopher P; Williams, Julie; Sims, Rebecca; O'Donovan, Michael C; Choi, Seung Hoan; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; DeStefano, Anita L; van der Lee, Sven J; Psaty, Bruce M; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Launer, Lenore; Seshadri, Sudha; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Hardy, John; Ulstein, Ingun Dina; Aarsland, Dag; Fladby, Tormod; White, Linda R; Sando, Sigrid B; Rongve, Arvid; Witoelar, Aree; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hyman, Bradley T; Snaedal, Jon; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Andreassen, Ole A; Dale, Anders M

    2015-06-09

    Epidemiological findings suggest a relationship between Alzheimer disease (AD), inflammation, and dyslipidemia, although the nature of this relationship is not well understood. We investigated whether this phenotypic association arises from a shared genetic basis. Using summary statistics (P values and odds ratios) from genome-wide association studies of >200 000 individuals, we investigated overlap in single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with clinically diagnosed AD and C-reactive protein (CRP), triglycerides, and high- and low-density lipoprotein levels. We found up to 50-fold enrichment of AD single-nucleotide polymorphisms for different levels of association with C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride single-nucleotide polymorphisms using a false discovery rate threshold protein, and plasma lipids. By conditioning on the genetic association with the cardiovascular phenotypes, we identify novel AD susceptibility loci, including 2 genome-wide significant variants conferring increased risk for AD. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. High-sensitive C-reactive protein is associated with reduced lung function in young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Finn; Mikkelsen, Dennis; Hancox, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Systemic inflammation has been associated with reduced lung function. However, data on the interrelationships between lung function and inflammation are sparse, and it is not clear if low-grade inflammation leads to reduced lung function. Associations between high-sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP...... decline was 6.2 mL.yr(-1) in the highest CRP quintile versus an increase of 1.8 mL.yr(-1) in the lowest CRP quintile. In a multiple regression analysis adjusted for sex, body mass index, cardiorespiratory fitness, smoking, asthma, airway hyperresponsiveness and serum eosinophil cationic protein, higher...... levels of CRP at age 20 yrs were associated with a greater reduction in both FEV(1) and forced vital capacity between ages 20 and 29 yrs. The findings show that higher levels of C-reactive protein in young adults are associated with subsequent decline in lung function, suggesting that low-grade systemic...

  15. Serum C-reactive protein as a diagnostic biomarker in dogs with bacterial respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, S J; Laurila, H P; Lilja-Maula, L I; Melamies, M A; Rantala, M; Rajamäki, M M

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a major acute-phase protein in dogs. Serum concentrations are low in healthy animals, but increase rapidly after inflammatory stimuli. The aim of the study was to investigate CRP concentrations in various respiratory diseases of dogs and to determine if CRP can be used as a biomarker in the diagnosis of bacterial respiratory diseases. A total of 106 privately owned dogs with respiratory diseases (17 with bacterial tracheobronchitis [BTB], 20 with chronic bronchitis [CB], 20 with eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy [EBP], 12 with canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis [CIPF], 15 with cardiogenic pulmonary edema [CPE], and 22 with bacterial pneumonia [BP]) and 72 healthy controls. The study was conducted as a prospective cross-sectional observational study. CRP was measured in serum samples. Diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and laboratory findings, diagnostic imaging, and selected diagnostic methods such as cytological and microbiological analysis of respiratory samples, echocardiography, and histopathology. Dogs with BP had significantly higher CRP concentrations (median, 121 mg/L; interquartile range, 68-178 mg/L) than dogs with BTB (23, 15-38, P = .0003), CB (13, 8-14, P < .0001), EBP (5, 5-15, P < .0001), CIPF (17, 10-20, P < .0001), or CPE (19, 13-32, P < .0001) and healthy controls (14, 8-20, P < .0001). Dogs with BTB had significantly higher CRP concentrations than dogs with CB (P = .001) or EBP (P < .0001) and healthy controls (P = .029). These results indicate that CRP has potential for use as an additional biomarker, especially in the diagnostics of BP. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship with clinical findings and radiographic severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Furuhashi, Hiroki; Koyama, Hiroshi; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-09-01

    We assessed erythrocyte sedimentation rate and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration in knee osteoarthritis and non-knee osteoarthritis. In addition, we investigated potential relationship between the levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein with clinical findings and radiographic severity. We compared erythrocyte sedimentation rate and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration between 104 patients with knee osteoarthritis (knee osteoarthritis group; 25 males, 79 females; mean age, 73 y) and 50 patients without knee osteoarthritis (non-knee osteoarthritis group; 16 males, 34 females; mean age, 64 y) excluding any patients with comorbid joint osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, malignant tumours or inflammatory diseases. In the knee osteoarthritis group, we assessed whether erythrocyte sedimentation rate and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration differed in clinical features and Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grades. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were significantly higher in the knee osteoarthritis group than in the non-knee osteoarthritis group (P = 0.0013 and 0.00010, respectively). In the knee osteoarthritis group, erythrocyte sedimentation rate was significantly elevated in patients with tenderness and patellar ballottement (P = 0.032 and 0.038, respectively), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration was significantly elevated in patients with tenderness, swelling and patellar ballottement (P = 0.0042, 0.00030 and 0.019, respectively). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate in KL-I was lower than erythrocyte sedimentation rate in KL-III and -IV (P = 0.012 and 0.037, respectively). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate in KL-II did not significantly differ from erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the other groups. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration was lower in grade I than in KL-II, -III and -IV (P = 0.044, 0.0085 and 0

  17. C-reactive protein level correlation with depression and anxiety among patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenava, T; Gegenava, M; Kavtaradze, G

    2011-05-01

    Some studies have reported that depression is associated with higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) a marker of systemic inflammation that has been shown consistently to predict coronary heart disease risk. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between history of depressive episode and anxiety and presence of low-grade systemic inflammation as measured by serum CRP in postoperative period of coronary angioplasty and aorto-coronary bypass graft surgery. The research was performed in 80 patients (n = 80), mean age 60 ± 15 years. These patients have no high cholesterol level, high body mass index and n = 64 (80%) of them are no smoker. To evaluate depression we used Beck depression scale. Anxiety was assessed by the Spilberger State-trait anxiety scale. CRP was measured in venous blood. Results show that increased level of C-reactive protein was found in aorto-coronary bypass graft surgery group n = 28 (70%), in angioplasty group C-reactive protein n = 12 (30%); χ² = 6.40 p = 0.012. In angioplasty group patients who had increased level of CRP had high degree of depression p = 0.001. In these group was revealed high degree of trait anxiety p coronary bypass surgery group elevated level of CRP was associated with high degree of depression p = 0.001. Our study demonstrated association between depression, anxiety and increased C-reactive protein level. Inflammation, the key regulator of CRP synthesis, plays a pivotal role in atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. Our findings have important implications for explaining the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiovascular disease.

  18. Predicting Outcome of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis With a Single Measurement of C-Reactive Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Bernardino, Luis; Latin Amer Meningitis Study Grp

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, shows high serum levels in invasive bacterial infections. We investigated the potential of a single CRP measurement at different phases of acute childhood bacterial meningitis to predict outcomes. Methods: Using whole-blood finger-prick samples with no centrifugation, CRP was measured quantitatively on arrival and on day 3 or 4 in children participating in 2 prospective, randomized, double-blind treatment studies conducted in L...

  19. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SERUM C - REACTIVE PROTEIN ESTIMATION IN ACUTE MENINGITIS IN ADULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Konatham; Kathyayani

    2015-01-01

    In the study of 50 cases of acute meningitis the following observations were made in sex incidence, age, clinical presentation, CSF analysis and serum C reactive protein levels and prognosis. Serum CRP level of less than 6 mg / l with signs of meningeal inf ection is a definitive indicative of viral meningitis and CRP levels more than 48 mg / l with clinical signs of meningeal infection is definite indication of bacterial meningitis. AIM OF THE STUDY: to evalu...

  20. Study of effects of metformin on C-reactive protein level in Type-2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Niteshkumar C. Gamit; Naresh D. Kantharia; Khushbu B. Vaghasiya; Ankit J. Vataliya; Aashal B. Shah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is extremely common; represent a significant global health problem. Type-2 DM is considered to be associated with a low grade inflammation, which may play a significant role in development of cardiovascular complications evidenced by C-reactive protein (CRP) is a an extremely sensitive marker of systemic inflammation. The study was undertaken to check the effect of metformin on CRP level in Type-2 DM. Methods: The study was prospective and non-randomized....

  1. Interactions between C-reactive protein genotypes with markers of nutritional status in relation to inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Swanepoel, Bianca; Dolman, Robin C; Pieters, Marlien; Conradie, Karin R; Towers, G Wayne

    2014-11-11

    Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP), is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state.

  2. COMPARISONS OF SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN YOUNG SOCCER PLAYERS AND NON-ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Siahkouhian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the plasma concentration of high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, white blood cells (WBC, uric acid, and total cholesterol (TC between soccer players and non-athletes. We also intended to evaluate the relations of blood markers with ·VO2max and body composition variables. This cross-sectional study involved professional soccer players (n=40 and sedentary young men (n=60, aged 18-22 years. Blood markers such as CRP, WBC, uric acid, and TC were determined by laboratory tests. Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max, body mass index (BMI and fat tissue (FM were determined by the standard test protocols. There were no significant differences between CRP levels of soccer players and non-athletes (0.32±0.13 vs. 0.34±0.19 mg/dl. CRP correlated significantly with FM among soccer players (r=0.482, p≤0.002. Our results also showed a significant correlation between TC and VO2max in soccer players (r=0.469, p≤0.002. Our results showed that long-term soccer training may have no significant effect on the CRP level

  3. Dietary glycemic index, dietary glycemic load, blood lipids, and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Emily B; Cook, Nancy R; Stampfer, Meir J; Ridker, Paul M; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Buring, Julie E; Manson, JoAnn E; Liu, Simin

    2008-03-01

    Carbohydrate quantity and quality may influence the risk of cardiovascular disease through blood lipid concentrations and inflammation. We measured dietary glycemic index (GI) and dietary glycemic load (GL) among 18137 healthy women > or = 45 years old without diagnosed diabetes using a food-frequency questionnaire. We assayed fasting total, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio; triacylglycerols (TG); and C-reactive protein (CRP). We evaluated associations with dietary GI and GL using a cross-sectional design, adjusting for age, body mass index, lifestyle factors, and other dietary factors. Dietary GI was significantly associated with HDL and LDL cholesterol, LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio, TG, and CRP (comparing top to bottom quintile difference in HDL cholesterol = -2.6 mg/dL, LDL cholesterol = 2.2 mg/dL, LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio = 0.16, TG = 12 mg/dL, and CRP = 0.21 mg/L). Dietary GL was associated with HDL cholesterol, LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio, and TG (comparing top to bottom quintile HDL cholesterol = -4.9 mg/dL, LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio = 0.24, and TG = 13 mg/dL). Differences in blood lipids and CRP between extreme quintiles of dietary GI and GL were small, but may translate into a clinically meaningful difference in cardiovascular risk.

  4. Serum C-Reactive Protein Level as a Biomarker for Differentiation of Ischemic from Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Roudbary

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular accidents rank first in the frequency and importance among all neurological disease. Although a number of studies had shown increased level of the high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP in patients with ischemic stroke, the association of increased hs-CRP with various type of stroke especially the assessment hs-CRP level in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke have not been investigated. In the present study, we assessed the concentration of hs-CRP in patients with documented ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the first 24 hours of the onset of symptoms. Thirty-two patients with Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were evaluated at neurology department of Poursina Hospital. The presence of baseline vascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking, was determined. The blood samples were then collected and routine hematology and biochemistry tests were done. hs-CRP levels were determined using a highly sensitive immunonephelometric method. In this cross sectional study, the age of patient varied from 45-85 years (Mean 70.9  9.4. Serum level of hs-CRP in Ischemic patients were 18.92  11.28 and in hemorrhagic group was 2.65  1.7. This relationship was statistically significant (P<0.0001. It might be concluded that hs-CRP might be considered as a usefully adjunct method for the initial diagnosis of the type of stroke.

  5. Interactions between C-Reactive Protein Genotypes with Markers of Nutritional Status in Relation to Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelie Nienaber-Rousseau

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP, is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state.

  6. [C-reactive protein is asociated to carotid intima media thickness in patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Milagros; Ruiz, Nelina; Leal, Ulises; Urbaneja, Hermaliz; Rojas, Susan; Orozco, Ursula; Pinto, Norkis; Castrillo, Smirna

    2010-03-01

    Studies have shown that high concentrations of total cholesterol at the expense of LDL cholesterol and markers of inflammation are linked with subclinical atherosclerosis. This study was aimed to associate the carotid intima media thickness (IMT) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia. The investigation was descriptive, transverse and included 100 patients divided into a control group (normocholesterolemic) and a study group (hypercholesterolemic). There were no significant differences in age and gender distribution among the groups. The body mass index, waist circumference, total cholesterol and its fractions, IMT and hs-CRP were significantly elevated in the study group. Only in the hypercholesterolemic group, the IMT was significantly associated with hsCRP. In the study group, the mean IMT rose by quartiles of hs-CRP, reaching its highest level in the fourth quartile. The multiple linear regression analysis identified LDL cholesterol and hs-CRP as predictors of IMT only in the study group. The findings support other data suggesting that not only the LDL cholesterol but also hs-CRP could be an important factor for early atherosclerotic changes in the carotid artery of patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia.

  7. [Value of C-reactive protein in the diagnosis of arteriosclerosis in patients with essential hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lie-Hua; Huang, Rong; Wu, Zhen-Li; Xu, Ding-Li

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the value of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the diagnosis of arteriosclerosis in patients with essential hypertension. This study included 771 patients with essential hypertension and 243 healthy individuals, and all the subjects were measured for carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and serum CRP level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The value of CRP in the diagnosis of arteriosclerosis in patients with essential hypertension was evaluated according to the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve, and the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity was evaluated with cfPWV> or =9 m/s as the golden diagnostic standard. The hypertensive patients had significantly higher cfPWV and serum CRP concentration than the healthy individuals (16.51-/+1.6 vs 9.81-/+1.1, Parteriosclerosis. Arteriosclerosis and nonspecific inflammation are prevalent in patients with essential hypertension, and CRP with the cutoff value of 3.85 mg/L may serve as a sensitive indicator for arteriosclerosis diagnosis in these patients.

  8. Association between preterm delivery and subsequent C-reactive protein: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Claire E; Smith, Gordon C S; Mackay, Daniel F; Pell, Jill P

    2011-12-01

    We sought to determine whether giving birth preterm is associated with raised maternal C-reactive protein (CRP) in later life and whether the association is specific to indicated or spontaneous delivery. This was a Scotland-wide retrospective cohort study of 1124 women who had a first pregnancy resulting in a singleton, liveborn infant delivered between 24-43 weeks' gestation. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association between preterm delivery and subsequent CRP concentration. The difference in CRP between women who delivered term and preterm was nonsignificant on univariate analysis (beta coefficient 0.04, P = .18) but was statistically significant following adjustment for potential confounders (beta coefficient 0.05, P < .05). On subgroup analysis the association was specific to women who had had indicated preterm delivery (unadjusted beta coefficient 0.09, P < .01; adjusted beta coefficient 0.09, P < .01). Women who undergo indicated preterm delivery are at increased risk of raised CRP in later life. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. SERUM LEVELS OF HIGH SENSITIVITY C REACTIVE PROTEIN AND MALONDIALDEHYDE IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakshitha Gowda B.H, Meera K.S , Mahesh E

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney disease cases are at increased risk for progression to end stage renal disease and accelerated atherosclerosis, with premature cardiovascular morbidity and mortality being the more frequent outcome. Aim: The study was taken up to find if there is any association between nontraditional cardiovascular risk markers like high sensitivity C reactive protein (marker of inflammation and malondialdehyde (marker of lipid peroxidation with the progression of chronic kidney disease. Methodology: The study included 44 pre dialysis chronic kidney disease cases and 44 healthy controls. Serum levels of creatinine, high sensitivity C reactive protein and malondialdehyde were estimated in both groups. The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate(eGFR in chronic kidney disease patients was calculated by the MDRD formula. Results: The mean eGFR in cases was found to be 23.65 14.99 ml/min by MDRD formula. The serum hsCRP and malondialdehyde levels in cases was 11.8 7.24 mg/L and 3.02 1.24 nmol/ml respectively. Conclusion: There was a significant negative correlation (p<0.001 between high sensitivity C-reactive protein and malondialdehyde with eGFR. A highly significant positive correlation was found between serum hsCRP and malondialdehyde (p<0.001 in chronic kidney disease underlining the synergism between oxidative stress and inflammation, perpetuating to further deterioration of renal function and enhancing the predisposition to cardiovascular risk with the progression of chronic kidney disease.

  10. Evaluation of serum haptoglobin and C-reactive protein in dogs with mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planellas, Marta; Bassols, Anna; Siracusa, Carlo; Saco, Yolanda; Giménez, Mercè; Pato, Raquel; Pastor, Josep

    2009-09-01

    In veterinary medicine, there is increasing interest in measuring acute phase proteins as a tool in the diagnosis and monitoring of neoplastic diseases. Although mammary neoplasms are the most common type of cancer in dogs, acute phase proteins have not been extensively evaluated in dogs with mammary tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum haptoglobin (Hp) and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in the dogs with mammary tumors and assess their potential association with malignancy. A retrospective study of dogs with mammary tumors was performed. Serum concentrations of CRP and Hp were determined in healthy control dogs (n=20) and dogs with mammary tumors before surgery (n=41). Mammary tumors were grouped as carcinomas (n=24), fibrosarcoma (n=1), malignant mixed tumors (n=7), benign mixed tumors (n=6), and adenomas (n=3). CRP and Hp concentrations were compared in dogs with different tumor types and were also compared based on tumor size, lymph node infiltration, skin ulceration, fixation to underlying tissue, and time between tumor identification and removal. Hp concentration was significantly (Pdogs with mammary tumors (median 2.03 g/L, range 0.09-2.94 g/L) compared with controls (1.38 g/L, range 0.08-3.00 g/L), but the range of values overlapped considerably. CRP concentration was higher in dogs with carcinomas (4.70 mg/L, range 0.63-128.96 mg/L) vs controls (2.11 mg/L, range 0.25-6.57 mg/L) (P=.0008) and in dogs with ulcerated skin (14.8 mg/L, range 5.7-128.9 mg/L, n=3) compared with those without ulceration (2.4 mg/L, range 0.11-30.3 mg/L, n=38) (P=.048). Serum Hp and CRP do not appear to have value in diagnosing or predicting malignancy of mammary tumors in dogs. Higher CRP concentrations in dogs with mammary carcinoma suggest a role for inflammation in this tumor type.

  11. Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein, successful aging, and mortality: the PolSenior study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzianowska-Kuźnicka, Monika; Owczarz, Magdalena; Wieczorowska-Tobis, Katarzyna; Nadrowski, Pawel; Chudek, Jerzy; Slusarczyk, Przemyslaw; Skalska, Anna; Jonas, Marta; Franek, Edward; Mossakowska, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    In the elderly, chronic low-grade inflammation (inflammaging) is a risk factor for the development of aging-related diseases and frailty. Using data from several thousand Eastern Europeans aged 65 years and older, we investigated whether the serum levels of two proinflammatory factors, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), were associated with physical and cognitive performance, and could predict mortality in successfully aging elderly. IL-6 and CRP levels systematically increased in an age-dependent manner in the entire study group (IL-6: n = 3496 individuals, p successfully aging individuals who had never been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, type 2 diabetes, or cancer, and had a Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score ≥24 and a Katz Activities of Daily Living (ADL) score ≥5 (IL-6: n = 1258, p aging-related diseases/disability, only IL-6 increased with age (IL-6: n = 2238, p successfully aging individuals than in the remaining study participants (both p age, gender, BMI, lipids, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and smoking status. Longer survival was associated with lower concentrations of IL-6 and CRP not only in individuals with aging-related diseases/disability (HR = 1.063 per each pg/mL, 95 % CI: 1.052-1.074, p successfully aging subgroup (HR = 1.163 per each pg/mL, 95 % CI: 1.128-1.199, p age, gender, BMI, lipids and smoking status. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed similar results (all p successfully aging individuals.

  12. Effect of dietary patterns on serum C-reactive protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y; Kang, D; Lee, S-A

    2014-09-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of inflammation which has been shown in multiple prospective epidemiological studies to predict the risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Dietary patterns may influence the risk of diseases through the effects of CRP on inflammation. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of dietary patterns with CRP in blood, taking into consideration gender and blood pressure. The present cross-sectional analysis included 7574 participants from a large, population-based study of middle-aged Koreans. Four dietary patterns, including 'fruit', 'vegetable', 'meat' and 'coffee', were derived using factor analysis. Multiple linear regressions were used to evaluate the association between dietary patterns and CRP after adjusting for age, sex, education, waist circumference, smoke status and alcohol consumption. We found that the 'vegetable' pattern was inversely associated with CRP (Ptrend = 0.01). The adjusted mean CRP was 0.04 mg/dl lower (95% CI -0.07, -0.01) for subjects in the highest quartile of the 'vegetable' pattern compared with those in the lowest quartile. This inverse association was more pronounced in men with hypertensive blood; CRP concentrations across increasing quartile categories of the 'vegetable' pattern score were 0.1, 0.14, and 0.15 mg/dl reduction compared to the 1st quartile (the lowest quartile) (Ptrend = 0.04, Plinearity = 0.02). The inverse association of the 'vegetable' pattern with CRP was assessed, and the association appeared to be more predominant in men with hypertensive blood pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. C-Reactive Protein in Adolescent Twins: Patterns and Relationship to Adiposity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoying; Christoffel, Katherine Kaufer; Brickman, Wendy J.; Hong, Xiumei; Arguelles, Lester; Zhang, Shanchun; Wang, Binyan; Li, Zhiping; Xing, Houxun; Tang, Gengfu; Zimmerman, Donald; Xu, Xiping

    2011-01-01

    Context: Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular risk in adults. Patterns and determinants of CRP in adolescents have not been well described. Objective: This study aimed to determine how CRP varies by age, gender, Tanner stage, and body fat composition in rural Chinese adolescents and to what degree adiposity-CRP associations are attributable to shared genetic and environmental factors. Design and Setting: Data were derived from an ongoing study of metabolic syndrome in a large community-based twin cohort enrolled in Anqing, China. Participants: The study sample included 1180 adolescent twins aged 13–21 yr. Main Outcome Measures: Plasma CRP concentrations were measured by sandwich immunoassay using flow metric xMAP technology. Body fat composition was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results: CRP levels linearly increased across age and Tanner stage in males (P ≤ 0.0001), but in females, CRP exhibited no trend after adjusting for fat mass (P > 0.05). For males, the most explanatory measure was body mass index (partial r2 = 5.2%), whereas percent body fat (partial r2 = 8.8%) was more explanatory in females. Of the phenotypic correlations between adiposity measures and CRP (0.25–0.28), 86–89% were attributed to shared genetic factors and 11–14% to common unique environmental factors in both sexes. Conclusions: Adiposity is a strong determinant of CRP even in this relatively lean Chinese population. There is notable gender difference for the CRP pattern and the relationship of CRP with adiposity during adolescence. To a large degree, common genetic factors may underlie the observed adiposity-CRP-phenotypic correlations. PMID:21832113

  14. Utility of haematological parameters and C-reactive protein in the detection of neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucha, V; Rusia, U; Sikka, M; Faridi, M M A; Madan, N

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate various haematological parameters, individually and in combination, to formulate a haematological scoring system (HSS, defined by Rodwell et al.), which can then be used to screen for sepsis in neonates who are clinically suspected of infection.1 The study cohort consisted of 150 neonates (from birth to 3 days old) with clinically suspected infection. Blood was collected by peripheral venepuncture in all neonates. A complete blood count, differential leucocyte count, total leucocyte count (TLC), total neutrophil count (TNC), immature neutrophil count, band form count and platelet count were performed. Immature total neutrophil count (I/T) and immature/mature neutrophil count (I/M) ratios were then obtained. C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured semiquantitatively and blood culture and antibiotic sensitivity were performed in each case. The haematological parameters were compared individually and in combination (by HSS) with CRP. Twenty-one (14%) neonates had blood culture proven sepsis. On evaluation of various haematological parameters, TLC 0.25, I/T > 0.14, band count > 15% and platelet count or = 3 had a sensitivity of 86% and NPV of 96%. C-reactive protein as a single test had a sensitivity of 76% and NPV of 96%. A combination of CRP with haematological parameters decreased the sensitivity and NPV of the HSS. A haematological score can be obtained by a complete blood count and examination of peripheral blood smear, thus permitting an objective assessment of haematological changes that occur in a neonate suspected of sepsis. C-reactive protein does not have any advantage over HSS, either as a single test or in combination.

  15. C-reactive protein, dietary n-3 fatty acids, and the extent of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Skou, Helle Aarup; Hansen, Vibeke Ellegaard

    2001-01-01

    The acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) has emerged as an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Experimental and clinical studies provide evidence of anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from fish. We have studied the effect of marine...... vessels. Subjects with CRP levels in the lower quartile had a significantly higher content of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in granulocytes than subjects with CRP levels in the upper quartile (p=0.02), and in a multivariate linear regression analysis, DHA was independently correlated to CRP (R-2=0.179; p=0...

  16. [C-reactive protein and risk of ischaemic vascular and cerebrovascular disease--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated levels of C reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risk of ischaemic vascular disease. We tested whether this is a causal association. CRP > 3 vs disease of 1.6 and 1.3, respectively. Four...... vascular disease Udgivelsesdato: 2009/5/18...... CRP polymorphisms were associated with a 64% increase in CRP levels, resulting in a theoretically predicted increased risk of 32% and 25% for ischemic heart- and ischemic cerebrovascular disease, respectively. However, these genotype combinations were not associated with an increased risk of ischaemic...

  17. C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jørgen; Hansen, Tine Willum; Olsen, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    ischaemic heart disease and nonfatal stroke, amounted to 222 cases. In Cox proportional-hazard models, adjusted for age, sex, smoking habit, total cholesterol, waist circumference, levels of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, physical activity......BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR), a metabolic disorder, are closely related. CRP and IR have both been identified as significant risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors...

  18. Relationship between C-reactive protein and stroke: a large prospective community based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Liu

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that C-reactive protein (CRP was associated with risk of stroke. There were few studies in Asian population, or on stroke subtypes other than ischemic stroke. We thus investigated the relationship between CRP and the risks of all stroke and its subtypes in a Chinese adult population.In the current study, we included 90,517 Chinese adults free of stroke and myocardial infarction at baseline (June 2006 to October 2007 in analyses. Strokes were classified as ischemic stroke (IS, intracranial heamorrhage (ICH and subarachnoid heamorrhage (SAH. High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP were categorized into three groups: 3 mg/L. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the association between hs-CRP concentrations and all stroke, as well as its subtypes.During a median follow-up time of 49 months, we documented 1,472 incident stroke cases. Of which 1,049 (71.3% were IS, 383 (26.0% were ICH, and 40 (2.7% were SAH. After multivariate adjustment, hs-CRP concentrations ≥1 mg/L were associated with increased risks of all stroke (hs-CRP 1-3 mg/L: hazard ratio (HR 1.17, 95% confidential interval (CI 1.03-1.33; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.07-1.46 and IS (hs-CRP 1-3 mg/L: HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.36; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.11-1.60, but not with ICH and SAH. Subgroup analyses showed that higher hs-CRP concentration was more prone to be a risk factor for all stroke and IS in non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive participants.We found that higher hs-CRP concentrations were associated with a higher risk of IS, particularly for non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive subjects. In contrast, we did not observe significant associations between hs-CRP and ICH/SAH.

  19. Efect of periodontal disease and non surgical periodontal treatment on C-reactive protein. Evaluation of type 1 diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Llambés Arenas, Fernando; Silvestre Donat, Francisco Javier; Hernández Mijares, Antonio; Guiha, Rami; Bautista, Daniel; Caffesse, Raul G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze how anti-infectious periodontal treatment affects C reactive protein (CRP) values in patients with type 1 diabetes, and correlate baseline CRP levels with periodontal disease severity. Study Design: A cohort of fifty three subjects with type 1 diabetes and moderate to severe periodontitis were recruited. Periodontal parameters were measured, and blood samples were obtained to evaluate high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Group 1 wa...

  20. Ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein, and central augmentation index to identify individuals with severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Sillesen, Henrik; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease.......We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease....

  1. Comparison of peak serum C-reactive protein and hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase levels in patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with alteplase and streptokinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Pietila; W.T. Hermens (Wim); A. Harmoinen (Aimo); T. Baardman (Taco); A. Pasternack (Amos); E.J. Topol (Eric); M.L. Simoons (Maarten)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractPeak serum C-reactive protein concentrations were measured in 146 patients randomized to receive streptokinase, alteplase, or a combination of streptokinase and alteplase in the GUSTO-I trial. Those receiving alteplase treatment had lower values than those receiving streptokinase or the

  2. Leukocyte Populations and C-Reactive Protein as Predictors of Bacterial Infections in Febrile Outpatient Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zühre Kaya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Infections remain the major cause of unnecessary antibiotic use in pediatric outpatient settings. Complete blood count (CBC is the essential test in the diagnosis of infections. C-reactive protein (CRP is also useful for assessment of young children with serious bacterial infections. The purpose of the study was to evaluate leukocyte populations and CRP level to predict bacterial infections in febrile outpatient children. METHODS: The values of CBC by Cell-DYN 4000 autoanalyzer and serum CRP levels were evaluated in 120 febrile patients with documented infections (n: 74 bacterial, n: 46 viral and 22 healthy controls. RESULTS: The mean CRP, neutrophil and immature granulocyte (IG values were significantly higher in bacterial infections than in viral infections and controls (p<0.05. C-reactive protein was significantly correlated with neutrophil level in bacterial infections (r: 0.76, p<0.05. Specificity of IG was greatest at 93%, only a modest 56% for neutrophil and mild 18% for CRP, whereas 100% for combination of IG, neutrophil and CRP. CONCLUSION: Acute bacterial infection seems to be very unlikely in children with normal leukocyte populations and CRP values, even if clinically signs and symptoms indicate acute bacterial infections.

  3. Association between nutritional status, C-reactive protein, adiponectin and HOMA-AD in Brazilian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Domingos, Ana Luiza; Luiz Lins Machado-Coelho, George; Pinheiro Volp, Ana Carolina; Luiz Pereira de Oliveira, Fernando; Santana Caldas, Ivo; Nascimento de Freitas, Silvia

    2014-07-01

    In children, the presence of obesity is a major risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases on the adulthood. To evaluate the association of anthropometry, body composition, clinical variables and biochemical profile with C-reactive protein and adiponectin levels, and insulin resistance in children in the municipality of Nova Era, Brazil. Nested case-control study following a crosssectional study. We evaluated 178 children, 57 of them classified as obese and 121 as normal-weight from a population of 1024 schoolchildren 6 to 10 years old: Blood samples were collected after 12-hour fast to obtain serum and plasma. We collected anthropometric and body composition measures, systolic and diastolic blood pressure data. Sexual maturation was assessed according to the stage of sexual development. We performed Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, Pearson's correlation, Spearman's test and multiple linear regression analysis. Independent variables with p body fat percentage estimated by skinfold thickness (R2 adjusted = 27.6%, p body fat percentage estimated by skinfold thickness (R2 adjusted = 75.5%, p body composition, anthropometry, clinical variables, biochemical profile and adiponectin and C-reactive protein levels and insulin resistance in obese and normal-weight children. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. C-reactive protein and the risk of cancer: a mendelian randomization study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Zacho, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, are associated with an increased risk of cancer, but it is unclear whether this association is causal. We examined whether four common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene that are associated with alte......Elevated plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, are associated with an increased risk of cancer, but it is unclear whether this association is causal. We examined whether four common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene that are associated...... with altered plasma CRP levels are causally associated with an increased risk of cancer. The study population included participants in a prospective study (n = 10 215) and a cross-sectional study (n = 36 403) of the adult general population in Denmark, all of whom were genotyped for the CRP SNPs....... The association between plasma CRP levels measured by a high-sensitivity turbidimetry assay and the risk of cancer was examined for 8224 participants in the prospective study. The hazard ratio of cancer for a doubling of the plasma CRP level was 1.09 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03 to 1.14). The nine most...

  5. Arsenite activates NFκB through induction of C-reactive protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druwe, Ingrid L.; Sollome, James J.; Sanchez-Soria, Pablo; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Camenisch, Todd D.; Vaillancourt, Richard R., E-mail: vaillancourt@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2012-06-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein in humans. Elevated levels of CRP are produced in response to inflammatory cytokines and are associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Exposure to inorganic arsenic, a common environmental toxicant, also produces cardiovascular disorders, namely atherosclerosis and is associated with insulin-resistance. Inorganic arsenic has been shown to contribute to cardiac toxicities through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that result in the activation of NFκB. In this study we show that exposure of the hepatic cell line, HepG2, to environmentally relevant levels of arsenite (0.13 to 2 μM) results in elevated CRP expression and secretion. ROS analysis of the samples showed that a minimal amount of ROS are produced by HepG2 cells in response to these concentrations of arsenic. In addition, treatment of FvB mice with 100 ppb sodium arsenite in the drinking water for 6 months starting at weaning age resulted in dramatically higher levels of CRP in both the liver and inner medullary region of the kidney. Further, mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct cells (mIMCD-4), a mouse kidney cell line, were stimulated with 10 ng/ml CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. Pretreatment with 10 nM Y27632, a known Rho-kinase inhibitor, prior to CRP exposure attenuated NFκB activation. These data suggest that arsenic causes the expression and secretion of CRP and that CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway, thereby providing a novel pathway by which arsenic can contribute to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► Exposure to arsenic can induce the expression and secretion of CRP. ► Mice treated with NaAsO{sub 2} showed higher levels of CRP in both the liver and kidney. ► mIMCD-3 were stimulated with CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. ► CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway. ► Data

  6. Functional and structural diversities of C-reactive proteins present in horseshoe crab hemolymph plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, D; Osaki, T; Mizunoe, Y; Wai, S N; Iwanaga, S; Kawabata, S

    1999-09-01

    Limulin, a sialic-acid-binding and phosphorylethanolamine-binding hemagglutinin in the hemolymph plasma of the American horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus), is a hemolytic C-reactive protein [Armstrong, P.B., Swarnakar, S., Srimal, S., Misquith, S., Hahn, E.A., Aimes, R. T. & Quigley, J.P. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 14717-14721]. We have now identified three types of C-reactive protein in the plasma of the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus), based on different affinities against fetuin-agarose and phosphorylethanolamine-agarose determined by quantitative precipitin assays using fetuin and an artificial phosphorylethanolamine-protein conjugate. Partial amino acid sequences of the isolated C-reactive proteins identified homologous proteins which were named Tachypleus tridentatus CRP-1 (tCRP-1), tCRP-2 and tCRP-3, each of which possibly constitute isoprotein mixtures. tCRP-2 and tCRP-3, but not tCRP-1, agglutinated mammalian erythrocytes. tCRP-1, the most abundant C-reative protein in the plasma, exhibited the highest affinity to the phosphorylethanolamine-protein conjugate but lacked both sialic-acid-binding and hemolytic activities. tCRP-2 bound to both fetuin-agarose and phosphorylethanolamine-agarose, and exhibited Ca2+-dependent hemolytic and sialic-acid-binding activities, suggestive of limulin-like properties. Furthermore, tCRP-2 exhibited a higher affinity to colominic acid, a bacterial polysialic acid. By contrast, tCRP-3 shows stronger hemolytic, sialic-acid-binding and hemagglutinating activities than tCRP-2. tCRP-3 has no affinity to phosphorylethanolamine-agarose, phosphorylethanolamine-protein conjugate and colominic acid. This suggests tCRP-3 is a novel hemolytic C-reactive protein lacking a common characteristic of phosphorylethanolamine-agarose binding affinity. Twenty-two clones of tCRPs with different deduced amino acid sequences were obtained by PCR using oligonucleotide primers based on the N-terminal and C-terminal sequences of t

  7. Tissue-type plasminogen activator and C-reactive protein in acute coronary heart disease. A nested case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, J; Bladbjerg, E-M; Møller, L

    2000-01-01

    and 258 controls. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Subjects with ischaemic heart disease identified in 1991 by the Danish National Hospital Register. Protein concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) were measured with ELISA methods in stored serum...... samples. RESULTS: CRP and t-PA concentrations were both significantly higher in cases than in controls (P

  8. Plasma concentrations of ascorbic acid and C-reactive protein, and risk of future coronary artery disease, in apparently healthy men and women: the EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Meuwese, Marijn C.; Day, Nicholas E.; Luben, Robert; Welch, Ailsa; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2006-01-01

    High plasma concentrations of ascorbic acid, a marker of fruit and vegetable intake, are associated with low risk of coronary artery disease. Whether this relationship is explained by a reduction in systemic inflammation is unclear. We investigated the relationship between ascorbic acid plasma

  9. Lipoprotein (a), C-reactive protein and some metabolic cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbera, Anthonia O; Azenabor, Alfred O

    2010-07-27

    Lipoprotein (a) (LP (a) is an independent cardiovascular risk factor that is not widely studied in people of sub-Saharan African origin. The aim of this report is to determine the frequency of occurrence of elevated Lp (a) and possible relationship with total cholesterol (TCHOL), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), C reactive protein (CRP) and serum uric acid (SUA). This is a cross sectional study carried out in 200 Nigerian patients with type 2 DM and 100 sex and age matched healthy Controls aged between 32-86 years. We determined the frequency of occurrence of elevated Lp (a) levels in the study subjects and compared clinical and biochemical variables between type 2 diabetic patients and non-diabetic patients. Clinical and biochemical parameters were also compared between subjects with type 2 DM who had elevated LP (a) and normal LP (a) levels. Long term glycaemic control using glycosylated haemoglobin was determined and compared in the study subjects. Test statistics used include chi square, correlation coefficient analysis and Student's t test. The mean Lp(a) concentration differed significantly between type 2 diabetic patients and the Control subjects (18.7 (5.8) mg/dl vs 23 (6.8) mg/dl, 0.00001). Similarly, the prevalence of high LP (a) levels in type 2 DM patients was significantly higher than that of the Control subjects (12.5% vs 4%, p-0.019). The mean levels of the lipid profile parameters (TCHOL, LDL-C, TG, LDL/HDL) and CRP were significantly higher in DM patients than in the Control subjects. The mean LP (a) levels were comparable in both sexes and in DM subjects with and without hypertension. TG was the only parameter that differed significantly between subjects with elevated Lp (a) levels and those with normal Lp (a) levels. There was a significant positive correlation (r) between Lp(a) levels and TG, LDL-C. TCHOL, LDL/HDL and uric acid. No association was found between Lp

  10. [High sensitivity C reactive protein and lipid status as a risk factors for coronary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurkić, Jasmina; Nurkić, Mahmud; Nurkić, Midhat

    2007-01-01

    It is generally accepted that inflammation has an important role, not just in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, but also in initiation of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). A number of studies showed, that a high concentration of high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) is an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease in a healthy person. HsCRP can predict new cardiovascular episodes, including death, in patients with unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Ability of oxidated low densiti lipoprotein (oxLDL) to induce accumulation of holesterol in macrofage was his first described proaterogenic characteristic and it help in hipotesis that oxidation of low densiti lipoprotein (LDL) can be important step in proces of aterogenesis. Framingham study showed that ther is significant corelation between level of total holesterol in blood and coronary artery disease (CAD). Evaluation of bouth hsCRP and LDL levels is superior in detection of CAD. Aims of this study were to determine values of hsCRP in patients with coronary arteries disease verified by coronary angiography (stenosis>70%), and to check if values of hsCRP higher than 3.0 mg/ dL are better predictor of coronary artery disease then lipid status. A prospective study was conducted on 60 patients, who were divided in two groups in compliance with significance of coronary artery disease. All patients have earlier diagnosis of ACS, and from this study excluded patients with acute infection, chronic, systemic or malignant disease. This research shows that patients with significant coronary artery disease, verified by coronary angiography, have higher values of hsCRP than those without disease that have values within the range of the reference values (0-3 mg/dL). Patients with coronary artery disease verified by coronary angiography have values of hsCRP that put them in a group of patients with intermediate to high risk of a future acute cardiovascular event, by

  11. C-reactive protein reacts with the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Clos, T.W. (VA Medical Center, Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-10-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) was found to produce a small, discrete, speckled fluorescence pattern in the nucleus of HEp-2 cells. Double staining with anti-RNP serum and CRP produced very similar staining patterns. By counterimmunoelectrophoresis CRP was bound to extractable nuclear antigens found in rabbit thymus extract. The reactive components of the extract were only partially sensitive to treatment with RNase. CRP immunoprecipitated the U1 RNA species from ({sup 32}P)labeled HeLa cells and the protein bands of the Sm/RNP complex from ({sup 35}S)-methionine-labeled HeLa cells. By blotting, CRP bound to several discrete bands in a calcium-dependent, PC-inhibitable manner. Two of the bands comigrated with the 70K protein band associated with the U1 snRNP, and its major breakdown product. Binding to these bands was inhibited by both EDTA and PC indicating that CRP binds these proteins through the PC-binding site. Binding to the 70K protein of the U1 snRNP was confirmed by reactivity with the recombinant 70K protein in a dot blot. These findings indicate the CRP binds to the U1-RNP snRNP particle. Considering the ability of CRP to inhibit antibody responses to its ligands and its ability to activate C and promote phagocytosis it is suggested that CRP may play a role in the regulation of autoantibody responses to nuclear Ag.

  12. Elevated C-reactive protein levels in schizophrenia inpatients is associated with aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, R; Lobel, T; Krivoy, A; Shlosberg, D; Weizman, A; Katz, N

    2016-01-01

    An association between inflammation and behavioral domains of mental disorders is of growing interest. Recent studies reported an association between aggression and inflammation. In this study, we investigated the association between aggressive behavior and inflammatory markers in schizophrenia inpatients. Adult schizophrenia inpatients without affective symptoms (n=213) were retrospectively identified and categorized according to their C-reactive protein measurement at admission as either elevated (CRP>1 mg/dL; n=57) or normal (CRPaggression were compared: PANSS excitement component (PANSS-EC), restraints and suicidal behavior during hospitalization. Univariate comparisons between elevated and normal CRP levels were performed and multivariate analysis was conducted to control for relevant covariates. CRP levels significantly correlated with other laboratory markers indicating increased inflammation including leukocyte count and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (r=0.387, Paggressive behavior compared to patients with normal CRP levels (aggression) in schizophrenia inpatients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuropathic pain, depressive symptoms, and C-reactive protein in sciatica patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Tomas; Bob, Petr

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that neuropathic pain component in low back pain (LBP) patients is associated with higher ratings of comorbidities such as depression and anxiety disorders. In line with current findings, the purpose of this clinical study is to examine a hypothesis regarding a relationship of neuropathic pain component, depression, and other psychopathological symptoms in a specific group of LBP patients with sciatica pain. With respect to findings that depression is related to inflammatory changes, and inflammatory mediators may play a role in neuropathic pain generation, we have assessed also serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Results of the present study show that increased neuropathic pain component in sciatica patients is associated with elevated levels of depression, anxiety, alexithymia, and serum CRP levels. In conclusion, results of this study indicate that CRP levels in sciatica patients are closely associated with neuropathic pain.

  14. The added value of C-reactive protein measurement in diagnosing pneumonia in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minnaard, Margaretha C; de Groot, Joris A H; Hopstaken, Rogier M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is increasingly being included in the diagnostic work-up for community-acquired pneumonia in primary care. Its added diagnostic value beyond signs and symptoms, however, remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis of individual patient data to quantify...... to a basic signs-and-symptoms prediction model was assessed. Outcome measures were improvement in discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia in primary care and improvement in risk classification, both within the individual studies and across studies. RESULTS: Authors of 8 eligible studies (n...... not change (n = 4). Overall, the proportion of patients assigned to the intermediate-risk category decreased from 56% to 51%. INTERPRETATION: Adding CRP measurement to the diagnostic work-up for suspected pneumonia in primary care improved the discrimination and risk classification of patients. However...

  15. C reactive protein and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a Mendelian randomisation approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lange, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design. Methods The authors measured high...... versus a doubling of genetically elevated CRP resulted in ORs for COPD of 1.27 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.30) versus 1.01 (0.81 to 1.26) and for COPD hospitalisation of 1.47 (1.43 to 1.51) versus 0.82(0.59 to 1.13). Conclusion Although elevated CRP is related to both a diagnosis of COPD and subsequent hospital...... admission, genetically elevated plasma CRP is not associated with an increased risk of clinical COPD. This suggests that the association between CRP levels and COPD is not causal....

  16. C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.W.; Olsen, M.H.; Rasmussen, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR), a metabolic disorder, are closely related. CRP and IR have both been identified as significant risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors....... It is not clear whether CRP predicts CVD independent of IR. DESIGN: Prospective population-based study. METHODS: Two thousand three hundred and fifty-seven Danish men and women, recruited from the general population, aged 41-72 years, without major CVD at baseline were studied. Traditional and new risk factors...... were recorded at baseline. CRP was determined by a high-sensitivity assay, and IR was determined by the homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) method. RESULTS: Over a median follow-up of 9.4 years, the incidence of the prespecified CV event, defined as the composite event of CV death, nonfatal...

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein for intraabdominal infections after colorectal resections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørner, Hartwig; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intraabdominal infections are caused mainly by anastomotic leaks and represent a serious complication. Diagnosis is usually made when patients become critically ill. Though inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood count (WBC), may contribute to an early...... diagnosis, their clinical roles remain unclear. The diagnostic accuracy of continuous tests depends on the choice of cut-off values. We analyzed the diagnostic accuracy of serial CRP and WBC measurements to detect infectious complications after colorectal resections. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The CRP and WBC...... were routinely measured postoperatively in 231 consecutive patients undergoing colorectal resection. Clinical outcome was registered with regard to postoperative complications. The diagnostic accuracy of CRP and WBC was analyzed by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis with intra...

  18. C-reactive protein level as a predictor of mortality in liver disease patients with bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Sine H; Søvsø, Morten; Gradel, Kim O

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective. C-reactive protein (CRP) is synthesized in the liver in response to inflammation, and CRP is a widely used marker of sepsis. In bacteremia the initial CRP level is an independent predictor of mortality. Since the CRP response in patients with chronic liver disease...... is lower than in patients without liver disease the objective was to assess whether CRP levels in chronic liver disease and bacteremia was associated with case fatality. Patients. The study enrolled 105 patients with chronic liver disease and bacteremia as well as 202 patients with bacteremia...... was significantly higher in patients with chronic liver disease (mortality rate ratio 2.2; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.9) and it was correlated to Child-Turcotte-Pugh scores. CRP levels were not different between the three Child-Turcotte-Pugh classes (p = 0.33), and no linear correlation with 30-day mortality...

  19. Serum levels of C-reactive protein in adolescents with periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Rodrigo; Baelum, Vibeke; Hedegaard, Chris Juul

    2011-01-01

    Background: The results of several cross-sectional studies suggested a relationship between periodontitis and higher serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). Most of these studies were restricted to adult study groups with severe periodontal inflammation, and the potential effects of confounding...... were obtained, and CRP levels were quantified, using a high-sensitive bead-based flow cytometric assay. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to assess overall differences between groups. Results: The median serum CRP values for cases and controls were 64 ng/ml (interquartile range: 27 to 234 ng/ml) and 55...... ng/ml (31 to 183 ng/ml), respectively (P = 0.8). Conclusions: Serum levels of CRP were not significantly higher among subjects with periodontitis than among controls. However, a statistically significant positive association between percentages of sites with bleeding on probing and log...

  20. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on C-reactive protein levels in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Farin Kiany; Karimi, Noozhan; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Roozbeh, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been implicated as a possible mediator of the association between periodontitis and several systemic diseases. This study evaluated the impact of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on the serum levels of CRP in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients on hemodialysis. A total of 77 CKD patients on hemodialysis were included in this study. At baseline, periodontal examination was assessed for all the patients, and chronic periodontitis was defined through clinical attachment level and probing pocket depth, according to the American Association of Periodontology. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment was performed and serum levels of CRP were evaluated at baseline and 8 weeks after periodontal treatment. Periodontal treatment resulted in significant reductions in CRP levels (p periodontitis. Periodontitis is an important source of systemic inflammation in CKD patients. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment can effectively reduce the serum level of CRP in these patients.

  1. C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN BACTERIAL MENINGITIS: DOSE IT HELP TO DIFFERENTIATE BACTERIAL FROM VIRAL MENINGITIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR EMAMI NAEINI

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Central nervous system infections are among the most serious conditions in of medical practice. C-reactive Protein has recently been evaluated in terms of its ability to diffeccentiate bacterial from nonbacterial central nervous system inflammations.
    Methods. We studied the frequency of positive CRP in 61 patients who had signs of meningitis. All the specimens referred to one laboratory and were examined by Slide method.
    Results. Positive CRP was found in 97.6 percent of those who were finally diagnosed as bacterial meningitis. The frequency of CRP for other types of meningitis was 16.6 percent (P < 0.05.
    Discussion. In the absence of infection, CSF is free of CRP. Positive CRP may help to the differentiate the different types of meningitis.

  2. C-reactive protein, pre- and postdexamethasone cortisol levels in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Carsten; Wibisono, Dennis; Terfehr, Kirsten; Löwe, Bernd; Otte, Christian; Wingenfeld, Katja

    2014-07-01

    Dysregulations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis may impact inflammatory processes in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), possibly resulting in a low-grade inflammation as reflected by elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). Serum CRP levels and salivary cortisol before and after the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) were assessed in 50 inpatients with main diagnoses PTSD, major depressive disorder or borderline personality disorder. A strong trend for lower CRP levels was found in PTSD positive individuals compared with patients without PTSD. Our study does not support the hypothesis of elevated serum CRP levels in PTSD compared with other psychiatric patients. However, a dysbalanced immune system with suppressed CRP might contribute to the elevated somatic comorbidity in PTSD.

