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Sample records for c-phycocyanin hydration water

  1. Dynamics of C-phycocyanin in various deuterated trehalose/water environments measured by quasielastic and elastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köper, Ingo; Combet, Sophie; Petry, Winfried; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2008-07-01

    The molecular understanding of protein stabilization by the disaccharide trehalose in extreme temperature or hydration conditions is still debated. In the present study, we investigated the role of trehalose on the dynamics of the protein C-phycocyanin (C-PC) by neutron scattering. To single out the motions of C-PC hydrogen (H) atoms in various trehalose/water environments, measurements were performed in deuterated trehalose and heavy water (D2O). We report that trehalose decreases the internal C-PC dynamics, as shown by a reduced diffusion coefficient of protein H atoms. By fitting the Elastic Incoherent Structure Factor--which gives access to the "geometry" of the internal proton motions--with the model of diffusion inside a sphere, we found that the presence of trehalose induces a significantly higher proportion of immobile C-PC hydrogens. We investigated, by elastic neutron scattering, the mean square displacements (MSDs) of deuterated trehalose/D2O-embedded C-PC as a function of temperature in the range of 40-318 K. Between 40 and approximately 225 K, harmonic MSDs of C-PC are slightly smaller in samples containing trehalose. Above a transition temperature of approximately 225 K, we observed anharmonic motions in all trehalose/water-coated C-PC samples. In the hydrated samples, MSDs are not significantly changed by addition of 15% trehalose but are slightly reduced by 30% trehalose. In opposition, no dynamical transition was detected in dry trehalose-embedded C-PC, whose hydrogen motions remain harmonic up to 318 K. These results suggest that a role of trehalose would be to stabilize proteins by inhibiting some fluctuations at the origin of protein unfolding and denaturation.

  2. Photodynamic action of C-phycocyanins obtained from marine and fresh water cyanobacterial cultures: a comparative study using EPR spin trapping technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bibbin Tom; Patel, Anamika; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam; Mishra, Sandhya; Ghosh, Pushpita Kumar; Murugesan, Ramachandran

    2006-08-01

    C-phycocyanins, major biliproteins of blue green algae (cyanobacteria), widely used as colourants in food and cosmetics are known for their antioxidant as well as therapeutic potential. Recent claims indicating phycobiliproteins exert stronger photodynamic action on tumor cells than clinically approved hematoporphyrin derivatives motivate us to investigate the photodynamic action of two newly isolated C-phycocyanins from Phormidium [PHR] and Lyngbya [LY] spp, respectively in comparison with known C-phycocyanin from Spirulina sp. [SPI]. Photolysis of air saturated solutions of PHR, LY and SPI in the presence of 2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl piperidinol (TEMPL) generated three line EPR spectrum characteristic of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxyl (TEMPOL). The increase in intensity of the EPR spectrum with time of irradiation and decrease in intensity, in the presence of 1O2 quencher DABCO confirm the formation of 1O2. Photoirradiation in the presence of spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) generated EPR signal characteristic of O2(-) adduct. Efficiency of 1O2 generation is of the order LY > PHR> SPI. The yield of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is found to be 1O2>O2(-) indicating type II mechanism to be the prominent pathway for photosensitation by phycocyanins.

  3. Single-particle dynamics of hydration water in protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.C.; Teixeira, J. (Lab. Leon Brillouin (CEA-CNRS), CEN-Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Bradley, K.F.; Chen, S.H. (Nuclear Engineering Dept., M.I.T., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Crespi, H.L. (Chemistry Div., Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-06-01

    Incoherent quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies of in vivo deuterated C-phycocyanin have been made. At full hydration the high-temperature data can be interpreted using a model where each water molecule is diffusing in a confined space of 3 A in radius. The excess elastic intensity at large Q indicates that a relatively low fraction of a water molecules attached to the immediate vicinity of the protein surface is immobile, in agreement with computer simulation. The translational and librational density of states show slight up-shifts from the corresponding bulk cases. (orig.).

  4. Production of Nanofibers Containing the Bioactive Compound C-Phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Felipe da Silva; Gettens, Juliana Garcia; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque; Moraes, Caroline Costa; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2016-01-01

    C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is a water-soluble phycobiliprotein present in light-harvesting antenna system of cyanobacteria. The nanostructures have not been widely evaluated, precluding improvements in stability and application of the C-PC. Electrospun nanofibers have an extremely high specific surface area due to their small diameter, they can be produced from a wide variety of polymers, and they are successfully evaluated to increase the efficacy of antitumor drugs. The incorporation of C-PC into nanofibers would allow investigations of potential uses in alternative cancer treatments and tissue engineering scaffolds. In this paper, C-phycocyanin were incorporated into the polymer polyethylene oxide (PEO) in various concentrations for nanofiber production via an electrospinning process. Nanofibers structures were analyzed using digital optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermogravimetric analysis was performed on the pure starting compounds and the produced nanofibers. At a concentration of 2% (w/w) of PEO, nanofibers were not produced, and concentrations of 4% (w/w) of PEO failed to produce nanofibers of good quality. Solutions with 6% (w/w) PEO, 6% (w/w) PEO plus 1% (w/w) NaCI, and 8% (w/w) PEO promote the formation of bluish, homogeneous and bead-free nanofibers with average diameters varying between 542.1 and 759.9 nm, as evaluated by optical microscopy. SEM analysis showed that nanofibers produced from polymer solutions containing 6% (w/w) PEO, 1% (w/w) NaCl and 3% (w/w) C-PC have an average diameter of 295 nm. Thermogravimetric analysis detected an increase in thermal resistance with the incorporation of C-phycocyanin into nanofibers.

  5. C-phycocyanin extraction from Spirulina platensis wet biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Moraes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available C-Phycocyanin is a natural blue dye used in food and pharmaceutical industry. In the present study, a simple and efficient method to extract C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis wet biomass is reported. The extractions were carried out using six different methods, including chemical (organic and inorganic acid treatment, physical (freezing and thawing, sonication, homogenization and enzymatic (lysozyme treatment methods. The extraction using ultrasonic bath in the presence of glass pearls in the biomass proved to be the most efficient method, 56% higher than using freezing and thawing (the method most frequently used, and presented a extraction yield of 43.75 mg.g-1 and a C-phycocyanin concentration of 0.21 mg.mL-1.

  6. Structure and dynamics of interfacial water. Role of hydratation water in the globular proteins dynamics; Structure et dynamique de l`eau interfaciale. Role de l`eau d`hydratation dans la dynamique des proteines globulaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotti, J.M.

    1997-01-27

    This memoir includes five chapters. In the first chapter, are given the elements of the neutrons scattering theory that is used in this study. the second chapter is devoted to a general presentation of the interaction between biological macro molecule and water. The third part is dedicated to the study of the structure and the dynamics of interfacial water in the neighbouring of model systems, the vycor and the amorphous carbon. The results presented in this part are compared with these one relative to water dynamics at the C-phycocyanin surface. This study makes the object of the fourth chapter. Then, in the fifth and last chapter are discussed the results relative to the role of hydratation on the parv-albumin dynamics for which have been combined the neutron quasi elastic incoherent scattering and the nuclear magnetic resonance of the carbon 13 solid in natural abundance.

  7. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  8. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin against kainic acid-induced neuronal damage in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbau, V; Camins, A; Romay, C; González, R; Pallàs, M

    1999-12-03

    The neuroprotective role of C-phycocyanin was examined in kainate-injured brains of rats. The effect of three different treatments with C-phycocyanin was studied. The incidence of neurobehavioral changes was significantly lower in animals receiving C-phycocyanin. These animals also gained significantly more weight than the animals only receiving kainic acid, whereas their weight gain did not differed significantly from controls. Equivalent results were found when the neuronal damage in the hippocampus was evaluated through changes in peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (microglial marker) and heat shock protein 27 kD expression (astroglial marker). Our results are consistent with the oxygen radical scavenging properties of C-phycocyanin described elsewhere. Our findings and the virtual lack of toxicity of C-phycocyanin suggest this drug could be used to treat oxidative stress-induced neuronal injury in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

  9. Kinetics of energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵井泉; 李晔

    1999-01-01

    The antenna system of algae for photosynthesis is a functional entity composed of various phycobiliproteins and the linker polypeptides. Up to now, high-resolution crystal structure data have been available only for the isolated phycobiliproteins. To have an understanding of the functional connection between different phycobiliproteins, it is necessary to study the complexes composed of different phycobiliproteins. The energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes were studied through computer simulation because it is difficult to be studied by conventional experimental methods. The main pathways of energy flow and the dynamic property of the energy transfer were obtained. A fast transfer process between two neighboring disks was observed through analyzing the distribution curves of excitation energy over time. According to the definition of the time constants for energy transfer in time-resolved spectrum techniques, for a complex with three C-phycoeyanin hexamer disks, a fluorescence-rising comp

  10. Medical Application of Spirulina platensis Derived C-Phycocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of marine biological pharmaceutical research, high-effective and low-toxic drugs and functional foods isolated from marine organisms have become a new field of pharmacy and bromatology. The pharmacological actions, such as anti-inflammation, antioxidation, antitumor, immunological enhancement, and hepatorenal protection of C-phycocyanin (C-PC from Spirulina platensis, have been reported, and C-PC has important value of development and utilization either as drug or as functional food. There are many researches about the various pharmacological actions and mechanisms of C-PC, but related reports are only to some extent integrated deeply and accurately enough, which put some limitations to the further application of C-PC in medicine. Particularly, with the improvement of living standards and attention to health issues, C-PC being a functional food is preferred by more and more people. C-PC is easy to get, safe, and nontoxic; thus, it has a great potential of research and development as a drug or functional food. Here, the separation and purification, physicochemical properties, physiological and pharmacological activities, safety, and some applications are reviewed to provide relevant basis for the development of natural medicine and applied products.

  11. Antitumor activity of C-phycocyanin from Arthronema africanum (Cyanophyceae

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    Elena Gardeva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pure C-phycocyanin (C-PC was isolated from Arthronema africanumto evaluate its potential antitumor effects in vivo and in vitro. Experimental myeloid Graffi tumor in hamsters was used as a model. The cell proliferation assay showed that C-PC treatment, at concentration of 100 µg mL-1 for 24 h, significantly inhibited the growth of Graffi tumor cells (51.4% viability. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the genomic DNA of treated cells displayed time-and concentration-dependent fragmentation pattern, typical for apoptosis. Apoptotic process was related to the increase in cellular manganese and copper/zinc superoxide dismutases and glutathione reductase activities, coupled with a low catalase activity. In vivo C-PC administration (5.0 mg kg-1 body weight suppressed the tumor transplantability and growth, while the mean survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters was increased. The results revealed promising antitumor activities of A. africanum C-PC and suggested the potential of this natural biliprotein pigment for future pharmacological and medical applications. The study provided new data on the mechanism of the C-PC induced apoptosis in which the imbalance of antioxidant enzymes that favoured hydrogen peroxide accumulation might play a leading role.

  12. C-phycocyanin ameliorates doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in adult rat cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahmood; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Shobha, Jagdish C; Naidu, Madireddi U; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Kutala, Vijay Kumar; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2006-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX), a potent antineoplastic agent, poses limitations for its therapeutic use due to the associated risk of developing cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. The cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin is associated with oxidative stress and apoptosis. We have recently shown that Spirulina, a blue-green alga with potent antioxidant properties, offered significant protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice. The aim of the present study was to establish the possible protective role of C-phycocyanin, one of the active ingredients of Spirulina, against doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. The study was carried out using cardiomyocytes isolated from adult rat hearts. Doxorubicin significantly enhanced the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells as measured by the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and dihydroethidium fluorescence. The doxorubicin-induced reactive oxygen species formation was significantly attenuated in cells pretreated with C-phycocyanin. It was further observed that the doxorubicin-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis, as assayed by TUNEL assay and flow cytometry coupled with BrdU-FITC/propidium iodide staining, were markedly attenuated by C-phycocyanin. C-phycocyanin also significantly attenuated the doxorubicin-induced increase in the expression of Bax protein, release of cytochrome c, and increase in the activity of caspase-3 in cells. In summary, C-phycocyanin ameliorated doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. This study further supports the crucial role of the antioxidant nature of C-phycocyanin in its cardioprotection against doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  13. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goa...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products......Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  14. Kinetics and adsorption isotherm of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis on ion-exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available C-phycocyanin is a natural blue dye extracted from Spirulina platensis, which has many applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this paper the effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption of C-phycocyanin onto two different ion exchange resins (Streamline DEAE and Streamline Q XL for expanded bed adsorption chromatography was investigated. Moreover, the kinetics and adsorption isotherm were evaluated. The equilibrium for the Q XL matrix was reached after 60 min, while for DEAE it was only reached after 140 min. C-phycocyanin showed the highest partition coefficient at pH 7.5 for both resins at 25 ºC. The C-phycocyanin adsorption isotherm was very well represented by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich models, where the estimated values for Qm and Kd obtained by the Langmuir isotherm were, respectively, 33.92 mg.mL-1 and 0.123 mg.mL-1 for DEAE, and 28.12 mg.mL-1 and 0.082 mg.mL-1 for the Q XL matrix. A negative cooperativity was observed for C-phycocyanin binding when the Q XL matrix was used, while the cooperativity was purely independent using the DEAE matrix.

  15. Energy transfer from C-phycocyanin to phthalocyanine metal complex in reverse micelles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵继全; 赵井泉; 丁西明; 蒋丽金

    1999-01-01

    A new mimic system of photosynthetic apparatus was constructed from C-phycocyanin and phthalocyanine zinc. C-PC was solubilized in the reverse micelles of non ionic surfactant Tween-80, cosurfactant pentanol, and solvent cyclohexane, in which the overall concentration of surfactant was 20% (w/v) and the mass ratio of Tween-80 to pentanol was 4:1. When the molar ratio of water to Tween-80 (Rw)≥9.0, the characteristic properties of C-PC were maintained. When it was excited, the energy transfer from C-PC to phthalocyanine zinc took place. The energy transfer efficiency was only related with the concentration of phthalocyanine, but not that of C-PC. Furthermore, the energy transfer was roughly in keeping with Perrin formulation, which indicated that the energy transfer took place approximately through dipole-dipole interaction in rigid system. The radii of the quenching sphere were calculated from the experimental results. For example, when the concentration of phthalocyanine zinc was 2.10 × 10-4 mol/

  16. Single step aqueous two-phase extraction for downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chethana, S; Nayak, Chetan A; Madhusudhan, M C; Raghavarao, K S M S

    2015-04-01

    C-phycocyanin, a natural food colorant, is gaining importance worldwide due to its several medical and pharmaceutical applications. In the present study, aqueous two-phase extraction was shown to be an attractive alternative for the downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis. By employing differential partitioning, C-phycocyanin selectively partitioned to the polymer rich (top) phase in concentrated form and contaminant proteins to the salt rich (bottom) phase. This resulted in an increase in the product purity (without losing much of the yield) in a single step without the need of multiple processing steps. Effect of process parameters such as molecular weight, tie line length, phase volume ratio, concentration of phase components on the partitioning behavior of C-phycocyanin was studied. The results were explained based on relative free volume of the phase systems. C-phycocyanin with a purity of 4.32 and yield of about 79 % was obtained at the standardized conditions.

  17. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  18. Recent Developments in Production and Biotechnological Applications of C-Phycocyanin

    OpenAIRE

    Kuddus, M.; Singh, P.; Thomas, G.; Al-Hazimi, Awdah

    2013-01-01

    An extensive range of pigments including phycobiliproteins are present in algae. C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a phycobiliprotein, is one of the key pigments of Spirulina, a microalgae used in many countries as a dietary supplement. Algal pigments have massive commercial value as natural colorants in nutraceutical, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries, besides their health benefits. At present, increasing awareness of harmful effects of synthetic compounds and inclination of community towards the...

  19. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  20. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

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    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  1. Digestion by pepsin releases biologically active chromopeptides from C-phycocyanin, a blue-colored biliprotein of microalga Spirulina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, Simeon L; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; Mihailovic, Jelena; Krstic, Maja; Nikolic, Milan R; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja

    2016-09-16

    C-phycocyanin, the major protein of cyanobacteria Spirulina, possesses significant antioxidant, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, ascribed to covalently attached linear tetrapyrrole chromophore phycocyanobilin. There are no literature data about structure and biological activities of released peptides with bound chromophore in C-phycocyanin digest. This study aims to identify chromopeptides obtained after pepsin digestion of C-phycocyanin and to examine their bioactivities. C-phycocyanin is rapidly digested by pepsin in simulated gastric fluid. The structure of released chromopeptides was analyzed by high resolution tandem mass spectrometry and peptides varying in size from 2 to 13 amino acid residues were identified in both subunits of C-phycocyanin. Following separation by HPLC, chromopeptides were analyzed for potential bioactivities. It was shown that all five chromopeptide fractions have significant antioxidant and metal-chelating activities and show cytotoxic effect on human cervical adenocarcinoma and epithelial colonic cancer cell lines. In addition, chromopeptides protect human erythrocytes from free radical-induced hemolysis in antioxidative capacity-dependant manner. There was a positive correlation between antioxidative potency and other biological activities of chromopeptides. Digestion by pepsin releases biologically active chromopeptides from C-phycocyanin whose activity is mostly related to the antioxidative potency provided by chromophore.

  2. Piroxicam and C-phycocyanin mediated apoptosis in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride induced colon carcinogenesis: exploring the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath; Vaiphei, Kim

    2012-04-01

    Apoptosis is a synchronized procedure of cell death that is regulated by caspases and proapoptotic proteins. During apoptosis, translocation of cytochrome c, an electron carrier, from mitochondria into the cytosol is regulated by Bcl-2 family members. Cytochrome c in association with an apoptotic protease activating factor (Apaf), a proapoptotic protein essential for cell differentiation and procaspase-9 form the apoptosome complex, which consecutively activates effector caspase, caspase-3, and coordinate the implementation of apoptosis. In the current study, an attempt has been made to gain insight into piroxicam, a traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug and c-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis (cyanobacterium) mediated apoptosis in DMH-induced colon cancer. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were segregated into 5 groups: control, DMH, DMH + piroxicam, DMH + c-phycocyanin, and DMH + piroxicam + c-phycocyanin. Results illustrated that piroxicam and c-phycocyanin treatments stimulate cytochrome c release by downregulating the Bcl-2 (an antiapoptotic protein) expression significantly, while promoting the level of Bax (a proapoptotic protein), thereby activating caspases (caspases-9 and -3) and Apaf-1. The outcomes of the present study clearly signify that piroxicam and c-phycocyanin may mediate mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in DMH-induced colon cancer. Moreover, apoptosis induction was more apparent in the combination regimen of piroxicam and c-phycocyanin than the individual drugs alone.

  3. Methane storage in dry water gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Bray, Christopher L; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2008-09-03

    Dry water stores 175 v(STP)/v methane at 2.7 MPa and 273.2 K in a hydrate form which is close to the Department of Energy volumetric target for methane storage. Dry water is a silica-stabilized free-flowing powder (95% wt water), and fast methane uptakes were observed (90% saturation uptake in 160 min with no mixing) as a result of the relatively large surface-to-volume ratio of this material.

  4. X-ray crystallographic studies on C-phycocyanins from cyanobacteria from different habitats: marine and freshwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, L; Suresh, C G; Patel, Anamika; Mishra, Sandhya; Ghosh, Pushpito Kumar

    2005-09-01

    C-phycocyanins from three cyanobacterial cultures of freshwater and marine habitat, Spirulina, Phormidium and Lyngbya spp., were purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Blue-coloured crystals in different crystal forms, monoclinic and hexagonal, were obtained for the three species. The crystals took 1-12 weeks to grow to full size using polyethylene glycols of different molecular weights as precipitants. The amino-acid sequences of these proteins show high similarity to other known C-phycocyanins from related organisms; however, the C-phycocyanins reported here showed different biochemical and biophysical properties, i.e. molecular weight, stability etc. The X-ray diffraction data were collected at resolutions of 3.0 A for the monoclinic and 3.2 and 3.6 A for the hexagonal forms. The unit-cell parameters corresponding to the monoclinic space group P2(1) are a = 107.33, b = 115.64, c = 183.26 A, beta = 90.03 degrees for Spirulina sp. C-phycocyanin and are similar for crystals of Phormidium and Lyngbya spp. C-phycocyanins. Crystals belonging to the hexagonal space group P6(3), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 154.97, c = 40.35 A and a = b = 151.96, c = 39.06 A, were also obtained for the C-phycocyanins from Spirulina and Lyngbya spp., respectively. The estimated solvent content is around 50% for the monoclinic crystals of all three species assuming the presence of two hexamers per asymmetric unit. The solvent content is 66.5 and 64.1% for the hexagonal crystals of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina and Lyngbya spp. assuming the presence of one alphabeta monomer per asymmetric unit.

  5. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  6. Interacion of Heavy Metal Ions with C-Phycocyanin: Binding Isotherms and Cooperative Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Gelagutashvili, Eteri

    2007-01-01

    The binding constant of copper(II) ions to C-PC were determined at different ionic strengths from binding isotherms by equilibrium dialysis and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Fluorescence and absorbtion spectroscopy provides insight of metal-C-phycocyanin interactions. Fluorescence measurements demonstrate C-PC quenching of heavy metal ions emission intensities. Stern-Volmer quenching constants were obtained from the linear quenching plots. Blue shifts in the fluorescence spectra were observed during metal binding to C-PC. It was shown, that between bound metal ions in C-PC there exists positive cooperativity.

  7. Effects of C-phycocyanin and Spirulina on Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus, Expression of NMDA Receptor and Inflammatory Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Juen-Haur; Chen, Jin-Cherng; Chan, Yin-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Effects of C-phycocyanin (C-PC), the active component of Spirulina platensis water extract on the expressions of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) genes in the cochlea and inferior colliculus (IC) of mice were evaluated after tinnitus was induced by intraperitoneal injection of salicylate. The results showed that 4-day salicylate treatment (unlike 4-day saline treatment) caused a significant increase in NR2B, TNF-α, and IL-1β mRNAs expression in the cochlea and IC. On the other hand, dietary supplementation with C-PC or Spirulina platensis water extract significantly reduced the salicylate-induced tinnitus and down-regulated the mRNAs expression of NR2B, TNF-α, IL-1β mRNAs, and COX-2 genes in the cochlea and IC of mice. The changes of protein expression levels were generally correlated with those of mRNAs expression levels in the IC for above genes. PMID:23533584

  8. Water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2013-11-01

    water retention curve plays a central role in numerical algorithms that model hydrate dissociation in sediments. The determination of the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments faces experimental difficulties, and most studies assume constant water retention curves regardless of hydrate saturation. This study employs network model simulation to investigate the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments. Results show that (1) hydrate in pores shifts the curve to higher capillary pressures and the air entry pressure increases as a power function of hydrate saturation; (2) the air entry pressure is lower in sediments with patchy rather than distributed hydrate, with higher pore size variation and pore connectivity or with lower specimen slenderness along the flow direction; and (3) smaller specimens render higher variance in computed water retention curves, especially at high water saturation Sw > 0.7. Results are relevant to other sediment pore processes such as bioclogging and mineral precipitation.

  9. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes.

  10. Study on the Structure of C-Phycocyanin in Spirulina platensis with Scanning Tunneling Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Shi, Dong-Xia; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zeng, Cheng-Kui; Pang, Shi-Jin

    1997-01-01

    The C-phycocyanin (C-PC) trimmer was isolated from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis, and scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was used to investigate its structure. High resolution STM images of C-PC were obtained. From the STM images, it could be observed that the C-PC molecules were disk-like in shape and the subunits of C-PC arranged in ring-like pattern with a channel in the center. After filter treatment, the folding of the polypeptide chains could be seen clearly. This is the first time to observe directly the topography of phycobiliprotein, and the results showed STM to be a powerful tool for the structural study of phycobiliproteins.

  11. Recent developments in production and biotechnological applications of C-phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuddus, M; Singh, P; Thomas, G; Al-Hazimi, Awdah

    2013-01-01

    An extensive range of pigments including phycobiliproteins are present in algae. C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a phycobiliprotein, is one of the key pigments of Spirulina, a microalgae used in many countries as a dietary supplement. Algal pigments have massive commercial value as natural colorants in nutraceutical, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries, besides their health benefits. At present, increasing awareness of harmful effects of synthetic compounds and inclination of community towards the usage of natural products have led to the exploitation of microalgae as a source of natural pigments/colors. This review describes recent findings about the sources and production of C-PC, with emphasis on specific techniques for extraction and purification, along with potential industrial applications in diagnostics, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries.

  12. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2016-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  13. Recent Developments in Production and Biotechnological Applications of C-Phycocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kuddus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An extensive range of pigments including phycobiliproteins are present in algae. C-phycocyanin (C-PC, a phycobiliprotein, is one of the key pigments of Spirulina, a microalgae used in many countries as a dietary supplement. Algal pigments have massive commercial value as natural colorants in nutraceutical, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries, besides their health benefits. At present, increasing awareness of harmful effects of synthetic compounds and inclination of community towards the usage of natural products have led to the exploitation of microalgae as a source of natural pigments/colors. This review describes recent findings about the sources and production of C-PC, with emphasis on specific techniques for extraction and purification, along with potential industrial applications in diagnostics, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries.

  14. C-phycocyanin, a very potent and novel platelet aggregation inhibitor from Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, George; Chou, Po-Hsiu; Shen, Ming-Yi; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lin, Chien-Huang; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2005-10-05

    The aim of this study was to systematically examine the inhibitory mechanisms of C-phycocyanin (C-PC), one of the major phycobiliproteins of Spirulina platensis (a blue-green alga), in platelet activation. In this study, C-PC concentration-dependently (0.5-10 nM) inhibited platelet aggregation stimulated by agonists. C-PC (4 and 8 nM) inhibited intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and thromboxane A2 formation but not phosphoinositide breakdown stimulated by collagen (1 microg/mL) in human platelets. In addition, C-PC (4 and 8 nM) markedly increased levels of cyclic GMP and cyclic GMP-induced vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) Ser(157) phosphorylation. Rapid phosphorylation of a platelet protein of Mw 47,000 (P47), a marker of protein kinase C activation, was triggered by phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (150 nM). This phosphorylation was markedly inhibited by C-PC (4 and 8 nM). In addition, C-PC (4 and 8 nM) markedly reduced the electron spin resonance (ESR) signal intensity of hydroxyl radicals in collagen (1 microg/mL)-activated platelets. The present study reports on a novel and very potent (in nanomolar concentrations) antiplatelet agent, C-PC, which is involved in the following inhibitory pathways: (1) C-phycocyanin increases cyclic GMP/VASP Ser157 phosphorylation and subsequently inhibits protein kinase C activity, resulting in inhibition of both P47 phosphorylation and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, and (2) C-PC may inhibit free radicals (such as hydroxyl radicals) released from activated platelets, which ultimately inhibits platelet aggregation. These results strongly indicate that C-PC appears to represent a novel and potential antiplatelet agent for treatment of arterial thromboembolism.

  15. Chemoprevention of DMH-induced rat colon carcinoma initiation by combination administration of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Vaiphei, Kim; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2012-02-01

    Cancer research illustrated that combinatorial studies can provide significant improvement in safety and effectiveness over the monotherapy regimens. A combination of two drugs may restrain precancerous colon polyps, opening a new possible opportunity for chemoprevention of colon cancer. In this context, chemopreventive efficacy of a combination regimen of C-phycocyanin, a biliprotein present in Spirulina platensis, a cyanobacterium, which is a selective cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor and piroxicam, a traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug was considered in 1,2 dimethylhyadrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, DNA fragmentation, fluorescent staining, PGE(2) enzyme immunoassay, and carrageenan-induced paw edema test were performed along with morphological and histological analysis. DMH treatment showed a rich presence of preneoplastic lesions such as multiple plaque lesions, aberrant crypt foci, and well-characterized dysplasia. These features were reduced with piroxicam and C-phycocyanin administration. The number of apoptotic cells was featured prominently in all the groups compared with DMH. DMH treatment revealed intact high molecular weight genomic DNA with no signs of laddering/DNA fragmentation while it was noticeable significantly in control and DMH + piroxicam + C-phycocyanin. DMH group showed highest COX-2 expression and PGE(2) level in comparison with other groups. Doses of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin used in the present study were established at an anti-inflammatory range. A combination regimen of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin, rather than individually has the much greater potential for reduction of DMH-induced colon cancer development and COX-2 being the prime possible target in such chemoprevention.

  16. Kinetics of hydrate formation using gas bubble suspended in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马昌峰; 陈光进; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    An innovative experimental technique, which was devised to study the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate of hydrate formation at the surface of a gas bubble suspended in a stagnant water phase, was adapted in this work. Under such conditions, the hydrate-growth process is free from dynamic mass transfer factors. The rate of hydrate formation of methane and carbon dioxide has been systematically studied. The measured hydrate-growth data were correlated by using the molar Gibbs free energy as driving force. In the course of the experiments, some interesting surface phenomena were observed.

  17. Protective role of C-phycocyanin against secondary changes during sodium selenite mediated cataractogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rasiah Pratheepa; Anbarasu, Kumarasamy

    2014-04-01

    Age related cataract is the leading cause of blindness associated with accumulation of oxidative stress in the eye lens. The present investigation reveals the rational of the beneficial effects of the natural compound C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is beneficial when administered to rat pups to protect against the secondary effects of sodium selenite induced cataractogenesis. A single subcutaneous dose of sodium selenite (19 μmol/kg body weight) on the 10th day of postpartum is adequate to induce cataract in rat pups. Serum biochemical parameters, such as the level of electrolytes, mean activities of anti-oxidant enzymes i.e. superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione were observed to be significantly altered during selenite induced cataractogenic process. Histopathological examination revealed signs of degradation of normal cell architecture in the liver, kidney and eye lens. Interestingly, the deleterious effects of sodium selenite toxicity were restored with the simultaneous treatment with C-PC. The results suggest that an administration of 200 mg/kg body weight of C-PC has the ability to prevent/alter the secondary changes reflected in the serum biochemical and histological modifications in rats exposed to sodium selenite. These results complement the beneficial role of C-PC of cyanobacterial origin as a efficacious anti-cataractogenic agent against sodium selenite toxicity.

  18. C-phycocyanin prevents cisplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rojas, Berenice; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Sarai; Granados-Castro, Luis Fernando; Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Reyes, José L; Zazueta, Cecilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-08-01

    The potential of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) to prevent cisplatin (CP)-induced kidney mitochondrial dysfunction was determined in CD-1 male mice. The CP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction was characterized by ultrastructural abnormalities and by decrease in the following parameters in isolated kidney mitochondria: adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced oxygen consumption (state 3), respiratory control ratio, ADP/oxygen (ADP/O) ratio, adenosine triphosphate synthesis, membrane potential, calcium retention, glutathione (GSH) content, and activity of respiratory complex I, aconitase, catalase, and GSH peroxidase. These mitochondria also showed increase in hydrogen peroxide production, malondialdehyde, and 3-nitrotyrosine protein adducts content. The above-described changes, as well as CP-induced nephrotoxicity, were attenuated in mice pretreated with a single injection of C-PC. Our data suggest that the attenuation of mitochondrial abnormalities is involved in the protective effect of C-PC against CP-induced nephrotoxicity. This is the first demonstration that C-PC pretreatment prevents CP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.

  19. Purification of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis in aqueous two-phase systems using an experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Silva Antelo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis was purified in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS of polyethylene glycol (PEG/potassium phosphate, varying the molar mass of the PEG. Results using a full factorial design showed that an increase in the concentration of salt and decrease in the concentration of PEG caused an increment in the purification factor for all the ATPS studied. Optimization of the conditions of the purification was studied using a central composite rotatable design for each molar mass of PEG. The ATPS composed of 7% (w/w PEG 1500 or 4% (w/w PEG 8000 (g/gmol and 23 or 22.5% (w/w of phosphate resulted a purification factor of 1.6-fold for C-phycocyanin, with total and 57% recovery, respectively. Process conditions were optimized for the purification factor for the system with PEG 1500. The ATPS with 4% (w/w PEG 4000 or 4% (w/w PEG 6000 and 21% (w/w phosphate resulted purification factors of 2.1 and 2.2-fold, recovering 100% and 73.5%, respectively of C-phycocyanin in the top phase.

  20. CD59 Underlines the Antiatherosclerotic Effects of C-Phycocyanin on Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of C-phycocyanin (C-PC on atherosclerosis and the regulatory effects of CD59 gene on anti-atherosclerotic roles of C-PC were investigated. Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(−/− mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group, C-PC treatment group, CD59 transfection group and C-PC+CD59 synergy group. The mice were fed with high-fat-diet and treated with drug intervention at the same time. Results showed the atherosclerotic mouse model was successfully established. CD59 was over-expressed in blood and tissue cells. Single CD59 or C-PC could reduce blood lipid levels and promote the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 but inhibit pro-apoptotic Fas proteins in endothelial cells. The expression levels of cell cycle protein D1 (Cyclin D1 and mRNA levels of cyclin dependent protein kinase 4 (CDK4 in smooth muscle cells were restrained by CD59 and C-PC. CD59 or C-PC alone could inhibit the formation of atherosclerotic plaque by suppressing MMP-2 protein expression. In addition, C-PC could promote CD59 expression. So both CD59 and C-PC could inhibit the progress of atherosclerosis, and the anti-atherosclerotic effects of C-PC might be fulfilled by promoting CD59 expression, preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation and the apoptosis of endothelial cells, reducing blood fat levels, and at last inhibiting the development of atherosclerosis.

  1. The role of water in gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    When raised to temperatures above the ice melting point, gas hydrates release their gas in well-defined, reproducible events that occur within self-maintained temperature ranges slightly below the ice point. This behavior is observed for structure I (carbon dioxide, methane) and structure II gas hydrates (methane-ethane, and propane), including those formed with either H2O- or D2O-host frameworks, and dissociated at either ambient or elevated pressure conditions. We hypothesize that at temperatures above the H2O (or D2O) melting point: (1) hydrate dissociation produces water + gas instead of ice + gas, (2) the endothermic dissociation reaction lowers the temperature of the sample, causing the water product to freeze, (3) this phase transition buffers the sample temperatures within a narrow temperature range just below the ice point until dissociation goes to completion, and (4) the temperature depression below the pure ice melting point correlates with the average rate of dissociation and arises from solution of the hydrate-forming gas, released by dissociation, in the water phase at elevated concentrations. In addition, for hydrate that is partially dissociated to ice + gas at lower temperatures and then heated to temperatures above the ice point, all remaining hydrate dissociates to gas + liquid water as existing barriers to dissociation disappear. The enhanced dissociation rates at warmer temperatures are probably associated with faster gas transport pathways arising from the formation of water product.

  2. Investigation of the Structure and Element Composition of C-Phycocyanin Extracted from the Microalgae Spirulina platensis

    CERN Document Server

    Mosulishvili, L M; Kirkesali, E I; Khizanishvili, A I; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, S S; Gundorina, S F

    2002-01-01

    The structure and element composition of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) extracted from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis were studied. The behavior of structural subunits forming phycobilisomes in the purification process was studied by capillary electrophoresis. Their proportion in high-purity C-PC was determined. The element composition of C-PC of different purity was studied by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis, and metals which may form macromolecular complexes with C-PC were determined (Zn, Cr, Ni, Co, As, Sr, Mo, Ag, Hg). It was shown that contents of toxic metals did not exceed accepted permissible levels for the human organism.

  3. Water in volcanic glass: From volcanic degassing to secondary hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Angela N.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watkins, James M.; Ross, Abigail M.

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic glass is deposited with trace amounts (0.1-0.6 wt.%) of undegassed magmatic water dissolved in the glass. After deposition, meteoric water penetrates into the glass structure mostly as molecular H2O. Due to the lower δD (‰) values of non-tropical meteoric waters and the ∼30‰ offset between volcanic glass and environmental water during hydration, secondary water imparts lighter hydrogen isotopic values during secondary hydration up to a saturation concentration of 3-4 wt.% H2O. We analyzed compositionally and globally diverse volcanic glass from 0 to 10 ka for their δD and H2Ot across different climatic zones, and thus different δD of precipitation, on a thermal conversion elemental analyzer (TCEA) furnace attached to a mass spectrometer. We find that tephrachronologically coeval rhyolite glass is hydrated faster than basaltic glass, and in the majority of glasses an increase in age and total water content leads to a decrease in δD (‰), while a few equatorial glasses have little change in δD (‰). We compute a magmatic water correction based on our non-hydrated glasses, and calculate an average 103lnαglass-water for our hydrated felsic glasses of -33‰, which is similar to the 103lnαglass-water determined by Friedman et al. (1993a) of -34‰. We also determine a smaller average 103lnαglass-water for all our mafic glasses of -23‰. We compare the δD values of water extracted from our glasses to local meteoric waters following the inclusion of a -33‰ 103lnαglass-water. We find that, following a correction for residual magmatic water based on an average δD and wt.% H2Ot of recently erupted ashes from our study, the δD value of water extracted from hydrated volcanic glass is, on average, within 4‰ of local meteoric water. To better understand the difference in hydration rates of mafic and felsic glasses, we imaged 6 tephra clasts ranging in age and chemical composition with BSE (by FEI SEM) down to a submicron resolution. Mafic tephra

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of C-phycocyanin and allophycocyanin from Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A; Bermejo, R; Talavera, E; Alvarez-Pez, J M; Sanz-Aparicio, J; Romero-Garrido, A

    1997-05-01

    C-phycocyanin and allophycocyanin from the green alga Spirulina platensis were isolated and crystallized by gel-acupuncture techniques. A novel two-step chromatographic procedure was used for purification. Blue hexagonal crystals were obtained by diffusing magnesium chloride into the protein solution for a week, followed by diffusion of PEG 6000 in order to complete the reduction of the solubility of the protein in the capillary tube used as a growth cell. In the case of allophycocyanin, crystals with a size of 0.4 x 0.3 x 0.3 mm were characterized by X-ray diffraction. They belong to space group P6(3)22 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 102.04, c = 131.22 A. The crystals of C-phycocyanin belong to either space group P6 or P6(3) with unit-cell constants a = b = 182.38, c = 60.87 A, alpha = beta = 90, gamma = 120 degrees. The crystals diffract beyond 2.4 and 2.5 A resolution, respectively, using a rotating anode as an X-ray source.

  5. Hydration of proteins: excess partial volumes of water and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A; Komissarov, Igor A; Khadiullina, Aigul V

    2012-04-05

    High precision densitometry was applied to study the hydration of proteins. The hydration process was analyzed by the simultaneous monitoring of the excess partial volumes of water and the proteins in the entire range of water content. Five unrelated proteins (lysozyme, chymotrypsinogen A, ovalbumin, human serum albumin, and β-lactoglobulin) were used as models. The obtained data were compared with the excess partial enthalpies of water and the proteins. It was shown that the excess partial quantities are very sensitive to the changes in the state of water and proteins. At the lowest water weight fractions (w(1)), the changes of the excess functions can mainly be attributed to water addition. A transition from the glassy to the flexible state of the proteins is accompanied by significant changes in the excess partial quantities of water and the proteins. This transition appears at a water weight fraction of 0.06 when charged groups of proteins are covered. Excess partial quantities reach their fully hydrated values at w(1) > 0.5 when coverage of both polar and weakly interacting surface elements is complete. At the highest water contents, water addition has no significant effect on the excess quantities. At w(1) > 0.5, changes in the excess functions can solely be attributed to changes in the state of the proteins.

  6. Correlation Between Chain Architecture and Hydration Water Structure in Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossutti, Michael; Dutcher, John R

    2016-03-14

    The physical properties of confined water can differ dramatically from those of bulk water. Hydration water associated with polysaccharides provides a particularly interesting example of confined water, because differences in polysaccharide structure provide different spatially confined environments for water sorption. We have used attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of hydration water in films of three different polysaccharides under controlled relative humidity (RH) conditions. We compare the results obtained for films of highly branched, dendrimer-like phytoglycogen nanoparticles to those obtained for two unbranched polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid (HA), and chitosan. We find similarities between the water structuring in the two linear polysaccharides and significant differences for phytoglycogen. In particular, the results suggest that the high degree of branching in phytoglycogen leads to a much more well-ordered water structure (low density, high connectivity network water), indicating the strong influence of chain architecture on the structuring of water. These measurements provide unique insight into the relationship between the structure and hydration of polysaccharides, which is important for understanding and exploiting these sustainable nanomaterials in a wide range of applications.

  7. Heterogeneities in confined water and protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, H E; Kumar, P; Han, S; Mazza, M G; Stokely, K; Buldyrev, S V [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Franzese, G [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Mallamace, F [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Villaggio S Agata, CP 55, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Xu, L, E-mail: hes@bu.ed [World Premier International (WPI) Research Center, Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-12-16

    We report recent efforts to understand a broad range of experiments on confined water and protein hydration water, many initiated by a collaboration between workers at the University of Messina and MIT-the editors of this special issue. Preliminary calculations are not inconsistent with one tentative interpretation of these experiments as resulting from the system passing from the high-temperature high-pressure 'HDL' side of the Widom line (where the liquid might display non-Arrhenius behavior) to the low-temperature low-pressure 'LDL' side of the Widom line (where the liquid might display Arrhenius behavior). The Widom line-defined to be the line in the pressure-temperature plane where the correlation length has its maximum-arises if there is a critical point. Hence, interpreting the Messina-MIT experiments in terms of a Widom line is of potential relevance to testing, experimentally, the hypothesis that water displays a liquid-liquid critical point.

  8. Spectroscopic study of the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin associated with colorless linker peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizarro, Shelly Ann [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The phycobilisome (PBS) light-harvesting antenna is composed of chromophore-containing biliproteins and 'colorless' linker peptides and is structurally designed to support unidirectional transfer of excitation energy from the periphery of the PBS to its core. The linker peptides have a unique role in this transfer process by modulating the spectral properties of the associated biliprotein. There is only one three-dimensional structure of a biliprotein/linker complex available to date (APC/LC7.8) and the mechanism of interaction between these two proteins remains unknown. This study brings together a detailed spectroscopic characterization of C-Phycocyanin (PC)-linker complexes (isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002) with proteomic analysis of the linker amino acid sequences to produce a model for biliprotein/linker interaction. The amino acid sequences of the rod linkers [LR8.9, LR32.3 and LRC28.5] were examined to identify evolutionarily conserved regions important to either the structure or function of this protein family. Although there is not one common homologous site among all the linkers, there are strong trends across each separate subset (LC, LR and LRC) and the N-terminal segments of both LR32.3 and LRC28.5 display multiple regions of similarity with other linkers. Predictions of the secondary structure of LR32.3 and LRC28.5, and comparison to the crystal structure of LC7.8, further narrowed the candidates for interaction sites with the PC chromophores. Measurements of the absorption, fluorescence, CD and excitation anisotropy of PC trimer, PC/LR32.3, and PC/LRC28.5, document the spectroscopic effect of each linker peptide on the PC chromophores at a series of temperatures (298 to 77 K

  9. Spectroscopic study of the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin associated with colorless linker peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizarro, Shelly A.

    2000-05-12

    The phycobilisome (PBS) light-harvesting antenna is composed of chromophore-containing biliproteins and 'colorless' linker peptides and is structurally designed to support unidirectional transfer of excitation energy from the periphery of the PBS to its core. The linker peptides have a unique role in this transfer process by modulating the spectral properties of the associated biliprotein. There is only one three-dimensional structure of a biliprotein/linker complex available to date (APC/LC7.8) and the mechanism of interaction between these two proteins remains unknown. This study brings together a detailed spectroscopic characterization of C-Phycocyanin (PC)-linker complexes (isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002) with proteomic analysis of the linker amino acid sequences to produce a model for biliprotein/linker interaction. The amino acid sequences of the rod linkers [LR8.9, LR32.3 and LRC28.5] were examined to identify evolutionarily conserved regions important to either the structure or function of this protein family. Although there is not one common homologous site among all the linkers, there are strong trends across each separate subset (LC, LR and LRC) and the N-terminal segments of both LR32.3 and LRC28.5 display multiple regions of similarity with other linkers. Predictions of the secondary structure of LR32.3 and LRC28.5, and comparison to the crystal structure of LC7.8, further narrowed the candidates for interaction sites with the PC chromophores. Measurements of the absorption, fluorescence, CD and excitation anisotropy of PC trimer, PC/LR32.3, and PC/LRC28.5, document the spectroscopic effect of each linker peptide on the PC chromophores at a series of temperatures (298 to 77 K). Because LR32.3 and LRC28.5 modulate the PC trimer spectral properties in distinct manners, it suggests different chromophore-interaction mechanisms for each linker. The low temperature absorbance spectrum of the PC trimer is consistent with an excitonic

  10. Hydration of proteins: excess partial enthalpies of water and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A; Khadiullina, Aigul V

    2011-12-22

    Isothermal batch calorimetry was applied to study the hydration of proteins. The hydration process was analyzed by the simultaneous monitoring of the excess partial enthalpies of water and the proteins in the entire range of water content. Four unrelated proteins (lysozyme, chymotrypsinogen A, human serum albumin, and β-lactoglobulin) were used as models. The excess partial quantities are very sensitive to the changes in the state of water and proteins. At the lowest water weight fractions (w(1)), the changes of the excess thermochemical functions can mainly be attributed to water addition. A transition from the glassy to the flexible state of the proteins is accompanied by significant changes in the excess partial quantities of water and the proteins. This transition appears at a water weight fraction of 0.06 when charged groups of proteins are covered. Excess partial quantities reach their fully hydrated values at w(1) > 0.5 when coverage of both polar and weakly interacting surface elements is complete. At the highest water contents, water addition has no significant effect on the excess thermochemical quantities. At w(1) > 0.5, changes in the excess functions can solely be attributed to changes in the state of the proteins.

  11. Dynamics of water and hydrated protons in confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis the dynamics of water and hydrated protons in confinement has been studied using nonlinear spectroscopy methods, including IR pump-probe spectroscopy and vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFG spectroscopy). Using the IR pump-probe spectroscopy, we first investigated

  12. Application of various water soluble polymers in gas hydrate inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.; Sultan, Abdullah S.;

    2016-01-01

    . This review presents the various types of water soluble polymers used for hydrate inhibition, including conventional and novel polymeric inhibitors along with their limitations. The review covers the relevant properties of vinyl lactam, amide, dendrimeric, fluorinated, and natural biodegradable polymers....... The factors affecting the performance of these polymers and the structure-property relationships are reviewed. A comprehensive review of the techniques used to evaluate the performance of the polymeric inhibitors is given. This review also addresses recent developments, current and future challenges......, and field applications of a range of polymeric kinetic hydrate inhibitors....

  13. Carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles coupled with CD59-specific ligand peptide for targeted delivery of C-phycocyanin to HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Li, Bing; Yin, Qi-Feng; Wang, Yu-Juan

    2017-03-01

    The combination of nanotechnology and medicine will be the next generation of vehicles for targeted drug delivery. Carboxymethyl chitosan loaded with the anticancer drug C-phycocyanin and the CD59-specific ligand peptide for cancer cell targeting were used to create C-phycocyanin/carboxymethyl chitosan-CD59-specific ligand peptide nanoparticles using the ionic-gelation method. Optimal synthesis conditions, selected by response surface methodology, comprised the ratio carboxymethyl chitosan:C-phycocyanin = 3:1, and carboxymethyl chitosan and CaCl2 concentrations of 2.0 and 1.0 mg/mL, respectively. The resulting nanoparticles were spherical, with diameters of approximately 200 nm; the entrapment efficient was about 65%; and the drug loading was about 20%. The release of C-phycocyanin from C-phycocyanin/carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles was pH sensitive and had a sustainable effect in vitro. Guided by the CD59-specific ligand peptide, the nanoparticles efficiently targeted the surface of HeLa cells and had an obvious inhibitory effect on HeLa cell proliferation as determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assays. The nanoparticles were hemocompatible and induced apoptosis by upregulation of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved polyADP-ribose polymerase proteins, and downregulation of Bcl-2 proteins. Our study provides a novel approach to the research and development of marine drugs, and support for targeted therapy using anticancer drugs.

  14. Direct measurement of excitation transfer dynamics between two trimers in C-phycocyanin hexamer from cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingmin; Zhao, Fuli; Zheng, Xiguang; Wang, Hezhou

    1999-05-01

    We provide the first experimental evidence for the excitation transfers between two trimers of an isolated C-phycocyanin hexamer (αβ) 6PCL RC27, at the end of the rod proximal to the core of PBS in cyanobacterium of Anabaena variabilis, with picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Our results strongly suggest that the observed fluorescence decay constants around 20 and 10 ps time scales, shown in anisotropy decay, not in isotropic decay experiments arose from the excitation transfers between two trimers via two types of transfer pathways such as 1β 155↔6β 155 (2β 155↔5β 155 and 3β 155↔4β 155) and 2α 84↔5α 84 (3α 84↔6α 84 and 1α 84↔4α 84) channels and these could be described by Föster dipole-dipole resonance mechanism.

  15. The Water Retention Curves in THF Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Experimental Measurement and Pore Scale Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, N.; Zheng, X.; Dai, S.; Seol, Y.; Zapata, C.; Yun, T.; Jang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The water retention curve (WRC) of hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behaviour of hydrate dissociation for gas production. Most gas hydrates in marine environment have been formed from an aqueous phase (gas-dissolved water). However, the gas hydrate formation from an aqueous phase in a laboratory requires long period due to low gas solubility in water and is also associated with many experimental difficulties such as hydrate dissolution, difficult hydrate saturation control, and dynamic hydrate dissolution and formation. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is chosen to form THF hydrate because the formation process is faster than gas hydrate formation and hydrate saturation is easy to control. THF hydrate is formed at water-excess condition. Therefore, there is only water in the pore space after a target THF hydrate saturation is obtained. The pore habit of THF hydrate is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel and X-ray computed tomography images; and the water retention curves are obtained under different THF hydrate saturation conditions. Targeted THF hydrate saturations are Sh=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. Results shown that at a given water saturation the capillary pressure increases as THF hydrate saturation increases. And the gas entry pressure increases with increasing hydrate saturation. The WRC obtained by experiments is also compared with the results of a pore-network model simulation and Lattice Boltzmann Method. The fitting parameters of van Genuchten equation for different hydrate saturation conditions are suggested for the use as input parameters of reservoir simulators.