  3. Specific removal of C-reactive protein by apheresis in a porcine cardiac infarction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagman, Anna Christine; Bock, Christopher; Abdel-Aty, Hassan; Vogt, Birgit; Gebauer, Frank; Janelt, Gunnar; Wohlgemuth, Franziska; Morgenstern, Rene; Yapici, Gülcan; Puppe, Astrid; Modersohn, Diethelm; Mans, Dörte; Jerichow, Timo; Ott, Sascha; Kunze, Rudolf; Schrödl, Wieland; Janko, Christina; Hermann, Martin; Kalden, Joachim R; Kern, Peter; Parsch, Hans; Kirschfink, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Röttgen, Rainer; Unger, Juliane K; Frei, Ulrich; Schindler, Ralf; Möckel, Martin; Sheriff, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a possible causative factor of the destructive processes observed during the weeks after myocardial infarction. We developed a clinically relevant animal model including the removal of CRP from blood plasma utilizing a specific CRP adsorber and the visualization of the infarct scar in the living animal by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging as a tool to investigate the impact of CRP after acute myocardial infarction. We describe the facets of this model system and kinetics of clinical blood parameters like CRP and troponin. In addition, we demonstrate the potency of CRP apheresis reducing CRP levels by ~70% in the established treatment system. We showed for the first time that it is possible to conduct apheresis at the following 2 days after acute myocardial infarction in a porcine infarction model and to analyze the infarct by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging at day 1 and 14. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. C-reactive protein +1444CT (rs1130864) genetic polymorphism is associated with the susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus and C-reactive protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delongui, Francieli; Lozovoy, Marcell Allyson Batisti; Iriyoda, Tatiana Mayiumi Veiga; Costa, Neide Tomimura; Stadtlober, Nicole Perugini; Alfieri, Daniela Frizon; Flauzino, Tamires; Dichi, Isaias; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci

    2017-08-01

    The T rare allele of +1444CT (rs1130864) polymorphism of C-reactive protein (CRP) has been associated with increased CRP levels in some inflammatory conditions, but its role on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility and on CRP levels in SLE patients remains uncertain. The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between the rs1130864 CRP polymorphism with SLE susceptibility, disease activity, and CRP levels in SLE Brazilian patients. The study enrolled 176 SLE patients and 137 controls. SLE disease activity was assessed using the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). The rs1130864 CRP polymorphism was determined using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. SLE patients presented higher body mass index (p = 0.046) and CRP levels (p = 0.017) than controls. The genotype and allele frequencies of patients differed from controls [CC vs. CT = odds ratio (OR) 1.730, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.068-2.803, p = 0.035; CC vs. TT = OR 3.667, 95% CI 1.410-9.533, p = 0.009; C vs. T = OR 1.883, 95% CI 1.299-2.728, p = 0.001)]. Patients carrying the T allele presented higher CRP levels (p = 0.009), were more frequent Caucasians (p = 0.018), and with no use of immunosuppressive treatment (p = 0.004) than those carrying the C allele. However, the SLEDAI and anti-double-stranded DNA positivity did not differ from those carrying T vs. C allele (p = 0.595 and p = 0.243, respectively). The rs1130864 CRP polymorphism was associated with SLE susceptibility and CRP levels, but not with disease activity, suggesting that this polymorphism may play a role in the pathophysiology of SLE through increasing the CRP that, probably, plays an inflammatory role in SLE pathophysiology.

  5. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and risk of sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry E Wang

    Full Text Available Conventional C-reactive protein assays have been used to detect or guide the treatment of acute sepsis. The objective of this study was to determine the association between elevated baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and the risk of future sepsis events.We studied data from 30,239 community dwelling, black and white individuals, age ≥45 years old enrolled in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS cohort. Baseline hsCRP and participant characteristics were determined at the start of the study. We identified sepsis events through review of hospital records. Elevated hsCRP was defined as values >3.0 mg/L. Using Cox regression, we determined the association between elevated hsCRP and first sepsis event, adjusting for sociodemographic factors (age, sex, race, region, education, income, health behaviors (tobacco and alcohol use, chronic medical conditions (coronary artery disease, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic lung disease and statin use.Over the mean observation time of 5.7 years (IQR 4.5-7.1, 974 individuals experienced a sepsis event, and 11,447 (37.9% had elevated baseline hsCRP (>3.0 mg/L. Elevated baseline hsCRP was independently associated with subsequent sepsis (adjusted HR 1.56; 95% CI 1.36-1.79, adjusted for sociodemographics, health behaviors, chronic medical conditions and statin use.Elevated baseline hsCRP was associated with increased risk of future sepsis events. hsCRP may help to identify individuals at increased risk for sepsis.

  6. Correlation between Plaque Composition as assessed by Virtual Histology and C-reactive Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Dimytri Alexandre de Alvim, E-mail: dimytri@cardiol.br; Sousa, Amanda Guerra Moraes R.; Costa Junior, José de Ribamar; Costa, Ricardo Alves da; Staico, Rodolfo; Tanajura, Luis Fernando Leite; Centemero, Marinella Patrizia; Feres, Fausto; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Sousa, J. Eduardo Moraes R. [Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that coronary plaque composition plays a pivotal role in plaque instability, and imaging modalities and serum biomarkers have been investigated to identify vulnerable plaque. Virtual histology IVUS (VH-IVUS) characterizes plaque components as calcified, fibrotic, fibrofatty, or necrotic core. C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is an independent risk factor and a powerful predictor of future coronary events. However, a relationship between inflammatory response indicated by CRP and plaque characteristics in ACS patients remains not well established. To determine, by using VH-IVUS, the relation between coronary plaque components and plasma high-sensitivity CRP levels in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). 52 patients with ACS were enrolled in this prospective study. Electrocardiographically-gated VH-IVUS were performed in the culprit lesion before PCI. Blood sample was drawn from all patients before the procedure and after 24 hours, and hs-CRP levels were determined. Mean age was 55.3±4.9 years, 76.9% were men and 30.9% had diabetes. Mean MLA was 3.9±1.3 mm{sup 2}, and plaque burden was 69±11.3%, as assessed by IVUS. VH-IVUS analysis at the minimum luminal site identified plaque components: fibrotic (59.6±15.8%), fibrofatty (7.6±8.2%), dense calcium (12.1±9.2%) and necrotic core (20.7±12.7%). Plasma hs-CRP (mean 16.02±18.07 mg/L) did not correlate with necrotic core (r=-0.089, p = 0.53) and other plaque components. In this prospective study with patients with ACS, the predominant components of the culprit plaque were fibrotic and necrotic core. Serum hs C-reactive protein levels did not correlate with plaque composition.

  7. Extreme Sleep Durations and Increased C-Reactive Protein: Effects of Sex and Ethnoracial Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandner, Michael A.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Jackson, Nicholas; Sands-Lincoln, Megan; Pandey, Abhishek; Jean-Louis, Girardin

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: We hypothesize that extremes of sleep duration are associated with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), a pro-inflammatory marker for cardiovascular disease risk. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Population-based research. Participants: Nationally representative sample of 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants (n = 5,587 adults). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Associations between CRP and self-reported total sleep time (TST) were examined. Explanatory models considered contributions of sex, age, race/ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), and BMI squared (BMI2). Models also explored the role of insomnia symptoms, sleep apnea, active medical illness, and antidiabetic/antihypertensive treatment. Differential patterns among race/ethnicity groups were examined using interactions and stratified analyses. Nonlinear relationships between CRP and TST were assessed using polynomial and multinomial regression models ( 9 h). Linear and squared terms were significant in all models in the complete sample, with notable differences by sex and ethnoracial group. Overall, in models adjusted for sociodemographics and BMI, different patterns were observed for non-Hispanic white (elevated CRP for 9 h), black/African-American (elevated CRP for 9 h), and Asian/ Other (higher in 9 and > 9 h and lower in 5 h and 6 h) groups. Ethnoracial groups also demonstrated patterning by sex. Conclusion: In a representative sample of American adults, elevated CRP was associated with extreme sleep durations. Sex, race/ethnicity, sleep disorders, and medical comorbidity influenced these associations. Differences in CRP along these dimensions should be considered in future research on sleep related disparities influencing cardiometabolic disease risk. Citation: Grandner MA; Buxton OM; Jackson N; Sands M; Pandey A; Jean-Louis G. Extreme sleep durations and increased C-reactive protein: effects of sex and ethnoracial group. SLEEP 2013

  8. C-reactive protein as an early predictor for anastomotic leakage in elective abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scepanovic, M S; Kovacevic, B; Cijan, V; Antic, A; Petrovic, Z; Asceric, R; Krdzic, I; Cuk, V

    2013-10-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) represents a serious complication after abdominal surgery. Therefore, it is important to detect it early before it becomes clinically apparent. The predictive value of C-reactive protein (CRP) as a marker of infective postoperative complications, particularly in the form of anastomotic leakage, has been investigated by several authors with promising results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein in predicting anastomotic leakage. The serum CRP level, white blood cell (WBC) count, and body temperature (BT) of 156 patients who underwent elective abdominal surgery with primary anastomosis were monitored daily until postoperative day (POD) 7. We recorded all postoperative complications and analyzed the data. Diagnostic accuracy of CRP with regard to development of AL was assessed by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Fifteen patients (9.6 %) developed anastomotic leakage. CRP was significantly higher every day during the first 7 postoperative days in patients who developed AL compared with those patients who did not develop complications, whereas the WBC count and BT were not. A CRP cutoff value of 135 mg/l on POD 3 yielded a sensitivity of 73 %, a specificity of 73 %, and a negative predictive value of 95.4 % for the detection of AL. According to our results, values of CRP less than 135 mg/l on POD 3 may contribute to a safe discharge from hospital. Patients with CRP values higher than 135 mg/l on POD 3 require prolonged hospitalization and an intensive search for infective complications, particularly AL.

  9. Serum levels of hypersensitive-C-reactive protein in moderate and severe acne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Namazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP has been reported to occur in psoriasis, urticaria, acne, rosacea and many other dermatological and nondermatological conditions. Chronic systemic inflammation has been implicated in the development of neuropsychiatric/degenerative disorders, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus and even carcinogenesis. The present study is designed to determine whether the level of inflammation created by acne vulgaris could be high enough to raise the serum levels of high-sensitive CRP. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with moderate and severe acne vulgaris were enrolled, along with 44 age and sex matched healthy blood donors as controls. Hypersensitive-CRP (Hs-CRP was measured in both groups. Results: Hypersensitive-C-reactive protein levels in the case group varied between 0 and 28.1 μg/ml with an average of 2.24 ± 4.87 μg/ml (mean ± standard deviation and a median of 0.6 μg/ml (interquartile range [IQR] =0.3, 1.4 μg/ml. Hs-CRP levels of the control group varied between 0 and 14 μg/ml with an average of 3.12 ± 3.67 μg/ml and a median of 1.5 μg/ml (IQR = 0.55, 5.0 μg/ml. No significant difference of Hs-CRP level between the two groups was seen (t = -0.961, 95% confidence interval: Lower = -2.6942, upper = 0.9377; P = 0.339. Additionally, no significant difference in the level of Hs-CRP was noted between the moderate and severe acne groups (95% confidence interval: Lower = -5.2495, upper = 1.6711; P = 0.165. Conclusion: Acne vulgaris, even in its severe grades (excluding acne fulminans and acne conglobata, does not induce significant inflammation at the systemic level.

  10. Effect of Resistance Training on Serum Level of C-Reactive Protein (CRP and Fibrinogen in Male Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abbas saremi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Addiction to narcotic drugs is associated with cardiovascular diseases; and increased levels of biomarkers, such as C-reactive protein and fibrinogen are independently correlated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of 8 weeks of resistance training on C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels in drug addicted men. Method: In this quasi-experimental study with pretest-posttest, the number of 30 male addicts was randomly divided into resistance training group (n = 15 and non-sports control group (n = 15. Then, resistance training was conducted within two months, four days a week, and 50 to 60 minutes a day. The serum levels of C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, body compositions, and metabolic parameters were evaluated before and after the training period. Results: After the passage of 8 weeks of resistance training, skeletal muscle strength significantly increased (P < .05. At the same time, levels of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen significantly decreased in response to resistance training (P < .05. Conclusion: Short-term resistance training program improves muscle mass and strength in the male addicts after drug abstinence and this improvement is associated with reduced levels of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen.

  11. C-reactive protein is a biomarker of AFP-negative HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Sha; Xiang, Yi; Yang, Min; Ding, Xiangchun; Liu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Lina; Liu, Qing; Liu, Bin; Lu, Zhenhui; Li, Shiying; Liu, Yi; Ran, Xiaoping; Xu, Xiaoming; Hu, Huaidong; Hu, Peng; Zhang, Dazhi; Ren, Hong; Yang, Yixuan

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most aggressive cancers worldwide and is associated with the high rates of morbidity and mortality. α-fetoprotein (AFP) is common used in diagnosis of HCC; however, a growing body of research is questioning the diagnostic power of AFP. There is, therefore, an urgent need to develop additional novel non-invasive techniques for the early diagnosis of HCC, particularly for patients with AFP-negative [AFP(-)] HCC. Accordingly, in the present study, we employed iTRAQ-based mass spectro-metry to analyze the plasma proteins of subjects with AFP(-) HBV-related HCC, AFP(+) HBV-related HCC and non-malignant cirrhosis. We identified 14 aberrantly expressed proteins specific to the HCC patients, including 10 upregulated and 4 downregulated proteins. We verified C-reactive protein (CRP) overexpression by ELISA and immunohistochemical staining of clinical samples. Per ROC curve analyses, CRP was positive in 73.3% of patients with HBV-related HCC, and CRP overexpression had significant diagnostic power for AFP(-) HBV-related HCC. Furthermore, we found that silencing CRP caused a >2-fold decease in HBV replication. Additionally, we determined that this reduction in HBV replication involved the interferon-signaling pathway. However, silencing CRP also promoted HCC invasion and migration in vitro. In conclusion, we demonstrated that CRP can serve as a diagnostic biomarker for AFP(-) HBV-related HCC.

  12. Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein with carotid artery intima-media thickness in hypertensive older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Moatassem S; Elawam, Amal E; Khater, Mohamed S; Omar, Omar H; Mabrouk, Randa A; Taha, Hend M

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a major traditional risk factor for atherosclerosis. Increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is considered to be a noninvasive marker of global atherosclerotic disease. The aim of this study is to assess the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) and carotid artery IMT among hypertensive older adults. A case-control study was done on 90 adults age 60 years and older, of which 60 were hypertensive (30 males and 30 females) and 30 were matched healthy controls. Measurements included conventional cardiovascular risk factors including obesity parameters, blood pressure, lipid profiles, smoking habits, the serum concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP), and the carotid artery IMT. Hypertensive patients had higher body mass index, Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and hs-CRP level (P adults rather than other traditional risk factors. Copyright © 2011 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Collaborative pooled analysis of data on C-reactive protein gene variants and coronary disease: judging causality by Mendelian randomisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danesh, J.; Hingorani, A.; Wensley, F.

    2008-01-01

    Many prospective studies have reported associations between circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but causality remains uncertain. Studies of CHD are being conducted that involve measurement of common polymorphisms of the CRP gene known...... to be associated with circulating concentrations, thereby utilising these variants as proxies for circulating CRP levels. By analysing data from several studies examining the association between relevant CRP polymorphisms and CHD risk, the present collaboration will undertake a Mendelian randomisation analysis...... to help assess the likelihood of any causal relevance of CRP levels to CHD risk. A central database is being established containing individual data on CRP polymorphisms, circulating CRP levels, and major coronary outcomes as well as age, sex and other relevant characteristics. Associations between CRP...

  14. Culture and the Immune System: Cultural Consonance in Social Support and C-reactive Protein in Urban Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ribeiro, Rosane P; Dos Santos, José Ernesto

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we examine the distribution of a marker of immune system stimulation-C-reactive protein-in urban Brazil. Social relationships are associated with immunostimulation, and we argue that cultural dimensions of social support, assessed by cultural consonance, are important in this process. Cultural consonance is the degree to which individuals, in their own beliefs and behaviors, approximate shared cultural models. A measure of cultural consonance in social support, based on a cultural consensus analysis regarding sources and patterns of social support in Brazil, was developed. In a survey of 258 persons, the association of cultural consonance in social support and C-reactive protein was examined, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, depressive symptoms, and a social network index. Lower cultural consonance in social support was associated with higher C-reactive protein. Implications of these results for future research are discussed. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  15. [Screening for cellular signal transduction pathway involved in C-reactive protein induced endothelial cell inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xu-dong; Chen, Ai-hua; Zhou, Li-yao; Xiao, Hua; Fu, Qiang; Li, Zhi-liang

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the cellular signal transduction pathway involved in participation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in inflammation process in endothelial cell. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells were cultured and characterized by anti-Factor VIII-related antigen. The cells were divided into CRP group and control group, and they were respectively treated with CRP (20 mg/L) or serum-free medium for 24 hours. RNAs of two groups were extracted and analyzed by human signal transduction pathway gene array. Expressions of 13 genes were increased, whereas expressions of 25 genes were decreased in CRP group compared with control group. Especially, WNT1 inducible signaling pathway protein 2 (WISP2) was increased by 37.63 folds, which was believed to involve in inflammation process as a growth factor, p53 was increased by 30.50 folds, which was a key factor to modulate apoptosis, whereas, Bcl-x and Bcl-2 were decreased by 9.61% and 49.95% which were characterized as an important factor to prevent apoptosis. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was increased by 2.75 folds after treated with CRP, while intercellular adhesion molecular (ICAM) between two groups didn't show statistically significant difference. CRP may be involved in inflammatory process of endothelial cell, and the mechanism may be to induce apoptosis and activate cellular signal transduction pathway of cell adhesion proteins.

  16. The profile of C-reactive proteins in functional psychotic states in a cohort in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohaeri, J U; Hedo, C C; Lagundoye, O O

    1993-10-01

    Based on the findings of previous work involving the measurement of 8 acute-phase proteins in 8 subjects receiving electroconvulsive therapy, we assayed the levels of C-reactive proteins (CRP) in 40 functional psychotic subjects, 37 of whom were consecutive admissions at the psychiatric ward. From 16 subjects, a second sample of blood for assay of CRP was collected 6 weeks after discharge from hospital, when the patients were no longer experiencing psychotic symptoms. The patients and controls were screened for tissue injury, inflammatory conditions and other diseases. We found that 14 (35%) of the psychiatric patients and only one (2%) of 50 normal control subjects had detectable levels of CRP. At follow-up, none of the 7 patients in whom CRP had been earlier detectable had measurable levels of CRP in the non-psychotic state. The presence of CRP was not related to biochemical indexes of nutritional status (total proteins and albumin), nor did clinical variables such as type of psychosis, pacing in acutely disturbed patients, use of intramuscular injections or diet and drugs distinguish the two groups of patients. It is suggested that the presence of CRP in the psychotic state is probably a state-dependent expression of nonspecific humoral immune alteration in subjects in whom more specific tests could reveal some immune alteration.

  17. C-reactive protein increases BBB permeability: implications for obesity and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsuchou, Hung; Kastin, Abba J; Mishra, Pramod K; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Acute phase C-reactive protein (CRP), elevated in obesity and inflammation, is a major binding protein for leptin. It is thought that CRP contributes to leptin resistance by preventing leptin from crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here we determined how CRP interacts with the BBB and whether it deters leptin from reaching CNS targets. BBB permeability, compartmental distribution, tracer stability, and expression of tight junction protein and inflammatory marker were determined. CRP was stable in blood, but did not permeate the BBB in trace amounts. However, it increased paracellular permeability at a higher dose. Agouti viable (A(vy)) mice with adult-onset obesity show higher CRP entry into the brain. CRP did not permeate hCMEC/D3 cells nor change zona occludin-1 or cyclooxygenase-2 expression. An intermediate dose of CRP had no effect on leptin transport across the BBB after co-treatment. Thus, acute interactions between CRP and leptin at the BBB level were negligible and did not explain the leptin resistance seen in obesity. The interactions of CRP and the BBB are a two-phase process, with increased paracellular permeability at a high dose that enables its entry into the CNS and serves to induce reactive gliosis and impair CNS function. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Moderate alcohol consumption reduces plasma C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels : a randomized, diet-controlled intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierksma, A.; Gaag, M.S. van der; Kluft, C.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of moderate alcohol consumption on the acute phase proteins C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. Design: Randomized, diet-controlled, cross-over study. Setting: The study was performed at TNO Nutrition and Food Research, Zeist, The Netherlands. Subjects: Ten

  19. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events after ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Daniel Rios Pinto; Ramos, Adriane Monserrat; Vieira, Pedro Lima; Menti, Eduardo; Bordin, Odemir Luiz Jr.; Souza, Priscilla Azambuja Lopes de; Quadros, Alexandre Schaan de; Portal, Vera Lúcia, E-mail: veraportal.pesquisa@gmail.com [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde: Cardiologia - Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention remains controversial. To investigate the potential association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and an increased risk of MACE such as death, heart failure, reinfarction, and new revascularization in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. This prospective cohort study included 300 individuals aged >18 years who were diagnosed with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary health center. An instrument evaluating clinical variables and the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk scores was used. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was determined by nephelometry. The patients were followed-up during hospitalization and up to 30 days after infarction for the occurrence of MACE. Student's t, Mann-Whitney, chi-square, and logistic regression tests were used for statistical analyses. P values of ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. The mean age was 59.76 years, and 69.3% of patients were male. No statistically significant association was observed between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent MACE (p = 0.11). However, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was independently associated with 30-day mortality when adjusted for TIMI [odds ratio (OR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.51; p = 0.005] and GRACE (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06-1.49; p = 0.007) risk scores. Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was not predictive of combined major cardiovascular events within 30 days after ST-elevation myocardial infarction in patients who underwent primary angioplasty and stent implantation, it was an independent predictor

  20. C-reactive protein inhibits survivin expression via Akt/mTOR pathway downregulation by PTEN expression in cardiac myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Seob Lee

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is one of the most important biomarkers for arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have shown that CRP affects cell cycle and inflammatory process in cardiac myocytes. Survivin is also involved in cardiac myocytes replication and apoptosis. Reduction of survivin expression is associated with less favorable cardiac remodeling in animal models. However, the effect of CRP on survivin expression and its cellular mechanism has not yet been studied. We demonstrated that treatment of CRP resulted in a significant decrease of survivin protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner in cardiac myocytes. The upstream signaling proteins of survivin, such as Akt, mTOR and p70S6K, were also downregulated by CRP treatment. In addition, CRP increased the protein and mRNA levels of PTEN. The siRNA transfection or specific inhibitor treatment for PTEN restored the CRP-induced downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway and survivin protein expression. Moreover, pretreatment with a specific p53 inhibitor decreased the CRP-induced PTEN expression. ERK-specific inhibitor also blocked the p53 phosphorylation and PTEN expression induced by CRP. Our study provides a novel insight into CRP-induced downregulation of survivin protein expression in cardiac myocytes through mechanisms that involved in downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway by expression of PTEN.

  1. Variation in C-reactive protein following weight loss in obese insulin resistant postmenopausal women: is there an independent contribution of lean body mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalani, R; Riesco, É; Perreault, K; Imbeault, P; Brochu, M; Dionne, I J

    2015-03-01

    We showed that obese insulin resistant postmenopausal women are characterized by higher lean body mass and elevated C-reactive protein. Although counterintuitive, we hypothesized that losses in muscle mass following caloric restriction and increase in muscle quality will be associated with improvements in glucose homeostasis through decreases in C-reactive protein. To determine 1) if improvements in C-reactive protein concentrations occurs through losses in lean body mass; and 2) if decreases in C-reactive protein levels contribute to improvements in insulin sensitivity. 50 postmenopausal women (body mass index>26 kg/m(²)) with impaired glucose disposal (fat distribution (VAT and SAT by CT scan) and plasma high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin-6 (Il-6). Significant correlations were observed between Δ hsCRP levels with Δ Il-6 (r=0.33, p≤0.05), Δ total LBM index (r=0.44, p≤0.01), Δ trunk LBM (r=0.38, p≤0.01) Δ SAT (r=0.35, p≤0.05) and ∆ glucose disposal rate (r=- 0.44, p≤0.01). After including all the correlated variables in Stepwise linear regression model, Δ LBM index was the only independent predictor of the reduction in hsCRP levels (R(2)=0.20, p≤0.01). Losses in total lean body mass are independently associated with improvements in inflammatory state (CRP levels) in obese postmenopausal women with impaired glucose disposal. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Inhibiting C-Reactive Protein for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease: Promising Evidence from Rodent Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Szalai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Raised blood C-reactive protein (CRP level is a predictor of cardiovascular events, but whether blood CRP is causal in the disease process is unknown. The latter would best be defined by pharmacological inhibition of the protein in the context of a randomized case-control study. However, no CRP specific drug is currently available so such a prospective study cannot be performed. Blood CRP is synthesized primarily in the liver and the liver is an organ where antisense oligonucleotide (ASO drugs accumulate. Taking advantage of this we evaluated the efficacy of CRP specific ASOs in rodents with experimentally induced cardiovascular damage. Treating rats for 4 weeks with a rat CRP-specific ASO achieved >60% reduction of blood CRP. Notably, this effect was associated with improved heart function and pathology following myocardial infarction (induced by ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Likewise in human CRP transgenic mice treated for 2 weeks with a human CRP-specific ASO, blood human CRP was reduced by >70% and carotid artery patency was improved (2 weeks after surgical ligation. CRP specific ASOs might pave the way towards a placebo-controlled trial that could clarify the role of CRP in cardiovascular disease.

  3. Effect of wine phenolics on cytokine-induced C-reactive protein expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAUR, G.; RAO, L. V. M.; AGRAWAL, A.; PENDURTHI, U. R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in blood was recognized as one of the cardiac disease risk factors. Consumption of wine is shown to reduce the risk from heart disease and improve longevity. Objectives In the present study, we evaluated the effect of various wine polyphenolic compounds and several active synthetic derivatives of resveratrol on the inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β + IL-6)-induced CRP expression in Hep3B cells. Results Among the wine phenolics tested, quercetin and resveratrol, in a dose-dependent manner, suppressed cytokine-induced CRP expression. Two of the synthetic derivatives of resveratrol, R3 and 7b, elicited a fiftyfold higher suppressive effect compared with resveratrol. The inhibitory effects of resveratrol and its derivatives on CRP expression were at the level of mRNA production. Investigation of signaling pathways showed that the cytokines induced the phosphorylation of p38 and p44/42MAP kinases. Inhibitors of p38 and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation inhibited CRP expression, implicating the involvement of both pathways in cytokine-induced CRP expression. These data revealed a previously unrecognized role of the p44/42 MAPK signaling pathway in CRP expression. Wine polyphenolics or the synthetic compounds of resveratrol did not affect cytokine-activated phosphorylation of these MAPKs. Conclusions Wine phenolics inhibit CRP expression; however, to do so, they do not utilize the MAPK pathways. PMID:17388968

  4. Association between serum levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein and inflammation activity in chronic gastritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Asghar; Moradkhani, Atefeh; Hafezi Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Jafari Heirdarlo, Ali; Abangah, Ghobad; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis is an important premalignant lesion and recent studies suggested a production of inflammatory cytokine-like C-reactive protein during gastritis. This study aimed to determine any relationship between high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and inflammation activity among patients with gastritis. Demographic and clinical variables of participants were collected by a validated questionnaire. Using histology of the gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori status was investigated and serum concentrations of hs-CRP were measured among dyspeptic patients. Correlation between hs-CRP serum levels and inflammation activities was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. The relation between active inflammation and other variables was evaluated by logic link function model. Totally 239 patients (56.6% female) were analysed. The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe inflammation activities was 66.5%, 23.8% and 9.6% respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among men and women were 2.85 ± 2.84 mg/dl and 2.80 ± 4.80 mg/dl (p = 0.047) respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among patients with H. pylori infection, gland atrophy, metaplasia and dysplasia were 2.83 ± 3.80 mg/dl, 3.52 ± 5.1 mg/dl, 2.22 ± 2.3 mg/dl and 5.3 ± 5.04 mg/dl respectively. Relationship between hs-CRP and inflammation activities (p gastritis, elevated hs-CRP levels may be considered as a predictive marker of changes in gastric mucosa and a promising therapeutic target for patients with gastritis.

  5. C-reactive protein a better indicator of inflammation after third molar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operative pain and pre-operative levels of C-reactive and post-operative pain and swelling in impacted third molar surgery. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study subjects were patients indicated for mandibular third molar extraction.

  6. Serum C-reactive protein and C-reactive gene (-717C>T polymorphism are not associated with periodontitis in Indonesian male patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius Winoto Suhartono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease caused by periodontal pathogens and influenced by multiple risk factors such as genetics, smoking habit, age and systemic diseases. The inflammatory cascade is characterized by the release of C-reactive protein (CRP. Periodontitis has been reported to have plausible links to increased level of CRP, which in turn has been associated to elevated risk of  cardiovascular disease (CVD. Purpose: The purpose of this study was t o investigate the relationship amongst the severity of periodontitis, CRP level in blood and CRP (-717 C>T gene polymorphism in male Indonesian smokers and non-smokers. Method: The severity of periodontitis was assessed for 97 consenting male Indonesian smokers and non-smokers. The CRP level of the subjects was determined by using immuno-turbidimetric assay performed in PARAHITA Diagnostic Center Laboratory ISO 9001: 2000 Cert No. 15225/2. The rate of CRP (-717C>T gene polymorphism was determined by using PCR-RFLP in Oral Biology Laboratory, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia. Result: The results suggest that the CRP protein level is not significantly associated with the tested CRP gene polymorphism (p>0.05. Also, while the severity of periodontitis increased significantly with subject age, the CRP level in blood serum was not significantly related to the severity of  periodontitis. The genotypes of the tested polymorphism did not show significant association with the severity of periodontitis either in smokers or in the combined population including smokers and non-smokers. The results naturally do not exclude such associations, but suggest that to discern the differences the sample size must be considerably increased. Conclusion: The CRP (-717C>T gene polymorphism and CRP level in blood serum were not found to be associated with the severity of periodontitis in male smokers or in the combined population of smokers and non-smokers.

  7. CdSe and ZnSe quantum dots capped with PEA for screening C-reactive protein in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, D; Algarra, M; Diez de los Rios, M J; Arrebola, M M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E; Seller-Pérez, G; Esteves da Silva, J C G

    2012-05-15

    A fluorescence chemical sensor for C-reactive protein (CRP) was developed based on the selective interaction with CdSe and ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) coated with O-phosphorylethanolamine (PEA). Synthesis procedure and analytical parameters such as pH and ionic strength were studied. The decrease in the fluorescence emission intensity was explained due to the specific interaction of the QDs-PEA with CRP, and a correlation was observed between the quenching of the fluorescence and the concentration of CRP. The accuracy of the proposed method was 0.37% as RSD. The proposed method was applied to screen serum samples, and showed to be sensible at the C-reactive protein concentrations of risks levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Agglutination of intravenously administered phosphatidylcholine-containing lipid emulsions with serum C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugirimana, Pierrot; Speeckaert, Marijn M; Fiers, Tom; De Buyzere, Marc L; Kint, Jos; Benoit, Dominique; Delanghe, Joris R

    2013-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is able to bind phospholipids in the presence of calcium. We wanted to investigate the reaction of CRP with various commercial fat emulsions and to explore the impact of CRP agglutination on serum CRP levels. Serum specimens were mixed with Intralipid 20% (soybean oil-based fat emulsion), Structolipid (structured oil-based fat emulsion), Omegaven (fish oil-based fat emulsion), or SMOFlipid (mixed soybean oil-, olive oil-, and fish oil-based emulsion) in Tris-calcium buffer (pH 7.5). After 30 minutes of incubation at 37°C, CRP-phospholipid complexes were turbidimetrically quantified and flow cytometric analysis was performed. Similarly, CRP complexes were monitored in vivo, following administration of fat emulsion. CRP was able to agglutinate phospholipid-containing lipid droplets present in the soybean oil-based fat emulsion and the structured oil-based fat emulsion. To a lesser extent, agglutination was observed for fish oil-containing fat emulsions, whereas no agglutination was noticed for the mixed soybean oil-, olive oil-, and fish oil-based emulsion. Results for propofol-containing emulsions were comparable. Agglutination correlated with phospholipid content of the emulsions. When in vivo agglutination occurred, plasma CRP values dropped due to consumption of CRP by phospholipid-induced agglutination. In this in vitro experiment, we demonstrated agglutination of CRP with phospholipids in various fat emulsions. Research studies are required in patients to determine which effects occur with various intravenous fat emulsions.

  9. Cardiovascular risk assessment using high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandis-Cortes, Cristina; Martínez-Jabaloyas, José M; Díez-Calzadilla, Nelson A; Hernández-Medina, José A; Chuan-Nuez, Pascual

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with cardiovascular events. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a cardiovascular risk marker. The aim of this study is to determine whether hsCRP is useful in evaluating ED. In 121 patients with ED, age, ED type and severity, time since onset of ED, weight, height, BMI, body fat percentage, waist and hip circumference, hsCRP and hormone profile were studied. Patients were classified as low or moderate-high cardiovascular risk based on hsCRP levels. A descriptive and univariate study was performed. A logistic regression was used to establish factors associated with low versus moderate-high cardiovascular risk and hsCRP. Most patients had moderate-severe ED (70%). 74% had a moderate-high cardiovascular risk based on hsCRP levels, and 33.9 and 34.7% had hypogonadism according to total (TT) and free testosterone. In the univariate analysis, a relationship between hsCRP and TT and physical examination variables was observed (p cardiovascular risk was found in the hypogonadic group (OR: 5.51; 95% CI: 1.185-25.662) and waist- to-hip ratio (p = 0.008; OR: 1.361; 95% CI: 1.075-1.612). A majority of patients with ED have high cardiovascular risk based on hsCRP levels and there is an association with hypogonadism and obesity. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Relation of Serum Leptin and Adiponectin Level to Serum C-Reactive Protein: The INTERLIPID Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Despite considerable study, the relevance of leptin and adiponectin for atherosclerosis development is still unsettled. We investigated relations of serum leptin and adiponectin to serum C-reactive protein (CRP, using the INTERLIPID dataset on Japanese emigrants living in Hawaii and Japanese in Japan. Design and Methods. Serum leptin, adiponectin, and CRP were measured by standardized methods in men and women of ages 40 to 59 years from two population samples, one Japanese-American in Hawaii (83 men, 89 women and the other Japanese in central Japan (111 men, 104 women. Participants with CRP >10 mg/L were excluded. Results. Sex-specific multiple linear regression analyses, with log-transformed leptin and adiponectin (log-leptin, log-adipo, site (Hawaii = 1, Japan = 0, SBP, HbA1c, smoking (cigarettes/day, and physical activity index score of the Framingham Offspring Study as covariates, showed that log-leptin directly related and log-adipo inversely related to log-CRP for both sexes (Ps < 0.05 to <0.01. Addition to the model of BMI and interaction terms (BMI × log-leptin, BMI × log-adipo, SITE × log-leptin, SITE × log-adipo resulted in disappearance of statistical significance except for direct relation of log-leptin to log-CRP in men (P=0.006. Conclusions. Leptin directly related to CRP independent of BMI and other confounding factors in men but not in women.

  11. Elevated C-reactive protein in adolescents: roles of stress and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Carissa A; Matthews, Karen A; Hall, Martica

    2013-06-01

    Psychological stress can up-regulate inflammatory processes and increase disease risk. In the context of stress, differences in how individuals cope might have implications for health. The goal of this study was to evaluate associations among stress, coping, and inflammation in a sample of African American and white adolescents. Adolescents (n = 245) completed self-report measures of stressful life events and coping, provided daily diary reports of interpersonal conflict for 7 days, and provided fasting blood samples for assessment of C-reactive protein (CRP). In regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, and socioeconomic status, there were no significant associations between stress and CRP, but significant interactions between stress and coping emerged. For adolescents reporting more unpleasant stressful life events in the past 12 months, positive engagement coping was inversely associated with CRP (β= -.19, p adolescents reporting fewer stressful life events. Positive engagement coping was significantly and inversely associated with CRP in the context of interpersonal stress, whether measured as stressful life events reflecting interpersonal conflict (e.g., arguments with parents or siblings, conflict between adults in the home, and friendship ended) or frequency of arguments with others reported in daily diaries. Disengagement coping was unrelated to CRP. Findings suggest that positive engagement coping is associated with lower levels of inflammation, but only when adolescents are challenged by significant stress.

  12. [Predictive value of C-reactive protein in emerging non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, F; Wang, L M; Ji, C P; Liu, Z L; Yang, C X; Wang, Z M; Wu, S L

    2016-08-20

    Objective: To investigate the predictive value of C-reactive protein (CRP) in emerging non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed. A total of 101510 employees of Kailuan Group Company who underwent physical examination from July 2006 to October 2007 were enrolled as study subjects. The employees with a history of drinking, fatty liver disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, and malignant tumors and incomplete data were excluded. Finally 25843 employees were enrolled in the cohort study. According to the baseline CRP level, these employees were divided into CRP 3 mg/L group. The detection rate of emerging NAFLD was compared between groups, and the multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyze the risk of NAFLD in each group. Results: With the increasing CRP level, age, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, waist circumference, body mass index, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, serum uric acid, and the proportion of male patients tended to increase (P 3 mg/L group (χ (2)= 92.10,Pfactors such as age, sex, and waist circumference were corrected, the risk of NAFLD in the CRP 1-3 mg/L group and CRP > 3 mg/L group was 1.09 (95%CI1.01-1.17) and 1.24 (95%CI1.13-1.35) times that in the CRP factor for the development of NAFLD.

  13. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and C-reactive Protein Measurements and Their Relevance in Clinical Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Christopher; Bell, Lauren N; Liang, Hong; Haykal, Rasha; Kaiksow, Farah; Mazza, Joseph J; Yale, Steven H

    2016-12-01

    Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are widely used laboratory markers of systemic inflammation. A thorough understanding of the similarities and differences between these two serological markers, including factors that affect measurements, is necessary for the proper utilization and interpretation of ESR and CRP. This review summarizes the current published literature (searched on MEDLINE through February 2016) surrounding the history and utilization of ESR and CRP, and examines factors that affect ESR and CRP measurements and discordance amongst these two inflammatory markers. As ESR and CRP lack sensitivity or specificity, these tests should be used only in combination with clinical history and physical exam for diagnosis and monitoring of pathological conditions. The clinical application of these tests in diagnosis is best applied to conditions in which there is high or low clinical probability of disease. Importantly, discrepancies between ESR and CRP measurements commonly have been reported in both inpatient and outpatient settings and this problem may be particularly prevalent in chronic inflammatory diseases. Numerous physiological factors, including noninfectious conditions and resolution of inflammation can contribute to abnormally high ESR/low CRP readings or vice versa. Although discordance may be encountered in certain settings, proper utilization of ESR and CRP measurements continues to play an important role in clinical management of many inflammatory and other conditions.

  14. Sensitivity of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and C-reactive Protein in Childhood Bone and Joint Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Markku J. T.; Kallio, Pentti E.; Peltola, Heikki

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the examination of clinical signs, several laboratory markers have been measured for diagnostics and monitoring of pediatric septic bone and joint infections. Traditionally erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and leukocyte cell count have been used, whereas C-reactive protein (CRP) has gained in popularity. We monitored 265 children at ages 3 months to 15 years with culture-positive osteoarticular infections with a predetermined series of ESR, CRP, and leukocyte count measurements. On admission, ESR exceeded 20 mm/hour in 94% and CRP exceeded 20 mg/L in 95% of the cases, the mean (± standard error of the mean) being 51 ± 2 mm/hour and 87 ± 4 mg/L, respectively. ESR normalized in 24 days and CRP in 10 days. Elevated CRP gave a slightly better sensitivity in diagnostics than ESR, but best sensitivity was gained with the combined use of ESR and CRP (98%). Elevated ESR or CRP was seen in all cases during the first 3 days. Measuring ESR and CRP on admission can help the clinician rule out an acute osteoarticular infection. CRP normalizes faster than ESR, providing a clear advantage in monitoring recovery. Level of Evidence: Level II, diagnostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19533263

  15. Cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function and C-reactive protein levels in nonsmoking individuals with diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Fisioterapia, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Lopes, S.L.B. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Medicina, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Benze, B.G. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Estatística, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Estatística, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Del Vale, A.M.; Leal, A.M.O. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Medicina, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness and pulmonary function and the relationship with metabolic variables and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). Nineteen men with diabetes and 19 age- and gender-matched control subjects were studied. All individuals were given incremental cardiopulmonary exercise and pulmonary function tests. In the exercise test, maximal workload (158.3±22.3 vs 135.1±25.2, P=0.005), peak heart rate (HR{sub peak}: 149±12 vs 139±10, P=0.009), peak oxygen uptake (VO{sub 2peak}: 24.2±3.2 vs 18.9±2.8, P<0.001), and anaerobic threshold (VO{sub 2VT}: 14.1±3.4 vs 12.2±2.2, P=0.04) were significantly lower in individuals with diabetes than in control subjects. Pulmonary function test parameters, blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides, HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol), and CRP plasma levels were not different in control subjects and individuals with DM. No correlations were observed between hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c), CRP and pulmonary function test and cardiopulmonary exercise test performance. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that nonsmoking individuals with DM have decreased cardiorespiratory fitness that is not correlated with resting pulmonary function parameters, HbA1c, and CRP plasma levels.

  16. Dual-Quantum-Dots-Labeled Lateral Flow Strip Rapidly Quantifies Procalcitonin and C-reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, XiaoPing; Huang, YunYe; Lin, ZhongShi; Xu, Liang; Yu, Hao

    2016-03-01

    In the article, a dual-quantum-dots-labeled (dual-QDs-labeled) lateral flow strip (LFS) method was developed for the simultaneous and rapid quantitative detection of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood. Two QD-antibody conjugates with different fluorescence emission spectra were produced and sprayed on the LFS to capture PCT and CRP in the blood. Furthermore, a double antibody sandwich method for PCT and, meanwhile, a competitive inhibition method for CRP were employed in the LFS. For PCT and CRP in serum assayed by the dual-QDs-labeled LFS, their detection sensitivities reached 0.1 and 1 ng/mL, respectively, and their linear quantitative detection ranges were from 0.3 to 200 ng/mL and from 50 to 250 μg/mL, respectively. There was little evidence that the PCT and CRP assays would be interfered with each other. The correlations for testing CRP and PCT in clinical samples were 99.75 and 97.02 %, respectively, between the dual-QDs-labeled LFS we developed and commercial methods. The rapid quantification of PCT and CRP on dual-QDs-labeled LFS is of great clinical value to distinguish inflammation, bacterial infection, or viral infection and to provide guidance for the use of antibiotics or other medicines.

  17. C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement in geriatric patients hospitalized for acute infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Lauretani, Fulvio; Nouvenne, Antonio; Porro, Emanuela; Fanelli, Guido; Maggio, Marcello; Meschi, Tiziana

    2017-01-01

    The physiology of inflammatory response is modified by the aging process and is substantially affected by multimorbidity and disability. Infection is the most frequent cause of acute inflammation in both adult and older subjects. C-reactive protein (CRP) is the most used biomarker of inflammation, and a substantial amount of literature has demonstrated its importance and clinical usefulness in adult subjects. However, the clinical significance of serum CRP determination has not been completely clarified in older subjects with acute infection, especially in the light of the age-related rearrangements in immunity and cytokine production. Thus, in the present review, we focus on the existing knowledge about serum CRP level interpretation in geriatric patients hospitalized with acute infection. Our aims were to determine the significance of CRP measurement at hospital admission for establishing a diagnosis of infection and/or a prognosis and to evaluate whether it is indicated to repeat hs-CRP measurements during hospital stay for monitoring disease course and, possibly, guiding the discharge timing. We concluded that CRP dosage at hospital admission is helpful to detect acute infection, and particularly sepsis, in geriatric patients, and that CRP elevation may provide valuable short-term prognostic information. At the current state of art, serial CRP measurements are instead not indicated to monitor disease course and plan hospital discharge in this setting. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Flaxseed oil supplementation decreases C-reactive protein levels in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Joana R N; Alencastro, Mariana Gascue de; Konrath, Anita Vieceli; Cargnin, Marina; Manfro, Roberto Ceratti

    2012-12-01

    Malnutrition and chronic inflammation in dialysis patients negatively impact their survival prognosis, and nutrients, such as omega-3 oils, are postulated to reduce proinflammatory response. In this randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled trial, we investigated the effects of flaxseed oil (FO) on the inflammatory state of patients with chronic renal failure undergoing renal replacement therapy with hemodialysis (HD). We hypothesized that FO supplementation lowers C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. One hundred sixty patients with chronic renal failure who received HD therapy of 3 dialysis units over a 3-month period in South Brazil were included. The patients received blind doses of FO (1 g twice a day) and placebo (mineral oil, 1 g twice a day) for a period of 120 days. Inflammation was observed in 89 patients (61%) at the beginning of the study. There was a correlation between CRP and the body mass index (R(s) = 0.22; P = .022) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (R(s) = -0.23; P = .032), and the CRP levels decreased significantly over time in the group that received FO compared with the control group (P oil group (P = .04). We conclude that the administration of FO decreases the CRP levels and that inflammation in HD patients appears to be correlated to their body mass index and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Studies with a larger number of patients and over a longer duration are necessary to corroborate these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of serum uric acid with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeisi, A; Ostovar, A; Vahdat, K; Rezaei, P; Darabi, H; Moshtaghi, D; Nabipour, I

    2017-02-01

    To explore the independent correlation between serum uric acid and low-grade inflammation (measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hs-CRP) in postmenopausal women. A total of 378 healthy Iranian postmenopausal women were randomly selected in a population-based study. Circulating hs-CRP levels were measured by highly specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and an enzymatic calorimetric method was used to measure serum levels of uric acid. Pearson correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression and logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between uric acid and hs-CRP levels. A statistically significant correlation was seen between serum levels of uric acid and log-transformed circulating hs-CRP (r = 0.25, p uric acid levels (β = 0.20, p uric acid levels (odds ratio =1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.96). Higher serum uric acid levels were positively and independently associated with circulating hs-CRP in healthy postmenopausal women.

  20. Multimeric stability of human C-reactive protein in archived specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiling Li

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is a marker of inflammation and a risk predictor of cardiovascular disease. Current CRP assays are focused on the quantification of the CRP levels as pentamers. However, CRP can be present as other multimeric forms. There will be a market need to measure the CRP multimeric structure in addition to the levels in human populations. To meet this need, we investigated whether the long-term archived samples could be used instead of freshly collected samples.The specimens of serum, plasma and tissues were collected from transgenic rats expressing the human CRP. These samples were stored at 4°C, -20°C and -80°C for different periods. Non-denaturing Western blot analysis was used to observe the influence of storage conditions to multimeric structures of human CRP. Our results showed that there was no difference on multimeric structures of human CRP between samples stored at 4°C, -20°C and -80°C, between samples stored at -80°C for twenty-four hours and three months, and between plasma and serum.This study implicated that archived samples stored at these conditions in those large longitudinal studies could be used for investigating the multimeric structures of CRP. Our report may speed up these researches and save labors and budget by enabling them to use currently available archived samples rather than freshly collected samples.

  1. Circadian Misalignment Increases C-Reactive Protein and Blood Pressure in Chronic Shift Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Mistretta, Joseph; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-04-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classical risk factors. Shift workers' behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers, independent of differences in work stress, food quality, and other factors that are likely to differ between night and day shifts. Thus, our objectives were to determine the independent effect of circadian misalignment on 24-h high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; a marker of systemic inflammation) and blood pressure levels-cardiovascular disease risk factors-in chronic shift workers. Chronic shift workers undertook two 3-day laboratory protocols that simulated night work, comprising 12-hour inverted behavioral and environmental cycles (circadian misalignment) or simulated day work (circadian alignment), using a randomized, crossover design. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h hs-CRP by 11% ( p shift workers. This may help explain the increased inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers.

  2. Predicting Outcome of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis With a Single Measurement of C-Reactive Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Bernardino, Luis

    2016-06-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, shows high serum levels in invasive bacterial infections. We investigated the potential of a single CRP measurement at different phases of acute childhood bacterial meningitis to predict outcomes. Using whole-blood finger-prick samples with no centrifugation, CRP was measured quantitatively on arrival and on day 3 or 4 in children participating in 2 prospective, randomized, double-blind treatment studies conducted in Latin America or Angola. The results were compared with patient outcomes. Although initial CRP values from 669 children gave useful prognostic information, the 3rd or 4th day measurements taken from 275 children associated significantly with seizures, slow recovery and low scores on the Glasgow Outcome Scale, with odds ratios for CRP values above the median (62 mg/L) ranging from 2 to 6, 2 to 5, and 3 to 5 (Latin America-Angola), respectively. Hearing impairment, although not full deafness, was 3 to 7 times more likely if CRP was above the median soon after hospitalization. Especially in resource-poor settings, clinicians have few simple-enough tools to identify the child with meningitis who requires maximum attention. CRP is a worthy addition.

  3. Genistein Precipitated Hypothyroidism, Altered Leptin and C-Reactive Protein Synthesis in Pregnant Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awobajo, F O; Onokpite, B O; Ali, Y M; Babaleye, T A; Uzor, P O; Tijani, K O

    2015-12-20

    Genistein is an isoflavone constituent of soya. This study examined the mechanism by which genistein produced adverse effects in pregnant laboratory rats. Pregnant rats were divided into control (Con) and genistein (Gen) force fed (2 mg/kg) groups. At terminal gestation day (GD) ranging from 0-20, the rats were sacrificed, and blood samples and amniotic fluids were collected. Thyroid hormone, C-reactive protein (CRP) and leptin assay was carried using the blood samples. Leptin was also assayed in the placenta and amniotic fluid supernatant. Oral exposure of pregnant rats to genistein significantly altered maternal T3, (GD18; Con 1.65 ± 0.01, Gen 1.03 ± 0.04 nmol/L), T4 (GD6; Con 29.60 ± 0.00, Gen 36.04 ± 1.29 nmol/L), Leptin (Placenta GD20; Con 0.08 ± 0.01, Gen 0.31 ± 0.02 ng/ml, amniotic fluid ;GD 20; Con 0.02 ± 0.00, Gen 0.35 ± 0.05 ng/ml) in genistein group. These changes were accompanied with loss of embryonic implants and a decrease in fetal and placental weights. The CRP level was significantly decreased and increased at the onset and toward late pregnancy respectively. Oral exposure of pregnant rats to genistein precipitated hypothyroidism, altered some metabolic hormones with a reduction in fetal and placental growth and increased resorption of embryonic implants.