  16. Production behaviour of gas hydrate under hot sea water injection : laboratory case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nengkoda, A. [Schlumberger, Calgary, AB (Canada); Budhijanto, B.; Supranto, S.; Prasetyo, I.; Purwono, S.; Sutijan, S. [Gadjah Mada Univ., Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2010-07-01

    The gas hydrate potential in Indonesia was discussed, with particular reference to offshore production of gas from deep-water gas-hydrates by injection of hot seawater. In 2004, the Indonesian National Agency for Assessment and Application Technology estimated the gas hydrate resource potential to be 850 trillion cubic feet (tcf). To date, the 3 most reliable scenarios for gas hydrate production are thermal stimulation which involves increasing the temperature until the hydrates break into water and gas; depressurization which involves lowering the pressure by pumping out gas at the base of the hydrate to cause dissociation of hydrates into gas; and injection of a chemical inhibitor such as methanol into the hydrated sediments to cause destabilization, thus releasing gas from hydrates. This study investigated the effect of hot seawater injection on the gas hydrate production under laboratory conditions. The temperature profile distribution was examined along with operational parameters and flow characteristics of the dissociated gas and water from hydrates in porous systems under a synthetic hydrate setup. The study showed that gas production increases with time until a maximum is reached, at which time it begins to decrease. The energy ratio of thermal stimulation production was found to be influenced by the injection water temperature and rate as well as the hydrate content in the synthetic sediment. Scale problems were found to be associated with high temperature seawater injection. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  17. Water permeability in hydrate-bearing sediments: A pore-scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Seol, Yongkoo

    2014-06-01

    Permeability is a critical parameter governing methane flux and fluid flow in hydrate-bearing sediments; however, limited valid data are available due to experimental challenges. Here we investigate the relationship between apparent water permeability (k') and hydrate saturation (Sh), accounting for hydrate pore-scale growth habit and meso-scale heterogeneity. Results from capillary tube models rely on cross-sectional tube shapes and hydrate pore habits, thus are appropriate only for sediments with uniform hydrate distribution and known hydrate pore character. Given our pore network modeling results showing that accumulating hydrate in sediments decreases sediment porosity and increases hydraulic tortuosity, we propose a modified Kozeny-Carman model to characterize water permeability in hydrate-bearing sediments. This model agrees well with experimental results and can be easily implemented in reservoir simulators with no empirical variables other than Sh. Results are also relevant to flow through other natural sediments that undergo diagenesis, salt precipitation, or bio-clogging.

  18. Water anomalous thermodynamics, attraction, repulsion, and hydrophobic hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2016-04-01

    A model composed of van der Waals-like and hydrogen bonding contributions that simulates the low-temperature anomalous thermodynamics of pure water while exhibiting a second, liquid-liquid critical point [P. H. Poole et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 1632 (1994)] is extended to dilute solutions of nonionic species. Critical lines emanating from such second critical point are calculated. While one infers that the smallness of the water molecule may be a relevant factor for those critical lines to move towards experimentally accessible regions, attention is mainly focused on the picture our model draws for the hydration thermodynamics of purely hydrophobic and amphiphilic non-electrolyte solutes. We first focus on differentiating solvation at constant volume from the corresponding isobaric process. Both processes provide the same viewpoint for the low solubility of hydrophobic solutes: it originates from the combination of weak solute-solvent attractive interactions and the specific excluded-volume effects associated with the small molecular size of water. However, a sharp distinction is found when exploring the temperature dependence of hydration phenomena since, in contrast to the situation for the constant-V process, the properties of pure water play a crucial role at isobaric conditions. Specifically, the solubility minimum as well as enthalpy and entropy convergence phenomena, exclusively ascribed to isobaric solvation, are closely related to water's density maximum. Furthermore, the behavior of the partial molecular volume and the partial molecular isobaric heat capacity highlights the interplay between water anomalies, attraction, and repulsion. The overall picture presented here is supported by experimental observations, simulations, and previous theoretical results.

  19. Hydrophobic hydration and the anomalous partial molar volumes in ethanol-water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Miller, Benjamin T.; Te, Jerez; Cendagorta, Joseph R.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2015-02-01

    The anomalous behavior in the partial molar volumes of ethanol-water mixtures at low concentrations of ethanol is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous work indicates that the striking minimum in the partial molar volume of ethanol VE as a function of ethanol mole fraction XE is determined mainly by water-water interactions. These results were based on simulations that used one water model for the solute-water interactions but two different water models for the water-water interactions. This is confirmed here by using two more water models for the water-water interactions. Furthermore, the previous work indicates that the initial decrease is caused by association of the hydration shells of the hydrocarbon tails, and the minimum occurs at the concentration where all of the hydration shells are touching each other. Thus, the characteristics of the hydration of the tail that cause the decrease and the features of the water models that reproduce this type of hydration are also examined here. The results show that a single-site multipole water model with a charge distribution that mimics the large quadrupole and the p-orbital type electron density out of the molecular plane has "brittle" hydration with hydrogen bonds that break as the tails touch, which reproduces the deep minimum. However, water models with more typical site representations with partial charges lead to flexible hydration that tends to stay intact, which produces a shallow minimum. Thus, brittle hydration may play an essential role in hydrophobic association in water.

  20. Dynamic morphology of gas hydrate on a methane bubble in water: Observations and new insights for hydrate film models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzinski, Robert P.; Lynn, Ronald; Haljasmaa, Igor; Leifer, Ira; Shaffer, Frank; Anderson, Brian J.; Levine, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-01

    Predicting the fate of subsea hydrocarbon gases escaping into seawater is complicated by potential formation of hydrate on rising bubbles that can enhance their survival in the water column, allowing gas to reach shallower depths and the atmosphere. The precise nature and influence of hydrate coatings on bubble hydrodynamics and dissolution is largely unknown. Here we present high-definition, experimental observations of complex surficial mechanisms governing methane bubble hydrate formation and dissociation during transit of a simulated oceanic water column that reveal a temporal progression of deep-sea controlling mechanisms. Synergistic feedbacks between bubble hydrodynamics, hydrate morphology, and coverage characteristics were discovered. Morphological changes on the bubble surface appear analogous to macroscale, sea ice processes, presenting new mechanistic insights. An inverse linear relationship between hydrate coverage and bubble dissolution rate is indicated. Understanding and incorporating these phenomena into bubble and bubble plume models will be necessary to accurately predict global greenhouse gas budgets for warming ocean scenarios and hydrocarbon transport from anthropogenic or natural deep-sea eruptions.

  1. Modelling membrane hydration and water balance of a pem fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2015-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells requires an appropriate hydration in order to ensure high efficiency and long durability. As water is essential for promoting proton conductivity in the membrane, it is important to control membrane water hydration to avoid flooding. In this study we...

  2. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  3. The water retention curve and relative permeability for gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments: pore-network model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Dai, Sheng; Seol, Yongkoo; Sup Yun, Tae; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-08-01

    The water retention curve and relative permeability are critical to predict gas and water production from hydrate-bearing sediments. However, values for key parameters that characterize gas and water flows during hydrate dissociation have not been identified due to experimental challenges. This study utilizes the combined techniques of micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT) and pore-network model simulation to identify proper values for those key parameters, such as gas entry pressure, residual water saturation, and curve fitting values. Hydrates with various saturation and morphology are realized in the pore-network that was extracted from micron-resolution CT images of sediments recovered from the hydrate deposit at the Mallik site, and then the processes of gas invasion, hydrate dissociation, gas expansion, and gas and water permeability are simulated. Results show that greater hydrate saturation in sediments lead to higher gas entry pressure, higher residual water saturation, and steeper water retention curve. An increase in hydrate saturation decreases gas permeability but has marginal effects on water permeability in sediments with uniformly distributed hydrate. Hydrate morphology has more significant impacts than hydrate saturation on relative permeability. Sediments with heterogeneously distributed hydrate tend to result in lower residual water saturation and higher gas and water permeability. In this sense, the Brooks-Corey model that uses two fitting parameters individually for gas and water permeability properly capture the effect of hydrate saturation and morphology on gas and water flows in hydrate-bearing sediments.

  4. Simulation of gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is proposed,which can overcome the deficiency of single production method.Based on the combination production method,the physical and mathematical models are developed to simulate the hydrate dissociation.The mathematical model can be used to analyze the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,the convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production.The mechanism of gas production by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is revealed by the numerical simulation.The evolutions of such physical variables as pressure,temperature,saturations and gas and water rates are analyzed.Numerical results show that under certain conditions the combination method has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single producing method.

  5. Water Density Fluctuations Relevant to Hydrophobic Hydration are Unaltered by Attractions

    CERN Document Server

    Remsing, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of density fluctuations in bulk water has made significant contributions to our understanding of the hydration and interactions of idealized, purely repulsive hydrophobic solutes. To similarly inform the hydration of realistic hydrophobic solutes that have dispersive interactions with water, here we characterize water density fluctuations in the presence of attractive fields that correspond to solute-water attractions. We find that when the attractive field acts only in the solute hydration shell, but not in the solute core, it does not significantly alter water density fluctuations in the solute core region. We further find that for a wide range of solute sizes and attraction strengths, the free energetics of turning on the attractive fields in bulk water are accurately captured by linear response theory. Our results also suggest strategies for more efficiently estimating hydration free energies of realistic solutes in bulk water and at interfaces.

  6. Vibrational excitations of proteins and their hydration water in the far-infrared range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paciaroni, A., E-mail: alessandro.paciaroni@fisica.unipg.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita’ degli Studi di Perugia, Via Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Conti Nibali, V. [Lehrstuhl für Physikalische Chemie II, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Orecchini, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita’ degli Studi di Perugia, Via Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue J. Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Petrillo, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita’ degli Studi di Perugia, Via Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue J. Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Tarek, M. [UMR Structure et Réactivité des Systèmes Moléculaires Complexes, Nancy-University, CNRS (France); D’Angelo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita’ degli Studi di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d’Alcontres 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Sacchetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita’ degli Studi di Perugia, Via Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2013-10-16

    Highlights: • We characterize the vibrations of proteins and hydration water in far-infrared range. • Isotopic contrast is used to highlight protein or water component. • MD simulations help understanding vibrational bands. • The inelastic behavior of proteins is quite independent on the solvent. • Protein hydration water vibrational behavior is similar to amorphous ice. - Abstract: Incoherent neutron scattering has been used to single out the vibrational contribution from maltose binding protein (MBP) and its hydration water in the energy range 1 meV–80 meV. The vibrational density of states from both protein and hydration water have been investigated by measuring respectively dry and D{sub 2}O-hydrated isotopically natural MBP and dry and H{sub 2}O-hydrated perdeuterated MBP. Molecular dynamics simulations done on the same system allow us to attribute the protein inelastic features. The inelastic behavior of the biomolecule seems to be largely independent on the presence of solvent. Conversely, protein hydration water exhibits remarkable differences with respect to hexagonal ice in the whole spectral range, with clear similarities to amorphous phases of ice.

  7. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Formation in Pure Water and Inhibitor Containing Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIUJunhong; GUOTianmin

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic data of methane hydrate formation in the presence of pure water,brines with single salt and mixed salts,and aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol(EG) and salt+EG were measured.A new kinetic model of hydrate formation for the methane+water systems was developed based on a four-step formation mechanism and reaction kinetic approach.The proposed kinetic model predicts the kinetic behavior of methane hydrate formation in pure water with good accuracy.The feasibility of extending the kenetic model of salt(s) and EG containing systems was explored.

  8. Water dynamics in protein hydration shells: the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Laage, Damien

    2014-07-17

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra.

  9. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, N.

    2016-09-06

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  10. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-09-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  11. Hydrophobic hydration and the anomalous partial molar volumes in ethanol-water mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Te, Jerez; Cendagorta, Joseph R. [Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia 20057 (United States); Miller, Benjamin T.; Brooks, Bernard R. [Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20892 (United States); Ichiye, Toshiko, E-mail: ti9@georgetown.edu [Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia 20057 (United States); Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2015-02-14

    The anomalous behavior in the partial molar volumes of ethanol-water mixtures at low concentrations of ethanol is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous work indicates that the striking minimum in the partial molar volume of ethanol V{sub E} as a function of ethanol mole fraction X{sub E} is determined mainly by water-water interactions. These results were based on simulations that used one water model for the solute-water interactions but two different water models for the water-water interactions. This is confirmed here by using two more water models for the water-water interactions. Furthermore, the previous work indicates that the initial decrease is caused by association of the hydration shells of the hydrocarbon tails, and the minimum occurs at the concentration where all of the hydration shells are touching each other. Thus, the characteristics of the hydration of the tail that cause the decrease and the features of the water models that reproduce this type of hydration are also examined here. The results show that a single-site multipole water model with a charge distribution that mimics the large quadrupole and the p-orbital type electron density out of the molecular plane has “brittle” hydration with hydrogen bonds that break as the tails touch, which reproduces the deep minimum. However, water models with more typical site representations with partial charges lead to flexible hydration that tends to stay intact, which produces a shallow minimum. Thus, brittle hydration may play an essential role in hydrophobic association in water.

  12. Annular multiphase flow behavior during deep water drilling and the effect of hydrate phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhiyuan; Sun Baojiang

    2009-01-01

    It is very important to understand the annular multiphase flow behavior and the effect of hydrate phase transition during deep water drilling. The basic hydrodynamic models, including mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations, were established for annular flow with gas hydrate phase transition during gas kick. The behavior of annular multiphase flow with hydrate phase transition was investigated by analyzing the hydrate-forming region, the gas fraction in the fluid flowing in the annulus, pit gain, bottom hole pressure, and shut-in casing pressure. The simulation shows that it is possible to move the hydrate-forming region away from sea floor by increasing the circulation rate. The decrease in gas volume fraction in the annulus due to hydrate formation reduces pit gain, which can delay the detection of well kick and increase the risk of hydrate plugging in lines. Caution is needed when a well is monitored for gas kick at a relatively low gas production rate, because the possibility of hydrate presence is much greater than that at a relatively high production rate. The shut-in casing pressure cannot reflect the gas kick due to hydrate formation, which increases with time.

  13. Prediction of natural gas hydrate formation region in wellbore during deep- water gas well testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-yuan; SUN Bao-jiang; WANG Xue-rui; ZHANG Zhen-nan

    2014-01-01

    Wellbore temperature field equations are established with considerations of the enthalpy changes of the natural gas during the deep-water gas well testing. A prediction method for the natural gas hydrate formation region during the deep-water gas well testing is proposed, which combines the wellbore temperature field equations, the phase equilibrium conditions of the natural gas hydrate formation and the calculation methods for the pressure field. Through the sensitivity analysis of the parameters that affect the hydrate formation region, it can be concluded that during the deep-water gas well testing, with the reduction of the gas production rate and the decrease of the geothermal gradient, along with the increase of the depth of water, the hydrate formation region in the wellbore enlarges, the hydrate formation regions differ with different component contents of natural gases, as compared with the pure methane gas, with the increase of ethane and propane, the hydrate formation region expands, the admixture of inhibitors, the type and the concentrations of which can be optimized through the method proposed in the paper, will reduce the hydrate formation region, the throttling effect will lead to the abrupt changes of temperature and pressure, which results in a variation of the hydrate formation region, if the throttling occurs in the shallow part of the wellbore, the temperature will drop too much, which enlarges the hydrate formation region, otherwise, if the throttling occurs in the deep part of the wellbore, the hydrate formation region will be reduced due to the decrease of the pressure.

  14. Impact of Residual Water on CH4-CO2 Exchange rate in Hydrate bearing Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersland, G.; Birkedal, K.; Graue, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is previously shown that sequestration of CO2 in natural gas hydrate reservoirs may offer stable long term deposition of a greenhouse gas while benefiting from methane production, without adding heat to the process. In this work CH4 hydrate formation and CO2 reformation in sandstone has been quantified in a series of experiments using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The overall objective was to provide an improved basic understanding of processes involved in formation and production of methane from methane hydrates within porous media, and to provide data for numerical modeling and scaling. CH4 hydrate has been formed repeatedly in Bentheim sandstone rocks to study hydrate growth patterns for various brine salinities and saturations to prepare for subsequent lab-scale methane production tests through carbon dioxide replacement at various residual water saturations. Surface area for CO2 exposure and the role of permeability and diffusion on the CH4-CO2 exchange rate will also be discussed.

  15. Kinetic and Phase Behaviors of Catalytic Cracking Dry Gas Hydrate in Water-in-Oil Emulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qinglan; HUANG Qiang; CHEN Guangjin; WANG Xiulin; SUN Changyu; YANG Lanying

    2013-01-01

    The systematic experimental studies were performed on the hydrate formation kinetics and gas-hydrate equilibrium for a simulated catalytic cracking gas in the water-in-oil emulsion.The effect of temperature,pressure and initial gas-liquid ratio on the hydrate formation was studied,respectively.The data were obtained at pressures ranging from 3.5 to 5 MPa and temperatures from 274.15 to 277.15 K.The results showed that hydrogen and methane can be separated from the C2+ fraction by forming hydrate at around 273.15 K which is much higher temperature than that of the cryogenic separation method,and the hydrate formation rate can be enhanced in the water-in-oil emulsion compared to pure water.The experiments provided the basic data for designing the industrial process,and setting the suitable operational conditions.The measured data of gas-hydrate equilibria were compared with the predictions by using the Chen-Guo hydrate thermodynamic model.

  16. Cyclic formation and dissociation of methane hydrate within partially water saturated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.

    2010-12-01

    For partially water-saturated sediments, laboratory experiments have shown that methane hydrate forms heterogeneously within a sample at the core scale. The heterogeneous distribution of hydrate in combination with grain-scale hydrate location (eg. grain cementing, load bearing, and pore filling), determines the overall mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments including shear strength and seismic properties. For this reason, understanding the heterogeneity of hydrate-bearing sample is essential when the bulk properties of the sample are examined in the laboratory. We present a series of laboratory methane hydrate formation and dissociation experiments with concurrent x-ray CT imaging and low-frequency (near 1 kHz) seismic measurements. The seismic measurements were conducted using a new acoustic resonant bar technique called the Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar method, which allows using a small sediment core (3.75 cm diameter, 7.5 cm length). The experiment was conducted using a jacketed, pre-compacted, fine-grain silica sand sample with a 40% distilled water saturation. Under isotropic confining stress of 6.9 MPa and a temperature 4 oC, the hydrate was formed in the sample by injecting pure methane gas at 5.6 MPa. Once the hydrate formed, it was dissociated by reducing the pore pressure to 2.8 MPa. This cycle was repeated by three times (dissociation test for the third cycle was not done) to examine the resulting changes in the hydrate distribution and seismic signatures. The repeated formation of hydrate resulted in significant changes in its distribution, which resulted in differences in the overall elastic properties of the sample, determined from the seismic measurements. Interestingly, the time intervals between the dissociation and subsequent formation of hydrate affected the rate of hydrate formation, shorter intervals resulting in faster formation. This memory effect, possibly caused by the presence of residual “seed crystals” in the pore water

  17. 高效分离纯化藻蓝蛋白新法%New method for efficient separation and purification of C-phycocyanin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖晓霞; 张学武

    2011-01-01

    An efficient method was developed for the purification of C-phycocyanin (C-PC), which involved three steps:chitosan affinity precipitation,activated charcoal absorption and DEAE Sephadex A-25 chromatography. As compared with conventional methods,this method was cheap, time-saving and easy to operate. The purity(A620/A280) of C- phycocyanin obtained after chitosan- activated charcoal treatment was increased from 0.93 to 2.78,which could be improved to 4.3 after being subjected to DEAE Sephadex A-25 chromatography. Analyzed by SDS -PAGE electrophoresis,phycocyanin migrated as two bands corresponding to its two subunits(α and β)and the molecular weights were 16.5ku and 17.6ku, respectively. The absorption spectra and fluorescence emission specra of purified protein showed peaks at 620nm and 643nm, respectively,which was characteristic of C-phycocyanin.%采用壳聚糖亲和沉淀-活性炭吸附-DEAE Sephadex A-25柱层析三步法分离纯化藻蓝蛋白,与传统方法相比具有成本低、耗时短、操作便捷等优点.壳聚糖和活性炭结合使用,可使藻蓝蛋白纯度(A62>/A280)由0.93提高至2.78.通过DEAE Sephadex A-25葡聚糖凝胶柱层析后,可得到高纯度藻蓝蛋白,纯度达4.3.纯化后的藻蓝蛋白经聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳(SDS-PAGE)鉴定,产生分子量分别为16.5ku和17.6ku的α,β亚基条带.吸收光谱和荧光发射光谱扫描表明所得蛋白在620、643nm分别具有藻蓝蛋白特征吸收峰和荧光发射峰.

  18. Hydration Simulations of a Carbon Nanotube, Immersed in Water, according to the 3-Attractor Water Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis F. Muguet

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available MC simulations of a set of zigzag ((9,0-(14,0 and armchair ((6,6-(10,10carbon nanotubes immersed in water have been carried out in an NpT-ensemble (512 watermolecules, p=1 bar, T=298 K. Intermolecular interactions were described by BMWpotential according to which, besides the well-known linear water dimer bifurcated andinverted water dimers are metastable. In all cases, it was found that there are large periodicfluctuations of water occupancy inside the nanotubes. Decrease in the size of the nanotubediameter leads to a significant destruction of the H-bond network, and to a bifucarted dimerpopulation increase. Inverted dimer concentration relationship with the nanotube diameter ismore complicated. Population maximum for inverted dimers occurs for diameters of 10-11 å. Water features different intermolecular structures not only inside carbon nanotubesbut also in the outer first hydration shells. The amount of bifurcated and inverted dimers issignificantly more important in the first hydration shell than in bulk water.

  19. Hydrate film growth on the surface of a gas bubble suspended in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, B Z; Dandekar, A; Sun, C Y; Luo, H; Ma, Q L; Pang, W X; Chen, G J

    2007-11-01

    The lateral film growth rate of CH4, C2H4, CO2, CH4 + C2H4, and CH4 + C3H8 hydrates in pure water were measured at four fixed temperatures of 273.4, 275.4, 277.4, and 279.4 K by means of suspending a single gas bubble in water. The results showed that the lateral growth rates of mixed-gas CH4 + C2H4 hydrate films were slower than that of pure gas (CH4 or C2H4) for the same driving force and that of mixed-gas CH4 + C3H8 hydrate film growth was the slowest. The dependence of the thickness of hydrate film on the driving force was investigated, and it was demonstrated that the thickness of hydrate film was inversely proportional to the driving force. It was found that the convective heat transfer control model reported in the literature could be used to formulate the lateral film growth rate v(f) with the driving force DeltaT perfectly for all systems after introduction of the assumption that the thickness of hydrate films is inversely proportional to the driving force DeltaT; i.e., v(f) = psiDeltaT(5/2) is correct and independent of the composition of gas and the type of hydrate. The thicknesses of different gas hydrate films were estimated, and it is demonstrated that the thicknesses of mixed-gas hydrate films were thicker than those of pure gases, which was qualitatively consistent with the experimental result.

  20. Purification of c-phycocyanin from Spirulina fusiformis and its effect on the induction of urokinase-type plasminogen activator from calf pulmonary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhyastha, H K; Radha, K S; Sugiki, M; Omura, S; Maruyama, M

    2006-09-01

    c-Phycocyanin (c-pc), a blue coloured, fluorescent protein was purified from blue-green alga, Spirulina fusiformis and its effect on fibrinolytic system in vascular endothelial cells was investigated. The c-pc consisted of two subunits, alpha and beta, whose molecular masses were 16 and 17 kDa, respectively. N-terminal sequences of both subunits were well conserved compared with other blue green algal phycobiliproteins. Fibrinolytic activity in the medium conditioned by calf pulmonary arterial endothelial cells was measured by the fibrin plate method. The c-pc increased the fibrinolytic activity in dose- and time-dependent manners. Fibrin zymographic studies indicated that c-pc-induced urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the cells. These in vitro results suggest that c-pc from S. fusiformis is a potent profibrinolytic protein in the vascular endothelial system.

  1. Computer Simulation on Kinetics of Primary Process in Photosynthesis(Ⅱ)——Energy Transfer in the β Subunits and Monomers in C-Phycocyanins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵井泉; 朱晋昌; 蒋丽金

    1994-01-01

    Based on the crystal structure data of C-phycocyanins from Mastigocladus Laminosus andAgmenellum Quadruplicatum,the energy transfer processes in the βsubunits and the monomers are simulat-ed by the use of computer simulation technique.The simulation results show that excitation energy cantransfer in both directions between any pair of chromophores,and furthermore,the transfer can take place intwo opposite directions for many times between a pair of chromophores.There certainly exists energy trans-fer between the two subunits in a monomer.The dynamic nature of the energy transfer processes has beenshown.Besides,it is also indicated that a component obtained from mathematically fitting the experimentaldata cannot be equivalent to a physical process.

  2. Water Retention Curve and Relative Permeability for Gas Production from Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, N.; Dai, S.; Seol, Y.; Jang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Water retention curve (soil water characteristic curve SWCC) and relative permeability equations are important to determine gas and water production for gas hydrate development. However, experimental studies to determine fitting parameters of those equations are not available in the literature. The objective of this research is to obtain reliable parameters for capillary pressure functions and relative permeability equations applicable to hydrate dissociation and gas production. In order to achieve this goal, (1) micro X-ray Computer Tomography (CT) is used to scan the specimen under 10MPa effective stress, (2) a pore network model is extracted from the CT image, (3) hydrate dissociation and gas expansion are simulated in the pore network model, (4) the parameters for the van Genuchten-type soil water characteristic curve and relative permeability equation during gas expansion are suggested. The research outcome will enhance the ability of numerical simulators to predict gas and water production rate.

  3. Hydration status moderates the effects of drinking water on children's cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clinton S; Rapinett, Gertrude; Glaser, Nicole S; Ghetti, Simona

    2015-12-01

    Changes in hydration status throughout the day may affect cognitive performance with implications for learning success in the classroom. Our study tested the hypothesis that the benefit of drinking water on working memory and attention depends upon children's hydration status and renal response to water intake. Fifty-two children aged 9-12 years old were tested under two experimental conditions. The treatment session (Water session) consisted of a standard breakfast with 200 ml water, a baseline test, consumption of 750 ml of water over a period of two hours and subsequently retested. No water was provided after breakfast during the control session. Changes in hydration were assessed via urine samples. Cognitive testing consisted of digit span, pair cancellation, and delayed match to sample tasks. Children who exhibited smaller decreases in urine osmolality following water intake performed significantly better on the water day compared to the control day on a digit-span task and pair-cancellation task. Children who exhibited larger decreases in urine osmolality following water intake performed better on the control day compared to the water day on the digit-span task and pair-cancellation task. These results suggest that focusing on adequate hydration over time may be key for cognitive enhancement.

  4. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V., E-mail: aneimark@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8058 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  5. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  6. Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BC Technologies

    2009-12-30

    Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL

  7. Hydration of methanol in water. A DFT-based molecular dynamics study

    CERN Document Server

    Van Erp, T S; Erp, Titus S. van; Meijer, Evert Jan

    2000-01-01

    We studied the hydration of a single methanol molecule in aqueous solution by first-principle DFT-based molecular dynamics simulation. The calculations show that the local structural and short-time dynamical properties of the water molecules remain almost unchanged by the presence of the methanol, confirming the observation from recent experimental structural data for dilute solutions. We also see, in accordance with this experimental work, a distinct shell of water molecules that consists of about 15 molecules. We found no evidence for a strong tangential ordering of the water molecules in the first hydration shell.

  8. Hydration water and peptide dynamics--two sides of a coin. A neutron scattering and adiabatic calorimetry study at low hydration and cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Margarida; Alves, Nuno; Maia, Sílvia; Gomes, Paula; Inaba, Akira; Miyazaki, Yuji; Zanotti, Jean-Marc

    2013-10-21

    In the present work we bridge neutron scattering and calorimetry in the study of a low-hydration sample of a 15-residue hybrid peptide from cecropin and mellitin CA(1-7)M(2-9) of proven antimicrobial activity. Quasielastic and low-frequency inelastic neutron spectra were measured at defined hydration levels - a nominally 'dry' sample (specific residual hydration h = 0.060 g/g), a H2O-hydrated (h = 0.49) and a D2O-hydrated one (h = 0.51). Averaged mean square proton mobilities were derived over a large temperature range (50-300 K) and the vibrational density of states (VDOS) were evaluated for the hydrated samples. The heat capacity of the H2O-hydrated CA(1-7)M(2-9) peptide was measured by adiabatic calorimetry in the temperature range 5-300 K, for different hydration levels. The glass transition and water crystallization temperatures were derived in each case. The existence of different types of water was inferred and their amounts calculated. The heat capacities as obtained from direct calorimetric measurements were compared to the values derived from the neutron spectroscopy by way of integrating appropriately normalized VDOS functions. While there is remarkable agreement with respect to both temperature dependence and glass transition temperatures, the results also show that the VDOS derived part represents only a fraction of the total heat capacity obtained from calorimetry. Finally our results indicate that both hydration water and the peptide are involved in the experimentally observed transitions.

  9. Temperature effects in deep-water hydrate foam

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, Alexander V; Rozhkov, Aleksey N

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on heat and mass exchange processes in hydrate foam during its formation from methane bubbles in gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) of the Lake Baikal and following delivery of it in open container to the lake surface. The foam was formed as a result of methane bubble collection with a trap/container. The trap was inverted glass beaker of diameter of 70 mm and 360 mm long. Open bottom end of the beaker used as enter for bubbles ascended from the lakebed. At a depth of 1400 m all bubbles which fed to the trap were transformed here into solid hydrate foam. The sensitive thermometer was mounted in the middle of the trap and recorded the temperature inside trap. The fate of the bubbles in the trap was recorded by video-camera. During ascend within GHSZ with velocity of about 0.375 m/s we observed the continuous decrease of the temperature in the foam up to a level of negative magnitude in a depth interval of 1400 - 750 meters. Above 750 m temperature decrease was changed by small growth. However...

  10. A study of hydrate formation and dissociation from high water cut emulsions and the impact on emulsion inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greaves, D.P.; Boxall, J.A.; Mulligan, J.; Dendy Sloan, E.; Koh, C.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Center for Hydrate Research

    2008-07-01

    The challenges facing the petroleum industry regarding clathrate hydrate formation were discussed, with particular reference to the costly and dangerous pipeline blocking plugs that form upon hydrate accumulation and agglomeration. Although a variety of inhibitors are used to prevent hydrate plug formation, they are not designed for high water content production. As oil and gas are produced from less profitable or older wells, there is a greater probability of higher water cuts. Therefore, this study focused on methane hydrate formation and dissociation from these high water content (greater than 60 per cent volume) emulsions of water-in-oil (W/O) and oil-in-water (O/W). At high water cuts, the system can quickly agglomerate with hydrate formation, while dissociation can lead to a significant change in the emulsion type. Although inhibition can be costly at high water cuts, it must be considered because of the risk of immediate agglomeration and plug formation with hydrates. In this study, the hydrate formation and dissociation from W/O emulsions destabilized the emulsion, with the final emulsion formulation favouring a water continuous state following re-emulsification. After dissociation, the W/O emulsion formed a multiple o/W/O emulsion or inverted at even higher water cuts, forming an O/W emulsion with 68 per cent water volume. In contrast, hydrate formation and dissociation from O/W emulsions with more than 71 per cent water volume stablized the O/W emulsion. 24 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Effect of Hydration Aging and Water Binder Ratio on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Sprayed Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Ditao; WANG Jiabin; WANG Yan

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the durability of sprayed concrete (shotcrete), effects of different hydration aging and water-binder ratio (w/b) on the microstructure of cement paste and basic mechanical properties of test specimens were investigated. The phase composition, mass percentage of ettringite and portland in hydration production and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo gravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The experimental results showed that changes in phase composition was more signiifcant than those of water-binder ratio. With hydration aging and water-binder ratio increased, the mass percentage of ettringite and portland was decreased from 4.42%, 1.49% to 3.31%, 1.35%, respectively and the microstructure of paste was signiifcantly compacted. Likewise, the mechanical properties including cubic compressive strength and splitting tensile strength were rised obviously.

  12. Calculation of Liquid Water-Hydrate-Methane Vapor Phase Equilibria from Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for determining fluid- and crystal-phase chemical potentials are used for the first time to calculate liquid water-methane hydrate-methane vapor phase equilibria from knowledge of atomistic interaction potentials alone. The water and methane molecules are modeled...... using the TIP4P/ice potential and a united-atom Lennard-Jones potential. respectively. The equilibrium calculation method for this system has three components, (i) thermodynamic integration from a supercritical ideal gas to obtain the fluid-phase chemical potentials. (ii) calculation of the chemical...... potential of the zero-occupancy hydrate system using thermodynamic integration from an Einstein crystal reference state, and (iii) thermodynamic integration to obtain the water and guest molecules' chemical potentials as a function of the hydrate occupancy. The three-phase equilibrium curve is calculated...

  13. Methane hydrate stability in the presence of water-soluble hydroxyalkyl cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mohammad-Taheri; A. Zarringhalam Moghaddam; K. Nazari; N. Gholipour Zanjani

    2012-01-01

    The effect of low-dosage water-soluble hydroxyethyl cellulose (approximate Mw~90,000 and 250,000) as a member ofhydroxyalkyl cellulosic polymer group on methane hydrate stability was investigated by monitoring hydrate dissociation at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure in a closed vessel.In particular,the influence of molecular weight and mass concentration of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) was studied with respect to hydrate formation and dissociation.Methane hydrate formation was performed at 2 ℃ and at a pressure greater than 100 bar.Afterwards,hydrate dissociation was initiated by step heating from - 10 ℃ at a mild pressure of 13 bar to -3 ℃,0 ℃ and 2 ℃.With respect to the results obtained for methane hydrate formation/dissociation and the amount of gas uptake,we concluded that HEC 90,000 at 5000 ppm is suitable for long-term gas storage and transportation under a mild pressure of 13 bar and at temperatures below the freezing point.

  14. Hydration evolution of pre-cast concrete with steam and water curing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巴明芳; 钱春香

    2013-01-01

    The hydration characteristics of pre-cast concrete considering the effects of effective initial steam-curing and water-curing duration were measured and analyzed with XRD, TG, X-ray CT, SEM-BSE and MIP techniques. The results show that the effective initial steam-curing duration for pre-cast concrete with lower water-binder ratio was 10 14 h at 50 °C and the initial water-curing duration was 7 14 d. And the hydration evolution of cement, fly ash and slag in pre-cast concrete was obtained respectively by combining the hydrochlorides and EDTA selecting dissolution methods, based on which the contents of hydrated and anhydrate in concrete were calculated and the corresponding dynamic capillary porosity was also determined. Moreover, the comparison between calculated results and experimental ones indicates that the proposed evolution models of microscopic characteristics corresponding to hydration kinetics of cemented materials could be adopted to predict the developing trend of capillary porosity and hydration-products content in pre-cast concrete with fly ash and slag under certain curing conditions.

  15. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering and Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics.

  16. Selective and reactive hydration of nitriles to amides in water using silver nanoparticles stabilized by organic ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Koji [Hokkaido University, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Japan); Kawakami, Hayato [Miyoshi Oil & Fat Co., Ltd. (Japan); Narushima, Takashi; Yonezawa, Tetsu, E-mail: tetsu@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Water-dispersible silver nanoparticles stabilized by silver–carbon covalent bonds were prepared. They exhibited high catalytic activities for the selective hydration of nitriles to amides in water. The activation of a nitrile group by the functional groups of the substrates and the hydrophobic layer on the nanoparticles influenced the catalyzed reaction were confirmed. Alkyl nitriles could also be selectively hydrated.

  17. Molecular properties of aqueous solutions: a focus on the collective dynamics of hydration water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comez, L; Paolantoni, M; Sassi, P; Corezzi, S; Morresi, A; Fioretto, D

    2016-07-07

    When a solute is dissolved in water, their mutual interactions determine the molecular properties of the solute on one hand, and the structure and dynamics of the surrounding water particles (the so-called hydration water) on the other. The very existence of soft matter and its peculiar properties are largely due to the wide variety of possible water-solute interactions. In this context, water is not an inert medium but rather an active component, and hydration water plays a crucial role in determining the structure, stability, dynamics, and function of matter. This review focuses on the collective dynamics of hydration water in terms of retardation with respect to the bulk, and of the number of molecules whose dynamics is perturbed. Since water environments are in a dynamic equilibrium, with molecules continuously exchanging from around the solute towards the bulk and vice versa, we examine the ability of different techniques to measure the water dynamics on the basis of the explored time scales and exchange rates. Special emphasis is given to the collective dynamics probed by extended depolarized light scattering and we discuss whether and to what extent the results obtained in aqueous solutions of small molecules can be extrapolated to the case of large biomacromolecules. In fact, recent experiments performed on solutions of increasing complexity clearly indicate that a reductionist approach is not adequate to describe their collective dynamics. We conclude this review by presenting current ideas that are being developed to describe the dynamics of water interacting with macromolecules.

  18. 藻蓝蛋白静态吸附平衡及热力学研究%Adsorption equilibrium and thermodynamic of c-phycocyanin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杨; 虞永蕾

    2011-01-01

    研究了钝顶螺旋藻中藻蓝蛋白在DEAE-Sephadex A-50离子交换树脂上的静态吸附平衡,考察了无机盐NaCl浓度和聚合物PEG6000质量分数,以及吸附温度对藻蓝蛋白静态吸附平衡的影响,以Langmuir和Freundlich吸附等温方程分别对不同条件下的吸附平衡数据进行拟合,并计算出吸附过程的热力学参数△G,△H和△S.研究表明:NaCl具有显著抑制藻蓝蛋白吸附的作用,而PEG具有明显促进藻蓝蛋白吸附的作用;Freundlich吸附等温方程对藻蓝蛋白的吸附平衡数据具有更好的拟合效果,并判定吸附过程为优惠吸附;在不同的吸附条件下,AG <0,且其绝对值小于20 k J/mol,表明吸附过程可自发进行并为物理吸附,△H>O,表明该吸附过程为吸热过程,△S>0,该吸附过程属于熵增过程.%The adsorption equilibrium of c-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis on DEAE-Sephadex A-SO was studied. The effects of NaCl concentration and polymer PEG6000 mass fraction, and adsorption temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of c-phycocyanin were investigated. The adsorption data were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich equations, and the thermodynamic parameters such as AG, Aif and AS were calculated. The results imply that NaCl can decrease the adsorption while PEC can increase the adsorption. The experimental data can be well fitted by Freundlich equations and the adsorption is verified to be the optimal adsorption. Under the various adsorption conditions, Gibbs free energy change △G0 indicates that the process is endothermic and physical adsorption. The entropy change △S>0 indicates that the adsorption is an entropic increasing process.

  19. Relative water and gas permeability for gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Jang, Jaewon

    2014-06-01

    water and gas permeability equations are important for estimating gas and water production from hydrate-bearing sediments. However, experimental or numerical study to determine fitting parameters of those equations is not available in the literature. In this study, a pore-network model is developed to simulate gas expansion and calculate relative water and gas permeability. Based on the simulation results, fitting parameters for modified Stone equation are suggested for a distributed hydrate system where initial hydrate saturations range from Sh = 0.1 to 0.6. The suggested fitting parameter for relative water permeability is nw ≈ 2.4 regardless of initial hydrate saturation while the suggested fitting parameter for relative gas permeability is increased from ng = 1.8 for Sh = 0.1 to ng = 3.5 for Sh = 0.6. Results are relevant to other systems that experience gas exsolution such as pockmark formation due to sea level change, CO2 gas formation during geological CO2 sequestration, and gas bubble accumulation near the downstream of dams.

  20. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J; Weik, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  1. Effect of hydration on plasma volume and endocrine responses to water immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M. H.; Keil, L. C.; Wade, C. A.; Silver, J. E.; Geelen, G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of hydration status on early endocrine responses and on osmotic and intravascular volume changes during immersion was determined in humans undergoing successive periods of dehydration, immersion, rehydration, and immersion. Immersion caused an isotonic expansion of plasma volume, as well as suppression of plasma renin activity and aldosterone, which all occurred independently of hydration status. On the other hand, the concentration of plasma vasopressin (PVP) was found to decrease during dehydrated immersion, but not during rehydrated immersion. It is concluded that plasma tonicity is not a factor influencing PVP suppression during water immersion.

  2. X-ray computed-tomography observations of water flow through anisotropic methane hydrate-bearing sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2009-06-01

    We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to image and quantify the effect of a heterogeneous sand grain-size distribution on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate, as well as the effect on water flow through the heterogeneous hydrate-bearing sand. A 28 cm long sand column was packed with several segments having vertical and horizontal layers with sands of different grain-size distributions. During the hydrate formation, water redistribution occurred. Observations of water flow through the hydrate-bearing sands showed that water was imbibed more readily into the fine sand, and that higher hydrate saturation increased water imbibition in the coarse sand due to increased capillary strength. Hydrate dissociation induced by depressurization resulted in different flow patterns with the different grain sizes and hydrate saturations, but the relationships between dissociation rates and the grain sizes could not be identified using the CT images. The formation, presence, and dissociation of hydrate in the pore space dramatically impact water saturation and flow in the system.

  3. Gas chromatographic thermodynamics on hydration processes of magnesium chloride with low water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建军; 陈关城; 马培华; 保积庆; 马玉涛; 陈丰秋

    2003-01-01

    The dehydration and hydration processes of magnesium chloride hydrates were studied by means of frontal chromatography analysis, calorimetry, thermogravimetry and chemical analysis. The mathematical imitation for the adsorption isotherms of MgCl2*4H2O and MgCl2*2H2O at different temperatures indicates that Boltzmann Function is the ideal equation to describe those adsorption isotherms. Its adsorption heat is -13.06kJ/mol and -16.11kJ/mol, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium constants are also given. From the data obtained, there is a thermodynamical possibility to use partial dehydrated magnesium chloride hydrates as an absorbance to clean water vapor contained in bischophite dehydration equipment and let the protection gas HCl recycle in the fluid bed reaction system.

  4. Calculation of liquid water-hydrate-methane vapor phase equilibria from molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas; Wierzchowski, Scott; Walsh, Matthew R; Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy; Wu, David T; Sum, Amadeu K

    2010-05-06

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for determining fluid- and crystal-phase chemical potentials are used for the first time to calculate liquid water-methane hydrate-methane vapor phase equilibria from knowledge of atomistic interaction potentials alone. The water and methane molecules are modeled using the TIP4P/ice potential and a united-atom Lennard-Jones potential, respectively. The equilibrium calculation method for this system has three components, (i) thermodynamic integration from a supercritical ideal gas to obtain the fluid-phase chemical potentials, (ii) calculation of the chemical potential of the zero-occupancy hydrate system using thermodynamic integration from an Einstein crystal reference state, and (iii) thermodynamic integration to obtain the water and guest molecules' chemical potentials as a function of the hydrate occupancy. The three-phase equilibrium curve is calculated for pressures ranging from 20 to 500 bar and is shown to follow the Clapeyron behavior, in agreement with experiment; coexistence temperatures differ from the latter by 4-16 K in the pressure range studied. The enthalpy of dissociation extracted from the calculated P-T curve is within 2% of the experimental value at corresponding conditions. While computationally intensive, simulations such as these are essential to map the thermodynamically stable conditions for hydrate systems.

  5. Antimelanogenic effect of c-phycocyanin through modulation of tyrosinase expression by upregulation of ERK and downregulation of p38 MAPK signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Yu-Ting

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigmentation is one of the essential defense mechanisms against oxidative stress or UV irradiation; however, abnormal hyperpigmentation in human skin may pose a serious aesthetic problem. C-phycocyanin (Cpc is a phycobiliprotein from spirulina and functions as an antioxidant and a light harvesting protein. Though it is known that spirulina has been used to reduce hyperpigmentation, little literature addresses the antimelanogenic mechanism of Cpc. Herein, we investigated the rationale for the Cpc-induced inhibitory mechanism on melanin synthesis in B16F10 melanoma cells. Methods Cpc-induced inhibitory effects on melanin synthesis and tyrosinase expression were evaluated. The activity of MAPK pathways-associated molecules such as MAPK/ERK and p38 MAPK, were also examined to explore Cpc-induced antimelanogenic mechanisms. Additionally, the intracellular localization of Cpc was investigated by confocal microscopic analysis to observe the migration of Cpc. Results Cpc significantly (P Conclusions Cpc exerted dual antimelanogenic mechanisms by upregulation of MAPK/ERK-dependent degradation of MITF and downregulation of p38 MAPK-regulated CREB activation to modulate melanin formation. Cpc may have potential applications in biomedicine, food, and cosmetic industries.

  6. Study of the Effects of Betaine and/or C-Phycocyanin on the Growth of Lung Cancer A549 Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rea Bingula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of betaine, C-phycocyanin (C-PC, and their combined use on the growth of A549 lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo. When cells were coincubated with betaine and C-PC, an up to 60% decrease in viability was observed which is significant compared to betaine (50% or C-PC treatment alone (no decrease. Combined treatment reduced the stimulation of NF-κB expression by TNF-α and increased the amount of the proapoptotic p38 MAPK. Interestingly, combined treatment induced a cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase for ~60% of cells. In vivo studies were performed in pathogen-free male nude rats injected with A549 cells in their right flank. Their daily food was supplemented with either betaine, C-PC, both, or neither. Compared to the control group, tumour weights and volumes were significantly reduced in either betaine- or C-PC-treated groups and no additional decrease was obtained with the combined treatment. This data indicates that C-PC and betaine alone may efficiently inhibit tumour growth in rats. The synergistic activity of betaine and C-PC on A549 cells growth observed in vitro remains to be further confirmed in vivo. The reason behind the nature of their interaction is yet to be sought.

  7. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-16

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  8. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  9. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Feng; Wang, Hong, E-mail: hwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, International Center for Applied Mechanics and School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Suo, Zhigang, E-mail: hwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Kavli Institute of Bionano Science and Technology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-13

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  10. Influence of Hydration Level on Polymer and Water Dynamics in Alkaline Anion Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, Jacob; Kim, Jenny; Tyagi, Madhu; Soles, Christopher; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Coughlin, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    Triblock copolymers based on poly(chloromethylstyrene)-b-poly(ethylene)-b-poly(chloromethylstyrene) can be quaternized to different extents to yield anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells. In the absence of moisture, these membranes demonstrate bilayer lamellar morphology. Upon high levels of hydration, however, in-situ small angle neutron scattering reveals the emergence of higher-order diffraction peaks. This phenomena has previously been observed in analogous diblock copolymer-based membranes and has been attributed to the induction of a multilayer lamellar morphology in which selective striping of water occurs in the center of the ion-rich domain. By conducting humidity-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements using deuterated water, we are able to isolate differences in the pico- to nanosecond timescale dynamics of the hydrogenated membrane upon hydration. QENS measurements in the presence of a hydrogenated water source subsequently permit deconvolution and isolation of the translational and rotational dynamics of water as a function of relative humidity, revealing spatial and temporal changes in polymer and water motion at high levels of hydration.

  11. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of 1-methylthymine and its water clusters: the dark state survives hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busker, Matthias; Nispel, Michael; Häber, Thomas; Kleinermanns, Karl; Etinski, Mihajlo; Fleig, Timo

    2008-08-04

    Electronic and vibrational gas phase spectra of 1-methylthymine (1MT) and 1-methyluracil (1MU) and their clusters with water are presented. Mass selective IR/UV double resonance spectra confirm the formation of pyrimidine-water clusters and are compared to calculated vibrational spectra obtained from ab initio calculations. In contrast to Y. He, C. Wu, W. Kong; J. Phys. Chem. A, 2004, 108, 94 we are able to detect 1MT/1MU and their water clusters via resonant two-photon delayed ionization under careful control of the applied water-vapor pressure. The long-living dark electronic state of 1MT and 1MU detected by delayed ionization, survives hydration and the photostability of 1MT/1MU cannot be attributed solely to hydration. Oxygen coexpansions and crossed-beam experiments indicate that the triplet state population is probably small compared to the (1)n pi* and/or hot electronic ground state population. Ab initio theory shows that solvation of 1MT by water does not lead to a substantial modification of the electronic relaxation and quenching of the (1)n pi* state. Relaxation pathways via (1)pi pi*(1)-n pi*(1) and (1)pi pi*-S(0) conical intersections and barriers have been identified, but are not significantly altered by hydration.

  12. ATR-FTIR study of water in Nafion membrane combined with proton conductivity measurements during hydration/dehydration cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimatsu, Keiji; Bae, Byungchan; Miyatake, Kenji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2011-04-21

    We have conducted combined time-resolved attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and proton conductivity measurements of Nafion NRE211 membrane during hydration/dehydration cycles at room temperature. Conductivity change was interpreted in terms of different states of water in the membrane based on its δ(HOH) vibrational spectra. It was found that hydration of a dry membrane leads first to complete dissociation of the sulfonic acid groups to liberate hydrated protons, which are isolated from each other and have δ(HOH) vibrational frequency around 1740 cm(-1). The initial hydration is not accompanied by a significant increase of the proton conductivity. Further hydration gives rise to a rapid increase of the conductivity in proportion to intensity of a new δ(HOH) band around 1630 cm(-1). This was interpreted in terms of formation of channels of weakly hydrogen-bonded water to combine the isolated hydrophilic domains containing hydrated protons and hydrated sulfonate ions produced during the initial stage of hydration. Upon dehydration, proton conductivity drops first very rapidly due to loss of the weakly hydrogen bonded water from the channels to leave hydrophilic domains isolated in the membrane. Dehydration of the protons proceeds very slowly after significant loss of the proton conductivity.

  13. A cheaper, faster, better way to detect water of hydration on Solar System bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith

    1994-01-01

    The 3.0-micrometers water of hydration absorption feature observed in the IR photometry of many low-albedo and some medium-albedo asteroids strongly correlates with the 0.7-micrometers Fe(+2) to Fe(+3) oxidized iron absorption feature observed in narrowband spectrophotometry of these asteroids. Using this relationship, an empirical algorithm for predicting the presence of water of hydration in the surface material of a Solar System body using photometry obtained through the Eight-Color Asteroid Survey nu (0.550 micrometers), w (0.701 micrometers), and x (0.853 micrometers) filters was developed and applied to the ECAS photometry of asteroids and outer planet satellites. The percentage of objects in low-albedo, outer main-belt asteroid classes that test positively for water of hydration increases from P to B to C to G class and correlates linearly with the increasing mean albedos of those objects testing positively. The medium-albedo M-class asteroids do not test positively in large number using this algorithm. Aqueously altered asteroids dominate the Solar System population between heliocentric distances of 2.6 to 3.5 AU, bracketing the Solar System region where the aqueous alteration mechanism operated most strongly. One jovian satellite, J VI Himalia, and one saturnian satellite. Phoebe, tested positively for water of hydration, supporting the hypothesis that these may be captured C-class asteroids from a postaccretional dispersion. The proposed testing technique could be applied to an Earth-based survey of asteroids or a space-probe study of an asteroid's surface characteristic in order to identify a potential water source.

  14. Salt hydrates for in situ water activity control have acid-base effects on enzymes in nonaqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Nuno; Harper, Neil; Halling, Peter J; Barreiros, Susana

    2003-06-30

    Salt hydrates very frequently are utilized as in situ water activity buffers in reaction mixtures of enzymes in nonaqueous media. In addition to buffering water activity, there is evidence that salt hydrates also often affect initial rates in other ways. This has been generally overlooked or thought to be related to water transfer effects. Here we show that salt hydrates can have important acid-base effects on enzymes in nonaqueous media. We performed transesterification reactions in n-hexane and in supercritical ethane catalyzed by cross-linked crystals of subtilisin, differing in the method used to set a(W), and confirmed that the presence of salt hydrate pairs significantly affected the catalytic performance of the enzyme. However, in the presence of a solid-state acid-base buffer, salt hydrates had no effect on enzymatic activity. Direct evidence for the acid-base effects of salt hydrates was obtained by testing their effect on the protonation state of an organo-soluble H(+)/Na(+) indicator. The four salt hydrate pairs tested affected the indicator to very different extents. By promoting the exchange of H(+) for Na(+), salt hydrates will tend to affect the ionization state of acidic residues in the protein and, hence, enzymatic activity. In fact, salt hydrates were able to affect the pH memory of subtilisin lyophilized from different aqueous pHs, bringing about up to 20-fold enhancements and up to 5-fold decreases in catalytic activity. The possibility of such acid-base effects need to be considered in all experiments using salt hydrates to control water activity.