  4. Elevated Serum C-Reactive Protein and Markers of Sleep Disordered Breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Constance Wiener

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies indicated sleep-disordered breathing (SDB is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD. Systemic inflammation is recognized as a risk factor for CVD. Studies examining SDB and inflammation are limited. Methods. We studied sleep duration, snoring, snorting, and daytime sleepiness, and an additive SDB score. The main outcome was a C-reactive protein (CRP of >1 mg/dL. Results. Snoring, snorting, daytime sleepiness, and sleeping >7 or <7 hours, and the additive score were significantly associated with high CRP. The additive score was not associated in men but moderately associated in women in a multivariable model adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, smoking, hypertension, alcohol intake, physical activity, body mass index, depression, diabetes, hypertension, and total cholesterol (P-interaction =0.42. For race/ethnicity, the association was strongest in Mexican Americans/others, modest in Non-Hispanic whites, and absent in Non-Hispanic blacks (P-interaction =0.07. Conclusions. The association between SDB and high CRP was present mainly in women and Mexican Americans, implying SDB has a residual, independent association with inflammation after controlling for lifestyle and metabolic risk factors like BMI, physical activity, depression, diabetes, and cholesterol.

  5. Camera phone-based quantitative analysis of C-reactive protein ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeough, Cathy M; O'Driscoll, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate the use of a camera phone as a low-cost optical detector for quantitative analysis of a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The camera phone was used to acquire images of the ELISA carried out in a conventional 96 well plate. Colorimetric analysis of the images was used to determine a standard curve that exhibited excellent agreement with a fitted 4-parameter logistic model (R²=0.998). The limit of detection (LOD) for this approach was determined to be 0.026 ± 0.002 μg/ml (1.035 ± 0.079 μM) CRP. Furthermore, these results were found to be in very close agreement with measurements obtained for the same assay using a laboratory-based instrument. These findings indicate the basic technology to enable low-cost quantitative home-based monitoring of an important clinical biomarker of inflammatory disease may already be present in the patient's home.

  6. Sleep-disordered breathing and C-reactive protein in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eyck, Annelies; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; De Winter, Benedicte Y; Ramet, Jose; Van Gaal, Luc; De Backer, Wilfried; Verhulst, Stijn L

    2014-05-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is common among overweight and obese children. It is a risk factor for several health complications, including cardiovascular disease. Inflammatory processes leading to endothelial dysfunction are a possible mechanism linking SDB and cardiovascular disease. Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is independently correlated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in adults. Our goal is to evaluate the relationship between CRP and OSAS in overweight and obese children and adolescents. One hundred and twenty children were prospectively studied (85 without OSAS, 20 mild OSAS, 15 moderate-to-severe OSAS). All subjects underwent polysomnography, and a blood sample was taken to determine CRP levels. No significant differences were found in CRP between subjects with or without OSAS, and no correlations were found between CRP and OSAS severity, despite the relationship between CRP and BMI (r = 0.21, p = 0.015) and between CRP and fat mass (r = 0.31, p obesity but are not influenced by SDB in obese children and adolescents; hence, this in contrast to that in adult population.

  7. Prediction of the Grade of Acute Cholecystitis by Plasma Level of C-Reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabul Gurbulak, Esin; Gurbulak, Bunyamin; Akgun, Ismail Ethem; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Battal, Muharrem; Fevzi Celayir, Mustafa; Demir, Uygar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute cholecystitis is the most common complication of gallbladder stones. Today, Tokyo guidelines criteria are recommended for diagnosis, grading, and management of acute cholecystitis. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) at different cut-off values to predict the severity of the disease and its possible role in grading the disease with regard to the guideline. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective study, analyzing 682 cases out of consecutive 892 patients with acute cholecystitis admitted to two different general surgery clinics in Istanbul, Turkey. Records of patients diagnosed with acute cholecystitis were screened retrospectively from the hospital computer database between January 2011 and July 2014. A total of 210 patients with concomitant diseases causing high CRP levels were excluded from the study. The criteria of Tokyo guidelines were used in grading the severity of acute cholecystitis, and patients were divided into 3 groups. CRP values at the time of admission were analyzed and compared among the groups. Results: Mean CRP levels of groups were found to be significantly different, 18.96 mg/L in Group I, 133.51 mg/L in Group II, and 237.23 mg/L in Group III (P acute phase reactant that increases rapidly in various inflammatory processes, can be accepted as a strong predictor in classifying different grades of the disease, and treatment can be reliably planned according to this classification. PMID:26023353

  8. Immunochemical recognition of the binding of C-reactive protein to solid-phase phosphorylethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, J M

    1988-06-01

    The influence of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, trypsin digestion and mercaptoethanol treatment of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the CRP binding to solid-phase phosphorylethanolamine (PE) has been investigated. Nine monoclonal antibodies reacting with CRP could be divided into at least 2 well-defined groups: one group of 6-7 monoclonals interfering with the binding of CRP to PE (mainly represented by monoclonal 2) and the not interfering with the binding of CRP to PE (mainly represented by monoclonal 5). Trypsin digestion resulted in sequence identified CRP fragments still able to bind to PE and detectable by monoclonal 5 but not by monoclonal 2. On the other hand, binding of CRP to PE was abolished by mercaptoethanol treatment. These results, together with the estimation of the extent of the antigenicity of the PE binding site and the characteristics of the hydrophobicity profile of CRP, suggest that most of the hydrophilic sequences contribute to the PE binding region except a non-overlapping region defined by monoclonal 5. Most probably, some of these sequences are located inside or around the internal bisulphide bridge of each monomer of the pentameric CRP.

  9. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Darío BRAVO-TOBAR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35, II (n = 29, and III (n = 18. A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease.

  10. C-reactive protein and metabolic syndrome in youth: a strong relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Antônio C; Oliveira, Ana M; Adan, Luis F; Oliveira, Nelson F; Silva, Agnaluce M; Ladeia, Ana M

    2008-05-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is on the rise in youth. As high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is associated with cardiovascular/metabolic disorders, we evaluated the association between MS and its components and hs-CRP in a sample of Brazilian overweight and obese youth. A total of 407 students (229 girls, 273 with excessive weight, 11.3+/-3.2 years) were evaluated. Measurement included BMI, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure, lipids, insulin, and hs-CRP. Excessive weight was defined using BMI z -score; MS by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III. Subjects were classified into two groups: with MS (n=72) and without (n=335). hs-CRP means and medians were higher in MS group (1.41 mg/l vs. 1.06 mg/l, Plow HDL-c (P=0.023) were significant; adjustment of hs-CRP for BMI z-score eliminated the previous association, except for the number of MS components (nMSc) (Pconfidence interval (CI), 4.7-13.4; P=0.000), hypertension (OR, 2.3; CI, 1.3-4.2; P=0.003), and hypertriglyceridemia (OR, 2.3; CI, 1.5-3.7; Pyouth, hs-CRP is strongly related with MS and its components, and is also determined by the body composition. This association indicates a precocious proinflammatory state.

  11. Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein as Useful Surrogate Markers for Evaluating CKD Risk in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsun Chuang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of homocysteine and C-reactive protein (CRP as potential markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD in adults in Taiwan, and to identify associations between these factors and CKD, stratifying by gender. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed multi-center data retrospectively. Data were collected from 22,043 adult Taiwanese at Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital from 2005 to 2011. Smoking/drinking history, personal medical/medication history, pregnancy, fasting times as well as laboratory parameters, including homocysteine and CRP were measured and analyzed. Results: Significant differences were observed between four homocysteine and CRP quartiles in eGFR and CKD. For males, only one model showed significant associations between plasma homocysteine and CKD, while in females, all three models showed significant associations with CKD. On the contrary, the gender difference in the case of CRP was opposite. Combined homocysteine and CRP were associated with CKD in males but not in females. Conclusion: Among Taiwanese adults, plasma homocysteine is associated with CKD in females and plasma hsCRP is associated with CKD in males. High hsCRP/high homocysteine is associated with elevated CKD risk in male. Our results suggest that homocysteine and hsCRP may be useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults.

  12. High-sensitive C-Reactive Protein as a Marker for Inflammation in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Keren; Ringel-Kulka, Tamar; Martin, Christopher F; Maharshak, Nitsan; Ringel, Yehuda

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies demonstrated low-grade inflammation in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, these studies have been relatively small and do not enable examination of this factor in different subtypes of IBS and the possibility of confounding effects of comorbidities that may be associated with inflammatory responses. To investigate the association between high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and the diagnosis of IBS, IBS subtypes, symptoms' severity, and IBS-associated comorbidities. This cross-sectional study uses data from a large matched case-control study of IBS subjects and healthy controls (HC). hs-CRP levels were measured in all subjects. IBS diagnosis was determined by Rome III criteria, negative screening blood tests, and normal colonoscopy. Subjects were evaluated for IBS severity and associated pain and psychological comorbidities. A total of 242 IBS patients and 244 HC were studied. Median hs-CRP levels in the IBS group were significantly higher than in HC (1.80; interquartile range, 0.7 to 4.04 mg/L vs. 1.20, interquartile range, 0.5 to 2.97 mg/L respectively, Pinflammation in the pathogenesis and/or clinical presentation of IBS.

  13. Evaluation of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluid C-reactive protein in patients with peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Kumaresan; Padmanabhan, Giri; Vijayaraghavan, Bhooma

    2016-05-01

    Severe peritonitis causing death is one of the most devastating complications of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Since the predictive value of C-reactive protein (CRP) in PD fluid has not been assessed, the objective of the present study is to evaluate its predictive value and clinical correlation in patients on PD with peritonitis. One hundred and twenty patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) were enrolled and their serum and fluid CRP (Fl. CRP) were evaluated at the start of CAPD. All patients who developed peritonitis were further evaluated for serum and fluid CRP. The patients were categorized into four groups, namely: normal patients (control group), patients with peritonitis, patients with peritonitis leading to catheter removal, and death due to peritonitis. Sixty-five patients developed peritonitis of whom, catheter removal was performed in eight patients. Five patients died due to peritonitis-related complications. Fl. CRP showed a significant difference among the three groups, unlike S. CRP. Estimation of CRP in the peritoneal fluid may be a useful marker to monitor the onset of peritonitis.

  14. C-reactive protein level and obesity as cardiovascular risk factors in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Ülkü Uludağ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of C-reactive protein(CRP level elevation and obesity for the increased cardiovasculardisease risk in polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS.Methods: A hundred and nine patients with PCOS and 30age matched healthy volunteers with regular menstrualcycle are involved in the study. PCOS group is furthersubdivided into three subgroups according to the bodymass index (BMI. Subgroups included 54 with BMI30. Blood samplesfor glucose, insulin, uric acid, and CRP were collected inthe morning after overnight fasting (12 hours. Homeostasismodel assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IRwas calculated. Results: Fasting blood glucose, insulin,and HOMA-IR was significantly higher in PCOS group(p=0.02, p=0.01 and p=0.02. CRP level was higher insubgroup with BMI>30. High CRP level in PCOS wasfound to be independent from BMI (p30.When compared with the control group high insulin levelwas the only to be statistically significant in obese PCOSpatients (p=0.005. HOMA-IR was higher in PCOS subgroupwith BMI>30 when compared with controls and thePCOS subgroup with BMI<25 (p<0.001, p= 0.003.Conclusion: Obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and high CRPlevels are seemed to be related and potentiating eachother in PCOS. Struggling with obesity is one of the mostimportant issues for preventive medicine.Key words: PCOS, CRP, obesity, cardiovascular risk

  15. Baseline C-reactive protein is associated with incident cancer and survival in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with risk of incident cancer in the general population and early death in patients with cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 10,408 individuals from the Danish general population who had CRP...... measured at baseline were observed for up to 16 years; 1,624 developed cancer, and of these, 998 patients died during follow-up. Follow-up was 100% complete. We excluded individuals with a cancer diagnosis at baseline. RESULTS: Baseline CRP levels more than 3 versus less than 1 mg/L were associated...... with multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios of 1.3 (95% CI, 1.0 to 1.6) for cancer of any type, 2.2 (95% CI, 1.0 to 4.6) for lung cancer, 1.9 (95% CI, 0.8 to 4.6) for colorectal cancer, and 0.7 (95% CI, 0.4 to 1.4) for breast cancer. Corresponding hazard ratios for the highest versus the lowest quintile of baseline...

  16. Does C-reactive protein independently predict mortality in adult community-acquired bacteremia patients with known sepsis severity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim O; Jensen, Thøger G; Kolmos, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated whether sepsis severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level on admission prognostically corroborated or annulled each other in adult patients with incident community-acquired bacteremia (Funen, Denmark, 2000-2008). We used logistic regression and area under the receiver operating...

  17. Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Relationships between Perceived Stress and C-reactive Protein in Men and Women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbosa-Leiker, C.; Roper, V.; McPherson, S.; Lei, M.; Wright, B.; Hoekstra, T.; Kostick, M.

    2014-01-01

    To date, an examination of the longitudinal relationship between perceived stress and C-reactive protein (CRP) is limited. We explored the relationship between perceived stress and CRP concurrently and across 2 and 4years in 383 men and women. Multiple linear regressions examined the cross-sectional

  18. Evaluation of C-reactive protein as an inflammatory biomarker in rabbits for vaccine nonclinical safety studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Destexhe, E.; Prinsen, M.K.; Schöll, I. van; Kuper, C.F.; Garçon, N.; Veenstra, S.; Segal, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory reactions are one of the potential safety concerns that are evaluated in the framework of vaccine safety testing. In nonclinical studies, the assessment of the inflammation relies notably on the measurement of biomarkers. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase plasma

  19. Usefulness of consecutive C-reactive protein measurements in follow-up of severe community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, A H W; Oosterheert, J J; Hak, E; Hoepelman, A I M

    Despite the introduction of new inflammatory markers, C-reactive protein (CRP) remains commonly used in patients hospitalised with severe infections. However, evidence on the usefulness of consecutive CRP measurements is still unclear. The clinical relevance of consecutive CRP measurements was

  20. C-reactive protein levels in relation to various features of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease among obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Esther; Anty, Rodolphe; Tordjman, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major hepatic consequence of obesity. It has been suggested that the high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an obesity-independent surrogate marker of severity of NAFLD, especially development of non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH...

  1. How age and sex affect the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemons, L.; Klooster, P.M. ten; Vonkeman, H.E.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Glas, C.A.; Laar, M.A. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are two commonly used measures of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As current RA treatment guidelines strongly emphasize early and aggressive treatment aiming at fast remission, optimal measurement of

  2. Prognostic value of anemia and C-reactive protein levels in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hugo J A; De Klerk, John M H; Fijnheer, Rob; Heggelman, Ben G F; Dubois, Stefan V.; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Kwee, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prognostic value of pretreatment anemia, pretreatment elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and 6-month posttreatment anemia in patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin, and

  3. In patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration, physical activity may influence C-reactive protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Association of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with C-reactive protein (CRP) was previously reported, indicating a relation to systemic low-grade inflammation. However, visual impairment limits physical activity, and physical activity modulates CRP levels. Here, we investigated...

  4. Early rise in C-reactive protein is a marker for infective complications in laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nason, Gregory J

    2014-02-01

    Infective complications are the most significant cause of morbidity associated with elective colorectal surgery. It can sometimes be difficult to differentiate complications from the normal postoperative course. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant which has been reported to be predictive of postoperative infective complications.

  5. Glycemic index and glycemic load and their association with C-reactive protein and incident type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenbergh, van G.J.; Kuijsten, A.; Sijbrands, E.J.G.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether the Glycemic Index (GI) or Glycemic Load (GL) of a diet is associated with C-reactive Protein (CRP) and risk of type 2 diabetes in a prospective study. Materials and Methods. Our analysis included 4,366 participants who did not have diabetes at baseline. During

  6. Meat consumption and its association with C-reactive protein and incident type 2 diabetes : The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenbergh, van G.J.; Kuijsten, A.; Tigcheler, B.; Sijbrands, E.J.G.; Rooij, van F.J.A.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether intake of different types of meat is associated with circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and risk of type 2 diabetes in a prospective cohort study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Our analysis included 4,366 Dutch participants who did not have diabetes at baseline.

  7. Meat consumption and its association with C-reactive protein and incident type 2 diabetes: The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. van Woudenbergh (Geertruida); A. Kuijsten (Anneleen); B. Tigcheler (Basia); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); A. Hofman (Albert); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); E.J.M. Feskens (Edith)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - To investigate whether intake of different types of meat is associated with circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and risk of type 2 diabetes in a prospective cohort study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Our analysis included 4,366 Dutch participants who did not have diabetes

  8. Relationship of C-reactive protein with components of the metabolic syndrome in normal-weight and overweight elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, T.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Kluft, C.; Kok, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is known to be elevated in the metabolic syndrome. We aimed to explore in more detail the relationship between CRP and other components of the metabolic syndrome in a general population of 605 Dutch elderly individuals aged 65¿84 years. Methods and results Data were

  9. Plasma vitamin D metabolites and C-reactive protein in stage-stop racing endurance sled dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoo, J W; Downey, R L; Griffitts, C; Horst, R J; Levine, C B; Childs, R M; Wakshlag, J J

    2015-01-01

    Dogs are a unique model for examining the effects of exercise on vitamin D status because of their lack of vitamin D synthesis by UV exposure. In addition, the inflammatory response may be associated with hypovitaminosis D. To investigate the effects of several days of endurance exercise on plasma vitamin D (25-(OH)D3, 24,25-(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)D3) and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in stage-stop racing sled dogs. 12 racing sled dogs and 8 control dogs. Blood was collected before the race and immediately after racing on days 2 and 8. Plasma vitamin D metabolites and serum CRP concentrations were measured. Racing dogs showed a significant increase in 25(OH)D3 on day 2 (P = .027) and day 8 of the race (P Racing dogs had significantly increased CRP concentrations by day 2 (39.3 ± 30.1 μg/mL; P racing sled dogs. This finding was contrary to the hypothesis that decreases in vitamin D status in athletes may be related to the acute phase inflammatory response during exercise. In addition, the increased 24,25(OH)D3 concentrations compared to what is observed in other species suggests metabolic variations in dogs that lead to enhanced disposal of vitamin D. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor on the C-reactive protein promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voleti, Bhavya; Hammond, David J.; Thirumalai, Avinash; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a plasma protein of the innate immune system, is produced by hepatocytes. A critical regulatory region (−42 to −57) on the CRP promoter contains binding site for the IL-6-activated transcription factor C/EBPβ. The IL-1β-activated transcription factor NF-κB binds to a κB site located nearby (−63 to −74). The κB site overlaps an octamer motif (−59 to −66) which is the binding site for the constitutively active transcription factor Oct-1. Oct-1 is known to function both as a transcriptional repressor and as an activator depending upon the promoter context. Also, Oct-1 can regulate gene expression either by binding directly to the promoter or by interacting with other transcription factors bound to the promoter. The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of Oct-1 in regulating CRP expression. In luciferase transactivation assays, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression in Hep3B cells. Deletion of the Oct-1 site from the promoter drastically reduced the cytokine response because the κB site was altered as a consequence of deleting the Oct-1 site. Surprisingly, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited the residual (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. Similarly, deletion of the Oct-1 site reduced the induction of CRP expression in response to overexpressed C/EBPβ, and overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited C/EBPβ-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. We conclude that Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CRP expression and it does so by occupying its cognate site on the promoter and also via other transcription factors by an as yet undefined mechanism. PMID:22750226

  11. Targeting C-reactive protein for the treatment of cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepys, Mark B.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Tennent, Glenys A.; Ruth Gallimore, J.; Kahan, Melvyn C.; Bellotti, Vittorio; Hawkins, Philip N.; Myers, Rebecca M.; Smith, Martin D.; Polara, Alessandra; Cobb, Alexander J. A.; Ley, Steven V.; Andrew Aquilina, J.; Robinson, Carol V.; Sharif, Isam; Gray, Gillian A.; Sabin, Caroline A.; Jenvey, Michelle C.; Kolstoe, Simon E.; Thompson, Darren; Wood, Stephen P.

    2006-04-01

    Complement-mediated inflammation exacerbates the tissue injury of ischaemic necrosis in heart attacks and strokes, the most common causes of death in developed countries. Large infarct size increases immediate morbidity and mortality and, in survivors of the acute event, larger non-functional scars adversely affect long-term prognosis. There is thus an important unmet medical need for new cardioprotective and neuroprotective treatments. We have previously shown that human C-reactive protein (CRP), the classical acute-phase protein that binds to ligands exposed in damaged tissue and then activates complement, increases myocardial and cerebral infarct size in rats subjected to coronary or cerebral artery ligation, respectively. Rat CRP does not activate rat complement, whereas human CRP activates both rat and human complement. Administration of human CRP to rats is thus an excellent model for the actions of endogenous human CRP. Here we report the design, synthesis and efficacy of 1,6-bis(phosphocholine)-hexane as a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CRP. Five molecules of this palindromic compound are bound by two pentameric CRP molecules, crosslinking and occluding the ligand-binding B-face of CRP and blocking its functions. Administration of 1,6-bis(phosphocholine)-hexane to rats undergoing acute myocardial infarction abrogated the increase in infarct size and cardiac dysfunction produced by injection of human CRP. Therapeutic inhibition of CRP is thus a promising new approach to cardioprotection in acute myocardial infarction, and may also provide neuroprotection in stroke. Potential wider applications include other inflammatory, infective and tissue-damaging conditions characterized by increased CRP production, in which binding of CRP to exposed ligands in damaged cells may lead to complement-mediated exacerbation of tissue injury.

  12. Meal-induced increases in C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor α are attenuated by prandial + basal insulin in patients with Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisswenger, P J; Brown, W V; Ceriello, A; Le, N A; Goldberg, R B; Cooke, J P; Robbins, D C; Sarwat, S; Yuan, H; Jones, C A; Tan, M H

    2011-01-01

    Aim To determine if a regimen with prandial + basal insulin compared with basal insulin attenuates post-meal inflammatory and glycative biomarkers in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Methods This test-meal sub-study in the USA is from a previously reported clinical trial comparing the effect on glycaemic control of 24 weeks of thrice-daily pre-meal insulin lispro mix 50 (50% insulin lispro, 50% insulin lispro protamine suspension) or bedtime insulin glargine, both plus metformin. In the sub-study, glucose, insulin, triglycerides, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, methylglyoxal and 3-deoxyglucosone were measured during the post-meal period of a mixed-meal breakfast at the final visit. Prandial + basal (n = 25) and basal (n = 21) insulin were administered at the same times as during the previous 24 weeks. Results Post-meal, the prandial + basal insulin group had significantly higher insulin, lower glucose and triglycerides, as well as lower high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor α and interleukin-6, than the basal insulin group. Glucose incremental area under the concentration curve significantly correlated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, methylglyoxal and 3-deoxyglucosone incremental area under the concentration curve. Insulin incremental area under the concentration curve correlated inversely with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and tumour necrosis factor α incremental area under the concentration curve. However, after adjusting for glucose incremental area under the concentration curve, these inverse correlations were no longer significant. Triglyceride incremental area under the concentration curve was not correlated with any biomarker incremental area under the concentration curve. Conclusions Controlling post-meal hyperglycaemia with prandial + basal insulin in patients with Type 2 diabetes attenuates meal-induced increases in high

  13. Aptamer-conjugated live human immune cell based biosensors for the accurate detection of C-reactive protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a pentameric protein that is present in the bloodstream during inflammatory events, e.g., liver failure, leukemia, and/or bacterial infection. The level of CRP indicates the progress and prognosis of certain diseases; it is therefore necessary to measure CRP levels in the blood accurately. The normal concentration of CRP is reported to be 1-3 mg/L. Inflammatory events increase the level of CRP by up to 500 times; accordingly, CRP is a biomarker of acute inflammatory disease. In this study, we demonstrated the preparation of DNA aptamer-conjugated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (Apt-PBMCs) that specifically capture human CRP. Live PBMCs functionalized with aptamers could detect different levels of human CRP by producing immune complexes with reporter antibody. The binding behavior of Apt-PBMCs toward highly concentrated CRP sites was also investigated. The immune responses of Apt-PBMCs were evaluated by measuring TNF-alpha secretion after stimulating the PBMCs with lipopolysaccharides. In summary, engineered Apt-PBMCs have potential applications as live cell based biosensors and for in vitro tracing of CRP secretion sites.

  14. Evidence for sodium azide as an artifact mediating the modulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase by C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Nuria; Azcutia, Verónica; Matesanz, Nuria; Cercas, Elena; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Peiró, Concepción

    2005-03-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase protein identified as a cardiovascular risk marker. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have investigated the possible direct effects of CRP on the vasculature, using mainly commercial CRP. In the present work, a potential role for CRP as a modulator of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induction was explored. Cultured human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HASMC) were stimulated for 18 hours with 10 ng/mL interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), resulting in a marked increase of iNOS levels and NO production, as determined by Western blotting and nitrite measurement, respectively. Commercial CRP (1 to 100 microg/mL) concentration-dependently inhibited the effects elicited by IL-1beta. Unexpectedly, similar results were observed when the commercial CRP solution was replaced by the corresponding vehicle medium containing growing concentrations of sodium azide. The inhibitory effects of commercial CRP or vehicle medium were lost on sodium azide removal by dialysis. In conclusion, sodium azide from the commercial CRP solution, but not CRP itself, mainly accounts for the inhibitory effect on IL-1beta-evoked iNOS induction and NO release. Care should be taken before attributing any biologic role to commercial CRP containing sodium azide.

  15. Decreased postoperative C-reactive protein production in dogs with pyometra through the use of low-dose ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-Yu; Chang, Shi-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Sheng; Wang, Hsien-Chi

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effects of subanesthetic ketamine in dogs with pyometra on C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations following surgery. Prospective, nonconcealed, alternating allocation controlled trial. Veterinary teaching hospital. Sixteen dogs diagnosed with pyometra. The tentative diagnosis of canine pyometra was based on compatible history, physical examination findings, ultrasonographic findings, and hematological evaluation. Two different anesthesia and analgesic protocols with and without low-dose ketamine were used during and following ovariohysterectomy in 16 female dogs (n = 8 per group) that were diagnosed with naturally occurring pyometra. Dogs were sequentially allocated to treatment groups in an alternating fashion without concealment. Serum was collected before, 24, and 48 hours after surgery for CRP measurement. Perioperative physical parameters in the 2 groups of dogs were similar. The serum concentrations of CRP in both groups were essentially the same before surgery, but significantly increased in the control group and decreased in ketamine group at 48 hours after surgery. Low-dose ketamine attenuated the postoperative concentration of serum CRP in dogs with pyometra compared with dogs that did not receive ketamine in the perioperative period. Further studies are warranted to determine the clinical implications of these findings. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  16. Value of procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, and neopterin in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Lacoma

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Alicia Lacoma1,4, Cristina Prat1,4, Felipe Andreo2,4, Luis Lores3, Juan Ruiz-Manzano2,4, Vicente Ausina1,4, Jose Domínguez1,41Servei de Microbiologia, 2Servei de Pneumologia, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Badalona, Spain; 3Servei de Pneumologia, Hospital de Sant Boi, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain; 4CIBER Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, SpainObjective: The identification of biological markers in order to assess different aspects of COPD is an area of growing interest. The objective of this study was to investigate whether levels of procalcitonin (PCT, C-reactive protein (CRP, and neopterin in COPD patients could be useful in identifying the etiological origin of the exacerbation and assessing its prognosis.Methods: We included 318 consecutive COPD patients: 46 in a stable phase, 217 undergoing an exacerbation, and 55 with pneumonia. A serum sample was collected from each patient at the time of being included in the study. A second sample was also collected 1 month later from 23 patients in the exacerbation group. We compared the characteristics, biomarker levels, microbiological findings, and prognosis in each patient group. PCT and CRP were measured using an immunofluorescence assay. Neopterin levels were measured using a competitive immunoassay.Results: PCT and CRP showed significant differences among the three patient groups, being higher in patients with pneumonia, followed by patients with exacerbation (P < 0.0001. For the 23 patients with paired samples, PCT and CRP levels decreased 1 month after the exacerbation episode, while neopterin increased. Neopterin showed significantly lower levels in exacerbations with isolation of pathogenic bacteria, but no differences were found for PCT and CRP. No significant differences were found when comparing biomarker levels

  17. High C-Reactive Protein Predicts Delirium Incidence, Duration, and Feature Severity After Major Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha M; Dillon, Simon T; Inouye, Sharon K; Ngo, Long H; Fong, Tamara G; Jones, Richard N; Travison, Thomas G; Schmitt, Eva M; Alsop, David C; Freedman, Steven D; Arnold, Steven E; Metzger, Eran D; Libermann, Towia A; Marcantonio, Edward R

    2017-08-01

    To examine associations between the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) measured preoperatively and on postoperative day 2 (POD2) and delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity. Prospective cohort study. Two academic medical centers. Adults aged 70 and older undergoing major noncardiac surgery (N = 560). Plasma CRP was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Delirium was assessed from Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) interviews and chart review. Delirium duration was measured according to number of hospital days with delirium. Delirium feature severity was defined as the sum of CAM-Severity (CAM-S) scores on all postoperative hospital days. Generalized linear models were used to examine independent associations between CRP (preoperatively and POD2 separately) and delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity; prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS, >5 days); and discharge disposition. Postoperative delirium occurred in 24% of participants, 12% had 2 or more delirium days, and the mean ± standard deviation sum CAM-S was 9.3 ± 11.4. After adjusting for age, sex, surgery type, anesthesia route, medical comorbidities, and postoperative infectious complications, participants with preoperative CRP of 3 mg/L or greater had a risk of delirium that was 1.5 times as great (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-2.1) as that of those with CRP less than 3 mg/L, 0.4 more delirium days (P delirium (3.6 CAM-S points higher, P delirium (95% CI = 1.0-2.4) as those in the lowest quartile (≤127.53 mg/L), had 0.2 more delirium days (P delirium (4.5 CAM-S points higher, P delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity. CRP may be useful to identify individuals who are at risk of developing delirium. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Effect of Vitamin D supplementation on symptoms and C-reactive protein in migraine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Mottaghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migarine is the most common headache around the world including Iran. In recent years, Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to a global health problem. A few studies have been determined inverse association between serum levels of Vitamin D with a headache. So, in this study, we investigated the effect of Vitamin D supplementation on symptoms and C-reactive protein (CRP among patients with migraine. Materials and Methods: This study was randomized, double-blind, and controlled-placebo clinical trial. Sixty-five migraine patients aged 10-61 years were included for analysis. Vitamin D was administrated for 10 weeks with 50,000 IU dosage of Vitamin D per week. Multivariate analysis of covariate and univariate analysis of covariate were done to determine the effects of Vitamin D supplementation on symptoms, including severity, duration, frequency of headache, and the headache diary result (HDR. Results: Mean headache frequency and HDR had significant difference among two groups (5.9 ± 7.0 vs. 7.0 ± 6.0, P = 0.06 and 85.0 ± 134.2 vs. 132.1 ± 147.1, P = 0.04. But, a mean difference of headache frequency was marginally significant (P = 0.06. These values were lower among the intervention group compared to placebo group. The association was not observed between CRP with migraine disease. Conclusion: In this study, we shown Vitamin D supplementation may be useful in decreasing frequency of headache attacks and HDR among patients with migraine.

  19. C-Reactive Protein Predicts Incidence of Dementia in an Elderly Asian Community Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pai-Feng; Pan, Wen-Harn; Yip, Bak-Sau; Chen, Rosalind Chia-Yu; Cheng, Hao-Min; Chuang, Shao-Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Many studies have investigated the association between markers for peripheral inflammation and risk of dementia, but the results have been conflicting. We aimed to evaluate the association between a specific inflammation marker, C-reactive protein (CRP), and dementia in an elderly Asian community cohort. The cohort included 1436 individuals (ages 65 and older) from a national representative sample in Taiwan. Dementia incidence was identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for vascular dementia, Alzheimer disease, and nonvascular dementia. Baseline characteristics and CRP levels were determined. A Cox proportional hazard model and Fine and Grays model were adjusted for stroke and competing risk of death to estimate the association between inflammation and development of dementia. During 11.04 years (median) of follow-up, 607 individuals (50.77%) died and 260 individuals (18.11%) were diagnosed with dementia. Those with high CRP had a 55% higher risk of dementia (hazard ratio 1.55; 95% confidence interval 1.21-2.00) compared with those with normal CRP. After adjusting for possible confounding cardiovascular risk factors, high CRP was independently associated with vascular dementia but not Alzheimer disease. In this prospective study of an elderly Asian community cohort with more than 10 years of follow-up, the baseline serum CRP level was associated with future development of vascular dementia, but not Alzheimer disease after adjusting for common cardiovascular risk factors, stroke, and competing risk of death. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic syndrome: prevalence, associated factors, and C-reactive protein: the MADRIC (MADrid RIesgo Cardiovascular) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Maria A; Puig, Juan G; Mora, Marta; Aragón, Rosa; O'Dogherty, Pascual; Antón, José L; Sánchez-Villares, Teresa; Rubio, José M; Rosado, Javier; Torres, Rosa; Marcos, Joaquín; Pallardo, Luis F; Banegas, José R

    2008-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is defined by the clustering of a number of cardiovascular risk factors. The aims of the present study were to estimate the prevalence of MS in Madrid (Spain) by 2 definitions and to investigate its relationship with several sociodemographic factors and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. This was a cross-sectional population study, and participants were 1344 subjects aged 31 to 70 years. Clinical evaluation included data on sociodemographic and cardiovascular background, physical examination, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The CRP levels were determined in a subgroup of 843 subjects. The diagnosis of MS was made according to the 2005 Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of MS was 24.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.3%-26.9%) using the ATP III definition and 30.9% (95% CI, 28.4%-33.3%) using the International Diabetes Federation definition. The overall agreement rate was 91.5% (kappa = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.76-0.83). Prevalence figures by both definitions were higher in men than in women and increased with age. Male sex, older age, low educational level, and physical inactivity were all determinants of ATP III-defined MS. The presence of MS or any of its components was associated with high CRP levels. In a logistic regression analysis, low educational level and waist circumference were the best predictors for high CRP level. The prevalence of MS in the Madrid region is one of the highest in Europe and confirms the strong Spanish regional variability in this syndrome frequency. Some sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, particularly educational level, are predictors for MS and high CRP levels.

  1. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein to monitor treatment outcomes in diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asten, Suzanne Av; Jupiter, Daniel C; Mithani, Moez; La Fontaine, Javier; Davis, Kathryn E; Lavery, Lawrence A

    2017-02-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of the inflammatory markers, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP), in monitoring treatment of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot. We screened 150 charts of patients admitted to our hospital with diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO), confirmed by positive results of bone culture and/or histopathology. We included patients who had an initial ESR/CRP within 72 hours of admission and two reported follow-up values. We dichotomised patients based on the outcomes wound healing, re-infection, recurrent ulceration, re-hospitalisation, additional surgery, re-amputation and death, all within 12 months, and analysed the trajectories of the markers over time. Our primary outcome, DFO remission, was defined as wound healing within 12 months of follow-up without re-infection. We included 122 subjects; 65 patients (53·3%) had a combination of positive culture and histopathology. Factors associated with DFO remission (n = 46) were a lower white blood count (WBC) at admission (P = 0·006) and a higher glomerular filtration rate (GFR, P = 0·049). Factors associated with healing were a lower WBC (P = 0·004), a higher GFR (P = 0·01), longer wound duration before admission (P = 0·01), location of the ulcer on the great toe (P = 0·01) and higher glycated haemoglobin (P = 0·03). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated no associations between DFO remission and other variables collected. Trajectories of the inflammatory markers showed an association between stagnating values of ESR and CRP and poor clinical outcomes. In this study population, the trajectories of both ESR and CRP during 12 months follow-up suggest a predictive role of both inflammatory markers when monitoring treatment of DFO. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Pretreatment elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein as a predictor of malarial complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sachin; Katara, Vidyalakshmi; Bhaskaran, Unnikrishnan; Adappa, Sushma; Chakrapani, Mahabala

    2016-12-30

    Complications of malaria can develop suddenly and unexpectedly. Although various parameters have been associated with severity of malaria, they have not been studied as predictors of these events. Many of the malarial complications are inflammatory in nature, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) could be early markers of these complications and might precede and predict the development of complications. A total of 122 inpatients with uncomplicated newly diagnosed malaria were studied. CRP, ESR, hemoglobin, and platelets were measured before initiating treatment. Patients were monitored closely for the subsequent development of complications based on the World Health Organization's definition of severe malaria. Seven patients (5.7%) had worsening of symptoms compared to the day of admission and had higher pretreatment CRP and increased ESR compared to those patients who did not develop complications. Area under receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.761(p=0.02) for CRP and 0.739 (p = 0.035) for ESR. CRP>124 mg/L and increased ESR (>34.5 mm in the first hour) had a sensitivity of 71.4% and specificity of 79.1%, respectively, for predicting complications of malaria. Other parameters did not reach statistical significance for predicting complications. Elevated CRP and elevated ESR had a negative predictive value of 97.8%. Elevated CRP>124mg/L and increased ESR>34.5 mm in the first hour at the time of diagnosis in patients with uncomplicated malaria identifies patients who might subsequently develop complications of malaria.

  3. Frequency and causes of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate disagreements in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbong, Stephanie; Feldman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often ordered together in patients with suspected infection or inflammation. However, the test results can disagree in as many as 33% of patients. Our aim was to further examine CRP/ESR disagreements and their stability on repeat testing. We analyzed simultaneously ordered CRP and ESR results in 70 adult patients who had been tested on three separate occasions a median of 4 weeks apart. Initial CRP/ESR disagreements occurred in 14 of the 70 patients (20%; 95% CI, 12-31). Only four of these 14 patients had stable CRP/ESR disagreements throughout the study (two with lupus nephritis and one with osteomyelitis had persistent high ESR/normal CRP disagreements and one with rheumatoid arthritis had a persistent high CRP/normal ESR disagreement). The other 10 patients with initial CRP/ESR disagreements later exhibited CRP/ESR agreements. Of the 56 patients with initial CRP/ESR agreements, only 10 developed a CRP/ESR disagreement (or disagreements) on subsequent testing. CRP/ESR disagreements are common in clinical practice. Three mechanisms were identified to explain CRP/ESR disagreements: (i) slight fluctuations in the CRP and ESR around the upper limits of normal for these tests; (ii) development of an intercurrent illness; and (iii) different time courses of CRP and ESR elevations, in which the CRP rose and fell faster than the ESR. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. [Early evaluations of BISAP plus C-reactive protein in predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis].

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    Zheng, Jimin; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Juncha

    2015-03-31

    To explore the early evaluations of Bedside Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis (BISAP) plus C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting the severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP). A total of 114 cases of AP at our hospital over the last 2 years were retrospectively analyzed. The levels of amylase, serum glucose, serum calcium, CRP and D-dimer in 24 hours were measured. According to the evaluation standard, the scores of BISAP, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II), Ranson and computed tomography severity index (CTSI) were obtained. Mild acute pancreatitis (MAP), moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP), severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), death toll and their proportion were compared in different BISAP scores. Correlation analyses were conducted for BISAP scores and laboratory indices, CRP and different scoring systems. We compared the evaluative value of BISAP plus CRP and other scoring systems in SAP. With rising BISAP scores, both severity and mortality increased in acute pancreatitis (χ(2) = 78.616, P APACHE-II, Ranson's, BISAP and CTSI scores (r = 0.407, 0.392, 0.451, 0.427, P < 0.001). When CRP was included into the BISAP scores, the area under the curve (AUC) of predicting SAP was 0.873 and the AUC of predicting death 0.909 so that BISAP score plus CRP had a good predictive value for the severity of AP and death. In clinical practice, the simple BISAP scoring system may predict the severity of AP. And BISAP score plus CRP has a better predictive value for AP.

  5. Relationships Among Changes in C-Reactive Protein and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors With Lifestyle Interventions

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    Young, D.; Camhi, S.; Wu, T.; Hagberg, J.; Stefanick, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Inflammation plays a role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Elevated levels of the inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein (CRP), are cross-sectionally associated with traditional CVD risk factors and are being considered as an emerging CVD risk factor. In a secondary data analysis, we examined changes in CRP and several CVD risk factors after one-year diet and exercise interventions to assess whether CRP changed concurrently with other risk factors, or was independent of the traditional risk factors. Methods and Results Data were analyzed from 143 men and 133 women with dyslipidemia who were randomized to one-year interventions of low-fat diet only, physical activity only, diet plus physical activity, or control. Plasma high-sensitivity CRP, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), fasting and 2-hr blood glucose and insulin, blood pressure (BP), and waist circumference were obtained at baseline and follow-up. Multiple linear regression models were used to predict CRP change based on other risk factor changes, controlling for age, race, alcohol intake, and hormone replacement therapy. Treatment groups were combined for analysis. Baseline mean (SD) CRP levels were 1.3±1.3 (men) and 1.9±1.8 mg/L (women), with mean changes of -0.11±1.3 and -0.17±1.5 mg/L, respectively. Plasma CRP change was negatively associated with TG change in men (p=0.003) and women (p=0.05), positively associated with change in systolic BP in men (p=0.01), but was not associated with changes in the other risk factors. Conclusion Dietary and/or physical activity induced changes in CRP may be largely independent of traditional CVD risk factors in persons with dyslipidemia. PMID:22831953

  6. High sensitivity C-reactive protein in airline pilots with metabolic syndrome.

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    Alonso-Rodríguez, César; Medina-Font, Juan

    2012-05-01

    Airline pilots belong to a relatively high-income, healthy population, with sedentary behavior during their flight activity, who often eat unsuitable meals. We assessed the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and the levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in a population of airline pilot in order to study a possible relationship between the hs-CRP and MS. MS was established according to the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III. hs-CRP was classified into three categories: Low 3 mg x L(-1). The prevalence of MS was 14.8%. The hs-CRP level in the population studied was 1.68 +/- 1.79 mg x L(-1). hs-CRP significantly increased with age. The pilots with MS presented significantly higher hs-CRP levels (median = 1.9 with an interquartile range (IQR) = 2.5 mg x L(-1)) than the pilots without MS (median = 0.9 and IQR = 1.275 mg x L(-1)). MS significantly increased in the groups with high hs-CRP in comparison with pilots with intermediate hs-CRP levels and with those with low hs-CRP levels. A similar association was found between the levels of hs-CRP and the prevalence of MS in the three age groups. The levels of hs-CRP increased in pilots as they presented greater numbers of MS diagnostic criteria. hs-CRP rises significantly in pilots of increasing age, in pilots with MS as compared to those without the syndrome, and in pilots as they present greater numbers of MS diagnostic criteria. The prevalence of MS increased among the groups with higher levels of hs-CRP.

  7. Preoperative C-reactive protein predicts the need for repeated intracerebral brain abscess drainage.

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    Neidert, Marian C; Karlin, Kirill; Actor, Bertrand; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl

    2015-04-01

    To determine predicting factors for repeated surgical drainage in patients with intracerebral brain abscesses. Patients operated between 01/2008 and 10/2013 with a single-burr-hole technique to drain an intracerebral brain abscess were included from our prospective database. Clinical and radiological characteristics were analyzed retrospectively and compared between patients requiring a single surgical abscess drainage (S group) vs. patients requiring multiple surgical abscess aspirations (M group). Thirty-five patients (mean age 42.6 years, 14 females) including 27 patients in the S group and 8 in the M group were included in this study. Age, gender, causing bacterial agent, surgical technique and abscess volume were comparable for both groups. Preoperative mean C-reactive protein (CRP) (13.9 mg/l vs. 56.1 mg/l, p=0.015) was significantly higher in the M group. Preoperative mean leukocyte count (12.3×10(9)/l vs. 8.9×10(9)/l, p=0.050) was borderline significantly higher in the M group. Although the origin in the overall population was cryptogenic in 43% of the cases, this was never the case in the patient population needing multiple surgeries. Patients with multiple intracerebral brain abscess aspirations showed significantly higher preoperative CRP values than patients who needed surgery only once. Patients with high CRP values at admission and obvious origin of infection might need closer radiographic as well as clinical and laboratory exams after surgery to earlier select patients, which need repeated surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Association between high sensitivity C-reactive protein and dietary intake in Vietnamese young women

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    Ko, Ahra; Kim, Hyesook; Han, Chan-Jung; Kim, Ji-Myung; Chung, Hye-Won

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a strong independent predictor of future cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We evaluated the relationship between hsCRP and dietary intake in apparently healthy young women living in southern Vietnam. SUBJECTS/METHODS Serum hsCRP was measured and dietary intake data were obtained using the 1-day 24-hour recall method in women (n = 956; mean age, 25.0 ± 5.7 years) who participated in the International Collaboration Study for the Construction of Asian Cohort of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES) in 2011. RESULTS Women in the high risk group (> 3 mg/L) consumed fewer fruits and vegetables, total plant food, potassium, and folate than those in the low risk group (< 1 mg/L). A multiple regression analysis after adjusting for covariates revealed a significant negative association between hsCRP and fruit and vegetable consumption. A logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio (OR) of having a high hsCRP level in women with the highest quartiles of consumption of fruits and vegetables [OR, 0.391; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.190-0.807], potassium [OR, 0.425; 95% CI, 0.192-0.939] and folate [OR, 0.490; 95% CI, 0.249-0.964] were significantly lower than those in the lowest quartiles. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that, in young Vietnamese women, an increased consumption of fruit and vegetables might be beneficial for serum hsCRP, a risk factor for future CVD events. PMID:25110566

  9. H-Type Hypertension and C Reactive Protein in Recurrence of Ischemic Stroke

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    Qing Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension with high homocysteine (HHcy (H-type hypertension and C reactive protein (CRP can increase the incidence of ischemic stroke. However, it is not clear whether recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS is related to H-type hypertension and CRP. The present study investigated the correlation of H-type hypertension and CRP level with RIS. Totally, 987 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke were recruited in a teaching hospital in Henan province, China during March 2014 to March 2015. The demographic and clinical characteristics and blood biochemical parameters of patients were analyzed. Elevated levels of CRP and homocysteine (Hcy were defined as >8.2 mg/L and 10 μmol/L, respectively. Among the 987 patients, 234 were RIS. Thirty-eight percent of RIS patients had elevated CRP level and 91.5% of RIS patients had HHcy. In multivariate analysis, adjusted odds ratio (OR of RIS in patients aged ≥60 years was 1.576 (95% CI: 1.125–2.207, in male patients 1.935 (95% CI: 1.385–2.704, in patients with diabetes 1.463 (95% CI: 1.037–2.064, CRP levels 1.013 (95% CI: 1.006–1.019, simple hypertension 3.370 (95% CI: 1.15–10.183, and H-type hypertension 2.990 (95% CI: 1.176–7.600. RIS was associated with older age, male, diabetes, H-type hypertension and CRP. Controlling H-type hypertension and CRP level may reduce the risk of RIS.

  10. Predictive value of C-reactive protein/albumin ratio in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mustafa; Ates, Ihsan; Akpinar, Muhammed Yener; Yuksel, Mahmut; Kuzu, Ufuk Baris; Kacar, Sabite; Coskun, Orhan; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2017-08-15

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) increases and albumin decreases in patients with inflammation and infection. However, their role in patients with acute pancreatitis is not clear. The present study was to investigate the predictive significance of the CRP/albumin ratio for the prognosis and mortality in acute pancreatitis patients. This study was performed retrospectively with 192 acute pancreatitis patients between January 2002 and June 2015. Ranson scores, Atlanta classification and CRP/albumin ratios of the patients were calculated. The CRP/albumin ratio was higher in deceased patients compared to survivors. The CRP/albumin ratio was positively correlated with Ranson score and Atlanta classification in particular and with important prognostic markers such as hospitalization time, CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. In addition to the CRP/albumin ratio, necrotizing pancreatitis type, moderately severe and severe Atlanta classification, and total Ranson score were independent risk factors of mortality. It was found that an increase of 1 unit in the CRP/albumin ratio resulted in an increase of 1.52 times in mortality risk. A prediction value about CRP/albumin ratio >16.28 was found to be a significant marker in predicting mortality with 92.1% sensitivity and 58.0% specificity. It was seen that Ranson and Atlanta classification were higher in patients with CRP/albumin ratio >16.28 compared with those with CRP/albumin ratio ≤16.28. Patients with CRP/albumin ratio >16.28 had a 19.3 times higher chance of death. The CRP/albumin ratio is a novel but promising, easy-to-measure, repeatable, non-invasive inflammation-based prognostic score in acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases International. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Moderate, but not vigorous, intensity exercise training reduces C-reactive protein.

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    Fedewa, Michael V; Hathaway, Elizabeth D; Higgins, Simon; Forehand, Ronald L; Schmidt, Michael D; Evans, Ellen M

    2017-08-28

    Sprint interval cycle training is a contemporary popular mode of training but its relative efficacy, under conditions of matched energy expenditure, to reduce risk factors for cardiometabolic disease is incompletely characterised, especially in young women. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relative efficacy of six weeks of moderate-intensity cycling (MOD-C) and vigorous sprint-interval cycling (VIG-SIC) on lipid profile, insulin (INS) and insulin resistance using the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in inactive, overweight/obese (OW/OB) young women. Participants (BMI ≥25 kg/m(2), waist circumference ≥88 cm) were randomly assigned to MOD-C (20-30 min at 60-70% of heart rate reserve(HRR)) or VIG-SIC (5-7 repeated bouts 30-second maximal effort sprints, followed by four minutes of active recovery) supervised training three days/week for six weeks, with each group matched on energy expenditure. Adiposity (%Fat) was measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry. Forty-four participants (20.4 ± 1.6 years, 65.9% Caucasian, 29.8 ± 4.1 kg/m(2)) were included in the analysis. The improvement in CRP observed in the MOD-C group was larger than the VIG-C group (p = .034). Overall, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels improved following training (p  .05). These results indicate MOD-C training may be more effective in reducing CRP than VIG-SIC.