  15. Temperature dependence of the structure of protein hydration water and the liquid-liquid transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, S R; Malaspina, D C; Rodriguez Fris, J A; Alarcón, L M; Appignanesi, G A

    2012-03-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the structure and orientation of the first hydration layers of the protein lysozyme and compare it with the situation for a model homogeneous hydrophobic surface, a graphene sheet. We show that in both cases these layers are significantly better structured than bulk water. The geometrical constraint of the interface makes the water molecules adjacent to the surface lose one water-water hydrogen bond and expel the fourth neighbors away from the surface, lowering local density. We show that a decrease in temperature improves the ordering of the hydration water molecules, preserving such a geometrical effect. For the case of graphene, this favors an ice Ih-like local structuring, similar to the water-air interface but in the opposite way along the c axis of the basal plane (while the vicinal water molecules of the air interface orient a hydrogen atom toward the surface, the oxygens of the water molecules close to the graphene plane orient a lone pair in such a direction). In turn, the case of the first hydration layers of the lysozyme molecule is shown to be more complicated, but still displaying signs of both kinds of behavior, together with a tendency of the proximal water molecules to hydrogen bond to the protein both as donors and as acceptors. Additionally, we make evident the existence of signatures of a liquid-liquid transition (Widom line crossing) in different structural parameters at the temperature corresponding to the dynamic transition incorrectly referred to as "the protein glass transition."

  16. Molecular mechanism of inhibitory effects of C-phycocyanin combined with all-trans-retinoic acid on the growth of HeLa cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Li, Bing; Chu, Xian-Ming; Lv, Cong-Yi; Xu, Ying-Jie; Yang, Peng

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effects of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), C-phycocyanin (C-PC), or ATRA+C-PC on the growth of cervical cells (HeLa cells), cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis. The anticancer mechanism of the drug combination was revealed. MTT assay was adopted to determine the effects of C-PC and ATRA on the growth of HeLa cells. The expression quantities of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, caspase-3, and CD59 were determined by in situ hybridization, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry staining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. TUNEL assay was adopted to determine the cellular apoptosis levels. Both C-PC and ATRA could inhibit the growth of HeLa cells, and the combination of ATRA+C-PC functioned cooperatively to induce apoptosis in HeLa cells. The dosage of ATRA was reduced when it cooperated with C-PC to reduce the toxicity. ATRA treated with C-PC could induce more cell cycle arrests than the single drug used by decrease in cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression. The combination of the two drugs could upregulate caspase-3 and downregulate the Bcl-2 gene and induce cell apoptosis. Moreover, the combination therapy has an important immunological significance in decreased expression of the CD59 protein. Singly, C-PC or ATRA could inhibit the growth of HeLa cells, and the effects of treatment were further enhanced in the combination group. In combination with C-PC, the dosage of ATRA was effectively reduced. The C-PC + ATRA combination might take effect by inhibiting the progress of the cell cycle, inducing cell apoptosis and promoting complement-mediated cytolysis.

  17. Computer Simulation on Kinetics of Primary Process in Photosynthesis (Ⅲ)——Energy Transfer in the Trimers and Hexamers of C-Phycocyanins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵井泉; 朱晋昌; 蒋丽金

    1994-01-01

    Based on the crystal structure data from X-ray analysis,the energy transfer processes inthe trimers and hexamers of C-phycocyanins(C-PC)have been simulated.The simulation results show(i)The excitation energy could transfer back and forth many times through a certain path before it was finallylost through fluorescence emission.(ii)The higher the aggregate,the less the transfer times.(iii)In atrimer,an m-(mediate)chromophore in a monomer and an f-(fluorescing)chromophore in another are inclosest proximity to each other and an appropriate orientation.These two chromophores form a fast transferpair with their energy transfer proceeding so fast that the time constant is less than 1 ps.There are 3 suchfast transfer pairs which are symmetrically equivalent in a trimer,while the paths of m■f and f■f betweenthe monomers are responsible for linking the fast transfer pairs.(iv)The excitation energy on an s-(sensi-tizing)chromophore is dominantly transferred to the f-chromophore in the same monomer.(v)In the hex-amer,there are 2 types of principal paths for linking the 2 trimers,which are m■m and s■s paths,whilethe excitation energy on the f-chromophores will be transferred into another trimer through the m-chro-mophore in the same fast transfer pair.The simulation shows that the hexamer possesses an optimal struc-ture for energy transfer.

  18. Water proton configurations in structures I, II, and H clathrate hydrate unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Fumihito; Hiratsuka, Masaki; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2013-03-28

    Position and orientation of water protons need to be specified when the molecular simulation studies are performed for clathrate hydrates. Positions of oxygen atoms in water are experimentally determined by X-ray diffraction analysis of clathrate hydrate structures, but positions of water hydrogen atoms in the lattice are disordered. This study reports a determination of the water proton coordinates in unit cell of structure I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH) clathrate hydrates that satisfy the ice rules, have the lowest potential energy configuration for the protons, and give a net zero dipole moment. Possible proton coordinates in the unit cell were chosen by analyzing the symmetry of protons on the hexagonal or pentagonal faces in the hydrate cages and generating all possible proton distributions which satisfy the ice rules. We found that in the sI and sII unit cells, proton distributions with small net dipole moments have fairly narrow potential energy spreads of about 1 kJ∕mol. The total Coulomb potential on a test unit charge placed in the cage center for the minimum energy∕minimum dipole unit cell configurations was calculated. In the sI small cages, the Coulomb potential energy spread in each class of cage is less than 0.1 kJ∕mol, while the potential energy spread increases to values up to 6 kJ∕mol in sH and 15 kJ∕mol in the sII cages. The guest environments inside the cages can therefore be substantially different in the sII case. Cartesian coordinates for oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the sI, sII, and sH unit cells are reported for reference.

  19. Protocol for Measuring the Thermal Properties of a Supercooled Synthetic Sand-water-gas-methane Hydrate Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Michihiro; Susuki, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Tsuji, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-21

    Methane hydrates (MHs) are present in large amounts in the ocean floor and permafrost regions. Methane and hydrogen hydrates are being studied as future energy resources and energy storage media. To develop a method for gas production from natural MH-bearing sediments and hydrate-based technologies, it is imperative to understand the thermal properties of gas hydrates. The thermal properties' measurements of samples comprising sand, water, methane, and MH are difficult because the melting heat of MH may affect the measurements. To solve this problem, we performed thermal properties' measurements at supercooled conditions during MH formation. The measurement protocol, calculation method of the saturation change, and tips for thermal constants' analysis of the sample using transient plane source techniques are described here. The effect of the formation heat of MH on measurement is very small because the gas hydrate formation rate is very slow. This measurement method can be applied to the thermal properties of the gas hydrate-water-guest gas system, which contains hydrogen, CO2, and ozone hydrates, because the characteristic low formation rate of gas hydrate is not unique to MH. The key point of this method is the low rate of phase transition of the target material. Hence, this method may be applied to other materials having low phase-transition rates.

  20. Direct measurement of the correlated dynamics of the protein-backbone and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Cheng; Huang, Jiaxin; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of the correlation times of the protein backbone carbons and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The experimental data indicate a decrease in the correlation times of the carbonyl carbons as the strain on the biopolymer is increased. These observations are in good agreement with short 4ns molecular dynamics simulations of (VPGVG)3, a well studied mimetic peptide of elastin. The experimental results also indicate a reduction in the correlation time of proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain applied to the elastomer. A simple model is suggested that correlates the increase in the motion of proximal waters of hydration to the increase in frequency of libration of the protein backbone that develops with increasing strain. Together, the reduction in the protein entropy accompanied with the increase in entropy of the proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain, support the notion that the source ...

  1. Analysis of the hydration water around bovine serum albumin using terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Jordan W; Meliga, Stefano; Ferachou, Denis; Cinque, Gianfelice; Zeitler, J Axel; Falconer, Robert J

    2014-01-09

    Terahertz spectroscopy was used to study the absorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in water. The Diamond Light Source operating in a low alpha mode generated coherent synchrotron radiation that covered a useable spectral bandwidth of 0.3-3.3 THz (10-110 cm(-1)). As the BSA concentration was raised, there was a nonlinear change in absorption inconsistent with Beer's law. At low BSA concentrations (0-1 mM), the absorption remained constant or rose slightly. Above a concentration of 1 mM BSA, a steady decrease in absorption was observed, which was followed by a plateau that started at 2.5 mM. Using a overlapping hydration layer model, the hydration layer was estimated to extend 15 Å from the protein. Calculation of the corrected absorption coefficient (αcorr) for the water around BSA by subtracting the excluded volume of the protein provides an alternative approach to studying the hydration layer that provides evidence for complexity in the population of water around BSA.

  2. Coordination variation of hydrated Cu2+/Br1- ions traversing the interfacial water in mesopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Huang, X. F.; Li, C. X.; Pan, L. Q.; Wu, Z. H.; Hu, T. D.; Jiang, Z.; Huang, Y. Y.; Cao, Z. X.; Sun, G.; Lu, K. Q.

    2012-06-01

    Resolution of the atomistic and electronic details about the coordination structure variation of hydrated ions in the interfacial water is still a tough challenge, which is, however, essentially important for the understanding of ion adsorption, permeation and other similar processes in aqueous solutions. Here we report the tracing of coordination structure variation for hydrated Cu2+/Br1- ions traversing the interfacial water in Vycor mesopores (ϕ = 7.6 nm) by employing both X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. By controlled desorption/adsorption of water, the filling fraction of the mesopores, thus the water layer thickness, can be adjusted, which in turn effects the variation of coordination structure of the ions therein. It is found that both Cu2+ and Br1- ions prefer staying exclusively in the core water, and in this circumstance no ion pairs have been detected in the solution of concentrations up to 1.0 M. Following capillary decondensation occurring at a filling fraction of ˜35% which corresponds to a water layer of about three monolayers, Br1- ions begin immediately to reconstruct their first coordination shell, characterized by ionic dehydration, shrinkage of ion-water bond length, and formation of ion pairs. In contrast, Cu2+ ions can retain a bulk-like coordination structure till being driven to bond directly to the pore surface when the filling fraction is below 20%. At the final stage of dehydration via thermal vacuum treatment at 110°C, Cu2+ ions can be completely reduced to the Cu1+ state, and recover at room temperature only when the filling fraction is above 14%. These results may be inspirable for the investigation of similar problems concerning hydrated ions in water solution under different confining conditions.

  3. Coordination variation of hydrated Cu2+/Br1− ions traversing the interfacial water in mesopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resolution of the atomistic and electronic details about the coordination structure variation of hydrated ions in the interfacial water is still a tough challenge, which is, however, essentially important for the understanding of ion adsorption, permeation and other similar processes in aqueous solutions. Here we report the tracing of coordination structure variation for hydrated Cu2+/Br1- ions traversing the interfacial water in Vycor mesopores (ϕ = 7.6 nm by employing both X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. By controlled desorption/adsorption of water, the filling fraction of the mesopores, thus the water layer thickness, can be adjusted, which in turn effects the variation of coordination structure of the ions therein. It is found that both Cu2+ and Br1- ions prefer staying exclusively in the core water, and in this circumstance no ion pairs have been detected in the solution of concentrations up to 1.0 M. Following capillary decondensation occurring at a filling fraction of ∼35% which corresponds to a water layer of about three monolayers, Br1- ions begin immediately to reconstruct their first coordination shell, characterized by ionic dehydration, shrinkage of ion-water bond length, and formation of ion pairs. In contrast, Cu2+ ions can retain a bulk-like coordination structure till being driven to bond directly to the pore surface when the filling fraction is below 20%. At the final stage of dehydration via thermal vacuum treatment at 110°C, Cu2+ ions can be completely reduced to the Cu1+ state, and recover at room temperature only when the filling fraction is above 14%. These results may be inspirable for the investigation of similar problems concerning hydrated ions in water solution under different confining conditions.

  4. Hydration and hydrogen bond network of water around hydrophobic surface investigated by terahertz spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, K; Suzuki, T; Kondo, N; Ogawa, Y

    2014-12-21

    Water conformation around hydrophobic side chains of four amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-aminobutyric acid, and L-norvaline) was investigated via changes in complex dielectric constant in the terahertz (THz) region. Each of these amino acids has the same hydrophilic backbone, with successive additions of hydrophobic straight methylene groups (-CH2-) to the side chain. Changes in the degree of hydration (number of dynamically retarded water molecules relative to bulk water) and the structural conformation of the water hydrogen bond (HB) network related to the number of methylene groups were quantitatively measured. Since dielectric responses in the THz region represent water relaxations and water HB vibrations at a sub-picosecond and picosecond timescale, these measurements characterized the water relaxations and HB vibrations perturbed by the methylene apolar groups. We found each successive straight -CH2- group on the side chain restrained approximately two hydrophobic hydration water molecules. Additionally, the number of non-hydrogen-bonded (NHB) water molecules increased slightly around these hydrophobic side chains. The latter result seems to contradict the iceberg model proposed by Frank and Evans, where water molecules are said to be more ordered around apolar surfaces. Furthermore, we compared the water-hydrophilic interactions of the hydrophilic amino acid backbone with those with the water-hydrophobic interactions around the side chains. As the hydrophobicity of the side chain increased, the ordering of the surrounding water HB network was altered from that surrounding the hydrophilic amino acid backbone, thereby diminishing the fraction of NHB water and ordering the surrounding tetrahedral water HB network.

  5. Hydration status and water turnover of dogsled drivers during an endurance sled dog even in the Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To determine changes in common urinary markers of hydration maintained by the drivers (mushers) during a wilderness endurance event in the arctic and to determine water turnover in this select group of individuals. Study Design. During this descriptive study, data was systematically collected on hydration, water turnover, changes in resting and exercise heart rate, fatigue and rating of perceived exertion during an arduous dogsled race in the arctic. Methods. Sixteen mushers were ...

  6. Role of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites in the dynamic crossover of the protein-hydration water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Mateus Henrique; Barbosa, Rafael C.; da Silva, Leandro B.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the water structure and dynamics in the hydration shell of the globular TS-Kappa protein. The results show that for a wide range of temperatures the diffusion coefficient of water near the protein surface is lower than in bulk. A crossover in the diffusion behavior of hydration water is observed at different temperatures for hydrophilic and hydrophobic vicinities. We have found a correlation between the crossover in the hydrophilic case and the protein dynamical transition. An explanation in terms of the competition between water-water water-protein H-bond formation is provided based on H-bond network analysis.

  7. Verification of simple hydration/dehydration methods to characterize multiple water compartments on tendon type 1 collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ivan L; Short, Nicholas J; Fullerton, Gary D

    2007-06-01

    A molecular model of collagen hydration is used to validate centrifugal dehydration force (CDF) and re-hydration isotherm (RHI) methods to measure and characterize hydration compartments on bovine tendon. The CDF method assesses fluid flow rate from flexor and extensor tendons expressed in (g-water/g-dry mass-minute) and hydration capacity of compartments in (g-water/g-dry mass). Measured water compartment capacities agree with the molecular model of collagen hydration [Fullerton GD, Rahal A. Collagen structure: the molecular source of tendon magic angle effect. J Mag Reson Imag 2007;25:345-361; Fullerton GD, Amurao MR. Evidence that collagen and tendon have monolayer water coverage in the native state. Cell Biol Int 2006;30(1):56-65]. Native tendon hydration has monolayer coverage on collagen h(m)=1.6 g/g which divides into primary hydration on polar surfaces h(pp)=0.8 g/g and secondary hydration h(s)=0.8 g/g bridging over hydrophobic surfaces. Primary hydration is hydrogen bonded to collagen polar side chains h(psc)=0.54 g/g with small free energy or to the protein main chain hydration h(pmc)=0.26 g/g with greater free energy of binding. The CDF method replaces the more time consuming water proton NMR spin-lattice dehydration (NMR titration) method, confirms the presence of three non-bulk water compartments on collagen (h(pmc)=0.26 g/g, h(pp)=0.8 g/g and h(m)=1.6 g/g). This CDF method provides the most reproducible experimental measure of total tissue non-bulk water (TNBW). The re-hydration isotherm method, on the other hand, provides the most accurate measure of the Ramachandran water-bridge capacity h(Ra)=0.0656 g/g. The only equipment needed are: microfilterfuge tubes, a microcentrifuge capable of 14,000 x g or 4MPa, a vacuum drying oven, an accurate balance and curve fitting ability. The newly validated methods should be useful for characterizing multiple water compartments in biological and non-biological materials by allowing direct measurement of water

  8. Unraveling the Sc(3+) Hydration Geometry: The Strange Case of the Far-Coordinated Water Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorati, Valentina; D'Angelo, Paola

    2016-07-05

    The hydration structure and dynamics of Sc(3+) in aqueous solution have been investigated using a combined approach based on quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. An effective Sc-water two-body potential has been generated from QM calculations and then used in the MD simulation of Sc(3+) in water, and the reliability of the entire procedure has been assessed by comparing the theoretical structural results with the EXAFS experimental data. The outstanding outcome of this work is that the Sc(3+) ion forms a well-defined capped square antiprism (SAP) complex in aqueous solution, where the eight water molecules closest to the ion are located at the vertexes of a SAP polyhedron, while the ninth water molecule occupying the capping position is unusually found at a very long distance from the ion. This far-coordinated water molecule possesses a degree of structure comparable with the other first shell molecules surrounding the ion at much shorter distances, and its presence gave us the unique opportunity to easily identify the geometry of the Sc(3+) coordination polyhedron. Despite very strong ion-water interactions, the Sc(3+) hydration shell is very labile, as the far-coordinated ligand allows first shell water molecules to easily exchange their positions both inside the solvation shell and with the rest of the solvent molecules.

  9. Effects of polar solvents on the fracture resistance of dentin: Role of water hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, R O; Nalla, R K; Balooch, M; Ager III, J W; Kruzic, J J; Kinney, J H

    2004-12-10

    Although healthy dentin is invariably hydrated in vivo, from a perspective of examining the mechanisms of fracture in dentin, it is interesting to consider the role of water hydration. Furthermore, it is feasible that exposure to certain polar solvents, e.g., those found in clinical adhesives, can induce dehydration. In the present study, in vitro deformation and fracture experiments, the latter involving a resistance-curve (R-curve) approach (i.e., toughness evolution with crack extension), were conducted in order to assess changes in the constitutive and fracture behavior induced by three common solvents - acetone, ethanol and methanol. In addition, nanoindentation-based experiments to evaluate the deformation behavior at the level of individual collagen fibers and ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy to evaluate changes in bonding were performed. The results indicate a reversible effect of chemical dehydration, with increased fracture resistance, strength, and stiffness associated with lower hydrogen bonding ability of the solvent. These results are analyzed both in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic toughening phenomena to further understand the micromechanisms of fracture in dentin and the specific role of water hydration.

  10. Hydrated Electrons in Water Clusters: Inside or Outside, Cavity or Noncavity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turi, László

    2015-04-14

    In this work, we compare the applicability of three electron–water molecule pseudopotentials in modeling the physical properties of hydrated electrons. Quantum model calculations illustrate that the recently suggested Larsen–Glover–Schwartz (LGS) model and its modified m-LGS version have a too-attractive potential in the vicinity of the oxygen. As a result, LGS models predict a noncavity hydrated electron structure in clusters at room temperature, as seen from mixed one-electron quantum–classical molecular dynamics simulations of water cluster anions, with the electron localizing exclusively in the interior of the clusters. Comparative calculations using the cavity-preferring Turi–Borgis (TB) model predict interior-state and surface-state cluster isomers. The computed associated physical properties are also analyzed and compared to available experimental data. We find that the LGS and m-LGS potentials provide results that appear to be inconsistent with the size dependence of the experimental data. The simulated TB tendencies are qualitatively correct. Furthermore, ab initio calculations on static LGS noncavity structures indicate weak stabilization of the excess electron in regions where the LGS potential preferably and strongly binds the electron. TB calculations give stabilization energies that are in line with the ab initio results. In conclusion, we observe that the cavity-preferring pseudopotential model predicts cluster physical properties in better agreement with experimental data and ab initio calculations than the models predicting noncavity structures for the hydrated electron.

  11. Observation of a Dynamic Crossover in RNA Hydration Water which Triggers the Glass Transition in the Biopolymer

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, X; Chen, S H; Faraone, A; Fratini, E; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Chu, Xiang-qiang; Faraone, Antonio; Fratini, Emiliano

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering spectroscopy was used to measure H2O and D2O hydrated RNA samples. The contribution of scattering from RNA was subtracted out by taking the difference of the signals between the two samples. The measurements were made at a series of temperatures from 270 K down to 180 K. The Relaxing-Cage Model was used to analyze the difference quasi-elastic spectra. We observed clear evidence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) at TL = 220 K in RNA hydration water. We further show that the mean-square displacement of the hydrogen atoms in both RNA and its hydration water exhibit a sharp change in slope at approximately the same temperature 220 K. This latter fact suggests that the dynamic transition (or the glass transition) in RNA is triggered by the abrupt change of mobility of the hydration water at its FSC temperature TL.

  12. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  13. Hydration and translocation of an excess proton in water clusters: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arindam Bankura; Amalendu Chandra

    2005-10-01

    The hydration structure and translocation of an excess proton in hydrogen bonded water clusters of two different sizes are investigated by means of finite temperature quantum simulations. The simulations are performed by employing the method of Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics where the forces on the nuclei are obtained directly from `on the fly' quantum electronic structure calculations. Since no predefined interaction potentials are used in this scheme, it is ideally suited to study proton translocation processes which proceed through breaking and formation of chemical bonds. The coordination number of the hydrated proton and the index of oxygen to which the excess proton is attached are calculated along the simulation trajectories for both the clusters.

  14. A hydrated ion model of [UO2] 2 + in water: Structure, dynamics, and spectroscopy from classical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Conesa, Sergio; Torrico, Francisco; Martínez, José M.; Pappalardo, Rafael R.; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    A new ab initio interaction potential based on the hydrated ion concept has been developed to obtain the structure, energetics, and dynamics of the hydration of uranyl in aqueous solution. It is the first force field that explicitly parameterizes the interaction of the uranyl hydrate with bulk water molecules to accurately define the second-shell behavior. The [UO2(H2O)5 ] 2 + presents a first hydration shell U-O average distance of 2.46 Å and a second hydration shell peak at 4.61 Å corresponding to 22 molecules using a coordination number definition based on a multisite solute cavity. The second shell solvent molecules have longer mean residence times than those corresponding to the divalent monatomic cations. The axial regions are relatively de-populated, lacking direct hydrogen bonding to apical oxygens. Angle-solved radial distribution functions as well as the spatial distribution functions show a strong anisotropy in the ion hydration. The [UO2(H2O)5 ] 2 + solvent structure may be regarded as a combination of a conventional second hydration shell in the equatorial and bridge regions, and a clathrate-like low density region in the axial region. Translational diffusion coefficient, hydration enthalpy, power spectra of the main vibrational modes, and the EXAFS spectrum simulated from molecular dynamics trajectories agree fairly well with the experiment.

  15. PMR Characterization of the Water Structure in Tibetan Milk Mushroom Zooglea: Influence of Medium Hydration and Hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupskaya, T. V.; Prylutskyy, Yu. I.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Tsapko, M. D.; Turov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The state of water in Tibetan milk mushroom zooglea with different degrees of hydration (h) was investigated using low-temperature PMR spectroscopy in air and in contact with the hydrophobic media polydimethylsiloxane PDMS-1000 and CHCl3 with added trifl uoroacetic acid (TFA). The maximum hydration of the zooglea amounted to h = 32 g/g (of dry matter). Water existed as polyassociates (clusters or domains) of strongly and weakly associated water. Bound water decomposed into clusters in the presence of TFA. The NMR spectra showed six types of bound water at h = 0.3 g/g.

  16. Relation between soil matrix potential changes and water conversion ratios during methane hydrate formation processes in loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhang; Qingbai Wu; Guanli Jiang; Yibin Pu

    2011-01-01

    With a new apparatus designed and assembled by ourselves,the matrix potential of non-saturated loess was firstly measured and studied during methane hydrate formation processes.The experimental results showed that during two formation processes,the matrix potential changes of the loess all presented a good linear relationship with water conversion ratios.In addition,although it was well known that the secondary gas hydrate formation was easier than the initial,our experimental results showed that the initial hydrate formation efficiency in non-saturated loess was higher than that of the secondary.

  17. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies on dynamics of water confined in nanoporous copper rubeanate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Yonamine, Ryo; Yamada, Teppei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Nagao, Michihiro; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2011-11-24

    We have investigated the mechanism of the first order transition and proton conductivity in copper rubeanate hydrates from microscopic and dynamical points of view. Three different types of neutron spectrometer-time-of-flight, backscattering, and neutron spin echo-were used to cover a wide dynamic range (1 ps to 100 ns). We found that the water molecules adsorbed in the pore are divided into "free water" having diffusion coefficients similar to those of bulk water at room temperature and "condensed water" which is about 10 times slower than bulk water owing to the interaction with the pore wall. The hydrogen atoms in the pore wall exhibited no relaxation within the measured time scales. The free water has, in the framework of the jump-diffusion model, smaller activation energy, longer residence time, and longer jump distance than bulk water. The neutron spin echo measurement revealed that the first order transition is a kind of liquid-liquid transition at which the free water is condensed on the pore surface in the low temperature phase. On cooling the condensed water, the relaxation time starts to deviate from the VFT equation around 200 K as previously observed in the water confined in nanoporous silicates. The free water plays an important role as the proton carrier but the proton conductivity is mainly governed by the number of protons provided into the adsorbed water from the pore wall.

  18. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Membrane Hydration by Direct Liquid Water Contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    An effective means of providing direct liquid hydration of the membrane tends to improve performance particularly of cells with thicker membranes or at elevated temperatures. Supplying the water to the membrane from the anode flow-field through the anode backing via wicks would appear to have advantages over delivering the water through the thickness of the membrane with regards to the uniformity and stability of the supply and the use of off-the-shelf membranes or MEAs. In addition to improving cell performance, an important contribution of direct liquid hydration approaches may be that the overall fuel cell system becomes simpler and more effective. The next steps in the evolution of this approach are a demonstration of the effectiveness of this technique with larger active area cells as well as the implementation of an internal flow-field water reservoir (to eliminate the injection method). Scale-up to larger cell sizes and the use of separate water channels within the anode flow-field is described.

  19. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Pilon, Laurent; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-12-28

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C-S-H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C-S-H's nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C-S-H's atomic network. Taken together, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  20. Acid-base balance and hydration status following consumption of mineral-based alkaline bottled water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heil Daniel P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study sought to determine whether the consumption of a mineral-rich alkalizing (AK bottled water could improve both acid-base balance and hydration status in young healthy adults under free-living conditions. The AK water contains a naturally high mineral content along with Alka-PlexLiquid™, a dissolved supplement that increases the mineral content and gives the water an alkalizing pH of 10.0. Methods Thirty-eight subjects were matched by gender and self-reported physical activity (SRPA, hrs/week and then split into Control (12 women, 7 men; Mean +/- SD: 23 +/- 2 yrs; 7.2 +/- 3.6 hrs/week SRPA and Experimental (13 women, 6 men; 22 +/- 2 yrs; 6.4 +/- 4.0 hrs/week SRPA groups. The Control group consumed non-mineralized placebo bottled water over a 4-week period while the Experimental group consumed the placebo water during the 1st and 4th weeks and the AK water during the middle 2-week treatment period. Fingertip blood and 24-hour urine samples were collected three times each week for subsequent measures of blood and urine osmolality and pH, as well as total urine volume. Dependent variables were analyzed using multivariate repeated measures ANOVA with post-hoc focused on evaluating changes over time within Control and Experimental groups (alpha = 0.05. Results There were no significant changes in any of the dependent variables for the Control group. The Experimental group, however, showed significant increases in both the blood and urine pH (6.23 to 7.07 and 7.52 to 7.69, respectively, a decreased blood and increased urine osmolality, and a decreased urine output (2.51 to 2.05 L/day, all during the second week of the treatment period (P Conclusions Consumption of AK water was associated with improved acid-base balance (i.e., an alkalization of the blood and urine and hydration status when consumed under free-living conditions. In contrast, subjects who consumed the placebo bottled water showed no changes over the

  1. Structural and functional properties of hydration and confined water in membrane interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disalvo, E A; Lairion, F; Martini, F; Tymczyszyn, E; Frías, M; Almaleck, H; Gordillo, G J

    2008-12-01

    The scope of the present review focuses on the interfacial properties of cell membranes that may establish a link between the membrane and the cytosolic components. We present evidences that the current view of the membrane as a barrier of permeability that contains an aqueous solution of macromolecules may be replaced by one in which the membrane plays a structural and functional role. Although this idea has been previously suggested, the present is the first systematic work that puts into relevance the relation water-membrane in terms of thermodynamic and structural properties of the interphases that cannot be ignored in the understanding of cell function. To pursue this aim, we introduce a new definition of interphase, in which the water is organized in different levels on the surface with different binding energies. Altogether determines the surface free energy necessary for the structural response to changes in the surrounding media. The physical chemical properties of this region are interpreted in terms of hydration water and confined water, which explain the interaction with proteins and could affect the modulation of enzyme activity. Information provided by several methodologies indicates that the organization of the hydration states is not restricted to the membrane plane albeit to a region extending into the cytoplasm, in which polar head groups play a relevant role. In addition, dynamic properties studied by cyclic voltammetry allow one to deduce the energetics of the conformational changes of the lipid head group in relation to the head-head interactions due to the presence of carbonyls and phosphates at the interphase. These groups are, apparently, surrounded by more than one layer of water molecules: a tightly bound shell, that mostly contributes to the dipole potential, and a second one that may be displaced by proteins and osmotic stress. Hydration water around carbonyl and phosphate groups may change by the presence of polyhydroxylated compounds

  2. Effects of Water Provision and Hydration on Cognitive Function among Primary-School Pupils in Zambia: A Randomized Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Trinies

    Full Text Available There is a well-established link between hydration and improved cognitive performance among adults, with evidence of similar findings among children. No trials have investigated the impact of water provision on cognitive performance among schoolchildren in hot and arid low-resource settings. We conducted a randomized-controlled trial in five schools with limited water access in Chipata district in Eastern province, Zambia, to assess the efficacy of water provision on cognition. Pupils in grades 3-6 were randomly assigned to either receive a bottle of drinking water that they could refill throughout the day (water group, n = 149 or only have access to drinking water that was normally available at the school (control group, n = 143. Hydration was assessed in the morning before provision of water and in the afternoon through urine specific gravity (Usg measured with a portable refractometer. In the afternoon we administered six cognitive tests to assess short-term memory, concentration, visual attention, and visual motor skills. Morning prevalence of dehydration, defined as Usg≥1.020, was 42%. Afternoon dehydration increased to 67% among the control arm and dropped to 10% among the intervention arm. We did not find that provision of water or hydration impacted cognitive test scores, although there were suggestive relationships between both water provision and hydration and increased scores on tests measuring visual attention. We identified key improvements to the study design that are warranted to further investigate this relationship.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01924546.

  3. Piroxicam and c-phycocyanin prevent colon carcinogenesis by inhibition of membrane fluidity and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling while up-regulating ligand dependent transcription factor PPARγ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-06-01

    The colon cancer tissues from DMH treated rats exhibited higher membrane potential, fluidity and changed lipid order as examined by Merocyanine 540 and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, respectively. A transition from gel to liquid crystalline state was observed by Laurdan fluorescence and also reduced fluorescence quenching of NBD-PE as contributed in the decreased membrane lipid phase separation. With piroxicam, a traditional NSAID and c-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis, these effects were normalized. An augmented intracellular Ca(+2) had contributed to the drug mediated apoptosis which is supported by an elevated calpain-9 expression. Histopathologically, a large pool of secreted acid/neutral mucopolysaccrides as well as the presence of blood vessels and dysplastic crypts signifies invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma while both the drugs reduced these neoplastic alterations. Wnt/β-catenin pathway was also found to be up-regulated which served as a crucial indicator for cancer cell growth. A concomitant down regulation of PPARγ was noted in DMH treatment which is associated with tumor progression. The expression of PPARα and δ, the other two isoforms of PPAR family was also modulated. We conclude that piroxicam and c-phycocyanin exert their anti-neoplastic effects via regulating membrane properties, raising calpain-9 and PPARγ expression while suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in experimental colon carcinogenesis.

  4. Structural Interpretation of the Large Slowdown of Water Dynamics at Stacked Phospholipid Membranes for Decreasing Hydration Level: All-Atom Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Calero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydration water determines the stability and function of phospholipid membranes as well as the interaction of membranes with other molecules. Experiments and simulations have shown that water dynamics slows down dramatically as the hydration decreases, suggesting that the interfacial water that dominates the average dynamics at low hydration is slower than water away from the membrane. Here, based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we provide an interpretation of the slowdown of interfacial water in terms of the structure and dynamics of water–water and water–lipid hydrogen bonds (HBs. We calculate the rotational and translational slowdown of the dynamics of water confined in stacked phospholipid membranes at different levels of hydration, from completely hydrated to poorly hydrated membranes. For all hydrations, we analyze the distribution of HBs and find that water–lipids HBs last longer than water–water HBs and that at low hydration most of the water is in the interior of the membrane. We also show that water–water HBs become more persistent as the hydration is lowered. We attribute this effect (i to HBs between water molecules that form, in turn, persistent HBs with lipids; (ii to the hindering of the H-bonding switching between water molecules due to the lower water density at the interface; and (iii to the higher probability of water–lipid HBs as the hydration decreases. Our interpretation of the large dynamic slowdown in water under dehydration is potentially relevant in understanding membrane biophysics at different hydration levels.

  5. Dynamical Coupling of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins and Their Hydration Water: Comparison with Folded Soluble and Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallat, F.-X.; Laganowsky, A.; Wood, K.; Gabel, F.; van Eijck, L.; Wuttke, J.; Moulin, M.; Härtlein, M.; Eisenberg, D.; Colletier, J.-P.; Zaccai, G.; Weik, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hydration water is vital for various macromolecular biological activities, such as specific ligand recognition, enzyme activity, response to receptor binding, and energy transduction. Without hydration water, proteins would not fold correctly and would lack the conformational flexibility that animates their three-dimensional structures. Motions in globular, soluble proteins are thought to be governed to a certain extent by hydration-water dynamics, yet it is not known whether this relationship holds true for other protein classes in general and whether, in turn, the structural nature of a protein also influences water motions. Here, we provide insight into the coupling between hydration-water dynamics and atomic motions in intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP), a largely unexplored class of proteins that, in contrast to folded proteins, lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. We investigated the human IDP tau, which is involved in the pathogenic processes accompanying Alzheimer disease. Combining neutron scattering and protein perdeuteration, we found similar atomic mean-square displacements over a large temperature range for the tau protein and its hydration water, indicating intimate coupling between them. This is in contrast to the behavior of folded proteins of similar molecular weight, such as the globular, soluble maltose-binding protein and the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin, which display moderate to weak coupling, respectively. The extracted mean square displacements also reveal a greater motional flexibility of IDP compared with globular, folded proteins and more restricted water motions on the IDP surface. The results provide evidence that protein and hydration-water motions mutually affect and shape each other, and that there is a gradient of coupling across different protein classes that may play a functional role in macromolecular activity in a cellular context. PMID:22828339

  6. Evaluation of electroosmotic drag coefficient of water in hydrated sodium perfluorosulfonate electrolyte polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liuming; Shao, Changle; Ji, Xiaobo

    2009-07-15

    The electroosmotic drag coefficient of water molecules in hydrated sodium perfluorosulfonate electrolyte polymer is evaluated on the basis of the velocity distribution functions of the sodium cations and water molecules with an electric field applied using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results indicate that both velocity distribution functions of water molecules and of sodium cations agree well with the classic Maxwellian velocity distribution functions when there is no electric field applied. If an electric field is applied, the distribution functions of velocity component in directions perpendicular to the applied electric field still agree with the Maxwellian velocity distribution functions but with different temperature parameters. In the direction of the applied electric field, the electric drag causes the velocity distribution function to deviate from the Maxwellian velocity distribution function; however, to obey the peak shifted Maxwellian distribution function. The peak shifting velocities coincide with the average transport velocities induced by the electric field, and could be applied to the evaluation of the electroosmotic drag coefficient of water. By evaluation of the transport velocities of water molecules in the first coordination shells of sodium cations, sulfonate anion groups, and in the bulk, it is clearly shown that the water molecules in the first coordination shell of sodium cations are the major contribution to the electroosmotic drag and momentum transfer from water molecules within the first coordination shell to the other water molecules also contributes to the electroosmotic drag.

  7. Effects of commercially formulated water on the hydration status of dehydrated collegiate wrestlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, J Scott; Utter, Alan C; Quindry, John C; Nieman, David C

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different drinks (commercially formulated water, bottled water, and a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage) on blood and urinary markers of hydration after acute dehydration in collegiate wrestlers. Twenty-one athletes were recruited to perform a randomized, crossover study comparing the effectiveness of commercially formulated water, carbohydrate-electrolyte (6% or 60 g L(-1)), or regular bottled water (placebo) in promoting rehydration after a 3% reduction in body mass. Urine specific gravity (U(sg)), urine osmolarity (U(osm)), plasma osmolarity (P(osm)), and plasma volume were measured pre- and post-dehydration and at 1 hour after rehydration. Statistical analyses used a 3 (conditions) x 3 (times) repeated measures analysis of variance. Significant (p < 0.01) interactions were found for P(osm), U(osm), and U(sg). P(osm) returned to baseline levels and U(osm) remained in a lower balance after 1 hour of rehydration in the trials of the commercially formulated water and regular bottled water. No significant interactions were found for plasma volume shift. The findings of this study demonstrate that the commercially formulated water was no more effective in promoting rehydration than either a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution or plain water in collegiate wrestlers after a 3% reduction in body mass and a rehydration period of 1 hour when consuming 100% of their body weight loss.

  8. Total allowable concentrations of monomeric inorganic aluminum and hydrated aluminum silicates in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2012-05-01

    Maximum contaminant levels are used to control potential health hazards posed by chemicals in drinking water, but no primary national or international limits for aluminum (Al) have been adopted. Given the differences in toxicological profiles, the present evaluation derives total allowable concentrations for certain water-soluble inorganic Al compounds (including chloride, hydroxide, oxide, phosphate and sulfate) and for the hydrated Al silicates (including attapulgite, bentonite/montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) in drinking water. The chemistry, toxicology and clinical experience with Al materials are extensive and depend upon the particular physical and chemical form. In general, the water solubility of the monomeric Al materials depends on pH and their water solubility and gastrointestinal bioavailability are much greater than that of the hydrated Al silicates. Other than Al-containing antacids and buffered aspirin, food is the primary source of Al exposure for most healthy people. Systemic uptake of Al after ingestion of the monomeric salts is somewhat greater from drinking water (0.28%) than from food (0.1%). Once absorbed, Al accumulates in bone, brain, liver and kidney, with bone as the major site for Al deposition in humans. Oral Al hydroxide is used routinely to bind phosphate salts in the gut to control hyperphosphatemia in people with compromised renal function. Signs of chronic Al toxicity in the musculoskeletal system include a vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia (deranged membranous bone formation characterized by accumulation of the osteoid matrix and reduced mineralization, reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, decreased lamellar and osteoid bands with elevated Al concentrations) presenting as bone pain and proximal myopathy. Aluminum-induced bone disease can progress to stress fractures of the ribs, femur, vertebrae, humerus and metatarsals. Serum Al ≥100 µg/L has a 75-88% positive predictive value for Al bone disease. Chronic Al

  9. A Theoretical Study of the Hydration of Methane, from the Aqueous Solution to the sI Hydrate-Liquid Water-Gas Coexistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Porfirio Luis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations were done with three recent water models TIP4P/2005 (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/2005, TIP4P/Ice (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/ Ice and TIP4Q (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 charges combined with two models for methane: an all-atom one OPLS-AA (Optimal Parametrization for the Liquid State and a united-atom one (UA; a correction for the C–O interaction was applied to the latter and used in a third set of simulations. The models were validated by comparison to experimental values of the free energy of hydration at 280, 300, 330 and 370 K, all under a pressure of 1 bar, and to the experimental radial distribution functions at 277, 283 and 291 K, under a pressure of 145 bar. Regardless of the combination rules used for σC,O, good agreement was found, except when the correction to the UA model was applied. Thus, further simulations of the sI hydrate were performed with the united-atom model to compare the thermal expansivity to the experiment. A final set of simulations was done with the UA methane model and the three water models, to study the sI hydrate-liquid water-gas coexistence at 80, 230 and 400 bar. The melting temperatures were compared to the experimental values. The results show the need to perform simulations with various different models to attain a reliable and robust molecular image of the systems of interest.

  10. A Theoretical Study of the Hydration of Methane, from the Aqueous Solution to the sI Hydrate-Liquid Water-Gas Coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Daniel Porfirio; García-González, Alcione; Saint-Martin, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations were done with three recent water models TIP4P/2005 (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/2005), TIP4P/Ice (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/ Ice) and TIP4Q (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 charges) combined with two models for methane: an all-atom one OPLS-AA (Optimal Parametrization for the Liquid State) and a united-atom one (UA); a correction for the C–O interaction was applied to the latter and used in a third set of simulations. The models were validated by comparison to experimental values of the free energy of hydration at 280, 300, 330 and 370 K, all under a pressure of 1 bar, and to the experimental radial distribution functions at 277, 283 and 291 K, under a pressure of 145 bar. Regardless of the combination rules used for σC,O, good agreement was found, except when the correction to the UA model was applied. Thus, further simulations of the sI hydrate were performed with the united-atom model to compare the thermal expansivity to the experiment. A final set of simulations was done with the UA methane model and the three water models, to study the sI hydrate-liquid water-gas coexistence at 80, 230 and 400 bar. The melting temperatures were compared to the experimental values. The results show the need to perform simulations with various different models to attain a reliable and robust molecular image of the systems of interest. PMID:27240339

  11. Experimental Investigation of Gas Hydrate Production at Injection of Liquid Nitrogen into Water with Bubbles of Freon 134A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meleshkin Anton V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic processes during the injection of the cryogenic liquid into the volume of water with bubbles of gas freon 134a are studding experimentally. A processes during the explosive boiling of liquid nitrogen in the volume of water are registered. Video recording of identified gas hydrate flakes formed during this process is carried out by high speed camera. These results may be useful for the study of the new method of producing gas hydrates, based on the shock-wave method.

  12. Sequentially sampled gas hydrate water, coupled with pore water and bottom water isotopic and ionic signatures at the Kukuy mud volcano, Lake Baikal: ambiguous deep-rooted source of hydrate-forming water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hirotsugu; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Soramoto, Yusuke; Kotake, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Shoji, Hitoshi; Pogodaeva, Tatyana; Khlystov, Oleg; Khabuev, Andrey; Naudts, Lieven; De Batist, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic and ionic composition of pure gas hydrate (GH) water was examined for GHs recovered in three gravity cores (165-193 cm length) from the Kukuy K-9 mud volcano (MV) in Lake Baikal. A massive GH sample from core St6GC4 (143-165 cm core depth interval) was dissociated progressively over 6 h in a closed glass chamber, and 11 sequentially collected fractions of dissociated GH water analyzed. Their hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions, and the concentrations of Cl- and HCO3 - remained essentially constant over time, except that the fraction collected during the first 50 minutes deviated partly from this pattern. Fraction #1 had a substantially higher Cl- concentration, similar to that of pore water sampled immediately above (135-142 cm core depth) the main GH-bearing interval in that core. Like the subsequent fractions, however, the HCO3 - concentration was markedly lower than that of pore water. For the GH water fractions #2 to #11, an essentially constant HCO3 -/Cl- ratio of 305 differed markedly from downcore pore water HCO3 -/Cl- ratios of 63-99. Evidently, contamination of the extracted GH water by ambient pore water probably adhered to the massive GH sample was satisfactorily restricted to the initial phase of GH dissociation. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of hydrate-forming water was estimated using the measured isotopic composition of extracted GH water combined with known isotopic fractionation factors between GH and GH-forming water. Estimated δD of -126 to -133‰ and δ18O of -15.7 to -16.7‰ differed partly from the corresponding signatures of ambient pore water (δD of -123‰, δ18O of -15.6‰) and of lake bottom water (δD of -121‰, δ18O of -15.8‰) at the St6GC4 coring site, suggesting that the GH was not formed from those waters. Observations of breccias in that core point to a possible deep-rooted water source, consistent with published thermal measurements for the neighboring Kukuy K-2 MV. By contrast, the pore

  13. 13C MAS NMR studies of the effects of hydration on the cell walls of potatoes and Chinese water chestnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H; Belton, P S; Ng, A; Ryden, P

    1999-02-01

    13C NMR with magic angle spinning (MAS) has been employed to investigate the cell walls of potatoes and Chinese water chestnuts over a range of hydration levels. Both single-pulse excitation (SPEMAS) and cross-polarization (CPMAS) experiments were carried out. Hydration led to a substantial increase in signal intensities of galactan and galacturonan in the SPEMAS spectra and a decrease in line width, implying mobilization in the backbone and side chains of pectin. In CPMAS spectra of both samples, noncellulose components showed signal loss as hydration increased. However, the signals of some galacturonan in the 3(1) helix configuration remained in the spectra even when the water content was as high as 110%. Cellulose was unaffected. It is concluded that the pectic polysaccharides experience a distribution of molecular conformations and mobility, whereas cellulose remained as typical rigid solid.

  14. Hydrogen bond network in the hydration layer of the water confined in nanotubes increasing the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenpeng; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-09-01

    The water confined in nanotubes has been extensively studied, because of the potential usages in drug delivery and desalination. The radial distribution of the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis was obtained by molecular dynamics simulations in a carbon nanotube and a nanotube with a very small van der Waals potential. The confined water was divided into two parts, the middle part water and the hydration water. In both cases, the hydrogen bond orientation of the middle water is isotropic, while the hydrogen bonds in hydration layers are apt to parallel along the nanotube axis. Therefore, the hydration water has higher dipole correlations increasing the dielectric constant along the nanotube axis.

  15. Evaluation of Hydrate Inhibition Performance of Water-soluble Polymers using Torque Measurement and Differential Scanning Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyuchul; Park, Juwoon; Kim, Jakyung; Kim, Hyunho; Seo, Yutaek [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yohan; Seo, Yongwon [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, hydrate inhibition performance of water-soluble polymers including pyrrolidone, caprolactam, acrylamide types were evaluated using torque measurement and high pressure differential scanning calorimeter (HP µ-DSC). The obtained experimental results suggest that the studied polymers represent the kinetic hydrate inhibition (KHI) performance. 0.5 wt% polyvinylcaprolactam (PVCap) solution shows the hydrate onset time of 34.4 min and subcooling temperature of 15.9 K, which is better KHI performance than that of pure water - hydrate onset time of 12.3 min and subcooling temperature of 6.0 K. 0.5 wt% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution shows the hydrate onset time of 27.6 min and the subcooling temperature of 13.2 K while polyacrylamide-co-acrylic acid partial sodium salt (PAM-co-AA) solution shows less KHI performance than PVP solution at both 0.5 and 5.0 wt%. However, PAM-co-AA solution shows slow growth rate and low hydrate amount than PVCap. In addition to hydrate onset and growth condition, torque change with time was investigated as one of KHI evaluation methods. 0.5 wt% PVCap solution shows the lowest average torque of 6.4 N cm and 0.5 wt% PAM-co-AA solution shows the average torque of 7.2 N cm. For 0.5 wt% PVP solution, it increases 11.5 N cm and 5.0 wt% PAM-co-AA solution shows the maximum average torque of 13.4 N cm, which is similar to the average torque of pure water, 15.2 N cm. Judging from the experimental results obtained by both an autoclave and a HP µ-DSC, the PVCap solution shows the best performance among the KHIs in terms of delaying hydrate nucleation. From these results, it can be concluded that the torque change with time is useful to identify the flow ability of tested solution, and the further research on the inhibition of hydrate formation can be approached in various aspects using a HP µ-DSC.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of trehalose as a 'dynamic reducer' for solvent water molecules in the hydration shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngjin; Cho, Kum Won; Jeong, Karpjoo; Jung, Seunho

    2006-06-12

    Systematic computational work for a series of 13 disaccharides was performed to provide an atomic-level insight of unique biochemical role of the alpha,alpha-(1-->1)-linked glucopyranoside dimer over the other glycosidically linked sugars. Superior osmotic and cryoprotective abilities of trehalose were explained on the basis of conformational and hydration characteristics of the trehalose molecule. Analyses of the hydration number and radial distribution function of solvent water molecules showed that there was very little hydration adjacent to the glycosidic oxygen of trehalose and that the dynamic conformation of trehalose was less flexible than any of the other sugars due to this anisotropic hydration. The remarkable conformational rigidity that allowed trehalose to act as a sugar template was required for stable interactions with hydrogen-bonded water molecules. Trehalose made an average of 2.8 long-lived hydrogen bonds per each MD step, which was much larger than the average of 2.1 for the other sugars. The stable hydrogen-bond network is derived from the formation of long-lived water bridges at the expense of decreasing the dynamics of the water molecules. Evidence for this dynamic reduction of water by trehalose was also established based on each of the lowest translational diffusion coefficients and the lowest intermolecular coulombic energy of the water molecules around trehalose. Overall results indicate that trehalose functions as a 'dynamic reducer' for solvent water molecules based on its anisotropic hydration and conformational rigidity, suggesting that macroscopic solvent properties could be modulated by changes in the type of glycosidic linkages in sugar molecules.

  17. Multiple-pressure-tapped core holder combined with X-ray computed tomography scanning for gas-water permeability measurements of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Jin, Yusuke; Uchiumi, Takashi; Nagao, Jiro

    2013-06-01

    We present a novel setup for measuring the effective gas-water permeability of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments. We developed a core holder with multiple pressure taps for measuring the pressure gradient of the gas and water phases. The gas-water flooding process was simultaneously detected using an X-ray computed tomography scanner. We successfully measured the effective gas-water permeability of an artificial sandy core with methane hydrate during the gas-water flooding test.