  12. C-reactive protein level in morbidly obese patients before and after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojano-Rodríguez, M E; Valenzuela-Salazar, C; Cárdenas-Lailson, L E; Romero Loera, L S; Torres-Olalde, M; Moreno-Portillo, M

    2014-01-01

    Human obesity is associated with a proinflammatory state and an elevated level of mediators, such as C-reactive protein (CRP). To establish CRP levels as baseline preoperative values and then at 6 months after bariatric surgery, as well as to determine the changes in weight, body mass index (BMI), leukocytes, and glycemia. An observational, analytical, retrospective, longitudinal, and open study was conducted. Serum CRP values were measured in 36 adults presenting with morbid obesity, and their baseline relation to weight, BMI, leukocytes, and glycemia was determined; the relation to the same parameters was established again, 6 months after bariatric surgery. The mean and standard deviation of preoperative and postoperative CRP (mg/L) was 1.15±0.86 and 0.34±0.28, respectively with p<0.0001; weight (kg) 112.10±22.91 and 84.82±17.11, p=0.0443; BMI (kg/m(2)) 42.48±5.97 and 32.2±4.79, p=0.0988; glucose (mg/dL) 100.58±17.82 and 87.11±8.49, p<0.0001, and leukocytes (× 10(3)/mm(3)) 8.62±1.69 and 6.99±1.56, p=0.3192. Baseline CRP only correlated with weight and BMI (p=0.047 and p=0.027 respectively) and there was no correlation between postoperative CRP and the evaluated parameters. Preoperative CRP had a significant lineal relation to weight and body mass index. Patients who underwent bariatric surgery had a significant decrease in CRP, weight, and fasting glucose at 6 months after surgery. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploratory Cohort Study of Associations between Serum C - Reactive Protein and Fatigue after Stroke.

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    Simiao Wu

    Full Text Available Post-stroke fatigue is a common and distressing problem but little is known about its biological mechanisms. This cohort study was to investigate associations between C-reactive protein (CRP and fatigue after stroke.Patients were assessed at one, six and 12 months after their stroke onset, with the Fatigue Assessment Scale, a case definition of post-stroke fatigue, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and daily step counts. Blood samples were collected at each assessment and the CRP level was determined by a standard CRP immunoassay. Cross-sectional associations between CRP and fatigue at each time point were determined by Pearson correlation coefficient and independent-samples t-test. Whether CRP levels at one month predict fatigue scores at six and 12 months was explored by multiple linear regression, with anxiety, depression, and daily step counts as covariates.Sixty-five patients (mean age 67 years, 65% men were included: 61 at one month, 49 at six months, and 41 at 12 months. CRP levels and fatigue scores were not associated at one month (p = 0.88 or 12 months (p = 0.56, but weakly associated at six months (r = 0.27, p = 0.04; however, this association was no longer significant (p = 0.14 after controlling for the effects of covariates. The CRP level was not associated with the fulfilment of case definition of post-stroke fatigue at any time points (all p > 0.05. The CRP level at one month was not a significant predictor for fatigue levels at either six months (p = 0.93 or 12 months (p = 0.78.There is insufficient evidence for the association between CRP and PSF in stroke patients. Future studies with larger sample sizes and controlling for potential confounders are needed to investigate whether this association exists.

  14. Clinical significance of preoperative serum C-reactive protein in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, S; Kale, J; Hallikeri, K; Anehosur, V; Arnold, D

    2018-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an index of systemic inflammation. However, CRP is not usually assessed preoperatively. Hence the study intended to evaluate the preoperative serum CRP levels in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients and to analyse its relationship with the clinicopathologic characteristics. CRP values for 60 OSCCs and 30 healthy controls were evaluated using a CRP assessment kit and spectrophotometer. The Mann-Whitney U test, χ2 test, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and logistic regression were applied. The CRP ranged from 0.3 to 86mg/L in OSCCs. CRP was significantly higher in OSCCs than in controls. A raised CRP was seen in 70% of OSCCs. CRP in OSCCs was associated with clinical nodal status and lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P<0.05). CRP was significantly higher in the metastatic than in the non-metastatic group. The area under the ROC was 0.819. The best cut-off value for predicting LNM was 8.65mg/L for the CRP with 0.767 sensitivity and 0.767 specificity (P<0.05). The cut-off revealed a significant association with LNM. Raised CRP may predict LNM. The CRP levels regressed significantly in relation to LNM. CRP could offer prognostic information beyond staging and histology. Hence, CRP can be added as an extension to known clinicopathologic parameters to predict the prognosis in OSCCs. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. C-reactive protein variability is associated with vascular access outcome in hemodialysis patients.

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    Kuo, Wei-Hung; Lee, Yueh-Ting; Ng, Hwee-Yeong; Wang, Chun-Yeh; Wu, Chien-Hsing; Lee, Chien-Te

    2018-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) vascular access failure is one of the most important causes of morbidity and contributes to the cost of dialysis care. There is paucity of data evaluating long-term monitoring of C-reactive protein (CRP) on outcome of HD vascular access. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether variability of serum CRP level was associated with vascular access failure rate over a 7-year period. A total of 318 HD patients were included. Their demographic data, co-morbidities and biochemical data were reviewed and collected. Serum high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) level was measured every 6 months. Patients were divided into three groups according to their serial hs-CRP levels. Patients with their hs-CRP below 2 mg/L were defined as low group (n=65, 20.4%) and those with higher than 4 mg/L were defined as high (n=39, 12.3%). The rest were classified as fluctuated hs-CRP group (n=214, 67.3%). Treatment of vascular access failure includes angioplasty and access re-creation. Their body mass index, indicators of dialysis adequacy and serum albumin and hs-CRP levels differed significantly among three groups. The annual vascular access failure rate was significantly higher in fluctuated hs-CRP group than in high hs-CRP group (0.41 vs 0.36, P=.037). Serum albumin was a significant associate of vascular access failure. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated patients with high or fluctuated hs-CRP had shorter free interval of vascular access failure than low hs-CRP group. HD patients with fluctuated hs-CRP levels were associated with increased vascular access failure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a predictor of locally advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Marchiñena, Patricio; Billordo-Perés, Nicolas; Tobía-González, Ignacio; Jurado, Alberto; Damia, Oscar; Gueglio, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    To determine if elevated levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma are associated with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (LARCC) after surgery. Retrospective cross-sectional study conducted from May 2009 to January 2011. Altogether, 192 patients with non-disseminated disease and with preoperative quantitative determination of the CRP were evaluated. We evaluated the relation between age, gender, history of smoking, symptoms and CRP higher than 10 mg/L, with LARCC. The chi-square and Fisher's tests were used to compare categorical variables. For the multivariate analysis, we used logistic regression methods. The median age was 62 years (r=23-85), 72.4% were males. The median CRP was 2.40 mg/L (r=0.1-173). Of all the patients, 43.2% had a history of smoking and 81.8% were asymptomatic. As for the tumors, 77.1%were clear cell carcinoma, 14.6% chromophobe, 4.7% papillary, 2.6% oncocytomas, and 1% other varieties of renal cell carcinoma. As for the TNM classification, 45.8% corresponded to stage pT1a, 27.6% pT1b, 13% pT2, and 13.5% pT3, pT4 was not found. In the multivariate analysis, the presence of symptoms (p=0.002, OR=3.1) and the presence of CRP higher than 10 mg/L (p=0.006, OR=4) remained as the only prognostic variables of LARCC. Values of CRP higher than 10 mg/L increase 4 times the possibilities of finding LARCC in the pathological study of the surgical specimen. This variable should be taken into account when deciding what is the best surgical option.

  17. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in patients with depressive disorder on antidepressive medication

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    Stanojević Albina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recurrent depression is a psychiatric disorder of which etiology and pathogenesis might be related to immune response. Metabolic Syndrome (MetS and its components are also strongly associated with elevated inflammatory indicators, as so as the body mass index (BMI and total cholesterol levels. Objective. Objective of this study was to investigate if there was any difference in C-reactive protein (CRP levels in patients with recurrent depressive disorder, treated with antidepressants, compared to a healthy control group of subjects and if there was an association between increased CRP levels and the presence of MetS in these two groups. Methods. Sixty subjects entered the study; of these 35 patients with the diagnosis of recurrent depressive disorder, while the healthy control group included 25 subjects. MetS was defined according to the NCEP ATP III criteria. The cut-off point for CRP was set at >5 mg /L. Results. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of MetS and CRP values between the studied groups. Waist circumference and total cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the experimental group. Patients that fulfilled the criteria for MetS showed significantly higher values of central obesity and arterial hypertension in the experimental group as well. The elevated CRP levels were associated with increased frequency of MetS in depressed patients. Conclusion. Both CRP levels and metabolic risk profile screening, according to the international criteria, may be beneficial in order to obtain better assessment for depressive long term medicated patients.

  18. Analysis of some sepsis markers: C-reactive protein, Procalcitonin, Osteopontin and suPAR

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    Ilaria Crespi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis appears to be due to an uncontrolled pro and anti-inflammatory response leading to organ dysfunction until shock and death.Accuracy of diagnosis and appropriate treatment affect the outcome. Aim of the study was to investigate if the levels of Osteopontin (OPN and Soluble Urokinase-type Plasminoge Activator Receptor (suPAR might be early markers of sepsis and if these markers play a role in predicting the progression to septic shock. Methods:The levels of OPN, suPAR, C-reactive protein (CRP and procalcitonin (PCT were measured in patients at higher risk of infection. The samples were collected from the day of admission for the following fifteenth day. During recovery Sistemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS criteria, blood chemistry data, blood gas- analysis, lactate and diuresis were collected. Microbiological culture were performed according to the clinical condition. Results: 29 patients were enrolled in the study, including 14 subjects with positive blood cultures.The values of OPN, PCT, suPAR and CRP were significantly increased in patients with positive blood cultures than those with negative blood cultures.Analysing changes of the levels of OPN, suPAR, PCT and CRP in patients with septic shock, the values of OPN increased in advance to the clinical diagnosis of septic shock, while the values of suPAR and PCT slight delay compared to those OPN.The levels of CRP were independent from the onset of septic shock state. Conclusions: These preliminary data suggest that Osteopontin and suPAR can be used as early markers of sepsis and might be useful in monitoring of septic outcome to predict a possible evolution to septic shock.

  19. The relationship between C-reactive protein rs3091244 polymorphism and ankylosing spondylitis.

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    Akbal, Ayla; Reşorlu, Hatice; Gökmen, Ferhat; Savaş, Yılmaz; Zateri, Çoşkun; Sargin, Betül; Bozkurt, Emre; Sılan, Fatma; Özdemir, Öztürk

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that C-reactive protein (CRP) gene polymorphism can be related to inflammatory changes. The present study aimed to examine the association between CRP gene polymorphism and clinical and laboratory findings in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. A total of 80 patients, 40 with AS and 40 controls, were included in the study. Diagnosis of AS was made according to Assessment in AS International Working Group criteria. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index scores were evaluated. CRP gene C, A and T alleles were evaluated and were determined using the analysis of melting curves after real time polymerase chain reaction. The odds ratios were calculated for all alleles and haploids of the CRP gene. We investigated the relationship between the CRP polymorphism and clinical and laboratory findings. A, C, T allele frequencies in the control group were 15%, 57.5% and 27.5%. The allele frequencies in the AS group were 38%, 68.8% and 26.2%. While C and T allele frequencies were shown to be similar in the two groups, A allele frequency was higher in the AS group compared to the control group. The CC wild allele was 42.5% in the control group and 47.5% in the AS group (P = 1.0). Odds ratios for the C allele were 1.6, for the CC haploid 1.2 and for the CT haploid 3.7. Chest expansion and finger-to-ground distance was better in the CRP gene polymorphism group compared to the no polymorphism group. The presence of the CRP gene CC wild haploid and C allele in patients may indicate an increased risk for AS. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. The Prognostic Value of C-Reactive Protein Serum Levels in Patients with Uterine Leiomyosarcoma.

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    Richard Schwameis

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP has previously been shown to serve as a prognostic parameter in women with gynecologic malignancies. Due to the lack of valid prognostic markers for uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS this study set out to investigate the value of pre-treatment CRP serum levels as prognostic parameter.Data of women with ULMS were extracted from databases of three Austrian centres for gynaecologic oncology. Pre-treatment CRP serum levels were measured and correlated with clinico-pathological parameters. Univariate and multivariable survival analyses were performed.In total, 53 patients with ULMS were included into the analysis. Mean (SD CRP serum level was 3.46 mg/dL (3.96. Solely, an association between pre-treatment CRP serum levels and tumor size (p = 0.04 but no other clinic-pathologic parameter such as tumor stage (p = 0.16, or histological grade (p = 0.07, was observed. Univariate and multivariable survival analyses revealed that CRP serum levels (HR 2.7 [1.1-7.2], p = 0.037 and tumor stage (HR 6.1 [1.9-19.5], p = 0.002 were the only independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS in patients with ULMS. Patients with high pre-treatment CRP serum levels showed impaired OS compared to women with low levels (5-year-OS rates: 22.6% and 52.3%, p = 0.007.High pre-treatment CRP serum levels were independently associated with impaired prognosis in women with ULMS and might serve as a prognostic parameter in these patients.

  1. Does C-reactive Protein Add Prognostic Value to GRACE Score in Acute Coronary Syndromes?

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    Correia, Luis Cláudio Lemos, E-mail: lccorreia@terra.com.br; Vasconcelos, Isis; Garcia, Guilherme; Kalil, Felipe; Ferreira, Felipe; Silva, André; Oliveira, Ruan; Carvalhal, Manuela; Freitas, Caio; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia Maria [Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Hospital São Rafael, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The incremental prognostic value of plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to GRACE score has not been established in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with non-ST segment elevation. To test the hypothesis that CRP measurements at admission increases the prognostic value of GRACE score in patients with ACS. A total of 290 subjects, consecutively admitted for ACS, with plasma material obtained upon admission CRP measurement using a high-sensitivity method (nephelometry) were studied. Cardiovascular outcomes during hospitalization were defined by the combination of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction or nonfatal refractory angina. The incidence of cardiovascular events during hospitalization was 15% (18 deaths, 11 myocardial infarctions, 13 angina episodes) with CRP showing C-statistics of 0.60 (95% CI = 0.51-0.70, p = 0.034) in predicting these outcomes. After adjustment for the GRACE score, elevated CRP (defined as the best cutoff point) tended to be associated with hospital events (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 0.92 to 3.88, p = 0.08). However, the addition of the variable elevated CRP in the GRACE model did not result in significant increase in C-statistics, which ranged from 0.705 to 0.718 (p = 0.46). Similarly, there was no significant reclassification of risk with the addition of CRP in the predictor model (net reclassification = 5.7 %, p = 0.15). Although CRP is associated with hospital outcomes, this inflammatory marker does not increase the prognostic value of the GRACE score.

  2. Association between serum levels of C-reactive protein and personality traits in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While low-grade inflammation has consistently been observed in subjects with depression, studies on the possible relationship between inflammation and other aspects of brain function are as yet sparse. In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible association between serum levels of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein (CRP and personality traits. Methods In this study, serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP were determined by ELISA in a population of 270 42-year-old women recruited from the population registry who had been assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory. Self-reported previous or ongoing depression was also recorded. Unpaired two-tailed t-tests were used for comparison between two groups and correlations were evaluated by the calculation of Pearson's r-coefficient. Results The temperament trait harm avoidance was positively (r = 0.227, p r = -0.261, p p-values corrected for multiple comparisons. The correlations between the personality traits and CRP were observed also after exclusion of subjects reporting ongoing depression (n = 26. Whereas women reporting ongoing depression showed significantly increased levels of CRP as compared to non-depressed women (n = 155, women reporting a history of depression displayed no significant difference in CRP levels as compared to women that reported that they had never been depressed. Conclusion Serum levels of CRP in women was found to be associated with the personality traits harm avoidance and self-directedness. In addition, moderately elevated levels may be a state dependent marker of depression.

  3. Correlations between Peripheral Blood Coxiella burnetii DNA Load, Interleukin-6 Levels, and C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Acute Q Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, R.; Wielders, C. C. H.; Kampschreur, L. M.; Schneeberger, P. M.; Netten, P. M.; de Klerk, A.; Hodemaekers, H. M.; Hermans, M. H. A.; Notermans, D. W.; Wever, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    From 2007 to 2010, the Netherlands experienced the largest reported Q fever outbreak, with >4,000 notified cases. We showed previously that C-reactive protein is the only traditional infection marker reflecting disease activity in acute Q fever. Interleukin-6 is the principal inducer of C-reactive protein. We questioned whether increased C-reactive protein levels in acute Q fever patients coincide with increased interleukin-6 levels and if these levels correlate with the Coxiella burnetii DNA load in serum. In addition, we studied their correlation with disease severity, expressed by hospital admission and the development of fatigue. Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein levels were analyzed in sera from 102 patients diagnosed with seronegative PCR-positive acute Q fever. Significant but weak negative correlations were observed between bacterial DNA loads expressed as cycle threshold values and interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein levels, while a significant moderate-strong positive correlation was present between interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein levels. Furthermore, significantly higher interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein levels were observed in hospitalized acute Q fever patients in comparison to those in nonhospitalized patients, while bacterial DNA loads were the same in the two groups. No marker was prognostic for the development of fatigue. In conclusion, the correlation between interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein levels in acute Q fever patients points to an immune activation pathway in which interleukin-6 induces the production of C-reactive protein. Significant differences in interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein levels between hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients despite identical bacterial DNA loads suggest an important role for host factors in disease presentation. Higher interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein levels seem predictive of more severe disease. PMID:24477856

  4. Pentraxin 3 and C-reactive protein in severe meningococcal disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, T.; Peri, G.; Neeleman, C.; Mantovani, A.; Signorini, S.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Deuren, M. van

    2009-01-01

    The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is an important element of the innate immune system and has potential as a diagnostic tool in inflammatory conditions. We studied PTX3 in patients admitted to an intensive care unit with severe meningococcal disease and compared it with the short pentraxin C-reactive

  5. Dietary total antioxidant capacity from different assays in relation to serum C-reactive protein among young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satomi; Murakami, Kentaro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Uenishi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Mitsuyo; Hayabuchi, Hitomi; Goda, Toshinao; Oka, Jun; Baba, Keiko; Ohki, Kazuko; Watanabe, Reiko; Sugiyamama, Yoshiko

    2012-10-30

    The association between dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) from different assays and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) has not been assessed in non-Western populations. We examined the association between dietary TAC and serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women using different four TAC assays. The subjects were 443 young Japanese women aged 18-22 years. Dietary TAC was assessed with a self-administered diet history questionnaire and the TAC value of each food using the following four assays: ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP); oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC); Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC); and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP). Serum CRP concentrations were measured by highly sensitive nephelometry. The major contributor to dietary TAC was green, barley, and oolong tea (FRAP: 53%, ORAC: 45%, TEAC: 36%, and TRAP: 44%). The prevalence of elevated CRP concentrations (≥ 1 mg/L) was 5.6%. TAC from FRAP was inversely associated with serum CRP concentrations (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for elevated CRP concentration in high [compared with low] dietary TAC group: 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16-0.98]; P = 0.04). TAC from ORAC was inversely associated with CRP, although the association was not significant (OR: 0.48 [95% CI: 0.20-1.14]; P = 0.10). TAC from TEAC was inversely associated with CRP (OR: 0.32 [95% CI: 0.12-0.82]; P = 0.02), as was TAC from TRAP (OR: 0.31 [95% CI: 0.12-0.81]; P = 0.02). Dietary TAC was inversely associated with serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women regardless of assay. Further studies are needed in other populations to confirm these results.

  6. Dietary total antioxidant capacity from different assays in relation to serum C-reactive protein among young Japanese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Satomi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC from different assays and serum C-reactive protein (CRP has not been assessed in non-Western populations. We examined the association between dietary TAC and serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women using different four TAC assays. Methods The subjects were 443 young Japanese women aged 18–22 years. Dietary TAC was assessed with a self-administered diet history questionnaire and the TAC value of each food using the following four assays: ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP; oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC; Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC; and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP. Serum CRP concentrations were measured by highly sensitive nephelometry. Results The major contributor to dietary TAC was green, barley, and oolong tea (FRAP: 53%, ORAC: 45%, TEAC: 36%, and TRAP: 44%. The prevalence of elevated CRP concentrations (≥ 1 mg/L was 5.6%. TAC from FRAP was inversely associated with serum CRP concentrations (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for elevated CRP concentration in high [compared with low] dietary TAC group: 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.16-0.98]; P = 0.04. TAC from ORAC was inversely associated with CRP, although the association was not significant (OR: 0.48 [95% CI: 0.20-1.14]; P = 0.10. TAC from TEAC was inversely associated with CRP (OR: 0.32 [95% CI: 0.12-0.82]; P = 0.02, as was TAC from TRAP (OR: 0.31 [95% CI: 0.12-0.81]; P = 0.02. Conclusions Dietary TAC was inversely associated with serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women regardless of assay. Further studies are needed in other populations to confirm these results.

  7. human serum protein and c-reactive protein levels among hiv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-30

    reactive protein and detection of tuberculosis in persons co-infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical. Medicine and Hygiene; 95(1):41-42. Le Carrer, D., Giraud, .F, Siramy ...

  8. Assessment of C-reactive Proteins, Cytokines, and Plasma Protein Levels in Hypertensive Patients with Apical Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashmi, N; Galhotra, Vineet; Goel, Pallavi; Rajguru, Jagadish P; Jha, Satyendra K; Kulkarni, Kiran

    2017-06-01

    Chronic apical periodontitis (CAP) manifests mostly as periapical radiolucency. Various inflammatory mediators play a significant role in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis. In acute inflammatory conditions, C-reactive proteins (CRP) and fibrinogen show a rise in their concentrations. In chronic diseases with high inflammatory components, an increased prevalence of hypertension has been observed. Hence, we assessed the association of CAP and plasma levels of various inflammatory markers (CRP, interleukin 6 [IL-6], and fibrinogen) in severely hypertensive patients. This study was conducted in the conservative wing of the institute and included assessment of 250 hypertensive patients with apical periodontitis. With the help of periapical radiographs and clinical examination, the assessment of following parameters was done: Amount of teeth present, visible plaque index, periodontal pocket probing depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, presence/absence of carious lesions, which included assessment of caries in crown portion, in the root portion, and residual tooth roots (RR), presence of CAP from each patient; 8 mm of venous blood was collected in the morning for the assessment of plasma levels of IL-6, CRP, and fibrinogen levels. Immediate collection and processing of the samples were done in the hospital laboratory. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Out of 250, 155 patients were females. Mean plasma levels of CRP observed in our study were 0.8 mg/dL. Mean plasma levels of IL-6 and fibrinogen were found to be 3.3 and 337.1 mg/dL respectively. A significant correlation was observed while comparing mean body mass index (BMI), RR, and CAP in hypertensive patients. While comparing the mean plasma IL-6 levels, mean BMI, and CAP in the patients, significant results were obtained. Significant correlation was observed while comparing the mean BMI and CAP in hypertensive patients. Systemic levels of CRP

  9. DHA Supplementation Decreases Serum C-Reactive Protein and Other Markers of Inflammation in Hypertriglyceridemic Men1–3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Darshan S.; Siegel, David; Fedor, Dawn M.; Adkins, Yuriko; Mackey, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Dietary (n-3) PUFA reduce inflammation, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The antiinflammatory effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in hypertriglyceridemic men have not been previously reported, to our knowledge, and were the focus of this study. Hypertriglyceridemic men (n = 17 per group) aged 39–66 y, participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled parallel study. They received no supplements for the first 8 d and then received either 7.5 g/d DHA oil (3 g DHA/d) or olive oil (placebo) for the last 90 d. Blood samples were collected from fasting men on study days −7, 0, 45, 84, and 91. DHA supplementation for 45 and 91 d decreased the number of circulating neutrophils by 11.7 and 10.5%, respectively (P < 0.05). It did not alter the circulating concentrations of other inflammatory markers tested within 45 d, but at 91 d it reduced (P < 0.05) concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) by 15%, interleukin-6 by 23%, and granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulating factor by 21% and DHA increased the concentration of antiinflammatory matrix metalloproteinase-2 by 7%. The number of circulating neutrophils was positively associated with the weight percent (wt %) of 20:4(n-6) in RBC lipids, and negatively to the wt % of 20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3). Concentrations of CRP and serum amyloid A were positively associated with the sum of SFA and negatively with the wt % of 18:1(n-9) and 17:0 in RBC lipids; CRP was also positively associated with the wt % of 20:2(n-6). The mean size of VLDL particles was positively associated with plasma concentrations of neutrophils and CRP. In conclusion, DHA may lessen the inflammatory response by altering blood lipids and their fatty acid composition. PMID:19158225

  10. Effect of CPAP therapy on C-reactive protein and cognitive impairment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu Qing; Liao, Qing Chi; Xu, Xing Xiang; Sun, Li; Wang, Jing; Chen, Rui

    2016-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is associated with neurocognitive impairment. We examined the role of the systemic inflammatory response, measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) assay, and the effect of CPAP treatment on hsCRP and cognitive impairment in patients with OSAHS. Eligible subjects (n = 178) were categorized into two groups: absent or mild OSAHS, and moderate to severe OSAHS. First, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and serum hsCRP concentration were measured. Then, the moderate to severe OSAHS group was further divided into a conservative treatment subgroup (n = 68) and a CPAP subgroup (n = 68). After 6 months of treatment, MoCA scores and hsCRP concentrations were re-measured in the moderate to severe group. Compared with the absent or mild OSAHS group, hsCRP concentration was higher (1.00 ± 1.28 mg/L versus 2.71 ± 1.8, p education, body mass index, and neck circumference, hsCRP and MoCA scores correlated with parameters of overnight hypoxia. hsCRP and the proportion of time spent with blood oxygen saturation CPAP treatment subgroup. In conservatively managed patients, hsCRP concentration increased, and there was no improvement in neurocognitive dysfunction, with the memory subdomain significantly worse. hsCRP may play a role in neurocognitive dysfunction in OSAHS. Long-term CPAP treatment could normalize the serum hsCRP concentration and partially reverse cognitive dysfunction in OSAHS.

  11. C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate discordance: frequency and causes in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Mark; Aziz, Bilal; Kang, Gha Na; Opondo, Mildred A; Belz, Randall K; Sellers, Connie

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are widely used tests of inflammation that sometimes show opposite results. We performed a retrospective cohort study to clarify the frequency and causes of CRP/ESR discordance in adults. Between January and December of 2011, the laboratories of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital performed 2150 paired CRP/ESR measurements in 1753 patients, 1731 of whom were nonpregnant adults aged ≥ 18 years. Initial CRP and ESR results for each patient were divided into quartiles. CRP/ESR discordance, predefined as results differing by 2 or 3 quartiles, occurred in 212 patients (12%), 105 of whom had high CRP/low ESR discordance (6%) and 107 of whom had high ESR/low CRP discordance (6%). The 212 patients in the CRP/ESR-discordant group (128 women and 84 men) were subdivided into 1 of 6 diagnostic categories, and the causes of discordances were compared. The high CRP/low ESR-discordant group had more patients with infections than the high ESR/low CRP-discordant group (P = 0.001), particularly infections in the urinary tract (P = 0.03), gastrointestinal tract (P = 0.001), lungs (P = 0.005), and bloodstream (P = 0.03). However, they had fewer bone and joint infections than the high ESR/low CRP-discordant group (P = 0.001). Connective tissue diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, were less common in the high CRP/low ESR-discordant group than in the high ESR/low CRP-discordant group (P = 0.001). Ischemic strokes or transient ischemic attacks almost invariably occurred in the high ESR/low CRP-discordant group (P = 0.001), whereas myocardial infarction or venous thromboembolism was limited to the high CRP/low ESR-discordant group (P = 0.001). Our findings provide information to physicians who order these 2 tests together and receive discordant results, which occurs in approximately 1 in 8 patients. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and orthopedic implant infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerryl E Piper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR have been shown to be useful for diagnosis of prosthetic hip and knee infection. Little information is available on CRP and ESR in patients undergoing revision or resection of shoulder arthroplasties or spine implants. METHODS/RESULTS: We analyzed preoperative CRP and ESR in 636 subjects who underwent knee (n=297, hip (n=221 or shoulder (n=64 arthroplasty, or spine implant (n=54 removal. A standardized definition of orthopedic implant-associated infection was applied. Receiver operating curve analysis was used to determine ideal cutoff values for differentiating infected from non-infected cases. ESR was significantly different in subjects with aseptic failure infection of knee (median 11 and 53.5 mm/h, respectively, p=<0.0001 and hip (median 11 and 30 mm/h, respectively, p=<0.0001 arthroplasties and spine implants (median 10 and 48.5 mm/h, respectively, p=0.0033, but not shoulder arthroplasties (median 10 and 9 mm/h, respectively, p=0.9883. Optimized ESR cutoffs for knee, hip and shoulder arthroplasties and spine implants were 19, 13, 26, and 45 mm/h, respectively. Using these cutoffs, sensitivity and specificity to detect infection were 89 and 74% for knee, 82 and 60% for hip, and 32 and 93% for shoulder arthroplasties, and 57 and 90% for spine implants. CRP was significantly different in subjects with aseptic failure and infection of knee (median 4 and 51 mg/l, respectively, p<0.0001, hip (median 3 and 18 mg/l, respectively, p<0.0001, and shoulder (median 3 and 10 mg/l, respectively, p=0.01 arthroplasties, and spine implants (median 3 and 20 mg/l, respectively, p=0.0011. Optimized CRP cutoffs for knee, hip, and shoulder arthroplasties, and spine implants were 14.5, 10.3, 7, and 4.6 mg/l, respectively. Using these cutoffs, sensitivity and specificity to detect infection were 79 and 88% for knee, 74 and 79% for hip, and 63 and 73% for shoulder arthroplasties, and 79 and

  13. Association of C-Reactive Protein and Metabolic Disorder in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxia Sun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP levels and explore the risk factors for an elevated hs-CRP level. We also provide the clinical utility of CRP to identify subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS. Methods: Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey in China. Subjects were divided into three subgroups: hs-CRP ≤ 1 mg/L, 1 mg/L < hs-CRP ≤ 3 mg/L and hs-CRP > 3 mg/L. Multiple linear regressions and logistic regression models were used. Results: In the Chinese population, 50.43% subjects had a low hs-CRP level, 30.21% subjects had an intermediate hs-CRP level and 19.36% subjects had an elevated hs-CRP level. Age, physical inactivity, abdominal obesity, a low LDL level, an elevated fasting glucose level, uric acid and urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR were correlated with log-CRP. In multivariate analysis, relative risks of an elevated CRP level were 2.40 (95% CI 1.44–3.99, p = 0.001, 3.63 (95% CI 2.20–5.98, p < 0.001, 4.23 (95% CI 2.51–7.11, p < 0.001 and 6.23 (95% CI 3.45–11.26, p < 0.001 for subjects with 1, 2, 3, or more than 3 MetS components, respectively. The accurate estimates of the area under the receiver operating characteristic of hs-CRP for MetS was 0.6954 (95% CI, 0.67–0.72. Conclusion: Age, physical inactivity, abdominal obesity, a low LDL level, an elevated fasting glucose level, uric acid and ACR are correlated with log-CRP. The number of MetS components is a significant determinant of elevated CRP levels after adjusted for other potential confounders.

  14. Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yue; Ahmadi-Abhari, Sara; Wainwright, Nick W J; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Surtees, Paul G; Luben, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2014-11-11

    To explore whether daytime napping and sleep duration are linked to serum C reactive protein (CRP), a pro-inflammatory marker, in an older aged British population. Cross-sectional study. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk study. A total of 5018 men and women aged 48-92 years reported their sleep habits and had serum CRP levels measured. CRP was measured (mg/L) during 2006-2011 in fresh blood samples using high-sensitivity methods. Participants reported napping habits during 2002-2004, and reported sleep quantity during 2006-2007. Multivariable linear regression models were used to examine the association between napping and log-transformed CRP, and geometric mean CRP levels were calculated. After adjustment for age and sex, those who reported napping had 10% higher CRP levels compared with those not napping. The association was attenuated but remained borderline significant (β=0.05 (95% CI 0.00 to 0.10)) after further adjustment for social class, education, marital status, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, self-reported health, pre-existing diseases, systolic blood pressure, hypnotic drug use, depression and in women-only hormone replacement therapy use. The geometric means (95% CI) of CRP levels were 2.38 (2.29 to 2.47) mg/L and 2.26 (2.21 to 2.32) mg/L for those who reported napping and no napping, respectively. A U-shaped association was observed between time spent in bed at night and CRP levels, and nighttime sleep duration was not associated with serum CRP levels. The association between napping and CRP was stronger for older participants, and among extremes of time spent in bed at night. Daytime napping was associated with increased CRP levels in an older aged British population. Further studies are needed to determine whether daytime napping is a cause for systemic inflammation, or if it is a symptom or consequence of underlying health problems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  15. C-Reactive Protein As a Marker for Initiating Steroid Treatment in Children With Orbital Cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Brett W; Smith, Jesse M; Hink, Eric M; Durairaj, Vikram D

    2015-01-01

    To determine both the benefit of systemic steroids in pediatric patients with orbital cellulitis and to assess the usefulness of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels as a marker for starting steroids. Prospective, comparative interventional study. Pediatric patients aged 1 to 18 years admitted to a tertiary care children's hospital with a diagnosis of orbital cellulitis from October 2012 to March 2014 were included in the study. All patients were treated with intravenous antibiotics, and patients with subperiosteal abscess who met previously published criteria for surgical decompression underwent combined transorbital drainage and/or endoscopic sinus surgery. CRP was measured daily as a biomarker of inflammation, and when below 4 mg/dl, patients were started on oral prednisone 1 mg/kg per day for 7 days. Patients whose families did not consent to steroid treatment served as the control group. Patients were followed after discharge until symptoms resolved and all medications were discontinued. Thirty-one children were diagnosed with orbital cellulitis during the study period. Of these 31 children, 24 received oral steroids (77%) and 7 did not (23%). There were 19 males and 5 females in the steroid group with an average age of 8.1 years, and 6 males and 1 female in the nonsteroid group with an average age of 7.1 years (p = 0.618). Thirteen patients (54%) in the steroid group and 2 patients (29%) in the nonsteroid group underwent sinus surgery with or without orbitotomy (p = 0.394). The average CRP at the onset of steroid treatment was 2.8 mg/dl (range: 0.5-4). Patients who received oral steroids were admitted for an average of 3.96 days. In comparison, patients who did not receive steroids were admitted for an average of 7.17 days (p orbital cellulitis. Futhermore, this is the first study to suggest a standardized starting point (CRP ≤ 4 mg/dl) and dosing schedule (oral prednisone 1 mg/kg for 7 days) for children with orbital cellulitis. Patients who received

  16. The impact of an exercise intervention on C - reactive protein during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Marquis; Braun, Barry; Marcus, Bess H; Stanek, Edward; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-06-24

    C-reactive protein (CRP) during pregnancy has been associated with adverse maternal outcomes such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus. Randomized trials suggest that exercise programs may be associated with reductions in CRP in non-pregnant populations; however, such studies have not been conducted among pregnant women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an individually-tailored motivationally-matched exercise intervention on CRP in pregnant women. The Behaviors Affecting Baby and You study was a randomized controlled trial of prenatal physical activity to prevent the development of gestational diabetes mellitus in women at increased risk. Women were randomized to either a 12-week exercise intervention (n = 84) or a comparison health and wellness intervention (n = 87). High sensitivity CRP (mg/dL) was measured using a commercial immunoassay kit. Physical activity was measured using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to evaluate the impact of the intervention on change in CRP using an intent-to-treat approach. CRP decreased (-0.09 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.25, 0.07) from pre- to post-intervention in the exercise arm (p = 0.14) and increased (0.08 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.07, 0.24) (p = 0.64) in the health and wellness arm; however the between group difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.14). Findings did not differ according to ethnic group or pre-pregnancy body mass index. In a secondary analysis based on self-reported physical activity, women who decreased their time spent in sports/exercise experienced a mean increase in CRP (0.09 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.14, 0.33), whereas women who maintained or increased their sports/ exercise experienced a mean decrease in CRP (-0.08 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.23, 0.08) (p = 0.046). Findings from this randomized trial in an ethnically and socio-economically diverse population of pregnant women were consistent with a positive impact

  17. Effects of hemolysis, lipemia, hyperbilirrubinemia, and anticoagulants in canine C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, and ceruloplasmin assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the present study was to determine the effects that hemolysis, lipemia, bilirubinemia, and anticoagulants might have on the most commonly used assays for C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, and determination of ceruloplasmin values in dogs. Solutions of hemoglobin, lipid, and bilirubin were added to serum aliquots. Additionally, serum and plasma samples with different anticoagulants (heparin, EDTA, and citrate) were obtained from healthy dogs. Hemolysis, lipemia, and hyperbilirubinemia interfered significantly with the C-reactive protein and ceruloplasmin results, but not with those for the serum amyloid A assay. The use of anticoagulants produced significant changes in the results for the assays tested. However, the magnitude of the differences caused by the interfering substances does not appear to have an important impact on the clinical interpretation of the tests. PMID:16152718

  18. Relationship of Cardiac Structures and Functions with Adiponectin, C-Reactive Protein and Interleukin-6 Levels in Obese Children

    OpenAIRE

    Aşan, Nuran

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Obesity in childhood is associated with increased morbidity and mortality inadulthood due to cardiovascular disease. C-Reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)levels are elevated in obese patients, whereas the adiponectin level is negatively correlated.This study was conducted to determine the effects of obesity on cardiac structure and functionsand to investigate the relationship of cardiac structures and functions with CRP, Il-6, andadiponectin levels.Patients and Methods:...

  19. Relationship of Cardiac Structures and Functions with Adiponectin, C-Reactive Protein and Interleukin-6 Levels in Obese Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nuran Aşan, Güzide Doğan, Sadi Türkay, Meki Bilici,; Nesibe Andıran, Cemile Koca

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Obesity in childhood is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in adulthood due to cardiovascular disease. C-Reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are elevated in obese patients, whereas the adiponectin level is negatively correlated. This study was conducted to determine the effects of obesity on cardiac structure and functions and to investigate the relationship of cardiac structures and functions with CRP, Il-6, and adiponectin levels. Patients ...

  20. Increased levels of C-reactive protein and leukocyte count are poor predictors of anastomotic leakage following laparoscopic colorectal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Torben; Roikjær, Ole; Jess, Per

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic procedure and fast-track regimen with short post-operative hospital stay are gaining ground in colorectal surgery. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell counts (WBC) have a role as early predictors of post......-operative septic complications including anastomotic leakage in patients operated laparoscopically in a fast-track regimen....

  1. Evaluation of C-reactive protein, Haptoglobin and cardiac troponin 1 levels in brachycephalic dogs with upper airway obstructive syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Planellas Marta; Cuenca Rafaela; Tabar Maria-Dolores; Bertolani Coralie; Poncet Cyrill; Closa Josep M; Lorente Juan; Cerón Jose J; Pastor Josep

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Brachycephalic dogs have unique upper respiratory anatomy with abnormal breathing patterns similar to those in humans with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between anatomical components, clinical signs and several biomarkers, used to determine systemic inflammation and myocardial damage (C-reactive protein, CRP; Haptoglobin, Hp; cardiac troponin I, cTnI), in dogs with brachycephalic upper airway obstructiv...

  2. Postoperative C-reactive protein/albumin ratio as a novel predictor for short-term complications following gastrectomy of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng; Ge, Xiaolong; Liu, Zhijian; Du, Shangce; Ai, Shichao; Guan, Wenxian

    2017-10-24

    Postoperative complications following gastric cancer resection remain a clinical problem. Early detection of postoperative complications is needed before critical illness develops. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of C-reactive protein/albumin ratio in patients with gastric cancer. A total of 322 patients undergoing curative (R0) gastrectomy between 2015 and 2017 were retrospectively analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify clinical factors predicting postoperative complications. The cutoff values and diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein/albumin ratio and C-reactive protein were determined by receiver-operating characteristic curves. Among all of the patients, 85 (26.4%) developed postoperative complications. The optimal cutoff of C-reactive protein/albumin ratio was set at 3.04 based on the ROC analysis. Multivariate analysis identified C-reactive protein/albumin ratio was an independent risk factors for complications after gastrectomy (OR 3.037; 95% CI 1.248-7.392; P = 0.014). Additionally, C-reactive protein/albumin ratio showed a higher diagnostic accuracy than C-reactive protein on postoperative day 3 (AUC: 0.685 vs 0.660; sensitivity: 0.624 vs 0.471; specificity: 0.722 vs 0.835). Elevated C-reactive protein/albumin ratio was an independent predictor for postoperative complications following gastrectomy of gastric cancer, and the diagnostic accuracy was higher than C-reactive protein alone. Overall, postoperative C-reactive protein/albumin ratio may help to identify patients with high probability of postoperative complications.

  3. Serum Amyloid A, but Not C-Reactive Protein, Stimulates Vascular Proteoglycan Synthesis in a Pro-Atherogenic Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patricia G.; Thompson, Joel C.; Webb, Nancy R.; de Beer, Frederick C.; King, Victoria L.; Tannock, Lisa R.

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory markers serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are predictive of cardiac disease and are proposed to play causal roles in the development of atherosclerosis, in which the retention of lipoproteins by vascular wall proteoglycans is critical. The purpose of this study was to determine whether SAA and/or CRP alters vascular proteoglycan synthesis and lipoprotein retention in a pro-atherogenic manner. Vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated with either SAA or CRP (1 to 100 mg/L) and proteoglycans were then isolated and characterized. SAA, but not CRP, increased proteoglycan sulfate incorporation by 50 to 100% in a dose-dependent manner (P proteoglycans; P proteoglycan synthesis in vivo, ApoE−/− mice were injected with an adenovirus expressing human SAA-1, a null virus, or saline. Mice that received adenovirus expressing SAA had increased TGF-β concentrations in plasma and increased aortic biglycan content compared with mice that received either null virus or saline. Thus, SAA alters vascular proteoglycans in a pro-atherogenic manner via the stimulation of TGF-β and may play a causal role in the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:18974302

  4. Insulin resistance in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with C-reactive protein independent of abdominal obesity

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    Feng Xiaocheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is debate as to whether the association between C-reactive protein (CRP and insulin resistance is independent of body fatness, particularly central obesity. Therefore, the association among CRP, insulin resistance and obesity was analyzed in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods The study included 520 Chinese patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes with CRP levels not exceeding 10 mg/L. The degree of insulin resistance was determined with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. The CRP levels were categorized into quartiles from the lowest to the highest concentrations (Q1-Q4. Results Body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC were both higher in Q4, Q3 and Q2 than those in Q1. HOMA-IR was higher in Q2, Q3 and Q4 than that in Q1 (Q1 vs Q4, P Conclusion These findings showed that insulin resistance was associated with CRP levels independent of abdominal obesity in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting that abdominal obesity could only partly explain the link between subclinical inflammation and insulin resistance.

  5. Gender comparison of C-reactive protein and cardiovascular disease risk in college students and intercollegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orri, J C; Carter, S R; Howington, E B

    2010-03-01

    Research involving coronary artery disease (CAD) risk in young adults is limited; therefore we compared cardiovascular risk between college-aged men and women. Thirty college men and women volunteered as study subjects. CAD risk assessment included systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), waist circumference, percent body fat (%BF), maximum oxygen consumption, fasting plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), Body Mass Index (BMI) and fasting glucose. Risk factors were compared between groups using a t-test and Pearson product moment correlations were used to determine the relationships between CRP and CAD risk factors. Statistically significant differences were observed for HDL, TC/HDL ratio, SBP, and %BF, between men and women. Total cholesterol and CRP concentration were not different between men and women. Log CRP was positively correlated with %BF and BMI. Further, 47% of the subjects met the criteria for one or more risk factors for CAD, as specified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Our data indicate a gender difference in CAD risk in college students with similar reported activity. Waist circumference, fasting glucose, % body fat, and BMI are associated with CRP in college age men and women.

  6. Relation of Serum Uric Acid With C-reactive Protein and Ferritin Levels in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

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    Biniaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Clinical studies have shown that precipitation of urate crystals in joints of hyperuricemic patients could lead to systemic inflammation; however, this subject has been little explored in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Objectives We carried out this study in order to evaluate the association of serum uric acid (SUA levels with plasma concentrations of CRP, an inflammatory marker, and ferritin in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 182 hemodialysis patients in two hemodialysis wards in Iran. Required laboratory parameters, including serum levels of uric acid, C-reactive protein, lipid profiles (cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, LDL, and ferritin were measured. Demographic data were also collected with the self-report survey. P Value less than 0.05 is considered significant. Results Higher serum levels of uric acid and CRP were seen in 44% and 47% of the patients, respectively. Hyperferritinemia was observed in 80% of participants. Although there was a significant relationship between SUA level and plasma triglyceride (P = 0.007, a linear correlation indicated that SUA level had no significant association with CRP and ferritin. Conclusions Our results indicated that there is no statistical relationship between SUA level and CRP and serum ferritin. Detailed investigations with larger sample size are recommended.

  7. Response of Leptin and C-reactive Protein Serum Levels to 12 Weeks Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Obese Men

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    Sonia Ghiasi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 12 weeks moderate intensity aerobic exercise on leptin and C-reactive protein serum levels in obese men. The study was conducted in Urmia- Iran in 2015. Twenty-four obese men with an aged range 40-50 yrs. were enrolled into the study. Subjects were randomized to one of 2 groups exercise (n=12 and control groups (n=12. The exercise group performed aerobic exercise training up to 50-70 % heart rate reserve, three times a week for 12 weeks. Leptin and CRP serum level was measured by ELISA method before and after the 12 weeks. After 12 weeks exercise training, leptin and CRP serum level in the exercise group compared to the control group, were decreased significantly (P<0.05. To sum up, 12 weeks moderate intensity aerobic exercise in the reduction of CRP and leptin concentration had a prominent role that might be effective in reducing weight and improving cardiovascular risk factors.

  8. Detection of c-reactive protein based on a magnetic immunoassay by using functional magnetic and fluorescent nanoparticles in microplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S F; Gao, B Z; Tsai, H Y; Fuh, C Bor

    2014-11-07

    We report the preparation and application of biofunctional nanoparticles to detect C-reactive protein (CRP) in magnetic microplates. A CRP model biomarker was used to test the proposed detection method. Biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles, CRP, and biofunctional fluorescent nanoparticles were used in a sandwich nanoparticle immunoassay. The CRP concentrations in the samples were deduced from the reference plot, using the fluorescence intensity of the sandwich nanoparticle immunoassay. When biofunctional nanoparticles were used to detect CRP, the detection limit was 1.0 ng ml(-1) and the linear range was between 1.18 ng ml(-1) and 11.8 μg ml(-1). The results revealed that the method involving biofunctional nanoparticles exhibited a lower detection limit and a wider linear range than those of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and most other methods. For CRP measurements of serum samples, the differences between this method and ELISA in CRP measurements of serum samples were less than 13%. The proposed method can reduce the analysis time to one-third that of ELISA. This method demonstrates the potential to replace ELISA for rapidly detecting biomarkers with a low detection limit and a wide dynamic range.

  9. Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load and Their Association with C-Reactive Protein and Incident Type 2 Diabetes

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    Geertruida J. van Woudenbergh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate whether the Glycemic Index (GI or Glycemic Load (GL of a diet is associated with C-reactive Protein (CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes in a prospective study. Materials and Methods. Our analysis included 4,366 participants who did not have diabetes at baseline. During follow-up 456 diabetes cases were confirmed. Dietary GI and GL were derived from a food-frequency questionnaire and its association with CRP was examined cross-sectionally using linear regression models. The association of GI and GL with diabetes incidence was examined using Cox proportional hazard models. Results. GL, but not GI, was associated with lnCRP at baseline (bGL=0.11 per 50 units; P=.01. When comparing the highest to the lowest tertile of GI with respect to diabetes incidence, a Relative Risk (RR of 0.95 [95%CI 0.75, 1.21] was found after adjustment for lifestyle and nutritional factors. For GL the RR for diabetes incidence was 1.00 [95%CI 0.74, 1.36]. Additional adjustment for CRP did not change RRs. Conclusion. Since GI was not associated with CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes, it is unlikely that a high GI diet induces the previously shown positive association between CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes by increasing CRP concentrations.

  10. Elevated Serum C-Reactive Protein Relates to Increased Cerebral Myoinositol Levels in Middle-Aged Adults

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    Danielle E. Eagan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP, a systemic marker of inflammation, is a risk factor for late life cognitive impairment and dementia, yet the mechanisms that link elevated CRP to cognitive decline are not fully understood. In this study we examined the relationship between CRP and markers of neuronal integrity and cerebral metabolism in middle-aged adults with intact cognitive function, using proton magnetic resonance spectrocospy. We hypothesized that increased levels of circulating CRP would correlate with changes in brain metabolites indicative of early brain vulnerability. Thirty-six individuals, aged 40 to 60, underwent neuropsychological assessment, a blood draw for CRP quantification, and 1H MRS examining N-acetyl-aspartate, myo-inositol, creatine, choline, and glutamate concentrations in occipito-parietal grey matter. Independent of age, sex and education, serum CRP was significantly related to higher cerebral myo-inositol/creatine ratio (F(4,31=4.74,  P=0.004, a relationship which remained unchanged after adjustment for cardiovascular risk (F(5,30=4.356, CRP β = 0.322, P=0.045. Because these biomarkers are detectable in midlife they may serve as useful indicators of brain vulnerability during the preclinical period when mitigating intervention is still possible.

  11. Dietary Fiber, C-Reactive Protein, and Leisure-Time Physical Activity Among U.S. Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M Ryan; Arikawa, Andrea Y; Churilla, James R

    2018-03-01

    Some evidence suggests an inverse association between increased fiber intake and C-reactive protein (CRP). However, few studies have examined the associations among CRP, dietary fiber, and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Sample (n = 8372) included adults (≥20 years of age) who participated in the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Tertiles of reported fiber intake were created. The dependent variable was elevated CRP (>3-10 mg/L). Logistic regression models were stratified by LTPA participation and adjusted for age, gender, race, waist circumference (WC), and standing height. In adults reporting any volume of LTPA participation, increased fiber intake was significantly (P < 0.05 for the upper tertile of fiber intake) associated with lower odds of having an elevated CRP concentration when compared with the lowest tertile. Similar associations were not revealed in analyses limited to adults reporting no LTPA participation. After additional adjustment for WC and standing height, this protective association was no longer statistically significant. Results suggest that WC and standing height may mediate the beneficial association between increased fiber intake and lower odds of elevated CRP in adults reporting LTPA participation.

  12. Adipokines, C-reactive protein and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - results from a population- based ALS registry in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Gabriele; Peter, Raphael S; Rosenbohm, Angela; Koenig, Wolfgang; Dupuis, Luc; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Ludolph, Albert C

    2017-06-29

    To investigate the associations of leptin, adiponectin and high-sensitive (hs) C-reactive protein (CRP) with risk and prognosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Data from a population-based case-control study in Southern Germany (10/2010-6/2014) of 289 ALS patients (mean age of 65.7 (SD 10.5) years, 59.5% men) and 506 controls were included. During median follow-up of 14.5 months of 279 ALS patients 104 (53.9% men, 68.9 (10.3) years) died. Serum samples were measured for leptin, adiponectin and hs-CRP. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate ALS risk. Survival models were used to appraise the prognostic value. ALS patients were characterized by lower levels of school education, BMI and smoking prevalence. Adjusted for covariates, leptin was inversely associated with ALS risk (top vs. bottom quartile: OR 0.49; 95% CI 0.29-0.80), while for adiponectin a positive association was found (OR 2.89; 95% CI 1.78-4.68). Among ALS patients increasing leptin concentrations were associated with longer survival (p for trend 0.002), while for adiponectin no association was found (p for trend 0.55). For hs-CRP no association was found. Leptin and adiponectin, two key hormones regulating energy metabolism, were strongly and independently related with ALS risk. Leptin levels were further negatively related with overall survival of ALS patients.

  13. C-reactive protein as a predictor for poor collateral circulation in patients with chronic stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Li, Sha; Li, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Qing, Ping; Gao, Ying; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the association between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and coronary collateral circulation (CCC) in Chinese patients with angiography-proven ≥95% coronary stenosis. In this study, 1158 patients with angiography-proven ≥95% occlusion in ≥1 major epicardial coronary artery were enrolled, and then classified into two groups: poor CCC (Rentrop grades 0-1) and good CCC (Rentrop grades 2-3). CRP levels were grouped using the following two models: Model 1 discretized CRP group with 33.33% and 66.66% as the critical values and Model 2 with 1.0 and 3.0 mg/L as the cut off values. There were significant differences in serum CRP levels between the two groups (5.76 ± 3.45 vs. 3.49 ± 2.44 mg/L, respectively; p coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiovascular disorders. In a Chinese cohort of patients with coronary artery occlusion or stenosis of ≥95% TIMI grade 1 anterograde-flow, the relationship between CRP concentrations and angiographically visible coronary collateral (CC) was assessed. Our data indicated that elevated CRP associated with a significant impairment in CC development, and might supply a useful biomarker in clinical applications.

  14. High sensitivity C-reactive protein distribution in the elderly: the Bambuí Cohort Study, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assunção, L.G.S. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Eloi-Santos, S.M. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Departamento de Propedêutica Complementar, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Peixoto, S.V. [Departamento de Enfermagem Aplicada, Escola de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima-Costa, M.F. [Departamento de Medicina Preventiva e Social, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Vidigal, P.G. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Departamento de Propedêutica Complementar, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-28

    The measurement of the serum concentration of the acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) provides a useful marker in clinical practice. However, the distribution of CRP is not available for all age and population groups. This study assessed the distribution of high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) by gender and age in 1470 elderly individuals from a Brazilian community that participates in the Bambuí Cohort Study. Blood samples were collected after 12 h of fasting and serum samples were stored at -70°C. Measurements were made with a commercial hs-CRP immunonephelometric instrument. More than 50% of the results were above 3.0 mg/L for both genders. Mean hs-CRP was higher in women (3.62 ± 2.58 mg/L) than in men (3.03 ± 2.50 mg/L). This difference was observed for all ages, except for the over-80 age group. This is the first population-based study to describe hs-CRP values in Latin American elderly subjects. Our results indicate that significant gender differences exist in the distribution of hs-CRP, and suggest that gender-specific cut-off points for hs-CRP would be necessary for the prediction of cardiovascular risks.

  15. Evaluation of C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and cardiac troponin 1 levels in brachycephalic dogs with upper airway obstructive syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planellas, Marta; Cuenca, Rafaela; Tabar, Maria-Dolores; Bertolani, Coralie; Poncet, Cyrill; Closa, Josep M; Lorente, Juan; Cerón, Jose J; Pastor, Josep

    2012-08-31

    Brachycephalic dogs have unique upper respiratory anatomy with abnormal breathing patterns similar to those in humans with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between anatomical components, clinical signs and several biomarkers, used to determine systemic inflammation and myocardial damage (C-reactive protein, CRP; Haptoglobin, Hp; cardiac troponin I, cTnI), in dogs with brachycephalic upper airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS). Fifty brachycephalic dogs were included in the study and the following information was studied: signalment, clinical signs, thoracic radiographs, blood work, ECG, components of BAOS, and CRP, Hp and cTnI levels. A high proportion of dogs with BAOS (88%) had gastrointestinal signs. The prevalence of anatomic components of BAOS was: elongated soft palate (100%), stenotic nares (96%), everted laryngeal saccules (32%) and tracheal hypoplasia (29.1%). Increased serum levels of biomarkers were found in a variable proportion of dogs: 14% (7/50) had values of CRP > 20 mg/L, 22.9% (11/48) had values of Hp > 3 g/L and 47.8% (22/46) had levels of cTnI > 0.05 ng/dl. Dogs with everted laryngeal saccules had more severe respiratory signs (pdogs with BAOS that can be detected by cTnI concentration.

  16. High sensitivity C-reactive protein distribution in the elderly: the Bambuí Cohort Study, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G.S. Assunção

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the serum concentration of the acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP provides a useful marker in clinical practice. However, the distribution of CRP is not available for all age and population groups. This study assessed the distribution of high sensitivity-CRP (hs-CRP by gender and age in 1470 elderly individuals from a Brazilian community that participates in the Bambuí Cohort Study. Blood samples were collected after 12 h of fasting and serum samples were stored at -70°C. Measurements were made with a commercial hs-CRP immunonephelometric instrument. More than 50% of the results were above 3.0 mg/L for both genders. Mean hs-CRP was higher in women (3.62 ± 2.58 mg/L than in men (3.03 ± 2.50 mg/L. This difference was observed for all ages, except for the over-80 age group. This is the first population-based study to describe hs-CRP values in Latin American elderly subjects. Our results indicate that significant gender differences exist in the distribution of hs-CRP, and suggest that gender-specific cut-off points for hs-CRP would be necessary for the prediction of cardiovascular risks.

  17. Serum copeptin and cortisol do not accurately predict sickle cell anaemia vaso-occlusive crisis as C-reactive protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehinde Sola Akinlade

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the diagnostic performance and prognostic properties of C-reactive protein (CRP, copeptin and cortisol in individuals with sickle cell anaemia (SCA. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. METHODS: Sixty consecutive SCA subjects (18-40 years comprising 30 subjects in the steady state and 30 subjects in vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC were recruited into this study. Thirty (30 apparently healthy individuals with HbAA genotype served as controls. ELISA was used for the determination of serum levels of copeptin, CRP and cortisol. Data obtained were statistically analyzed using the Student's t-test and Mann Whitney U as appropriate and P<0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: SCA subjects in VOC had significantly lower copeptin level and significantly higher CRP level compared with controls. However, serum levels of copeptin, cortisol and CRP were significantly higher in SCA subjects in VOC compared with SCA subjects in steady state. Furthermore, CRP had the widest Area under the ROC curve (AUROC than copeptin and cortisol. No significant difference was observed in the levels of copeptin, CRP and cortisol when SCA subjects in VOC who were hospitalized for less ≤ 5 days were compared with subjects who had longer stays. CONCLUSION: It could be concluded that C-reactive protein has a superior diagnostic performance for vaso-occlusive crisis in individuals with sickle cell anaemia and that C-reactive protein, cortisol and copeptin are not good prognostic markers in SCA subjects in vaso-occlusive crisis.

  18. [Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein as early indicators of postoperative intra-abdominal infection after surgery for gastrointestinal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Comesaña, Elías; López-Gómez, Victoria; Estevez-Fernández, Sergio Manuel; Mariño Padín, Esther; Ballinas-Miranda, Julio; Carrera-Dacosta, Ester; Piñon-Cimadevila, Miguel Ángel; Barreiro-Morandeira, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    to evaluate the association between serum levels of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein, on the first 3 postoperative days, and the appearance of postoperative intra-abdominal infection. Prospective observational study including 67 patients operated on for colo-rectal, gastric and pancreatic cancer. Serum levels of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein were analyzed before surgery and daily until the third postoperative day. Values of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were recorded as well as their accuracy for detection of postoperative intra-abdominal infection (PIAI). The incidence of postoperative intra-abdominal infection was 13.4%. CRP serum levels at 72h, PCT serum levels at 24, 48 and 72h and the ratio between serum levels of CRP at 72hours and serum levels of CRP at 48hours (CRP D3/CRP D2) were significantly associated with the appearance of postoperative intra-abdominal infection. The highest sensitivity corresponded to PCT at 72hours (88.9%); the highest specificity and positive predictive value corresponded to the ratio CRP D3/CRP D2 (96.49% and 71.4%, respectively); the highest negative predictive value to procalcitonin at 72h and 24h. Serum levels of PCT are significantly associated with the appearance of postoperative intra-abdominal infection. Sensitivity and predictive positive values are low, but negative predictive value is high, even at 24h after surgery. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of C-Reactive Protein and Serum Amyloid A in Early to Late Manifestations of Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Melanie; Ajamian, Mary; Li, Xueting; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-12-01

     Infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, triggers host immune responses that affect the clinical outcome and are a source of biomarkers with diagnostic utility. Although adaptive immunity to B. burgdorferi has been extensively characterized, considerably less information is available about the development of innate acute-phase responses in Lyme disease. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the expression of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA), the prototype acute-phase response proteins, in the context of the varying manifestations associated with Lyme borreliosis.  Circulating concentrations of CRP and SAA in patients with a range of early to late objective manifestations of Lyme disease and in individuals with post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome were compared with those in healthy control groups.  CRP and SAA levels were significantly elevated in early localized and early disseminated Lyme disease but not in the later stages of active infection. Levels of CRP, but not SAA, were also found to be significantly increased in patients with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis and in those with post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.  These findings indicate that circulating CRP and SAA levels are highest when the concentration of spirochetes is greatest in skin and/or blood and that levels decline after the dissemination of the organism to extracutaneous sites in subsequent stages of infection. The data also suggest that antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis and post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome are associated with elevated CRP responses that are driven by inflammatory mechanisms distinct from those in active infection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Expression of C-Reactive Protein and Serum Amyloid A in Early to Late Manifestations of Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Melanie; Ajamian, Mary; Li, Xueting; Wormser, Gary P.; Marques, Adriana; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, triggers host immune responses that affect the clinical outcome and are a source of biomarkers with diagnostic utility. Although adaptive immunity to B. burgdorferi has been extensively characterized, considerably less information is available about the development of innate acute-phase responses in Lyme disease. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the expression of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA), the prototype acute-phase response proteins, in the context of the varying manifestations associated with Lyme borreliosis. Methods. Circulating concentrations of CRP and SAA in patients with a range of early to late objective manifestations of Lyme disease and in individuals with post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome were compared with those in healthy control groups. Results. CRP and SAA levels were significantly elevated in early localized and early disseminated Lyme disease but not in the later stages of active infection. Levels of CRP, but not SAA, were also found to be significantly increased in patients with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis and in those with post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. Conclusions. These findings indicate that circulating CRP and SAA levels are highest when the concentration of spirochetes is greatest in skin and/or blood and that levels decline after the dissemination of the organism to extracutaneous sites in subsequent stages of infection. The data also suggest that antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis and post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome are associated with elevated CRP responses that are driven by inflammatory mechanisms distinct from those in active infection. PMID:27585799

  1. Validation of immunoassays for the candidate renal markers C-reactive protein, immunoglobulin G, thromboxane B2 and retinol binding protein in canine urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddens, Bert E J; Daminet, Sylvie; Demeyere, Kristel; Demon, Dieter; Smets, Pascale; Meyer, Evelyne

    2010-04-15

    The study of early markers for glomerular and tubular dysfunction in dogs with renal diseases holds promise to gain new insights in the pathogenesis of canine nephropathies. However, the validation of such markers in canine urine is largely lacking. Therefore, immunoassays for the quantification of a set of four urinary markers, C-reactive protein (CRP), immunoglobulin G (IgG), thromboxane B(2) (TXB(2)) and retinol binding protein (RBP), were validated by determining their sensitivity, reproducibility, precision and accuracy in a large patient group. The results show that the immunoassays are appropriate for analysis of urinary CRP, IgG, TXB(2) and RBP in dogs. Furthermore, the significant differences in urinary concentrations of the selected glomerular and tubular markers between healthy (H) dogs and dogs with several types of nephropathies (R) support their future application in both clinical settings and research models. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Serum procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and white blood cell levels following hypothermia after cardiac arrest: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Philipp; Affolter, Barbara; Hunziker, Sabina; Winterhalder, Clemens; Fischer, Michael; Balestra, Gianmarco M; Hunziker, Patrick; Marsch, Stephan

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate time course of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC) levels in patients with therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. We retrospectively assessed laboratory and clinical data in a consecutive cohort of patients admitted to the medical intensive-care-unit of the University Hospital in Basel, Switzerland, in whom therapeutic hypothermia was induced because of cardiac arrest between December 2007 and January 2009. Infection was considered based on microbiological evidence (restricted definition) and/or clinical evidence of infection with prescription of antibiotics (extended definition). From 34 included patients, 25 had respiratory tract infection based on the clinical judgment and in 18 microbiological cultures turned positive (restricted definition). PCT concentrations were highest on the first day after hypothermia and showed a steady decrease until day 7 without differences in patients with and without presumed infection. CRP concentrations increased to a peak level at days 3-4 followed by a steady decrease; CRP concentrations were higher in patients with clinical diagnosis of infection on day 4 (P = 0.02); and in patients with evidence of bacterial growth in cultures on days 4 and 5 (P = 0.01 and P = 0.006). WBC remained unchanged after hypothermia without differences between patients with and without infection. High initial values of PCT and high peak levels after 3-4 days of CRP were found in patients with induction of hypothermia after cardiac arrest. This increase was unspecific and mirrors rather an inflammatory reaction than true underlying infection, limiting the diagnostic potential for early antibiotic stewardship in these patients.

  3. Utility of measuring serum levels of anti-PGL-I antibody, neopterin and C-reactive protein in monitoring leprosy patients during multi-drug treatment and reactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silva, E. A; Iyer, A; Ura, S; Lauris, J. R; Naafs, B; Das, P. K; Vilani-Moreno, F

    2007-01-01

    ...)-I antibody, neopterin, a product of activated macrophages, and C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase protein, in serial serum samples from patients for monitoring the leprosy spectrum and reactions during the course of multi-drug treatment (MDT...

  4. Increased ultrasensitive C-reactive protein is not associated with obesity in hospitalized heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schommer, Vânia Ames; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Marcadenti, Aline; Wittke, Estefania Inez; Galvão, André Luís Câmara; Rosito, Guido Bernardo Aranha

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association between obesity and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with heart failure admitted to a tertiary hospital. Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sampling of hospitalized patients with heart failure. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected, and the nutritional status was assessed through indicators such as body mass index (in kg/m2), waist circumference (in cm), waist-hip ratio, triceps skinfold (in mm) and subscapularis skinfold (in mm). Neck circumference (in cm) was measured as well as serum levels of hs-CRP, in mg/L. Among 123 patients, the mean age was 61.9±12.3 years and 60.2% were male. The median of hs-CRP was 8.87mg/L (3.34 to 20.01). A tendency to an inverse correlation between neck circumference and hs-CRP was detected (r=-0.167; p=0.069). In the multiple linear regression analysis, after adjustment for age, disease severity (NYHA classification III and IV, low ejection fraction, left ventricular dysfunction during diastole), and infectious conditions there was an inverse association between hs-CRP and neck circumference (ß=-0.196; p=0.03) and subscapularis skinfold (ß=-0.005; p=0.01) in the total sample, which was not maintained after the stratification by sex. Increased levels of hs-CRP in patients hospitalized for heart failure were not associated with obesity. Avaliar a associação entre obesidade e níveis de proteína c-reativa ultrassensível (PCR-us) em pacientes com insuficiência cardiac admitidos em um hospital terciário. Estudo transversal com amostragem consecutiva de pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca hospitalizados. Foram coletados dados sociodemográficos e clínicos, e o estado nutricional foi avaliado por meio de indicadores como índice de massa corporal (em kg/m2), circunferência da cintura (em cm), razão cintura-quadril, dobra cutânea tricipital (em mm) e dobra cutânea subescapular (em mm). Circunferência do pescoço (em cm) foi aferida bem como n

  5. Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease--a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2010-12-09

    The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with "intermediate risk" as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals with

  6. Variation in C - reactive protein response according to host and mycobacterial characteristics in active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James; Clark, Kristina; Smith, Colette; Hopwood, Jennifer; Lynard, Oliver; Toolan, Michael; Creer, Dean; Barker, Jack; Breen, Ronan; Brown, Tim; Cropley, Ian; Lipman, Marc

    2016-06-10

    The C - reactive protein (CRP) response is often measured in patients with active tuberculosis (TB) yet little is known about its relationship to clinical features in TB, or whether responses differ between ethnic groups or with different Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) strain types. We report the relationship between baseline serum CRP prior to treatment and disease characteristics in a metropolitan population with TB resident in a low TB incidence region. People treated for TB at four London, UK sites between 2003 and 2014 were assessed and data collected on the following characteristics: baseline CRP level; demographics (ethnicity, gender and age); HIV status; site of TB disease; sputum smear (in pulmonary cases) and culture results. The effect of TB strain-type was also assessed in culture-positive pulmonary cases using VNTR typing data. Three thousands two hundred twenty-two patients were included in the analysis of which 72 % had a baseline CRP at or within 4 weeks prior to starting TB treatment. CRP results were significantly higher in culture positive cases compared to culture negative cases: median 49 mg/L (16-103 mg/L) vs 19 mg/L (IQR 5-72 mg/L), p = <0.001. In those with pulmonary disease, smear positive cases had a higher CRP than smear negative cases: 67 mg/L (31-122 mg/L) vs 24 mg/L (7-72 mg/L), p < 0.001. HIV positive cases had higher baseline CRPs than HIV negative cases: 75 mg/L (26-136 mg/L) vs 37 mg/L (10-88 mg/L), p <0.001. Differing sites of disease were associated with differences in baseline CRP: locations that might be expected to have a high mycobacterial load (e.g. pulmonary disease and disseminated disease) had a significantly higher CRP than those such as skin, lymph node or CNS disease, where the mycobacterial load is typically low in HIV negative subjects. In a multivariable log-scale linear regression model adjusting for host characteristics and M.tb strain type, infection with the East African Indian strain

  7. Longitudinal changes in C-reactive protein, proform of eosinophil major basic protein, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A during weight changes in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Gamborg, Michael; Bøjsøe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is associated with several complications, including cardiovascular comorbidity. Several biomarkers, such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), proform of eosinophil major basic protein (Pro-MBP) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), have equally...... concentrations of hs-CRP, Pro-MBP, and PAPP-A were measured at baseline; at days 14, 33 and 82 during weight loss; and at months 10, 16, and 28 during follow-up. RESULTS: Fifty-three boys and 62 girls aged 8-15 years with a median body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS) at baseline of 2.78 (boys......), and 2.70 (girls) were included. Ninety children completed the weight loss program and 68 children entered the follow-up program. Pro-MBP and PAPP-A, but not hs-CRP, exhibited individual-specific levels (tracking) during weight loss and regain. The PAPP-A/Pro-MBP correlation was strong, whereas the hs-CRP/PAPP-A...

  8. Longitudinal changes in C-reactive protein, proform of eosinophil major basic protein, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A during weight changes in obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Gamborg, Michael; Bøjsøe, Christine; Hedley, Paula L; Hagen, Christian Munch; Christiansen, Michael; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2015-03-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with several complications, including cardiovascular comorbidity. Several biomarkers, such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), proform of eosinophil major basic protein (Pro-MBP) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), have equally been linked to increased cardiovascular susceptibility. This study investigates these biomarkers during weight loss and regain in obese children. A longitudinal study during a 12-week weight loss program with a 28 months follow-up was conducted. Anthropometrics and plasma concentrations of hs-CRP, Pro-MBP, and PAPP-A were measured at baseline; at days 14, 33 and 82 during weight loss; and at months 10, 16, and 28 during follow-up. Fifty-three boys and 62 girls aged 8-15 years with a median body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS) at baseline of 2.78 (boys), and 2.70 (girls) were included. Ninety children completed the weight loss program and 68 children entered the follow-up program. Pro-MBP and PAPP-A, but not hs-CRP, exhibited individual-specific levels (tracking) during weight loss and regain. The PAPP-A/Pro-MBP correlation was strong, whereas the hs-CRP/PAPP-A correlation was weak during weight fluctuations. Hs-CRP changes reflect weight changes. PAPP-A and Pro-MBP exhibited tracking during weight perturbations and may contribute as early risk markers of cardiovascular susceptibility.

  9. Altered serum and salivary C-reactive protein levels in patients with oral premalignant lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metgud, R; Bajaj, S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with cancer development. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase protein synthesized primarily in the liver, is a marker for inflammation and for the progression of many cancers. We compared serum and salivary CRP levels in 20 normal individuals, 20 patients with oral premalignant lesions and 20 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to assess its efficacy as a prognostic indicator for OSCC. Saliva and blood samples were obtained and evaluated for CRP levels. Mean CRP levels were higher in patients with oral premalignant lesions compared to controls. CRP levels in OSCC patients were elevated and were associated with advanced tumor stages.

  10. Oxidative Stress Markers and C-Reactive Protein Are Related to Severity of Heart Failure in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina Wojciechowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of study was to determine relationships between functional capacity (NYHA class, left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF, hemodynamic parameters, and biomarkers of redox state and inflammation in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Methods. DCM patients (n=109, aged 45.97±10.82 years, NYHA class IIV, and LVEF 2.94±7.1% were studied. Controls comprised age-matched healthy volunteers (n=28. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization were performed. Serum activities of superoxide dismutase isoenzymes (MnSOD and CuZnSOD, concentrations of uric acid (UA, malondialdehyde (MDA, and C-reactive protein (hs-CRP were measured. Results. MnSOD, UA, hs-CRP, and MDA were significantly higher in DCM patients compared to controls. Except MDA concentration, above parameters were higher in patients in III-IV NYHA class or with lower LVEF. hsCRP correlated with of MnSOD (P<0.05 and CuZnSOD activity (P<0.01. Both isoenzymes positively correlated with mPAP and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (MnSOD, resp., P<0.01 and P<0.05 and CuZnSOD P<0.05; P<0.05. UA positively correlated with MnSOD (P<0.05, mPAP (P<0.05, and PVRI (P<0.05. The negative correlation between LVEF and UA (P<0.01 was detected. Conclusion. There are relationships among the severity of symptoms of heart failure, echocardiographic hemodynamic parameters, oxidative stress, and inflammatory activation. Increased MnSOD activity indicates the mitochondrial source of ROS in patients with advanced heart failure.

  11. Quantitative and rapid detection of C-reactive protein using quantum dot-based lateral flow test strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruili; Zhou, Shuai; Chen, Ting; Li, Jinjie; Shen, Huaibin; Chai, Yujuan; Li, Lin Song

    2018-05-30

    A novel QD-based immunoassay on a paper-based lateral flow system has been developed to quantitatively detect C-reactive protein (CRP). Different standard CRP antigens from 1 to 200 μg mL -1 were diluted 200-fold and only 60 μL diluted sample were needed to load onto the sample pad. The QD fluorescence signals on the test line and the control line were able to be observed within 3 min after the initiation of assay, and the limit of detection was as sensitive as 0.30 ng mL -1  by measuring the fluorescence intensity immediately afterwards with fluorescence immunoassay analyzer. The linearity on the detection of QD fluorescence signals has been established well in the range of 0.5 ng mL -1 and 1 μg mL -1 for CRP. The precision of the assay has been confirmed for low coefficient of variation (CV), satisfying less than 15% (intra-assay and inter-assay), and the accuracy of assay meets the requirements with the mean recovery of the control was 102.63%. These results indicated that such newly developed platform was reliable with high sensitivity, rapidness, and could cover a broad range of target concentrations. Furthermore, a total of 135 human serum clinical samples with inflammation or infection with the concentration of CRP from 0.2 to 200 μg mL -1  has been used to check the performance of this QD-based LFIA, it correlated very well with Roche Tina-quant CRP (Latex) (r = 0.966, n = 135). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of plasma adiponectin /C-reactive protein ratio in obesity and type 2 diabetes among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Preetha Anna; Attipoe, Selasi; Kazman, Josh B; Zeno, Stacey Anne; Poth, Merrily; Deuster, Patricia Anne

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is a modifiable risk factor for hypertension and T2D. Objective(s): We examined relations between fasting plasma adiponectin (ADIP), C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations and markers of T2D in African Americans (AA). Fasting plasma ADIP, CRP, Insulin (IN), HOMA-IR, lipid profiles, body fat percent (%BF), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure measures were determined in AA women (W: n=77) and men (M: n=34). Participants were classified into: 1) Normal fasting glucose (FG) and Normal %BF; 2) Normal FG and High %BF; and 3) High FG. Compared to men, women had significantly higher mean ADIP (W: 31.4±2.9 vs. M: 18.0±4.4 ng/L), CRP (W: 3.2±0.3 vs. M: 2.0±0.5 mg/L), %BF (W: 41.2±0.9 vs. M: 27.2±1.3), and BMI (W: 32.3±0.7 vs. M: 29.2±1.1 kg/m2). Women with normal FG and %BF had significantly higher ADIP (64.0±6.0) and lower CRP (1.3±0.6) concentrations than normal FG/ high %BF (ADIP: 37.0±5.0 and CRP: 3.1 ±0.5) and high FG (ADIP: 15.1±4.1 and CRP: 4.0 ± 0.5) groups. Women with high ADIP to CRP ratio had favorable metabolic and anthropometric profiles. Low ADIP and high CRP are associated with excessive %BF and FG in AA women. ADIP/CRP, may be useful for detecting metabolic dysregulation.

  13. C-reactive protein increases membrane fluidity and distorts lipid lateral organization of pulmonary surfactant. Protective role of surfactant protein A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saenz, Alejandra; Lopez-Sanchez, Almudena; Mojica-Lazaro, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how surfactant membranes can be perturbed by C-reactive protein (CRP) and whether surfactant protein A (SP-A) might overcome CRP-induced surfactant membrane alterations. The effect of CRP on surfactant surface adsorption was evaluated in vivo after int...

  14. High sensitive C-reactive protein-Effective tool in determining postoperative recovery in lumbar disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Narayan Rathod

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is common in medical practice to see patients having persistent pain and radiculopathy even after undergoing discectomy surgery. Inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukins are produced at the site of disc herniation and are now considered responsible for the pain perceived by the patient. This study has used high sensitive C-reactive protein (HSCRP assay for predicting inflammation around the nerve roots on very same principle, which has used HSCRP for predicting coronary artery diseases in current clinical practice. Thus, purpose of this study is to test whether HSCRP can stand as an objective tool to predict postoperative recovery in patients undergoing lumbar discectomy. That is, to study association between preoperative HSCRP blood level and postoperative recovery with the help of modified Oswestry Back Disability Score. Materials and Methods: A study group consisting of 50 cases of established lumbar disc disease and control group of 50 normal subjects, matched with the study group. Both the study and control groups were subjected to detailed evaluation with the help of modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale both pre and postoperatively at 3 months, 6 months and 1-year. The preoperative blood samples were analyzed to assess the HSCRP concentration. All the cases underwent surgery over a period of 1-year by the same surgeon. Results: The level of HSCRP in the study group was between 0.050- and 0.710 mg/dL and in the control group, 0.005-0.020 mg/dL. There was highly significant positive correlation between preoperative HSCRP level and postoperative score at P 10 points, while those with HSCRP level in the range of 0.470 ± 0.163 mg/dL, showed poor recovery (score improved < 10 points. Conclusion: HSCRP will serve as a good supplementary prognostic marker for operative decision making in borderline and troublesome cases of lumbar disc disease.

  15. Effect of psyllium fiber supplementation on C-reactive protein: the trial to reduce inflammatory markers (TRIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dana E; Mainous, Arch G; Egan, Brent M; Woolson, Robert F; Geesey, Mark E

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a significant association between the intake of dietary fiber and levels of inflammatory markers. The objective of this study was to determine whether daily fiber supplementation would reduce levels of inflammatory markers. This study was a prospective randomized controlled trial at a single university medical center. Participants were overweight or obese adults with no history of heart disease. The intervention was psyllium supplementation at either 7 or 14 g/d for 3 months compared with no supplements in a control group. The main outcome measure was change in level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration; secondary outcomes included changes in interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, fibrinogen levels, and white blood cell (WBC) count. Protocol completers attended at least 2 visits and took more than 75% of the prescribed fiber dose. In this intent-to-treat analysis (n = 158), there were no significant differences between either of the 2 treatment groups and the control group in the amount of change in CRP, fibrinogen, or IL-6 levels or in WBC count (P>.05). In the analysis of protocol completers (n = 132), there also were no significant differences between the groups except for a small decrease in fibrinogen level in the high-fiber group (-6 mg/dL [-0.18 micromol/L] compared with 13 mg/dL [0.38 micromol/L] in the control group, PPsyllium fiber supplementation did not significantly reduce CRP levels in overweight or obese individuals in this trial, and changes in other markers were not consistent. Further research is needed to determine whether other fibers or nutrients can reduce inflammatory markers.

  16. A linear relationship between serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein and hemoglobin in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Behzad; Fazli, Muhammad Reza; Misaeid, Muhammad Ali Ghazi; Heidari, Parham; Hakimi, Niloofar; Zeraati, Abbas Ali

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory process in hemodialysis patients involves hematopoiesis. The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) as a marker of inflammation with hemoglobin in patients under hemodialysis. Patients under maintenance hemodialysis for more than 3 months were studied. Serum high-sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) was measured by immunoturbidimetric method and hemoglobin High serum hs-CRP (> 5 mg/l) was found in 42 (57.5 %) and anemia in 32 (43.8 %) patients. High CRP was significantly associated with anemia OR = 20.8 (95 % CI 5.35-81, p = 0.001). After adjustment for age, dialysis duration, blood indices and serum albumin, the odds of anemia in the high CRP group remained at a significant level of 16.7 (95 % CI 3.7-75, p = 0.001). Hemoglobin levels conversely correlated with serum hs-CRP (r = -0.607, r (2) = 0.36, p = 0.001). In linear regression analysis for each 1 mg/l increase in serum hs-CRP, hemoglobin value increased by 12.4 % (p = 0.002). Serum iron at cutoff level of 54 µg/dl discriminated patients with and without iron deficiency anemia with sensitivity of 93.3 %, specificity of 84 % and accuracy of 90 % (AUC ± SE = 0.901 ± 0.04 (95 % CI, 0.805-0.998, p = 0.001). These findings indicate that in hemodialysis patients, the inflammatory process alters hemoglobin level in converse correlation with CRP concentration with a linear relationship pattern. Serum iron high accuracy.

  17. Evaluation of C-reactive protein, Haptoglobin and cardiac troponin 1 levels in brachycephalic dogs with upper airway obstructive syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Planellas Marta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachycephalic dogs have unique upper respiratory anatomy with abnormal breathing patterns similar to those in humans with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between anatomical components, clinical signs and several biomarkers, used to determine systemic inflammation and myocardial damage (C-reactive protein, CRP; Haptoglobin, Hp; cardiac troponin I, cTnI, in dogs with brachycephalic upper airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS. Results Fifty brachycephalic dogs were included in the study and the following information was studied: signalment, clinical signs, thoracic radiographs, blood work, ECG, components of BAOS, and CRP, Hp and cTnI levels. A high proportion of dogs with BAOS (88% had gastrointestinal signs. The prevalence of anatomic components of BAOS was: elongated soft palate (100%, stenotic nares (96%, everted laryngeal saccules (32% and tracheal hypoplasia (29.1%. Increased serum levels of biomarkers were found in a variable proportion of dogs: 14% (7/50 had values of CRP > 20 mg/L, 22.9% (11/48 had values of Hp > 3 g/L and 47.8% (22/46 had levels of cTnI > 0.05 ng/dl. Dogs with everted laryngeal saccules had more severe respiratory signs (p Conclusions According to the low percentage of patients with elevated levels of CRP and Hp, BAOS does not seem to cause an evident systemic inflammatory status. Some degree of myocardial damage may occur in dogs with BAOS that can be detected by cTnI concentration.

  18. Diagnostic value of lactate, procalcitonin, ferritin, serum-C-reactive protein, and other biomarkers in bacterial and viral meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Alizadeh, Shekoofan; Karimi, Abdullah; Khalifeh, Masoomeh; Shoja, Seyed Abdolmajid

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There are many difficulties distinguishing bacterial from viral meningitis that could be reasonably solved using biomarkers. The aim of this study was to evaluate lactate, procalcitonin (PCT), ferritin, serum-CRP (C-reactive protein), and other known biomarkers in differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in children. All children aged 28 days to 14 years with suspected meningitis who were admitted to Mofid Children's Hospital, Tehran, between October 2012 and November 2013, were enrolled in this prospective cross-sectional study. Children were divided into 2 groups of bacterial and viral meningitis, based on the results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture, polymerase chain reaction, and cytochemical profile. Diagnostic values of CSF parameters (ferritin, PCT, absolute neutrophil count [ANC], white blood cell count, and lactate) and serum parameters (PCT, ferritin, CRP, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR]) were evaluated. Among 50 patients with meningitis, 12 were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis. Concentrations of all markers were significantly different between bacterial and viral meningitis, except for serum (P = .389) and CSF (P = .136) PCT. The best rates of area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) were achieved by lactate (AUC = 0.923) and serum-CRP (AUC = 0.889). The best negative predictive values (NPV) for bacterial meningitis were attained by ANC (100%) and lactate (97.1%). The results of our study suggest that ferritin and PCT are not strong predictive biomarkers. A combination of low CSF lactate, ANC, ESR, and serum-CRP could reasonably rule out the bacterial meningitis. PMID:28858084

  19. Effects of C-reactive protein on adipokines genes expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Guoyue, E-mail: yuanguoyue@hotmail.com [Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Jia, Jue; Di, Liangliang [Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Zhou, Libin [Ruijin Hospital, Center of Molecular Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Jiaotong University Medical School, 197, Ruijin Road II, Shanghai 200025 (China); Dong, Sijing; Ye, Jingjing; Wang, Dong; Yang, Ling; Wang, Jifang [Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Li, Lianxi [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, 600, Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China); Yang, Ying [Ruijin Hospital, Center of Molecular Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Jiaotong University Medical School, 197, Ruijin Road II, Shanghai 200025 (China); Mao, Chaoming [Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Chen, Mingdao, E-mail: mingdaochensh@yahoo.com [Ruijin Hospital, Center of Molecular Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Jiaotong University Medical School, 197, Ruijin Road II, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRP increases TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 genes expression in matured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRP suppresses adiponectin, leptin and PPAR-{gamma} mRNA levels in matured 3T3-L1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wortmannin reverses effects of CRP on adiponectin, TNF-{alpha} and leptin mRNA levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRP may regulate IR, obesity and metabolic syndrome by this mechanism. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue is now recognized to be an important endocrine organ, secreting a variety of adipokines that are involved in the regulation of energy metabolism, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. C-reactive protein (CRP) is considered as one of the most sensitive markers of inflammation. A number of studies have shown that elevation of CRP concentrations is an independent predictive parameter of type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is also strongly associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of CRP on adipokines genes expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that CRP inhibited adiponectin, leptin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-{gamma}) genes expression and raised tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels in matured 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a dose and time-dependent manner. Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3 kinase by wortmannin partially reversed the effects of CRP on adiponectin, TNF-{alpha} and leptin genes expression. These results collectively suggest that CRP regulates adiponectin, TNF-{alpha}, leptin, IL-6 and PPAR-{gamma} genes expression, and that might represent a mechanism by which CRP regulates insulin resistance, obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  20. C-reactive protein levels and body mass index: elucidating direction of causation through reciprocal Mendelian randomization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timpson, N J; Nordestgaard, B G; Harbord, R M

    2011-01-01

    Context:The assignment of direction and causality within networks of observational associations is problematic outside randomized control trials, and the presence of a causal relationship between body mass index (BMI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) is disputed.Objective:Using reciprocal Mendelian...... randomization, we aim to assess the direction of causality in relationships between BMI and CRP and to demonstrate this as a promising analytical technique.Participants and methods:The study was based on a large, cross-sectional European study from Copenhagen, Denmark. Genetic associates of BMI (FTO(rs9939609...

  1. Prognostic Value of C-Reactive Protein, Leukocytes, and Vitamin D in Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Mia; Vestbo, Jørgen; Martinez, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers predict mortality and hospitalisation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Yet, it remains uncertain if biomarkers in addition to reflecting disease severity add new prognostic information on severe COPD. We investigated if leukocytes, C-reactive protein (CRP......), and vitamin D were independent predictors of mortality and hospitalisation after adjusting for disease severity with an integrative index, the i-BODE index. In total, 423 patients participating in a pulmonary rehabilitation programme, with a mean value of FEV1 of 38% of predicted, were included. Mean followup...

  2. A C-reactive protein promoter polymorphism is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Pima Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolford, Johanna K; Gruber, Jonathan D; Ossowski, Victoria M

    2003-01-01

    Linkage analysis has identified a susceptibility locus for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on chromosome 1q21-q23 in several populations. Results from recent prospective studies indicate that increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of immune system activation, are predictive.......9kb of the CRP-APCS locus was screened for polymorphisms using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. We identified 27 informative polymorphisms, including 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1 insertion/deletion, which were divided into 7 linkage...

  3. Biomarkers (Procalcitonin, C Reactive Protein, and Lactate) as Predictors of Mortality in Surgical Patients with Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-de-la-Rica, Alejandro; Maseda, Emilio; Anillo, Víctor; Tamayo, Eduardo; García-Bernedo, Carlos A; Ramasco, Fernando; Hernández-Gancedo, Carmen; López-Tofiño, Araceli; Gimenez, Maria-Jose; Granizo, Juan-Jose; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Gilsanz, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    An accurate and readily available biomarker for identifying patients with complicated intra-abdominal infection needing special attention in critical care units because of their greater risk of dying would be of value for intensivists. A multi-center, observational, retrospective study explored blood lactate, C-reactive protein (CRP), and procalcitonin (PCT) concentrations, and also Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS II) as mortality predictors in all adult patients with complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI) admitted to Surgical Critical Care Units (SCCUs) for ≥48 h in four Spanish hospitals (June 2012-June 2013). Logistic regression models (step-wise procedure) were constructed using as dependent variables "intra-SCCU mortality" or "overall mortality," and variables showing differences (p≤0.1) in bivariate analyses as independent variables. One hundred twenty-one cases were included. Mortality intra-SCCU (R(2)=0.189, p=0.001) was associated with SAPS II (categorized as high if ≥47) (OR=9.55; 95% CI, 1.09-83.85; p=0.042) and 24 h-lactate (≥5.87 categorized as high) (OR=6.90; 95% CI, 1.28-37.08). Overall mortality (R(2)=0.275, p=0.001) was associated with peak PCT (≥100 categorized as high) (OR=11.28; 95% CI, 1.80-70.20), peak lactate (≥1.8 categorized as high) (OR=8.86; 95% CI, 1.51-52.10) and SOFA at admission (≥7 categorized as high) (OR=8.14; 95% CI, 1.69-39.20), but was predicted better (R(2)=0.275, p=0.001) by a single dummy variable (high peak PCT-high peak lactate concentrations) (OR=99.11; 95% CI, 5.21-1885.97; p=0.002). In the present study, SAPS II and 24 h-lactate concentrations predicted intra-SCCU mortality whereas overall mortality was predicted better by concurrent high PCT and lactate peak concentrations than by clinical scores or by each biomarker separately.

  4. Interleukin-1 Blockade With Canakinumab to Improve Exercise Capacity in Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure and Elevated High Sensitivity C-reactive Protein (Hs-CRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Prior Acute Myocardial Infarction; Evidence of Systemic Inflammation (C Reactive Protein Plasma >2 mg/l); Reduced Left Ventricle Ejection Fraction (<50%); Symptoms of Heart Failure (NYHA Class II-III)

  5. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is only weakly related to cardiovascular damage after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael H; Christensen, Marina K; Hansen, Tine W

    2006-01-01

    The independent prognostic value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) has been questioned, and consequently we decided to investigate whether hsCRP was associated with subclinical cardiovascular (CV) damage independently of traditional CV risk factors.......The independent prognostic value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) has been questioned, and consequently we decided to investigate whether hsCRP was associated with subclinical cardiovascular (CV) damage independently of traditional CV risk factors....

  6. Assessment of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels as Diagnostic Discriminator of Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young Due to HNF1A Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Owen, Katharine R.; Thanabalasingham, Gaya; James, Timothy J.; Karpe, Fredrik; Farmer, Andrew J.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite the clinical importance of an accurate diagnosis in individuals with monogenic forms of diabetes, restricted access to genetic testing leaves many patients with undiagnosed diabetes. Recently, common variation near the HNF1 homeobox A (HNF1A) gene was shown to influence C-reactive protein levels in healthy adults. We hypothesized that serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) could represent a clinically useful biomarker for the identification of HNF1A mut...

  7. New evidences for C-reactive protein (CRP deposits in the arterial intima as a cardiovascular risk factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Montecucco

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Fabrizio Montecucco, François MachDivision of Cardiology, Foundation for Medical Research, University Hospital, Geneva, SwitzerlandAbstract: Inflammatory processes are orchestrated by several soluble molecules, which interact with cell populations involved. Cytokines, chemokines, acute-phase reactants, and hormones are crucial in the evolution of several inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. Several evidences suggest that C-reactive protein (CRP started to be considered as a cardiovascular risk factor, since CRP directly induces atheroslerosis development. The recent demonstration of CRP production not only by the liver, but also within atherosclerotic plaques by activated vascular cells, also suggests a possible dual role, as both a systemic and tissue agent. Although more studies are needed, some therapeutic approaches to reduce CRP levels have been performed with encouraging results. However, given the strong limitations represented by its low specificity and still accordingly with the American Heart Association, there is no need for high sensitivity CRP screening of the entire adult population as a public-health measure. The measure of serum CRP might be useful only for patients who are considered at intermediate risk.Keywords: atherosclerosis, inflammation, plaque, cardiovascular risk, C-reactive protein

  8. [Ultra-sensitive C-reactive protein associated to nutritional status and biochemical profile in Mexican shoolchildren].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro-Acosta, María Elena; Ruíz Esparza-Cisneros, Josefina; Delgado-Valdez, Jesús Hernán; Díaz-Molina, Raúl; Ayala-Figueroa, Rafael Iván

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a nonspecific marker of inflammation with low serum levels, which are not usually detectable. In order to assess cardiovascular risk in adults apparently healthy, ultrasensitive methods are used, and the CRP measured through these techniques is known as ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (US-CRP). Some researchers report an association of US-CRP with some anthropometric parameters in children with no apparent disease. The aim was to associate US-CRP with nutritional status and biochemical profiles in Mexican schoolchildren. In this cross-sectional study 300 healthy children (aged 10 to 12 years) were evaluated. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, body fat percentage, glucose, lipid profiles and US-CRP were measured. Exclusion criteria was: US-CRP > 10mg/L. We used multivariate regression models. 53.7 % were girls and 46.3 % were boys. The US-CRP median was of 0.3 mg/L (range: 0.3 mg/L-6.8 mg/L), and it was positively and significantly correlated with BMI (ß = 0.226, p = 0.032) and LDL-C (ß = -0.267, p = 0.007) and negatively associated with cholesterol (ß = -0.267, p = 0.007). There is an association between US-CRP and cardiovascular risk indicators, such as obesity and some lipid disorder in childhood; therefore, US-CRP may be used for close examination in Mexican children.

  9. C-reactive protein and homocysteine levels are associated with abnormal heart rate recovery in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Cemil; Akgül, Ebru; Pabuccu, Recai

    2010-06-01

    To determine heart rate recovery (HRR) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and its relation to C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine (Hcy) levels. Prospective clinical study. University hospital. Sixty-eight women with PCOS and 68 healthy women were included this study. Heart rate recovery was evaluated. We measured serum levels of CRP and Hcy. The presence of insulin resistance was investigated using homeostasis model assesment (HOMA-IR). Heart rate recovery, CRP, Hcy. Heart rate recovery was significantly decreased in women with PCOS compared with control group women. Subjects with abnormal HRR had significantly greater levels of CRP and Hcy. The PCOS patients with HRR in the top tertile compared with the bottom quartile tended to have lower mean CRP and Hcy levels. The HRR was significantly and negatively correlated with age, CRP, Hcy, HOMA-IR, and body mass index. C-reactive protein and Hcy are independent determinants of HRR. The CRP and Hcy levels may affect the development and progression of abnormal HRR in PCOS. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 in the peripheral blood of patients with chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gani Dhruva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate systemic levels of inflammatory markers of cardiovascular diseases like C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 in patients with chronic periodontitis, in comparison to periodontally healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: A total of 42 individuals, both males and females above the age of 30 years, were included in the study. Healthy controls (Group I, n = 14, chronic localized periodontitis (Group II, n = 14, and chronic generalized periodontitis (Group III, n = 14, all without any medical disorder, were recruited. Peripheral blood samples were taken and C-reactive protein (CRP levels were estimated in the serum samples by using the Particle-Enhanced Turbidimetric Immunoassay (PETIA technique. Serum samples of Interleukin-6 (IL-6 were assayed by using the Chemiluminescent Immunoassay (IMMULITE technique. Results: When mean CRP levels were compared between the groups, group III showed statistical significance when compared to group I (P = 0.04. Group III had a higher median IL-6 level (6.35 pg/mL than Group II (< 5.0 pg/ mL and group I (< 5.0 pg/mL. Differences in median values of IL-6 were not statistically significant in any group (P = 0.29. Conclusion: Periodontitis results in higher systemic levels of CRP and IL-6. These elevated inflammatory factors may increase inflammatory activity in atherosclerotic lesions and potentially increasing the risk for cardiovascular events.

  11. Elevated salivary C-reactive protein predicted by low cardio-respiratory fitness and being overweight in African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, T; Konkol, K; Biccard, B; Dudose, K; McKune, A J

    2012-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a sensitive marker of systemic inflammation and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between salivary CRP, cardio-respiratory fitness and body composition in a paediatric population. This was a cross-sectional study of 170 black South African children (age 9.41 ± 1.55 years, 100 females, 70 males) in grades 3 to 7. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were obtained for the analysis of CRP. Height, mass, skin-fold thickness, resting blood pressure, and waist and hip circumference measurements were obtained. Cardio-respiratory fitness was assessed using a 20-m multi-stage shuttle run. Children were classified as overweight/obese according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) body mass index (BMI) percentile ranking, and meeting percentage body fat recommendations, if percentage body fat was ≤ 25% in boys and ≤ 32% in girls. The cut-off point for low cardio-respiratory fitness was a predicted aerobic capacity value ≤ the 50th percentile for the group. Contributions of low cardio-respiratory fitness, overweight/obesity, and not meeting percentage body fat recommendations, to elevated salivary CRP (≥ 75th percentile) concentration and secretion rate were examined using binary logistic regression analysis with a backward stepwise selection technique based on likelihood ratios. Poor cardio-respiratory fitness was independently associated with elevated salivary CRP concentration (OR 3.9, 95% CI: 1.7-8.9, p = 0.001). Poor cardio-respiratory fitness (OR 2.7, 95% CI: 1.2-6.1, p = 0.02) and overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 85th percentile) (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.1-5.9, p = 0.03) were independent predictors of elevated salivary CRP secretion rate. The results suggest a strong association between poor cardio-respiratory fitness and/or overweight/obesity and inflammatory status in children, based on elevated salivary CRP levels.

  12. Absolute Quantification of C-Reactive Protein in Human Plasma Derived from Patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Utilizing Protein Cleavage Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. Keith; Muddiman, David C.

    2009-01-01

    A method employing protein cleavage isotope dilution mass spectrometry (PC-IDMS) was developed for quantification of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human plasma. This method was completed without the use of immuno-affinity chromatography or size exclusion chromatography, as previous mass spectrometric methods for the quantification of CRP have employed. A total of 110 human plasma samples were analyzed with PC-IDMS via 1-D nano LC-MS/MS using a 30 minute gradient with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in selective reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The results from this newly developed method were compared to results generated from an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) performed by an independent CLIA certified laboratory. The comparison of these results generated a R2 = 0.9708 which indicates successful quantification of CRP from human plasma utilizing the methodology described herein. Interestingly, the PC-IDMS method provided concentration values that were ~10X the concentration reported by the ELISA method, which demonstrated that the method of detection is an important consideration when determining reference ranges of a particular analyte. In addition, data is shown that illustrates that as epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progresses from stage I to stage IV, mean levels of CRP increase. PMID:19196186

  13. Uncoupling protein 2 G(-866A polymorphism: a new gene polymorphism associated with C-reactive protein in type 2 diabetic patients C-reactive protein in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocozza Sergio

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the relationship between the G(-866A polymorphism of the uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 gene and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP plasma levels in diabetic patients. Methods We studied 383 unrelated people with type 2 diabetes aged 40-70 years. Anthropometry, fasting lipids, glucose, HbA1c, and hs-CRP were measured. Participants were genotyped for the G (-866A polymorphism of the uncoupling protein 2 gene. Results Hs-CRP (mg/L increased progressively across the three genotype groups AA, AG, or GG, being respectively 3.0 ± 3.2, 3.6 ± 5.0, and 4.8 ± 5.3 (p for trend = 0.03. Since hs-CRP values were not significantly different between AA and AG genotype, these two groups were pooled for further analyses. Compared to participants with the AA/AG genotypes, homozygotes for the G allele (GG genotype had significantly higher hs-CRP levels (4.8 ± 5.3 vs 3.5 ± 4.7 mg/L, p = 0.01 and a larger proportion (53.9% vs 46.1%, p = 0.013 of elevated hs-CRP (> 2 mg/L. This was not explained by major confounders such as age, gender, BMI, waist circumference, HbA1c, smoking, or medications use which were comparable in the two genotype groups. Conclusions The study shows for the first time, in type 2 diabetic patients, a significant association of hs-CRP levels with the G(-866A polymorphism of UCP2 beyond the effect of major confounders.