  18. Hydration of gelatin molecules in glycerol-water solvent and phase diagram of gelatin organogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanwlani, Shilpa; Kumar, Pradip; Bohidar, H B

    2011-06-09

    We present a systematic investigation of hydration and gelation of the polypeptide gelatin in water-glycerol mixed solvent (glycerol solutions). Raman spectroscopy results indicated enhancement in water structure in glycerol solutions and the depletion of glycerol density close to hydration sheath of the protein molecule. Gelation concentration (c(g)) was observed to decrease from 1.92 to 1.15% (w/v) while the gelation temperature (T(g)) was observed to increase from 31.4 to 40.7 °C with increase in glycerol concentration. Data on hand established the formation of organogels having interconnected networks, and the universal gelation mechanism could be described through an anomalous percolation model. The viscosity of sol diverged as η ∼ (1 - c(g)/c)(-k) as c(g) was approached from below (c c(g)). It is important to note that values determined for critical exponents k and t were universal; that is, they did not depend on the microscopic details. The measured values were k = 0.38 ± 0.10 and t = 0.92 ± 0.17 whereas the percolation model predicts k = 0.7-1.3 and t = 1.9. Isothermal frequency sweep studies showed power-law dependence of gel storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G'') on oscillation frequency ω given as G'(ω) ∼ ω(n') and G''(ω) ∼ ω(n''), and consistent with percolation model prediction it was found that n' ≈ n'' ≈ δ ≈ 0.73 close to gelation concentration. We propose a unique 3D phase diagram for the gelatin organogels. Circular dichroism data revealed that the gelatin molecules retained their biological activity in these solvents. Thus, it is shown that the thermomechanical properties of these organogels could be systematically tuned and customized as per application requirement.

  19. New Insights into the Dynamics of Zwitterionic Micelles and Their Hydration Waters by Gigahertz-to-Terahertz Dielectric Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    George, Deepu K; Hull, Olivia A; Mishra, Archana; Capelluto, Daniel G S; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R; Vinh, Nguyen Q

    2016-01-01

    Gigahertz-to-terahertz spectroscopy of macromolecules in aqueous environments provides an important approach for identifying their global and transient molecular structures, as well as directly assessing hydrogen-bonding. We report dielectric properties of zwitterionic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles in aqueous solutions over a wide frequency range, from 50 MHz to 1.12 THz. The dielectric relaxation spectra reveal different polarization mechanisms at the molecular level, reflecting the complexity of DPC micelle-water interactions. We have made a deconvolution of the spectra into different components and combined them with the effective-medium approximation to separate delicate processes of micelles in water. Our measurements demonstrate reorientational motion of the DPC surfactant head groups within the micelles, and two levels of hydration water shells, including tightly- and loosely-bound hydration water layers. From the dielectric strength of bulk water in DPC solutions, we found that the number of wa...

  20. Solid and liquid phase equilibria and solid-hydrate formation in binary mixtures of water with amines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车冠全; 彭文烈; 黄良恩; 古喜兰; 车飙

    1997-01-01

    Solid and liquid phase diagrams have been constructed for {water+triethylamine,or+N,N-dimethylformamide(DMF) or+N,N-dimethlacetamide (DMA)} Solid-hydrates form with the empirical formulae N(C2H5)3 3H2O,DMF 3H2O,DMF 2H2O,DMA 3H2O and (DMA)2 3H2O.All are congruently melting except the first which melts incongruently.The solid-hydrate formation is attributed to hydrogen bond.The results are compared with the references

  1. Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, M.P.

    1994-05-01

    We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

  2. Multicomponent seismic methods for characterizing gas hydrate occurrences and systems in deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.; Hardage, Bob A.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ characterization and quantification of natural gas hydrate occurrences remain critical research directions, whether for energy resource, drilling hazard, or climate-related studies. Marine multicomponent seismic data provide the full seismic wavefield including partial redundancy, and provide a promising set of approaches for gas hydrate characterization. Numerous authors have demonstrated the possibilities of multicomponent data at study sites around the world. We expand on this work by investigating the utility of very densely spaced (10’s of meters) multicomponent receivers (ocean-bottom cables, OBC, or ocean-bottom seismometers, OBS) for gas hydrate studies in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. Advanced processing techniques provide high-resolution compressional-wave (PP) and converted shearwave (PS) reflection images of shallow stratigraphy, as well as P-wave and S-wave velocity estimates at each receiver position. Reflection impedance estimates can help constrain velocity and density, and thus gas hydrate saturation. Further constraint on velocity can be determined through identification of the critical angle and associated phase reversal in both PP and PS wideangle data. We demonstrate these concepts with examples from OBC data from the northeast Green Canyon area and numerically simulated OBS data that are based on properties of known gas hydrate occurrences in the southeast (deeper water) Green Canyon area. These multicomponent data capabilities can provide a wealth of characterization and quantification information that is difficult to obtain with other geophysical methods.

  3. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

  4. Ternary phase behaviour and vesicle formation of a sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate/1-decanol/water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Nasima; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Reza, Mohammad Imam Hasan

    2011-08-01

    The phase behaviour of a system composed of amino acid-based surfactant (sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate), 1-decanol and deionised water was investigated for vesicle formation. Changing the molar ratio of the amphiphiles, two important aggregate structures were observed in the aqueous corner of the phase diagram. Two different sizes of microemulsions were found at two amphiphile-water boundaries. A stable single vesicle lobe was found for 1∶2 molar ratios in 92 wt% water with vesicles approximately 100 nm in size and with high zeta potential value. Structural variation arises due to the reduction of electrostatic repulsions among the ionic headgroups of the surfactants and the hydration forces due to adsorbed water onto monolayer's. The balance of these two forces determines the aggregate structures. Analysis was followed by the molecular geometrical structure. These findings may have implications for the development of drug delivery systems for cancer treatments, as well as cosmetic and food formulations.

  5. Water flow in carbon-based nanoporous membranes impacted by interactions between hydrated ions and aromatic rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping

    2017-02-01

    Carbon-based nanoporous membranes, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene/graphene oxide and graphyne, have shown great potential in water desalination and purification, gas and ion separation, biosensors, and lithium-based batteries, etc. A deep understanding of the interaction between hydrated ions in an aqueous solution and the graphitic surface in systems composed of water, ions and a graphitic surface is essential for applications with carbon-based nanoporous membrane platforms. In this review, we describe the recent progress of the interaction between hydrated ions and aromatic ring structures on the carbon-based surface and its applications in the water flow in a carbon nanotube. We expect that these works can be extended to the understanding of water flow in other nanoporous membranes, such as nanoporous graphene, graphyne and stacked sheets of graphene oxide.

  6. Hydration or dehydration: competing effects of upper tropospheric cloud radiation on the TTL water vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A tropical channel version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model is used to investigate the radiative impacts of upper tropospheric clouds on water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL. The WRF simulations of cloud radiative effects and water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere show reasonable agreement with observations, including approximate reproduction of the water vapor "tape recorder" signal. By turning on and off the upper tropospheric cloud radiative effect (UTCRE above 200 hPa, we find that the UTCRE induces a warming of 0.76 K and a moistening of 9% in the upper troposphere at 215 hPa. However, the UTCRE cools and dehydrates the TTL, with a cooling of 0.82 K and a dehydration of 16% at 100 hPa. The enhanced vertical ascent due to the UTCRE contributes substantially to mass transport and the dehydration in the TTL. The hydration due to the enhanced vertical transport is counteracted by the dehydration from adiabatic cooling associated with the enhanced vertical motion. The UTCRE also substantially changes the horizontal winds in the TTL, resulting in shifts of the strongest dehydration away from the lowest temperature anomalies in the TTL. The UTCRE increases in-situ cloud formation in the TTL. A seasonal variation is shown in the simulated UTCRE, with stronger impact in the moist phase from June to November than in the dry phase from December to May.

  7. HYDRATION AND PHASE SEPARATION OF TEMPERATURE-SENSITIVE WATER-SOLUBLE POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fumihiko Tanaka; Tsuyoshi Koga; Hiroyuki Kojima; Francoise M. Winnik

    2011-01-01

    Collapse of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) chain upon heating and phase diagrams of aqueous PNIPAM solutions with very flat LCST phase separation line are theoretically studied on the basis of cooperative dehydration (simultaneous dissociation of bound water molecules in a group of correlated sequence), and compared with the experimental observation of temperature-induced coil-globule transition by light scattering methods. The transition becomes sharper with the cooperativity parameter σ of hydration. Reentrant coil-globule-coil transition in mixed solvent of water and methanol is also studied from the viewpoint of competitive hydrogen bonds between polymer-water and polymer-methanol. The downward shift of the cloud-point curves (LCST cononsolvency) with the mole fraction of methanol due to the competition is calculated and compared with the experimental data. Aqueous solutions of hydophobically-modified PNIPAM carrying short alkyl chains at both chain ends (telechelic PNIPAM) are theoretically and experimentally studied. The LCST of these solutions is found to shift downward along the sol-gel transition curve as a result of end-chain association (association-induced phase separation), and separate from the coil-globule transition line. Associated structures in the solution, such as flower micelles, mesoglobules and higher fractal assembly, are studied by USANS with theoretical modeling of the scattering function.

  8. Interaction of Simple Ions with Water: Theoretical Models for the Study of Ion Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancheff, Jorge S.; Kremer, Carlos; Ventura, Oscar N.

    2009-01-01

    A computational experiment aimed to create and systematically analyze models of simple cation hydrates is presented. The changes in the structure (bond distances and angles) and the electronic density distribution of the solvent and the thermodynamic parameters of the hydration process are calculated and compared with the experimental data. The…

  9. Beaufort Sea deep-water gas hydrate recovery from a seafloor mound in a region of widespread BSR occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Patrick E.; Pohlman, John W.; Lorenson, T.D.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Gas hydrate was recovered from the Alaskan Beaufort Sea slope north of Camden Bay in August 2010 during a U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy expedition (USCG cruise ID HLY1002) under the direction of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Interpretation of multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected in 1977 by the USGS across the Beaufort Sea continental margin identified a regional bottom simulating reflection (BSR), indicating that a large segment of the Beaufort Sea slope is underlain by gas hydrate. During HLY1002, gas hydrate was sampled by serendipity with a piston core targeting a steep-sided bathymetric high originally thought to be an outcrop of older, exposed strata. The feature cored is an approximately 1100m diameter, 130 m high conical mound, referred to here as the Canning Seafloor Mound (CSM), which overlies the crest of a buried anticline in a region of sub-parallel compressional folds beneath the eastern Beaufort outer slope. An MCS profile shows a prominent BSR upslope and downslope from the mound. The absence of a BSR beneath the CSM and occurrence of gas hydrate near the summit indicates that free gas has migrated via deep-rooted thrust faults or by structural focusing up the flanks of the anticline to the seafloor. Gas hydrate recovered from near the CSM summit at a subbottom depth of about 5.7 meters in a water depth of 2538 m was of nodular and vein-filling morphology. Although the hydrate was not preserved, residual gas from the core liner contained >95% methane by volume when corrected for atmospheric contamination. The presence of trace C4+hydrocarbons (inflation of the seafloor caused by formation and accumulation of shallow hydrate lenses is also a likely factor in CSM growth. Pore water analysis shows the sulfate-methane transition to be very shallow (0-1 mbsf), also supporting an active high-flux interpretation. Pore water with chloride concentrations as low as 160 mM suggest fluid migration pathways may extend to the mound from buried

  10. Effect of temperature on the low-frequency vibrational spectrum and relative structuring of hydration water around a single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-01-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the single-stranded DNA oligomer (5'-CGCGAAT TCGCG-3') in aqueous solution have been carried out at different temperatures between 160 K and 300 K. The effects of temperature on the low-frequency vibrational spectrum and local structural arrangements of water molecules hydrating the DNA strand have been explored in detail. The low-frequency density of states distributions reveal that increasingly trapped transverse water motions play a dominant role in controlling the band corresponding to O⋯O⋯O bending or transverse oscillations of hydration water at supercooled temperatures. In addition, presence of a broad band around 260 (±20) cm(-1) under supercooled conditions indicates transformation from high density liquid-like structuring of hydration water at higher temperatures to that of a low density liquid at lower temperatures. It is found that long-range correlations between the supercooled hydration water molecules arise due to such local structural transition around the DNA oligomer.

  11. Theoretical study on the hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration on large solutes: The case of phthalocyanines in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Elisa I; Martínez, José M; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2015-07-28

    A theoretical study on the hydration phenomena of three representative Phthalocyanines (Pcs): the metal-free, H2Pc, and the metal-containing, Cu-phthalocyanine, CuPc, and its soluble sulphonated derivative, [CuPc(SO3)4](4-), is presented. Structural and dynamic properties of molecular dynamics trajectories of these Pcs in solution were evaluated. The hydration shells of the Pcs were defined by means of spheroids adapted to the solute shape. Structural analysis of the axial region compared to the peripheral region indicates that there are no significant changes among the different macrocycles, but that of [CuPc(SO3)4](4-), where the polyoxoanion presence induces a typically hydrophilic hydration structure. The analyzed water dynamic properties cover mean residence times, translational and orientational diffusion coefficients, and hydrogen bond network. These properties allow a thorough discussion about the simultaneous existence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration in these macrocycles, and indicate the trend of water structure to well define shells in the environment of hydrophobic solutes. The comparison between the structural and dynamical analysis of the hydration of the amphipathic [CuPc(SO3)4](4-) and the non-soluble Cu-Pc shows a very weak coupling among the hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments of the macrocycle. Quantitative results are employed to revisit the iceberg model proposed by Frank and Evans, leading to conclude that structure and dynamics support a non-strict interpretation of the iceberg view, although the qualitative trends pointed out by the model are supported.

  12. Hydration, phase separation and nonlinear rheology of temperature-sensitive water-soluble polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Koga, Tsuyoshi; Kaneda, Isamu; Winnik, Françoise M

    2011-07-20

    The collapse of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) chain upon heating and the phase diagrams of aqueous PNIPAM solutions with a very flat lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase separation line are theoretically studied on the basis of cooperative dehydration (simultaneous dissociation of bound water molecules in a group of correlated sequence), and compared with the experimental observation of temperature-induced coil-globule transition by light scattering methods. The transition becomes sharper with the cooperativity parameter σ of hydration. The reentrant coil-globule-coil transition and cononsolvency in a mixed solvent of water and methanol are also studied from the viewpoint of competitive hydrogen bonds between polymer-water and polymer-methanol. The downward shift of the cloud-point curves (LCST cononsolvency) with the mol fraction of methanol due to the competition is calculated and compared with the experimental data. Aqueous solutions of hydrophobically modified PNIPAM carrying short alkyl chains at both chain ends (telechelic PNIPAM) are theoretically and experimentally studied. The LCST of these solutions is found to shift downward along the sol-gel transition curve as a result of end-chain association (association-induced phase separation), and separate from the coil-globule transition line. Associated structures in the solution, such as flower micelles, mesoglobules, and higher fractal assembly, are studied by ultra small-angle neutron scattering with theoretical modeling of the scattering function. Dynamic-mechanical modulus, nonlinear stationary viscosity, and stress build-up in start-up shear flows of the associated networks are studied on the basis of the affine and non-affine transient network theory. The molecular conditions for thickening, strain hardening, and stress overshoot are found in terms of the nonlinear amplitude A of the chain tension and the tension-dissociation coupling constant g.

  13. Comparison of the water change characteristics between the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate and the freezing and thawing of ice in sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhang; Qingbai Wu; Yingmei Wang

    2009-01-01

    Hydrate formation and dissociation processes are always accompanied by water migration in porous media, which is similar to the ice. In our study, a novel pF-meter sensor which could detect the changes of water content inside sand was first applied to hydrate formation and dissociation processes. It also can study the water change characteristics in the core scale of a partially saturated silica sand sample and compare the differences of water changes between the processes of formation and dissociation of methane hydrate and freezing and thawing of ice. The experimental results showed that the water changes in the processes of formation and dissociation of methane hydrate were basically similar to that of the freezing and thawing of ice in sand. When methane hydrate or ice was formed, water changes showed the decrease in water content on the whole and the pF values rose following the formation processes. However, there were very obvious differences between the ice thawing and hydrate dissociation.

  14. Clay hydration/dehydration in dry to water-saturated supercritical CO2: Implications for caprock integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Miller, Quin R.; Chen, Jeffrey; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Martin, Paul F.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) for the geologic storage of carbon dioxide will displace formation water, and the pore space adjacent to overlying caprocks could eventually be dominated by dry to water-saturated scCO2. Wet scCO2 is highly reactive and capable of carbonating and hydrating certain minerals, whereas anhydrous scCO2 can dehydrate water-containing minerals. Because these geochemical processes affect solid volume and thus porosity and permeability, they have the potential to affect the long-term integrity of the caprock seal. In this study, we investigate the swelling and shrinkage of an expandable clay found in caprock formations, montmorillonite (Ca-STx-1), when exposed to variable water-content scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar using a combination of in situ probes, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), and in situ attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). We show that the extent of montmorillonite clay swelling/shrinkage is dependent not only on water hydration/dehydration, but also on CO2 intercalation reactions. Our results also suggest a competition between water and CO2 for interlayer residency where increasing concentrations of intercalated water lead to decreasing concentrations of intercalated CO2. Overall, this paper demonstrates the types of measurements required to develop fundamental knowledge that will enhance modeling efforts and reduce risks associated with subsurface storage of CO2.

  15. Neutron scattering studies of dynamic crossover phenomena in a coupled system of biopolymer and its hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S H; Mallamace, F; Chu, X Q; Kim, C; Lagi, M [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Faraone, A [Dipartmento di Fisica and CNISM, Universita di Messina, Vil. S. Agata CP 55, 98166 Messina (Italy); Fratini, E; Baglioni, P, E-mail: sowhsin@mit.ed [Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, 50019 (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    We have observed a Fragile-to-Strong Dynamic Crossover (FSC) phenomenon of the alpha-relaxation time and self-diffusion constant in hydration water of three biopolymers: lysozyme, B-DNA and RNA. The mean squared displacement (MSD) of hydrogen atoms is measured by Elastic Neutron Scattering (ENS) experiments. The alpha-relaxation time is measured by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) experiments and the self-diffusion constant by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments. We discuss the active role of the FSC of the hydration water in initiating the dynamic crossover phenomenon (so-called glass transition) in the biopolymer. The latter transition controls the flexibility of the biopolymer and sets the low temperature limit of its biofunctionality. Finally, we show an MD simulation of a realistic hydrated powder model of lysozyme and demonstrate the agreement of the MD simulation with the experimental data on the FSC phenomenon in the plot of logarithm of the alpha-relaxation time vs. 1/T.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip.

  17. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute.

  18. 聚乙二醇-硫酸铵双水相体系萃取螺旋藻藻蓝蛋白的研究%The extraction of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina using aqueous two- phase system composed of PEG and ammonium sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于淑坤; 岳思君; 田露; 苏建宇

    2012-01-01

    对聚乙二醇一硫酸铵双水相体系直接从螺旋藻破碎液中萃取藻蓝蛋白的技术进行了研究。结果表明,对于藻蓝蛋白含量为0.282mg/mL的螺旋藻细胞破碎液,10%PEG2000与20%的硫酸铵双水相体系萃取藻蓝蛋白的效果最佳,经2次革取,藻蓝蛋白总革取率为96.1,藻蓝蛋白纯度达到1.2。%The technology of extracting C-phycocyanin from Spirulina by using a aqueous two-phase system composed of PEG and ammonium sulfate was studied in this paper. The results showed that the optimum conditions of extraction were 10 percent of PEG2000 and 20 percent of (NH4)2SO4. The total extraction rate of C-phycocyanin was reached to 96.1 percent and the purity of C-phycocyanin was as high as 1.2.

  19. Exploring the role of water in molecular recognition: predicting protein ligandability using a combinatorial search of surface hydration sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Brennan, Paul E.; Huggins, David J.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between any two biological molecules must compete with their interaction with water molecules. This makes water the most important molecule in medicine, as it controls the interactions of every therapeutic with its target. A small molecule binding to a protein is able to recognize a unique binding site on a protein by displacing bound water molecules from specific hydration sites. Quantifying the interactions of these water molecules allows us to estimate the potential of the protein to bind a small molecule. This is referred to as ligandability. In the study, we describe a method to predict ligandability by performing a search of all possible combinations of hydration sites on protein surfaces. We predict ligandability as the summed binding free energy for each of the constituent hydration sites, computed using inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory. We compared the predicted ligandability with the maximum observed binding affinity for 20 proteins in the human bromodomain family. Based on this comparison, it was determined that effective inhibitors have been developed for the majority of bromodomains, in the range from 10 to 100 nM. However, we predict that more potent inhibitors can be developed for the bromodomains BPTF and BRD7 with relative ease, but that further efforts to develop inhibitors for ATAD2 will be extremely challenging. We have also made predictions for the 14 bromodomains with no reported small molecule K d values by isothermal titration calorimetry. The calculations predict that PBRM1(1) will be a challenging target, while others such as TAF1L(2), PBRM1(4) and TAF1(2), should be highly ligandable. As an outcome of this work, we assembled a database of experimental maximal K d that can serve as a community resource assisting medicinal chemistry efforts focused on BRDs. Effective prediction of ligandability would be a very useful tool in the drug discovery process.

  20. The Structure of Hydrated Electron. Part 1. Magnetic Resonance of Internally Trapping Water Anions: A Density Functional Theory Study

    CERN Document Server

    Shkrob, I A

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to rationalize magnetic parameters of hydrated electron trapped in alkaline glasses as observed using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies. To this end, model water cluster anions (n=4-8 and n=20,24) that localize the electron internally are examined. It is shown that EPR parameters of such water anions (such as hyperfine coupling tensors of H/D nuclei in the water molecules) are defined mainly by the cavity size and the coordination number of the electron; the water molecules in the second solvation shell play a relatively minor role. An idealized model of hydrated electron (that is usually attributed to L. Kevan) in which six hydroxyl groups arranged in an octahedral pattern point towards the common center is shown to provide the closest match to the experimental parameters, such as isotropic and anisotropic hyperfine coupling constants for the protons (estimated from ESEEM), the second moment of the E...

  1. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  2. Distribution of long-lived radioactive iodine isotope (I-129) in pore waters from the gas hydrate fields on the continental margins: Indication for methane source of gas hydrate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaru, H.; Lu, Z.; Fehn, U.

    2011-12-01

    Because iodine has a strong association with organic matters in marine environments, pore waters in high methane potential region, in particular gas hydrate occurrences on the continental margins, are enriched significantly in iodine compared with seawater. Natural iodine system is composed of stable and radioactive species, I-129 (half-life of 15.7 Myr) has been used for estimating the age of source formations both for methane and iodine, because iodine can be liberated into pore water during the degradation of organic matter to methane in deep sediments. Here we present I-129 age data in pore waters collected from variety of gas hydrate occurrences on the continental margins. The I-129 ages in pore waters from these locations are significantly older than those of host sediments, indicating long-term transport and accumulation from deep/old sediments. The I-129 ages in the Japan Sea and Okhotsk Sea along the plate boundary between the North American and Amurian Plates correspond to the ages of initial spreading of these marginal seas, pointing to the massive deposition of organic matter for methane generation in deep sediments within limited periods. On the Pacific side of these areas, organic matter-rich back stop is responsible for methane in deep-seated gas hydrate deposits along the Nankai Trough. Deep coaly sequences responsible for deep conventional natural gas deposits are also responsible for overlying gas hydrate deposits off Shimokita Peninsula, NE Japan. Those in the Gulf of Mexico are correlative to the ages of sediments where the top of salt diapirs intrude. Marine sediments on the Pacific Plate subducting beneath the Australian Plate are likely responsible for the methane and iodine in the Hikurangi Trough, New Zealand. These ages reflect well the regional geological settings responsible for generation, transport, and accumulation of methane, I-129 is a key to understand the geological history of gas hydrate deposition.

  3. Unexpected inhibition of CO2 gas hydrate formation in dilute TBAB solutions and the critical role of interfacial water structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Nguyen, Khoi T.; Rintoul, Llew; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-12-01

    Gas hydrates formed under moderated conditions open up novel approaches to tackling issues related to energy supply, gas separation, and CO2 sequestration. Several additives like tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) have been empirically developed and used to promote gas hydrate formation. Here we report unexpected experimental results which show that TBAB inhibits CO2 gas hydrate formation when used at minuscule concentration. We also used spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation to gain further insights and explain the experimental results. They have revealed the critical role of water alignment at the gas-water interface induced by surface adsorption of tetra-n-butylammonium cation (TBA+) which gives rise to the unexpected inhibition of dilute TBAB solution. The water perturbation by TBA+ in the bulk is attributed to the promotion effect of high TBAB concentration on gas hydrate formation. We explain our finding using the concept of activation energy of gas hydrate formation. Our results provide a step toward to mastering the control of gas hydrate formation.

  4. Why can water cages adsorb aqueous methane? A potential of mean force calculation on hydrate nucleation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang-Jun; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yi-Gang; Wu, Chang-Hua

    2009-11-28

    By performing constrained molecular dynamics simulations in the methane-water system, we successfully calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) between a dodecahedral water cage (DWC) and dissolved methane for the first time. As a function of the distance between DWC and methane, this is characterized by a deep well at approximately 6.2 A and a shallow well at approximately 10.2 A, separated by a potential barrier at approximately 8.8 A. We investigated how the guest molecule, cage rigidity and the cage orientation affected the PMF. The most important finding is that the DWC itself strongly adsorbs methane and the adsorption interaction is independent of the guests. Moreover, the activation energy of the DWC adsorbing methane is comparable to that of hydrogen bonds, despite differing by a factor of approximately 10% when considering different water-methane interaction potentials. We explain that the cage-methane adsorption interaction is a special case of the hydrophobic interaction between methane molecules. The strong net attraction in the DWC shell with radii between 6.2 and 8.8 A may act as the inherent driving force that controls hydrate formation. A cage adsorption hypothesis for hydrate nucleation is thus proposed and discussed.

  5. The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

    2012-01-01

    A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of thermal,salt and depressurization on gas hydrate dissociation.The method has the advantage of high efficiency,low cost and enhanced safety.Based on the proposed conceptual method,the physical and mathematical models are established,in which the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,salt inhibition,dispersion,convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production are considered.The gas and water rates,formation pressure for the combination method are compared with that of the single depressurization,which is referred to the method in which only depressurization is used.The results show that the combination method can remedy the deficiency of individual producing methods.It has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single depressurization.It can also reduce the geologic hazard caused by the formation deformation due to the maintaining of the formation pressure by injected ocean warm water.

  6. Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water using multivariate curve resolution of near-infrared spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba, M. Isabel [Group of Research in Applied Thermal Engineering-CREVER, Mechanical Engineering Dept. (Spain); Larrechi, M. Soledad, E-mail: mariasoledad.larrechi@urv.cat [Analytical and Organic Chemistry Dept., Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Coronas, Alberto [Group of Research in Applied Thermal Engineering-CREVER, Mechanical Engineering Dept. (Spain)

    2016-05-05

    The hydration process of lithium iodide, lithium bromide, lithium chloride and lithium nitrate in water was analyzed quantitatively by applying multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to their near infrared spectra recorded between 850 nm and 1100 nm. The experiments were carried out using solutions with a salt mass fraction between 0% and 72% for lithium bromide, between 0% and 67% for lithium nitrate and between 0% and 62% for lithium chloride and lithium iodide at 323.15 K, 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. Three factors were determined for lithium bromide and lithium iodide and two factors for the lithium chloride and lithium nitrate by singular value decomposition (SVD) of their spectral data matrices. These factors are associated with various chemical environments in which there are aqueous clusters containing the ions of the salts and non-coordinated water molecules. Spectra and concentration profiles of non-coordinated water and cluster aqueous were retrieved by MCR-ALS. The amount of water involved in the process of hydration of the various salts was quantified. The results show that the water absorption capacity increases in the following order LiI < LiBr < LiNO{sub 3} < LiCl. The salt concentration at which there is no free water in the medium was calculated at each one of the temperatures considered. The values ranged between 62.6 and 65.1% for LiBr, 45.5–48.3% for LiCl, 60.4–61.2% for LiI and 60.3–63.7% for LiNO{sub 3}. These values are an initial approach to determining the concentration as from which crystal formation is favored. - Highlights: • Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water. • The absorption capacity of the electrolytes in function of the salt is evaluated. • The lithium salt concentration is estimated when the crystal formation is favored.

  7. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  8. Re-parameterisation of a three-band semi-empirical algorithm for c-phycocyanin-pigment estimation in an optically complex tropical reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Diogo de Jesus Amore

    2016-01-01

    The eutrophication of aquatic systems is a worldwide environmental problem. A major aftermath is health-inflicting toxic algal bloom, which can affect humans. Therefore, aquatic systems, mostly near urban environments require environmental monitoring. The use of remote sensing for monitoring algal blooms via bio-optical modelling is based on the spectral behaviour of the optically active components (OACs) in the water to estimate their concentrations. The detection of cyanobacteria, one of th...

  9. The Inhibitory Effect of C-phycocyanin Containing Protein Extract (C-PC Extract) on Human Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in Hepatocellular Cancer Cell Line (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunte, Mugdha; Desai, Krutika

    2017-03-30

    Spirulina platensis :have been studied for several biological activities. In the current study C-phycocyanin containing protein extract (C-PC extract) of Spirulina platensis have been studied for its effect on human matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9) and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2). In the present study, breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB 231) and hepatocellular cancer cell line (HepG2) were examined for inhibition of MMPs at different levels of expression after C-PC extract treatment. Herein, we have demonstrated that C-PC extract significantly reduced activity of MMP-2 by 55.13% and MMP-9 by 57.9% in HepG2 cells at 15 μg concentration. Additionally, the treatment has reduced mRNA expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 at 20 μg concentration by 1.65-folds and 1.66-folds respectively. The C-PC extract treatment have also downregulated a mRNA expression of TIMP-2 by 1.12 folds at 20 μg concentration in HepG2 cells. Together, these results indicate that C-PC, extract successfully inhibited MMP-2 and -9 at different levels of expression and TIMP-2 at a mRNA expression level; however, extract did not have any effect on MMP-1 expressed in MDA-MB231 and TIMP-1 expressed in HepG2 cells as well as the exact mechanism of inhibition of MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-2 remained unclear.

  10. Neutrons describe ectoine effects on water H-bonding and hydration around a soluble protein and a cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccai, Giuseppe; Bagyan, Irina; Combet, Jérôme; Cuello, Gabriel J.; Demé, Bruno; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, François-Xavier; Galvan Josa, Victor M.; von Gronau, Susanne; Haertlein, Michael; Martel, Anne; Moulin, Martine; Neumann, Markus; Weik, Martin; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2016-08-01

    Understanding adaptation to extreme environments remains a challenge of high biotechnological potential for fundamental molecular biology. The cytosol of many microorganisms, isolated from saline environments, reversibly accumulates molar concentrations of the osmolyte ectoine to counterbalance fluctuating external salt concentrations. Although they have been studied extensively by thermodynamic and spectroscopic methods, direct experimental structural data have, so far, been lacking on ectoine-water-protein interactions. In this paper, in vivo deuterium labeling, small angle neutron scattering, neutron membrane diffraction and inelastic scattering are combined with neutron liquids diffraction to characterize the extreme ectoine-containing solvent and its effects on purple membrane of H. salinarum and E. coli maltose binding protein. The data reveal that ectoine is excluded from the hydration layer at the membrane surface and does not affect membrane molecular dynamics, and prove a previous hypothesis that ectoine is excluded from a monolayer of dense hydration water around the soluble protein. Neutron liquids diffraction to atomic resolution shows how ectoine enhances the remarkable properties of H-bonds in water—properties that are essential for the proper organization, stabilization and dynamics of biological structures.

  11. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  12. Influence of supplementary cementitious materials on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime and cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ince, C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is an investigation of the possible role of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime (CL90 and Portland cement (PC mortars. The properties of hydrated lime are significantly different from those of cement and therefore modifying fresh and hardened properties of these mortars are vital for mortar/substrate optimisation in masonry construction. The parameters investigated in this paper often are the main barriers to the use of hydrated lime in construction practice. The results show that transfer sorptivity and time to dewater freshly-mixed hydrated lime mortars can be modified when binder is partially replaced with SCMs. Compressive strength of CL90 mortars is increased systematically with the increased replacement levels of SCMs and the results are supported with the microstructural images. The ability to modify the water transport kinetics and mechanical properties allows compatibility between the mortar and the substrate unit in masonry construction.El objetivo de este artículo es investigar el papel de los materiales cementantes suplementarios (SCMs en la cinética de transporte del agua y en las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros de cal hidratada (CL90 y cemento Portland. Las propiedades de la cal hidratada son significativamente diferentes a las del cemento y por lo tanto el control de las propiedades de los morteros frescos y endurecidos es fundamental en la optimización mortero/substrato en albañilería. Los parámetros estudiados en este trabajo son a menudo las principales barreras para el uso de la cal hidratada en la práctica de la construcción. Los resultados indican que la absortividad y el tiempo necesario para deshidratar morteros de cal hidratada recién mezclados pueden ser controlados cuando el conglomerante es parcialmente remplazado por SCMs. La resistencia a compresión de los morteros CL90 aumenta sistem

  13. Influence of hydration water on CHsub>3sub>NHsub>3sub>PbIsub>3sub> perovskite films prepared through one-step procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyi; Yuan, Sijian; Li, Dahai; Jin, Feng; Zhang, Rongjun; Zhan, Yiqiang; Lu, Ming; Wang, Songyou; Zheng, Yuxiang; Guo, Junpeng; Fan, Zhiyong; Chen, Liangyao

    2016-10-31

    Organic-inorganic perovskites were fabricated through a one-step procedure with different levels of hydration water in precursor solutions. The optical properties of CHsub>3sub>NHsub>3sub>PbIsub>3sub> films were investigated through spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence measurements. With the measured optical constants, the efficiency limit of perovskite solar cells is predicted with a detailed balance model. By comparing the optical measurement to that of planar heterojunction solar cells, we conclude that the radiative efficiency and porosity of the perovskite film significantly influence the performance of perovskite solar cells. An optimized hydration-water concentration is obtained for the 3CHsub>3sub>NHsub>3sub>I:1PbAcsub>2sub>•xHsub>2sub>O precursor solution. The results can provide guidance for further optimization of the device performance of perovskite solar cells by utilizing hydration water.

  14. Investigation of Wyoming Bentonite Hydration in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2: Implications for Caprock Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, J. S.; Chen, J.; Thompson, C.; Schaef, T.; Miller, Q. R.; Martin, P. F.; Ilton, E. S.; Qafoku, O.; Felmy, A. R.; Rosso, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    The effectiveness of geologic sequestration as an enterprise for CO2 storage depends partly on the reactivity of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) with caprock minerals. Injection of scCO2 will displace formation water, and the pore space adjacent to overlying caprocks could eventually be dominated by dry to water-saturated scCO2. Caprock formations have high concentrations of clay minerals, including expandable montmorillonites. Water-bearing scCO2 is highly reactive and capable of hydrating or dehydrating clays, possibly leading to porosity and permeability changes that directly impact caprock performance. Dehydration will cause montmorillonite clay minerals in caprocks to contract, thereby decreasing solid volume and possibly increasing caprock permeability and porosity. On the other hand, water intercalation will cause these clays to expand, thereby increasing solid volume and possibly leading to self-sealing of caprock fractures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Carbon Sequestration Initiative is developing capabilities for studying wet scCO2-mineral reactions in situ. Here, we introduce novel in situ infrared (IR) spectroscopic instrumentation that enables quantitative titrations of reactant minerals with water in scCO2. Results are presented for the infrared spectroscopic titrations of Na-, Ca-, and Mg-saturated Wyoming betonites with water over concentrations ranging from zero to scCO2 saturated. These experiments were carried out at 50°C and 90 bar. Transmission IR spectroscopy was used to measure concentrations of water dissolved in the scCO2 or intercalated into the clays. The titration curves evaluated from the transmission-IR data are compared between the three types of clays to assess the effects of the cation on water partitioning. Single-reflection attenuated total reflection (ATR) IR spectroscopy was used to collect the spectrum of the clays as they hydrate at every total water concentration during the titration. Clay hydration is evidenced by

  15. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    , not all of them are white like snow. Some hydrates from the deep Gulf of Mexico are richly colored in shades of yellow, orange, or even red. The ice-like masses are beautiful, and contrast with the dull gray of deep sea muds. Hydrates from the Blake... volcanoes and associated gas hydrates: Marine Geology, v. 167, p. 29-42. Milkov, A.V. and R. Sassen, 2001a, Estimate of gas hydrate resource, northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope: Marine Geology, v. 179, pp. 71-83. Milkov, A.V., Sassen, R...

  16. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF FILLED AND EMPTY CAGE-LIKE WATER CLUSTERS IN LIQUID WATER AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE TO GAS HYDRATE FORMATION MECHANISMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Guangjun; ZHANG Yigang; ZHAO Yajuan

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to observe the evolutions of 512 and 51262 cage-like water clusters filled with or without a methane molecule immersed in bulk liquid water at 250 K and 230 K. The lifetimes of these clusters are calculated according to their Lindemann index δ (t) using the criteria of δ≥0.07. For both the filled and empty clusters, we find the dynamics of bulk water determines the lifetimes of cage-like water clusters, and that the lifetime of 512 62 cage-like cluster is the same as that of 512 cage-like cluster. Although the methane molecule indeed makes the filled cage-like cluster more stable than the empty one, the empty cage-like cluster still has chance to be long-lived compared with the filled clusters. These observations support the labile cluster hypothesis on the formation mechanisms of gas hydrates.

  17. Direct phase coexistence molecular dynamics study of the phase equilibria of the ternary methane-carbon dioxide-water hydrate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalis, Vasileios K; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-09-14

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to predict the phase equilibrium conditions of a ternary hydrate system. In particular, the direct phase coexistence methodology is implemented for the determination of the three-phase coexistence temperature of the methane-carbon dioxide-water hydrate system at elevated pressures. The TIP4P/ice, TraPPE-UA and OPLS-UA forcefields for water, carbon dioxide and methane respectively are used, in line with our previous studies of the phase equilibria of the corresponding binary hydrate systems. The solubility in the aqueous phase of the guest molecules of the respective binary and ternary systems is examined under hydrate-forming conditions, providing insight into the predictive capability of the methodology as well as the combination of these forcefields to accurately describe the phase behavior of the ternary system. The three-phase coexistence temperature is calculated at 400, 1000 and 2000 bar for two compositions of the methane-carbon dioxide mixture. The predicted values are compared with available calculations with satisfactory agreement. An estimation is also provided for the fraction of the guest molecules in the mixed hydrate phase under the conditions examined.

  18. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  19. Occurrence of methane hydrate in saturated and unsaturated solutions of sodium chloride and water in dependence of temperature and pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Roo, J.L.; Diepen, G.A.M.; Lichtenthaler, R.N.; Peters, C.J.

    1983-07-01

    Experimental results of the formation of methane hydrate in dependence of temperature and pressure in unsaturated solutions of NaCl in water will be presented in a temperature range from 261.85 to 285.98 K and pressure up to 11.0 MPa. Furthermore the four-phase equilibrium NaCl X 2H/sub 2/O /SUB s/ -CH/sub 4/ X nH/sub 2/O /SUB s/ -L-G has been calculated from the experimental results. Also the heats of transformation of several other equilibria in the ternary system CH/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O-NaCl are obtained.

  20. Determination of methane concentrations in water in equilibrium with sI methane hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Most submarine gas hydrates are located within the two-phase equilibrium region of hydrate and interstitial water with pressures (P) ranging from 8 to 60 MPa and temperatures (T) from 275 to 293 K. However, current measurements of solubilities of methane in equilibrium with hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase are limited below 20 MPa and 283.15 K, and the differences among these data are up to 30%. When these data were extrapolated to other P-T conditions, it leads to large and poorly known uncertainties. In this study, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to measure methane concentrations in pure water in equilibrium with sI (structure one) methane hydrate, in the absence of a vapor phase, at temperatures from 276.6 to 294.6 (??0.3) K and pressures at 10, 20, 30 and 40 (??0.4%) MPa. The relationship among concentration of methane in water in equilibrium with hydrate, in mole fraction [X(CH4)], the temperature in K, and pressure in MPa was derived as: X(CH4) = exp [11.0464 + 0.023267 P - (4886.0 + 8.0158 P)/T]. Both the standard enthalpy and entropy of hydrate dissolution at the studied T-P conditions increase slightly with increasing pressure, ranging from 41.29 to 43.29 kJ/mol and from 0.1272 to 0.1330 kJ/K ?? mol, respectively. When compared with traditional sampling and analytical methods, the advantages of our method include: (1) the use of in situ Raman signals for methane concentration measurements eliminates possible uncertainty caused by sampling and ex situ analysis, (2) it is simple and efficient, and (3) high-pressure data can be obtained safely. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In Situ Characterization of Hydrated Proteins in Water by SALVI and ToF-SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jiachao; Zhou, Yufan; Hua, Xin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate in situ chemical imaging of protein biomolecules in the aqueous solution using System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface (SALVI) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The fibronectin protein film was immobilized on the silicon nitride (SiN) membrane forming the SALVI detection area. During ToF-SIMS analysis, three modes of analysis were conducted including high spatial resolution mass spectra, two-dimensional (2D) imaging, and depth profiling. Mass spectra were acquired in both positive and negative modes. Deionized water was also analyzed as a reference sample. Our results show that fibronectin film in water has more distinct and stronger water cluster peaks compared to water alone. Characteristic peaks of amino acid fragments are also observable in the hydrated protein ToF-SIMS spectra. These results illustrate that protein molecule adsorption on a surface can be studied dynamically using SALVI and ToF-SIMS in the liquid environment.

  2. Distribution of gas hydrate inhibitor monoethylene glycol in condensate and water systems: Experimental measurement and thermodynamic modeling using the cubic-plus-association equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Yussuf, Mustafe A.; Frost, Michael

    2014-01-01

    hydrate formation in subsea pipelines, monoethylene glycol (MEG) and methanol are injected in large amounts. It is important to know the distribution of these chemicals in oil and water systems for economical operation of a production facility and environmental perspective. In this work, we present new......The deepwater energy sector represents one of the major growth areas of the oil and gas industry today. To meet the challenges of hydrate formation, corrosion, scaling, and foaming, the oil and gas industry uses many chemicals and their use has increased significantly over the years. To inhibit gas...

  3. 2H and 13C NMR studies on the temperature-dependent water and protein dynamics in hydrated elastin, myoglobin and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusceac, Sorin A; Vogel, Michael R; Herbers, Claudia R

    2010-01-01

    (2)H NMR spin-lattice relaxation and line-shape analyses are performed to study the temperature-dependent dynamics of water in the hydration shells of myoglobin, elastin, and collagen. The results show that the dynamical behaviors of the hydration waters are similar for these proteins when using comparable hydration levels of h=0.25-0.43. Since water dynamics is characterized by strongly nonexponential correlation functions, we use a Cole-Cole spectral density for spin-lattice relaxation analysis, leading to correlation times, which are in nice agreement with results for the main dielectric relaxation process observed for various proteins in the literature. The temperature dependence can roughly be described by an Arrhenius law, with the possibility of a weak crossover in the vicinity of 220 K. Near ambient temperatures, the results substantially depend on the exact shape of the spectral density so that deviations from an Arrhenius behavior cannot be excluded in the high-temperature regime. However, for the studied proteins, the data give no evidence for the existence of a sharp fragile-to-strong transition reported for lysozyme at about 220 K. Line-shape analysis reveals that the mechanism for the rotational motion of hydration waters changes in the vicinity of 220 K. For myoglobin, we observe an isotropic motion at high temperatures and an anisotropic large-amplitude motion at low temperatures. Both mechanisms coexist in the vicinity of 220 K. (13)C CP MAS spectra show that hydration results in enhanced elastin dynamics at ambient temperatures, where the enhancement varies among different amino acids. Upon cooling, the enhanced mobility decreases. Comparison of (2)H and (13)C NMR data reveals that the observed protein dynamics is slower than the water dynamics.

  4. Crystal structures of hydrates of simple inorganic salts. III. Water-rich aluminium halide hydrates: AlCl3 · 15H2O, AlBr3 · 15H2O, AlI3 · 15H2O, AlI3 · 17H2O and AlBr3 · 9H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Horst; Hennings, Erik; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Water-rich aluminium halide hydrate structures are not known in the literature. The highest known water content per Al atom is nine for the perchlorate and fluoride. The nonahydrate of aluminium bromide, stable pentadecahydrates of aluminium chloride, bromide and iodide, and a metastable heptadecahydrate of the iodide have now been crystallized from low-temperature solutions. The structures of these hydrates were determined and are discussed in terms of the development of cation hydration spheres. The pentadecahydrate of the chloride and bromide are isostructural. In AlI(3) · 15H2O, half of the Al(3+) cations are surrounded by two complete hydration spheres, with six H2O in the primary and 12 in the secondary. For the heptadecahydrate of aluminium iodide, this hydration was found for every Al(3+).

  5. Naphthenic acids hydrates of gases: influence of the water/oil interface on the dispersing properties of an acidic crude oil; Acides naphteniques hydrates de gaz de l'interface eau/huile sur les proprietes dispersantes d'un brut acide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arla, D.

    2006-01-15

    Nowadays, the development of offshore oil production under increasing water depths (high pressures and low temperatures) has led oil companies to focus on gas hydrates risks. Hydrates are crystals containing gas and water molecules which can plug offshore pipelines. It has been shown that some asphaltenic crude oils stabilize water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) during several months and exhibit very good anti-agglomerant properties avoiding hydrate plugs formation. In this work, we have studied the 'anti-hydrate' properties of a West African acidic crude oil called crude AH. This oil contains naphthenic acids, RCOOH hydrocarbons which are sensitive to both the pH and the salinity of the water phase.The emulsifying properties of the crude AH have firstly been explored. It has been shown that heavy resins and asphaltenes are the main compounds of the crude AH responsible for the long term stability of the W/O emulsions whereas the napthenates RCOO{sup -} lead to less stable W/O emulsions. Dealing with hydrates, the crude AH exhibits moderate anti-agglomerant properties due to the presence of heavy resins and asphaltenes. However, the naphthenates RCOO{sup -} drastically increase the formation of hydrate plugs. Moreover, it has been pointed out that hydrate particles agglomeration accelerates the kinetics of hydrate formation and enhances the water/oil separation. In order to explain these behaviours, a mechanism of agglomeration by 'sticking' between a hydrate particle and a water droplet has been proposed. Finally, we have developed a model which describes the physico-chemical equilibria of the naphthenic acids in the binary system water/crude AH, in order to transpose the results obtained in the laboratory to the real oil field conditions. (author)

  6. EFFECT OF MAGNETIZATION OF WATER ON INDUCTION TIME AND GROWTH PERIOD OF NATURAL GAS HYDRATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Li; FAN Shuanshi

    2003-01-01

    The effect of diluted solution's magnetization on induction time and growth period of natural gas hydrate (NGH) has been investigated in quiescent reaction system at pressure of 4. 5 MPa and temperature of 274 K with SDS as surfactant, by using volume fixed and pressure falling method. Experimental results show that magnetization will have effect on the induction time of NGH. After magnetization with magnetic field intensity of 0.33 T, the induction time of NGH has been reduced to 47 min (average) from 99 min (average) in which there is no magnetization. On the other hand, the induction time has been prolonged after magnetization of the diluted solution with magnetic field intensity of 0.05 T, 0. 11 T, 0.22 T, 0.44T. Especially with magnetic field intensity of 0.11 T, the induction time had even been prolonged to 431min (average). The effect of magnetization on the growth period of NGH has not been found at the experimental condition.

  7. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  8. Nanostructural analysis of water distribution in hydrated multicomponent gels using thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codoni, Doroty; Belton, Peter; Qi, Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Highly complex, multicomponent gels and water-containing soft materials have varied applications in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and food sciences, but the characterization of these nanostructured materials is extremely challenging. The aim of this study was to use stearoyl macrogol-32 glycerides (Gelucire 50/13) gels containing seven different species of glycerides, PEG, and PEG-esters, as model, complex, multicomponent gels, to investigate the effect of water content on the micro- and nanoarchitecture of the gel interior. Thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry were used to probe the thermal and diffusional behavior of water molecules within the gel network. For the highly concentrated gels (low water content), the water activity was significantly lowered due to entrapment in the dense gel network. For the gels with intermediate water content, multiple populations of water molecules with different thermal responses and diffusion behavior were detected, indicating the presence of water in different microenvironments. This correlated with the network architecture of the freeze-dried gels observed using SEM. For the gels with high water content, increased quantities of water with similar diffusion characteristics as free water could be detected, indicating the presence of large water pockets in these gels. The results of this study provide new insights into structure of Gelucire gels, which have not been reported before because of the complexity of the material. They also demonstrate that the combination of thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry offers insights into the structure of soft materials not available by the use of each technique alone. However, we also note that in some instances the results of these measurements are overinterpreted and we suggest limitations of the methods that must be considered when using them.

  9. Flare-Shaped Acoustic Anomalies in the Water Column Along the Ecuadorian Margin: Relationship with Active Tectonics and Gas Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Francois; Proust, Jean-Noël; Dano, Alexandre; Collot, Jean-Yves; Guiyeligou, Grâce Daniella; Hernández Salazar, María José; Ratzov, Gueorgui; Martillo, Carlos; Pouderoux, Hugo; Schenini, Laure; Lebrun, Jean-Frederic; Loayza, Glenda

    2016-10-01

    With hull-mounted multibeam echosounder data, we report for the first time along the active Ecuadorian margin, acoustic signatures of water column fluid emissions and seep-related structures on the seafloor. In total 17 flare-shaped acoustic anomalies were detected from the upper slope (1250 m) to the shelf break (140 m). Nearly half of the flare-shaped acoustic anomalies rise 200-500 m above the seafloor. The base of the flares is generally associated with high-reflectivity backscatter patches contrasting with the neighboring seafloor. We interpret these flares as caused by fluid escape in the water column, most likely gases. High-resolution seismic profiles show that most flares occur close to the surface expression of active faults, deformed areas, slope instabilities or diapiric structures. In two areas tectonic deformation disrupts a Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR), suggesting that buried frozen gas hydrates are destabilized, thus supplying free gas emissions and related flares. This discovery is important as it opens the way to determine the nature and origin of the emitted fluids and their potential link with the hydrocarbon system of the forearc basins along the Ecuadorian margin.

  10. Surfactants at Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Water Interface: Physics of Surfactants, Counter-Ions, and Hydration Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ketan S.; Phelan, Frederick R., Jr.

    Specialized applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) require an efficient and reliable method to sort these materials into monodisperse fractions with respect to their defining metrics (chirality, length, etc.) while retaining their physical and chemical integrity. A popular method to achieve this goal is to use surfactants that individually disperse SWCNTs in water and then to separate the resulting colloidal mixture into fractions that are enriched in monodisperse SWCNTs. Recently, experiments at NIST have shown that subtle point mutations of chemical groups in bile salt surfactants have a large impact on the hydrodynamic properties of SWCNT-surfactant complexes during ultracentrifugation. These results provide strong motivation for understanding the rich physics underlying the assembly of surfactants around SWCNTs, the structure and dynamics of counter ions around the resulting complex, and propagation of these effects into the first hydration shell. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the thermodynamics of SWCNT-bile salt surfactant complexes in water with an emphasis on the buoyant characteristics of the SWCNT-surfactant complexes. Simulation results will be presented along with a comparison with experimental data. Official contribution of the National Institute of Standards and Technology; not subject to copyright in the United States.