  14. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence determination of C-reactive protein with carboxyl CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Harris, Emma; Shi, Jian; Chen, Alfred; Parajuli, Suman; Jing, Xiaohui; Miao, Wujian

    2010-09-14

    Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of water-soluble core/shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) coated with carboxylated polyethylene glycol polymers ("Qdot 625") was investigated in aqueous solutions using 2-(dibutylamino)ethanol (DBAE) and tri-n-propylamine (TPrA) as ECL coreactants. In both cases, ECL emissions at glassy carbon (GC) electrode appeared at the same potential of approximately 0.80 V vs. Ag/AgCl (3.0 M KCl), which was approximately 200 and approximately 150 mV more positive compared with the oxidation potentials for DBAE (approximately +0.60 V vs. Ag/AgCl) and TPrA (approximately +0.65 V vs. Ag/AgCl), respectively. The ECL intensity, however, was significantly affected by the type and the concentration of the ECL coreactant used as well as the nature of the working electrode. Under the present experimental conditions, ECL from DBAE was approximately 17 times stronger than that from TPrA. The maximum ECL was obtained at GC electrode when [DBAE] approximately = 53 mM, where a ratio of 11:3:1 in ECL intensity was evaluated for GC, Au, and Pt electrodes, respectively. The ECL emission of the Qdot 625/DBAE system had an apparent peak value of approximately 625 nm that matched well the fluorescence data. The QD as a label for ECL-based immunoassays of C-reactive protein (CRP) was realized by covalent binding of avidin on its surface, which allowed biotinylated anti-CRP to be attached and interacted with solution-phase CRP and the anti-CRP linked to micro-sized magnetic beads. The newly formed sandwich type aggregates were separated magnetically from the solution matrix, followed by the ECL generation at partially transparent Au nanoparticle-coated ITO electrode or Au/CD electrode in the presence of DBAE. Much stronger ECL responses were observed from the Au/CD electrode, at which a dynamic range of 1.0-10.0 microg mL(-1) CRP and a limit of detection of 1.0 microg mL(-1) CRP were obtained, respectively.

  15. Low levels of vitamin C in dialysis patients is associated with decreased prealbumin and increased C-reactive protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xuyang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subclinical inflammation is a common phenomenon in patients on either continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD or maintenance hemodialysis (MHD. We hypothesized that vitamin C had anti-inflammation effect because of its electron offering ability. The current study was designed to test the relationship of plasma vitamin C level and some inflammatory markers. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 284 dialysis patients were recruited, including 117 MHD and 167 CAPD patients. The demographics were recorded. Plasma vitamin C was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. And we also measured body mass index (BMI, calculated as weight/height2, Kt/V, serum albumin, serum prealbumin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, ferritin, hemoglobin. The relationships between vitamin C and albumin, pre-albumin and hsCRP levels were tested by Spearman correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis. Patients were classified into three subgroups by vitamin C level according to previous recommendation 12 in MHD and CAPD patients respectively: group A: 4 ug/ml (> 22.8 umol/l, normal and above. Results Patients showed a widely distribution of plasma vitamin C levels in the total 284 dialysis patients. Vitamin C deficiency ( 14 ug/ml. The similar proportion of different vitamin C levels was found in both MHD and CAPD groups. Plasma vitamin C level was inversely associated with hsCRP concentration (Spearman r = -0.201, P = 0.001 and positively associated with prealbumin (Spearman r = 0.268, P 10hsCRP (P = 0.048 and positively with prealbumin levels (P = 0.002 adjusted for gender, age, diabetes, modality of dialysis and some other confounding effects. Conclusions The investigation indicates that vitamin C deficiency is common in both MHD patients and CAPD patients. Plasma vitamin C level is positively associated with serum prealbumin level and negatively associated with hsCRP level in both groups. Vitamin C deficiency

  16. Kinetics of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and -10, and phospholipase A2-II in severely traumatized septic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laušević Željko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Injury-induced anergy is one of the key factors contributing to trauma victims' high susceptibility to sepsis. This group of patients is mostly of young age and it is therefore essential to be able to predict as accurately as possible the development of septic complications, so appropriate treatment could be provided. The aim of this study was to assess kinetics of interleukin (IL -6 and -10, phospholipase A2- II and C-reactive protein (CRP in severely traumatized patients and explore the possibilities for early detection of potentially septic patients. Methods. This prospective study included 65 traumatized patients with injury severity score (ISS > 18, requiring treatment at surgical intensive care units, divided into two groups: 24 patients without sepsis and 41 patients with sepsis. C-reactive protein, IL-6 and -10 and phospholipase A2 group II, were determined within the first 24 hours, and on the second, third and seventh day of hospitalization. Results. Mean values of IL-6 and phospholipase A2-II in the patients with and without sepsis did not show a statistically significant difference on any assessed time points. In the septic patients with ISS 29-35 and > 35 on the days two and seven a statistically significantly lower level of IL-10 was found, compared with those without sepsis and with the same ISS. C-reactive protein levels were significantly higher in septic patients with ISS 18-28 on the first day. On the second, third and seventh day CRP levels were significantly lower in the groups of septic patients with ISS 29-35 and > 35, than in those with the same ISS but without sepsis. Conclusion. Mean levels of CRP on the first day after the injury may be useful predictor of sepsis development in traumatized patients with ISS score 18-28. Mean levels of CRP on the days two, three and seven after the injury may be a useful predictor of sepsis development in traumatized patients with ISS score more than 28. Mean levels of

  17. Reduction in C-reactive protein and LDL cholesterol and cardiovascular event rates after initiation of rosuvastatin: a prospective study of the JUPITER trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridker, Paul M; Danielson, Eleanor; Fonseca, Francisco Ah

    2009-01-01

    % CI 0.26-0.56, pcholesterol and hsCRP reductions were only weakly correlated in individual patients (r values cholesterol less than 1.8 mmol/L and hsCRP less......BACKGROUND: Statins lower high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and cholesterol concentrations, and hypothesis generating analyses suggest that clinical outcomes improve in patients given statins who achieve hsCRP concentrations less than 2 mg/L in addition to LDL cholesterol less than 1.......8 mmol/L (cholesterol and hsCRP after the start of statin therapy is controversial. We prospectively tested this hypothesis. METHODS: In an analysis of 15 548 initially healthy men and women participating in the JUPITER trial (87% of full cohort), we...

  18. Sulfur-containing amino acids, C-reactive protein, Vitamin B 12 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our study aimed to analyze, whether there is a relationship between the plasma concentration of SAA, CRP as a predictor of mortality in HD patients as well as systemic vitamin concentration, measured as levels of vitamin B12 and folate. The present study shows that many abnormalities are observed in plasma SAA ...

  19. Local C-Reactive Protein Expression in Obliterative Lesions and the Bronchial Wall in Posttransplant Obliterative Bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Outi E. Päiväniemi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The local immunoreactivity of C-reactive protein (CRP was studied in a heterotopic porcine model of posttranplant obliterative bronchiolitis (OB. Bronchial allografts and control autografts were examined serially 2–28 days after subcutaneous transplantation. The autografts stayed patent. In the allografts, proliferation of inflammatory cells (P<.0001 and fibroblasts (P=.02 resulted in occlusion of the bronchial lumens (P<.01. Influx of CD4+ (P<.001 and CD8+ (P<.0001 cells demonstrated allograft immune response. CRP positivity simultaneously increased in the bronchial walls (P<.01, in macrophages, myofibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Local CRP was predictive of features characteristic of OB (R=0.456–0.879, P< .05−P<.0001. Early obliterative lesions also showed CRP positivity, but not mature, collagen-rich obliterative plugs (P<.05. During OB development, CRP is localized in inflammatory cells, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells probably as a part of the local inflammatory response.

  20. Elevated C-reactive protein and late-onset bipolar disorder in 78 809 individuals from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No prospective studies have examined the role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in late-onset bipolar disorder. AIMS: We tested the hypothesis that elevated levels of CRP are associated cross-sectionally and prospectively with late-onset bipolar disorder, and that such an association possibly...... is causal. METHOD: We performed cross-sectional and prospective analyses with a median follow-up time of 5.9 years (interquartile range: 4.4-7.6) in 78 809 individuals from the general population, and used genetic variants influencing CRP levels to perform a Mendelian randomisation study. RESULTS: Elevated...... levels of CRP were associated both cross-sectionally and prospectively with late-onset bipolar disorder. When CRP was on a continuous scale, a doubling in CRP yielded an observational odds ratio for late-onset bipolar disorder of 1.28 (1.08-1.52) with a corresponding causal odds ratio of 4.66 (0...

  1. Elevated C-Reactive Protein Associated With Late- and Very-Late-Onset Schizophrenia in the General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Orsted, David Dynnes; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Individuals with autoimmune diseases and severe infections have persistent or acutely elevated inflammatory biomarkers and increased risk of schizophrenia. We tested the hypothesis that baseline elevated plasma levels of the inflammatory biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), associate...... and schizophrenia-like psychosis combined. We performed prospective and cross-sectional analyses adjusted for potential confounders with up to 20 years of follow-up. Furthermore, we used genetic variants influencing plasma CRP levels to perform a Mendelian randomization study. Results: Age- and gender......-adjusted hazard ratios vs individuals in the first quartile of CRP were 1.7 (95% CI: 0.3-8.9) for second quartile, 2.1 (0.4-10) for third quartile, and 11 (2.8-40) for fourth quartile individuals. The corresponding hazard ratio for fourth quartile individuals after multifactorial adjustment was 5.9 (1...

  2. Validation of commercially available automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric method for measuring canine C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillström, Anna; Hagman, Ragnvi; Tvedten, Harold

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammatory disease in canine patients. An automated human immunoturbidimetric assay has been validated for measuring canine CRP, but cross-reactivity with canine CRP is unpredictable. OBJECTIVE......: The purpose of the study was to validate a new automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric CRP method (Gentian cCRP). METHODS: Studies of imprecision, accuracy, prozone effect, interference, limit of quantification, and stability under different storage conditions were performed. The new method was compared...... with a human CRP assay previously validated for canine CRP determination. Samples from 40 healthy dogs were analyzed to establish a reference interval. RESULTS: Total imprecision was

  3. Procalcitonin versus C-reactive protein for predicting pneumonia in adults with lower respiratory tract infection in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anette; Pedersen, Svend S; Nexoe, Joergen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of procalcitonin in diagnosing bacterial infection has mainly been studied in patients with severe infections. There is no study on the value of procalcitonin measurements in adults with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) treated in primary care. AIM: To evaluate...... of Infectious Diseases, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. METHOD: A total of 364 patients with LRTI were prospectively enrolled from 42 general practices. Patients were examined with chest radiography, microbiological analyses, and measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin. The outcome...... 0.70, 0.51, and 0.67, and of CRP were > or =20 mg/l, 0.73, 0.56, and 0.74 respectively. Corresponding positive predictive values were between 0.09 and 0.28. CONCLUSION: Both procalcitonin >0.06 ng/ml and CRP > or =20 mg/l were associated with radiographic pneumonia, bacterial infection...

  4. C-reactive protein and white blood cell count do not improve clinical decision-making in acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tind, Sofie; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Zimmermann-Nielsen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute appendicitis (AA) remains a diagnostic challenge as indicated by the high rate of unnecessary surgery. Blood samples, primarily C-reactive protein (CRP) and leucocyte counts, are used as a diagnostic supplement despite their relatively low sensitivities and specificities...... the blood results and re-evaluate their diagnosis. The surgeon's diagnosis before and after was compared with the final diagnosis defined by surgical findings or follow-up. The gold standard was any degree of appendicitis on histology. RESULTS: A total of 226 patients were included of whom 91 (40.3%) had...... appendicitis on histology. The surgeons changed their diagnosis in nine cases after assessing blood samples. The changes in the proportion of correct diagnoses, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values after assessing blood samples were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: The results of CRP and leucocyte...

  5. C-reactive protein, heart rate variability and prognosis in community subjects with no apparent heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajadieh, A; Nielsen, OW; Rasmussen, Verner

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increased C-reactive protein (CRP) and reduced heart rate variability (HRV) both indicate poor prognosis. An inverse association between HRV and CRP has been reported, suggesting an interaction between inflammatory and autonomic systems. However, the prognostic impact...... of this interaction has not been studied. We thus investigated the prognostic impact of CRP, HRV and their combinations. DESIGN: Population-based study. SUBJECTS: A total of 638 middle-aged and elderly subjects with no apparent heart disease from community. METHODS: All were studied by clinical and laboratory...... of four HRV measures were significantly associated with increased rate of death or myocardial infarction. In a Cox model with CRP >or=2.5 microg mL(-1), standard deviation for the mean value of the time between normal complexes...

  6. Microbiota separation and C-reactive protein elevation in treatment-naïve pediatric granulomatous Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermayer, Richard; Mir, Sabina A V; Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Cox, Stephen B; Dowd, Scot E; Kaplan, Jess L; Sun, Yan; Reddy, Sahna; Bronsky, Jiri; Winter, Harland S

    2012-09-01

    In patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), the presence of noncaseating mucosal granuloma is sufficient for diagnosing Crohn disease (CD) and may represent a specific immune response or microbial-host interaction. The cause of granulomas in CD is unknown and their association with the intestinal microbiota has not been addressed with high-throughput methodologies. The mucosal microbiota from 3 different pediatric centers was studied with 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and the fungal small subunit (SSU) ribosomal region in transverse colonic biopsy specimens from 26 controls and 15 treatment-naïve pediatric CD cases. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) was tested with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The correlation of granulomatous inflammation with C-reactive protein was expanded to 86 treatment-naïve CD cases. The CD microbiota separated from controls by distance-based redundancy analysis (P = 0.035). Mucosal granulomata found in any portion of the intestinal tract associated with an augmented colonic bacterial microbiota divergence (P = 0.013). The granuloma-based microbiota separation persisted even when research center bias was eliminated (P = 0.04). Decreased Roseburia and Ruminococcus in granulomatous CD were important in this separation; however, principal coordinates analysis did not reveal partitioning of the groups. CRP levels >1 mg/dL predicted the presence of mucosal granulomata (odds ratio 28 [6-134.32]; 73% sensitivity, 91% specificity). Granulomatous CD associates with microbiota separation and C-reactive protein elevation in treatment-naïve children; however, overall dysbiosis in pediatric CD appears rather limited. Geographical/center bias should be accounted for in future multicenter microbiota studies.

  7. Impact of subcutaneous infiltration of 0.5% bupivacaine on postoperative C-reactive protein serum titer after craniotomy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shariat Moharari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Background: Tissue injuries may provoke neuro-hormonal response which in turn may lead to release of inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesize that block of afferent sensory pathways by infiltration of 0.5% bupivacaine in the scalp may decrease neuro-hormonal response in the neurosurgical patient. Methods: After obtaining informed consent, forty ASA physical statuses I, II, or III patients between the ages of 18 and 65 years were enrolled randomly into two equal groups to receive either 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine (group A or 20 ml of 0.9% normal saline as a placebo (group B in the site of pin insertion and scalp incision. As the primary outcome we checked serum C-reactive protein (CRP levels before implementation of noxious stimulus, 24h, and 48h after the end of surgery to compare these values between groups. In addition, mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR were checked at baseline (after the induction of anesthesia, one minute after pin fixation and 5, 10, and 15 minute after skin incision and the recorded values were compared between groups. Results: No significant difference was found between serum CRP levels of the two groups. Comparison of mean HR between groups shows no significant difference. The mean of MAP was significantly lower in the group A in comparison with the group B (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The results of this study confirm that 0.5% bupivacaine scalp infiltration before skull-pin holder fixation and skin incision could not decrease post-operative C-reactive protein level. 

  8. Genetic predisposition to elevated levels of C-reactive protein is associated with a decreased risk for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Cassandra N; Smith, Caitlin J; Saftlas, Audrey F; Triche, Elizabeth W; Bjonnes, Andrew; Keating, Brendan J; Saxena, Richa; Breheny, Patrick J; Dewan, Andrew T; Robinson, Jennifer G; Hoh, Josephine; Ryckman, Kelli K

    2017-02-01

    To examine the association between genetic predisposition to elevated C-reactive protein (CRP)and risk for preeclampsia using validated genetic loci for C-reactive protein. Preeclampsia cases (n = 177) and normotensive controls (n = 116) were selected from live birth certificates to nulliparous Iowa women during the period August 2002-May 2005. Disease status was verified by the medical chart review. Genetic predisposition to CRP was estimated by a genetic risk score on the basis of established loci for CRP levels. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between the genotype score and preeclampsia. Replication analyses were performed in an independent, US population of preeclampsia cases (n = 516) and controls (n = 1,097) of European ancestry. The genetic risk score (GRS) related to higher levels of CRP demonstrated a significantly decreased risk of preeclampsia (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96). When the GRS was analyzed by quartile, an inverse linear trend was observed (p = 0.0006). The results were similar after adjustments for the body mass index (BMI), smoking, and leisure-time physical activity. In the independent replication population, the association with the CRP GRS was also marginally significant (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.92, 1.02). Meta-analysis of the two studies was statistically significant (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.90, 0.99). Our data suggest an inverse, counterintuitive association between the genetic predisposition to elevated levels of CRP and a decreased risk of preeclampsia. This suggests that the blood CRP level is a marker of preeclampsia, but it does not appear to be a factor on the causal pathway.

  9. Comparison of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fetuin-A levels before and after treatment for subjects with subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgir, Oktay; Bilgir, Ferda; Topcuoglu, Tuba; Calan, Mehmet; Calan, Ozlem

    2014-03-01

    This study was designed to show the effect of propylthiouracil treatment on sCD40L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fetuin-A levels on subjects with subclinical hyperthyroidism. After checking sCD40L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fetuin-A levels of 35 patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism, each was given 50 mg tablets of propylthiouracil three times daily. After 3 months, sCD40L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fetuin-A levels were then compared to the levels before treatment. Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and sCD40L levels were normal in the subclinical hyperthyroidism patients compared to the healthy controls, fetuin-A levels were statistically significantly higher (*p = 0.022). After treatment, fetuin-A levels of subclinical hyperthyroidism patients decreased statistically significantly compared to the levels before treatment (**p = 0.026). sCD40L and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels did not have a statistically significant difference compared to the control group and post-propylthiouracil treatment. In subclinical hyperthyroidism patients, high fetuin-A levels before propylthiouracil treatment and decreases in these levels after treatment in cases with subclinical hyperthyroidism indicated the possibility of preventing long-term cardiac complications with propylthiouracil treatment.

  10. C-reactive protein collaborates with plasma lectins to boost immune response against bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, PM; Le Saux, A; Lee, CM

    2007-01-01

    in the presence of plasma factors. In the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, CRP is a major hemolymph protein. Incubation of hemolymph with a range of bacteria resulted in CRP binding to all the bacteria tested. Lipopolysaccharide-affinity chromatography of the hemolymph co-purified CRP, galactose...

  11. Total anti-oxidant status and C-reactive protein values in Nigerians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rev Olaleye

    result in the production of large amounts of free radicals which are harmful to the human body. Antioxidants on the other hand are substances that when present even in low concentrations avidly react with and annihilate free radicals before oxidative damage is inflicted on vital components of the cells. This case-control ...

  12. Sensors and Biosensors for C-Reactive Protein, Temperature and pH, and Their Applications for Monitoring Wound Healing: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Pietro; Dini, Valentina; Kirchhain, Arno; Janowska, Agata; Oranges, Teresa; Chiricozzi, Andrea; Lomonaco, Tommaso; Di Francesco, Fabio; Romanelli, Marco

    2017-12-19

    Wound assessment is usually performed in hospitals or specialized labs. However, since patients spend most of their time at home, a remote real time wound monitoring would help providing a better care and improving the healing rate. This review describes the advances in sensors and biosensors for monitoring the concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), temperature and pH in wounds. These three parameters can be used as qualitative biomarkers to assess the wound status and the effectiveness of therapy. CRP biosensors can be classified in: (a) field effect transistors, (b) optical immunosensors based on surface plasmon resonance, total internal reflection, fluorescence and chemiluminescence, (c) electrochemical sensors based on potentiometry, amperometry, and electrochemical impedance, and (d) piezoresistive sensors, such as quartz crystal microbalances and microcantilevers. The last section reports the most recent developments for wearable non-invasive temperature and pH sensors suitable for wound monitoring.

  13. Genetic variation in estrogen receptor, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen does not predict the plasma levels of inflammation markers after longterm hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt

    2007-01-01

    Markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen, are associated with the risk of atherothrombosis. Plasma levels of these markers of inflammation are affected by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and modulated by smoking. We studied whether genetic variation in the estrogen...... receptor- 1 (ESR1), CRP and fibrinogen-beta genes influences the plasma levels of inflammation markers after HRT. Plasma CRP and fibrinogen were measured after five years follow-up in healthy postmenopausal women (per-protocol group) who were randomised to hormone therapy (n=187) or no treatment (n=249......). The effect of HRT, smoking and genetic variations in ESR1 (PvuII and XbaI), CRP (1444C/T) and fibrinogen-beta (FGB, -455G/A) were determined. The plasma concentration of CRP was higher in the HRT group than in the control group (2.03 mg/l and 1.41 mg/l, respectively; p

  14. Clinical relevance of high sensitivity C-reactive protein in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Adukauskienė

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coping with cardiovascular diseases (CVD, which are of the main causes of death worldwide, has influenced investigation of high sensitivity CRP (hsCRP and its role in pathogenesis, prognosis and prevention of CVD. hsCRP can be synthesized in vascular endothelium, atherosclerotic plaques, and theory of inflammatory origin of atherosclerosis is being more widely debated, raising questions, whether higher hsCRP plasma concentration might be the cause or the consequence. Summing up controversial data from multiple studies, guidelines recommend hsCRP testing for both, primary (stratifying CVD risk groups, selecting patients for statin therapy and secondary CVD prevention (prognosis of CVD and its treatment complications, evaluation of treatment efficacy in moderate CVD risk group. hsCRP testing also has role in heart failure, atrial fibrillation, arterial hypertension, valve pathology and prognosis of coronary stent thrombosis or restenosis. Medications (the well-known and the new specific – CRP binding affecting its concentration are being investigated as well.

  15. C-reactive protein expression is up-regulated in apical lesions of endodontic origin in association with interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Mauricio; Dezerega, Andrea; Bordagaray, María José; Reyes, Montserrat; Vernal, Rolando; Melgar-Rodríguez, Samantha; Ciuchi, Pía; Paredes, Rodolfo; García-Sesnich, Jocelyn; Ahumada-Montalva, Pablo; Hernández, Marcela

    2015-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the prototype component of acute-phase proteins induced ultimately by interleukin (IL)-6 in the liver, but it is unknown whether periradicular tissues locally express CRP. The present study aimed to identify whether CRP messenger RNA synthesis occurs in situ within apical lesions of endodontic origin (ALEOs) and healthy periodontal ligament and its association with IL-6 and to determine their protein levels and tissue localization. Patients with asymptomatic apical periodontitis and healthy volunteers presenting at the School of Dentistry, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile, were enrolled. ALEOs and healthy teeth were obtained and processed for either immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence to assess IL-6 and CRP tissue localization, whereas healthy periodontal ligaments were processed as controls for real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for their RNA expression levels and multiplex assay to determine their protein levels. Statistic analysis was performed using the unpaired t test or Mann-Whitney test according to data distribution and Pearson correlation. IL-6 and CRP were synthesized in ALEOs, whereas their RNA expression and protein levels were significantly higher when compared with healthy periodontal ligament. IL-6 and CRP immunolocalized to the inflammatory cells, vascular endothelial cells, and mesenchymal cells. Both, IL-6 and CRP colocalized in ALEOs, and a positive correlation was found between their expression levels (P periodontal ligament and up-regulated in ALEOs along with higher protein levels. Given their pleiotropic effects, IL-6 and CRP protein levels in apical tissues might partially explain the development and progression of ALEOs as well as potentially asymptomatic apical periodontitis-associated systemic low-grade inflammation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The repeatability of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and C-reactive protein in COPD patients over one year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolsum, Umme; Roy, Kay; Starkey, Cerys

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many of the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are mediated through increased systemic levels of inflammatory proteins. We assessed the long term repeatability of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and C-reactive protein...

  17. The repeatability of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and C-reactive protein in COPD patients over one year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolsum, Umme; Roy, Kay; Starkey, Cerys

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many of the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are mediated through increased systemic levels of inflammatory proteins. We assessed the long term repeatability of Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and C-reactive protein...

  18. Utility of measuring serum levels of anti-PGL-I antibody, neopterin and C-reactive protein in monitoring leprosy patients during multi-drug treatment and reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, E. A.; Iyer, A.; Ura, S.; Lauris, J. R.; Naafs, B.; Das, P. K.; Vilani-Moreno, F.

    2007-01-01

    To verify the validity of measuring the levels of Mycobacterium leprae-specific anti-phenolic glycolipid (PGL)-I antibody, neopterin, a product of activated macrophages, and C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase protein, in serial serum samples from patients for monitoring the leprosy spectrum

  19. C-reactive protein in healthy subjects: Associations with obesity, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction : A potential role for cytokines originating from adipose tissue?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudkin, J.S.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Emeis, J.J.; Coppack, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    C-reactive protein, a hepatic acute phase protein largely regulated by circulating levels of interleukin-6, predicts coronary heart disease incidence in healthy subjects. We have shown that subcutaneous adipose tissue secretes interleukin-6 in vivo. In this study we have sought associations of

  20. Accuracy of C-reactive protein determination in predicting chorioamnionitis and neonatal infection in pregnant women with premature rupture of membranes: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, Rafli; van der Ham, David P.; Oei, S. Guid; Willekes, Christine; Weiner, Carl P.; Mol, Ben W. J.

    2009-01-01

    Preterm premature rupture of the fetal membranes (PPROM) is associated with intra-uterine infection. Early detection of intra-uterine infection may help prevent neonatal sepsis. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein often elevated when inflammation is present. The aim of this review was

  1. Association between lectin complement pathway initiators, C-reactive protein and left ventricular remodeling in myocardial infarction-a magnetic resonance study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2013-01-01

    Lectin complement pathway (LP) activation is an important mechanism in myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). LP is activated via the recognition molecules mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins-2 and-3 and is regulated by MBL/Ficolin-associated Protein-1 (MAP-1). Also, C-reactive protein...

  2. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li Hu

    Full Text Available Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD, stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200 detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and homocysteine was estimated at 500 m altitude, 3650 m altitude, 3 day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m, and 1 month after coming back to the 500 m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m. P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction.

  3. Clinical significance of C-reactive protein for assessment and outcomes of severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REN Linan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo study the change in serum CRP level in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP, and to explore its clinical significance in predicting outcomes and assessing the severity of SAP. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on 52 SAP patients with complete case data and admitted to General Hospital of Shenyang Military Area Command from September 2013 to September 2014. Blood drawing was performed and serum CRP concentration was determined on admission and at 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 hours after admission. The pattern of its dynamic change was observed. ResultsSerum CRP level in SAP patients significantly increased, and had a positive correlation with clinical outcomes. Forty-two cases (80.77% gradually recovered with aggressive treatment and the serum CRP levels were also slowly reduced (P<0.05. The serum CRP levels in four death cases (7.7% had no significant decrease and was maintained at a high level (P<0.05. Six patients (11.53% had aggravated conditions and recovered after aggressive treatment; meanwhile, the serum CRP levels first increased and then decreased (P<0.05. ConclusionFor SAP patients, serum CRP level fluctuates as their conditions change and can be considered as an important reference index for evaluating the severity and judging the outcomes of SAP.

  4. High-affinity RNA aptamers to C-reactive protein (CRP): newly developed pre-elution methods for aptamer selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orito, N.; Umekage, S.; Sato, K.; Kawauchi, S.; Tanaka, H.; Sakai, E.; Tanaka, T.; Kikuchi, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a modified SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) method to obtain RNA aptamers with high affinity to C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a clinical biomarker present in plasma, the level of which increases in response to infections and noninfectious inflammation. The CRP level is also an important prognostic indicator in patients with several syndromes. At present, CRP content in blood is measured immunochemically using antibodies. To develop a more sensitive method using RNA aptamers, we have attempted to obtain high-affinity RNA aptamers to CRP. We succeeded in obtaining an RNA aptamer with high affinity to CRP using a CRP-immobilized Sepharose column and pre-elution procedure. Pre-elution is a method that removes the weak binding portion from a selected RNA population by washing for a short time with buffer containing CRP. By surface plasmon-resonance (SPR) analysis, the affinity constant of this aptamer for CRP was calculated to be KD = 2.25×10-9 (M). The secondary structure, contact sites with CRP protein, and application of this aptamer will be described.

  5. Correlation of serum C-reactive protein, white blood count and neutrophil percentage with histopathology findings in acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xharra Shefki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute appendicitis is one of the most common surgical emergencies. Accurate diagnosis of acute appendicitis is based on careful history, physical examination, laboratory and imaging investigation. The aim of the study is to analyze the role of C-reactive protein (CRP, white blood count (WBC and Neutrophil percentage (NP in improving the accuracy of diagnosis of acute appendicitis and to compare it with the intraoperative assessment and histopathology findings. Materials and methods This investigation was a prospective double blinded clinical study. The study was done on 173 patients surgically treated for acute appendicitis. The WBC, NP, and measurement of CRP were randomly collected pre-operatively from all involved patients. Macroscopic assessment was made from the operation. Appendectomy and a histopathology examination were performed on all patients. Gross description was compared with histopathology results and then correlated with CRP, WBC, and NP. Results The observational accuracy was 87,3%, as compared to histopathological accuracy which was 85.5% with a total of 173 patients that were operated on. The histopathology showed 25 (14.5% patients had normal appendices, and 148 (85.5% patients had acutely inflamed, gangrenous, or perforated appendicitis. 52% were male and 48% were female, with the age ranging from 5 to 59 with a median of 19.7. The gangrenous type was the most frequent (52.6%. The WBC was altered in 77.5% of the cases, NP in 72.3%, and C-reactive protein in 76.9% cases. In those with positive appendicitis, the CRP and WBC values were elevated in 126 patients (72.8%, whereas NP was higher than 75% in 117 patients (67.6%. Out of 106 patients with triple positive tests, 101 (95.2% had appendicitis. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of the 3 tests in combination were 95.3%, 72.2%, and 95.3%, respectively. Conclusion The raised value of the CRP was directly related to the severity of

  6. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of teicoplanin in neonates: making better use of C-reactive protein to deliver individualized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martín, V; Neely, M N; McGowan, P; Siner, S; Padmore, K; Peak, M; Beresford, M W; Turner, M A; Paulus, S; Hope, W W

    2016-11-01

    There is uncertainty about the optimal teicoplanin regimens for neonates. The study aim was to determine the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of teicoplanin in neonates, evaluate currently recommended regimens and explore the exposure-effect relationships. An open-label PK study was conducted. Neonates from 26 to 44 weeks post-menstrual age were recruited (n = 18). The teicoplanin regimen was a 16 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 8 mg/kg once daily. Therapeutic drug monitoring and dose adjustment were not conducted. A standard two-compartment PK model was developed, followed by models that incorporated weight. A PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) model with C-reactive protein serial measurements as the PD input was fitted to the data. Monte Carlo simulations (n = 5000) were performed using Pmetrics. The AUCs at steady state and the proportion of patients achieving the recommended drug exposures (i.e. Cmin >15 mg/L) were determined. The study was registered in the European Clinical Trials Database Registry (EudraCT: 2012-005738-12). The PK allometric model best accounted for the observed data. The PK parameters medians were: clearance = 0.435 × (weight/70)0.75 (L/h); volume = 0.765 (L); Kcp = 1.3 (h-1); and Kpc = 0.629 (h-1). The individual time-course of C-reactive protein was well described using the Bayesian posterior estimates for each patient. The simulated median AUC96-120 was 302.3 mg·h/L and the median Cmin at 120 h was 12.9 mg/L; 38.8% of patients attained a Cmin >15 mg/L by 120 h. Teicoplanin population PK is highly variable in neonates, weight being the best descriptor of PK variability. A low percentage of neonates were able to achieve Cmin >15 mg/L. The routine use of therapeutic drug monitoring and improved knowledge on the PD of teicoplanin is required. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. C-reactive protein is associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and obesity in type 2 diabetic Sudanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongway AC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Angelo C Dongway,1 Areeg S Faggad,2,3 Hani Y Zaki,2 Badreldin E Abdalla,2,41Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Upper Nile University, Malakal, South Sudan; 2Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira, 3Department of Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute-University of Gezira, Wad Medani, Sudan; 4Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Type 2 diabetes is emerging in Sudan and is associated with obesity. Deregulated lipid metabolism and inflammatory states are suggested risk factors for cardiovascular disease, which is a leading cause of diabetic death. This study aimed to investigate C-reactive protein (CRP levels and the lipid profile in type 2 diabetic adult Sudanese compared with nondiabetics, and to test their associations with other characteristics. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 70 diabetics and 40 nondiabetics was conducted. Anthropometric measurements were assessed, and demographic and medical data were obtained using a structured questionnaire. Blood specimens were collected and biochemical parameters were analyzed applying standard methods. Results: CRP and triglycerides were significantly higher in the diabetic group (P<0.001 and P=0.01, respectively. Differences in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C were not statistically significant between the diabetic and nondiabetic groups. In the diabetic group, correlation analysis revealed that the CRP level had a significant positive correlation with LDL-C (r=0.255, P=0.034 and body mass index (r=0.29, P=0.016. Body mass index showed a significant positive correlation with triglycerides (r=0.386, P=0.001. Within the lipid parameters, a number of significant correlations were observed. Elevated levels of CRP, LDL-C, and triglycerides were markedly more prevalent in the

  8. C-Reactive Protein and Procalcitonin Diagnostic Value in Congenital Infection in Newborns with Extremely Low and Very Low Birth Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mikhaylova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high frequency of infectious complications in the early neonatal period of adaptation in infants with extremely low (ELBW and very low birth weight (VLBW attracts particular attention. The aim of our study was to evaluate the sensitivity (Se and specificity (Sp of C-reactive protein and procalcitonin in congenital pneumonia and congenital sepsis in newborn infants with extremely low and very low birth weight.Methods. In 160 preterm newborns that were included in our prospective study, 33 had early neonatal sepsis, 42 children had congenital pneumonia, and 85 infants were without neonatal infection. A comprehensive clinical and laboratoryinstrumental examination of the newborn was done, including determining the concentration of C-reactive protein and procalcitonin at the age of 48–72 hours of life. Results. Low sensitivity of CRP at the age of 48–72 hours of life in congenital sepsis and congenital pneumonia was observed. However, under these pathological conditions CRP and PCT are characterized by high specificity. It should also be noted that PCT has a high sensitivity in children with congenital sepsis aged 48–72 hours. Moreover, PCT also has a high specificity (Sp 80,6%, which determines its advantage in the use of sepsis diagnosis in extremely premature infants compared to CRP.Conclusion. Maximum specificity reaches 100%, co-located with the assessment of CRP and PCT, which determines the feasibility of using this combination for verification of congenital infectious conditions such as sepsis and pneumonia in children ELBW and VLBW aged 48–72 hours.

  9. C-reactive protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Americans. Increased serum CRP is related to traditional cardiovascular risk factors and may reflect the role of these risk factors in causing vascular inflammation. According to the ... developing cardiovascular disease if your hs-CRP level is lower ...

  10. Similar erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein sensitivities at the onset of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, acute rheumatic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Reitzenstein

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP are employed in the evaluation of patients with suspected septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and acute rheumatic fever. The purpose of this study is to determine if one test has greater sensitivity (rises earlier than the other. Laboratory data were retrieved for pediatric patients hospitalized with one of the above three conditions, who had both ESR and CRP tests done on or shortly prior to admission. Sensitivity calculations were performed for mild, moderate, and severe degrees of ESR and CRP elevation. Microcytic erythrocytes, as defined by mean corpuscular volume (MCV less than 80 μL, were identified to see if this affects the ESR. ESR or CRP sensitivities depend on the cutoff value (threshold chosen as a positive test. The sensitivities were similar for similar degrees of elevation. ESR and CRP discordance was not significantly related to MCV. We concluded that the CRP does not rise earlier than the ESR (their sensitivities are similar. Previously published conclusions are dependent on arbitrary thresholds. We could not find any evidence that MCV affects the ESR.

  11. Comparison of optomagnetic and AC susceptibility readouts in a magnetic nanoparticle agglutination assay for detection of C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fock, Jeppe; Parmvi, Mattias; Strömberg, Mattias; Svedlindh, Peter; Donolato, Marco; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2017-02-15

    There is an increasing need to develop biosensor methods that are highly sensitive and that can be combined with low-cost consumables. The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is attractive because their detection is compatible with low-cost disposables and because application of a magnetic field can be used to accelerate assay kinetics. We present the first study and comparison of the performance of magnetic susceptibility measurements and a newly proposed optomagnetic method. For the comparison we use the C-reactive protein (CRP) induced agglutination of identical samples of 100nm MNPs conjugated with CRP antibodies. Both methods detect agglutination as a shift to lower frequencies in measurements of the dynamics in response to an applied oscillating magnetic field. The magnetic susceptibility method probes the magnetic response whereas the optomagnetic technique probes the modulation of laser light transmitted through the sample. The two techniques provided highly correlated results upon agglutination when they measure the decrease of the signal from the individual MNPs (turn-off detection strategy), whereas the techniques provided different results, strongly depending on the read-out frequency, when detecting the signal due to MNP agglomerates (turn-on detection strategy). These observations are considered to be caused by differences in the volume-dependence of the magnetic and optical signals from agglomerates. The highest signal from agglomerates was found in the optomagnetic signal at low frequencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mean platelet volume in brucellosis: correlation between brucella standard serum agglutination test results, platelet count, and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okan, Dogan Halef; Gökmen, Zararsiz; Seyit, Bayik; Yuksel, Koca; Cevdet, Zungun; Deniz, Akbulut

    2014-12-01

    Brucellosis, a zoonotic infection, was most widely diagnosed by the Brucella standard serum agglutination test (SAT). No previous publication has demonstrated a correlation between the degree of Brucella SAT agglutination positivity and the severity of brucellosis infection. To contribute to the clarification of the relationship between patelets and brucellosis. It is also aimed at evaluating the usefulness of the SAT titer as a measure of brucellosis severity. We compared the control (n=60) and patients (n=96) groups in terms of mean platelet volume (MPV), C-reactive protein (CRP) and platelet values. Patients were grouped according to their degree of agglutination positivity titers and compared by means of CRP, MPV and platelet values. We also investigated the relationship among logarithmic values of MPV, platelet and CRP parameters for each group. Although statistically meaningful difference was observed between control and patients group in terms of MPV and platelet value, there were no statistically significant differences observed among patients groups. The physiological negative correlation between MPV and platelet count was not encountered in group 2 and 3. Logarithmic values of CRP were not correlated with logarithmic values of MPV and platelet counts. The MPV could be a new parameter to evaluate hematologic abnormalities in patients with brucellosis. The SAT titer was not a useful measure for evaluation of the severity of brucellosis.

  13. Parental perception of child weight and inflammation: Perceived overweight is associated with higher child c-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutin, Angelina R; Rust, George; Robinson, Eric; Daly, Michael; Terracciano, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Self-perceived overweight and weight discrimination are associated with inflammation in adulthood. We test whether there is an intergenerational association of parent perception of child overweight on higher levels of child c-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation implicated in stress. Data were from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2014 (N=4988). Parents reported their perception of their child's weight; CRP was assayed from children's blood samples. Children whose parents perceived them as overweight had higher CRP levels than children who were perceived about the right weight; perceived underweight was also associated with higher CRP (F(2,4977)=9.23, p<.001). These associations were independent of the child's objective weight status and waist circumference and held when the sample was limited to children with objective overweight and obesity. These results suggest an intergenerational transfer of the psychological perception of body weight from parents to the inflammatory health of their child. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Similar erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein sensitivities at the onset of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, acute rheumatic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzenstein, Jonathan E.; Yamamoto, Loren G.; Mavoori, Hareesh

    2010-01-01

    The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are employed in the evaluation of patients with suspected septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and acute rheumatic fever. The purpose of this study is to determine if one test has greater sensitivity (rises earlier) than the other. Laboratory data were retrieved for pediatric patients hospitalized with one of the above three conditions, who had both ESR and CRP tests done on or shortly prior to admission. Sensitivity calculations were performed for mild, moderate, and severe degrees of ESR and CRP elevation. Microcytic erythrocytes, as defined by mean corpuscular volume (MCV) <80 µL, were identified to see if this affects the ESR. ESR or CRP sensitivities depend on the cutoff value (threshold) chosen as a positive test. The sensitivities were similar for similar degrees of elevation. ESR and CRP discordance was not significantly related to MCV. We concluded that the CRP does not rise earlier than the ESR (their sensitivities are similar). Previously published conclusions are dependent on arbitrary thresholds. We could not find any evidence that MCV affects the ESR. PMID:21589835

  15. Investigation of High-Sensitivity C-reactive Protein and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate in Low Back Pain Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain can be a manifestation of lumbar degenerative disease, herniation of intervertebral discs, arthritis, or lumbar stenosis. When nerve roots are compromised, low back pain, with or without lower extremity involvement, may occur. Local inflammatory processes play an important role in patients with acute lumbosciatic pain. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) measurements in patients with chronic low back pain or radiculopathy. Methods ESR and hsCRP were measured in 273 blood samples from male and female subjects with low back pain and/or radiculopathy due to herniated lumbar disc, spinal stenosis, facet syndrome, and other diseases. The hsCRP and ESR were measured prior to lumbar epidural steroid injection. Results The mean ESR was 18.8 mm/h and mean hsCRP was 1.1 mg/L. ESR had a correlation with age. Conclusions A significant systemic inflammatory reaction did not appear to arise in patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:20556218

  16. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and exercise-induced changes in subjects suspected of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Mette Rauhe; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe; Carlsen, Christian Malchau

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammation plays a major role in the development of atherosclerosis. We wanted to investigate the effects of exercise on high-sensitivity (hs) C-reactive protein (CRP) in subjects who were suspected of having coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: Blood samples were obtained before......, 5 minutes after, and 20 hours after an exercise test in 155 subjects who were suspected of CAD. Coronary anatomy was evaluated by computed tomography coronary angiography and/or coronary angiography. RESULTS: Median baseline hs-CRP was higher in subjects with ≥50% coronary artery lumen diameter...... stenosis (n=41), compared with non-CAD-subjects (n=114), 2.93 mg/L (interquartile range 1.03-5.06 mg/L) and 1.30 mg/L (interquartile range 0.76-2.74 mg/L), respectively, P=0.007. In multivariate analyses testing conventional risk factors, hs-CRP proved borderline significant, odds ratio =2.32, P=0...

  17. Detection of the Inflammation Biomarker C-Reactive Protein in Serum Samples: Towards an Optimal Biosensor Formula

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    Wellington M. Fakanya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of an electrochemical immunosensor for the biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP, is reported in this work. CRP has been used to assess inflammation and is also used in a multi-biomarker system as a predictive biomarker for cardiovascular disease risk. A gold-based working electrode sensor was developed, and the types of electrode printing inks and ink curing techniques were then optimized. The electrodes with the best performance parameters were then employed for the construction of an immunosensor for CRP by immobilizing anti-human CRP antibody on the working electrode surface. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was then constructed after sample addition by using anti-human CRP antibody labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP. The signal was generated by the addition of a mediator/substrate system comprised of 3,3,5',5'-Tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride (TMB and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Measurements were conducted using chronoamperometry at −200 mV against an integrated Ag/AgCl reference electrode. A CRP limit of detection (LOD of 2.2 ng·mL−1 was achieved in spiked serum samples, and performance agreement was obtained with reference to a commercial ELISA kit. The developed CRP immunosensor was able to detect a diagnostically relevant range of the biomarker in serum without the need for signal amplification using nanoparticles, paving the way for future development on a cardiac panel electrochemical point-of-care diagnostic device.

  18. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein-based decision tree model for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections

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    Barbara Kraszewska-Głomba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As no specific laboratory test has been identified, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis remains a diagnosis of exclusion. We searched for a practical use of procalcitonin (PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in distinguishing PFAPA attacks from acute bacterial and viral infections. Levels of PCT and CRP were measured in 38 patients with PFAPA and 81 children diagnosed with an acute bacterial (n=42 or viral (n=39 infection. Statistical analysis with the use of the C4.5 algorithm resulted in the following decision tree: viral infection if CRP≤19.1 mg/L; otherwise for cases with CRP>19.1 mg/L: bacterial infection if PCT>0.65ng/mL, PFAPA if PCT≤0.65 ng/mL. The model was tested using a 10-fold cross validation and in an independent test cohort (n=30, the rule’s overall accuracy was 76.4% and 90% respectively. Although limited by a small sample size, the obtained decision tree might present a potential diagnostic tool for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections when interpreted cautiously and with reference to the clinical context.

  19. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein-based decision tree model for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszewska-Głomba, Barbara; Szymańska-Toczek, Zofia; Szenborn, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    As no specific laboratory test has been identified, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis) remains a diagnosis of exclusion. We searched for a practical use of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in distinguishing PFAPA attacks from acute bacterial and viral infections. Levels of PCT and CRP were measured in 38 patients with PFAPA and 81 children diagnosed with an acute bacterial (n=42) or viral (n=39) infection. Statistical analysis with the use of the C4.5 algorithm resulted in the following decision tree: viral infection if CRP≤19.1 mg/L; otherwise for cases with CRP>19.1 mg/L: bacterial infection if PCT>0.65ng/mL, PFAPA if PCT≤0.65 ng/mL. The model was tested using a 10-fold cross validation and in an independent test cohort (n=30), the rule’s overall accuracy was 76.4% and 90% respectively. Although limited by a small sample size, the obtained decision tree might present a potential diagnostic tool for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections when interpreted cautiously and with reference to the clinical context. PMID:27131024

  20. Objectively measured physical activity and C-reactive protein: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, P; Cardinal, B; Crespo, C; Brodowicz, G; Andersen, R; Sullivan, E; Smit, E

    2013-03-01

    The association between physical activity (PA) and C-reactive protein (CRP) is inconsistent, with nearly all studies using self-report measures of PA. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between objectively measured PA and CRP in US adults and children. Adults (N=2912) and children (N=1643) with valid accelerometer data and CRP data were included in the analyses. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the odds of meeting PA guidelines across CRP quartiles for children and among adults with low, average, and high CRP levels. For adults, after adjustments for age, gender, race, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), compared with those with low CRP levels, odds ratios were 0.59 (CI=0.45-0.77) and 0.46 (CI=0.28-0.76) for participants with average and high CRP levels, respectively. For children, after adjustments for age, gender, race, weight status, and HDL-C, compared with those in CRP quartile 1, odds ratios were 0.96 (CI=0.5-1.84), 1.23 (CI=0.71-2.12), and 0.79 (CI=0.33-1.88) for participants in quartiles 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Objectively measured PA is inversely associated with CRP in adults, with PA not related to CRP in children. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Elevated salivary C-reactive protein levels are associated with active and passive smoking in healthy youth: A pilot study

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    Azar Rima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined salivary C-reactive protein (CRP levels in the context of tobacco smoke exposure (TSE in healthy youth. We hypothesized that there would be a dose-response relationship between TSE status and salivary CRP levels. Methods This work is a pilot study (N = 45 for a larger investigation in which we aim to validate salivary CRP against serum CRP, the gold standard measurement of low-grade inflammation. Participants were healthy youth with no self-reported periodontal disease, no objectively measured obesity/adiposity, and no clinical depression, based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. We assessed tobacco smoking and confirmed smoking status (non-smoking, passive smoking, and active smoking with salivary cotinine measurement. We measured salivary CRP by the ELISA method. We controlled for several potential confounders. Results We found evidence for the existence of a dose-response relationship between the TSE status and salivary CRP levels. Conclusions Our preliminary findings indicate that salivary CRP seems to have a similar relation to TSE as its widely used serum (systemic inflammatory biomarker counterpart.

  2. MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode of the gated lateral bipolar junction transistor for C-reactive protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heng; Kwon, Hyurk-Choon; Yeom, Se-Hyuk; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won

    2011-10-15

    In this study, we propose a novel biosensor based on a gated lateral bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for biomaterial detection. The gated lateral BJT can function as both a BJT and a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with both the emitter and source, and the collector and drain, coupled. C-reactive protein (CRP), which is an important disease marker in clinical examinations, can be detected using the proposed device. In the MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode, the sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility of the gated lateral BJT for biosensors were evaluated in this study. According to the results, in the MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode, the gated lateral BJT shows good selectivity and reproducibility. Changes in the emitter (source) current of the device for CRP antigen detection were approximately 0.65, 0.72, and 0.80 μA/decade at base currents of -50, -30, and -10 μA, respectively. The proposed device has significant application in the detection of certain biomaterials that require a dilution process using a common biosensor, such as a MOSFET-based biosensor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Elevated copper, hs C-reactive protein and dyslipidemia in drug free schizophrenia: Relation with psychopathology score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanarayanan, Sivasankar; Nandeesha, Hanumanthappa; Kattimani, Shivanand; Sarkar, Siddharth; Jose, Jancy

    2016-12-01

    Inflammation, dyslipidemia and altered copper levels have been reported in several psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. However, their association with the severity of psychopathology in schizophrenia is yet to be established. The present study was designed to assess the serum levels of copper, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and lipid profile and to explore their association with psychopathology scores in schizophrenia. 40 cases and 40 controls were included in the study. Serum copper, hs-CRP and lipid profile were estimated in all the subjects. Disease severity was assessed using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Copper, hs-CRP, total cholesterol and LDL-Cholesterol were significantly increased and HDL-Cholesterol was significantly reduced in schizophrenia cases when compared with controls. Copper was positively correlated with hs-CRP (r=0.338, p=0.003). Total cholesterol was significantly correlated with PANSS total (r=0.452, p=0.003) and negative symptom scores (r=0.337, p=0.033). Triacylglycerol was positively correlated with general psychopathology symptom score (r=0.416, p=0.008). Copper and hs-CRP were increased and correlated well with each other in schizophrenia cases. Though total cholesterol and triacylglycerol showed positive association with severity of the psychopathology, copper and hs-CRP were not associated with the disease severity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The social patterns of a biological risk factor for disease: race, gender, socioeconomic position, and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Pamela; Karraker, Amelia; Friedman, Elliot

    2012-07-01

    Understand the links between race and C-reactive protein (CRP), with special attention to gender differences and the role of class and behavioral risk factors as mediators. This study utilizes the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project data, a nationally representative study of older Americans aged 57-85 to explore two research questions. First, what is the relative strength of socioeconomic versus behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences in CRP levels? Second, what role does gender play in understanding race differences? Does the relative role of socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences vary when examining men and women separately? When examining men and women separately, socioeconomic and behavioral risk factor mediators vary in their importance. Indeed, racial differences in CRP among men aged 57-74 are little changed after adjusting for both socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors with levels 35% higher for black men as compared to white men. For women aged 57-74, however, behavioral risk factors explain 30% of the relationship between race and CRP. The limited explanatory power of socioeconomic position and, particularly, behavioral risk factors, in elucidating the relationship between race and CRP among men, signals the need for research to examine additional mediators, including more direct measures of stress and discrimination.

  5. Clinical value of early serum procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and brain natriuretic peptide on prognosis of patients with sepsis

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    Wan-li JIANG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore clinical value of early serum procalcitonin (PCT, C-reactive protein (CRP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP on the prognosis of patients with sepsis. Methods The data of 45 ICU patients with sepsis in General Hospital of PLA admitted from Jan. 2011 to Jan. 2014 were retrospectively analyzed, and they were divided into survival group (n=36 and death group (n=9. The difference between serum PCT, CRP and BNP levels on the first day of their admission between the two groups was compared, and the relationship between the PCT, CRP, BNP levels and APACHEⅡ scores was also analyzed. Finally the positive predictive value of these biomarkers was assessed by using ROC curve. Results Significant differences were found in the serum BNP level and APACHE Ⅱ score between the two groups on the first day of their admission (P0.05, also the serum PCT and CRP levels showed no significant correlation with the APACHEⅡ score (P>0.05. Analysis of ROC curve showed that the sensitivity and specificity of serum BNP level showed a statistically significant predictive value in prognosis of sepsis (P=0.002, AUC=0.775, 95%CI: 0.626-0.886. Conclusion The serum BNP level may be used as a critical parameter in predicting the prognosis of sepsis. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.07.06

  6. Procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and APACHE II score for risk evaluation in patients with severe pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunkhorst, F M; Al-Nawas, B; Krummenauer, F; Forycki, Z F; Shah, P M

    2002-02-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is a peptide that is found elevated in patients with sepsis and severe infections. In healthy persons PCT serum levels are below 0.1 ng/mL. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of serum PCT determination for risk evaluation in patients with pneumonia. We focused on the correlation of PCT with the clinical status of the patient and prognosis of the disease. In a prospective study, in a nonsurgical intensive care unit the following parameters were assessed regularly in 93 patients with documented pneumonia: C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count (WBC), body temperature, PCT and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score. At the onset of infection 50% of the patients had elevated PCT levels above 2 ng/mL. The model of multivariate analysis of all tested parameters on days 0-5 stratified for clinical outcome (change in clinical classification or death) showed local significance for APACHE II score only. None of the other parameters in this model serves as an isolated indicator for change of clinical status or death. An intra-individual change of body temperature or CRP was never significantly associated with a change in the clinical status of the patient. Change in PCT on admission and at the end of the observation period significantly indicated a clinical change.

  7. Serum Profiles of C-Reactive Protein, Interleukin-8, and Tumor Necrosis Factor- in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis

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    Michael K. Digalakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background-Aims. Early prediction of the severity of acute pancreatitis would lead to prompt intensive treatment resulting in improvement of the outcome. The present study investigated the use of C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- as prognosticators of the severity of the disease. Methods. Twenty-six patients with acute pancreatitis were studied. Patients with APACHE II score of 9 or more formed the severe group, while the mild group consisted of patients with APACHE II score of less than 9. Serum samples for measurement of CRP, IL-8 and TNF- were collected on the day of admission and additionally on the 2nd, 3rd and 7th days. Results. Significantly higher levels of IL-8 were found in patients with severe acute pancreatitis compared to those with mild disease especially at the 2nd and 3rd days (=.001 and =.014, resp.. No significant difference for CRP and TNF- was observed between the two groups. The optimal cut-offs for IL-8 in order to discriminate severe from mild disease at the 2nd and 3rd days were 25.4 pg/mL and 14.5 pg/mL, respectively. Conclusions. IL-8 in early phase of acute pancreatitis is superior marker compared to CRP and TNF- for distinguishing patients with severe disease.

  8. Multiplex detection of B-type natriuretic peptide, cardiac troponin I and C-reactive protein with photonic suspension array.

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    Wenbin Lu

    Full Text Available A novel photonic suspension array has been developed for multiplex immunoassay. The carriers of this array were silica colloidal crystal beads (SCCBs. The codes of these carriers have characteristic reflection peaks originating from their structural periodicity; therefore they do not suffer from fading, bleaching, quenching or chemical instability. In addition, the fluorescence background of SCCBs is negligible because no fluorescence materials or dyes are involved. With a sandwich method, the proposed suspension array was used for simultaneous multiplex detection of heart failure (HF and coronary heart disease (CAD biomarkers in one test tube. The results showed that the three biomarkers: cardiac troponin I (cTnI, C-reactive protein (CRP and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP could be assayed in the ranges of 0.1-500 ng/ml, 1-500 mg/L and 0.02-50 ng/ml with detection limits of 0.01 ng/ml, 0.36 mg/L and 0.004 ng/ml at 3σ, respectively. There were no significant differences between the photonic suspension array and traditional parallel single-analyte test. This novel method demonstrated acceptable accuracy, high detection sensitivity and reproducibility and excellent storage stability. This technique provides a new strategy for low cost, automated, and simultaneous multiplex immunoassays of bio-markers.

  9. Clinical evaluation of C-reactive protein and procalcitonin for the early detection of postoperative complications after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frask, Agata; Orłowski, Michał; Dowgiałło-Wnukiewicz, Natalia; Lech, Paweł; Gajewski, Krzysztof; Michalik, Maciej

    2017-06-01

    Among the most common early complications after bariatric surgery are anastomosis leak and bleeding. In order to react quickly and perform accurate treatment before the clinical signs appear, early predictors should be found. In the study C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels were investigated. Characterized by a relatively short half-life, they can predict surgical complications. To develop and implement certain standards for early detection of complications. The study involved 319 adults who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) as a surgical intervention for morbid obesity at the Department of General Surgery of Ceynowa Hospital in Wejherowo. Every patient had CRP and PCT levels measured before the surgery and on the 1 st and 2 nd postoperative day (POD). Early postoperative complications occurred in 19 (5.96%) patients. Septic and non-septic complications occurred in 3 and 16 patients respectively. Among the patients with septic postoperative complications CRP level increased significantly on the 2 nd POD compared to the remainder (p = 0.0221). Among the patients with non-septic postoperative complications CRP level increased significantly on the 1 st and 2 nd POD compared to the remainder. Among the patients with septic and non-septic postoperative complications PCT level increased significantly on the 2 nd POD compared to the remainder. The CRP and PCT level are supposed to be relevant diagnostic markers to predict non-septic and septic complications after LSG.

  10. Gum Arabic Reduces C-Reactive Protein in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients without Affecting Urea or Indoxyl Sulfate Levels

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    Sarra Elamin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gum Arabic (GA is a complex polysaccharide with proven prebiotic properties and potentially beneficial systemic effects. Methods. We randomly allocated 36 chronic kidney disease (CKD patients to receive 10, 20, or 40 grams daily of GA for four weeks and studied the systemic effects of this intervention. Results. Thirty participants completed the study with baseline glomerular filtration rate 29.1±9.9 mL/min/1.7 m2. In contrast to previous observations, we found no effect on serum urea or creatinine levels. GA supplementation was associated with a small but statistically significant drop in serum sodium level (138±2 to 136±3 mmol/L, p = 0.002 without affecting other electrolytes, urine volume, or indoxyl sulfate (IS levels. GA supplementation was also associated with a significant drop in C-reactive protein (CRP level (3.5±1.5 to 2.8±1.6 ng/mL, p = 0.02 even in patients who received only 10 g/day (4.4±1.2 to 3.2±1.5 ng/mL, p = 0.03. Conclusions. Supplementing the diet of CKD patients with 10–40 g/day of GA significantly reduced CRP level which could have a positive impact on these patients’ morbidity and mortality. This trial is registered with Saudi Clinical Trial Registry number 15011402.

  11. The role of C-reactive protein in prediction of the severity of acute diverticulitis in an emergency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Jyrki T; Klintrup, Kai; Takala, Heikki; Rautio, Tero

    2015-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the most appropriate initial imaging modality for the assessment of acute diverticulitis. The aim here was to determine the usefulness of C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting the severity of the diverticulitis process and the need for a CT examination. The CRP values of 350 patients who presented first time with symptoms of acute diverticulitis and underwent CT imaging on admission to Oulu University Hospital were compared with the CT findings and clinical parameters by means of both univariate and multivariate analyses. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that a CRP cut-off value of 149.5 mg/l significantly discriminated acute uncomplicated diverticulitis from complicated diverticulitis (specificity 65%, sensitivity 85%, area under the curve 0.811, p = 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, a CRP value over 150 mg/l and old age were independent risk factors for acute complicated diverticulitis. The mean CRP value was significantly higher in the patients who died, 207 (84 SD), than in those who survived, 139 (SD 83). In addition, a CRP value over 150 mg/l and free abdominal fluid in CT were independent variables predicting postoperative mortality. CRP is useful for the predicting the severity of acute diverticulitis on admission. Patients with a CRP value higher than 150 mg/l have an in increased risk of complicated diverticulitis and a CT examination should always be carried out.

  12. Patterns of co-association of C-reactive protein and nitric oxide in malaria in endemic areas of Iran

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    Hossein Nahrevanian

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to numerous immune factors, C-reactive protein (CRP and nitric oxide (NO are believed to be molecules of malaria immunopathology. The objective of this study was to detect CRP and NO inductions by agglutination latex test and Griess microassay respectively in both control and malaria groups from endemic areas of Iran, including Southeastern (SE (Sistan & Balouchestan, Hormozgan, Kerman and Northwestern (NW provinces (Ardabil. The results indicated that CRP and NO are produced in all malaria endemic areas of Iran. In addition, more CRP and NO positive cases were observed amongst malaria patients in comparison with those in control group. A variable co-association of CRP/NO production were detected between control and malaria groups, which depended upon the malaria endemic areas and the type of plasmodia infection. The percentage of CRP/NO positive cases was observed to be lower in NW compare to SE region, which may be due to the different type of plasmodium in the NW (Plasmodium vivax with SE area (P. vivax, Plasmodium falciparum, mixed infection. The fluctuations in CRP/NO induction may be consistent with genetic background of patients. Although, CRP/NO may play important role in malaria, their actual function and interaction in clinical forms of disease remains unclear.

  13. Neurokinin 3 receptor and phosphocholine transferase: missing factors for pathogenesis of C-reactive protein in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchim, Nicholas F; Wang, Wei; Iriyama, Takayuki; Ashimi, Olaide A; Siddiqui, Athar H; Blackwell, Sean; Sibai, Baha; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2015-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), an innate immune mediator, is elevated in the circulation before symptoms in patients with preeclampsia, a severe hypertensive pregnancy disorder with high mortality and morbidity. However, the specific sources underlying increased CRP and the role of elevated CRP in preeclampsia are undefined. Here, we report that circulating CRP levels are significantly increased in a large cohort of normotensive pregnant individuals when compared with nulligravid women and is further increased in patients with preeclampsia. These findings led us to discover further that placental syncytiotrophoblasts are previously unrecognized cellular sources of CRP and underlie elevated CRP in normotensive pregnant women and the additional increase in patients with preeclampsia. Next, we demonstrated that injection of CRP induces preeclampsia features, including hypertension (157 mm Hg CRP treated versus 119 mm Hg control), proteinuria (35.0 mg/μg CRP treated versus 14.1 mg/μg control), kidney, and placental damage and increased levels of sFlt-1 in pregnant mice but not in nonpregnant mice. Our study implicates that phosphocholine transferase, a placental-specific enzyme post-translationally modifying neurokinin B, is essential for the pathogenic role of CRP in preeclampsia through activation of the neurokinin 3 receptor. Overall, our studies have provided significant new insight on the pathogenic role of CRP in preeclampsia and highlighted innovative therapeutic strategies. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Adiponectin, Interleukin-6 and High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein Levels in Overweight/Obese Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vandana; Kumar, Ajay; Agarwala, Anuja; Vikram, Naval; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy

    2017-10-15

    The aim of our study was to assess serum Adiponectin, Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels and their correlation with conventional risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes in overweight/obese Indian children. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting serum adiponectin, IL-6, hsCRP, blood glucose, triglycerides, and total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol were measured in children aged 7-15 years with BMI >85th centile. 84 overweight/obese children (48 boys) with mean (SD) age 10.2 (1.9) years were enrolled. Mean (SD) adiponectin, hsCRP and median (IQR) IL-6 levels were 6.0 (3.1) µg/mL, 3.4 (2.4) mg/L and 12.7 (5.0-90.0) pg/mL, respectively. Low adiponectin, high hsCRP and high IL-6 were noted in 16.5%, 49.4% and 54.4% participants, respectively. Adiponectin was inversely correlated with waist circumference, and IL-6 positively with BMI and blood glucose. Inflammatory mediators, hsCRP and IL-6 were elevated in half of the overweight children. Adiponectin and IL-6 correlated well with traditional risk markers.

  15. Abdominal adiposity is associated with elevated C-reactive protein independent of BMI in healthy nonobese people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapice, Emanuela; Maione, Simona; Patti, Lidia; Cipriano, Paola; Rivellese, Angela A; Riccardi, Gabriele; Vaccaro, Olga

    2009-09-01

    There is debate over the most appropriate adiposity markers of obesity-associated health risks. We evaluated the relationship between fat distribution and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), independent of total adiposity. We studied 350 people with abdominal adiposity (waist-to-hip ratio [WHR] > or =0.9 in male and > or =0.85 in female subjects) and 199 control subjects (WHR BMI and age. We measured hs-CRP and major cardiovascular risk factors. Participants with abdominal adiposity had BMI similar to that in control subjects (24.8 +/- 2.5 vs. 24.7 +/- 2.2 kg/m(2), respectively), but significantly higher waist circumference (96.4 +/- 6.0 vs. 83.3 +/- 6.7 cm; P adiposity had an adverse cardiovascular risk factor profile, significantly higher hs-CRP (1.96 +/- 2.60 vs. 1.53 +/- 1.74 mg/dl; P 3 mg/dl). In nonobese people, moderate abdominal adiposity is associated with markers of subclinical inflammation independent of BMI.

  16. Procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and serum lactate dehydrogenase in the diagnosis of bacterial sepsis, SIRS and systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglietta, Fabio; Faneschi, Maria Letizia; Lobreglio, Giambattista; Palumbo, Claudio; Rizzo, Adriana; Cucurachi, Marco; Portaccio, Gerolamo; Guerra, Francesco; Pizzolante, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), platelet count (PLT) and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as early markers for diagnosis of SIRS, bacterial sepsis and systemic candidiasis in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Based on blood culture results, the patients were divided into a sepsis group (70 patients), a SIRS group (42 patients) and a systemic candidiasis group (33 patients). PCT, CRP, LDH and PLT levels were measured on day 0 and on day 2 from the sepsis symptom onset. PCT levels were higher in Gram negative sepsis than those in Gram positive sepsis, although the P value between the two subgroups is not significant (P=0.095). Bacterial sepsis group had higher PCT and CRP levels compared with the systemic candidiasis group, whereas PLT and LDH levels showed similar levels in these two subgroups. The AUC for PCT (AUC: 0.892, P candidiasis groups (P=0.093 N.S.). In conclusion, PCT can be used as a preliminary marker in the event of clinical suspicion of systemic candidiasis; however, low PCT levels (candidiasis and SIRS groups.

  17. The correlation between highly sensitive C-reactive protein levels and erectile function among men with late-onset hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Konaka, Hiroyuki; Ijima, Masashi; Nohara, Takahiro; Narimoto, Kazutaka; Izumi, Koji; Kadono, Yoshifumi; Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Mizokami, Atsushi; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the correlation between highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels and erectile function, and assessed the clinical role of hs-CRP levels in men with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) syndrome. For 77 participants, we assessed Sexual Health Inventory for men (SHIM) score, Aging Male Symptoms (AMS) score and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). We also evaluated free testosterone (FT), hs-CRP, total cholesterol, triglyceride levels, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, waist size and blood pressure. We attempted to identify parameters correlated with SHIM score and to determine the factors affecting cardiovascular risk based on hs-CRP levels. A Spearman rank correlation test revealed that age, AMS score, IPSS and hs-CRP levels were significantly correlated with SHIM score. Age-adjusted analysis revealed that hs-CRP and IPSS were the independent factors affecting SHIM score (r= -0.304 and -0.322, respectively). Seventeen patients belonged to the moderate to high risk group for cardiovascular disease, whereas the remaining 60 belonged to the low risk group. Age, FT value and SHIM score showed significant differences between the two groups. A multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that SHIM score was an independent factor affecting cardiovascular risk (OR: 0.796; 95%CI: 0.637-0.995).

  18. Admission C-reactive protein does not predict functional outcomes in patients with strokes in a subacute rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadi, Meheroz H; Coar, Patricia L; Lukin, Meredith; Lesser, Martin; Blass, John P

    2008-09-01

    Because serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels correlate with the extent of inflammatory reactions, including acute strokes, we tested whether serum CRP levels on admission to a stroke rehabilitation unit help to predict functional outcome at discharge. We measured serum CRP level within 72 hrs of admission to an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit in 102 successive patients transferred to rehabilitation within 4 wks following stroke and who met inclusion criteria. Patients with normal levels of serum CRP (< or =9.9 mg/dl) on admission to our rehabilitation service were more likely to be discharged home rather than to an institution (66% vs. 44%, P < 0.03). These patients with normal serum CRP had higher absolute values for total functional independence measures and functional independence measures motor scores on admission, as well as on discharge (i.e., less disability). They also had fewer infections or other medical complications. However, the absolute magnitude of improvement (DeltaFIM) and length of stay were similar in the normal and elevated CRP groups. Multivariable logistic regression model did not show serum CRP level on admission to predict rehabilitation functional outcomes. Serum CRP level does not predict functional outcome at discharge on inpatient rehabilitation for stroke.

  19. Usefulness of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein for predicting bacteremia in urinary tract infections in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, A; Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Lizcano-Lizcano, A; López-Guerrero, M A; Barroso-Manso, Á; Heredero-Gálvez, E

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the capacity of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), lactate and leukocytes to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs). Observational, retro-prospective analytical study of adult patients (≥15 years) diagnosed with UTI in an emergency department from August 2012 to January 2013. The study included 328 patients diagnosed with UTI, with a mean age of 52±22 years, 74% of whom were women. Of these, 43 (13.1%) had bacteremia. For predicting bacteremia, PCT achieved the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) at .993 (95% CI .987-1; P<.001). A cutoff≥1.16ng/mL achieves a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 97%, a positive predictive value of 84% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Lactate achieved an ROC-AUC of .844, and CRP achieved only .534. The mean values when comparing PCT levels in patients with UTIs with and without bacteremia were 8.08±16.37 and .34±.37ng/mL, respectively (P<.001). For patients with UTIs in the emergency department, PCT achieves considerable diagnostic performance for suspecting bacteremia, a performance greater than that of lactate, CRP and leukocytes. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation between C-Reactive Protein in Peripheral Vein and Coronary Sinus in Stable and Unstable Angina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Weverton Ferreira, E-mail: wfleite@cardiol.br [Instituto do Coração (InCor) do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ramires, José Antonio Franchini; Moreira, Luiz Felipe Pinho; Strunz, Célia Maria Cassaro [Instituto do Coração (InCor) do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mangione, José Armando [Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is commonly used in clinical practice to assess cardiovascular risk. However, a correlation has not yet been established between the absolute levels of peripheral and central hs-CRP. To assess the correlation between serum hs-CRP levels (mg/L) in a peripheral vein in the left forearm (LFPV) with those in the coronary sinus (CS) of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and a diagnosis of stable angina (SA) or unstable angina (UA). This observational, descriptive, and cross-sectional study was conducted at the Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clinicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, and at the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, where CAD patients referred to the hospital for coronary angiography were evaluated. Forty patients with CAD (20 with SA and 20 with UA) were included in the study. Blood samples from LFPV and CS were collected before coronary angiography. Furthermore, analysis of the correlation between serum levels of hs-CRP in LFPV versus CS showed a strong linear correlation for both SA (r = 0.993, p < 0.001) and UA (r = 0.976, p < 0.001) and for the entire sample (r = 0.985, p < 0.001). Our data suggest a strong linear correlation between hs-CRP levels in LFPV versus CS in patients with SA and UA.

  1. Diagnostic Value of Serial Measurement of C-Reactive Protein in the Detection of a Surgical Complication after Laparoscopic Bowel Resection for Endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riiskjær, Mads; Forman, Axel; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of serial monitoring of biochemical inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC) count) in the postoperative diagnosis of anastomotic leakage or ureteral injury after bowel resection for deep infiltrating endometrio...

  2. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor is in contrast to high-sensitive C-reactive-protein associated with coronary artery calcifications in healthy middle-aged subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Hjortdal; Gerke, Oke; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to investigate the association between two markers of low-grade inflammation; soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP); and coronary artery calcification (CAC) score detected by cardiac ...

  3. Genetic variation in estrogen receptor, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen does not predict the plasma levels of inflammation markers after longterm hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Langdahl, Bente

    2007-01-01

    Markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen, are associated with the risk of atherothrombosis. Plasma levels of these markers of inflammation are affected by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and modulated by smoking. We studied whether genetic variation in the estrog...

  4. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, C-reactive protein, and urinary albumin levels as predictors of mortality and cardiovascular events in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kistorp, Caroline; Raymond, Ilan; Pedersen, Frants

    2005-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptides have been shown to predict cardiovascular disease in apparently healthy individuals but their predictive ability for mortality and future cardiovascular events compared with C-reactive protein (CRP) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio is unknown....

  5. Apolipoprotein A-II Influences Apolipoprotein E-Linked Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Women with High Levels of HDL Cholesterol and C-Reactive Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corsetti, James P.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Sparks, Charles E.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In a previous report by our group, high levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) were demonstrated to be associated with risk of incident cardiovascular disease in women with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the setting of both low (designated as HR1 subjects) and high (designated as

  6. C-Reactive Protein Predicts Progression of Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A 5-Year Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ljiljana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have indicated that high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP is a risk factor for the peripheral arterial disease (PAD in diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate the possible predictive significance of hs-CRP for the development and progression of PAD in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D.

  7. Effect of periodontal treatment on serum C-reactive protein level in obese and normal-weight women affected with chronic periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Zahrani, M.S.; Alghamdi, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of conventional periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level and periodontal status in obese and normal-weight chronic periodontitis patients. METHODS: This is a controlled clinical trial conducted at the King Abdulaziz University Faculty of

  8. Periodontal inflamed surface area and C-reactive protein as predictors of HbA1c : a study in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Hoedemaker, Evelien; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank

    Periodontitis may exert an infectious and inflammatory burden, evidenced by increased C-reactive protein (CRP). This burden may impair blood glucose control (HbA1c). The aim of our study was to analyze whether periodontitis severity as measured with the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) and

  9. High sensitivity C reactive protein as a prognostic marker in patients with mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis during lipid-lowering treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Asferg, Camilla; Nielsen, Olav W

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prognostic importance of high-sensitive C reactive protein (hsCRP) in patients with mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis during placebo or simvastatin/ezetimibe treatment in Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS). METHODS AND RESULTS: In 1620 SEAS patients, we m...

  10. Extension of antimicrobial treatment in patients with left-sided native valve endocarditis based on elevated C-reactive protein values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, D. W. M.; Hermanides, J.; Korevaar, J. C.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; van den Brink, R. B. A.; Speelman, P.; van der Meer, J. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this non-randomized study was to investigate whether there is any benefit in the extension of antimicrobial treatment in patients with left-sided native valve endocarditis in whom C-reactive protein levels are still elevated after a standard course of therapy. There was no statistically

  11. C-reactive protein level as diagnostic marker in young febrile children presenting in a general practice out-of-hours service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kool (Marijke); G. Elshout (Gijs); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.M. Bohnen (Arthur); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: It is unclear how well a C-reactive protein (CRP) value predicts a serious infection (SI) in young febrile children in general practice. Methods: This prospective cohort study with 1-week follow-up included children, aged 3 months to 6 years, presenting with fever to a

  12. C-Reactive Protein Level as Diagnostic Marker in Young Febrile Children Presenting in a General Practice Out-of-Hours Service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, Marijke; Elshout, Gijs; Koes, Bart W.; Bohnen, Arthur M.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is unclear how well a C-reactive protein (CRP) value predicts a serious infection (SI) in young febrile children in general practice. Methods: This prospective cohort study with 1-week follow-up included children, aged 3 months to 6 years, presenting with fever to a general

  13. Biological variation and reference intervals for circulating osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, Henriette Pia; Jacobsen, S; Jensen, T

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Monitoring inflammatory diseases and osteoclastogenesis with osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (total sRANKL) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) has recently attracted increased interest. The purpose...

  14. C-reactive protein and natural IgM antibodies are activators of complement in a rat model of intestinal ischemia and reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padilla, Niubel Diaz; van Vliet, Arlene K.; Schoots, Ivo G.; Seron, Mercedes Valls; Maas, M. Adrie; Peltenburg, Esther E. Posno; de Vries, Annebeth; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Hack, C. Erik; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2007-01-01

    Background. The role of C-reactive protein (CRP), natural immunoglobulin M (IgM), and natural IgM against phosphorylcholine (anti-Pc IgM) was investigated in relation with complement activation in a rat model of intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (II/R). The effect of Cl-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh)

  15. The effects of rose hip (Rosa canina) on plasma antioxidative activity and C-reactive protein in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal controls: A prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeskov, Bente; Christensen, Robin; Bügel, Susanne Gjedsted

    2011-01-01

    reductase and catalase and the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). The participants kept a food diary for the first 3 days and the last 3 days of the intervention period. The RA-patients completed The Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS: CRP...

  16. The added value of C-reactive protein measurement in diagnosing pneumonia in primary care : a meta-analysis of individual patient data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaard, Margaretha C.; de Groot, Joris A H; Hopstaken, Rogier M; Schierenberg, Alwin; de Wit, Niek J; Reitsma, Johannes B; Broekhuizen, Berna D. L.; de Vries-van Vugt, Saskia F.; Knuistingh Neven, Arie; Graffelman, Aleida W; Melbye, Hasse; Rainer, Timothy H; Steurer, Johann; Holm, Anette; Gonzales, Ralph; Dinant, Geert-Jan; van de Pol, Alma C; Verheij, Theo J M

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is increasingly being included in the diagnostic work-up for community-acquired pneumonia in primary care. Its added diagnostic value beyond signs and symptoms, however, remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis of individual patient data to quantify the

  17. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shrotriya, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence.

  18. Associations of C-reactive protein with measures of obesity, insulin resistance, and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy, middle-aged women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Hak (Liesbeth); C.D. Stehouwer (Coen); M.L. Bots (Michiel); K.H. Polderman; C.G. Schalkwijk (Casper); I.C.D. Westendorp (Iris); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractObesity, the insulin resistance syndrome, and atherosclerosis are closely linked and may all be determinants of an increased acute-phase response. In this study, we examined the relationship of C-reactive protein (CRP) with measures of obesity, variables of

  19. A Letter to the Editor: Using C-reactive protein to suggest an alternative explanation of the findings of Simanek et al

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2011-01-01

    . Timpson NJ, Lawlor DA, Harbord RM, Gaunt TR, Day IN, Palmer LJ, Hattersley AT, Ebrahim S, Lowe GD, Rumley A, Davey SG (2005) C-reactive protein and its role in metabolic syndrome: mendelian randomisation study. Lancet 366: 1954-1959. S0140-6736(05)67786-0 [pii];10.1016/S0140-6736(05)67786-0 [doi]. 10...

  20. The relationship of coffee and green tea consumption with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in Japanese men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Takako; Pham, Ngoc Minh; Yoshida, Daigo; Yin, Guang; Ohnaka, Keizo; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kono, Suminori

    2010-06-01

    Circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) is a good marker of chronic low-grade inflammation. The few studies that have addressed the relationship between coffee consumption and CRP concentrations report inconsistent findings. The authors of this study examined the relationship between coffee and green tea consumption and serum concentrations of CRP, and the interaction with alcohol consumption, smoking, and obesity in a large population of free-living Japanese men and women. Study subjects were 10,325 men and women, 49-76 years of age, living in Fukuoka City who participated in a baseline survey of a cohort study on lifestyle-related diseases. Coffee and green tea consumption and other lifestyle characteristics were assessed using a structured questionnaire. Anthropometric measurements and venous blood samples were also included. CRP concentrations were progressively lower with increasing levels of coffee consumption, after adjustment for smoking and other covariates (p for trend=0.03) in men, but not in women. Stratified analysis indicated that this inverse association was primarily limited to men with a high consumption of alcohol (> or =50 g/day). Green tea consumption showed no measurable relationship with CRP concentrations in either men or women. Coffee may be protective specifically against alcohol-induced hepatic inflammation. Further studies are warranted in different populations.

  1. Evaluation of C-reactive protein as an inflammatory biomarker in rabbits for vaccine nonclinical safety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destexhe, Eric; Prinsen, Menk K; van Schöll, Inge; Kuper, C Frieke; Garçon, Nathalie; Veenstra, Stéphane; Segal, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory reactions are one of the potential safety concerns that are evaluated in the framework of vaccine safety testing. In nonclinical studies, the assessment of the inflammation relies notably on the measurement of biomarkers. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase plasma protein of hepatic origin that could be used for that purpose in toxicity studies with rabbits. To evaluate the utility of CRP as an additional inflammatory biomarker in adjuvant or vaccine toxicity studies, rabbits were injected on Day 0 with saline, aluminium phosphate, aluminium hydroxide, Adjuvant System (AS)01, AS03, AS15, or diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis-hepatitis B vaccine (DTPw-HB). Body weights, haematology parameters, CRP and fibrinogen levels were measured daily up to Day 7. Macroscopic changes at the injection site were also evaluated up to Day 7. At Day 7, a histopathological examination of the injection site was performed. Like fibrinogen, CRP levels rapidly increased after the injection of Adjuvant Systems or DTPw-HB, peaking at Day 1, and returning to baseline in less than a week. The magnitude of the CRP increase was consistently higher than that of fibrinogen with a larger fold increase from background, providing a more sensitive evaluation. The number of circulating heterophils was also increased on Day 1 after the injection of Adjuvant Systems or DTPw-HB. The highest increases in CRP levels were observed after the injection of DTPw-HB or AS03, and were also associated with the persistence of mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates (including heterophils) at the injection sites on Day 7. No increases in CRP levels and in circulating heterophils were observed after injection of the aluminium salt adjuvants. Our study supports the use of CRP as an accurate biomarker of acute inflammation in rabbits for vaccine toxicity studies and highlights an association between increased CRP levels and the recruitment of heterophils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. C-reactive protein correlates to functional score systems of patients in general surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, J; Liu, X; Liu, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to document the relationship between inflammation indicated by the serum levels of widespread acute-phase proteins and scoring systems used in assessing patient’s functional condition. We therefore assessed serum levels of c-reactive protein (CRP) and four clinical tests [acutephysiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, functional independence measure (FIM) and Barthel index of activities of daily living (BI)]. We tested the hypothesis that results of functional tests correlate with infections and consecutively influence the length of stay (LOS) in non-specialized general intensive care units (ICUs). One hundred and twenty patients from non-specialized general ICU were enrolled in the study group. We scored patients consecutively on admission (APACHE II-initial; SOFA-initial, FIM initial and BI initial) and on the fifth day of stay (APACHE II-5th day; SOFA-5th day, FIM 5th day and BI 5th day). At the same time points, serum levels of CRP were assessed. FIM index did not correlate to the CRP at any time point (FIM- initial=0.027; FIM- 5th day=0.024; respectively) at discharge, total number of hospital days, i.e. LOS was recorded. Serum CRP values and APACHE II, SOFA, and BI scores correlated positively both on admission and on the fifth day of stay in the general surgical ICU (APACHE II- initial r=0.289; SOFA- initial r=0.305; BI - initial r=0.291; APACHE II 5th day r=0.728; SOFA-5th day r=0.725; BI 5th day r=0.792). Therefore, pending further studies, functional scoring in general surgical ICUs might prove useful in assessing LOS.

  3. Common variants in the CRP promoter are associated with a high C-reactive protein level in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Jung; Yun, Sin Weon; Yu, Jeong Jin; Yoon, Kyung Lim; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Kil, Hong-Ryang; Kim, Gi Beom; Han, Myung Ki; Song, Min Seob; Lee, Hyoung Doo; Byeon, Jung Hye; Sohn, Saejung; Hong, Young Mi; Jang, Gi Young; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2015-02-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute self-limiting form of vasculitis that afflicts infants and children and manifests as fever and signs of mucocutaneous inflammation. Children with KD show various laboratory inflammatory abnormalities, such as elevations in their white blood cell (WBC) count, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). We here performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 178 KD patients to identify the genetic loci that influence 10 important KD laboratory markers: WBC count, neutrophil count, platelet count, CRP, ESR, hemoglobin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), albumin, and total protein. A total of 165 loci passed our arbitrary stage 1 threshold for replication (p SNP located at the CRP locus (rs12068753) demonstrated the most significant association with CRP in KD patients (beta = 4.73 and p = 1.20 × 10(-6) according to the stage 1 GWAS; beta = 3.65 and p = 1.35 × 10(-8) according to the replication study; beta = 3.97 and p = 1.11 × 10(-13) according to combined analysis) and explained 8.1% of the phenotypic variation observed. However, this SNP did not demonstrate any significant association with CRP in the general population (beta = 0.37 and p = 0.1732) and only explained 0.1% of the phenotypic variation in this instance. Furthermore, rs12068753 did not affect the development of coronary artery lesions or intravenous immunoglobulin resistance in KD patients. These results indicate that common variants in the CRP promoter can play an important role in the CRP levels in KD.

  4. Procalcitonin and BISAP score versus C-reactive protein and APACHE II score in early assessment of severity and outcome of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezmarević, Mihailo; Kostić, Zoran; Jovanović, Miodrag; Micković, Sasa; Mirković, Darko; Soldatović, Ivan; Trifunović, Bratislav; Pejović, Janko; Vujanić, Svetlana

    2012-05-01

    Early assessment of severity and continuous monitoring of patients are the key factors for adequate treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP). The aim of this study was to determine the value of procalcitonin (PCT) and Bedside Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis (BISAP) scoring system as prognostic markers in early stages of AP with comparison to other established indicators such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score. This prospective study included 51 patients (29 with severe AP). In the first 24 h of admission in all patients the APACHE II score and BISAP score, CRP and PCT serum concentrations were determined. The values of PCT serum concentrations and BISAP score were compared with values of CRP serum concentrations and APACHE II score, in relation to the severity and outcome of the disease. Values of PCT, CRP, BISAP score and APACHE II score, measured at 24 h of admission, were significantly elevated in patients with severe form of the disease. In predicting severity of AP at 24 h of admission, sensitivity and specificity of the BISAP score were 74% and 59%, respectively, APACHE II score 89% and 69%, respectively, CRP 75% and 86%, respectively, and PCT 86% and 63%, respectively. It was found that PCT is highly significant predictor of the disease outcome (p APACHE II score. APACHE II score is a stronger predictor of the disease severity than BISAP score. PCT is a good predictor of AP outcome.

  5. C-reactive protein in outpatients with acute exacerbation of COPD: its relationship with microbial etiology and severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallego M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Miguel Gallego,1–3 Xavier Pomares,1,3 Silvia Capilla,4 Maria Angeles Marcos,5,6 David Suárez,7 Eduard Monsó,1–3,* Concepción Montón1,8,* 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hospital de Sabadell, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí-UAB, Sabadell, 2Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Esfera UAB, Barcelona, 3CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, CIBERES, Bunyola, 4Laboratory of Microbiology, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí-UAB, Sabadell, 5Department of Clinical Microbiology, Hospital Clínic, 6ISGlobal, Barcelona Centre for International Health Research (CRESIB, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, 7Epidemiology and Assessment Unit, Fundació Parc Taulí, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Sabadell, 8Health Services Research on Chronic Diseases Network-REDISSEC, Galdakao, Spain *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: C-reactive protein (CRP measurement has proven valuable for detecting exacerbations, but its usefulness in predicting etiology remains controversial. Likewise, its potential value as a marker of severity, which is well established in patients with pneumonia, remains unproven in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations. Methods: A cohort study of 118 patients with severe COPD and acute infectious exacerbations were included and followed up over 1 year. Episodes of exacerbations meeting Anthonisen’s criteria type I–II were evaluated, analyzing the etiology and inflammatory response as measured by CRP in blood. Results: A total of 380 episodes were recorded. Full microbiological analysis was available in 265 samples. Haemophilus influenzae was the most commonly isolated bacteria and rhinovirus the most common virus. Median CRP levels from the 265 episodes were higher in the cases with positive cultures for bacteria (58.30 mg/L, interquartile range [IQR] 21.0–28.2 than in episodes only positive for viruses (37.3 mg/L, IQR 18.6–79.1 and cases negative for any

  6. Relationship of Cardiac Structures and Functions with Adiponectin, C-Reactive Protein and Interleukin-6 Levels in Obese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuran Aşan, Güzide Doğan, Sadi Türkay, Meki Bilici,

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Obesity in childhood is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in adulthood due to cardiovascular disease. C-Reactive protein (CRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6 levels are elevated in obese patients, whereas the adiponectin level is negatively correlated. This study was conducted to determine the effects of obesity on cardiac structure and functions and to investigate the relationship of cardiac structures and functions with CRP, Il-6, and adiponectin levels. Patients and Methods: A total of 38 obese and 30 healthy non-obese children were included. The anthropometric profiles of all the children were recorded. CRP, IL-6, adiponectin, and fasting glucose insulin levels were measured. The Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated. The children were assessed using conventional transthoracic echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Serum CRP, IL-6, insulin, and HOMA-IR were higher, and adiponectin levels were lower in obese subjects. Left ventricular wall thickness and dimensions, and left atrial diameter were greater in the obese group and the myocardial performance index (MPI was measured higher (P=0.001. These alterations of cardiac structure were found to be positively correlated with body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, insulin and HOMA-IR, and negatively correlated with adiponectin. Conclusion: These alterations in cardiac structure and functions in obese children indicate cardiovascular diseases in adulthood, and can be measured by Doppler echocardiography. In addition, BMI, waist circumference, insulin, and HOMA-IR are useful parameters for both cardiac structure and cardiac functions. Adiponectin, should also be considered as a new parameter for cardiac structure.

  7. Plasma pentraxin 3 may be a better marker of peripheral artery disease in hemodialysis patients than C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yijun; Ni, Zhaohui; Zhang, Jiwei; Zhang, Weiming; Wu, Qingwei; Shen, Guijuan; Wang, Yongmei; Qian, Jiaqi

    2013-04-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a novel inflammatory cytokine produced in atherosclerotic plaque. We hypothesized that this marker may be a better predictor of peripheral artery disease (PAD) than C-reactive protein (CRP) in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The ankle-brachial index (ABI) was measured in HD patients. PTX3 levels in 116 HD patients and 30 healthy blood donors were measured by ELISA. A total of 116 HD patients (age: 56.44 ± 14.08 years) were enrolled; 21 (18%) patients had PAD. PTX3 was significantly higher in PAD versus non-PAD patients (5.55 ± 2.63 vs 2.32 ± 1.29 ng/mL; p < 0.001). In a univariate analysis, ABI correlated significantly with age, blood glucose and triglycerides, and plasma PTX3 (r = -0.548, p < 0.001) and high-sensitivity (hs)CRP (r = -0.495, p < 0.001). Using ROC curve analysis for PAD, PTX3 (cut-off value 4.06 ng/mL, AUC 0.901, p < 0.0001) showed a significantly better positive predictive value than hsCRP (cut-off value 3.33 mg/L, AUC 0.640, p < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis further confirmed that PTX3 (OR = 9.755, p = 0.001) was an independent predictor of PAD. In conclusion, we demonstrated that PTX3 may be a better marker of PAD than hsCRP, and independently correlated with PAD in HD patients.

  8. Genetic variation in C-reactive protein in relation to colon and rectal cancer risk and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Curtin, Karen; Poole, Elizabeth M; Duggan, David J; Samowitz, Wade S; Peters, Ulrike; Caan, Bette J; Potter, John D; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2011-06-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation, has been shown to be influenced by genetic variation in the CRP gene. In this study, we test the hypothesis that genetic variation in CRP influences both the risk of developing colon and rectal cancer and survival. Two population-based studies of colon cancer (n = 1,574 cases, 1,970 controls) and rectal (n = 791 cases, 999 controls) were conducted. We evaluated four CRP tagSNPs: rs1205 (G > A, 3' UTR); rs1417938 (T > A, intron); rs1800947 (G > C, L184L); and rs3093075 (C > A, 3' flanking). The CRP rs1205 AA genotype was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer (OR 1.3, 95%CI 1.1-1.7), whereas the rs3093075 A allele was associated with a reduced risk of rectal cancer (OR 0.7, 95%CI 0.5-0.9). The strongest association for the rs1205 polymorphism and colon cancer was observed among those with KRAS2 mutations (OR 1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.0). The CRP rs1205 AA genotype also was associated with an increased risk of CIMP+ rectal tumors (OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.2-5.3); conversely, the rs1417938 A allele was associated with a reduced risk of CIMP+ rectal tumors (OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3-0.9). We observed interactions between CRP rs1800947 and BMI and family history of CRC in modifying risk of both colon and rectal cancer. These data suggest that genetic variation in the CRP gene influences risk of both colon and rectal cancer development. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  9. C-reactive protein and its relation to high blood pressure in overweight or obese children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Juliana Andreia F.; Medeiros, Carla Campos M.; Cardoso, Anajás da Silva; Gonzaga, Nathalia Costa; Ramos, Alessandra Teixeira; Ramos, André Luiz C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) and high blood pressure (BP) in overweight or obese children and adolescents. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 184 overweight or obese children and adolescents aged from two to 18 years old, from April, 2009 to April, 2010. The classification of nutritional status used the body mass index (BMI). Based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention curve, individuals were classified as: overweight (BMI between the 85th-95th percentiles), obesity (BMI between 95th-97th percentiles) and severe obesity (BMI >97th percentile). Abnormal values were considered for systolic BP (SBP) and/or diastolic (DBP) if ≥90th percentile of the BP curve recommended for children and adolescents in the V Brazilian Guidelines on Hypertension, for waist circumference (WC) if ≥90th percentile of the curve established by the National Cholesterol Education Program, and for high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) if >3mg/dL. To evaluate the association of inadequate values of CRP and the studied groups, chi-square test and analysis of variance were applied, using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17.0 and adopting a significance level of 5%. RESULTS Among the evaluated sample, 66.3% were female, 63.5%, non-white, 64.1% had severe obesity, 78.3% had altered WC and 70.6% presented high BP. There was a significant association of CRP high levels with altered WC and BMI ≥97th percentile. In adolescents, high CRP was related to high SBP. CRP mean values were higher in individuals with elevated SBP. CONCLUSIONS Inadequate values of hs-CRP were associated with severe obesity and high SBP in the studied population. These markers can be used to identify children and adolescents at higher risk for developing atherosclerosis. PMID:24142315

  10. Impact of serum C-reactive protein level on the prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing TACE

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    Chung Hwan Jun

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsThe aim of this study was to determine the relationship between serum CRP levels and the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients.MethodsHCC patients who underwent the first session of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE between January 2005 and December 2009 (n=211 were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups: high C-reactive protein (CRP; ≥1 mg/dL, n=51 and low CRP (<1 mg/dL, n=160. They were followed for a mean of 22.44 months and their clinicoradiological variables and overall survival were compared.ResultsThere were significant differences between the two groups in regard to tumor type, tumor-progression-free survival, 10-month mortality, white blood cell (WBC count, tumor size, and TNM stage. Multivariate analysis revealed that a high serum CRP level was independently associated with tumor size and tumor type. Subgroup analysis of CRP groups according to tumor size demonstrated that a high serum level of CRP was significantly associated with poorly defined (diffuse tumor type in the tumor size <5 cm group [hazard ratio (HR=4.81, P=0.018]. A Lipiodol dose exceeding 7 mL (HR=5.55, P=0.046 and the 10-month mortality (HR=7.693, P=0.004 were significantly associated with high serum CRP level in the group of patients with a tumor size of ≥5 cm. In addition, subgroup analysis of matched CRP according to TNM stage revealed that elevated serum CRP was independently associated with tumor type, WBC count, and tumorprogression-free survival.ConclusionsA high serum CRP level is associated with large tumors and a poorly defined tumor type, and is significantly associated with 10-month mortality in patients with large HCC (size ≥5 cm who undergo TACE.

  11. Gene-specific DNA methylation association with serum levels of C-reactive protein in African Americans.

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    Yan V Sun

    Full Text Available A more thorough understanding of the differences in DNA methylation (DNAm profiles in populations may hold promise for identifying molecular mechanisms through which genetic and environmental factors jointly contribute to human diseases. Inflammation is a key molecular mechanism underlying several chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease, and it affects DNAm profile on both global and locus-specific levels. To understand the impact of inflammation on the DNAm of the human genome, we investigated DNAm profiles of peripheral blood leukocytes from 966 African American participants in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA study. By testing the association of DNAm sites on CpG islands of over 14,000 genes with C-reactive protein (CRP, an inflammatory biomarker of cardiovascular disease, we identified 257 DNAm sites in 240 genes significantly associated with serum levels of CRP adjusted for age, sex, body mass index and smoking status, and corrected for multiple testing. Of the significantly associated DNAm sites, 80.5% were hypomethylated with higher CRP levels. The most significant Gene Ontology terms enriched in the genes associated with the CRP levels were immune system process, immune response, defense response, response to stimulus, and response to stress, which are all linked to the functions of leukocytes. While the CRP-associated DNAm may be cell-type specific, understanding the DNAm association with CRP in peripheral blood leukocytes of multi-ethnic populations can assist in unveiling the molecular mechanism of how the process of inflammation affects the risks of developing common disease through epigenetic modifications.

  12. C-reactive protein may be a prognostic factor in hepatocellular carcinoma with malignant portal vein invasion.

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    Kim, Jong Man; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Park, Jae Berm; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Kim, Sung Joo; Paik, Seung Woon; Park, Cheol-Keun

    2013-04-23

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a high predilection for portal vein invasion, and the prognosis of HCC with malignant portal vein invasion is extremely poor. The objective of this study was to investigate the outcomes and the prognostic factor of recurrence in HCC patients with malignant portal vein invasion. We retrospectively reviewed the clinicopathologic data and outcomes of 83 HCC patients with malignant portal vein invasion and 1,056 patients without portal vein invasion who underwent liver resection. Increased serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, increased maximum tumor size, and intrahepatic metastasis were predisposing factors for malignant portal vein invasion by multivariate analysis. The median disease-free survival and overall survival of HCC patients with malignant portal vein invasion was 4.5 months and 25 months, respectively. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year disease-free survival rates were 30.6%, 26.1%, and 21.2%, respectively, and the overall survival rates for HCC patients with malignant portal vein invasion were 68.6%, 54.2%, and 41.6%, respectively. The initial detection site was the lung in HCC patients with portal vein invasion and the liver in HCC patients without portal vein invasion. C-reactive protein (CRP) was a significant independent predictor of tumor recurrence in HCC with malignant portal vein invasion after surgery. Increased ALP levels, increased maximum tumor size, and intrahepatic metastasis were independent predictors of malignant portal vein invasion in HCC. CRP level was closely associated with the predisposing factor of tumor recurrence in HCC patients with malignant portal vein invasion after a surgical resection, and lung metastasis was common.

  13. C reactive protein as a predictor of anastomotic leakage in colorectal surgery. Comparison between open and laparoscopic surgery.

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    Ramos Fernández, María; Rivas Ruiz, Francisco; Fernández López, Alberto; Loinaz Segurola, Carmelo; Fernández Cebrián, José María; de la Portilla de Juan, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Anastomotic leak (AL) is a serious complication in colorectal surgery due to its increase in morbidity and mortality. The aim of this prospective non-randomised study is to determine whether C-reactive Protein (CRP) is useful as a predictor of AL in patients undergoing open versus laparoscopic surgery. A total of 168 patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery were included. CRP was measured daily during the first 5postoperative days. Complications, specially AL, were analysed. Following an open approach 32 patients (45.7%) presented complications, 15 (18.7%) in the laparoscopic group and 12 (29.4%) in the converted group (P=0.153). Following open surgery 9 patients experienced AL, 5 were detected in the laparoscopic group and none in those converted (P=0.153). There were significant differences in CRP values between the 3 groups (P=0.03). ROC Curves showed AUC for the open and laparoscopic approach of 0.731 and 0.760 respectively. On day 4 the AUC was 0.867 for the open group and 0.914 for the laparoscopic group. Cut-off points on day 4 were: Open: 159.2mg/L; sensitivity 75%, specificity 89% and NPP 96% (P<0.001). Following laparoscopic surgery the cut-off point was 67.3%; sensitivity 100%, specificity 89.5% and NPP 100% (P=0.016). CRP on day 4 is useful to diagnose AL. Different cut-off values should be taken into account depending on the approach used. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensitivity of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein for the exclusion of septic arthritis in emergency department patients.