  11. Effects of the water level hydrated in NMMO on the physical properties of cellulose fiber in dry jet-wet spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.B.; Lee, W.S.; Kim, B.C.; Jo, S.M.; Park, J.S. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y.M. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    The effects of the amount of water hydrated in N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO) in dry jet-wet spinning of cellulose was investigated in terms of rheological properties of the spinning dope and the physical properties of the fiber. At the identical polymer concentration of 12 wt%, the solution of cellulose in 90.4 wt% NMMO gave higher viscosity and higher storage modulus (G`) than that in 86.7 wt% NMMO, which was more noticeable at 110 {sup o} C than at 12 {sup o} C. Decrease in the hydrated water level or increase in the air-gap or spin draw ratio increased such physical properties of the fiber as birefringence, initial modulus and tensile strength. The tensile fractured morphology revealed that the fiber from NMMO containing less water gave more fibrils resulting from higher orientation. Further, it produced thicker and longer fibrils when treated with an ultrasonic generator.

  12. Water exchange at a hydrated platinum electrode is rare and collective

    CERN Document Server

    Limmer, David T; Madden, Paul A; Chandler, David

    2015-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the exchange kinetics of water molecules at a model metal electrode surface -- exchange between water molecules in the bulk liquid and water molecules bound to the metal. This process is a rare event, with a mean residence time of a bound water of about 40 ns for the model we consider. With analysis borrowed from the techniques of rare-event sampling, we show how this exchange or desorption is controlled by (1) reorganization of the hydrogen bond network within the adlayer of bound water molecules, and by (2) interfacial density fluctuations of the bulk liquid adjacent to the adlayer. We define collective coordinates that describe the desorption mechanism. Spatial and temporal correlations associated with a single event extend over nanometers and tens of picoseconds.

  13. Communication: Librational dynamics in water, sI and sII clathrate hydrates, and ice Ih: Molecular-dynamics insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Christian J; English, Niall J

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations have been performed for liquid water, and on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to ice Ih, in order to study the dynamical properties of librational motion (rotation oscillation) depicted by protons in water molecules. In particular, hydrate lattices were found to display prominent "bifurcated" features, or peaks, at circa 70 and 80-95 meV (or ∼560 and 640-760 cm(-1), respectively), also displayed by ice, in essentially quantitative agreement with experimental neutron-scattering data. However, observed differences in dispersion between these librational modes between these two structures (both hydrate polymorphs vis-à-vis ice), owing primarily to density effects, have been decomposed into contributions arising from angular-velocity dynamics about axes in the local molecular frame of water molecules, with in-plane "wagging" and "twisting" rationalising one mode at ∼70 meV, and out-of-plane motion for the higher-frequency band. This was confirmed explicitly by a type of de facto normal-mode analysis, in which only immediate layers of water molecules about the one under consideration were allowed to move. In contrast, liquid water displayed no marked preference for such local in- or out-of-plane modes characterising librational motion, owing to the marked absence of rigid, pentamers or hexamers therein.

  14. Effects of rooibos tea, bottled water, and a carbohydrate beverage on blood and urinary measures of hydration after acute dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Alan C; Quindry, John C; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Valiente, J Scott

    2010-04-01

    Rooibos tea contains polyphenol antioxidants, including flavonoids and phenolic acids that are potent free radical scavengers and has purported benefits for accelerated rehydration. The objective was to evaluate the effects of three different drinks (rooibos tea, bottled water, and a carbohydrate beverage) on blood and urinary markers of hydration after acute dehydration in collegiate wrestlers. Twenty-three athletes were recruited and followed a randomized, cross-over design with three different study arms comparing the effectiveness of rooibos tea, carbohydrate beverage (6% or 60 grams l(-1)), or bottled water (placebo) in promoting rehydration after a 3% reduction in body mass. Urine specific gravity (U(sg)) urine (U(osm)) and plasma osmolarity (P(osm)), and plasma volume were measured pre- and post dehydration and at 1-h after rehydration. Statistical analyses utilized a 3 (conditions) x 3 (times) repeated measures analysis of variance to test main effects. Significant interaction effects were found for P(osm) and U(osm), both of which remained below basleline after 1-h rehydration in the rooibos tea and water trials. No significant interaction effects were found for either urine U(sg) or plasma volume shift. The findings of this study demonstrate that rooibos tea was no more effective in promoting rehydration than plain water, with significant changes being found for P(osm) and U(osm) in the carbohydrate/electrolyte solution, in collegiate wrestlers after a 3% reduction in body mass and a rehydration period of 1-h when consuming 100% of their body weight loss.

  15. Water in the hydration shell of halide ions has significantly reduced Fermi resonance and moderately enhanced Raman cross section in the OH stretch regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A; Sarkar, Sisir K

    2013-08-22

    Water in the presence of electrolytes plays an important role in biological and industrial processes. The properties of water, such as the intermolecular coupling, Fermi resonance (FR), hydrogen-bonding, and Raman cross section were investigated by measuring the Raman spectra in the OD and OH stretch regions in presence of alkali halides (NaX; X = F, Cl, Br, I). It is observed that the changes in spectral characteristics by the addition of NaX in D2O are similar to those obtained by the addition of H2O in D2O. The spectral width decreases significantly by the addition of NaX in D2O (H2O) than that in the isotopically diluted water. Quantitative estimation, on the basis of integrated Raman intensity, revealed that the relative Raman cross section, σ(H)/σ(b) (σ(H) and σ(b) are the average Raman cross section of water in the first hydration shell of X(-) and in bulk, respectively), in D2O and H2O is higher than those in the respective isotopically diluted water. These results suggest that water in the hydration shell has reduced FR and intermolecular coupling compared to those in bulk. In the isotopically diluted water, the relative Raman cross section increases with increase in size of the halide ions (σ(H)/σ(b) = 0.6, 1.1, 1.5, and 1.9 for F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-), respectively), which is assignable to the enhancement of Raman cross section by charge transfer from halide ions to the hydrating water. Nevertheless, the experimentally determined σ(H)/σ(b) is lower than the calculated values obtained on the basis of the energy of the charge transfer state of water. The weak enhancement of σ(H)/σ(b) signifies that the charge transfer transition in the hydration shell of halide ions causes little change in the OD (OH) bond lengths of hydrating water.

  16. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  17. Spatial and Orientational Structure of the Hydration Shell of Benzene in Sub- and Supercritical Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Ashu; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-07-09

    The spatial and orientational structure of the solvation shell of benzene in sub- and supercritical water are investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The present study reveals different local organization of water molecules at different parts of the solute. The π-hydrogen-bonding between benzene and water along the axial direction is found to exist even at supercritical conditions although to a reduced extent. The coordination number of benzene decreases substantially on increase of temperature and decrease of density. While the π-hydrogen-bonded part in the axial region shows a slight expansion, the hydrophobically solvated part in the equatorial plane shows an opposite behavior as the temperature is increased from normal to the supercritical temperature. Two other distribution functions, namely the radial/angular and spatial orientational functions (SOFs) are calculated to explore the spatially resolved angular preferences of water molecules around the benzene solute. Water molecules located axial to the benzene are found to have strong inward orientation toward the solute, however an opposite behavior is found in the equatorial region. Although at supercritical conditions, the orientational distributions of water molecules are broadened, the preferential orientations in the axial and equatorial regions remain similar to that under ambient condition on average.

  18. Water reorientation in the hydration shells of hydrophilic and hydrophobic solutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAAGE; Damien; STIRNEMANN; Guillaume; HYNES; James; T.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss some key aspects of our recent theoretical work on water reorientation dynamics,which is important in a wide range of phenomena,including aqueous phase chemical reactions,protein folding,and drug binding to proteins and DNA. It is shown that,contrary to the standard conception that these dynamics are diffusional,the reorientation of a water molecule occurs by sudden,large amplitude angular jumps. The mechanism involves the exchange of one hydrogen bond for another by the reorienting water,and the process can be fruitfully viewed as a chemical reaction. The results for reorientation times,which can be well described analytically,are discussed in the context of the molecular level interpretation of recent ultrafast infrared spectroscopic results,focusing on the concepts of structure making/breaking and solvent ’icebergs’.

  19. Hydrated goethite (alpha-FeOOH) (100) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, S.K.; Waychunas, G.A.; Trainor, T.P.; Eng, P.J.

    2009-12-15

    Goethite({alpha}-FeOOH), an abundant and highly reactive iron oxyhydroxide mineral, has been the subject of numerous stud-ies of environmental interface reactivity. However, such studies have been hampered by the lack of experimental constraints on aqueous interface structure, and especially of the surface water molecular arrangements. Structural information of this type is crucial because reactivity is dictated by the nature of the surface functional groups and the structure or distribution of water and electrolyte at the solid-solution interface. In this study we have investigated the goethite(100) surface using surface diffraction techniques, and have determined the relaxed surface structure, the surface functional groups, and the three dimensional nature of two distinct sorbed water layers. The crystal truncation rod (CTR) results show that the interface structure consists of a double hydroxyl, double water terminated interface with significant atom relaxations. Further, the double hydroxyl terminated surface dominates with an 89% contribution having a chiral subdomain structure on the(100) cleavage faces. The proposed interface stoichiometry is ((H{sub 2}O)-(H{sub 2}O)-OH{sub 2}-OH-Fe-O-O-Fe-R) with two types of terminal hydroxyls; a bidentate (B-type) hydroxo group and a monodentate (A-type) aquo group. Using the bond-valence approach the protonation states of the terminal hydroxyls are predicted to be OH type (bidentate hydroxyl with oxygen coupled to two Fe{sup 3+} ions) and OH{sub 2} type (monodentate hydroxyl with oxygen tied to only one Fe{sup 3+}). A double layer three dimensional ordered water structure at the interface was determined from refinement of fits to the experimental data. Application of bond-valence constraints to the terminal hydroxyls with appropriate rotation of the water dipole moments allowed a plausible dipole orientation model as predicted. The structural results are discussed in terms of protonation and H-bonding at the interface

  20. 甲烷水合物在纯水和抑制剂体系中的生成动力学%Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Formation in Pure Water and Inhibitor Containing Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裘俊红; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic data of methane hydrate formation in the presence of pure water, brines with single salt and mixed salts, and aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol(EG) and salt+EG were measured. A new kinetic model of hydrate formation for the methane-Fwater systems was developed based on a four-step formation mechanism and reaction kinetics approach. The proposed kinetic model predicts the kinetic behavior of methane hydrate formation in pure water with good accuracy. The feasibility of extending the kinetic model to salt(s) and EG containing systems was explored.

  1. Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalman Douglas S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sport drinks are ubiquitous within the recreational and competitive fitness and sporting world. Most are manufactured and artificially flavored carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages. Recently, attention has been given to coconut water, a natural alternative to manufactured sport drinks, with initial evidence indicating efficacy with regard to maintaining hydration. We compared coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men. Methods Following a 60-minute bout of dehydrating treadmill exercise, 12 exercise-trained men (26.6 ± 5.7 yrs received bottled water (BW, pure coconut water (VitaCoco®: CW, coconut water from concentrate (CWC, or a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink (SD [a fluid amount based on body mass loss during the dehydrating exercise] on four occasions (separated by at least 5 days in a random order, single blind (subject and not investigators, cross-over design. Hydration status (body mass, fluid retention, plasma osmolality, urine specific gravity and performance (treadmill time to exhaustion; assessed after rehydration were determined during the recovery period. Subjective measures of thirst, bloatedness, refreshed, stomach upset, and tiredness were also determined using a 5-point visual analog scale. Results Subjects lost approximately 1.7 kg (~2% of body mass during the dehydrating exercise and regained this amount in a relatively similar manner following consumption of all conditions. No differences were noted between coconut water (CW or CWC and SD for any measures of fluid retention (p > 0.05. Regarding exercise performance, no significant difference (p > 0.05 was noted between BW (11.9 ± 5.9 min, CW (12.3 ± 5.8 min, CWC (11.9 ± 6.0 min, and SD (12.8 ± 4.9 min. In general, subjects reported feeling more bloated and experienced greater stomach upset with the CW and CWC conditions. Conclusion All tested beverages are

  2. Mean-Field Approximation to the Hydrophobic Hydration in the Liquid-Vapor Interface of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kiharu; Sumi, Tomonari; Koga, Kenichiro

    2016-03-03

    A mean-field approximation to the solvation of nonpolar solutes in the liquid-vapor interface of aqueous solutions is proposed. It is first remarked with a numerical illustration that the solvation of a methane-like solute in bulk liquid water is accurately described by the mean-field theory of liquids, the main idea of which is that the probability (Pcav) of finding a cavity in the solvent that can accommodate the solute molecule and the attractive interaction energy (uatt) that the solute would feel if it is inserted in such a cavity are both functions of the solvent density alone. It is then assumed that the basic idea is still valid in the liquid-vapor interface, but Pcav and uatt are separately functions of different coarse-grained local densities, not functions of a common local density. Validity of the assumptions is confirmed for the solvation of the methane-like particle in the interface of model water at temperatures between 253 and 613 K. With the mean-field approximation extended to the inhomogeneous system the local solubility profiles across the interface at various temperatures are calculated from Pcav and uatt obtained at a single temperature. The predicted profiles are in excellent agreement with those obtained by the direct calculation of the excess chemical potential over an interfacial region where the solvent local density varies most rapidly.

  3. Distinct role of hydration water in protein misfolding and aggregation revealed by fluctuating thermodynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2015-04-21

    Protein aggregation in aqueous cellular environments is linked to diverse human diseases. Protein aggregation proceeds through a multistep process initiated by conformational transitions, called protein misfolding, of monomer species toward aggregation-prone structures. Various forms of aggregate species are generated through the association of misfolded monomers including soluble oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms and driving forces involved in the misfolding and subsequent association has been a central issue for understanding and preventing protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and type II diabetes. In this Account, we provide a thermodynamic perspective of the misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease through the application of fluctuating thermodynamics. This approach "dissects" the conventional thermodynamic characterization of the end states into the one of the fluctuating processes connecting them, and enables one to analyze variations in the thermodynamic functions that occur during the course of protein conformational changes. The central quantity in this approach is the solvent-averaged effective energy, f = Eu + Gsolv, comprising the protein potential energy (Eu) and the solvation free energy (Gsolv), whose time variation reflects the protein dynamics on the free energy landscape. Protein configurational entropy is quantified by the magnitude of fluctuations in f. We find that misfolding of the Aβ monomer when released from a membrane environment to an aqueous phase is driven by favorable changes in protein potential energy and configurational entropy, but it is also accompanied by an unfavorable increase in solvation free energy. The subsequent dimerization of the misfolded Aβ monomers occurs in two steps. The first step, where two widely separated monomers come into contact distance, is driven by water-mediated attraction, that is, by a

  4. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  5. Free Radical Chemistry of Disinfection Byproducts 1: Kinetics of Hydrated Electron and Hydroxyl Radical Reactions with Halonitromethanes in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. J. Mincher; R. V. Fox; S. P. Mezyk; T. Helgeson; S. K. Cole; W. J. Cooper; P. R. Gardinali

    2006-01-01

    Halonitromethanes are disinfection-byproducts formed during ozonation and chlorine/chloramine treatment of waters that contain bromide ion and natural organic matter. In this study, the chemical kinetics of the free-radical-induced degradations of a series of halonitromethanes were determined. Absolute rate constants for hydroxyl radical, OH, and hydrated electron, eaq-, reaction with both chlorinated and brominated halonitromethanes were measured using the techniques of electron pulse radiolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy. The bimolecular rate constants obtained, k (M-1 s-1), for eaq-/OH, respectively, were the following: chloronitromethane (3.01 ± 0.40) × 1010/(1.94 ± 0.32) × 108; dichloronitromethane (3.21 ± 0.17) × 1010/(5.12 ± 0.77) × 108; bromonitromethane (3.13 ± 0.06) × 1010/(8.36 ± 0.57) × 107; dibromonitromethane (3.07 ± 0.40) × 1010/(4.75 ± 0.98) × 108; tribromonitromethane (2.29 ± 0.39) × 1010/(3.25 ± 0.67) × 108; bromochloronitromethane (2.93 ± 0.47) × 1010/(4.2 ± 1.1) × 108; bromodichloronitromethane (2.68 ± 0.13) × 1010/(1.02 ± 0.15) × 108; and dibromochloronitromethane (2.95 ± 0.43) × 1010 / (1.80 ± 0.31) × 108 at room temperature and pH ~7. Comparison data were also obtained for hydroxyl radical reaction with bromoform (1.50 ± 0.05) × 108, bromodichloromethane (7.11 ± 0.26) × 107, and chlorodibromomethane (8.31 ± 0.25) × 107 M-1 s-1, respectively. These rate constants are compared to recently obtained data for trichloronitromethane and bromonitromethane, as well as to other established literature data for analogous compounds.

  6. Hydration of portland cement, natural zeolite mortar in water and sulphate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janotka, I.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to characterise sulphate resistance of mortars made from ordinary Portland cement ( PC and Portland-pozzolan cement with 35 wt.% of zeolite addition (zeolite-blended cement-ZBC . Mortars with two different cement types were tested in water and 5% sodium sulphate solution for 720 days. A favourable effect of zeolite on increased sulphate resistance of the cement is caused by decrease in free Ca(OH2 content of the mortar There is not sufficient of Ca(OH2 available for reacting with the sulphate solution to form voluminous reaction products. A decreased C3A, content due to 35 wt.% replacement of PC by zeolite is the next pronounced factor improving resistance of the mortar with such blended cement.

    El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido estudiar la resistencia a los sulfatos de morteros preparados con cemento portland ordinario (PC y cemento portland puzolánico, con un 35% en peso de zeolita (zeolite-blended cement (ZBC. Ambos tipos de morteros fueron conservados en agua y en una disolución de sulfato sódico al 5% durante 720 días. Se observó una mayor resistencia a los sulfatos en el mortero preparado con el cemento que contenía zeolita debido a su menor contenido en Ca(OH2. No hay cantidad suficiente de Ca(OH2 para que se produzca la reacción de los constituyentes de la pasta con la disolución de sulfato sódico y formar así productos de naturaleza expansiva. La disminución en el contenido de C,3A, debida a la sustitución de un 35% en peso de PC por zeolita, es el factor más determinante en el aumento de la resistencia del mortero en los cementos con adición.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  8. Hydrate prevention during formation test of gas in deep water; Prevencao de formacao de hidratos durante teste de formacao de poco de gas em lamina d'agua profunda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Renato Cunha [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work shows a scenery of formation test in deep water, for a well of gas, for which, there were made simulations with objective of identifying possible pairs of points (Pressure x Temperature), favorable to the hydrates formation. Besides, they were made comparisons of the values obtained in the simulation with the values registered during the formation test for the well Alfa of the field Beta. Of ownership of those information, we made an evaluation of the real needs of injection of inhibitors with intention of preventing the hydrates formation in each phase of the test. In an including way, the work has as objective recommends the volumes of hydrates inhibitors to be injected in each phase of a test of formation of well of gas in deep water, in way to assure that the operations are made without there is risk of hydrates formation. (author)

  9. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  10. Magnetically Separable and Recyclable Fe3O4-Supported Ag Nanocatalysts for Reduction of Nitro Compounds and Selective Hydration of Nitriles to Amides in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunje Woo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As hybrid nanostructures have become more important in many fields of chemistry, Ag nanoparticles (NPs are being increasingly immobilized onto Fe3O4 microspheres in situ. Structural characterization reveals that the Ag NPs are uniformly immobilized in the Fe3O4 microsphere-based supports. Moreover, Ag NPs are more stable in the hybrid structure than in the naked state and show high catalytic activity for the reduction of nitro compounds and hydration of nitriles to amides in water. The Fe3O4 microspheres were recycled several times using an external magnet.

  11. Surfactant process for promoting gas hydrate formation and application of the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Rudy E.; Zhong, Yu

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of storing gas using gas hydrates comprising forming gas hydrates in the presence of a water-surfactant solution that comprises water and surfactant. The addition of minor amounts of surfactant increases the gas hydrate formation rate, increases packing density of the solid hydrate mass and simplifies the formation-storage-decomposition process of gas hydrates. The minor amounts of surfactant also enhance the potential of gas hydrates for industrial storage applications.

  12. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  13. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  14. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  15. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. INFLUENCE OF THE COMPOSITION OF PHOSPHATE ROCK ON THE AMOUNT OF WATER-INSOLUBLE PHOSPHATE IMPURITIES IN SEMI-HYDRATE PHOSPHOGYPSUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Kybartiene

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work a chemical and mineral composition of phosphate rock and phosphogypsum was investigated in order to identify which impurities of phosphate rock prevent natural phosphates from decomposing in full during the production of phosphoric acid and increase the amount of water-insoluble phosphate impurities in phosphogypsum. The analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRF, X-ray fluorescence (XRD, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-Ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS and granulometry was carried out. The results showed that phosphate rocks (Kovdor and Kirovsk apatites and the semi-hydrate phosphogypsums differ by their chemical composition. The apatites and phosphogypsums differ in the amount of the major components, as well as other components (MgO, Al2O3, SrO, BaO, ZrO2, Ln2O3. In phosphate rock, Ln2O3 can be found in the composition of the mineral monazite. The SEM-EDS analysis revealed that the minerals of the apatite group and monazite form aggregate crystals. Monazite dissolves in sulphuric and phosphoric acids very marginal, therefore it prevents the apatites from full decomposition, thus influencing the quantity of insoluble phosphates in semi-hydrate phosphogypsum. The higher is the amount of minerals containing Ln2O3 in phosphate rock, the more water-insoluble phosphates remain in phosphogypsum. It was found that influence of Ln2O3 impurity is significant higher than influence of particles size of apatite.

  17. Prediction of Refrigerant Gas Hydrates Formation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deqing Liang; Ruzhu Wang; Kaihua Guo; Shuanshi Fan

    2001-01-01

    A fugacity model was developed for prediction of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates formation conditions based on the molecule congregation and solution theories. In this model, g as hydrates were regarded as non-ideal solid solution composed of water groups and guest molecules, and the expressions of fugacity of guest molecules in hydrate phase was proposed accordingly. It has been shown that the developed model can indicate successfully the effect of guest-guest molecule interaction. The results showed that the model can describe better the characteristics of phase equilibrium of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates and predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  19. Study of clathrate hydrates via equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation employing polarisable and non-polarisable, rigid and flexible water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Christian J.; English, Niall J.

    2016-04-01

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to liquid water and ice Ih. The non-polarisable TIP4P-2005, simple point charge model (SPC), and polarisable Thole-type models (TTM): TTM2, TTM3, and TTM4 water models were used in order to survey the differences between models and to see what differences can be expected when polarisability is incorporated. Rigid and flexible variants were used of each model to gauge the effects of flexibility. Power spectra are calculated and compared to density-of-states spectra inferred from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements. Thermodynamic properties were also calculated, as well as molecular-dipole distributions. It was concluded that TTM models offer optimal fidelity vis-à-vis INS spectra, together with thermodynamic properties, with the flexible TTM2 model offering optimal placement of vibrational modes.

  20. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  1. Characteristics of hydration water around hen egg lysozyme as the protein model in aqueous solution. FTIR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuszko, Aneta; Wojciechowski, Marek; Bruździak, Piotr; Rakowska, Paulina W; Stangret, Janusz

    2012-12-05

    In this paper, the hydration of a model protein--hen egg white lysozyme in aqueous solution has been presented. The leading method used was FTIR spectroscopy with an application of a technique of semi-heavy water (HDO) isotope dilution. Analysis of spectra of HDO isotopically diluted in water solution of lysozyme allowed us to isolate HDO spectra affected by lysozyme, and thus to characterise the energetic state of water molecules and their arrangement around protein molecules. The number of water molecules and the shape of the affected HDO spectrum were obtained using a classical and a chemometric method. This shape showed that the HDO spectrum affected by lysozyme may be presented as a superposition of two spectra corresponding to HDO affected by N-methylacetamide and the carboxylate anion (of the formic acid). Moreover, based on the difference in intermolecular distances distribution of water molecules (obtained from spectral data), we demonstrated that the lysozyme molecule causes a decrease in population of weak hydrogen bonds, and concurrently increases the probability of an occurrence of short hydrogen bonds in water affected by lysozyme. This conclusion was also confirmed by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation.

  2. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. Hydrated electron, supplemental data. [Reactions with transients from water, with inorganic solutes, and with solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, A.B.

    1975-06-01

    A compilation of rates of reactions of hydrated electrons with other transients and with organic and inorganic solutes in aqueous solution appeared in NSRDS-NBS 43, and covered the literature up to early 1971. This supplement includes additional rates which have been published through July 1973.

  3. Investigation of water mobility and diffusivity in hydrating micronized low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, and hydroxypropyl cellulose matrix tablets by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Masazumi; Nakagami, Hiroaki [Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co., Tokyo (Japan). Pharmaceutical Technology Research Lab.

    2002-12-01

    The water mobility and diffusivity in the gel-layer of hydrating low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (LH41) tablets with or without a drug were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compared with those properties in the gel-layer of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) tablets. For this purpose, a localized image-analysis method was newly developed, and the spin-spin relaxation time (T{sub 2}) and apparent self-diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water in the gel-layer were visualized in one-dimensional maps. Those maps showed that the extent of gel-layer growth in the tablets was in the order of HPC>HPMC>>LH41, and there was a water mobility gradient across the gel-layers of all three tablet formulations. The T{sub 2} and ADC in the outer parts of the gel-layers were close to those of free water. In contrast, these values in the inner parts of the gel-layer decreased progressively; suggesting that the water mobility and diffusivity around the core interface were highly restricted. Furthermore, the correlation between the T{sub 2} of {sup 1}H proton in the gel-layer of the tablets and the drug release rate from the tablets was observed. (author)

  4. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  5. Salinity-buffered methane hydrate formation and dissociation in gas-rich systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Kehua; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Polito, Peter; Bryant, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    Methane hydrate formation and dissociation are buffered by salinity in a closed system. During hydrate formation, salt excluded from hydrate increases salinity, drives the system to three-phase (gas, water, and hydrate phases) equilibrium, and limits further hydrate formation and dissociation. We developed a zero-dimensional local thermodynamic equilibrium-based model to explain this concept. We demonstrated this concept by forming and melting methane hydrate from a partially brine-saturated sand sample in a controlled laboratory experiment by holding pressure constant (6.94 MPa) and changing temperature stepwise. The modeled methane gas consumptions and hydrate saturations agreed well with the experimental measurements after hydrate nucleation. Hydrate dissociation occurred synchronously with temperature increase. The exception to this behavior is that substantial subcooling (6.4°C in this study) was observed for hydrate nucleation. X-ray computed tomography scanning images showed that core-scale hydrate distribution was heterogeneous. This implied core-scale water and salt transport induced by hydrate formation. Bulk resistivity increased sharply with initial hydrate formation and then decreased as the hydrate ripened. This study reproduced the salinity-buffered hydrate behavior interpreted for natural gas-rich hydrate systems by allowing methane gas to freely enter/leave the sample in response to volume changes associated with hydrate formation and dissociation. It provides insights into observations made at the core scale and log scale of salinity elevation to three-phase equilibrium in natural hydrate systems.

  6. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  7. Chloral Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a half glass of water, fruit juice, or ginger ale and you should drink it immediately.Swallow ... all appointments with your doctor.If you have diabetes, use TesTape or Clinistix to test your urine ...

  8. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  9. Physical activity, hydration and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory diseases and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  10. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  11. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  12. Water mediated ligand functional group cooperativity: the contribution of a methyl group to binding affinity is enhanced by a COO(-) group through changes in the structure and thermodynamics of the hydration waters of ligand-thermolysin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasief, Nader N; Tan, Hongwei; Kong, Jing; Hangauer, David

    2012-10-11

    Ligand functional groups can modulate the contributions of one another to the ligand-protein binding thermodynamics, producing either positive or negative cooperativity. Data presented for four thermolysin phosphonamidate inhibitors demonstrate that the differential binding free energy and enthalpy caused by replacement of a H with a Me group, which binds in the well-hydrated S2' pocket, are more favorable in presence of a ligand carboxylate. The differential entropy is however less favorable. Dissection of these differential thermodynamic parameters, X-ray crystallography, and density-functional theory calculations suggest that these cooperativities are caused by variations in the thermodynamics of the complex hydration shell changes accompanying the H→Me replacement. Specifically, the COO(-) reduces both the enthalpic penalty and the entropic advantage of displacing water molecules from the S2' pocket and causes a subsequent acquisition of a more enthalpically, less entropically, favorable water network. This study contributes to understanding the important role water plays in ligand-protein binding.

  13. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  14. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  15. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  16. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  17. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  18. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  19. Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau of Economic Geology

    2009-04-30

    The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability

  20. China's Research on Non-conventional Energy Resources- Gas Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Ming; Ma Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    @@ Methane exists in ice-like formations called gas hydrate. Hydrate traps methane molecules inside a cage of frozen water. The magnitude of this previously unknown global storehouse of methane is truly staggering and has raised serious inquiry into the possibility of using methane hydrate as a substitute source of energy for oil and conventional natural gas. According to the estimation by PGC, gas hydrate deposits amount to 7.6 × 1018m3 and contain more than twice as much organic carbon as all the world's coal, oil and non-hydrate natural gas combined.

  1. Kinetic of formation for single carbon dioxide and mixed carbon dioxide and tetrahydrofuran hydrates in water and sodium chloride aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabil, K.M.; Duarte, A.R.C.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Ahmad, M.M.; Yusup, S.; Omar, A.A.; Peters, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory-scale reactor system is built and operated to measure the kinetic of formation for single and mixed carbon dioxide-tetrahydrofuran hydrates. The T-cycle method, which is used to collect the kinetic data, is briefly discussed. For single carbon dioxide hydrate, the induction time decreas

  2. Proton percolation on hydrated lysozyme powders

    OpenAIRE

    Careri, G; Giansanti, A; Rupley, John A.

    1986-01-01

    The framework of percolation theory is used to analyze the hydration dependence of the capacitance measured for protein samples of pH 3-10, at frequencies from 10 kHz to 4 MHz. For all samples there is a critical value of the hydration at which the capacitance sharply increases with increase in hydration level. The threshold hc = 0.15 g of water per g of protein is independent of pH below pH 9 and shows no solvent deuterium isotope effect. The fractional coverage of the surface at hc is in cl...

  3. Terahertz sensing of corneal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul S; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bourges, Jean Louis; Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Bennett, David B; Taylor, Zachary D; Lee, H; Brown, Elliott R; Grundfest, Warren S; Culjat, Martin O

    2010-01-01

    An indicator of ocular health is the hydrodyanmics of the cornea. Many corneal disorders deteriorate sight as they upset the normal hydrodynamics of the cornea. The mechanisms include the loss of endothelial pump function of corneal dystophies, swelling and immune response of corneal graft rejection, and inflammation and edema, which accompany trauma, burn, and irritation events. Due to high sensitivity to changes of water content in materials, a reflective terahertz (300 GHz and 3 THz) imaging system could be an ideal tool to measure the hydration level of the cornea. This paper presents the application of THz technology to visualize the hydration content across ex vivo porcine corneas. The corneas, with a thickness variation from 470 - 940 µm, were successfully imaged using a reflective pulsed THz imaging system, with a maximum SNR of 50 dB. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on the use of THz in measuring hydration in corneal tissues or other ocular tissues. These preliminary findings indicate that THz can be used to accurately sense hydration levels in the cornea using a pulsed, reflective THz imaging system.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON GAS HYDRATE FORMATION IN PRESENCE OF ADDITIVE COMPONENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhigao; FAN Shuanshi; GUO Kaihua

    2003-01-01

    Additives were used to increase gas hydrate formation rate and storage capacity. Experimental tests of methane hydrate formation were carried out in surfactant water solutions in a high-pressure cell.Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG) were used to increase hydrate formation. The effect of SDS on hydrate formation is more pronounced compared APG. Cyclopentane (CP) also improves hydrate formation rates while it cannot increase methane gas storage capacity.

  5. Dielectric dispersion and protonic conduction in hydrated purple membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, I; Váró, G

    1988-01-01

    Dielectric dispersion effects were studied in purple membranes of different hydration levels. The capacitance and conductivity were measured over the frequency range of 10(2) Hz to 10(5) Hz. With increase in the hydration level, the conductivity increases sharply above the critical hydration of hc = 0.06 g H2O/g protein. This critical hydration is close to the extent of the first continuous strongly bound water layer and is interpreted as the threshold for percolative proton transfer. The capacitance increases continuously with increasing hydration and a larger increase above the water content of 0.1 g H2O/g protein can be seen only at low frequencies. Maxwell-Wagner relaxation also appears above this hydration, showing the presence of a bulk water phase.

  6. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  7. Some theoretical considerations concerning ion hydration in the case of ion transfer between water and 1,2-dichloroethane

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, C; Baruzzi, A M; Leiva, E P M

    1997-01-01

    Some aspects of direct ion transfer across the water/1,2-dichloroethane are analyzed using a very simple model based on thermodynamic considerations. It was concluded that ion solvation by water molecules may occur in some particular cases in the organic phase, delivering an important contribution to the Gibbs free energy of ion transfer between the aqueous and the organic phase. In general terms, this particular type of transfer should be favored in the case of highly charged small ions at interfaces with a relatively low surface tension and a large difference between the reciprocal of the corresponding dielectric constants.

  8. Gas hydrate dissociation structures in submarine slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidley, I.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Studies have suggested that gas hydrates may play a role in submarine slope failures. However, the mechanics surrounding such failures are poorly understood. This paper discussed experimental tests conducted on a small-scale physical model of submarine soils with hydrate inclusions. The laboratory tests investigated the effects of slope angle and depth of burial of the hydrate on gas escape structures and slope stability. Laponite was used to model the soils due to its ability to swell and produce a clear, colorless thixotropic gel when dispersed in water. An R-11 refrigerant was used to form hydrate layers and nodules. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the path of the fluid escape structures and the development of a subsequent slip plane caused by the dissociation of the R-11 hydrates. Slope angles of 5, 10, and 15 degrees were examined. Slopes were examined using high-resolution, high-speed imaging techniques. Hydrate placement and slope inclinations were varied in order to obtain stability data. Results of the study showed that slope angle influenced the direction of travel of the escaping gas, and that the depth of burial affected sensitivity to slope angle. Theoretical models developed from the experimental data have accurately mapped deformations and stress states during testing. Further research is being conducted to investigate the influence of the size, shape, and placement of the hydrates. 30 refs., 15 figs.

  9. The effect of water structure and solute hydration on the kinetics of mineral growth and dissolution (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.

    2012-04-01

    Classical crystal growth theory relates growth and dissolution rates to the degree of supersaturation. However, the solution composition may also affect the growth rate of carbonate minerals, via the Ca2+ to CO32- concentration ratio (e.g. Perdikouri et al., 2009; Stack and Grantham, 2010), ionic strength (e.g. Ruiz-Agudo et al. 2010) or the presence of organic matter (Hoch et al., 2000). For this reason, the influence of these parameters on the kinetics of mineral growth and dissolution has generated a considerable amount of research in the last decade. In particular, effects of both inorganic and organic impurities on mineral growth and dissolution have been frequently reported in the literature. Commonly, water in contact with rock forming minerals, contains significant and variable amounts of ions in solution. The effect of such ions on dissolution and growth rates has been traditionally ascribed to changes in solubility. However, experimental studies performed on different minerals have shown that the dependence of growth or dissolution rates on ionic strength is complex, and that the effect of ionic strength is not independent of the ionic species producing it. Here, we report investigations aimed at addressing the basic hypothesis that mineral growth and dissolution is governed by complex interactions between solvent structure, surface hydration and the ion solvation environment induced by the presence of electrolytes. It is proposed that any factor affecting ion solvation should alter growth and dissolution rates. These results have opened the possibility of a new understanding of very diverse phenomena in geochemistry and demonstrate the need for the inclusion of this "hydration effect" in the development of predictive models that describe crystal growth and dissolution in complex systems, such as those found in nature. Furthermore, we can hypothesise that ion-assisted dehydration of trace and minor element ions could occur in biological systems, thus

  10. Aquaporins are critical for provision of water during lactation and intrauterine progeny hydration to maintain tsetse fly reproductive success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua B Benoit

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies undergo drastic fluctuations in their water content throughout their adult life history due to events such as blood feeding, dehydration and lactation, an essential feature of the viviparous reproductive biology of tsetse. Aquaporins (AQPs are transmembrane proteins that allow water and other solutes to permeate through cellular membranes. Here we identify tsetse aquaporin (AQP genes, examine their expression patterns under different physiological conditions (blood feeding, lactation and stress response and perform functional analysis of three specific genes utilizing RNA interference (RNAi gene silencing. Ten putative aquaporins were identified in the Glossina morsitans morsitans (Gmm genome, two more than has been previously documented in any other insect. All organs, tissues, and body parts examined had distinct AQP expression patterns. Two AQP genes, gmmdripa and gmmdripb ( = gmmaqp1a and gmmaqp1b are highly expressed in the milk gland/fat body tissues. The whole-body transcript levels of these two genes vary over the course of pregnancy. A set of three AQPs (gmmaqp5, gmmaqp2a, and gmmaqp4b are expressed highly in the Malpighian tubules. Knockdown of gmmdripa and gmmdripb reduced the efficiency of water loss following a blood meal, increased dehydration tolerance and reduced heat tolerance of adult females. Knockdown of gmmdripa extended pregnancy length, and gmmdripb knockdown resulted in extended pregnancy duration and reduced progeny production. We found that knockdown of AQPs increased tsetse milk osmolality and reduced the water content in developing larva. Combined knockdown of gmmdripa, gmmdripb and gmmaqp5 extended pregnancy by 4-6 d, reduced pupal production by nearly 50%, increased milk osmolality by 20-25% and led to dehydration of feeding larvae. Based on these results, we conclude that gmmDripA and gmmDripB are critical for diuresis, stress tolerance and intrauterine lactation through the regulation of water and

  11. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: A new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.J.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Yang, M.Z.

    2006-01-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition. ?? 2006 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  12. Hydrate control for WAG injection in the Ekofisk field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lekvam, Knut; Surguchev, Leonid M.; Ekrann, Steinar; Svartaas, Thor Martin; Kelland, Malcolm; Nilsson, Svante; Oevsthus, Jorun; Gjoevikli, Nils B.

    1997-12-31

    The report relates to a hydrate formation project for the Ekofisk field on the Norwegian continental shelf. To remove the possible hydrate formation problems during WAG (Water Alternating Gas) treatment, the following project was conducted to estimate roughly the distance from the injection well that hydrate formation can be prevented by whatever treatment is most appropriate. The first aim was to test experimentally whether selected kinetic hydrate inhibitors could be used, and in which concentrations and quantities. In addition evaluations were done to calculate the required volume of the inhibitor solutions that have to be injected to prevent mixing of uninhibited water and gas. 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Hydration properties of lanthanoid(III) carbonate complexes in liquid water determined by polarizable molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Fausto; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Vercouter, Thomas; Beuchat, César; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Spezia, Riccardo

    2014-02-28

    In this work we have studied the structure and dynamics of complexes formed by three and four carbonates and a central lanthanoid(III) ion in liquid water by means of polarizable molecular dynamics simulations. With this aim we have developed a force field employing an extrapolation procedure that was previously developed for lanthanoid(III) aqua ions and then we have validated it against DFT-based data. In this way we were able to shed light on properties of the whole series, finding some similarities and differences across the series, and to help in interpreting experiments on those systems. We found that the bi-dentate tri-carbonate complexes are the most stable for all the atoms, but a variation of the number of water molecules in the first ion shell, and the associated exchange dynamics, is observed from lighter to heavier elements. On the other hand, for four-carbonate systems only one water molecule is observed in the first shell, with 10-20% probability, for La(III) and Ce(III), while for the rest of the series it seems impossible for a water molecule to enter the first ion shell in the presence of such an excess of carbonate ligands. Finally, the good performance of our extrapolation procedure, based on ionic radii, makes us confident in extending such approaches to study the structure and dynamics of other systems in solution containing Ln(III) and An(III) ions. This parametrization method results particularly useful since it does not need expensive quantum chemistry calculations for all the atoms in the series.

  14. Origin and character of gaseous hydrocarbons in the hydrate and non-hydrate charged sediments on the Norway - Svalbard margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaular, Espen Nesheim

    2011-05-15

    Gas incubated in clathrate water-structures, stabilizes the hydrogen bonded substance termed gas hydrate. In the marine environment vast amount of carbon is stored as gas hydrates within the temperature and pressure zone these ice-like structures are stable. Natural gas hydrate mapping and characterization is important basic research that brings about critical knowledge concerning various topics. Natural gas hydrates is a vital part of the carbon cycle, it is a potential energy resource (and thereby a potential climate agent) and it is a potential geo-hazard. One of the goals the GANS initiative aimed at exploring, was the hydrate bearing sediment of the Norway -Svalbard margins, to investigate the character and expansion of natural gas hydrates. Part of the investigation was to define how the gas in the hydrated sediment was produced and where it came from. As a result this thesis addresses the matter of light hydrocarbon characterization and origin in two Norwegian hydrate deposits. On cruises to Vestnesa on the Svalbard margin and to Nyegga in the mid-Norwegian margin, samples of hydrate charged and non-hydrate charged sediments were obtained and analyzed. Through compositional and isotopic analyses the origin of the hydrate bound gas in the fluid escape feature G11 at Nyegga was determined. The hydrate incubated methane is microbial produced as well as parts of the hydrate bound ethane. The compositional analysis in both the Nyegga area and at the Vestnesa Ridge points at thermogenic contributions in the sediment interstitials and pore water. The two hydrate bearing margins show large differences in hydrocarbon content and microbial activity in the pockmarks investigated. The gravity cores from the penetrated pockmark at Vestnesa showed low hydrocarbon content and thus suggest ceased or periodic venting. The fluid flow escape features at Nyegga show large variety of flux rates based on ROV monitoring and headspace analysis of the sediment and pore water. The

  15. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.; ,

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring “ice-like” combination of natural gas and water that has the potential to serve as an immense resource of natural gas from the world’s oceans and polar regions. However, gas-hydrate recovery is both a scientific and a technical challenge and much remains to be learned about the geologic, engineering, and economic factors controlling the ultimate energy resource potential of gas hydrate. The amount of natural gas contained in the world’s gas-hydrate accumulations is enormous, but these estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 2,800 to 8,000,000 trillion cubic meters of gas. By comparison, conventional natural gas accumulations (reserves and undiscovered, technically recoverable resources) for the world are estimated at approximately 440 trillion cubic meters. Gas recovery from gas hydrate is hindered because the gas is in a solid form and because gas hydrate commonly occurs in remote Arctic and deep marine environments. Proposed methods of gas recovery from gas hydrate generally deal with disassociating or “melting” in situ gas hydrate by heating the reservoir beyond the temperature of gas-hydrate formation, or decreasing the reservoir pressure below hydrate equilibrium. The pace of energy-related gas hydrate assessment projects has accelerated over the past several years.

  16. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  17. Authigenic gypsum found in gas hydrate-associated sediments from Hydrate Ridge, the eastern North Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Jiasheng; Erwin; Suess; Dirk; Rickert

    2004-01-01

    Characteristic gypsum micro-sphere and granular mass were discovered by binocular microscope in the gas hydrate-associated sediments at cores SO143-221 and SO143/TVG40-2A respectively on Hydrate Ridge of Cascadia margin, the eastern North Pacific. XRD patterns and EPA analyses show both micro-sphere and granular mass of the crystals have the typical peaks and the typical main chemical compositions of gypsum, although their weight percents are slightly less than the others in the non-gas hydrate-associated marine regions. SEM pictures show that the gypsum crystals have clear crystal boundaries, planes, edges and cleavages of gypsum in form either of single crystal or of twin crystals. In view of the fact that there are meanwhile gas hydrate-associated authigenic carbonates and SO42(-rich pore water in the same sediment cores, it could be inferred reasonably that the gypsums formed also authigenically in the gas hydrate-associated environment too, most probably at the interface between the downward advecting sulfate-rich seawater and the below gas hydrate, which spilled calcium during its formation on Hydrate Ridge. The two distinct forms of crystal intergrowth, which are the granular mass of series single gypsum crystals at core SO143/TVG40-2A and the microsphere of gypsum crystals accompanied with detrital components at core SO143-221 respectively, indicate that they precipitated most likely in different interstitial water dynamic environments. So, the distinct authigenic gypsums found in gas hydrate-associated sediments on Hydrate Ridge could also be believed as one of the parameters which could be used to indicate the presence of gas hydrate in an unknown marine sediment cores.

  18. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  19. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  20. Octa-coordination and the hydrated Ba2+(aq) ion

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I; Rempe, Susan B

    2014-01-01

    The hydration structure of Ba^{2+} ion is important for understanding blocking mechanisms in potassium ion channels. Here, we combine statistical mechanical theory, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, and electronic structure methods to calculate the hydration free energy and local hydration structure of Ba^{2+}(aq). The predicted hydration free energy (-302.9$\\pm$0.7 kcal/mol) matches the experimental value (-302.56 kcal/mol) when the fully occupied and exclusive inner solvation shell is treated. In the local environment defined by the inner and first shell of hydrating waters, Ba^{2+} is directly coordinated by eight (8) waters. Octa-coordination resembles the structure of Ba^{2+} and K^+ bound in potassium ion channels, but differs from the local hydration structure of K^+(aq) determined earlier.

  1. Methane Production and Carbon Capture by Hydrate Swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Liang; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    gas molecules in the structural lattice. In this work, we quantitatively investigate the swapping behavior from injection of pure carbon dioxide and the (CO2 + N2) binary gas mixture through artificial hydrate-bearing sandstone samples by use of a core-flooding experimental apparatus. A total of 13...... of pure carbon dioxide in swapping methane from its hydrate phase; the methane recovery efficiency in brine water systems is enhanced relative to pure water systems. The replenishment of a fresh (CO2 + N2) gas mixture into the vapor phase can be considered as an efficient extraction method because 46...... in small hydrate cages, as long as the equilibrium formation pressure of (CO2 + N2) binary gas hydrate is below that of methane hydrate, even though adding nitrogen to carbon dioxide reduces the thermodynamic driving force for the formation of a new hydrate. When other conditions are similar, the methane...

  2. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  3. Modeling DNA hydration: comparison of calculated and experimental hydration properties of nuclic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltev, V I; Malenkov, G G; Gonzalez, E J; Teplukhin, A V; Rein, R; Shibata, M; Miller, J H

    1996-02-01

    Hydration properties of individual nucleic acid bases were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. Three sets of classical potential functions (PF) used in simulations of nucleic acid hydration were juxtaposed: (i) the PF developed by Poltev and Malenkov (PM), (ii) the PF of Weiner and Kollman (WK), which together with Jorgensen's TIP3P water model are widely used in the AMBER program, and (iii) OPLS (optimized potentials for liquid simulations) developed by Jorgensen (J). The global minima of interaction energy of single water molecules with all the natural nucleic acid bases correspond to the formation of two water-base hydrogen bonds (water bridging of two hydrophilic atoms of the base). The energy values of these minima calculated via PM potentials are in somewhat better conformity with mass-spectrometric data than the values calculated via WK PF. OPLS gave much weaker water-base interactions for all compounds considered, thus these PF were not used in further computations. Monte Carlo simulations of the hydration of 9-methyladenine, 1-methyluracil and 1-methylthymine were performed in systems with 400 water molecules and periodic boundary conditions. Results of simulations with PM potentials give better agreement with experimental data on hydration energies than WK PF. Computations with PM PF of the hydration energy of keto and enol tautomers of 9-methylguanine can account for the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium of guanine in aqueous media to a dominance of the keto form in spite of nearly equal intrinsic stability of keto and enol tautomers. The results of guanine hydration computations are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base mispairing errors in nucleic acid biosynthesis. The data presented in this paper along with previous results on simulation of hydration shell structures in DNA duplex grooves provide ample evidence for the advantages of PM PF in studies of nucleic-acid hydration.

  4. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  5. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures: The σ of CH4 Hydrate + Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stern, Laura A. [U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Constable, Steven [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Weitemeyer, Karen A. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom), Univ. of Southampton Waterfront Campus, Southampton (United Kingdom); Smith, Megan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, Jeffery J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. We built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. We report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. Finally, these results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  6. Nuclear Well Log Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchwell, A.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing gas hydrate in a reservoir typically involves a full suite of geophysical well logs. The most common method involves using resistivity measurements to quantify the decrease in electrically conductive water when replaced with gas hydrate. Compressional velocity measurements are also used because the gas hydrate significantly strengthens the moduli of the sediment. At many gas hydrate sites, nuclear well logs, which include the photoelectric effect, formation sigma, carbon/oxygen ratio and neutron porosity, are also collected but often not used. In fact, the nuclear response of a gas hydrate reservoir is not known. In this research we will focus on the nuclear log response in gas hydrate reservoirs at the Mallik Field at the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nuclear logs may add increased robustness to the investigation into the properties of gas hydrates and some types of logs may offer an opportunity to distinguish between gas hydrate and permafrost. For example, a true formation sigma log measures the thermal neutron capture cross section of a formation and pore constituents; it is especially sensitive to hydrogen and chlorine in the pore space. Chlorine has a high absorption potential, and is used to determine the amount of saline water within pore spaces. Gas hydrate offers a difference in elemental composition compared to water-saturated intervals. Thus, in permafrost areas, the carbon/oxygen ratio may vary between gas hydrate and permafrost, due to the increase of carbon in gas hydrate accumulations. At the Mallik site, we observe a hydrate-bearing sand (1085-1107 m) above a water-bearing sand (1107-1140 m), which was confirmed through core samples and mud gas analysis. We observe a decrease in the photoelectric absorption of ~0.5 barnes/e-, as well as an increase in the formation sigma readings of ~5 capture units in the water-bearing sand as

  7. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...

  8. Kinetics of phycocyanobilin cleavage from C-phycocyanin by methanolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malwade, Chandrakant Ramkrishna; Roda Serrat, Maria Cinta; Christensen, Knud Villy

    2016-01-01

    Phycocyanobilin (PCB) is an important linear tetrapyrrolic molecule for food as well as pharmaceutical industry. It is obtained from blue-green algae, where it is attached covalently to phycobiliproteins (C-PC and APC) present in the light harvesting complexes. In this work, cleavage of PCB from...

  9. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Soumpasis, D.M. [Max Planck Inst. for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  10. A STUDY OF THE HEAT OF HYDRATION OF SULFONIC ACID RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XURongnan; JIJunyan; 等

    1992-01-01

    The heat of hydration of dry sulfonic acid resin in different comcentrations of sulfuric acid has been determined. The heat of hydration of the resin in H2O is 143.4J/g(resin). The greater the concentration of sulfuric acid,the less the heat will be released.The hydrate formed from three sulfonic acid groups and one water molecule is the most stable one of all the hydrates of sulfonic acid resin and water.

  11. Ethylene Separation via Hydrate Formation in W/O Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An hybrid absorption-hydration method was adopted to recover C2H4 from C2H4/CH4 binary gas mixtures and the hydrate formation conditions of C2H4/CH4 mixtures was studied experimentally in diesel in water (w/o emulsions. Span 20 at a concentration of 1.0 wt% in the aqueous phase was added to form water in diesel emulsions before hydrate formation and then hydrate in diesel slurry was separated after hydrate formation. The influences of initial gas-liquid volume ratio (53–142, pressure (3.4–5.4 MPa, temperature (274.15–278.15 K, water cuts (10–30 vol%, and the mole fraction of C2H4 in feed gas (13.19–80.44 mol% upon the C2H4 separation efficiency were systematically investigated. The experimental results show that ethylene can be enriched in hydrate slurry phase with high separation factor (S and recovery ratio (R. Most hydrate formation finished in 20 min, after that, the hydrate formation rate became very slow. The conclusion is useful for determining the suitable operation conditions when adopting an absorption-hydration method to separate C2H4/CH4.

  12. Pore Water Data From Three Gas Hydrate Sites in the Gulf of Mexico: First Results From the HyFlux Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, R. A.; Naehr, T. H.; MacDonald, I.; Kastner, M.; Robertson, G.; Solomon, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    The DOE/NETL funded HyFlux project combines sea-air, water column, and subsurface observations and measurements to better quantify the amount of methane released from seeps and gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico. A recently completed research cruise investigated Gulf of Mexico seeps in 540, 900, and 1200 m water depths. Piston, gravity, and push cores were collected for pore water and sediment analysis. Analyses of major pore water constituents were conducted using an ICP-OES. Preliminary pore water analyses included SO42-, alkalinity, HS-, and Ca2+. Cores taken at Mississippi Canyon site MC 118 showed sulfate concentrations decreasing from 25.2 mM at 1 cmbsf to 1.91 mM at 36.5 cmbsf. HS- measurements show a decrease from 3.02 mM at 1.5 cmbsf to 0 mM at 12 cmbsf, followed by an increase in HS- due to SO42- reduction in 12 cmbsf. Alkalinity concentrations show an increase with depth from 3.63 mM at 1.5 cmbsf to 27.8 mM at 36.5 cmbsf. Calcium concentrations decrease from 10.55 mM at 1.5 cmbsf to 4.87 mM at 36.5 cmbsf due to the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Data from a 10 cm-long push core taken at site MC 118 showed the same trends in SO42- reduction, a decrease in Ca2+ concentrations, along with an alkalinity increase and HS- production. Two piston cores were taken at site GC (Green Canyon) 600. The first core showed SO42- concentrations decreasing from 21.34 mM at 0 cmbsf to 0 mM at 20 cmbsf. HS- concentrations increased to 32.11 mM 20 cmbsf, then decreased to 3.05 mM at 282.5 cmbsf. Alkalinity and Ca2+ concentrations both increased with depth. Alkalinity concentrations were 10.27 mM at 1.5 cmbsf and increased to 35.59 mM at 282.5 cmbsf. Ca2+ also increased from 8.96 mM at 1.5 cmbsf to 12.27 mM at 282.5 cmbsf, which may be the result of carbonate dissolution at depth. The second piston core showed a more typical concentration profile for seep areas. The sulfate concentration at 3 cmbsf decreased from 21.93 mM to 3 mM at 44.5 cmbsf, coupled with the

  13. Hydration of protein–RNA recognition sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of water molecules in 89 protein–RNA complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. Those with tRNA and single-stranded RNA are less hydrated than with duplex or ribosomal proteins. Protein–RNA interfaces are hydrated less than protein–DNA interfaces, but more than protein–protein interfaces. Majority of the waters at protein–RNA interfaces makes multiple H-bonds; however, a fraction do not make any. Those making H-bonds have preferences for the polar groups of RNA than its partner protein. The spatial distribution of waters makes interfaces with ribosomal proteins and single-stranded RNA relatively ‘dry’ than interfaces with tRNA and duplex RNA. In contrast to protein–DNA interfaces, mainly due to the presence of the 2′OH, the ribose in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the phosphate or the bases. The minor groove in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the major groove, while in protein–DNA interfaces it is reverse. The strands make the highest number of water-mediated H-bonds per unit interface area followed by the helices and the non-regular structures. The preserved waters at protein–RNA interfaces make higher number of H-bonds than the other waters. Preserved waters contribute toward the affinity in protein–RNA recognition and should be carefully treated while engineering protein–RNA interfaces. PMID:25114050

  14. Effects of salinity on methane gas hydrate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; DingHui; XU; WenYue

    2007-01-01

    Using an approximately analytical formation,we extend the steady state model of the pure methane hydrate system to include the salinity based on the dynamic model of the methane hydrate system.The top and bottom boundaries of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) and the actual methane hydrate zone (MHZ),and the top of free gas occurrence are determined by using numerical methods and the new steady state model developed in this paper.Numerical results show that the MHZ thickness becomes thinner with increasing the salinity,and the stability is lowered and the base of the MHSZ is shifted toward the seafloor in the presence of salts.As a result,the thickness of actual hydrate occurrence becomes thinner compared with that of the pure water case.On the other hand,since lower solubility reduces the amount of gas needed to form methane hydrate,the existence of salts in seawater can actually promote methane gas hydrate formation in the hydrate stability zone.Numerical modeling also demonstrates that for the salt-water case the presence of methane within the field of methane hydrate stability is not sufficient to ensure the occurrence of gas hydrate,which can only form when the methane concentration dissolved in solution with salts exceeds the local methane solubility in salt water and if the methane flux exceeds a critical value corresponding to the rate of diffusive methane transport.In order to maintain gas hydrate or to form methane gas hydrate in marine sediments,a persistent supplied methane probably from biogenic or thermogenic processes,is required to overcome losses due to diffusion and advection.

  15. Hydration behaviour of polyhydroxylated fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Zavala, J G [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de Los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon S/N, 47460 Jalisco (Mexico); Barajas-Barraza, R E [Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, Periferico Sur, Manuel Gomez MorIn No 8585, 45604 Jalisco (Mexico); Padilla-Osuna, I; Guirado-Lopez, R A, E-mail: jgrz@culagos.udg.mx, E-mail: ebarajas@iteso.mx, E-mail: ismael@ifisica.uaslp.mx, E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2011-10-28

    We have performed semi-empirical as well as density functional theory calculations in order to analyse the hydration properties of both bare C{sub 60} and highly hydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes. In all of our calculations, a total of 42 and 98 water molecules are always surrounding our here-considered carbon nanostructures. We found different wetting properties as a function of the chemical composition and structure of the OH-molecular over-layer covering the fullerene surface. In the case of bare C{sub 60}, water adsorption reveals that the H{sub 2}O species are not uniformly arranged around the carbon network but rather forms water droplets of different sizes, clearly revealing the hydrophobic nature of the C{sub 60} structure. In contrast, in the polyhydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes, the degree of wetting is strongly influenced by the precise location of the hydroxyl groups. We found that different adsorbed configurations for the OH-molecular coating can lead to the formation of partially hydrated or completely covered C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} compounds, a result that could be used to synthesize fullerene materials with different degrees of wettability. By comparing the relative stability of our hydroxylated structures in both bare and hydrated conditions we obtain that the energy ordering of the C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomers can change in the presence of water. The radial distribution function of our hydrated fullerenes reveals that water near these kinds of surfaces is densely packed. In fact, by counting the number of H{sub 2}O molecules which are adsorbed, by means of hydrogen bonds, to the surface of our more stable C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomer, we found that it varies in the range of 5-10, in good agreement with experiments. Finally, by comparing the calculated optical absorption spectra of various C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} structures in the presence and absence of water molecules, we note that only slight variations in the position and

  16. Hydration process in Portland cement blended with activated coal gangue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-ping LIU; Pei-ming WANG; Min-ju DING

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the hydration of a blend of Portland cement and activated coal gangue in order to determine the relationship between the degree of hydration and compressive strength development.The hydration process was investigated by various means:isothermal calorimetry,thermal analysis,non-cvaporable water measurement,and X-ray diffraction analysis.The results show that the activated coal gangue is a pozzolanic material that contributes to the hydration of the cement blend.The pozzolanic reaction occurs over a period of between 7 and 90 d,consuming portlandite and forming both crystal hydrates and ill-crystallized calcium silicate hydrates.These hydrates are similar to those found in pure Portland cement.The results show that if activated coal gangue is substituted for cement at up to 30% (w/w),it does not significantly affect the final compressive strength of the blend.A long-term compressive strength improvement can in fact be achieved by using activated coal gangue as a supplementary cementing material.The relationship between compressive strength and degree of hydration for both pure Portland cement and blended cement can be described with the same equation.However,the parameters are different since blended cement produces fewer calcium silicate hydrates than pure Portland cement at the same degree of hydration.

  17. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  18. Component analysis of the protein hydration entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2012-05-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation entropy in water, which allows us to understand global change in the solvation entropy in terms of local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. This method can be implemented via a combined approach based on molecular dynamics simulation and integral-equation theory of liquids. An illustrative application is made to 42-residue amyloid-beta protein in water. We demonstrate how this method enables one to elucidate the molecular origin for the hydration entropy change upon conformational transitions of protein.

  19. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  20. Comparative analysis of growth characteristics of hydrate formation on the surface of suspended water droplet and bubble%悬垂水滴与悬浮气泡表面气体水合物形成特性对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆引哲; 刘道平; 杨亮

    2015-01-01

    Based on a set of high-pressure visual experiment device used for the natural gas hydrates crystallization and growth on the surface of suspended water droplet and suspended bubble,the influence of factors such as pressure,temperature,water quality on the crystallization and growth are analyzed and discussed respectively.Comparative analysis of the experimental phenomena about the characteristics of hydrate formation on the surface of suspended water droplet and bubble was discussed.Temperature and pressure are the important factors of hydrate crystallization and growth.The decrease of temperature or the increase of pressure will also improve the growth of hydrate.This paper also provides experimental support for the development of spray and bubbling method to improve the hydrate formation.%基于悬垂水滴和悬浮气泡表面形成气体水合物的可视化耐高压实验装置,分析探讨了反应压力、温度、水质等因素对水滴和气泡表面气体水合物成核和生长规律的影响。对已有的关于研究单个静止悬垂水滴和悬浮气泡表面气体水合物生长特性的实验现象及结果进行了对比分析,得出结论:温度和压力是影响表面水合物结晶与生长的重要因素;温度的降低或压力的升高均使水合反应速度加快。研究为发展喷雾法和鼓泡法这两种强化制备水合物的方式提供了有效的实验支撑。

  1. Pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shicai; LIU Changling; YE Yuguang; LIU Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the pore capillary pressure and hydrate saturation in sedi-ments, a new method was proposed. First, the phase equilibria of methane hydrate in fine-grained silica sands were measured. As to the equilibrium data, the pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate were calculated. The results showed that the phase equilibria of methane hydrates in fine-grained silica sands changed due to the depressed activity of pore water caused by the surface group and negatively charged characteristic of silica particles as well as the capillary pressure in small pores together. The capil-lary pressure increased with the increase of methane hydrate saturation due to the decrease of the available pore space. However, the capillary-saturation relationship could not yet be described quantitatively because of the stochastic habit of hydrate growth.

  2. STUDY FOR NATURAL GAS HYDRATE CONVERSED FROM ICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shengjie; SHEN Jiandong; HAO Miaoli; LIU Furong

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are crystalline clathrate compounds composed of water and gases of small molecular diameters that can be used for storage and transport of natural gas as a novel method. In the paper a series of experiments of aspects and kinetics for hydrate formed from natural gas and ice were carried out on the industrial small scale production apparatus. The experimental results show that formation conditions of hydrate conversed from ice are independent of induction time, and bigger degrees of supersaturation and supercooling improved the driving force and advanced the hydrate formation.Superpressure is also favorable for ice particle conversion to hydrate. In addition, it was found there have an optimal reaction time during hydrate formation.

  3. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane and methane-derived carbon that escape from sediments and soils and reach the atmosphere could exacerbate greenhouse warming. The synergy between warming climate and gas hydrate dissociation feeds a popular perception that global warming could drive catastrophic methane releases from the contemporary gas hydrate reservoir. Appropriate evaluation of the two sides of the climate-methane hydrate synergy requires assessing direct and indirect observational data related to gas hydrate dissociation phenomena and numerical models that track the interaction of gas hydrates/methane with the ocean and/or atmosphere. Methane hydrate is likely undergoing dissociation now on global upper continental slopes and on continental shelves that ring the Arctic Ocean. Many factors—the depth of the gas hydrates in sediments, strong sediment and water column sinks, and the inability of bubbles emitted at the seafloor to deliver methane to the sea-air interface in most cases—mitigate the impact of gas hydrate dissociation on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations though. There is no conclusive proof that hydrate-derived methane is reaching the atmosphere now, but more observational data and improved numerical models will better characterize the climate-hydrate synergy in the future.

  4. The effect of stereochemistry on carbohydrate hydration in aqueous solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galema, Saskia Alexandra

    1992-01-01

    Although-carbohydrates are widely used, not much is known about the stereochemical aspects of hydration of carbohydrates. For D-aldohexoses, for example, there are eight different stereoisomers. Just how the hydroxy topology of a carbohydrate molecule influences the hydration behaviour in water is r

  5. Hydration index--a better parameter for explaining small molecule hydration in inhibition of ice recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Ferreira, Sandra S; Czechura, Pawel; Chaytor, Jennifer L; Ben, Robert N

    2008-12-24

    Several simple mono- and disaccharides have been assessed for their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Two carbohydrates were found to be effective recrystallization inhibitors. D-galactose (1) was the best monosaccharide and D-melibiose (5) was the most active disaccharide. The ability of each carbohydrate to inhibit ice growth was correlated to its respective hydration number reported in the literature. A hydration number reflects the number of tightly bound water molecules to the carbohydrate and is a function of carbohydrate stereochemistry. It was discovered that using the absolute hydration number of a carbohydrate does not allow one to accurately predict its ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Consequently, we have defined a hydration index in which the hydration number is divided by the molar volume of the carbohydrate. This new parameter not only takes into account the number of water molecules tightly bound to a carbohydrate but also the size or volume of a particular solute and ultimately the concentration of hydrated water molecules. The hydration index of both mono- and disaccharides correlates well with experimentally measured RI activity. C-Linked derivatives of the monosaccharides appear to have RI activity comparable to that of their O-linked saccharides but a more thorough investigation is required. The relationship between carbohydrate concentration and RI activity was shown to be noncolligative and a 0.022 M solution of D-galactose (1) and C-linked galactose derivative (10) inhibited recrystallization as well as a 3% DMSO solution. The carbohydrates examined in this study did not possess any thermal hysteresis activity (selective depression of freezing point relative to melting point) or dynamic ice shaping. As such, we propose that they are inhibiting recrystallization at the interface between bulk water and the quasi liquid layer (a semiordered interface between ice and bulk water) by disrupting the preordering of water.

  6. Hydration study of ordinary portland cement in the presence of zinc ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Adriana Trezza

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydration products of Portland cement pastes, hydrated in water and in the presence of zinc ions were studied comparatively at different ages. Hydration products were studied by X ray diffractions (XRD and infrared spectroscopy (IR. Although IR is not frequently used in cement chemistry, it evidenced a new phase Ca(Zn(OH32. 2H2O formed during cement hydration in the presence of zinc. The significant retardation of early cement hydration in the presence of zinc is assessed in detail by differential calorimetry as a complement to the study carried out by IR and XRD, providing evidence that permits to evaluate the kinetic of the early hydration.

  7. Effect of localized water uptake on backfill hydration and water movement in a backfilled tunnel: half-scale tests at Aespoe Bentonite Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River (Canada); Jonsson, E. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hansen, J. [Posiva Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland); Hedin, M. [Aangpannefoereningen, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramqvist, G. [Eltekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden)

    2011-04-15

    The report describes the outcome of the work within the project 'SU508.20 Impact of water inflow in deposition tunnels'. Project decision SKB doc 1178871 Version 3.0. Two activity plans have been used for the field work: AP TD SU50820-09-019 and AP TD SU 50820-09-071. SKB and Posiva have been examining those processes that may have particularly strong effects on the evolution of a newly backfilled deposition tunnel in a KBS-3V repository. These assessments have involved the conduct of increasingly large and complex laboratory tests and simulations of a backfilled tunnel section. In this series of four tests, the effect of water inflow into a backfilled tunnel section via an intersecting fracture feature was evaluated. The tests included the monitoring of mock-ups where water entered via the simulated fractures as well as evaluation of what the effect of isolated tunnel sections caused by localized water inflow would have on subsequent evolution of these isolated sections. It was found that even a slowly seeping fracture can have a substantial effect on the backfill evolution as it will cause development of a gasket-like feature that effectively cuts of air and water movement from inner to outer regions of the backfilled tunnel. Water entering via these fractures will ultimately move out of the tunnel via a single discrete flow path, in a manner similar to what was observed in previous 1/2-scale and smaller simulations. If the low-rate of water inflow from fracture is the only source of water inflow to the tunnel this will result in hydraulic behaviour similar to that observed for a single inflow point in previous tests. The presence of a fracture feature will however result in a larger proportion of water uptake by the process of suction than might occur in a point inflow situation and hence a more uniform water distribution will be present in the pellet fill. This also results in a greater tendency for water to be absorbed into the adjacent block fill

  8. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  9. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  10. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  11. Molecular modeling of the dissociation of methane hydrate in contact with a silica surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Englezos, Peter; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2012-03-15

    We use constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissociation of the fully occupied structure I methane hydrate in a confined geometry between two hydroxylated silica surfaces between 36 and 41 Å apart, at initial temperatures of 283, 293, and 303 K. Simulations of the two-phase hydrate/water system are performed in the presence of silica, with and without a 3 Å thick buffering water layer between the hydrate phase and silica surfaces. Faster decomposition is observed in the presence of silica, where the hydrate phase is prone to decomposition from four surfaces, as compared to only two sides in the case of the hydrate/water simulations. The existence of the water layer between the hydrate phase and the silica surface stabilizes the hydrate phase relative to the case where the hydrate is in direct contact with silica. Hydrates bound between the silica surfaces dissociate layer-by-layer in a shrinking core manner with a curved decomposition front which extends over a 5-8 Å thickness. Labeling water molecules shows that there is exchange of water molecules between the surrounding liquid and intact cages in the methane hydrate phase. In all cases, decomposition of the methane hydrate phase led to the formation of methane nanobubbles in the liquid water phase.

  12. Water Resistance, Hydration Product and Microstructure of Glass Fiber Reinforced Magnesium Oxychloride Cement Exterior Wall Cladding%玻镁外墙挂板的抗水性、水化产物和微观结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董金美; 余红发; 刘倩倩; 李颖; 林启红

    2011-01-01

    Bending mechanical properties and deformations in natural state and wet state under water of common and high-performance glass fiber reinforced magnesium oxychloride cement ( GRMC ) exterior wall cladding were tested in this study. Hydration product components and microstructure were observed by X-ray diffraction ( XRD ) and scanning electron microscopy ( SEM). The results indicated that, in wet state under water, the main hydration product 5 ·1 ·8 was hydrolysed, microstructure is destroyed and bending strength is decreased for common GRMC exterior wall cladding. For high-performance GRMC exterior wall cladding with a complex water-repellent admixture and mixed minerals, the main hydration product 3 ·1 ·8 is stable existing in cement matrix and microstructure has been changed little. The sample reveals high water resistance. So, hydration product components and microstructure stability of GRMC exterior wall cladding are important prerequisites for high water resistance.%试验测定了普通玻镁外墙挂板、掺加复合抗水外加剂和矿物掺合料的高性能玻镁外墙挂板在自然和浸水状态下的弯曲力学性能和变形性能,并运用X射线衍射仪(XRD)和扫描电镜(SEM)分析了水化产物的组成和微观结构特征.结果表明:在浸水条件下,普通玻镁外墙挂板的主要水化产物5 ·1·8相发生了分解,破坏了微观结构,导致其抗弯强度降低;而掺加复合抗水外加剂和矿物掺合料的高性能玻镁外墙挂板的水化产物5·1·8相保持稳定,微观结构未发生变化,显示出较高的抗水性.因此,玻镁外墙挂板的水化产物组成和微观结构的稳定性是确保其抗水性的重要前提.

  13. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  14. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  15. Are seafloor pockmarks on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand, linked to CO2 hydrates? Gas hydrate stability considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Rose, P. S.; Coffin, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Vast areas of the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand are covered by seafloor pockmarks. Pockmark occurrence appears to be bathymetrically controlled with a band of smaller pockmarks covering areas between 500 and 700 m and large seafloor depressions beneath 800 m water depth. The current depth of the top of methane gas hydrate stability in the ocean is about 500 m and thus, we had proposed that pockmark formation may be linked to methane gas hydrate dissociation during sealevel lowering. However, while seismic profiles show strong indications of fluid flow, geochemical analyses of piston cores do not show any evidence for current or past methane flux. The discovery of Dawsonite, indicative of significant CO2 flux, in a recent petroleum exploration well, together with other circumstantial evidence, has led us to propose that instead of methane hydrate, CO2 hydrate may be linked to pockmark formation. We here present results from CO2 hydrate stability calculations. Assuming water temperature profiles remain unchanged, we predict the upper limit of pockmark occurrence to coincide with the top of CO2 gas hydrate stability during glacial-stage sealevel lowstands. CO2 hydrates may therefore have dissociated during sealevel lowering leading to gas escape and pockmark formation. In contrast to our previous model linking methane hydrate dissociation to pockmark formation, gas hydrates would dissociate beneath a shallow base of CO2 hydrate stability, rather than on the seafloor following upward "grazing" of the top of methane hydrate stability. Intriguingly, at the water depths of the larger seafloor depressions, the base of gas hydrate stability delineates the phase boundary between CO2 hydrates and super-saturated CO2. We caution that because of the high solubility of CO2, dissociation from hydrate to free gas or super-saturated CO2 would imply high concentrations of CO2 and speculate that pockmark formation may be linked to CO2 hydrate dissolution rather than dissociation

  16. Hydration dynamics of the collagen triple helix by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melacini, G; Bonvin, A M; Goodman, M; Boelens, R; Kaptein, R

    2000-07-28

    The hydration of the collagen-like Ac-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)(6)-NH(2) triple-helical peptide in solution was investigated using an integrated set of high-resolution NMR hydration experiments, including different recently developed exchange-network editing methods. This approach was designed to explore the hydration dynamics in the proximity of labile groups, such as the hydroxyproline hydroxyl group, and revealed that the first shell of hydration in collagen-like triple helices is kinetically labile with upper limits for water molecule residence times in the nanosecond to sub-nanosecond range. This result is consistent with a "hopping" hydration model in which solvent molecules are exchanged in and out of solvation sites at a rate that is not directly correlated to the degree of site localization. The hopping model thus reconciles the dynamic view of hydration revealed by NMR with the previously suggested partially ordered semi-clathrate-like cylinder of hydration. In addition, the nanosecond to sub-nanosecond upper limits for water molecule residence times imply that hydration-dehydration events are not likely to be the rate-limiting step for triple helix self-recognition, complementing previous investigations on water dynamics in collagen fibers. This study has also revealed labile proton features expected to facilitate the characterization of the structure and folding of triple helices in collagen peptides.

  17. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  18. Calorimetric Determination of Enthalpy of Formation of Natural Gas Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高军; KennethN.Marsh

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of enthalpies of natural gas hydrates in typical natural gas mixture containing methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane at pressure in the vicinity of 2000 kPa (300 psi) and 6900 kPa(1000psi). The measurements were made in a multi-cell differential scanning calorimeter using modified high pressure cells. The enthalpy of water and the enthalpy of dissociation of the gas hydrate were determined from the calorimeter response during slow temperature scanning at constant pressure. The amount of gas released from the dissociation of hydrate was determined from the pumped volume of the high pressure pump. The occupation ratio (mole ratio) of the water to gas and the enthalpy of hydrate formation are subject to uncertainty of 1.5%.The results show that the enthalpy of hydrate formation and the occupation ratio are essentially independent of pressure.

  19. Determination of Hydrazine Hydrate in Water with Paradime Thylaminobenzaldehyde Spectrophotometric Method%对二甲氨基苯甲醛分光光度法测定水中水合肼

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄岭; 李叙柏

    2016-01-01

    在酸性条件下,水合肼与对二甲氨基苯甲醛作用,形成黄色醌式化合物,可用分光光度法对其进行测定。文中主要介绍对二甲氨基苯甲醛分光光度法测定的回收率、相对标准偏差及检出限的复验,并对上海水源水及其出厂水水合肼进行测定。%Hydrazine hydrate can be detected using spectrophotometer,because yellow quinine compound is produced when it reacts with paradime thylaminobenzaldehyde under acidic conditions. In this paper,the recovery rate,relative standard deviation and lowest detection limit of this method were analyzed,and the hydrazine hydrate in the raw water and processed water of three water plants were determined.

  20. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  1. Continuous production of CO2 hydrate slurry added antifreeze proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Y.; Ota, M.; Murakami, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Ferdows, M. [Dhaka Univ., Dhaka (Bangladesh). Dept. of Mathematics; Endou, H. [Technova Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Ocean storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrate is possible in deep seas where low temperature and high pressure conditions exist. However, when hydrates are produced in large quantities, they can plug pipelines. The addition of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can prevent hydrate crystals from forming. The hydrate may then behave like a slurry which can be transported from a production place to a place of storage with minimal pressure loss. This study developed a production method for a CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry and presented the prospect of the inhibition effect for CO{sub 2} hydrate formation by adding AFPs. It revealed the shift in induction time, the formation rate and the torque of the agitator under conditions of AFPs at 0.01 mg/ml. It was concluded that compared to pure water, the induction time for hydrate production increased 244 per cent, the formation rate decreased 76 per cent and the ratio of the torque decreased 48 per cent by adding AFPs. The AFPs rendered the hydrate particles small and well dispersed. It was concluded that type 3 AFPs can effectively inhibit the production of structure s1 type hydrates. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  3. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  4. Geo-scientific investigations of gas-hydrates in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sain, K.; Gupta, H.; Mazumdar, A.; Bhaumik, A.K.; Bhowmick, P.K.

    The best solution to meet India's overwhelming energy requirement is to tap the nuclear and solar power to the maximum extent possible. Another feasible major energy resource is gas-hydrates (crystalline substances of methane and water) that have...

  5. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We

  6. Well log characterization of natural gas-hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 25 years there have been significant advancements in the use of well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrates in nature: whereas wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs were formerly used to identify gas-hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments, more advanced wireline and logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools are now routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas-hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Resistivity- and acoustic-logging tools are the most widely used for estimating the gas-hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical-resistivity and acoustic-velocity data can yield accurate gas-hydrate saturations in sediment grain-supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log-analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. New well-logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation-resistivity log measurements provide the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly interbedded and fracture-dominated gas-hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing (WFT) also allow for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids(i.e., free water along with clay- and capillary-bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms

  7. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  8. Estimation of gas hydrate saturation with temperature calculated from hydrate threshold at C0002 during IODP NanTroSEIZE Stage 1 expeditions in the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, A.; Yamada, Y.; Saito, S.; Bourlange, S.; Chang, C.; Conin, M.; Tomaru, H.; Kinoshita, M.; Tobin, H.; 314/315/316Scientists, E.

    2008-12-01

    During the IODP Expedition 314, conducted at Nankai trough accretionary prism, gas hydrate was observed at Site C0002. Gas hydrate beneath seafloor is promising energy source and potentially hazardous material during drilling. The precise estimation of gas hydrate saturation is important, but previous works have not considered the effect" of the in-situ temperature. In this study, we propose an estimation method of gas hydrate saturation with temperature calculated from threshold of gas hydrate. Gas hydrate saturation was determined based on the Logging While Drilling (LWD) Expedition 314 data. The gas hydrate bearing zone was located between 218.1 to 400.4 m below seafloor. Archie's relation was used to estimate gas hydrate saturation. This relation requires the porosity, the sea water resistivity and formation resistivity. We determined porosity to be between ~70 to ~30% based on density log. Since the resistivity of sea water is temperature dependent, temperature profile (calculated temperature model) was determined from the thermal conductivity and the temperature at the base of the gas hydrate. In our calculated temperature model, the saturation increases from ~10% at ~220m to ~30% at 400 m below sea floor. Spikes that have a maximum value at 80% at sand layers were observed. We also estimated the gas hydrate saturation from the constant temperature profile in 12°C (temperature constant model). This resulted in almost constant saturation (~15%) with the high saturation spikes. We compared these saturations with the hydrate occupation ratio within sand layers derived from RAB image. The hydrate occupation ratio shows increasing trend with increasing depth, and this trend is similar to the gas hydrate saturation with the calculated temperature model. This result suggests that the temperature profile should be considered to obtain precise gas hydrate saturation. Since the high sedimentation rate can affect thermal condition, we are planning to estimate the

  9. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  10. Properties of Hydrated Alkali Metals Aimed at the Ion Channel Selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Hai-Long; LIU Yu-Zhi; ZHANG Su-Hua; ZHAN Yong; ZHANG Hai-Lin

    2008-01-01

    The hydration structure properties of different alkali metal ions with eight water molecules and potassium ions with different numbers of water molecules are studied using the mixed density functional theory, B3LYP, with 6-311G basis set. The hydration structures are obtained from structure optimization and the optimum numbers of water molecules in the innermost hydration shell for the alkali metal ions are found. Some useful information about the ion channel selectivity is presented.

  11. Hydrophobic hydration from small to large lengthscales: Understanding and manipulating the crossover

    OpenAIRE

    Rajamani, Sowmianarayanan; Truskett, Thomas M.; Garde, Shekhar

    2005-01-01

    Small and large hydrophobic solutes exhibit remarkably different hydration thermodynamics. Small solutes are accommodated in water with minor perturbations to water structure, and their hydration is captured accurately by theories that describe density fluctuations in pure water. In contrast, hydration of large solutes is accompanied by dewetting of their surfaces and requires a macroscopic thermodynamic description. A unified theoretical description of these lengthscale dependencies was pres...

  12. Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

    2010-07-01

    To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

  13. Electrical Measurement to Assess Hydration Process and the Porosity Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiaosheng; XIAO Lianzhen; LI Zongjin

    2008-01-01

    The change of electrical resistivity with time at early ages was used to investigate the hydration process and the porosity development. Porosity reduction process of cement-based materials hydration was developed by a proposed method. The porosity reduction is fast at the setting period. The results find that the pore discontinuity occurs faster at lower water/cement ratios than at higher water/cement ratios which is similar to the results of the Percolation method.

  14. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas

  15. The Pore Structure and Hydration Performance of Sulphoaluminate MDF Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Cong-yun; YUAN Run-zhang; LONG Shi-zong

    2004-01-01

    The hydration and pore structure of sulphoaluminate MDF cement were studied by X-ray diffractometer ( XRD ), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimeter ( MIP ) etc. The ex-perimental results indicate that hydration products of the materials are entringites ( Aft ), aluminium hydroxide andCSH (Ⅰ) gel etc. Due to its very low water-cement ratio, hydration function is only confined to the surfaces of ce-ment grains, and there is a lot of sulphoaluminate cement in the hardenite which is unhydrated yet. Hydration re-action was rapidly carried under the condition of the heat-pressing. Therefore cement hydrates Aft, CSH (Ⅰ) andaluminium hydroxide gel fill in pores. The expansibility of Aft makes the porosity of MDF cement lower ( less than1 percent ) and the size of pore smaller (80 percent pore was less than 250A), and enhances its strength.

  16. Fundamental challenges to methane recovery from gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servio, P.; Eaton, M.W.; Mahajan, D.; Winters, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental challenges, the location, magnitude, and feasibility of recovery, which must be addressed to recover methane from dispersed hydrate sources, are presented. To induce dissociation of gas hydrate prior to methane recovery, two potential methods are typically considered. Because thermal stimulation requires a large energy input, it is less economically feasible than depressurization. The new data will allow the study of the effect of pressure, temperature, diffusion, porosity, tortuosity, composition of gas and water, and porous media on gas-hydrate production. These data also will allow one to improve existing models related to the stability and dissociation of sea floor hydrates. The reproducible kinetic data from the planned runs together with sediment properties will aid in developing a process to economically recover methane from a potential untapped hydrate source. The availability of plentiful methane will allow economical and large-scale production of methane-derived clean fuels to help avert future energy crises.

  17. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasol, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  18. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  19. Simulation of gas hydrate dissociation caused by repeated tectonic uplift events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shusaku; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Nagakubo, Sadao

    2016-05-01

    Gas hydrate dissociation by tectonic uplift is often used to explain geologic and geophysical phenomena, such as hydrate accumulation probably caused by hydrate recycling and the occurrence of double bottom-simulating reflectors in tectonically active areas. However, little is known of gas hydrate dissociation resulting from tectonic uplift. This study investigates gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments caused by repeated tectonic uplift events using a numerical model incorporating the latent heat of gas hydrate dissociation. The simulations showed that tectonic uplift causes upward movement of some depth interval of hydrate-bearing sediment immediately above the base of gas hydrate stability (BGHS) to the gas hydrate instability zone because the sediment initially maintains its temperature: in that interval, gas hydrate dissociates while absorbing heat; consequently, the temperature of the interval decreases to that of the hydrate stability boundary at that depth. Until the next uplift event, endothermic gas hydrate dissociation proceeds at the BGHS using heat mainly supplied from the sediment around the BGHS, lowering the temperature of that sediment. The cumulative effects of these two endothermic gas hydrate dissociations caused by repeated uplift events lower the sediment temperature around the BGHS, suggesting that in a marine area in which sediment with a highly concentrated hydrate-bearing layer just above the BGHS has been frequently uplifted, the endothermic gas hydrate dissociation produces a gradual decrease in thermal gradient from the seafloor to the BGHS. Sensitivity analysis for model parameters showed that water depth, amount of uplift, gas hydrate saturation, and basal heat flow strongly influence the gas hydrate dissociation rate and sediment temperature around the BGHS.

  20. Density dependence of the yield of hydrated electrons in the low-LET radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C: influence of the geminate recombination of subexcitation-energy electrons prior to thermalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesungnoen, Jintana; Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2013-10-21

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the yield of hydrated electrons (eaq(-)) in the low-linear energy transfer radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C as a function of water density over the range of ~0.15 to 0.6 g cm(-3). Very good agreement was found between our calculations and picosecond pulse radiolysis experimental data at ~60 ps and 1 ns at high density (>0.35 g cm(-3)). At densities lower than ~0.35 g cm(-3), our eaq(-) yields were lower than the experimental data, especially at ~60 ps. However, if we incorporated into the simulations a prompt geminate electron-cation (H2O˙(+)) recombination (prior thermalization of the electron) that decreased as the density decreased, our computed eaq(-) yields at ~60 ps and 1 ns compared fairly well with the experimental data for the entire density range studied.

  1. Preliminary discussion on gas hydrate reservoir system of Shenhu Area, North Slope of South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, N.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.; Wang, H.; Fu, S. [Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, H. [China Geological Survey, Beijing (China); Su, X. [China Univ. of Geosciences, Beijing (China)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrate is a type of ice-like solid substance formed by the combination of certain low-molecular-weight gases such as methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide with water. Gas hydrate primarily occurs naturally in sediments beneath the permafrost and the sediments of the continental slope with the water depth greater than 300 m. Marine gas hydrate geological systems are important because they may be sufficiently concentrated in certain locations to be an economically viable fossil fuel resource. However, gas hydrates can cause geo-hazards through large-scale slope destabilization and can release methane, a potential greenhouse gas, into the environment. This paper discussed the hydrate drilling results from a geological and geophysical investigation of the gas hydrate reservoir system of the Shenhu Area, located in the north slope of South China Sea. The paper identified the basic formation conditions, and discussed the pore-water geochemical features of shallow sediments and their inflected gas sources, gas hydrate distribution and seismic characteristics. It was concluded that the gas hydrate was heterogeneously distributed in space, and mainly distributed in certain ranges above the bottom of the gas hydrate stability zone. It was also concluded that methane gas that formed hydrate was likely from in-situ micro-biogenic methane. Last, it was found that distributed and in-situ micro-biogenic methane resulted in low methane flux, and formed the distributed pattern of gas hydrate system with the features of differential distribution and saturation. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  2. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-01-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant “onion-skin” fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2–3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched “hydration fronts” where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between ~110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at C. Our observations support fast hydration at temperatures as low as 60 °C; prolonged exposure to high temperature of 175°–225° during water addition is less likely as the glass would lose alkalies and should alter to clays within days. A compilation of low-temperature hydration diffusion coefficients suggests ~2 orders of magnitude higher rates of diffusion at 60–110 °C temperatures, compared with values expected from extrapolation of high-temperature (>400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration

  3. Experimental and Modeling Studies on the Prediction of Gas Hydrate Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Yi Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On the base of some kinetics model analysis and kinetic observation of hydrate formation process, a new prediction model of gas hydrate formation is proposed. The analysis of the present model shows that the formation of gas hydrate not only relevant with gas composition and free water content but also relevant with temperature and pressure. Through contrast experiment, the predicted result of the new prediction method of gas hydrate crystallization kinetics is close to measured result, it means that the prediction method can reflect the hydrate crystallization accurately.

  4. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. The hydration of Portland cement is retarded in the presence of both the admixtures and nanosize hydration products are formed.

  5. Effect of bubble size and density on methane conversion to hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leske, J.; Taylor, C.E.; Ladner, E.P.

    2007-03-01

    Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. One area of investigation is the storage of methane as methane hydrates. An economical and efficient means of storing methane in hydrates opens many commercial opportunities such as transport of stranded gas, off-peak storage of line gas, etc.We have observed during our investigations that the ability to convert methane to methane hydrate is enhanced by foaming of the methane–water solution using a surfactant. The density of the foam, along with the bubble size, is important in the conversion of methane to methane hydrate.

  6. Controls on gas hydrate stability in methane depleted sediments: Laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, L.; Chanton, J.; Martens, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits are the Earth’s largest reservoir of the powerful greenhouse gas methane and thus a key future energy resource. However, hydrate stability in sedimentary environments featuring highly variable methane concentrations needs to be understood to allow resource estimation and recovery. Hydrates are at chemical equilibrium and therefore stable where high pressures, low temperatures, and moderate salinities coexist with methane-saturated pore waters. When all of these conditions are not met, hydrates should dissociate or dissolve, releasing methane to the overlying water and possibly the atmosphere. In addition, other natural factors may control the kinetics of their degradation complicating models for hydrate stability and occurrence. Our measurements indicate that the pore-waters surrounding some shallow buried hydrates are not methane-saturated suggesting that dissolution should occur relatively rapidly. Yet, these hydrate deposits are known to persist relatively unchanged for years. We hypothesize that, once formed, hydrate deposits may be stabilized by natural factors inhibiting dissolution, including oil or microbial biofilm coatings. While most studies have focused on pressure and temperature changes where hydrates occur, relatively few have included measurements of in situ methane concentration gradients because of the difficulties inherent to making such measurements. Here we present recent measurements of methane concentration and stable carbon isotope gradients immediately adjacent to undisturbed hydrate surfaces obtained through deployments of novel seafloor instruments. Our results suggest that the hydrates studied are relatively stable when exposed to overlying and pore-waters that are undersaturated with methane. Concurrent laboratory measurements of methane concentration gradients next to artificial hydrate surfaces were utilized to test our protective coating hypothesis. After a stable dissolution rate for hydrate samples was

  7. Basin-Wide Temperature Constraints On Gas Hydrate Stability In The Gulf Of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Reagan, M. T.; Guinasso, N. L.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.

    2012-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits commonly occur at the seafloor-water interface on marine margins. They are especially prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico where they are associated with natural oil seeps. The stability of these deposits is potentially challenged by fluctuations in bottom water temperature, on an annual time-scale, and under the long-term influence of climate change. We mapped the locations of natural oil seeps where shallow gas hydrate deposits are known to occur across the entire Gulf of Mexico basin based on a comprehensive review of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data (~200 images). We prepared a bottom water temperature map based on the archive of CTD casts from the Gulf (~6000 records). Comparing the distribution of gas hydrate deposits with predicted bottom water temperature, we find that a broad area of the upper slope lies above the theoretical stability horizon for structure 1 gas hydrate, while all sites where gas hydrate deposits occur are within the stability horizon for structure 2 gas hydrate. This is consistent with analytical results that structure 2 gas hydrates predominate on the upper slope (Klapp et al., 2010), where bottom water temperatures fluctuate over a 7 to 10 C range (approx. 600 m depth), while pure structure 1 hydrates are found at greater depths (approx. 3000 m). Where higher hydrocarbon gases are available, formation of structure 2 gas hydrate should significantly increase the resistance of shallow gas hydrate deposits to destabilizing effects variable or increasing bottom water temperature. Klapp, S.A., Bohrmann, G., Kuhs, W.F., Murshed, M.M., Pape, T., Klein, H., Techmer, K.S., Heeschen, K.U., and Abegg, F., 2010, Microstructures of structure I and II gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 27, p. 116-125.Bottom temperature and pressure for Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate outcrops and stability horizons for sI and sII hydrate.

  8. Theoretical and computational studies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration: Towards a molecular description of the hydration of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Shekhar

    The unique balance of forces underlying biological processes-such as protein folding, aggregation, molecular recognition, and the formation of biological membranes-owes its origin in large part to the surrounding aqueous medium. A quantitative description of fundamental noncovalent interactions, in particular hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions at molecular- scale separations, requires an accurate description of water structure. Thus, the primary goals of our research are to understand the role of water in mediating interactions between molecules and to incorporate this understanding into molecular theories for calculating water-mediated interactions. We have developed a molecular model of hydrophobic interactions that uses methods of information theory to relate hydrophobic effects to the density fluctuations in liquid water. This model provides a quantitative description of small-molecule hydration thermodynamics, as well as insights into the entropies of unfolding globular proteins. For larger molecular solutes, we relate the inhomogeneous water structure in their vicinity to their hydration thermodynamics. We find that the water structure in the vicinity of nonpolar solutes is only locally sensitive to the molecular details of the solute. Water structures predicted using this observation are used to study the association of two neopentane molecules and the conformational equilibria of n-pentane molecule. We have also studied the hydration of a model molecular ionic solute, a tetramethylammonium ion, over a wide range of charge states of the solute. We find that, although the charge dependence of the ion hydration free energy is quadratic, negative ions are more favorably hydrated compared to positive ions. Moreover, this asymmetry of hydration can be reconciled by considering the differences in water organization surrounding positive and negative ions. We have also developed methods for predicting water structure surrounding molecular ions and relating

  9. Determination of Nucleic Acid Hydration Using Osmotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozners, Eriks

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the role water plays in biological processes requires detailed knowledge of the phenomena of biopolymer hydration. Crystal structures have identified exact sites occupied by the water molecules in immediate hydration layers. NMR and molecular modeling have provided information on dynamics of water molecules occupying these sites. However, these studies give little information on the thermodynamic contribution of water molecules to conformational equilibria and recognition affinity. This unit describes probing of nucleic acid hydration using osmotic stress, a method that provides thermodynamic information complementary to crystallography, NMR and molecular modeling. Osmotic stress monitors the depression of melting temperature upon decreasing the water activity and calculates the number of thermodynamically unique water molecules associated with the double helix and released from the single strands upon melting. PMID:21154532

  10. Preliminary Experimental Examination Of Controls On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Bryant, S. L.; You, K.; Polito, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate change will cause warming of the oceans and land. This will affect the occurrence, behavior, and location of subseafloor and subterranean methane hydrate deposits. We suggest that in many natural systems local salinity, elevated by hydrate formation or freshened by hydrate dissociation, may control gas transport through the hydrate stability zone. We are performing experiments and modeling the experiments to explore this behavior for different warming scenarios. Initially, we are exploring hydrate association/dissociation in saline systems with constant water mass. We compare experiments run with saline (3.5 wt. %) water vs. distilled water in a sand mixture at an initial water saturation of ~0.5. We increase the pore fluid (methane) pressure to 1050 psig. We then stepwise cool the sample into the hydrate stability field (~3 degrees C), allowing methane gas to enter as hydrate forms. We measure resistivity and the mass of methane consumed. We are currently running these experiments and we predict our results from equilibrium thermodynamics. In the fresh water case, the modeled final hydrate saturation is 63% and all water is consumed. In the saline case, the modeled final hydrate saturation is 47%, the salinity is 12.4 wt. %, and final water saturation is 13%. The fresh water system is water-limited: all the water is converted to hydrate. In the saline system, pore water salinity is elevated and salt is excluded from the hydrate structure during hydrate formation until the salinity drives the system to three phase equilibrium (liquid, gas, hydrate) and no further hydrate forms. In our laboratory we can impose temperature gradients within the column, and we will use this to investigate equilibrium conditions in large samples subjected to temperature gradients and changing temperature. In these tests, we will quantify the hydrate saturation and salinity over our meter-long sample using spatially distributed temperature sensors, spatially distributed

  11. Thermodynamic promotion of carbon dioxide-clathrate hydrate formation by tetrahydrofuran, cyclopentane and their mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Thomsen, Kaj; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Gas clathrate hydrate dissociation pressures are reported for mixtures of carbon dioxide, water and thermodynamic promoters forming structure II hydrates.Hydrate (H)-aqueous liquid (Lw)-vapour (V) equilibrium pressures for the ternary system composed of water, tetrahydrofuran (THF), and carbon....... It is shown that upon adding THF to the pure aqueous phase to form a 4mass percent solution, the equilibrium pressure of the formed hydrates may be lowered compared to the ternary system of water, cyclopentane and carbon dioxide. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd....

  12. Infrared spectroscopy for monitoring gas hydrates in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, G.T.; Luzinova, Y.; Mizaikoff, B. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Raichlin, Y.; Katzir, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Tel-Aviv (Israel). Shool of Physics and Astronomy

    2008-07-01

    This paper introduced the first principles for monitoring gas hydrate formation and dissociation in aqueous solution by evaluating state-responsive infrared (IR) absorption features of water with fiberoptic evanescent field spectroscopy. A first order linear functional relationship was also derived according to Lambert Beer's law in order to quantify the percentage gas hydrate within the volume of water probed via the evanescent field. In addition, spectroscopic studies evaluating seafloor sediments collected from a gas hydrate site in the Gulf of Mexico revealed minimal spectral interferences from sediment matrix components. As such, evanescent field sensing strategies were established as a promising perspective for monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrates in oceanic environments. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Process and device for hydrating organic compounds which can be hydrated by cathodically separated hydrogen. Verfahren und Vorrichtung zur Hydrierung von hydrierbaren organischen Verbindungen durch kathodisch abgeschiedenen Wasserstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biallas, B.; Schulten, R.; Weirich, W.

    1984-03-29

    Hydratable compounds, particularly alcohols, can be hydrated by cathodically separated hydrogen, by bringing them into contact with the back of the cathode, which is itself permeable to hydrogen. This procedure is particularly suitable for the hydration of methanol by cathodically separated hydrogen during electrolysis of water in the context of a hybrid circuit process for generating hydrogen, together with steam reforming and synthesis of methanol as further parts of the process.

  14. Temperature dependence of lysozyme hydration and the role of elastic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Jing; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Tang, Pei; Xu, Yan; Wu, Yue

    2011-03-01

    Water plays a critical role in protein dynamics and functions. However, the most basic property of hydration—the water sorption isotherm—remains inadequately understood. Surface adsorption is the commonly adopted picture of hydration. Since it does not account for changes in the conformational entropy of proteins, it is difficult to explain why protein dynamics and activity change upon hydration. The solution picture of hydration provides an alternative approach to describe the thermodynamics of hydration. Here, the flexibility of proteins could influence the hydration level through the change of elastic energy upon hydration. Using nuclear magnetic resonance to measure the isotherms of lysozyme in situ between 18 and 2 °C, the present work provides evidence that the part of water uptake associated with the onset of protein function is significantly reduced below 8 °C. Quantitative analysis shows that such reduction is directly related to the reduction of protein flexibility and enhanced cost in elastic energy upon hydration at lower temperature. The elastic property derived from the water isotherm agrees with direct mechanical measurements, providing independent support for the solution model. This result also implies that water adsorption at charged and polar groups occurring at low vapor pressure, which is known for softening the protein, is crucial for the later stage of water uptake, leading to the activation of protein dynamics. The present work sheds light on the mutual influence of protein flexibility and hydration, providing the basis for understanding the role of hydration on protein dynamics.

  15. Linking basin-scale and pore-scale gas hydrate distribution patterns in diffusion-dominated marine hydrate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Hillman, Jess I. T.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study is to computationally determine the potential distribution patterns of diffusion-driven methane hydrate accumulations in coarse-grained marine sediments. Diffusion of dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate systems has been proposed as a potential transport mechanism through which large concentrations of hydrate can preferentially accumulate in coarse-grained sediments over geologic time. Using one-dimensional compositional reservoir simulations, we examine hydrate distribution patterns at the scale of individual sand layers (1-20 m thick) that are deposited between microbially active fine-grained material buried through the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). We then extrapolate to two-dimensional and basin-scale three-dimensional simulations, where we model dipping sands and multilayered systems. We find that properties of a sand layer including pore size distribution, layer thickness, dip, and proximity to other layers in multilayered systems all exert control on diffusive methane fluxes toward and within a sand, which in turn impact the distribution of hydrate throughout a sand unit. In all of these simulations, we incorporate data on physical properties and sand layer geometries from the Terrebonne Basin gas hydrate system in the Gulf of Mexico. We demonstrate that diffusion can generate high hydrate saturations (upward of 90%) at the edges of thin sands at shallow depths within the GHSZ, but that it is ineffective at producing high hydrate saturations throughout thick (greater than 10 m) sands buried deep within the GHSZ. Furthermore, we find that hydrate in fine-grained material can preserve high hydrate saturations in nearby thin sands with burial.Plain Language SummaryThis study combines one-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations to explore one potential process by which methane dissolved in water beneath the seafloor can be converted into solid methane hydrate. This work specifically examines one end-member methane transport

  16. Monitoring hydrate formation and dissociation in sandstone and bulk with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, B A; Moradi-Araghi, A; Stevens, J C

    2003-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a very effective tool for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates because of the large intensity contrast between the images of the liquid components and the solid hydrate. Tetrahydrofuran/water hydrate was used because the two liquid components are miscible and form hydrate at ambient pressure. These properties made this feasibility study proceed much faster than using methane/water, which requires high pressure to form the hydrate. The formation and dissociation was monitored first in a THF/water-saturated Berea sandstone plug and second in the bulk. In both cases it appeared that nucleation was needed to begin the formation process, i.e., the presence of surfaces in the sandstone and shaking of the bulk solution. Dissociation appeared to be dominated by the rate of thermal energy transfer. The dissociation temperature of hydrate formed in the sandstone plug was not significantly different from the dissociation temperature in bulk.

  17. Structure and Hydration of Highly Branched, Monodisperse Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, John; Nickels, Jonathan; Stanley, Christopher; Diallo, Souleymane; Katsaras, John; Dutcher, John

    Monodisperse phytoglycogen nanoparticles are a promising, new soft colloidal nanomaterial with many applications in the personal care, food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. These applications rely on exceptional properties that emerge from the highly branched structure of phytoglycogen and its interaction with water, such as extraordinarily high water retention, and low viscosity and exceptional stability in water. The structure and hydration of the nanoparticles was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). SANS allowed us to determine the size of the nanoparticles, evaluate their radial density profile, quantify the particle-to-particle spacing, and determine their water content. The results show clearly that the nanoparticles are highly hydrated, with each nanoparticle containing 250% of its mass in water, and that aqueous dispersions approach a jamming transition at ~ 25% (w/w). QENS experiments provided an independent and consistent measure of the high level of hydration of the particles.