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    Hariharan, Praveen; Kabrhel, Christopher

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies in post-operative orthopedic and pediatric patients suggest that erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) testing may be helpful in ruling out septic arthritis. However, these tests have not been evaluated in a population of adult Emergency Department (ED) patients. Determine the sensitivity of ESR and CRP in patients with septic arthritis. Retrospective analysis of ED patients with septic arthritis from 2003 to 2008. Eligible patients had an International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision diagnosis of pyogenic arthritis (711.0x) plus: positive synovial fluid culture, positive synovial Gram stain, or operative irrigation. Patients were excluded if no ESR or CRP was performed within 24 h. Sensitivity of ESR and CRP at various cutoffs was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We identified 167 patients with septic arthritis. We included 143 (86%) who had ESR (n=140, 84%) or CRP (n=96, 57%) performed. Mean age was 49 (± 22) years, and 85 (59%) were male. Race was: 125 (87%) white, 4 (3%) black, and 12 (8%) Hispanic. Thirty-five (24%) had infection of prosthetic joints. Synovial cultures were positive in 102 (71%). Sensitivity of ESR was: 98% (95% CI 94-100%) using a cutoff of ≥10 mm/h (n=134) and 94% (95% CI 88-97%) using a cutoff of ≥15 mm/h (n=131). The sensitivity of CRP was 92% (95% CI 84-96%) using a cutoff of ≥20 mg/L (n=88). ESR and CRP have sensitivities of >90% for septic arthritis, but only when low thresholds are used. Further study is required to determine the clinical usefulness of ESR and CRP testing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlations of C-reactive protein levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rates with endoscopic activity indices in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin Young; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2014-04-01

    Accurate assessment of endoscopic severity is essential to the early detection of relapses and treatment of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). However, the relationships between non-invasive biomarkers and invasive endoscopic severity indices remain poorly understood. A total of 722 endoscopies in 552 patients were evaluated in this study. Endoscopic activity was assessed using five widely used endoscopic scoring systems: the Powell-Tuck assessment, Mayo Endoscopic Score, modified Baron Score, Rachmilewitz Endoscopic Activity Index, and Hanauer's Sigmoidoscopic Index. These five indices were compared with two non-invasive biomarkers, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The Pearson's correlation coefficients of CRP and ESR with endoscopic indices were r = 0.457 and 0.342 in the Powell-Tuck assessment, r = 0.503 and r = 0.402 in the Mayo Endoscopic Score, r = 0.507 and 0.408 in Hanauer's Sigmoidoscopic Index, r = 0.520 and 0.433 in the modified Baron Score, and r = 0.523 and 0.435 in the Rachmilewitz Endoscopic Activity Index. Sensitivity and specificity ranges for CRP and ESR were 50.5-53.3 % and 68.7-71.3 % and 85.1-87.2 % and 63.4-66.4 %, respectively, for the detection of endoscopic remission using the five endoscopic indices. CRP and ESR levels were modestly correlated with endoscopic activity indices in UC patients. However, the low sensitivities for detecting endoscopic remission suggest that CRP or ESR alone is not sufficient to reflect endoscopic severity accurately.

  16. Utility of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, Tanaz A; Schmidt, Jean; Crowson, Cynthia S; Ytterberg, Steven R; Hunder, Gene G; Matteson, Eric L; Warrington, Kenneth J

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the utility of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to determine the frequency of normal ESR and CRP at diagnosis of GCA. All patients undergoing temporal artery biopsy (TAB) between 2000 and 2008 were identified. Only subjects with both ESR and CRP at the time of TAB were included. The medical records of all patients were reviewed. We included 764 patients (65% women), mean age 72.7 (±9.27) years, who underwent TAB. Biopsy was consistent with GCA in 177 patients (23%). Elevated CRP and elevated ESR provided a sensitivity of 86.9% and 84.1%, respectively, for a positive TAB. The odds ratio of a concordantly elevated ESR and CRP for positive TAB was 3.06 (95% CI 2.03, 4.62), whereas the odds ratio for concordantly normal ESR and CRP was 0.49 (95% CI 0.29, 0.83). Seven patients (4%) with a positive TAB for GCA had a normal ESR and CRP at diagnosis. Compared with GCA patients with elevated markers of inflammation, a greater proportion of these patients had polymyalgia rheumatica symptoms (P = 0.008), whereas constitutional symptoms, anemia and thrombocytosis, were observed less often (P < 0.05). CRP is a more sensitive marker than ESR for a positive TAB that is diagnostic of GCA. There may be clinical utility in obtaining both tests in the evaluation of patients with suspected GCA. A small proportion of patients with GCA may have normal inflammatory markers at diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Original Article C-Reactive Protein 1059G/C Gene Polymorphism in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

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    Dilek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: C-reactive protein (CRP is considered to be a cardiovascular risk marker and changes in its level have been attributed to genetic factors. The aim of the study was to determine CRP 1059G/C gene polymorphism frequency and its relationship with CRP levels and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT in type 2 diabetic patients (DM. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty-four type 2 diabetic patients (mean age: 57±7 years; F/M: 80/84 and 151 controls (mean age: 53±7 years; F/M: 81/70 were recruited. CIMT was assessed by carotid ultrasonography. CRP 1059G/C polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. Results: The CRP 1059G/C polymorphism distribution in diabetic group and controls were similar (1059GG in 92% vs. 88%, 1059GC in 2% vs. 5%; 1059CC in 6% vs. 7%. CRP levels (4.3±6.6 mg/L vs. 2.5±2.3 mg/L; p=0.02 and CIMT (0.67±0.18mm vs. 0.56±0.19mm; p<0.0001 were increased in diabetics compared to controls. No association of CRP and CIMT with CRP 1059G/C polymorphism was found. Conclusions: Increased CRP levels and CIMT seem to be independent of CRP 1059G/C gene polymorphism in our group of type 2 diabetic patients. Turk Jem 2010; 14: 85-8

  18. Is procalcitonin to C-reactive protein ratio useful for the detection of late onset neonatal sepsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Won-Ho; Song, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Ho; Park, Suyeon

    2017-03-09

    Procalcitonin (PCT) has been reported as a sensitive marker for neonatal bacterial infections. Recently, small numbers of studies reported usefulness of PCT/C-reactive protein (CRP) ratio in detection of infectious conditions in adults. Thus, we conducted this study to evaluate PCT/CRP ratio in late onset neonatal sepsis. Serum PCT and CRP was measured in blood samples from 7 to 60 days after birth in 106 of neonates with late onset sepsis and 212 of controls who were matched with gestational age, postnatal age, birth weight, and gender. Areas under ROC curve (AUC) were calculated, and pairwise comparisons between ROC curves were performed. As a result, CRP (AUC 0.96) showed best performance in detection of sepsis from healthy controls compared with PCT (AUC 0.87) and PCT/CRP ratio (AUC 0.62); CRP > PCT > PCT/CRP ratio in pairwise comparison (p sepsis from healthy controls compared with PCT/CRP ratio (AUC 0.54); CRP = PCT > PCT/CRP ratio in pairwise comparison (p detection of blood culture proven sepsis from suspected sepsis, PCT (AUC 0.70), and PCT/CRP ratio (AUC 0.73) showed better performance compared with CRP (AUC 0.51); PCT = PCT/CRP ratio > CRP in pairwise comparison (p sepsis and healthy controls. However, PCT/CRP ratio seems to be helpful in distinguishing proven sepsis from suspected sepsis together with PCT. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the efficacy of PCT/CRP ratio with enrollment of enough numbers of infants.

  19. Calcium dobesilate reduces endothelin-1 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein serum levels in patients with diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadeh, Alireza; Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Adl, Farzad Hami; Andalib, Dima; Khojasteh-Jafari, Hassan; Ghabili, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    To determine the benefits of calcium dobesilate (CaD) administration on endothelial function and inflammatory status in patients with diabetic retinopathy through measurement of serum levels of endothelin-1 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, 90 patients with either severe nonproliferative or proliferative diabetic retinopathy and with blood glucose level of 120-200 mg/dl were randomly allocated to treatment with either CaD tablets (500 mg daily) or placebo for 3 months. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and macular status were performed before the study. The serum levels of endothelin-1 and hsCRP were evaluated in both groups before and at the third month of the trial. The median serum level of hsCRP significantly differed between the groups 3 months following the CaD or placebo administration (2.2 mg/l in the CaD group versus 3.7 mg/l in the placebo group, p=0.01). The mean endothelin-1 serum level was 0.69±0.32 pg/ml in the CaD group and 0.86±0.30 pg/ml in the placebo group (p=0.01). Furthermore, in the CaD group, the serum levels of both endothelin-1 and hsCRP were significantly decreased 3 months after administration of CaD (p<0.001). Administration of the CaD in the patients with diabetic retinopathy may reduce the serum levels of endothelin-1 and hsCRP. This might imply amelioration of the endothelial function and inflammatory status following CaD therapy in these patients.

  20. The cardiovascular markers copeptin and high-sensitive C-reactive protein decrease following specific therapy for primary aldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remde, Hanna; Dietz, Anna; Emeny, Rebecca; Riester, Anna; Peters, Annette; de Las Heras Gala, Tonia; Then, Cornelia; Seissler, Jochen; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin; Quinkler, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    Copeptin and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) are biomarkers associated with increased mortality in patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease as well as in the general population. No data exist regarding these markers in patients with primary aldosteronism. To evaluate copeptin and hsCRP levels as cardiovascular risk markers in primary aldosteronism patients. A total of 113 primary aldosteronism patients (64% male) from two centers of the prospective German Conn's Registry were identified, for whom a full data set and blood samples at baseline and follow-up (14 ± 3.4 months) after initiation of specific primary aldosteronism treatment were available. These cases were matched 1 : 3 (n = 339) for sex, renal function, BMI, age and SBP with participants from the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F4 survey. Copeptin and hsCRP were determined by sandwich fluoroimmunoassay. HsCRP was significantly higher in primary aldosteronism patients at baseline compared with matched controls. Following specific therapy, hsCRP and copeptin decreased significantly in primary aldosteronism patients [median (25th and 75th percentile): 1.6 (0.8, 3.4) to 1.2 (0.6, 2.1) mg/l, P copeptin levels at baseline and follow-up compared with women. The combination of sex, hypokalemia, lateralization index and blood pressure were the best predictors of outcome. However, copeptin and hsCRP had no predictive value despite the association of lower copeptin levels with better outcome regarding cure of primary aldosteronism. Copeptin and hsCRP levels decrease following specific primary aldosteronism therapy reflecting successful cardiovascular risk reduction. However, they are no independent predictors regarding cure of primary aldosteronism.

  1. Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and uric acid with the metabolic syndrome components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khatiwada, Saroj; Pandey, Sunil; Kc, Rajendra; Das, Binod Kumar Lal; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been found to be associated with inflammatory molecules. This study was conducted among 125 MetS patients at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal to find an association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum uric acid with MetS components. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, medical history and blood samples were taken. Estimation of hs-CRP, serum uric acid, blood glucose, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was done. hs-CRP had positive correlation with blood glucose (r = 0.2, p = 0.026) and negative with HDL cholesterol (r = -0.361, p uric acid had positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.178, p = 0.047). Patients with elevated hs-CRP and uric acid had higher waist circumference (p = 0.03), diastolic BP (p = 0.002) and lower HDL cholesterol (p = 0.004) than others. Elevated hs-CRP and high uric acid were individually associated with higher odds for low HDL cholesterol (7.992; 1.785-35.774, p = 0.002) and hyperglycemia (2.471; 1.111-5.495, p = 0.029) respectively. Combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid was associated with severity of MetS (p uric acid. The present study demonstrates that hs-CRP and serum uric acid are associated with MetS components, and the combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid is associated with the increase in severity of MetS.

  2. Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio may be superior to C-reactive protein for predicting the occurrence of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, H; Uyfun, M; Yilmaz, T S; Namuslu, M; Inan, O; Taskin, A; Cakmak, M; Bilgic, M A; Bavbek, N; Akcay, A; Kosar, A

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies revealed that inflammation plays a critical role in bone remodeling and the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, a major health concern. Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a cost-effective marker of inflammation that has been linked with several diseases. This study aimed to compare NLR and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in osteopenic, osteoporotic, and control subjects and to assess the correlation between NLR levels, CRP, and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women. In this cross-sectional study, the relationship between NLR, CRP, and BMD in 438 women was investigated using uni- and multivariate analyses. BMD (g/cm²) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) at the lumbar spine and femur. Complete blood count (CBC), CRP, glucose/lipid metabolism, and established risk factors were determined. In the osteoporotic group, NLR and CRP levels were found to be elevated as compared to the osteopenic and control groups (NLR: 4.68 ± 0.72, 3.17 ± 0.43, 2.01 ± 0.54; CRP: 12.3 ± 4.1, 4.1 ± 2.7, 3.2 ± 2.1, respectively). A negative correlation was present between NLR and the lumbar spine (L2-L4) and femoral neck BMD after adjusting other risk factors. There was no correlation between CRP levels and BMD after adjusting other risk factors. NLR was significantly associated with L2-L4 BMD (ß = -0.653, posteoporosis in postmenopausal women.

  3. Can C-reactive protein inform antidepressant medication selection in depressed outpatients? Findings from the CO-MED trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Manish K; Minhajuddin, Abu; Gadad, Bharathi S; Greer, Tracy; Grannemann, Bruce; Soyombo, Abigail; Mayes, Taryn L; Rush, A John; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2017-04-01

    Currently, no valid measures inform treatment selection for depressed patients. Whether C-reactive protein (CRP) in particular and two other acute phase reactants (inflammatory markers) could differentiate between patients responding to either of two treatments with different mechanisms of action was assessed. Subjects included Combining Medications to Enhance Depression Outcomes (CO-MED) trial participants randomly assigned to either escitalopram plus placebo (SSRI monotherapy, n=51) or bupropion plus escitalopram combination (bupropion-SSRI combination, n=55) with baseline plasma samples. CRP, serum amyloid P component, and alpha-2-macroglobulin were measured using the Bioplex Pro™ human acute-phase 4-plex panel. We conducted mixed model analyses of depressive symptom (Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report) and side-effect burden (Frequency, Intensity, and Burden of Side-Effects Rating Scale) obtained weekly or every other week over the 12-week acute-phase of CO-MED trial to evaluate the relationship between these outcomes and baseline CRP and other acute-phase reactants. The treatment arms did not differ in depressive symptom or side effect outcomes. Most participants (69.8%, 74/106) had baseline CRP levels greater than 1mg/L (indicative of systemic inflammatory activity). Higher baseline CRP levels were associated lower depression severity (correlation coefficient=-0.63) with bupropion-SSRI combination but not with SSRI monotherapy (correlation coefficient=0.40). The overall remission rate was 41.5%. The estimated remission rate with CRP threshold based assignment (SSRI monotherapy for <1mg/L and Bupropion-SSRI for ≥1mg/L) was 53.1%, with a number needed to treat of 8.6. Side effect burden was unrelated to any baseline inflammatory marker. Baseline CRP levels relate differentially to antidepressant treatment outcomes in persons with major depressive disorder. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00590863. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Predictive value of C-reactive protein in response to macrolides in children with macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Ho; Kim, Jang Su; Seo, Sung Chul; Seo, Won Hee; Yoo, Young; Song, Dae Jin; Choung, Ji Tae

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) has increased worldwide. The aim of this study was to estimate the proportion of MRMP in a tertiary hospital in Korea, and to find potential laboratory markers that could be used to predict the efficacy of macrolides in children with MRMP pneumonia. A total of 95 patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia were enrolled in this study. Detection of MRMP was based on the results of specific point mutations in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. The medical records of these patients were reviewed retrospectively and the clinical course and laboratory data were compared. The proportion of patients with MRMP was 51.6% and all MRMP isolates had the A2063G point mutation. The MRMP group had longer hospital stay and febrile period after initiation of macrolides. The levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-18 in nasopharyngeal aspirate were significantly higher in patients who did not respond to macrolide treatment. CRP was the only significant factor in predicting the efficacy of macrolides in patients with MRMP pneumonia. The area under the curve for CRP was 0.69 in receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, indicating reasonable discriminative power, and the optimal cutoff value was 40.7 mg/L. The proportion of patients with MRMP was high, suggesting that the prevalence of MRMP is rising rapidly in Korea. Serum CRP could be a useful marker for predicting the efficacy of macrolides and helping clinicians make better clinical decisions in children with MRMP pneumonia.

  5. Fish oil supplementation does not lower C-reactive protein or interleukin-6 levels in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, M F; Laderian, B; Kuan, D C H; Sereika, S M; Marsland, A L; Manuck, S B

    2016-01-01

    The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may prevent a range of chronic conditions through anti-inflammatory actions. However, as clinical trials using these fatty acids for primary prevention are yet unavailable, their putative role in disease prevention rests, in part, on evidence of anti-inflammatory actions in healthy individuals. To investigate in a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial whether supplementation with a moderate dose of EPA+DHA reduces common biomarkers of chronic, systemic inflammation in healthy individuals. A total of 261 healthy individuals aged 30-54 years who were free of inflammatory conditions and consumed ≤ 300 mg per day EPA+DHA were included in the study. Participants were randomly assigned to 18 weeks of either fish oil supplementation providing 1400 mg per day EPA+DHA or matching placebo. Outcome measures were serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6. In a substudy, ex vivo cytokine production was measured. Missing data for CRP and IL-6 were estimated using regression imputation. Data analyses conformed to intention-to-treat principles. Participant blinding was verified. Red blood cell EPA+DHA increased by 64% in the active treatment group, but serum CRP and IL-6 were not affected by supplementation (P ≥ 0.20). Findings were consistent with and without imputed values and across subgroups. Similarly, EPA+DHA supplementation did not alter ex vivo production of four pro-inflammatory cytokines (P ≥ 0.20). Supplementation with 1400 mg EPA+DHA did not reduce common markers of systemic inflammation in healthy adults. Whether this or a higher dose affects other measures of inflammation, oxidative stress or immune function warrants examination. © 2015 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  6. Serum copper, zinc and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in short and long sleep duration in ageing men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luojus, Maria K; Lehto, Soili M; Tolmunen, Tommi; Elomaa, Antti-Pekka; Kauhanen, Jussi

    2015-10-01

    Serum levels of zinc and copper have been proposed to associate with sleep duration. Mechanisms, such as inflammatory processes, have been suggested to relate this association. However, earlier studies have been conducted in small sample sizes. Human studies investigating the suggested associations while controlling for potential confounding factors are lacking. Population-based data consisted of 2570 men (aged 42-60 years) from Eastern Finland. The participants reported an estimate of their sleep duration. The serum levels of zinc (S-Zn), copper (S-Cu) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were measured. Analysis of covariance was used for multivariate analyses. S-Zn levels and Zn/Cu ratio were lowest in ≤6h sleep. S-Cu levels were highest in ≥10h sleep. Elevated levels (>3.0mmol/l) of hs-CRP were observed in ≤6h and ≥10h sleep. After adjustments for age, cumulative smoking history (pack-years), alcohol consumption (g/week), Human Population Laboratory depression scale scores, physical activity (kcal/day), cardiometabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease history, sleep duration was significantly associated with levels of both S-Cu and hs-CRP. The association with S-Cu remained statistically significant following further adjustment for hs-CRP in the same model. Our data suggests an association between S-Cu and sleep duration in ageing men. Elevated inflammation (measured as serum hs-CRP) does not explain this relationship. Mechanisms underlying the relationship require further investigation, as S-Cu may contribute to sleep regulation through pro-oxidative processes and copper-dependent N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between alveolar bone loss and serum C-reactive protein levels in aggressive and chronic periodontitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Chopra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-reactive protein (CRP is an acute phase reactant that is produced in response to diverse inflammatory stimuli, and is known predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. Aggressive and chronic periodontitis are two main forms of periodontal disease, which differ mainly in the method of disease progression. This study aims at determining and comparing the relative levels of serum CRP and alveolar bone loss in aggressive and chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 subjects, which were divided into 3 groups diagnosed as having generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP, chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP and non-periodontitis controls (NP, were selected for the study. Venous blood samples were collected for quantitative CRP analysis using Turbidimetric immunoassay. Alveolar bone loss (ABL was measured at proximal sites of posterior teeth on a panoramic radiograph. The relationship between the mean ratio of ABL to root length and serum CRP levels was statistically analyzed using Student unpaired t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA and Pearson′s correlation coefficient. Results: Mean CRP levels were significantly greater in both GAP (7.49±2.31 mg/l and CGP (4.88±1.80 mg/l groups as compared to NP (0.68±0.23 mg/l with P value <0.0001. The mean value of ABL (% was 31.58 in CGP group and 36.77 in the GAP group, the difference being statistically significant (P=0.0079. Correlation coefficient between CRP and ABL is 0.9310 in CGP, and 0.9252 in GAP, which indicates a positive correlation between both variables. Conclusion: Both forms of periodontitis are associated with increased systemic inflammatory response with aggressiveness of disease progression determining the degree of response.

  8. Oxidative Stress and C-Reactive Protein in Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident (Ischaemic Stroke): The role of Ginkgo biloba extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanoon, Imad A-J; Abdul-Jabbar, Hilmy As; Taha, Dhia A

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the presence of oxidative stress and inflammation in ischaemic stroke patients by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant status (TAS), and highly-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the early post-ischaemic period, and to determine the role of Ginkgo biloba therapy in correcting the markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. This study was conducted at Ibn Seena Hospital, Mosul City, Iraq and included 31 cerebrovascular accident (CVA) patients and 30 healthy controls. Ischaemic stroke patients were divided into two groups: group I (n = 15) received conventional therapy; group II (n = 16) received conventional therapy with G. biloba (1500 mg/day) for 30 days. Blood samples were obtained from patients and controls before treatment and assays done of serum levels of MDA, TAS, and hsCRP. For CVA patients, a post-treatment blood sample was taken and the same parameters reassessed. Compared with the controls, patients' serum levels of MDA, and hsCRP were significantly higher (P ≤0.001) and TAS significantly lower. Group I and II patients reported a significant reduction in serum levels of MDA and hsCRP and a significant increase in serum levels of TAS, in comparison with pre-treatment levels. There was no significant difference (P = 0.19) in serum MDA levels between groups I and II, whereas, serum TAS levels were significantly higher (P ≤0.01) and hsCRP significantly lower (P ≤0.01) in group II. Acute stroke is associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the early period. G. biloba plays a potential role in reducing oxidative damage and inflammatory response.

  9. C-reactive protein and future cardiovascular events in statin-treated patients with angina pectoris: the extended TRUTH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Shingo; Kunishima, Tomoyuki; Umezawa, Shigeo; Onishi, Yuko; Tohyama, Shinichi; Takeyama, Youichi; Morino, Yoshihiro; Yamauchi, Takao; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Sozu, Takashi; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Michishita, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The TRUTH trial demonstrated that 8-month statin therapy alters the composition of coronary artery plaque using virtual histology (VH)-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). The extended TRUTH study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between changes in coronary atherosclerosis and mid-term clinical outcomes and identify the factors associated with cardiovascular events. Of 164 patients with angina pectoris who participated in the TRUTH trial, 119 subjects with analyzable IVUS data at both enrollment and the 8-month follow-up were enrolled and observed for at least two years. The primary end point was the time to first occurrence of cardiovascular composite events, including cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal cerebral infarction, unstable angina and ischemic-driven revascularization, except for target lesion revascularization. The frequency of reaching the primary end point was 13% (16/119), with a mean follow-up period of 41.9±9.4 months. Although plaque regression and changes in plaque composition were not associated with future cardiovascular events, the serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels at the start of the extended TRUTH study were significantly higher in the event group than in the event-free group (1.43 mg/L vs. 0.58 mg/L, p=0.01). A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the hs-CRP level was an independent significant predictor of cardiovascular events (odds ratio: 1.69; 95% confidence interval: 1.14-2.50, p=0.01). Coronary artery plaque regression and changes in plaque composition during statin therapy do not predict future cardiovascular events in patients with angina pectoris. Instead, the serum hs-CRP level can be used as a predictor of cardiovascular events.

  10. The modifying effect of C-reactive protein gene polymorphisms on the association between central obesity and endometrial cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wanqing; Cai, Qiuyin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Wang-Hong; Ruan, Zhi Xian; Cheng, Jiarong; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2008-06-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for endometrial cancer. Obesity, particularly central obesity, is considered as a systemic inflammatory condition and is related strongly to insulin resistance. C-reactive protein (CRP) is the most recognized biologic marker of chronic systematic inflammation, and it is conceivable that the CRP gene may work together with obesity in the development of endometrial cancer. On the basis of a population-based case-control study in a Chinese population, the authors obtained obesity measurements and data on 6 CRP single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 1046 patients with newly diagnosed endometrial cancer (cases) and from 1035 age frequency-matched controls. The association of the CRP SNPs with endometrial cancer risk and their modification on the association between obesity and endometrial cancer risk were evaluated. Although CRP SNPs alone were not associated with endometrial cancer, the associations of endometrial cancer with central obesity, measured as the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and the waist circumference, seemed to be stronger in women who were homozygous for the major allele of reference SNP (rs)1130864 (cytidine [C]/C) than in women who had the C/thymidine (T) and T/T genotypes (interaction test: P = .013 for WHR; P = .083 for waist circumference). When the women were stratified further by menopausal status, the observed interactions persisted mainly in premenopausal women (interaction test: P obesity-related insulin resistance and proinflammatory effects may play an important role in endometrial cancer risk, and these effects were modified significantly by the CRP SNP rs1130864. (c) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  11. Sex differences in the association between stressor-evoked interleukin-6 reactivity and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Kimberly G; Marsland, Anna L; Cohen, Sheldon; Gianaros, Peter J

    2016-11-01

    Individuals differ consistently in the magnitude of their inflammatory responses to acute stressors, with females often showing larger responses than males. While the clinical significance of these individual differences remains unclear, it may be that greater inflammatory responses relate to increased systemic inflammation and thereby risk for chronic inflammatory disease. Here, we examined whether acute stressor-evoked interleukin (IL)-6 responses associate with resting levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, and whether this association differs by sex. Subjects were 57 healthy midlife adults (30-51years; 33% female; 68% white). Blood was drawn before and 30-min after two mental stress tasks: a multisource interference task and a Stroop color word task. Hierarchical regressions controlling for age, sex, race, and BMI tested whether stressor-evoked IL-6 responses were associated with resting CRP and whether this association differed by sex. Results indicated that sex and stressor-evoked IL-6 responses interacted to predict CRP (ΔR 2 =0.08, B=-1.33, β=-0.39, p=0.02). In males, larger stressor-evoked IL-6 responses associated with higher CRP, whereas in females, stressor-evoked IL-6 responses showed a non-significant negative association with CRP. These findings indicate that inflammatory responses to acute stressors associate with resting levels of CRP; however, this association differs by sex. Previous literature suggests that there are sex differences in stressor-evoked IL-6 responses, but this is the first study to show sex differences in the relationship between acute inflammatory responses and systemic inflammation. The contribution of these sex differences to inflammatory disease risk warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. C-Reactive protein in adults with chronic spinal cord injury: increased chronic inflammation in tetraplegia vs paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, A E; Buchholz, A C; Martin Ginis, K A

    2008-09-01

    Cross-sectional. In community-dwelling adults with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), to (1) quantify C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk; (2) determine factors associated with CRP. Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. We examined CVD risk factors in 69 participants. Measurements included length, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, percent fat mass (bioelectrical impedance analysis) and fasting blood parameters (high-sensitivity CRP, lipids, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)). Mean CRP of the group was 3.37+/-2.86 mg-l(-1), consistent with the American Heart Association (AHA) definition of high risk of CVD. CRP was 74% higher in persons with tetraplegia (4.31+/-2.97) than those with paraplegia (2.47+/-2.47 mg l(-1), P=0.002), consistent with high CVD risk. Participants with high CRP (3.1-9.9 mg l(-1)) had greater waist circumference, BMI, percent fat mass and HOMA values than those with lower CRP (< or =3.0 mg l(-1), all P<0.05). LogCRP was independently correlated with waist circumference (r=0.612), logTriglycerides (r=0.342), logInsulin (r=0.309) and logHOMA (r=0.316, all P<0.05). Only level of lesion and waist circumference remained significantly associated with logCRP when variables with significant bivariate correlations were included in multiple regression analysis. Mean CRP values in this sample of adults with chronic SCI were consistent with the AHA classification of high CVD risk, especially those of persons with tetraplegia. Level of lesion and waist circumference are independently associated with CRP in this population.

  13. Maternal serum C-reactive protein in early pregnancy and occurrence of preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam Banaem, Lida; Mohamadi, Bita; Asghari Jaafarabadi, Mohamad; Aliyan Moghadam, Narges

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between maternal serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy and later occurrence of preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm birth. A prospective cohort study that measured maternal serum CRP levels in 778 pregnant women in the first half of pregnancy was performed in the city of Noor (north Iran), and included follow-up of patients up to time of delivery. Preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm birth were defined as the occurrence of membranes rupture and birth, respectively before 37 weeks of gestation. Of the 778 pregnancies studied, 19 (2.41%) preterm premature rupture of membranes and 58 (7.3%) preterm births were seen. Median CRP levels in preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm birth cases were much higher than in term deliveries (7 and 6.8 respectively vs 2.4 mg/L; 66.67 and 64.76, respectively vs 24.38 nmol/L). CRP levels >4 mg/L had statistically significant relationships with preterm premature rupture of membranes (OR 5.91, 95% CI 2.07-16.89) and preterm birth (OR 8.95, 95% CI 4.60-17.43). With a cut-off level of 4 mg/L of CRP, sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios (LR(+) and LR(-) ) for preterm birth were 81, 70, 2.70, 0.28%, respectively, and for preterm premature rupture of membranes they were 79, 67, 2.41 and 0.31%, respectively. It seems that the inflammatory marker, CRP, can be used in the early stages of pregnancy to identify women at risk of experiencing preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm birth. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Variations in C-reactive protein, plasma free radicals and fibrinogen values in patients with osteoarthritis treated with Pycnogenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaro, G; Cesarone, M R; Errichi, S; Zulli, C; Errichi, B M; Vinciguerra, G; Ledda, A; Di Renzo, A; Stuard, S; Dugall, M; Pellegrini, L; Gizzi, G; Ippolito, E; Ricci, A; Cacchio, M; Cipollone, G; Ruffini, I; Fano, F; Hosoi, M; Rohdewald, P

    2008-01-01

    In a previous, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we evaluated the efficacy of a 3-month treatment with Pycnogenol for 156 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Pycnogenol significantly decreased joint pain and improved joint function as evaluated using the WOMAC score and walking performance of patients on a treadmill. In this study, we further investigated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Pycnogenol in a subset of the osteoarthritis patients presenting with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma-free radicals. Elevated CRP levels have been suggested to be associated with disease progression in osteoarthritis. In our study, 29 subjects of the Pycnogenol group and 26 patients in the placebo group showed CRP levels higher than 3 mg/l at baseline. Comparison of blood specimens drawn at baseline and after 3-month treatment showed that Pycnogenol significantly decreased plasma free radicals to 70.1% of baseline values. Plasma CRP levels decreased from baseline 3.9 mg/l to 1.1 mg/l in the Pycnogenol group whereas the control group had initial values of 3.9 mg/l which decreased to 3.6 mg/l. The CRP decrease in the Pycnogenol was statistical significant as compared to the control group (P Pycnogenol. No significant changes for plasma free radicals, CRP and fibrinogen were found in the placebo-treated group. The decrease of systemic inflammatory markers suggests that Pycnogenol may exert anti-inflammatory activity in osteoarthritic joints and patients did not present with other ailments or infections. The nature of the anti-inflammatory effects of Pycnogenol with regard to CRP warrants further investigation.

  15. Association between C-reactive protein (CRP) with depression symptom severity and specific depressive symptoms in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler-Forsberg, Ole; Buttenschøn, Henriette N; Tansey, Katherine E; Maier, Wolfgang; Hauser, Joanna; Dernovsek, Mojca Zvezdana; Henigsberg, Neven; Souery, Daniel; Farmer, Anne; Rietschel, Marcella; McGuffin, Peter; Aitchison, Katherine J; Uher, Rudolf; Mors, Ole

    2017-05-01

    Population-based studies have associated inflammation, particularly higher C-reactive protein (CRP), with depressive severity, but clinical trials in major depressive disorder were rather non-specific without examining the role of gender. We aimed to investigate the association between CRP and overall depression severity including specific depressive symptoms and to examine potential gender differences. We included 231 individuals with major depressive disorder from the Genome-Based Therapeutics Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) study. At baseline, we assessed high-sensitivity CRP levels and psychopathology with the Montgomery Aasberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). We performed linear regression analyses to investigate the association between baseline CRP levels with overall MADRS severity and specific symptoms at baseline and adjusted for age, gender, anti-inflammatory and psychotropic drug treatment, body mass index, smoking, inflammatory diseases, and recruitment center. Higher CRP levels were significantly associated with greater overall MADRS symptom severity (p=0.02), which was significant among women (p=0.02) but not among men (p=0.68). Among women, higher CRP was associated with increased severity on observed mood, cognitive symptoms, interest-activity, and suicidality, but we found no significant associations among men. Interaction analyses showed no significant gender differences on the overall MADRS score or specific symptoms. Our results support the sickness syndrome theory suggesting that chronic low-grade inflammation may be associated with a subtype of depression. The potential gender differences in psychopathology may be explained by biological and/or psychosocial factors, e.g. differential modulation of immune responses by sex hormones. Clinical studies should investigate symptom-specific and/or gender-specific treatment guided by peripheral inflammatory markers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of Procalcitonin and C-reactive Protein in Differential Diagnosis of Sepsis and Severe Sepsis in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kemal Erenler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sepsis and severe sepsis (sepsis accompanied by acute organ dysfunction are leading causes of death worldwide. In this study, our aim was to investigate utility of biomarkers commonly used in diagnosis of sepsis in discriminating these two entities. Methods: Two-hundred and three patients involved were divided into 2 subgroups as sepsis and severe sepsis according to Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012. Then groups were compared according to clinical and laboratory (including C-reactive protein (CRP and procalcitonin (PCT levels characteristics. Results: Of 203 patients included into the study, 124 (61.1% were male and 79 (38.9% were female. The most common reason for sepsis was urinary tract infection (n=64, 31.5%, followed by catheter infection (n=16, 7.9% and pneumonia (n=14, 6.9%. Escherichia coli was the most common agent in both blood and urinary cultures. Majority of the patients were treated with ceftriaxone (n=33, 16.3%, followed by meronem/dapson (n=25, 12.3%. In both groups, CRP and PCT levels were high, even higher in severe sepsis group. However, any statistical significance could not be determined between groups. Mortality rate in sepsis patients was 6.4%. Conclusion: Plasma levels of both markers elevate in sepsis and severe sepsis. It was determined that CRP and PCT is higher in severe sepsis than in sepsis. However, the difference is not statistically significant. Plasma levels of CRP and PCT are not useful in differential diagnosis of sepsis and severe sepsis.

  17. Accuracy of commercially available c-reactive protein rapid tests in the context of undifferentiated fevers in rural Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phommasone, Koukeo; Althaus, Thomas; Souvanthong, Phonesavanh; Phakhounthong, Khansoudaphone; Soyvienvong, Laxoy; Malapheth, Phatthaphone; Mayxay, Mayfong; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Paris, Daniel H; Dance, David; Newton, Paul; Lubell, Yoel

    2016-02-04

    C-Reactive Protein (CRP) has been shown to be an accurate biomarker for discriminating bacterial from viral infections in febrile patients in Southeast Asia. Here we investigate the accuracy of existing rapid qualitative and semi-quantitative tests as compared with a quantitative reference test to assess their potential for use in remote tropical settings. Blood samples were obtained from consecutive patients recruited to a prospective fever study at three sites in rural Laos. At each site, one of three rapid qualitative or semi-quantitative tests was performed, as well as a corresponding quantitative NycoCard Reader II as a reference test. We estimate the sensitivity and specificity of the three tests against a threshold of 10 mg/L and kappa values for the agreement of the two semi-quantitative tests with the results of the reference test. All three tests showed high sensitivity, specificity and kappa values as compared with the NycoCard Reader II. With a threshold of 10 mg/L the sensitivity of the tests ranged from 87-98 % and the specificity from 91-98 %. The weighted kappa values for the semi-quantitative tests were 0.7 and 0.8. The use of CRP rapid tests could offer an inexpensive and effective approach to improve the targeting of antibiotics in remote settings where health facilities are basic and laboratories are absent. This study demonstrates that accurate CRP rapid tests are commercially available; evaluations of their clinical impact and cost-effectiveness at point of care is warranted.

  18. The interactive effects of nocturnal sleep and daytime naps in relation to serum C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantua, Janna; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2015-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a general marker of inflammation that has been differentially linked with sleep. Elevated CRP (ie, high inflammation) has been associated with either short/insufficient sleep duration or long sleep duration, both, or neither. Daytime napping has also been tied to increased and decreased inflammation. We attempted to unify these findings by examining the relationship between CRP and sleep duration in conjunction with napping in a healthy young adult cohort. Participants were young adults (mean age = 29.05 years, n = 2147) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) cohort, a nationally representative longitudinal sample. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) tests examined whether self-reported sleep duration (short, medium, or long) and nap frequency (none-few days/week; most days/week; every day) interacted in relation to CRP. Standard covariates (ie, age, gender, race/ethnicity, body mass index, physical activity, depression, snoring, systolic blood pressure, clinical symptoms, and household income) were used. There was a linear increase in CRP with increased napping [contrast estimate = 0.265, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.045-0.485), P = 0.018]. There was also an interaction between sleep duration and napping frequency in relation to CRP (F4,2128 = 2.90, P = 0.021). Inflammation differed between nap groups within the long and short sleep groups. Our results suggest that increased napping is an independent predictor of inflammation in young adults. These results also provide evidence for interactive effects of inflammation, nocturnal sleep, and daytime naps. Our findings confirm that excess sleep, insufficient sleep, frequent napping, and infrequent napping can all be linked with elevated CRP, but these relationships depend on both nocturnal and daytime sleep patterns. These analyses will guide future work to more specifically examine sleep-inflammation processes and directionality

  19. Potential influence of Type A personality on plasma C-reactive protein levels in people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet-Gélinier, J-C; Trojak, B; Lemogne, C; Aho-Glélé, L-S; Brindisi, M-C; Bouillet, B; Ponavoy, E; Meille, V; Simoneau, I; Chahraoui, K; Vaillant, G; Petit, J-M; Consoli, S M; Bonin, B; Vergès, B

    2016-04-01

    Type A personality, although classically known as a factor linked to increased vascular risk, has recently been associated with increased survival in patients with diabetes. As low-grade inflammation predicts a poor outcome, the present study explored the potential associations between Type A and plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in diabetes. Type A personality was assessed by the Bortner questionnaire in people with diabetes. The association between Type A and plasma CRP levels was examined by multivariable linear regression, and structural equation modelling (SEM) was performed to determine the impact of the major clinical, biological and psychological confounders. The study included 626 participants with type 1 and type 2 diabetes from the Diabetes and Psychological Profile study. Multivariable analyses showed an independent inverse association between Type A score and CRP levels. The structural model adjusted for age, gender, diabetes type and duration, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, alcohol abuse, oral antidiabetic and statin treatments, HbA1c levels, lipids, perceived stress, anxiety and depression revealed significant associations between CRP and Type A (β=-0.135, 95% CI: -0.242, -0.028; P=0.014), BMI (β=0.194, 95% CI: 0.038, 0.350; P=0.015) and HDL cholesterol (β=-0.132, 95% CI: -0.245, -0.020; P=0.014). Our present study data indicate that Type A personality is independently associated with lower CRP levels. This lower level of inflammation might explain the better clinical outcomes associated with Type A personality in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Alterations of peripheral leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein in febrile urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mitra

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of peripheral leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) level in febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) for defining the UTI level. A total of 61 children aged between 1 and 10 years with documented febrile UTI (axillary temperature > or = 38 degrees C) were studied. They had a urine culture positive for infection. Laboratory investigations including peripheral total and differential leukocyte counts, ESR, and CRP were assessed in relation to the inflammatory responses. Leukocyte count results were available in all of the patients, ESR in 41, and CRP in 36. Leukocyte count was normal in 6 patients (9.8%). Lymphocytic leukocytosis was seen in 1 patients (1.6%), neutrophilic leukocytosis in 25 (41.0%), and relative neutrophilia in 29 (47.5%). Thirty patients (73.2%) had a high ESR and 23 (63.9%) had a positive CRP. In children with a high ESR, 12 (29.3%) had neutrophilic leukocytosis and 14 (34.1%) had relative neutrophilia. Relative neutrophilia and neutrophilic leukocytosis with positive CRP both were found in 11 patients (30.6%). Negative CRP with absence of neutrophilic leukocytosis was found in a significantly higher proportion of patients. There were no direct correlations between the severity of systemic inflammatory responses and urinary tract inflammatory response. Findings of this study showed that ESR and differential leukocyte count are two valuable tests in febrile UTI and may be useful for localization of UTI level, but the total leukocyte count and CRP level as in qualitative methods are not useful, and many patients with febrile UTI do not have leukocytosis.

  1. Infection biomarkers in primary care patients with acute respiratory tract infections-comparison of Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meili, Marc; Kutz, Alexander; Briel, Matthias; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Bucher, Heiner C; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-03-24

    There is a lack of studies comparing the utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) with Procalcitonin (PCT) for the management of patients with acute respiratory tract infections (ARI) in primary care. Our aim was to study the correlation between these markers and to compare their predictive accuracy in regard to clinical outcome prediction. This is a secondary analysis using clinical and biomarker data of 458 primary care patients with pneumonic and non-pneumonic ARI. We used correlation statistics (spearman's rank test) and multivariable regression models to assess association of markers with adverse outcome, namely days with restricted activities and persistence of discomfort from infection at day 14. At baseline, CRP and PCT did not correlate well in the overall population (r(2) = 0.16) and particularly in the subgroup of patients with non-pneumonic ARI (r(2) = 0.08). Low correlation of biomarkers were also found when comparing cut-off ranges, day seven levels or changes from baseline to day seven. High baseline levels of CRP (>100 mg/dL, regression coefficient 1.6, 95 % CI 0.5 to 2.6, sociodemographic-adjusted model) as well as PCT (>0.5ug/L regression coefficient 2.0, 95 % CI 0.0 to 4.0, sociodemographic-adjusted model) were significantly associated with larger number of days with restricted activities. There were no associations of either biomarker with persistence of discomfort at day 14. CRP and PCT levels do not well correlate, but both have moderate prognostic accuracy in primary care patients with ARI to predict clinical outcomes. The low correlation between the two biomarkers calls for interventional research comparing these markers head to head in regard to their ability to guide antibiotic decisions. Current Controlled Trials, ISRCTN73182671.

  2. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

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    Garcia, Vinicius Pacheco; Rocha, Helena Naly Miguens [Laboratório de Ciências do Exercício - Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Sales, Allan Robson Kluser [Unidade de Reabilitação Cardiovascular e Fisiologia do Exercício - Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Natália Galito; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas da, E-mail: anobrega@id.uff.br [Laboratório de Ciências do Exercício - Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years) were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors), MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p < 0.02). There were no differences in hsCRP levels among groups with MetS risk factors (p > 0.05). The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (p{sub sex} < 0.01). Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions.

  3. Microbiota Separation and C-reactive protein Elevation in Treatment Naïve Pediatric Granulomatous Crohn Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermayer, Richard; Mir, Sabina A. V.; Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Cox, Stephen B.; Dowd, Scot E.; Kaplan, Jess L.; Sun, Yan; Reddy, Sahna; Bronsky, Jiri; Winter, Harland S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), the presence of non-caseating mucosal granuloma is sufficient for diagnosing Crohn disease (CD) and may represent a specific immune response or microbial-host interaction. The cause of granulomas in CD is unknown and their association with the intestinal microbiota has not been addressed with high-throughput methodologies. Methods The mucosal microbiota from three different pediatric centers was studied with 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and the fungal small subunit (SSU) ribosomal region in transverse colonic biopsy specimens from 26 controls and 15 treatment naïve pediatric CD cases. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) was tested with real-time PCR. The correlation of granulomatous inflammation with C-reactive protein (CRP) was expanded to 86 treatment naïve CD cases. Results The CD microbiota separated from controls by distance based redundancy analysis (dbRDA; p=0.035). Mucosal granulomata found in any portion of the intestinal tract associated with an augmented colonic bacterial microbiota divergence (p=0.013). The granuloma based microbiota separation persisted even when research center bias was eliminated (p=0.04). Decreased Roseburia and Ruminococcus in granulomatous CD were important in this separation. However, principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) did not reveal partitioning of the groups. CRP levels above 1mg/dl predicted the presence of mucosal granulomata (OR: 28 [6–134.32]; 73% sensitivity, 91% specificity). Conclusions Granulomatous CD associates with microbiota separation and CRP elevation in treatment naïve children. However, overall dysbiosis in pediatric CD appears rather limited. Geographical/center bias should be accounted for in future multi-center microbiota studies. PMID:22699834

  4. The C-reactive protein/albumin ratio, a validated prognostic score, predicts outcome of surgical renal cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shengjie; He, Xiaobo; Chen, Qian; Yang, Guangwei; Yao, Kai; Dong, Pei; Ye, Yunlin; Chen, Dong; Zhang, Zhiling; Qin, Zike; Liu, Zhuowei; Xue, Yunfei; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ruiwu; Zhou, Fangjian; Han, Hui

    2017-03-06

    The preoperative C-reactive protein/Albumin (CRP/Alb) ratio has been shown to be valuable in predicting the prognosis of patients with certain cancers. The aim of our study is to explore its prognostic value in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A retrospective study was performed in 570 RCC patients underwent radical or partial nephrectomy including 541 patients who received full resection of localized (T1-3 N0/+ M0) RCC. The optimal cutoff value of CRP/Alb was determined by the receive operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The impact of the CRP/Alb and other clinicopathological characteristics on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was evaluated using the univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. The optimal cutoff of CRP/Alb ratio was set at 0.08 according to the ROC analysis. Multivariate analysis indicated that CRP/Alb ratio was independently associated with OS of RCC patients underwent radical or partial nephrectomy (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.94; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.12-3.36; P = 0.018), and DFS of localized RCC patients underwent full resection (HR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.22-3.75; P = 0.008). Elevated CRP/Alb ratio was an independent prognostic indicator for poor OS in patients underwent radical or partial nephrectomy and DFS of localized RCC patients underwent full resection. Overall, CRP/Alb may help to identify patients with high relapse risk.

  5. Lower heart rate variability predicts increased level of C-reactive protein 4 years later in healthy, nonsmoking adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarczok, M N; Koenig, J; Mauss, D; Fischer, J E; Thayer, J F

    2014-12-01

    Inflammation and vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) have been implicated in a number of conditions including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Consistent with the inflammatory reflex termed the 'cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway', numerous cross-sectional studies have demonstrated negative associations between vmHRV and inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP). The only prospective study, however, showed the opposite: higher CRP at baseline predicted higher high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) at follow-up. Thus, additional studies are needed to examine the prospective association between vmHRV and CRP. Healthy employees participated in a voluntary on-site health assessment. Blood samples and ambulatory heart rate recordings were obtained, and night-time HF-HRV was calculated. Useable heart rate data were available in 2007 for 106 nonsmoking employees (9% women; age 44.4 ± 8 years), all of whom returned for an identical follow-up health assessment in 2011. Bootstrapped (500 replications) bivariate (r) and partial Pearson's correlations (ppc) adjusting for sex, age and body mass index at baseline (2007) were calculated. Zero-order correlations indicated that higher HF-HRV was associated with lower levels of CRP at both time-points (2007: r = -0.19, P < 0.05; 2011: r = -0.34, P < 0.001). After adjustment, HF-HRV remained a significant predictor of CRP (ppc = -0.20, P < 0.05). In this study, we have provided in vivo support for the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in humans. Cardiac vagal modulation at baseline predicts level of CRP 4 years later. Our findings have important implications for the role of vmHRV as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Interventions targeted at vmHRV might be useful in the prevention of diseases associated with elevated systemic inflammation. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  6. [Use of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein as infection markers in febrile neutropenic patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Yepes, Marina; Aznar-Oroval, Eduardo; Lorente-Alegre, Pablo; García-Lozano, Tomás; Picón-Roig, Isabel; Pérez-Ballestero, Pilar; Ortiz-Muñoz, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Neutropenia is a frequent sign in patients who are going to have a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Infection is an important complication in these patients, which is favoured by immunosuppression and the degree of neutropenia. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in onco-haematological patients undergoing chemotherapy and HSCT to determine the origin of the fever. PCT and CRP values were measured in 30 episodes of febrile neutropenia: before starting chemotherapy, appearance of neutropenia, onset of fever, days 1, 2, 3 and 6 after the onset of fever, and when the febrile episode ended. The episodes were classified as 5 bacteraemia, 3 microbiologically documented infections, 10 clinical infections, and 12 fevers of unknown origin. The highest PCT mean values corresponded to the group of patients with bacteraemia. Statistically significant differences (P=.04) were found on the second day after the onset of fever. The cut-off point of 0.5ng/ml showed a sensitivity of 66% and a specificity of 75%. PCR results showed statistically significant differences on days 1, 2 and 3 after the onset of fever (P=.01, P=.003, and P=.002, respectively). The cut-off point of 7.5mg/L had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 58%. The combination of PCT and CRP is an insufficient method to detect bacterial infections and may not replace the proper clinical and microbiological diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. [Diagnostic usefulness of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in the Emergency Department for predicting bacterial meningitis in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casado, María Isabel; Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Moreno-Alonso, Fernando; Valente-Rodríguez, Eder; López-Muñoz, Diego; Saura-Montalbán, José; Cuena-Boy, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    To analyse and compare procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) as tools for detecting bacterial meningitis (BM) in the elderly (>74 years of age). A prospective, observational, descriptive, analytical study of 220 consecutive patients aged ≥1year and diagnosed with acute meningitis in an emergency department between September 2009 and July 2014. A total of 220 patients (136 [62%] male) were studied. The mean age was 30±26years, with BM being diagnosed in 17/83 patients from 1 to 14years of age, 32/111 from 15 to 74years of age, and 17/26 patients ≥75years of age. PCT had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) (0.972; 95%CI, 0.946-0,998; P<.001) to predict bacterial meningitis. With a cut-off of ≥0.52ng/mL, PCT achieved 93% sensitivity and 86% specificity, and for patients over 75years of age 96% sensitivity and 75% specificity, with the same AUC (0.972). The AUC for CRP was 0.888, and a ≥54,4mg/L cut-off achieved 91% sensitivity and 78% specificity, and for patients over 75years of age an AUC of only 0.514 achieved with 97% sensitivity and 43% specificity. For all patients with acute meningitis in the emergency department, PCT has a high diagnostic power, outperforming CRP and Leukocytes for detection of bacterial etiology, but CPR is of not useful in the elderly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Dialysis water treated by reverse osmosis decreases the levels of C-reactive protein in uremic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Thomé

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a major complication of chronic renal failure. Microinflammation is involved in atherogenesis and is associated with uremia and dialysis. The role of dialysate water contamination in inducing inflammation has been debated. Our aim was to study inflammatory markers in patients on chronic dialysis, before and 3 to 6 months after switching the water purification system from deionization to reverse osmosis. Patients had demographic, clinical and nutritional information collected and blood drawn for determination of albumin, ferritin, C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in both situations. Acceptable levels of water purity were less than 200 colony-forming units of bacteria and less than 1 ng/ml of endotoxin. Sixteen patients died. They had higher median CRP (26.6 vs 11.2 mg/dl, P = 0.007 and lower median albumin levels (3.1 vs 3.9 g/l, P < 0.05 compared to the 31 survivors. Eight patients were excluded because of obvious inflammatory conditions. From the 23 remaining patients (mean age ± SD: 51.3 ± 13.9 years, 18 h