  18. Structure II gas hydrates found below the bottom-simulating reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, M.; Cartwright, J. A.; Foschi, M.; Shipp, R. C.; Van Rensbergen, P.

    2016-06-01

    Gas hydrates are a major component in the organic carbon cycle. Their stability is controlled by temperature, pressure, water chemistry, and gas composition. The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is the primary seismic indicator of the base of hydrate stability in continental margins. Here we use seismic, well log, and core data from the convergent margin offshore NW Borneo to demonstrate that the BSR does not always represent the base of hydrate stability and can instead approximate the boundary between structure I hydrates above and structure II hydrates below. At this location, gas hydrate saturation below the BSR is higher than above and a process of chemical fractionation of the migrating free gas is responsible for the structure I-II transition. This research shows that in geological settings dominated by thermogenic gas migration, the hydrate stability zone may extend much deeper than suggested by the BSR.

  19. Estimates of future warming-induced methane emissions from hydrate offshore west Svalbard for a range of climate models

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Methane hydrate close to the hydrate stability limit in seafloor sediment could represent an important source of methane to the oceans and atmosphere as the oceans warm. We investigate the extent to which patterns of past and future ocean-temperature fluctuations influence hydrate stability in a region offshore West Svalbard where active gas venting has been observed. We model the transient behavior of the gas hydrate stability zone at 400–500 m water depth (mwd) in response to past temperatu...

  20. Determination of hydration film thickness using atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Changsheng; SONG Shaoxian; GU Qingbao

    2005-01-01

    Dispersion of a solid particle in water may lead to the formation of hydration film on the particle surface, which can strongly increase the repulsive force between the particles and thus strongly affect the stability of dispersions. The hydration film thickness, which varies with the variation of property of suspension particles, is one of the most important parameters of hydration film, and is also one of the most difficult parameters that can be measured accurately. In this paper, a method, based on force-distance curve of atomic force microscopy, for determining the hydration film thickness of particles is developed. The method utilizes the difference of cantilever deflection before, between and after penetrating the hydration films between tip and sample, which reflect the difference of slope on the force-distance curve. 3 samples, mica, glass and stainless steel, were used for hydration thickness determination, and the results show that the hydration film thickness between silicon tip and mica, glass and stainless steel are 30.0(2.0, 29.0(1.0 and 32.5(2.5 nm, respectively.

  1. Study on molecular controlled mining system of methane hydrate; Methane hydrate no bunshi seigyo mining ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyagawa, M.; Saito, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Karasawa, H.; Kiyono , F.; Nagaoki, R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Komai, T.; Haneda, H.; Takahashi, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Nada, H. [Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Basic studies are conducted for the collection of methane from the methane hydrate that exists at levels deeper than 500m in the sea. The relationship between the hydrate generation mechanism and water cluster structure is examined by use of mass spectronomy. It is found that, among the stable liquid phase clusters, the (H2O)21H{sup +} cluster is the most stable. Stable hydrate clusters are in presence in quantities, and participate in the formation of hydrate crystal nuclei. For the elucidation of the nucleus formation mechanism, a kinetic simulation is conducted of molecules in the cohesion system consisting of water and methane molecules. Water molecules that array near methane molecules at the normal pressure is disarrayed under a higher pressure for rearray into a hydrate structure. Hydrate formation and breakdown in the three-phase equilibrium state of H2O, CH4, and CO2 at a low temperature and high pressure are tested, which discloses that supercooling is required for formation, that it is possible to extract CH4 first for replacement by guest molecule CO2 since CO2 is stabler than CH4 at a lower pressure or higher temperature, and that formation is easier to take place when the grain diameter is larger at the formation point since larger grain diameters result in a higher formation temperature. 3 figs.

  2. Method for calculating the parameters of formation of hydrates from multicomponent gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaporozhets, E. P.; Shostak, N. A.

    2016-09-01

    A model of hydrate formation in multicomponent gas-liquid water or ice systems including the exo- and endothermic processes has been suggested. Based on this model, a method for calculating the molecular and energy parameters such as the hydration number, amount of moles of hydrate, amount of gas and water in it, its density and molar mass, and the energy and rate of hydrate formation was developed. A comparison of the calculated and experimental values of the parameters revealed that the difference between them varied from 0 to 5.46%.

  3. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-11-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant "onion-skin" fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2-3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched "hydration fronts" where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between 110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at 400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration rinds in perlites, measuring hundreds of microns, preserve the original D/H values of hydrating water as a recorder of paleoclimate conditions. Measured δD values in perlitic lavas are -150 to -191 or 20-40 ‰ lower than glass hydrated by modern Yellowstone waters. This suggests that Yellowstone perlites record the low-δD signature of glacial ice. Cooling calculations, combined with the observed high water diffusion coefficients noted for 60-150 °C, suggest that if sufficient hot

  4. 钻井液侵入海洋含水合物地层的一维数值模拟研究%Invasion of water-based drilling mud into oceanic gas-hydrate-bearing sediment:One-dimensional numerical simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁伏龙; 张可霓; 吴能友; 蒋国盛; 张凌; 刘力; 余义兵

    2013-01-01

    mud invasion into oceanic gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS) by taking hydrate reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico as a case. Compared with the conventional oil/gas-bearing sediments, hydrate dissociation and reformation are the main characteristics of mud invasion in GHBS when the invasion condition is in an unstable region of gas hydrates phase diagram. The simulation results show that the density (I. E. , corresponding pressure), temperature, and salt content of drilling fluids have great effects on the process of drilling fluid invasion. When the temperature and salt content of drilling fluids are constants, the higher the density of the drilling fluid is, the greater degree of invasion and hydrate dissociation are. The increased pore pressure caused by the mud invasion, endothermic cooling with hydrate dissociation compounded by the Joule-Thompson effect and lagged effect of heat transfer in sediments, together make water and gas forming secondary hydrates. The secondary hydrate together with existing hydrate probably makes the hydrate saturation higher than original hydrate saturation. This high saturation hydrate ring could be attributed to the displacement effect of mud invasion and the permeability reduction because of secondary hydrates forming. Under the same temperature and pressure of drilling fluids, the higher the salt concentration of the drilling fluid, the faster rate and greater degree of hydrate dissociation due to the stronger thermodynamic inhibition effect and heat transfer efficiency. The occurrence of high-saturation hydrate girdle band seems to mainly depend on the temperature and salinity of drilling fluids. The dissociated free gas, the dilution of water salinity associated with hydrate dissociation and the occurrence of high saturation hydrate ring probably cause the calculated hydrate saturation based on well logging is higher than that of actual hydrate-bearing sediments. Our simulations suggest that in order to keep wellbore stability

  5. CO2 hydrate: Synthesis, composition, structure, dissociation behavior, and a comparison to structure I CH4 hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Structure I (sI) carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrate exhibits markedly different dissociation behavior from sI methane (CH4) hydrate in experiments in which equilibrated samples at 0.1 MPa are heated isobarically at 13 K/h from 210 K through the H2O melting point (273.15 K). The CO2 hydrate samples release only about 3% of their gas content up to temperatures of 240 K, which is 22 K above the hydrate phase boundary. Up to 20% is released by 270 K, and the remaining CO2 is released at 271.0 plusmn; 0.5 K, where the sample temperature is buffered until hydrate dissociation ceases. This reproducible buffering temperature for the dissociation reaction CO2??nH2O = CO2(g) + nH2O(1 to s) is measurably distinct from the pure H2O melting point at 273.15 K, which is reached as gas evolution ceases. In contrast, when si CH4 hydrate is heated at the same rate at 0.1 MPa, >95% of the gas is released within 25 K of the equilibrium temperature (193 K at 0.1 MPa). In conjunction with the dissociation study, a method for efficient and reproducible synthesis of pure polycrystalline CO2 hydrate with suitable characteristics for material properties testing was developed, and the material was characterized. CO2 hydrate was synthesized from CO2 liquid and H2O solid and liquid reactants at pressures between 5 and 25 MPa and temperatures between 250 and 281 K. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination indicates that the samples consist of dense crystalline hydrate and 50-300 ??m diameter pores that are lined with euhedral cubic hydrate crystals. Deuterated hydrate samples made by this same procedure were analyzed by neutron diffraction at temperatures between 4 and 215 K; results confirm that complete conversion of water to hydrate has occurred and that the measured unit cell parameter and thermal expansion are consistent with previously reported values. On the basis of measured weight gain after synthesis and gas yields from the dissociation experiments, approximately all cages in the

  6. Importancia del agua en la hidratación de la población española: documento FESNAD 2010 Importance of water in the hydration of the Spanish population: FESNAD 2010 document

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Iglesias Rosado

    2011-02-01

    documento se presentan todas estas consideraciones en cuanto a la hidratación, y se realizan diferentes recomendaciones al respecto.For any healthy individual, thirst is an appropriate sign to drink water, except for babies, sportsmen, and most of ill and elderly people. In these instances, it is convenient to schedule appropriate times to drink water since great demands and the physiological mechanisms that determine thirst in these situations may condition water unbalances with important consequences for health and the physical and intellectual performance. The human body has a number of mechanisms that allow keeping constant the water content by adjusting intakes and wastes. Water balance is determined by intake (consumed water, beverages, and water contained in foods and wastes (urine, stools, the skin, and expired air from the lungs. Failure of these mechanisms and subsequent impairments in water balance may produce severe disarrangements that may threaten somebody´s life. In the present document, we analyze the evidences regarding the factors conditioning water needs in the different life stages and physiological situations, as well as the consequences of water unbalance under different situations. A proper hydration may be achieved by feeding and the use of water and other liquids. Although water is the beverage by excellence and represents the ideal way of restoring the losses and get hydrated, we should be aware that, from the very beginning, we have sought other liquid sources with hydration properties. In the last decades we have increased the consumption of different beverages, with a proliferation of sugar-containing beverages. Since excessive sugar consumption has been related to obesity and other chronic conditions, it is evident that the use of these caloric beverages should be rationalized, especially in children. In this document all the considerations regarding hydration are presented and different recommendations are exposed.

  7. Computer simulation of alkali metal cation-montmorillonite hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Fang-Ru Chou [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States); Skipper, N.T. [Univ. College, London (United Kingdom); Sposito, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Molecular structure in the interlayers of Li-, Na-, or K-Wyoming montmorillonite with one, two, or three adsorbed water layers was investigated for the first time by concurrent Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, based on the Matsouka-Clementi-Yoshimine, (MCY) model of water-water interactions. Calculated layer spacings, as well as interlayer-species self-diffusion coefficients, were in good agreement with available experimental data. Inner-sphere surface complexes of the cations with tetrahedral charge sites were observed for all hydrates, whereas outer-sphere surface complexes of the cations with octahedral charge sites, found also in the one-layer hydrate, tended to dissociate from the clay mineral basal planes into a diffuse layer in the two- and three-layer hydrates. Differences in the interlayer water structure among the hydrates mainly reflected cation solvation, although some water molecules were entrapped within cavities in the montmorillonite surface. All of the interlayer cation and water species exchanged on the time scale (0.2 ns) of the MD simulations. Comparisons with results obtained using, instead of the MCY model, the TIP4P model for water-water, cation-water, and cation-clay interactions indicated that layer spacings and interlayer species mobilities tend to be under-predicted by the TIP4P model.

  8. Clinical study on orofacial photonic hydration using phototherapy and biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Grandi, Natália D. P.; Florez, Fernando L. E.; Grecco, Clovis; Lopes, Luciana A.

    2015-06-01

    Skin hydration is important to prevent aging and dysfunction of orofacial system. Nowadays, it is known that cutaneous system is linked to muscle system, then every dentist need to treat healthy facial skin, as lips, keeping orofacial functions healthy. Thirty-two patients were treated using laser and led therapy single or associated to biomaterials (dermo-cosmetics) searching for the best protocol to promote skin hydration. Using a peace of equipment to measure electric impedance, percentage of water and oil from skin, before and after different treatments were analyzed. Statistic tests using 5% and 0.1% of significance were applied and results showed that light could improve hydration of epidermis layer of facial skin. Considering just light effect, using infrared laser followed by blue led system is more effective to hydration than just blue led system application. Considering dermo-cosmetic and light, the association between both presented the best result.

  9. Methane Hydrates: More Than a Viable Aviation Fuel Feedstock Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Demand for hydrocarbon fuels is steadily increasing, and greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise unabated with the energy demand. Alternate fuels will be coming on line to meet that demand. This report examines the recovering of methane from methane hydrates for fuel to meet this demand rather than permitting its natural release into the environment, which will be detrimental to the planet. Some background on the nature, vast sizes, and stability of sedimentary and permafrost formations of hydrates are discussed. A few examples of the severe problems associated with methane recovery from these hydrates are presented along with the potential impact on the environment and coastal waters. Future availability of methane from hydrates may become an attractive option for aviation fueling, and so future aircraft design associated with methane fueling is considered.

  10. Effect of Agents on Hydrate Formation and Low-Temperature Rheology of Polyalcohol Drilling Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guosheng Jiang; Fulong Ning; Ling Zhang; Yunzhong Tu

    2011-01-01

    In order to ensure safe drilling in deep water and marine gas hydrate bearing sediments,the needed characteristics of drilling fluid system were analyzed.Moreover,the effect of different agents on hydrate formation and the low-temperature rheology of designed polyalcohol drilling fluid were tested,respectively.The results show that clay can promote gas hydrate growth,while modified starch and polyalcohol can inhibit hydrate formation to some extent,and PVP K90 has a good performance on hydrate inhibition.The influence of clay on low-temperature rheology of polyglycols drilling fluid is notable.Therefore,the clay-free polyalcohol drilling fluid is suitable for deep water and marine gas hydrate drilling under optimal conditions.

  11. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  12. Three-phase flow of submarine gas hydrate pipe transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立; 徐海良; 杨放琼

    2015-01-01

    In the hydraulic transporting process of cutter-suction mining natural gas hydrate, when the temperature−pressure equilibrium of gas hydrate is broken, gas hydrates dissociate into gas. As a result, solid−liquid two-phase flow (hydrate and water) transforms into gas−solid−liquid three-phase flow (methane, hydrate and water) inside the pipeline. The Euler model and CFD-PBM model were used to simulate gas−solid−liquid three-phase flow. Numerical simulation results show that the gas and solid phase gradually accumulate to the center of the pipe. Flow velocity decreases from center to boundary of the pipe along the radial direction. Comparison of numerical simulation results of two models reveals that the flow state simulated by CFD-PBM model is more uniform than that simulated by Euler model, and the main behavior of the bubble is small bubbles coalescence to large one. Comparison of numerical simulation and experimental investigation shows that the values of flow velocity and gas fraction in CFD-PBM model agree with experimental data better than those in Euler model. The proposed PBM model provides a more accurate and effective way to estimate three-phase flow state of transporting gas hydrate within the submarine pipeline.

  13. Determination of the Physical Properties of Sediments Depending on Hydrate Saturation Using a "Quick Look" Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, B.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Seyberth, K.; Heeschen, K. U.; Priegnitz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and electromagnetic measurements are promising tools for the detection and quantification of gas hydrate occurrences in nature. The seismic wave velocity depends among others on the hydrate quantity and the quality (e.g. pore filling or cementing hydrate). For a proper interpretation of seismic data the knowledge of the dependency of physical properties as a function of hydrate saturation in a certain scenario is crucial. Within the SUGAR III project we determine such dependencies for various scenarios to support models for joint inversion of seismic and EM data e.g. for the shallow gas hydrate reservoirs in the Danube Delta. Since the formation of artificial lab samples containing pore filling hydrate from methane dissolved in water is a complex and time consuming procedure, we developed an easier alternative. Ice is very similar to hydrate in some of its physical properties. Therefore it might be used as analogous pore fill in a "quick look" experiment to determine the dependency of rock physical properties on hydrate content. We used the freezing point depression of a KCl solution to generate a dependency of ice saturation on temperature. The measured seismic wave velocity in dependence on ice saturation compares very well with data measured on a glass bead sediment sample with methane hydrate formed from methane dissolved in water. We could also observe that ice, formed from a salt solution in the pore space of sediment, behaves similar to methane hydrate as a non-cementing solid pore fill.

  14. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  15. Gas Hydrate Growth Kinetics: A Parametric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi-Erempagamo Tariyemienyo Meindinyo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrate growth kinetics was studied at a pressure of 90 bars to investigate the effect of temperature, initial water content, stirring rate, and reactor size in stirred semi-batch autoclave reactors. The mixing energy during hydrate growth was estimated by logging the power consumed. The theoretical model by Garcia-Ochoa and Gomez for estimation of the mass transfer parameters in stirred tanks has been used to evaluate the dispersion parameters of the system. The mean bubble size, impeller power input per unit volume, and impeller Reynold’s number/tip velocity were used for analyzing observed trends from the gas hydrate growth data. The growth behavior was analyzed based on the gas consumption and the growth rate per unit initial water content. The results showed that the growth rate strongly depended on the flow pattern in the cell, the gas-liquid mass transfer characteristics, and the mixing efficiency from stirring. Scale-up effects indicate that maintaining the growth rate per unit volume of reactants upon scale-up with geometric similarity does not depend only on gas dispersion in the liquid phase but may rather be a function of the specific thermal conductance, and heat and mass transfer limitations created by the limit to the degree of the liquid phase dispersion is batched and semi-batched stirred tank reactors.

  16. Proton transfer from water to ketyl radical anion: Assessment of critical size of hydrated cluster and free energy barrier in solution from first principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sohag; Dasgupta, Teesta; Mallik, Bhabani S.

    2016-09-01

    We present the reactivity of an organic intermediate by studying the proton transfer process from water to ketyl radical anion using gas phase electronic structure calculations and the metadynamics method based first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. Our results indicate that during the micro solvation of anion by water molecules systematically, the presence of minimum three water molecules in the gas phase cluster is sufficient to observe the proton transfer event. The analysis of trajectories obtained from initial FPMD simulation of an aqueous solution of the anion does not show any evident of complete transfer of the proton from water. The cooperativity of water molecules and the relatively weak anion-water interaction in liquid state prohibit the full release of the proton. Using biasing potential through first principles metadynamics simulations, we report the observation of proton transfer reaction from water to ketyl radical anion with a barrier height of 16.0 kJ/mol.

  17. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    In this work the nucleation kinetics of propane gas hydrate has been investigated experimentally using a stirred batch reactor. The experiments have been performed isothermally recording the pressure as a function of time. Experiments were conducted at different stirring rates, but in the same......) to the aqueous phase was found to reduce the gas dissolution rate slightly. However the induction times were prolonged quite substantially upon addition of PVP.The induction time data were correlated using a newly developed induction time model based on crystallization theory also capable of taking into account...... the presence of additives. In most cases reasonable agreement between the data and the model could be obtained. The results revealed that especially the effective surface energy between propane hydrate and water is likely to change when the stirring rate varies from very high to low. The prolongation...

  18. Predicting hydration energies for multivalent ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    We have predicted the free energy of hydration for 40 monovalent and multivalent cations and anions using density functional theory and the implicit solvent model COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) at the Becke-Perdew (BP)/Triple zeta valence with polarization functions...... (TZVP) level. Agreement with experimental data for monovalent and divalent ions is good and shows no significant systematic errors. Predictions are noticeably better than with standard COSMO. The agreement with experimental data for trivalent and tetravalent ions is slightly worse and shows systematic...... errors. Our results indicate that quantum chemical calculations combined with COSMO-RS solvent treatment is a reliable method for treating multivalent ions in solution, provided one hydration shell of explicit water molecules is included for metal cations. The accuracy is not high enough to allow...

  19. Detection and Appraisal of Gas Hydrates: Indian Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sain, K.

    2009-04-01

    Gas hydrates, found in shallow sediments of permafrost and outer continental margins, are crystalline form of methane and water. The carbon within global gas hydrates is estimated two times the carbon contained in world-wide fossil fuels. It is also predicted that 15% recovery of gas hydrates can meet the global energy requirement for the next 200 years. Several parameters like bathymetry, seafloor temperature, sediment thickness, rate of sedimentation and total organic carbon content indicate very good prospect of gas hydrates in the vast offshore regions of India. Methane stored in the form of gas hydrates within the Indian exclusive economic zone is estimated to be few hundred times the country's conventional gas reserve. India produces less than one-third of her oil requirement and gas hydrates provide great hopes as a viable source of energy in the 21st century. Thus identification and quantitative assessment of gas hydrates are very important. By scrutiny and reanalysis of available surface seismic data, signatures of gas hydrates have been found out in the Kerala-Konkan and Saurashtra basins in the western margin, and Krishna-Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman regions in the eastern margin of India by mapping the bottom simulating reflector or BSR based on its characteristic features. In fact, the coring and drilling in 2006 by the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program have established the ground truth in the eastern margin. It has become all the more important now to identify further prospective regions with or without BSR; demarcate the lateral/areal extent of gas hydrate-bearing sediments and evaluate their resource potential in both margins of India. We have developed various approaches based on seismic traveltime tomography; waveform inversion; amplitude versus offset (AVO) modeling; AVO attributes; seismic attributes and rock physics modeling for the detection, delineation and quantification of gas-hydrates. The blanking, reflection strength, instantaneous

  20. Acute physiological response to indoor cycling with and without hydration: case and self-control study

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ramos-Jiménez; R. P. Hernández-Torres; A. Wall-Medrano; P. V. Torres-Durán; M. A. Juárez-Oropeza; J. A. Solís Ceballos

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Oral rehydration drinks help maintain physical capacity and hydration during exercise. Objective: Evaluate, in a case and self-control study, the effectiveness of three hydration and exercise protocols on work capacity and physical and psychosomatic stress during indoor cycling (InC). Methods: 14 middle-aged eutrophic men participated in three controlled randomly and not sequentially hydration (~278 mL 6/c 15 min) and exercise (InC/90 min) protocols: No liquids, plain water, or ...

  1. Gas Hydrate Stability and Sampling: The Future as Related to the Phase Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dendy Sloan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The phase diagram for methane + water is explained, in relation to hydrate applications, such as in flow assurance and in nature. For natural applications, the phase diagram determines the regions for hydrate formation for two- and three-phase conditions. Impacts are presented for sample preparation and recovery. We discuss an international study for “Round Robin” hydrate sample preparation protocols and testing.

  2. Gas hydrate occurrence in the Krishna-Godavari offshore basin off the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.

    as the ecology of environment below the water and subsurface as well. Recent gas hydrate expeditions (Hydrate Ridge, Oregon Margin, Cascadian Margin, Gulf of Mexico, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, South China Sea, East Sea) aboard JOIDES... boundaries, and associates with amplitude blanking above and below it. Further, the BSR also indicates a depth below which the hydrate destabilises. Some of the best known world major oilfields (for example the Gulf of Mexico, the Norwegian Sea, and along...

  3. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    OpenAIRE

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi; Shiva Saran Das; Nakshatra Bahadur Singh; Sarita Rai; Namdev Shriram Gajbhiye

    2008-01-01

    Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP) and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP) on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. Th...

  4. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  5. Micromechanical measurements of the effect of surfactants on cyclopentane hydrate shell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erika P; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the effect of surfactants on clathrate hydrate growth and morphology, especially particle shell strength and cohesion force, is critical to advancing new strategies to mitigate hydrate plug formation. In this study, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and polysorbate 80 surfactants were included during the growth of cyclopentane hydrates at several concentrations above and below the critical micelle concentration. A novel micromechanical method was applied to determine the force required to puncture the hydrate shell using a glass cantilever (with and without surfactants), with annealing times ranging from immediately after the hydrate nucleated to 90 minutes after formation. It was shown that the puncture force was decreased by the addition of both surfactants up to a maximum of 79%. Over the entire range of annealing times (0-90 minutes), the thickness of the hydrate shell was also measured. However, there was no clear change in shell thickness with the addition of surfactants. The growth rate of the hydrate shell was found to vary less than 15% with the addition of surfactants. The cohesive force between two hydrate particles was measured for each surfactant and found to be reduced by 28% to 78%. Interfacial tension measurements were also performed. Based on these results, microscopic changes to the hydrate shell morphology (due to the presence of surfactants) were proposed to cause the decrease in the force required to break the hydrate shell, since no macroscopic morphology changes were observed. Understanding the hydrate shell strength can be critical to reducing the capillary bridge interaction between hydrate particles or controlling the release of unconverted water from the interior of the hydrate particle, which can cause rapid hydrate conversion.

  6. Acoustical method of whole-body hydration status monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvazyan, A. P.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Calhoun, M.; Utter, A.

    2016-07-01

    An acoustical handheld hydration monitor (HM) for assessing the water balance of the human body was developed. Dehydration is a critical public health problem. Many elderly over age of 65 are particularly vulnerable as are infants and young children. Given that dehydration is both preventable and reversible, the need for an easy-to-perform method for the detection of water imbalance is of the utmost clinical importance. The HM is based on an experimental fact that ultrasound velocity in muscle is a linear function of water content and can be referenced to the hydration status of the body. Studies on the validity of HM for the assessment of whole-body hydration status were conducted in the Appalachian State University, USA, on healthy young adults and on elderly subjects residing at an assisted living facility. The HM was able to track changes in total body water during periods of acute dehydration and rehydration in athletes and day-to-day and diurnal variability of hydration in elderly. Results of human studies indicate that HM has a potential to become an efficient tool for detecting abnormal changes in the body hydration status.

  7. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  8. A Sea Floor Methane Hydrate Displacement Experiment Using N2 Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Hester, K.

    2009-12-01

    The production of free methane gas from solid methane hydrate accumulations presents a considerable challenge. The presently preferred procedure is pressure reduction whereby the relief of pressure to a condition outside the hydrate phase boundary creates a gas phase. The reaction is endothermic and thus a problematic water ice phase can form if the extraction of gas is too rapid, limiting the applicability of this procedure. Additionally, the removal of the formation water in contact with the hydrate phase is required before meaningful pressure reduction can be attained -- and this can take time. An alternate approach that has been suggested is the injection of liquid CO2 into the formation, thereby displacing the formation water. Formation of a solid CO2 hydrate is thermodynamically favored under these conditions. Competition between CH4 and CO2 for the hydrate host water molecules can occur displacing CH4 from the solid to the gas phase with formation of a solid CO2 hydrate. We have investigated another alternate approach with displacement of the surrounding bulk water phase by N2 gas, resulting in rapid release of CH4 gas and complete loss of the solid hydrate phase. Our experiment was carried out at the Southern Summit of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, at 780m depth. There we harvested hydrate fragments from surficial sediments using the robotic arm of the ROV Doc Ricketts. Specimens of the hydrate were collected about 1m above the sediment surface in an inverted funnel with a mesh covered neck as they floated upwards. The accumulated hydrate was transferred to an inverted glass cylinder, and N2 gas was carefully injected into this container. Displacement of the water phase occurred and when the floating hydrate material approached the lower rim the gas injection was stopped and the cylinder placed upon a flat metal plate effectively sealing the system. We returned to this site after 7 days to measure progress, and observed complete loss of the hydrate phase

  9. Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Methane Gas Production from Gulf of Mexico Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore Mohanty; Bill Cook; Mustafa Hakimuddin; Ramanan Pitchumani; Damiola Ogunlana; Jon Burger; John Shillinglaw

    2006-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Estimates of the amounts of methane sequestered in gas hydrates worldwide are speculative and range from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet (modified from Kvenvolden, 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In this project novel techniques were developed to form and dissociate methane hydrates in porous media, to measure acoustic properties and CT properties during hydrate dissociation in the presence of a porous medium. Hydrate depressurization experiments in cores were simulated with the use of TOUGHFx/HYDRATE simulator. Input/output software was developed to simulate variable pressure boundary condition and improve the ease of use of the simulator. A series of simulations needed to be run to mimic the variable pressure condition at the production well. The experiments can be matched qualitatively by the hydrate simulator. The temperature of the core falls during hydrate dissociation; the temperature drop is higher if the fluid withdrawal rate is higher. The pressure and temperature gradients are small within the core. The sodium iodide concentration affects the dissociation pressure and rate. This procedure and data will be useful in designing future hydrate studies.

  10. Site selection for DOE/JIP gas hydrates drilling in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Ruppel, C. [United States Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Shelander, D.; Dai, J. [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States); McConnell, D. [AOA Geophysics Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shedd, W. [Minerals Management Service, New Orleans, LA (United States); Frye, M. [Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States); Boswell, R.; Rose, K. [United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Lab; Jones, E.; Latham, T. [Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Collett, T. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dugan, B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Science; Wood, W. [United States Naval Research Lab, Stennis Space Center, MS (United States)

    2008-07-01

    As drilling operations in the Gulf of Mexico shift from shallow water to deeper water targets, operators are encountering sediments with pressure-temperature regimes for gas hydrate stability. The Chevron-led Joint Industry Project (JIP) on methane hydrates was formed in 2001 to study the hazards associated with drilling these types of hydrate-bearing sediments and to assess the capacity of geological and geophysical tools to predict gas hydrate distributions and concentrations. Selected reservoirs units with high concentrations of gas hydrate were sampled to obtain physical data on hydrate bearing sediments. The JIP work validates methods devised to estimate gas hydrate distribution and concentrations in order to analyze the resource potential of these hydrate-bearing sediments. This paper described the geologic and geophysical setting of 3 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico that contain hydrate-bearing reservoir sands. The three sites that will undergo exploratory drilling and a logging campaign in late spring 2008 include the Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system characterized with seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets sheet sands and associated channel deposits within a small basin. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. 39 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  11. Animated molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated caesium-smectite interlayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sposito Garrison

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer animation of center of mass coordinates obtained from 800 ps molecular dynamics simulations of Cs-smectite hydrates (1/3 and 2/3 water monolayers provided information concerning the structure and dynamics of the interlayer region that could not be obtained through traditional simulation analysis methods. Cs+ formed inner sphere complexes with the mineral surface, and could be seen to jump from one attracting location near a layer charge site to the next, while water molecules were observed to migrate from the hydration shell of one ion to that of another. Neighboring ions maintained a partial hydration shell by sharing water molecules, such that a single water molecule hydrated two ions simultaneously for hundreds of picoseconds. Cs-montmorillonite hydrates featured the largest extent of this sharing interaction, because interlayer ions were able to inhabit positions near surface cavities as well as at their edges, close to oxygen triads. The greater positional freedom of Cs+ within the montmorillonite interlayer, a result of structural hydroxyl orientation and low tetrahedral charge, promoted the optimization of distances between cations and water molecules required for water sharing. Preference of Cs+ for locations near oxygen triads was observed within interlayer beidellite and hectorite. Water molecules also could be seen to interact directly with the mineral surface, entering its surface cavities to approach attracting charge sites and structural hydroxyls. With increasing water content, water molecules exhibited increased frequency and duration of both cavity habitation and water sharing interactions. Competition between Cs+ and water molecules for surface sites was evident. These important cooperative and competitive features of interlayer molecular behavior were uniquely revealed by animation of an otherwise highly complex simulation output.

  12. Esterase catalysis of substrate vapour: enzyme activity occurs at very low hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Penelope A; Daniel, Roy M; Monk, Colin; Dunn, Rachel V

    2004-10-01

    It has been generally accepted that enzyme activity requires a minimal hydration of about 0.2 g H2O g(-1) protein. This fits well with evidence that hydration above this level is associated with the onset of intramolecular motions. The influence of enzyme hydration on the hydrolysis of substrate by Candida rugosa Lipase B and pig liver esterase was investigated. Each enzyme was studied as a powder at various hydration levels, using vapour phase ethyl butyrate as substrate. This procedure allows the separation of those effects that are due to hydration from those arising from diffusional constraints. We found hydrolytic activity in both enzymes at all hydration levels above zero (between 0.054-0.47 and 0.029-0.60 g H2O g(-1) protein, respectively) that were investigated. The lowest hydration level investigated, hydrolysis of ethyl butyrate requires water as a second substrate, the absence of activity at zero hydration does not rule out the possibility of enzyme activity in the absence of water. These results suggest that the properties conferred on proteins by water, at least above 10% surface coverage (in this case corresponding to a hydration level of 0.03 g H2O g(-1) protein), are not a requirement for enzyme catalysis.

  13. High pressure rheology of gas hydrate formed from multiphase systems using modified Couette rheometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav; Linga, Praveen; Sangwai, Jitendra S.

    2017-02-01

    Conventional rheometers with concentric cylinder geometries do not enhance mixing in situ and thus are not suitable for rheological studies of multiphase systems under high pressure such as gas hydrates. In this study, we demonstrate the use of modified Couette concentric cylinder geometries for high pressure rheological studies during the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate formed from pure water and water-decane systems. Conventional concentric cylinder Couette geometry did not produce any hydrates in situ and thus failed to measure rheological properties during hydrate formation. The modified Couette geometries proposed in this work observed to provide enhanced mixing in situ, thus forming gas hydrate from the gas-water-decane system. This study also nullifies the use of separate external high pressure cell for such measurements. The modified geometry was observed to measure gas hydrate viscosity from an initial condition of 0.001 Pa s to about 25 Pa s. The proposed geometries also possess the capability to measure dynamic viscoelastic properties of hydrate slurries at the end of experiments. The modified geometries could also capture and mimic the viscosity profile during the hydrate dissociation as reported in the literature. The present study acts as a precursor for enhancing our understanding on the rheology of gas hydrate formed from various systems containing promoters and inhibitors in the context of flow assurance.

  14. Gas hydrate fast nucleation from melting ice and quiescent growth along vertical heat transfer tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Yingming; GUO; Kaihua; LIANG; Deqing; FAN; Shuanshi

    2005-01-01

    During the observation of HCFC141b gas hydrate growth processes outside a vertical heat transfer tube, two exciting phenomena were found: fast nucleation of gas hydrate from melting ice, and the spontaneous permeation of water into the guest phases along the surface of heat transfer tube to form gas hydrate continuously. These two phenomena were explained with Zhou & Sloan's hypothesis and the theory of surface free energy respectively, and a novel method of gas hydrate formation was presented--gas hydrate fast nucleation from melting ice and quiescent growth along heat transfer tube. There is no mechanic stirring in this method, the formed gas hydrates are compact, the ratio of unreacted interstitial water is little, which overcome the drawback of high energy cost and high ratio of unreacted interstitial water among the formed gas hydrates in the system with mechanic stirring. This finding will benefit the gas hydrate application technologies such as natural gas storage technology or cool storage technology with gas hydrate.

  15. The role of hydration in enzyme activity and stability: 1. Water adsorption by alcohol dehydrogenase in a continuous gas phase reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Russell, A J

    1996-03-20

    The adsorption of water by alcohol dehydrogenase from baker's yeast (YADH) has been measured in a continuous-flow gas reactor at varying temperatures. Adsorption isotherms in the presence of gaseous organic substrates are compared to those from organic-free gas mixtures. Almost no effect of the hydrophobic molecule on total water adsorption was observed. A rarely mentioned multilayer isotherm model from the 1930s, the Huttig's isotherm, has been found to fit the experimental data with extremely good accuracy. The model enables the calculation of both the heat of adsorption of water to the enzyme and the total amount of water necessary for monolayer coverage. The heat of adsorption of water in the first layer is approximately -16 kcal/mol. This tight binding of water, which is much higher than the heat of condensation of pure water, helps to explain the kinetic properties of YADH-catalyzed reactions on vapor phase substrates. While the monolayer coverage is temperature independent, the enzyme demonstrates hysteresis when transitioning between adsorption and desorption. The hysteresis observed in water sorption studies may also explain previously reported properties of the enzyme. (c) 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mora-Rodriguez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20–60 years from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake which was subtracted from daily urine volume to allow calculation of non-renal water loss (i.e., mostly sweating. Hydration status was assessed by urine and blood osmolality. A negative association was seen between ambient temperature and PA (r = −0.277; p < 0.001. Lower PA with high temperatures did not prevent increased non-renal water losses (i.e., sweating and elevated urine and blood osmolality (r = 0.218 to 0.163 all p < 0.001. When summer and winter data were combined PA was negatively associated with urine osmolality (r = −0.153; p = 0.001. Our data suggest that environmental heat acts to reduce voluntary PA but this is not sufficient to prevent moderate dehydration (increased osmolality. On the other hand, increased PA is associated with improved hydration status (i.e., lower urine and blood osmolality.

  17. [NMF and cosmetology of cutaneous hydration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, J-P

    2002-01-01

    In the stratum corneum, the water binds to the intracellular hygroscopic and hydrosoluble substances called "natural moisturizing factors" or NMF. These "natural moisturizing factors" contained in the corneocytes are formed during epidermal differentiation and may represent up to 10 p. cent of the corneocyte mass. They are principally amino acids, carboxylic pyrrolidone acid, lactic acid, urea, glucose and mineral ions. Keratinization plays an important part in the formation of NMF that exhibit strong osmotic potential attracting the water molecules. The binding of water to NMF is the static aspect of cutaneous hydration. The second, dynamic, aspect is related to the selective permeability of the stratum corneum and to its lipid barrier properties, the permeability of which depends on the integrity and nature of the inter-corneocyte lipids and their lamellar organization between the cells. In these conditions, hydration cosmetics rely on two concepts that can be isolated or associated: the supply of hydrophilic substances to the stratum corneum, capable of attracting and retaining water (moisturizer) or capable of restoring the barrier in order to restore normal water loss or of protecting it against aggression (occlusive).

  18. The influence of sedimentation rate variation on the occurrence of methane hydrate crystallized from dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuncheng, C.; Chen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is commonly delivered to the gas hydrate stability zone by advection of methane-bearing fluids, diffusion of dissolved methane, and in-situ biogenic methane production (Davie and Buffett, 2003), except at cold vent sites. Burial of pore water and sediment compaction can induce the fluid flux change (Bhatnagar et al., 2007). Sedimentation supply the organic material for methane production. In addition, Gas hydrate can move to below gas hydrate stability zone and decompose via sedimentation. Therefore, sedimentation significantly affect the gas hydrate accumulation. ODP site 997 located at the Blake Ridge. The sedimentation rate is estimated to 48 m/Ma, 245m/Ma, 17.2 m/Ma and 281m/Ma for 0-2.5Ma, 2.5-3.75Ma, 3.75-4.4Ma, and 4.4-5.9Ma, respectively, according to the age-depth profile of biostratigraphic marker of nonnofossils(Paull et al., 1996). We constructed a gas hydrate formation model and apply to ODP sites 997 to evaluate the influence of variation of sedimentation rate on gas hydrate accumulation. Our results show that the gas hydrate format rate varied from 0.013mol/m2-a to 0.017mol/m2-a and the gas hydrate burial to below gas hydrate stability zone varied from 0.001mol/m2-a to 0.018mol/m2-a during recently 5Ma. The gas hydrate formation rate by pore water advection and dissolved methane diffusion would be lower, and the top occurrence of gas hydrate would be shallower, when the sedimentation rate is higher. With higher sedimentation rate, the amount of gas hydrate burial to below stability zone would be larger. The relative high sedimentation rate before 2.5 Ma at ODP site 997 produced the gas hydrate saturation much lower than present value, and over 60% of present gas hydrates are formed during recent 2.5Ma. Reference: Bhatnagar,G., Chapman, W. G.,Dickens, G. R., et al. Generalization of gas hydrate distribution and saturation in marine sediments by scaling of thermodynamic and transport processes. American Journal of Science, 2007, 307, 861

  19. Observation of ice sheet formation on methane and ethane gas hydrates using a scanning confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, J.; Shimomura, N.; Ebinuma, T.; Narita, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Toyohira, Sapporo (Japan). Methane Hydrate Research Lab.

    2008-07-01

    Interest in gas hydrates has increased in recent years due to the discovery of large deposits under the ocean floor and in permafrost regions. Natural gas hydrates, including methane, is expected to become a new energy source and a medium for energy storage and transportation. Gas hydrates consist of an open network of water molecules that are hydrogen-bonded in a similar manner to ice. Gas molecules are interstitially engaged under high pressures and low temperatures. Although the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate under atmospheric pressure is about 193 K, studies have shown that methane hydrate can be stored at atmospheric pressure and 267 K for 2 years. Because of this phenomenon, known as self-preservation, transportation and storage of methane hydrate can occur at temperature conditions milder than those for liquefied methane gas at atmospheric pressure. This study examined the surface changes of methane and ethane hydrates during dissociation using an optical microscope and confocal scanning microscope (CSM). This paper reported on the results when the atmospheric gas pressure was decreased. Ice sheets formed on the surfaces of methane and ethane gas hydrates due to depressurizing dissociation of methane and ethane hydrates when the methane and ethane gas pressures were decreased at designated temperatures. The dissociation of methane gas hydrate below below 237 K resulted in the generation of small ice particles on the hydrate surface. A transparent ice sheet formed on the hydrate surface above 242 K. The thickness of the ice sheet on the methane hydrate surface showed the maximum of ca. 30 {mu}m at 253 K. In the case of ethane hydrates, ice particles and ice sheets formed below 262 and 267 respectively. Since the ice particles and ice sheets were formed by water molecules generated during the gas hydrate dissociation, the mechanism of ice sheet formation depends on the dissociation rate of hydrate, ice particle sintering rate, and water molecule

  20. Effects of lanthanoid cations on the first electronic transition of liquid water studied using attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet spectroscopy: ligand field splitting of lanthanoid hydrates in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeyoshi; Ikehata, Akifumi; Morisawa, Yusuke; Higashi, Noboru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2012-10-15

    The effects of the lanthanoid cations (Ln(3+)) on the first electronic transition (à ← X̃) of liquid water were studied from the attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet (ATR-FUV) spectra of trivalent Ln(3+) electrolyte solutions (1 M), except Pm(3+). The à ← X̃ transition energies of the Ln(3+) electrolyte solutions show a distinct tetrad in their dependence on the number of 4f electrons of the Ln(3+) cations. For the half occupation period of the 4f electrons, the à ← X̃ transition energies decrease from La(3+) (4f(0), 8.0375 eV) to Nd(3+) (4f(3), 8.0277 eV) and increase from Sm(3+) (4f(5), 8.0279 eV) to Gd(3+) (4f(7), 8.0374 eV). For the complete occupation period, there are two local minima at Dy(3+) (4f(9), 8.0349 eV) and Yb(3+) (4f(13), 8.0355 eV). The à ← X̃ transition energies of the tetrad nodes (La(3+), Gd(3+), Ho(3+) (4f(10)), and Lu(3+) (4f(14))) increase slightly, as the nuclear charge increases in accordance with the hydration energies of the Ln(3+) cations. The energy difference (ΔE) between the à ← X̃ transition energies and the line between La(3+) and Lu(3+) is largest at Nd(3+) (80.5 cm(-1)) for the half occupation period and at Dy(3+) (26.1 cm(-1)) and Yb(3+) (24.5 cm(-1)) for the complete occupation period. The order of magnitude of ΔE is comparable to the ligand field splitting (LFS) of the ground state multiplets of Ln(3+) complexes. The observed tetrad trend of the à ← X̃ transition energies of the Ln(3+) electrolyte solutions across the 4f period reflects the hydration energies of the Ln(3+) cations and the LFS induced by water ligands.

  1. SCHEMES OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM NATURAL GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑霞; 陈月明; 杜庆军

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are a kind of nonpolluting and high quality energy resources for future, the reserves of which are about twice of the carbon of the current fossil energy (petroleum, natural gas and coal) on the earth. And it will be the most important energy for the 21st century. The energy balance and numerical simulation are applied to study the schemes of the natural gas hydrates production in this paper,and it is considered that both depressurization and thermal stimulation are effective methods for exploiting natural gas hydrates, and that the gas production of the thermal stimulation is higher than that of the depressurization. But thermal stimulation is non-economic because it requires large amounts of energy.Therefore the combination of the two methods is a preferable method for the current development of the natural gas hydrates. The main factors which influence the production of natural gas hydrates are: the temperature of injected water, the injection rate, the initial saturation of the hydrates and the initial temperature of the reservoir which is the most important factor.

  2. Gas hydrates: entrance to a methane age or climate threat?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krey, Volker; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Grubler, Arnulf; O' Neill, Brian; Riahi, Keywan [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Schlossplatz 1, 2361 Laxenburg (Austria); Canadell, Josep G [Global Carbon Project, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, GPO Box 3023, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Abe, Yuichi [Social Science Consulting Unit, Japan Nus Co. Ltd, Loop-X Building 7F, 9-15 Kaigan 3-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0022 (Japan); Andruleit, Harald [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany); Archer, David [Department of the Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hamilton, Neil T M [WWF International Arctic Programme, Kristian Augusts gate 7a, 0130 Oslo (Norway); Johnson, Arthur [Hydrate Energy International, 612 Petit Berdot Drive, Kenner, LA 70065 (United States); Kostov, Veselin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lamarque, Jean-Francois [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Langhorne, Nicholas [US Office of Naval Research Global, Edison House, 223 Old Marylebone Road, London (United Kingdom); Nisbet, Euan G [Department of Geology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Riedel, Michael [Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montreal, QC, H3A 2A7 (Canada); Wang Weihua [Computer Network Information Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 4, 4th South Street, ZhongGuanCun, PO Box 349, Haidian District, Beijing 100080 (China); Yakushev, Vladimir, E-mail: krey@iiasa.ac.a [Gazprom VNIIGAZ LLC, Razvilka, Leninsky District, Moscow Region, 142717 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-15

    Methane hydrates, ice-like compounds in which methane is held in crystalline cages formed by water molecules, are widespread in areas of permafrost such as the Arctic and in sediments on the continental margins. They are a potentially vast fossil fuel energy source but, at the same time, could be destabilized by changing pressure-temperature conditions due to climate change, potentially leading to strong positive carbon-climate feedbacks. To enhance our understanding of both the vulnerability of and the opportunity provided by methane hydrates, it is necessary (i) to conduct basic research that improves the highly uncertain estimates of hydrate occurrences and their response to changing environmental conditions, and (ii) to integrate the agendas of energy security and climate change which can provide an opportunity for methane hydrates-in particular if combined with carbon capture and storage-to be used as a 'bridge fuel' between carbon-intensive fossil energies and zero-emission energies. Taken one step further, exploitation of dissociating methane hydrates could even mitigate against escape of methane to the atmosphere. Despite these opportunities, so far, methane hydrates have been largely absent from energy and climate discussions, including global hydrocarbon assessments and the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  3. Pectin as an Extraordinary Natural Kinetic Hydrate Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shurui; Fan, Shuanshi; Fang, Songtian; Lang, Xuemei; Wang, Yanhong; Chen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Pectin as a novel natural kinetic hydrate inhibitor, expected to be eco-friendly and sufficiently biodegradable, was studied in this paper. The novel crystal growth inhibition (CGI) and standard induction time methods were used to evaluate its effect as hydrate inhibitor. It could successfully inhibit methane hydrate formation at subcooling temperature up to 12.5 °C and dramatically slowed the hydrate crystal growth. The dosage of pectin decreased by 66% and effective time extended 10 times than typical kinetic inhibitor. Besides, its maximum growth rate was no more than 2.0%/h, which was far less than 5.5%/h of growth rate for PVCap at the same dosage. The most prominent feature was that it totally inhibited methane hydrate crystal rapid growth when hydrate crystalline occurred. Moreover, in terms of typical natural inhibitors, the inhibition activity of pectin increased 10.0-fold in induction time and 2.5-fold in subcooling temperature. The extraordinary inhibition activity is closely related to its hydrogen bonding interaction with water molecules and the hydrophilic structure. Finally, the biodegradability and economical efficiency of pectin were also taken into consideration. The results showed the biodegradability improved 75.0% and the cost reduced by more than 73.3% compared to typical commercial kinetic inhibitors.

  4. Stability Analysis of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Soils Considering Dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromasa Iwai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the methane hydrate dissociation process may lead to unstable behavior such as large ground deformations, uncontrollable gas production, etc. A linear instability analysis was performed in order to investigate which variables have a significant effect on the onset of the instability behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soils subjected to dissociation. In the analysis a simplified viscoplastic constitutive equation is used for the soil sediment. The stability analysis shows that the onset of instability of the material system mainly depends on the strain hardening-softening parameter, the degree of strain, and the permeability for water and gas. Then, we conducted a numerical analysis of gas hydrate-bearing soil considering hydrate dissociation in order to investigate the effect of the parameters on the system. The simulation method used in the present study can describe the chemo-thermo-mechanically coupled behaviors such as phase changes from hydrates to water and gas, temperature changes and ground deformation. From the numerical results, we found that basically the larger the permeability for water and gas is, the more stable the simulation results are. These results are consistent with those obtained from the linear stability analysis.

  5. Hydration-controlled bacterial motility and dispersal on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Wang, G.; Gulez, Gamze;

    2010-01-01

    hydrated habitats, where water dynamics result in fragmented aquatic habitats connected by micrometric films, is debated. Here, we quantify the spatial dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and its nonflagellated isogenic mutant as affected by the hydration status of a rough porous surface using...... an experimental system that mimics aquatic habitats found in unsaturated soils. The flagellar motility of the model soil bacterium decreased sharply within a small range of water potential (0 to −2 kPa) and nearly ceased in liquid films of effective thickness smaller than 1.5 μm. However, bacteria could rapidly...

  6. Hydration of protonated aromatic amino acids: phenylalanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bing; Wyttenbach, Thomas; Bowers, Michael T

    2009-04-01

    The first steps of hydration of the protonated aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine were studied experimentally employing a mass spectrometer equipped with a drift cell to examine the sequential addition of individual water molecules in equilibrium experiments and theoretically by a combination of molecular mechanics and electronic structure calculations (B3LYP/6-311++G**) on the three amino acid systems including up to five water molecules. It is found that both the ammonium and carboxyl groups offer good water binding sites with binding energies of the order of 13 kcal/mol for the first water molecule. Subsequent water molecules bind less strongly, in the range of 7-11 kcal/mol for the second through fifth water molecules. The ammonium group is able to host up to three water molecules and the carboxyl group one water molecule before additional water molecules bind either to the amino acid side chain as in tyrosine or to already-bound water in a second solvation shell around the ammonium group. Reasons for the surprisingly high water affinity of the neutral carboxyl group, comparable to that of the charge-carrying ammonium group, are found to be high intrinsic hydrophilicity, favorable charge-dipole alignment, and--for the case of multiply hydrated species--favorable dipole-dipole interaction among water molecules and the lack of alternative fully exposed hydration sites.

  7. Using stable isotopes (δ^{18}O and δ$D) of gypsum hydration water to unravel the mode of gypsum speleothem formation in semi-arid caves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gázquez, Fernando; Calaforra, Jose Maria; Evans, Nicholas P.; Hodell, David A.

    2016-04-01

    Subaerial gypsum speleothems form during the evaporation of calcium-sulfate-rich solutions in caves. The evaporation of infiltration water is the widely accepted mechanism to explain precipitation of gypsum speleothems; i.e., the dissolution of gypsum host-rock (e.g. Messinian marine gypsum) supplies Ca2+ and SO42- ions to cave waters and subsequent evaporation leads to gypsum saturation. However, water condensation actively occurs in caves of semi-arid regions and plays a key role in subaerial cave speleogenesis and recharge of aquifers in low-rainfall environments. To date, water condensation in karstic environments has not been considered as an important factor in gypsum speleothem formation. We collected speleothem samples from the upper passages of Covadura Cave in the gypsum karst of Sorbas (Almeria, SE Spain). This cave is located in a temperate (annual mean temperature of 19.5oC), semi-arid region (

  8. TOUGH+Hydrate v1.0 User's Manual: A Code for the Simulation of System Behavior in Hydrate-Bearing Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, George; Moridis, George J.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Pruess, Karsten

    2008-03-01

    TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.0 is a new code for the simulation of the behavior of hydrate-bearing geologic systems. By solving the coupled equations of mass and heat balance, TOUGH+HYDRATE can model the non-isothermal gas release, phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat under conditions typical of common natural CH{sub 4}-hydrate deposits (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments) in complex geological media at any scale (from laboratory to reservoir) at which Darcy's law is valid. TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate formation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and up to four mass components, i.e., water, CH{sub 4}, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dissociation or formation, phase changes and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects and inhibitor-induced effects. TOUGH+HYDRATE is the first member of TOUGH+, the successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available.

  9. Hydrates fighting tools; Des outils de lutte contre les hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-04-01

    Shell Exploration and Production company (SEPCo) is the operator of the 'Popeye' deep offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico. Thanks to the introduction of a low dosing hydrates inhibitor (LDHI) elaborated by Shell Global Solutions, the company has added a 7.5 Gpc extra volume of gas to its recoverable reserves. This new technology avoids the plugging of pipes by hydrates formation. (J.S.)

  10. The Hydration of Blended Cement at Low W/B Ratio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shu-guang; LU Lin-nu; HE Yong-jia; LI Yue; DING Qing-jun

    2003-01-01

    The hydration process, hydration product and hydration heat of blended cement paste mixed with mineral admixture and expansive agent at low W/B ratio are studied by XRD , thermo analysis , and calorimetry instrument, and they were compared with those of pure cement paste. The results show that pure cement and blended cement at low W/B ratio have the same types of hydration products, but their respective amounts of hydration products of various blended cements at same ages and the vatiation law of the amount of same hydration products with ages are different; Tim joint effect of tumefaction of gel-ettringite due to water absorption and the expansive pressure on the pore and riff caused by the crystalloid ettringite is the impetus of the volume expansion of cement paste , and the former effect is much greater than the latter one .

  11. Numerical simulation on gas production from a hydrate reservoir underlain by a free gas zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI YuHu; LI QingPing; LI XiangFang; DU Yan

    2009-01-01

    Physical and mathematical models of gas production by depressurization from a hydrate reservoir underlain by a free gas zone are established. The mathematical model can interpret the effects of the flow of multiphase fluids, the process of hydrate dissociation, ice-water phase transition, the variation of permeability, the convection and conduction on hydrate dissociation and gas and water production. The evolutions of temperature, pressure, and saturations in the hydrate and free gas zones are eluci-dated during gas production. The variation of some parameters, such as gas and water rates, with time is presented. The results show that the overlying hydrate zone can supply a certain amount of gas to improve the output of a production well and evidently prolong the lifespan of a gas reservoir.

  12. Deep-ocean field test of methane hydrate formation from a remotely operated vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peter G.; Orr, Franklin M., Jr.; Friederich, Gernot; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Orange, Daniel L.; McFarlane, James; Kirkwood, William

    1997-05-01

    We have observed the process of formation of clathrate hydrates of methane in experiments conducted on the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Ventana in the deep waters of Monterey Bay. A tank of methane gas, acrylic tubes containing seawater, and seawater plus various types of sediment were carried down on Ventana to a depth of 910 m where methane gas was injected at the base of the acrylic tubes by bubble stream. Prior calculations had shown that the local hydrographic conditions gave an upper limit of 525 m for the P-T boundary defining methane hydrate formation or dissociation at this site, and thus our experiment took place well within the stability range for this reaction to occur. Hydrate formation in free seawater occurred within minutes as a buoyant mass of translucent hydrate formed at the gas-water interface. In a coarse sand matrix the filling of the pore spaces with hydrate turned the sand column into a solidified block, which gas pressure soon lifted and ruptured. In a fine-grained black mud the gas flow carved out flow channels, the walls of which became coated and then filled with hydrate in larger discrete masses. Our experiment shows that hydrate formation is rapid in natural seawater, that sediment type strongly influences the patterns of hydrate formation, and that the use of ROV technologies permits the synthesis of large amounts of hydrate material in natural systems under a variety of conditions so that fundamental research on the stability and growth of these substances is possible.

  13. Hydration properties of vegetable foods explained by Flory-Rehner theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.; Paudel, E.; Voda, A.; Khalloufi, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we have analyzed the hydration properties of vegetable materials, namely carrots and mushrooms, by means of the Flory-Rehner theory. This is done to circumvent problems with the ill-defined concept of water holding capacity. Via this thermodynamic theory one can predict the hydration p

  14. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic modeling of ethane and propane hydrates in porous silica gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongwon; Lee, Seungmin; Cha, Inuk; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Huen

    2009-04-23

    In the present study, we examined the active role of porous silica gels when used as natural gas storage and transportation media. We adopted the dispersed water in silica gel pores to substantially enhance active surface for contacting and encaging gas molecules. We measured the three-phase hydrate (H)-water-rich liquid (L(W))-vapor (V) equilibria of C(2)H(6) and C(3)H(8) hydrates in 6.0, 15.0, 30.0, and 100.0 nm silica gel pores to investigate the effect of geometrical constraints on gas hydrate phase equilibria. At specified temperatures, the hydrate stability region is shifted to a higher pressure region depending on pore size when compared with those of bulk hydrates. Through application of the Gibbs-Thomson relationship to the experimental data, we determined the values for the C(2)H(6) hydrate-water and C(3)H(8) hydrate-water interfacial tensions to be 39 +/- 2 and 45 +/- 1 mJ/m(2), respectively. By using these values, the calculation values were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The overall results given in this study could also be quite useful in various fields, such as exploitation of natural gas hydrate in marine sediments and sequestration of carbon dioxide into the deep ocean.

  15. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermannová, Lada, E-mail: lada.biedermannova@ibt.cas.cz; Schneider, Bohdan [Institute of Biotechnology CAS, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  16. Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates from Seawater in Consolidated Sand: Mimicking Methane Hydrate Dynamics beneath the Seafloor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad B. Kerkar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Methane hydrate formation and dissociation kinetics were investigated in seawater-saturated consolidated Ottawa sand-pack under sub-seafloor conditions to study the influence of effective pressure on formation and dissociation kinetics. To simulate a sub-seafloor environment, the pore-pressure was varied relative to confining pressure in successive experiments. Hydrate formation was achieved by methane charging followed by sediment cooling. The formation of hydrates was delayed with increasing degree of consolidation. Hydrate dissociation by step-wise depressurization was instantaneous, emanating preferentially from the interior of the sand-pack. Pressure drops during dissociation and in situ temperature controlled the degree of endothermic cooling within sediments. In a closed system, the post-depressurization dissociation was succeeded by thermally induced dissociation and pressure-temperature conditions followed theoretical methane-seawater equilibrium conditions and exhibited excess pore pressure governed by the pore diameter. These post-depressurization equilibrium values for the methane hydrates in seawater saturated consolidated sand-pack were used to estimate the enthalpy of dissociation of 55.83 ± 1.41 kJ/mol. These values were found to be lower than those reported in earlier literature for bulk hydrates from seawater (58.84 kJ/mol and pure water (62.61 kJ/mol due to excess pore pressure generated within confined sediment system under investigation. However, these observations could be significant in the case of hydrate dissociation in a subseafloor environment where dissociation due to depressurization could result in an instantaneous methane release followed by slow thermally induced dissociation. The excess pore pressure generated during hydrate dissociation could be higher within fine-grained sediments with faults and barriers present in subseafloor settings which could cause shifting in geological layers.

  17. The influence of SO2 and NO2 impurities on CO2 gas hydrate formation and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeskow-Strauch, Bettina; Schicks, Judith M; Spangenberg, Erik; Erzinger, Jörg

    2011-04-11

    The sequestration of industrially emitted CO(2) in gas hydrate reservoirs has been recently discussed as an option to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas. This CO(2) contains, despite much effort to clean it, traces of impurities such as SO(2) and NO(2) . Here, we present results of a pilot study on CO(2) hydrates contaminated with 1% SO(2) or 1% NO(2) and show the impact on hydrate formation and stability. Microscopic observations show similar hydrate formation rates, but an increase in hydrate stability in the presence of SO(2). Laser Raman spectroscopy indicates a strong enrichment of SO(2) in the liquid and hydrate phase and its incorporation in both large and small cages of the hydrate lattice. NO(2) is not verifiable by laser Raman spectroscopy, only the presence of nitrate ions could be confirmed. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses show that hydrate stability and dissociation enthalpy of mixed CO(2)-SO(2) hydrates increase, but that only negligible changes arise in the presence of NO(2) impurities. X-ray diffraction data reveal the formation of sI hydrate in all experiments. The conversion rates of ice+gas to hydrate increase in the presence of SO(2), but decrease in the presence of NO(2). After hydrate dissociation, SO(2) and NO(2) dissolved in water and form strong acids.

  18. 油藏流体中H型水合物生成条件的计算%Prediction of Structure-H Gas Hydrate Formation Conditions for Reservoir Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马庆兰; 陈光进; 郭天民; 张坤; Julian Y.Zuo; Dan Zhang; Heng-Joo Ng

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a thermodynamic model is developed for prediction of structure H hydrate formation. The model combines the Peng-Robinson equation of state for the vapor, liquid and aqueous phases with the extended Ng-Robinson hydrate model for gas hydrate formation of all three structures. The parameters of 14 structureH hydrate formers are determined based on the experimental data of structure-H hydrates in the literature. The expression of fugacity of water in the empty hydrate phase is correlated for calculating structure-H hydrate formation conditions in the absence of free water. The model is tested by predicting hydrate formation conditions of a number of structure-H hydrate forming systems which are in good agreement with the experimental data. The proposed model is also applied to the prediction of hydrate formation conditions for various reservoir fluids such as natural gas and gas condensate.

  19. Clathrate formation and dissociation in vapor/water/ice/hydrate systems in SBA-15, sol-gel and CPG porous media, as probed by NMR relaxation, novel protocol NMR cryoporometry, neutron scattering and ab initio quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, J Beau W; Anderson, Ross; Strange, John H; Tohidi, Bahman

    2007-05-01

    The Gibbs-Thomson effect modifies the pressure and temperature at which clathrates occur, hence altering the depth at which they occur in the seabed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements as a function of temperature are being conducted for water/ice/hydrate systems in a range of pore geometries, including templated SBA-15 silicas, controlled pore glasses and sol-gel silicas. Rotator-phase plastic ice is shown to be present in confined geometry, and bulk tetrahydrofuran hydrate is also shown to probably have a rotator phase. A novel NMR cryoporometry protocol, which probes both melting and freezing events while avoiding the usual problem of supercooling for the freezing event, has been developed. This enables a detailed probing of the system for a given pore size and geometry and the exploration of differences between hydrate formation and dissociation processes inside pores. These process differences have an important effect on the environment, as they impact on the ability of a marine hydrate system to re-form once warmed above a critical temperature. Ab initio quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics calculations are also being employed to probe the dynamics of liquids in pores at nanometric dimensions.

  20. Cryopegs as destabilization factor of intra-permafrost gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Istomin, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic feature of permafrost soils in the Arctic is widespread intra-permafrost unfrozen brine lenses - cryopegs. They are often found in permafrost horizons in the north part of Western Siberia, in particular, on the Yamal Peninsula. Cryopegs depths in permafrost zone can be tens and hundreds of meters from the top of frozen strata. The chemical composition of natural cryopegs is close to sea waters, but is characterized by high mineralization. They have a sodium-chloride primary composition with a minor amount of sulphate. Mineralization of cryopegs brine is often hundreds of grams per liter, and the temperature is around -6…-8 °C. The formation of cryopegs in permafrost is associated with processes of long-term freezing of sediments and cryogenic concentration of salts and salt solutions in local areas. The cryopegs' formation can take place in the course of permafrost evolution at the sea transgressions and regressions during freezing of saline sea sediments. Very important feature of cryopegs in permafrost is their transformation in the process of changing temperature and pressure conditions. As a result, the salinity and chemical composition are changed and in addition the cryopegs' location can be changed during their migration. The cryopegs migration violates the thermodynamic conditions of existence intra-permafrost gas hydrate formations, especially the relic gas hydrates deposits, which are situated in the shallow permafrost up to 100 meters depth in a metastable state [1]. The interaction cryopegs with gas hydrates accumulations can cause decomposition of intra-permafrost hydrates. Moreover, the increasing of salt and unfrozen water content in sedimentary rocks sharply reduce the efficiency of gas hydrates self-preservation in frozen soils. It is confirmed by experimental investigations of interaction of frozen gas hydrate bearing sediments with salt solutions [2]. So, horizons with elevated pressure can appear, as a result of gas hydrate

  1. Investigating the Hydration of CM2 meteorites by IR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Góbi, S; Beck, P; Quirico, E; Schmidt, B

    2014-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites are of great interest since they are one of the most ancient remnants of the early solar system. Some of them, like the carbonaceous CM meteorites experienced aqueous alteration thus their olivine content transformed more or less into hydrated silicates such as phyllosilicates. These hydrated CM2 meteorites have been investigated in KBr pellets by means of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In our focus of interest was to study the 3 and 10 $\\mu$m (3000 and 1000 cm$^{-1}$, the O$-$H and silicate streching) bands of several CM2 chondrites. By investigating these signals the water content and the extent of hydration can be determined. In order to achieve this, development of a new pellet production method was essential. This technique facilitates the elimination of adsorbed water coming from the surrounding environment, which would complicate correct interpretation of the results.

  2. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2014-01-01

    Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure...... as the rhabdophane structure is preserved. The bound hydrate water is accommodated in the rhabdophane structure and is stable at temperatures of up to 650 oC. The thermal stability of the hydrate water and the phosphate structure are of significance for the proton conductivity. The LaPO4·0.6H2O and NdPO4•0.5H2O...... exhibited the structure dependence of the proton conductivity while the GdPO4•0.5H2O showed a large effect of the phosphate morphology....

  3. Benthic foraminifera from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea): Assessing present-day and past activity of hydrate pockmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanier, C.; Koho, K.A.; Goñi-Urriza, M.S.; Deflandre, B.; Galaup, S.; Ivanovsky, A.; Gayet, N.; Dennielou, B.; Gremare, A.; Bichon, S.; Gassie, C.; Anschutz, P.; Durán, R.; Reichart, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    We present ecological and isotopic (d18O and d13C) data on benthic foraminifera sampled from 4 deep-sea stations in a pockmark field from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean). In addition, a series of sedimentological and (bio)geochemical data are shown to back up f

  4. Benthic foraminifera from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea) : Assessing present-day and past activity of hydrate pockmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanier, C.; Koho, K. A.; Goñi-Urriza, M. S.; Deflandre, B.; Galaup, S.; Ivanovsky, A.; Gayet, N.; Dennielou, B.; Grémare, A.; Bichon, S.; Gassie, C.; Anschutz, P.; Duran, R.; Reichart, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present ecological and isotopic (δ18O and δ13C) data on benthic foraminifera sampled from 4 deep-sea stations in a pockmark field from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean). In addition, a series of sedimentological and (bio)geochemical data are shown to back up f

  5. CO2 hydrate formation and dissociation in cooled porous media: a potential technology for CO2 capture and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingjun; Song, Yongchen; Jiang, Lanlan; Zhu, Ningjun; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Yuechao; Dou, Binlin; Li, Qingping

    2013-09-03

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydrate formation and dissociation with CO2 flowing through cooled porous media at different flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and flow directions. CO2 hydrate saturation was quantified using the mean intensity of water. The experimental results showed that the hydrate block appeared frequently, and it could be avoided by stopping CO2 flooding early. Hydrate formed rapidly as the temperature was set to 274.15 or 275.15 K, but the hydrate formation delayed when it was 276.15 K. The flow rate was an important parameter for hydrate formation; a too high or too low rate was not suitable for CO2 hydration formation. A low operating pressure was also unacceptable. The gravity made hydrate form easily in the vertically upward flow direction. The pore water of the second cycle converted to hydrate more completely than that of the first cycle, which was a proof of the hydrate "memory effect". When the pressure was equal to atmospheric pressure, hydrate did not dissociate rapidly and abundantly, and a long time or reduplicate depressurization should be used in industrial application.

  6. Dissolution Rates of Synthetic Methane Hydrate and Carbon Dioxide Hydrate in Undersaturated Seawater at 1000m depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, G.; Kirby, S. H.; Durham, W. B.; Brewer, P. G.; Stern, L.; Peltzer, E. T.; Pinkston, J.

    2001-12-01

    Dissolution of synthetic methane and carbon dioxide hydrates was monitored after their transport to the ocean floor at 1000m depth. Cylindrical test specimens were initially grown in the laboratory by combining either cold, pressurized methane gas or pressurized liquid CO2 with sieved granular water ice, then heating the reactants through the H2O melting point. Samples were then hydrostatically compacted to near-zero porosity, with resulting geometry of approximately 2.5 cm in diameter by 3-4 cm in length. Two samples each of methane and carbon dioxide hydrate were placed in a custom-made sample display rack having individual compartments for each sample with a transparent polycarbonate front window, and side and back walls of a flexible fine-mesh screen that permitted seawater flow around the hydrates. The sample rack was then transferred to the ocean in a stainless steel transport vessel pressurized with 10 MPa methane using the (ROV) Ventana. On the seafloor, the sample display rack was removed from the pressure vessel and secured in a stand attached to an autonomous underwater video recorder system using a time-programmable Hi8 video recorder. The samples were continuously monitored for 2.30 h using VentanaIs HDTV camera system, then followed by 20.75 h observation with the autonomous Hi8 time-lapse camera system (15 s every 0.25 h), and additional 3.33 h HDTV observation at the end of the experiment. Loss of volume and dissolution rates of the hydrates were derived from the measurement of the change of the projected diameter of the individual samples over time. During the first 2.30 h, the diameter of the two CO2 hydrates decreased from 22 mm to 15 and 13 mm, respectively. Diameter loss followed a generally linear trend of 0.94 and 1.20 μ m/sec, corresponding to a dissolution rate of 13 to 17 mole CO2/m2h. Similar short-term oscillations about this linear trend were observed on both samples, suggesting a link to bottom current velocity. The CH4 hydrates

  7. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  8. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E. Rogers

    1999-09-27

    DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

  9. Separation of SF6 from gas mixtures using gas hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Inuk; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Gang-woo; Seo, Yongwon

    2010-08-15

    This study aims to examine the thermodynamic feasibility of separating sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), which is widely used in various industrial fields and is one of the most potent greenhouse gases, from gas mixtures using gas hydrate formation. The key process variables of hydrate phase equilibria, pressure-composition diagram, formation kinetics, and structure identification of the mixed gas hydrates, were closely investigated to verify the overall concept of this hydrate-based SF(6) separation process. The three-phase equilibria of hydrate (H), liquid water (L(W)), and vapor (V) for the binary SF(6) + water mixture and for the ternary N(2) + SF(6) + water mixtures with various SF(6) vapor compositions (10, 30, 50, and 70%) were experimentally measured to determine the stability regions and formation conditions of pure and mixed hydrates. The pressure-composition diagram at two different temperatures of 276.15 and 281.15 K was obtained to investigate the actual SF(6) separation efficiency. The vapor phase composition change was monitored during gas hydrate formation to confirm the formation pattern and time needed to reach a state of equilibrium. Furthermore, the structure of the mixed N(2) + SF(6) hydrate was confirmed to be structure II via Raman spectroscopy. Through close examination of the overall experimental results, it was clearly verified that highly concentrated SF(6) can be separated from gas mixtures at mild temperatures and low pressure conditions.

  10. Rheological properties of hydrate suspensions in asphaltenic crude oils; Proprietes rheologiques de suspensions d'hydrate dans des bruts asphalteniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques de Toledo Camargo, R.

    2001-03-01

    The development of offshore oil exploitation under increasing water depths has forced oil companies to increase their understanding of gas hydrate formation and transportation in multiphase flow lines in which a liquid hydrocarbon phase is present. This work deals with the flow behaviour of hydrate suspensions in which a liquid hydrocarbon is the continuous phase. Three different liquid hydrocarbons are used: an asphaltenic crude oil, a condensate completely free of asphaltenes and a mixture between the asphaltenic oil and heptane. The rheological characterisation of hydrate suspensions is the main tool employed. Two original experimental devices are used: a PVT cell adapted to operate as a Couette type rheometer and a semi-industrial flow loop. Hydrate suspensions using the asphaltenic oil showed shear-thinning behaviour and thixotropy. This behaviour is typically found in flocculated systems, in which the particles attract each other forming flocs of aggregated particles at low shear rates. The suspensions using the condensate showed Newtonian behaviour. Their relative viscosities were high, which suggests that an aggregation process between hydrate particles takes. place during hydrate formation. Finally, hydrate suspensions using the mixture asphaltenic oil-heptane showed shear-thinning behaviour, thixotropy and high relative viscosity. From these results it can be inferred that, after the achievement of the hydrate formation process, the attractive forces between hydrate particles are weak. making unlikely pipeline obstruction by an aggregation process. Nevertheless, during the hydrate formation, these attractive forces can be sufficiently high. It seems that the hydrate surface wettability is an important parameter in this phenomena. (author)

  11. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. Gas hydrate growth and stability conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Henry, P.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Thomas, M.

    2000-01-01

    The stability conditions of submarine gas hydrates (methane clathrates) are largely dictated by pressure, temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of the host sediments also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in the pores of a freezing soil, where capillary forces influence the energy balance. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments because of the excess internal phase pressure of small crystals with high surface curvature that coexist with liquid water in small pores. Therefore, the base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature, and so nearer to the seabed than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. The growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, sheets, and lenses in muds; cements in sand and ash layers) can be explained by a requirement to minimize the excess of mechanical and surface energy in the system.

  12. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  13. Phase behavior and hydration of silk fibroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sungkyun; Strey, Helmut H; Gido, Samuel P

    2004-01-01

    The osmotic stress method was applied to study the thermodynamics of supramolecular self-assembly phenomena in crystallizable segments of Bombyx mori silkworm silk fibroin. By controlling compositions and phases of silk fibroin solution, the method provided a means for the direct investigation of microscopic and thermodynamic details of these intermolecular interactions in aqueous media. It is apparent that as osmotic pressure increases, silk fibroin molecules are crowded together to form silk I structure and then with further increase in osmotic pressure become an antiparallel beta-sheet structure, silk II. A partial ternary phase diagram of water-silk fibroin-LiBr was constructed based on the results. The results provide quantitative evidence that the silk I structure must contain water of hydration. The enhanced control over structure and phase behavior using osmotic stress, as embodied in the phase diagram, could potentially be utilized to design a new route for water-based wet spinning of regenerated silk fibroin.

  14. TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.2 User's Manual: A Code for the Simulation of System Behavior in Hydrate-Bearing Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, George J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kowalsky, Michael B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pruess, Karsten [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.2 is a code for the simulation of the behavior of hydratebearing geologic systems, and represents the second update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. By solving the coupled equations of mass and heat balance, TOUGH+HYDRATE can model the non-isothermal gas release, phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat under conditions typical of common natural CH4-hydrate deposits (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments) in complex geological media at any scale (from laboratory to reservoir) at which Darcy’s law is valid. TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.2 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate formation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and up to four mass components, i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dissociation or formation, phase changes and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects and inhibitor-induced effects. TOUGH+HYDRATE is a member of TOUGH+, the successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available.

  15. Simultaneous determination of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat in sI methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat of sI methane hydrate were measured as functions of temperature and pressure using a needle probe technique. The temperature dependence was measured between −20°C and 17°C at 31.5 MPa. The pressure dependence was measured between 31.5 and 102 MPa at 14.4°C. Only weak temperature and pressure dependencies were observed. Methane hydrate thermal conductivity differs from that of water by less than 10 per cent, too little to provide a sensitive measure of hydrate content in water-saturated systems. Thermal diffusivity of methane hydrate is more than twice that of water, however, and its specific heat is about half that of water. Thus, when drilling into or through hydrate-rich sediment, heat from the borehole can raise the formation temperature more than 20 per cent faster than if the formation's pore space contains only water. Thermal properties of methane hydrate should be considered in safety and economic assessments of hydrate-bearing sediment.

  16. Sorbitol dehydration into isosorbide in a molten salt hydrate medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Spina, A.; Moulijn, J.A.; Makkee, M.

    2013-01-01

    The sorbitol conversion in a molten salt hydrate medium (ZnCl2; 70 wt% in water) was studied. Dehydration is the main reaction, initially 1,4- and 3,6-anhydrosorbitol are the main products that are subsequently converted into isosorbide; two other anhydrohexitols, (1,5- and 2,5-), formed are in less

  17. International Society of Nephrology-Hydration and Kidney Health Initiative - Expanding Research and Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moist, Louise M; Clark, William F; Segantini, Luca; Damster, Sandrine; Le Bellego, Laurent; Wong, Germaine; Tonelli, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to describe a collaborative research initiative to explore the role of hydration in kidney health. Our understanding of the effects of hydration in health and disease is surprisingly limited, particularly when we consider the vital role of hydration in basic human physiology. Recent initiatives and research outcomes have challenged the global medical community to expand our knowledge about hydration, including the differences between water, sugared beverages and other consumables. Identification of the potential mechanisms contributing to the benefits of hydration has stimulated the global nephrology community to advance research regarding hydration for kidney health. Hydration and kidney health has been a focus of research for several research centers with a rapidly expanding world literature and knowledge. The International Society of Nephrology has collaborated with Danone Nutricia Research to promote development of kidney research initiatives, which focus on the role of hydration in kidney health and the global translation of this new information. This initiative supports the use of existing data in different regions and countries to expand dialogue among experts in the field of hydration and health, and to increase scientific interaction and productivity with the ultimate goal of improving kidney health.

  18. Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2005-03-10

    The objective of this study is the description of the kinetic dissociation of CH4-hydrates in porous media, and the determination of the corresponding kinetic parameters. Knowledge of the kinetic dissociation behavior of hydrates can play a critical role in the evaluation of gas production potential of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media. We analyzed data from a sequence of tests of CH4-hydrate dissociation by means of thermal stimulation. These tests had been conducted on sand cores partially saturated with water, hydrate and CH4 gas, and contained in an x-ray-transparent aluminum pressure vessel. The pressure, volume of released gas, and temperature (at several locations within the cores) were measured. To avoid misinterpreting local changes as global processes, x-ray computed tomography scans provided accurate images of the location and movement of the reaction interface during the course of the experiments. Analysis of the data by means of inverse modeling (history matching ) provided estimates of the thermal properties and of the kinetic parameters of the hydration reaction in porous media. Comparison of the results from the hydrate-bearing porous media cores to those from pure CH4-hydrate samples provided a measure of the effect of the porous medium on the kinetic reaction. A tentative model of composite thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing media was also developed.

  19. Laser Desorption Supersonic Jet Spectroscopy of Hydrated Tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Hikari; Shimozono, Yoko; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Fujii, Masaaki; Carcabal, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    The structure of tyrosine (tyr) consists of amino-acid chain and phenol, and it has roughly two possible binding sites for water, amino-acid site and phenolic OH site. Investigating how water molecule binds to tyr will give fundamental information for hydrations of peptide and protein. Resonance enhanced multi photon ionization (REMPI) spectrum of tyr-water 1:1 cluster has already been reported by de Vries and co-workers, however, no analysis on the hydrated structures has been reported. In the REMPI spectrum, two clusters of bands are observed; one appears at ˜35600 cm^{-1} energy region which is the almost same with 0-0 transitions of tyr monomer, and another is observed at ˜300 cm^{-1} lower than the former. Based on the electronic transition energy of phenylalanine and the hydrated clusters, the former is expected to be derived from a structure that water binds to amino acid site. On the other hand, it is plausibly predicted that the latter originates from a structure that water binds to phenolic OH group, because the electronic transition of mono hydrated phenol is ˜300 cm^{-1} red-shifted from the monomer. We applied IR dip spectroscopy which can measure conformer selective IR spectra to the tyr-(H_{2}O)_{1} clusters by using laser desorption supersonic jet technique to confirm the assignments. Especially in the phenolic OH bound isomer, it was found that the intra molecular hydrogen bond within amino-acid chain, which is far from the water molecule and cannot interact directly with each other, is strengthened by the hydration. A. Abio-Riziq et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 6077 (2011). Y. Shimozono, et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., (2013) DOI: 10.1039/c3cp43573c. T. Ebata et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, 4783 (2006). T. Watanabe et al., J. Chem. Phys., 105, 408 (1996).

  20. Chemo-physical modeling of cement mortar hydration: Role of aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jena, E-mail: jeong@profs.estp.fr [Université Paris-Est, Institut de Recherche en Constructibilité, ESTP, 28 Avenue Président Wilson, 94234 Cachan (France); Ramézani, Hamidréza, E-mail: hamidreza.ramezani@univ-orleans.fr [CRMD, CNRS FRE 3520-Research Center on Divided Materials, École Polytechnique de l’Université d’Orléans, 8 rue Léonrad de Vinci, 45072 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Leklou, Nordine, E-mail: nordine.leklou@univ-nantes.fr [LUNAM Université, Université de Nantes-IUT Saint-Nazaire, GeM, CNRS UMR 6183, Research Institute in Civil Engineering and Mechanics, 58 rue Michel Ange BP 420 44606 Saint Nazaire Cedex (France); Mounanga, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.mounanga@univ-nantes.fr [LUNAM Université, Université de Nantes-IUT Saint-Nazaire, GeM, CNRS UMR 6183, Research Institute in Civil Engineering and Mechanics, 58 rue Michel Ange BP 420 44606 Saint Nazaire Cedex (France)

    2013-07-20

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: After mixing of the cement with water, most of the anhydride products sustain the hydration process and this leads to the hydrate products, e.g. CSH, Ca(OH){sub 2}, Afm and Aft. The mentioned hydration process is a highly complex phenomenon involving the chemically based thermo-activation inside the cement mortars during the early age hydration process. The chemo-thermal hydration reactions drasticaly increase at the early age of hydration after the mixing action and then it becomes less important and turns to be nearly asymptotic. The progress of the hydration phenomenon drives the material properties change during the very early age of cement hydration. Regarding the mortar and concrete, such hydration process would not be homogeneous through the cement matrix due to the aggregates presence. These inclusions will affect the temperature distribution as well as degree of hydration. In the current contribution, the chemical and thermal hydration have been firstly investigated by means of SEM observations using replica method and secondly by the 3D-FEM numerical experiments including two different case studies using glass beads as aggregates. The numerical experiments match fairly good the experimental measurements obtained using a pseudo-adiabatic testing setup for the case studies herein. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images observation demonstrates the gap spaces around the glass beads next to the external surfaces. These gaps can be essentially seen for the multi-glass beads case study. The role of the temperature and degree of hydration gradients are clearly obtained using the numerical samples. Some fresh routes and outlooks have been afterwards discussed.

  1. Study on gas hydrate as a new energy resource in the 21th century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Byeong-Jae; Kwak Young-Hoon; Kim, Won-Sik [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    Natural gas hydrate, a special type of clathrate hydrates, is a metastable solid compound which mainly consists of methane and water, and generally called as gas hydrate. It is stable in the specific low-temperature/high-pressure conditions. Gas hydrates play an important role as major reservoir of methane on the earth. On the other hand, the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates could cause the plugging in pipeline, gas kick during production, atmospheric pollution and geohazard. To understand the formation and dissociation of the gas hydrate, the experimental equilibrium conditions of methane hydrate were measured in pure water, 3 wt.% NaCl and MgCl{sub 2} solutions. The equilibrium conditions of propane hydrates were also measured in pure water. The relationship between methane hydrate formation time and overpressure was also analyzed through the laboratory work. The geophysical surveys using air-gun system and multibeam echo sounder were implemented to develop exploration techniques and to evaluate the gas hydrate potential in the East Sea, Korea. General indicators of submarine gas hydrates on seismic data is commonly inferred from the BSR developed parallel to the see floor, amplitude blanking at the upper part of the BSR, and phase reversal and decrease of the interval velocity at BSR. The field data were processed using Geobit 2.9.5 developed by KIGAM to detect the gas hydrate indicators. The accurate velocity analysis was performed by XVA (X-window based Velocity Analysis). Processing results show that the strong reflector occurred parallel to the sea floor were shown at about 1800 ms two way travel time. The interval velocity decrease at this strong reflector and at the reflection phase reversal corresponding to the reflection at the sea floor. Gas hydrate stability field in the study area was determined using the data of measured hydrate equilibrium condition, hydrothermal gradient and geothermal gradient. The depth of BSR detected in the seismic

  2. The Hydration of Subglacial Rhyolite to Form Perlite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, J. S.; Tuffen, H.; Gilbert, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Subglacial rhyolite deposits at Torfajökull, Iceland encountered glacier meltwater as they cooled, leading to variable amounts of hydration. High-temperature lava-meltwater interactions are key to understanding jökulhlaup hazards, perlite formation, cooling rates and, ultimately, soil formation [Denton et al., 2009]. Perlite is a hydrated glass that contains abundant, intersecting, arcuate and gently curved cracks surrounding cores of intact glass. Knowledge of how perlite forms is required for us to better understand the way in which meltwater and lava interact during and after subglacial eruptions. The mechanism for perlite formation is currently poorly understood, it is not known whether cracking leads to hydration or vice versa. Different textural zones from effusively erupted lava lobes from Torfajökull, Iceland [Tuffen et al., 2001] have been studied using a combination of experimental and quantitative textural measurements to examine the processes of hydration and perlite formation. A differential scanning calorimetry - thermogravimetric analyser coupled to a mass spectrometer (DSC-TGA-MS) has been used to quantify the total volatile contents of a number of samples. A novel petrological technique has been used to quantify the concentration of fractures present in a sample which has then been related to the amount of hydration. Water content using infra-red microspectroscopy (FTIR) has been used to study the micro-scale variations of water content and how they relate to fractures in the rhyolitic glasses. The results indicate that progressive perlitisation at the margins of lava bodies is accompanied by an increase in the water content, from ~0.5 wt. % to ~2 wt. %. The speciation of the inwardly diffusing water changes from hydroxyl to molecular water with increasing total volatile content. The temperature of dehydration of samples during TGA experiments decreases with increasing volatile content, consistent with a change in the dominant H2O species from

  3. Two-dimensional protonic percolation on lightly hydrated purple membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Rupley, John A.; Siemankowski, Linda; Careri, Giorgio; Bruni, Fabio

    1988-01-01

    The capacitance and dielectric loss factor were measured for a sample of purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium as a function of hydration level (0.017 to >0.2 g of water/g of membrane) and frequency (10 kHz to 10 MHz). The capacitance and the derived conductivity show explosive growth above a threshold hydration level, hc ≈ 0.0456. The conductivity shows a deuterium isotope effect, H/2H = 1.38, in close agreement with expectation for a protonic process. The level hc is frequency independe...

  4. Gas Phase Hydration of Methyl Glyoxal to Form the Gemdiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Axson, Jessica L.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-06-01

    Methylglyoxal is a known oxidation product of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Earth's atmosphere. While the gas phase chemistry of methylglyoxal is fairly well understood, its modeled concentration and role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) continues to be controversial. The gas phase hydration of methylglyoxal to form a gemdiol has not been widely considered for water-restricted environments such as the atmosphere. However, this process may have important consequences for the atmospheric processing of VOCs. We will report on spectroscopic work done in the Vaida laboratory studying the hydration of methylglyoxal and discuss the implications for understanding the atmospheric processing and fate of methylglyoxal and similar molecules.

  5. Progress of Gas Hydrate Studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊栓狮; 汪集旸

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview is given on the gas hydrate-related research activities carried out by Chinese researchers in the past 15 years. The content involves: (1) Historical review. Introducing the gas hydrate research history in China; (2) Gas hydrate research groups in China. There are nearly 20 groups engaged in gas hydrate research now; (3) Present studies.Including fundamental studies, status of the exploration of natural gas hydrate resources in the South China Sea region, and development of hydrate-based new techniques; (4) Future development.

  6. Silica surfaces lubrication by hydrated cations adsorption from electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donose, Bogdan C; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Higashitani, Ko

    2005-03-01

    Adsorption of hydrated cations on hydrophilic surfaces has been related to a variety of phenomena associated with the short-range interaction forces and mechanisms of the adhesive contact between the surfaces. Here we have investigated the effect of the adsorption of cations on the lateral interaction. Using lateral force microscopy (LFM), we have measured the friction force between a silica particle and silica wafer in pure water and in electrolyte solutions of LiCl, NaCl, and CsCl salts. A significant lubrication effect was demonstrated for solutions of high electrolyte concentrations. It was found that the adsorbed layers of smaller and more hydrated cations have a higher lubrication capacity than the layers of larger and less hydrated cations. Additionally, we have demonstrated a characteristic dependence of the friction force on the sliding velocity of surfaces. A mechanism for the observed phenomena based on the microstructures of the adsorbed layers is proposed.

  7. Natural gas hydrates and the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruy, H.J.

    1998-03-01

    Natural gas hydrates occur on the ocean floor in such great volumes that they contain twice as much carbon as all known coal, oil and conventional natural gas deposits. Releases of this gas caused by sediment slides and other natural causes have resulted in huge slugs of gas saturated water with density too low to float a ship, and enough localized atmospheric contamination to choke air aspirated aircraft engines. The unexplained disappearances of ships and aircraft along with their crews and passengers in the Bermuda Triangle may be tied to the natural venting of gas hydrates. The paper describes what gas hydrates are, their formation and release, and their possible link to the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle.

  8. Hydrate dissolution as a potential mechanism for pockmark formation in the Niger delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, N.; Marsset, B.; Ker, S.; Marsset, T.; Voisset, M.; Vernant, A. M.; Bayon, G.; Cauquil, E.; Adamy, J.; Colliat, J. L.; Drapeau, D.

    2010-08-01

    Based on acquired geophysical, geological and geotechnical data and modeling, we suggest hydrate dissolution to cause sediment collapse and pockmark formation in the Niger delta. Very high-resolution bathymetry data acquired from the Niger delta reveal the morphology of pockmarks with different shapes and sizes going from a small ring depression surrounding an irregular floor to more typical pockmarks with uniform depression. Geophysical data, in situ piezocone measurements, piezometer measurements and sediment cores demonstrate the presence of a common internal architecture of the studied pockmarks: inner sediments rich in gas hydrates surrounded by overpressured sediments. The temperature, pressure and salinity conditions of the studied area have allowed us to exclude the process of gas-hydrate dissociation (gas hydrate turns into free gas/water mixture) as a trigger of the observed pockmarks. Based on numerical modeling, we demonstrate that gas-hydrate dissolution (gas hydrate becomes mixture of water and dissolved gas) under a local decrease of the gas concentration at the base of the gas-hydrate occurrence zone (GHOZ) can explain the excess pore pressure and fluid flow surrounding the central hydrated area and the sediment collapse at the border of the GHOZ. The different deformation (or development) stages of the detected pockmarks confirm that a local process such as the amount of gas flow through faults rather than a regional one is at the origin of those depressions.

  9. Experimental study on steam and inhibitor injection into methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Temma, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Komai, T.

    2007-12-01

    Natural gas hydrate that exists in the ocean sediment is thought to constitute a large methane gas reservoir and is expected to be an energy resource in the future. In order to make recovery of natural gas from hydrates commercially viable, hydrates must be dissociated in-situ. Inhibitor injection method is thought to be one of the effective dissociation method as well as depressurization and thermal stimulation. Meanwhile, steam injection method is practically used for oil sand to recover heavy oil and recognized as a means that is commercially successful. In this study, the inhibitor injection method and the steam injection method for methane hydrate bearing sediments have been examined and discussed on an experimental basis. New experimental apparatuses have been designed and constructed. Using these apparatuses, inhibitor and steam were successfully injected into artificial methane hydrate bearing sediments that were simulated in laboratory scale. In the case of inhibitor injection, characteristic temperature drop during dissociation was observed. And decreases of permeability that is caused by the reformation of methane hydrate were prevented effectively. In the case of steam injection, the phase transition from vapor water to liquid water in methane hydrate bearing sediments was observed. It can be concluded that roughly 44 % of total hydrate origin gas was produced after steam injection. From these approaches, the applicability of these methods as enhanced gas recovery methods are discussed.

  10. Catalysis of gas hydrates by biosurfactants in seawater-saturated sand/clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R. E.; Kothapalli, C.; Lee, M.S. [Mississippi State University, Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, MS (United States); Woolsey, J. R. [University of Mississippi, Centre of Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, MS (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Large gas hydrate mounds have been photographed in the seabed of the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. According to industry experts, the carbon trapped within gas hydrates is two or three times greater than all known crude oil, natural gas and coal reserves in the world. Gas hydrates, which are ice-like solids formed from the hydrogen bonding of water as water temperature is lowered under pressure to entrap a suitable molecular-size gas in cavities of the developing crystal structure, are found below the ocean floor to depths exhibiting temperature and pressure combinations within the appropriate limits. The experiments described in this study attempt to ascertain whether biosurfactant byproducts of microbial activity in seabeds could catalyze gas hydrate formation. Samples of five possible biosurfactants classifications were used in the experiments. Results showed that biosurfactants enhanced hydrate formation rate between 96 per cent and 288 percent, and reduced hydrate induction time 20 per cent to 71 per cent relative to the control. The critical micellar concentration of rhamnolipid/seawater solution was found to be 13 ppm at hydrate-forming conditions. On the basis of these results it was concluded that minimal microbial activity in sea floor sands could achieve the threshold concentration of biosurfactant that would greatly promote hydrate formation. 28 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  11. Pressurized laboratory experiments show no stable carbon isotope fractionation of methane during gas hydrate dissolution and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Laura L; Wilson, Rachel M; Chanton, Jeffrey P

    2012-01-15

    The stable carbon isotopic ratio of methane (δ(13)C-CH(4)) recovered from marine sediments containing gas hydrate is often used to infer the gas source and associated microbial processes. This is a powerful approach because of distinct isotopic fractionation patterns associated with methane production by biogenic and thermogenic pathways and microbial oxidation. However, isotope fractionations due to physical processes, such as hydrate dissolution, have not been fully evaluated. We have conducted experiments to determine if hydrate dissolution or dissociation (two distinct physical processes) results in isotopic fractionation. In a pressure chamber, hydrate was formed from a methane gas source at 2.5 MPa and 4 °C, well within the hydrate stability field. Following formation, the methane source was removed while maintaining the hydrate at the same pressure and temperature which stimulated hydrate dissolution. Over the duration of two dissolution experiments (each ~20-30 days), water and headspace samples were periodically collected and measured for methane concentrations and δ(13)C-CH(4) while the hydrate dissolved. For both experiments, the methane concentrations in the pressure chamber water and headspace increased over time, indicating that the hydrate was dissolving, but the δ(13)C-CH(4) values showed no significant trend and remained constant, within 0.5‰. This lack of isotope change over time indicates that there is no fractionation during hydrate dissolution. We also investigated previous findings that little isotopic fractionation occurs when the gas hydrate dissociates into gas bubbles and water due to the release of pressure. Over a 2.5 MPa pressure drop, the difference in the δ(13)C-CH(4) was dissociates and demonstrated that there is no fractionation when the hydrate dissolves. Therefore, measured δ(13)C-CH(4) values near gas hydrates are not affected by physical processes, and can thus be interpreted to result from either the gas source or

  12. Internal motions in proteins: A combined neutron scattering and molecular modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    2004-07-01

    It is well-known that water plays a major role in the stability and catalytic function of proteins. Both the effect of hydration water on the dynamics of proteins and that of proteins on the dynamics of water have been studied using inelastic neutron scatter- ing. Inelastic neutron scattering is the most direct probe of diffusive protein dynamics on the picosecond-nanosecond time-scale. We present here results relative to a photosynthetic globular protein, the C-phycocyanin, that can be obtained in protonated and deuterated forms. Diffusive motions have been studied using the protonated C-phycocyanin, protein. Molecular dynamics simulation and analytical theory have been combined to analyse the data and get a detailed description of diffusive motions for protein. The simulation-derived dynamic structure factors are in good agreement with experiment. The dynamical param- eters are shown to present a smooth variation with distance from the core of the protein. The collective dynamics has been investigated using the fully deuterated C-phycocyanin protein. Both the experimental and calculated spectra exhibit a dynamic relaxation with a characteristic time of about 10 ps.

  13. Internal motions in proteins: A combined neutron scattering and molecular modelling approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M-C Bellissent-Funel

    2004-07-01

    It is well-known that water plays a major role in the stability and catalytic function of proteins. Both the effect of hydration water on the dynamics of proteins and that of proteins on the dynamics of water have been studied using inelastic neutron scattering. Inelastic neutron scattering is the most direct probe of diffusive protein dynamics on the picosecond{nanosecond time-scale. We present here results relative to a photosynthetic globular protein, the C-phycocyanin, that can be obtained in protonated and deuterated forms. Diffusive motions have been studied using the protonated C-phycocyanin, protein. Molecular dynamics simulation and analytical theory have been combined to analyse the data and get a detailed description of diffusive motions for protein. The simulation-derived dynamic structure factors are in good agreement with experiment. The dynamical parameters are shown to present a smooth variation with distance from the core of the protein. The collective dynamics has been investigated using the fully deuterated C-phycocyanin protein. Both the experimental and calculated spectra exhibit a dynamic relaxation with a characteristic time of about 10 ps.

  14. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties; Hydratation des argiles gonflantes: sequence d'hydratation multi-echelle determination des energies macroscopiques a partir des proprietes microscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles, F

    2006-10-15

    Smectites have interesting properties which make them potential candidates for engineered barriers in deep geological nuclear waste repository: low permeability, swelling and cations retention. The subject of this thesis consists in the determination of the relationship between hydration properties, swelling properties and cations mobility in relation with confinement properties of clayey materials. The aim is to understand and to predict the behaviour of water in smectites, following two research orientations: the mechanistic aspects and the energetic aspects of the hydration of smectites. We worked on the Na-Ca montmorillonite contained in the MX80 bentonite, with the exchanged homo ionic structure (saturated with alkaline cations and calcium cations). The approach crosses the various scales (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic) and implied the study of the various components of the system (layer-cation-water), by using original experimental methods (thermo-poro-metry and electric conductivity for various relative humidities (RH) and electrostatic calculations. Initially, the dry state is defined by SCTA (scanning calorimetry thermal analysis). Then a classical characterization of the smectite porosity for the dry state is carried out using mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption. We evidenced the existence of a meso-porosity which radius varies from 2 to 10 nm depending on the compensating cation. The thermo-poro-metry and conductivity experiments performed at various hydration states made it possible to follow the increase in the pore sizes and the cations mobility as a function of the hydration state. We highlight in particular the existence of an osmotic mesoscopic swelling for low RH (approximately 50-60%RH for Li and Na). By combining the results of thermo-poro-metry, X-ray diffraction and electric conductivity, we are able to propose a complete hydration sequence for each cation, showing the crucial role of the compensating cation in the hydration of

  15. Cooperative hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions in the hydration of dimethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utiramerur, S; Paulaitis, M E

    2010-04-21

    Cooperative interactions in the hydration of dimethyl ether (DME) relative to its purely hydrophobic analog, propane, are analyzed by expressing the free energy of hydration in terms of an "inner-shell" contribution from water molecular packing and chemical association, and an "outer-shell" contribution described by the mean binding energy of the solute to the solution and fluctuations in this binding energy. We find that nonadditive, cooperative interactions associated with strong correlations in the binding energy fluctuations of the methyl groups and ether oxygen play a dominant role in the hydration of DME relative to propane. The electrostatic nature of these interactions is revealed in a multi-Gaussian analysis of hydration substates, which shows that the formation of favorable ether oxygen-water hydrogen bonds is correlated with less favorable methyl group-water interactions, and vice versa. We conclude that the group additive distinction between the hydrophobic hydration of the DME methyl groups and hydrophilic hydration of the ether oxygen is lost in the context of these cooperative interactions. Our results also suggest that the binding energy fluctuations of constituent hydrophobic/hydrophilic groups are more sensitive than local water density fluctuations for characterizing the hydration of heterogeneous interfaces.

  16. Hydration and cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sécher, M; Ritz, P

    2012-04-01

    A clinical link exists between severe dehydration and cognitive performance. Using rapid and severe water loss induced either by intense exercise and/or heat stress, initial studies suggested there were alterations in short-term memory and cognitive function related to vision, but more recent studies have not all confirmed these data. Some studies argue that water loss is not responsible for the observations made, and studies compensating water losses have failed to prevent the symptoms. Studies in children have suggested that drinking extra water helps cognitive performance, but these data rely on a small number of children. In older adults (mean age around 60) the data are not strong enough to support a relationship between mild dehydration and cognitive function. Data on frail elderly and demented people are lacking. Methodological heterogeneity in these studies are such that the relationship between mild dehydration and cognitive performance cannot be supported.

  17. Contribution of hydration to protein folding thermodynamics. I. The enthalpy of hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhatadze, G I; Privalov, P L

    1993-07-20

    The enthalpy of hydration of polar and non-polar groups upon protein unfolding has been estimated for four globular proteins in the temperature range 5 to 125 degrees C, using structural information on the groups in these proteins exposed to water in the native and unfolded states and volume-corrected calorimetric information on the enthalpy and heat capacity of transfer into water of various model compounds. It has been shown that the enthalpy of hydration of polar groups greatly exceeds the enthalpy of hydration of non-polar groups. At low temperatures both these enthalpies are negative and change in opposite direction with increasing temperature. Subtracting the total enthalpy of hydration of polar and non-polar groups from the calorimetrically determined enthalpy of protein unfolding, the total enthalpy of internal interactions maintaining the native protein structure has been determined. Using thermodynamic information on the sublimation of organic crystals, the total enthalpy was divided into two components: one associated with the interactions between the non-polar groups (van der Waals interaction) and the rest associated with the interactions between polar groups (hydrogen bonding). This made it possible to estimate the overall enthalpies of disruption of contacts between the polar groups with their exposure to water and between the non-polar groups with their exposure to water. It appears that these enthalpies have opposite signs in the temperature range considered and change in opposite directions with increasing temperature. The enthalpy of transfer of non-polar groups from the protein interior into water is negative below 25 degrees C and positive above. The enthalpy of transfer of polar groups from the protein interior into water is positive at low temperatures and becomes negative at higher temperatures. Over the considered temperature range, however, the enthalpy of transfer of non-polar groups dominates. This results in a positive enthalpy of

  18. Determination of membrane hydration numbers of alkali metal ions by insertion in a conducting polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Junaid Mohamed Jafeen, Mohamed; Careem, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    , and a secondary (or outer) solvation shell, consisting of all other water molecules whose properties are still influenced significantly by the cation. Knowing the hydration number is important when considering, for instance, the transport of Na+ and K+ in biological cell membranes, since their different behavior...... of the number of M+ ions entering the film, and therefore the inserted M+ mass. The mass of the water molecules can then be calculated as a difference. The values determined this way may be called membrane hydration numbers. The results yield the following membrane hydration numbers: Li+: 5.3-5.5; Na+ 4...... membrane....

  19. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djikaev, Y S; Ruckenstein, E

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per