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Sample records for c-phycocyanin hydration water

  1. C-Phycocyanin Hydration Water Dynamics in the Presence of Trehalose: An Incoherent Elastic Neutron Scattering Study at Different Energy Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Frank; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of C-phycocyanin hydration water dynamics in the presence of trehalose by incoherent elastic neutron scattering. By combining data from two backscattering spectrometers with a 10-fold difference in energy resolution we extract a scattering law S(Q,ω) from the Q-dependence of the elastic intensities without sampling the quasielastic range. The hydration water is described by two dynamically different populations—one diffusing inside a sphere and the other diffusing quasifreely—with a population ratio that depends on temperature. The scattering law derived describes the experimental data from both instruments excellently over a large temperature range (235–320 K). The effective diffusion coefficient extracted is reduced by a factor of 10–15 with respect to bulk water at corresponding temperatures. Our approach demonstrates the benefits and the efficiency of using different energy resolutions in incoherent elastic neutron scattering over a large angular range for the study of biological macromolecules and hydration water. PMID:17350998

  2. Hematite photoanode co-functionalized with self-assembling melanin and C-phycocyanin for solar water splitting at neutral pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrantz, Krisztina; Wyss, Pradeep P.; Ihssen, Julian; Toth, Rita; Bora, Debajeet K.; Vitol, Elina A.; Rozhkova, Elena A.; Pieles, Uwe; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Braun, Artur

    2017-04-01

    tNature provides functional units which can be integrated in inorganic solar cell materials, such as lightharvesting antenna proteins and photosynthetic molecular machineries, and thus help in advancing artifi-cial photosynthesis. Their integration needs to address mechanical adhesion, light capture, charge transferand corrosion resistance. We showed recently how enzymatic polymerization of melanin can immobi-lize the cyanobacterial light harvesting protein C-phycocyanin on the surface of hematite, a prospectivemetal oxide photoanode for solar hydrogen production by water splitting in photoelectrochemical cells.After the optimization of the functionalization procedure, in this work we show reproducible hydrogenproduction, measured parallel to the photocurrent on this bio-hybrid electrode in benign neutral pHphosphate. Over 90% increase compared to the photocurrent of the pristine hematite could be achieved.The hydrogen evolution was monitored during the photoelectrochemical measurement in an improvedphotoelectrochemical cell. The C-phycocyanin-melanin coating on the hematite was shown to exhibit acomb-like fractal pattern. Raman spectroscopy supported the presence of the protein on the hematiteanode surface. The stability of the protein coating is demonstrated during the 2 h GC measurement andthe 24 h operando current density measurement

  3. The Role of the Primitive Relaxation in the Dynamics of Aqueous Mixtures, Nano-confined Water and Hydrated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    phycocyanin (C-PC) [r093]. There is overall good agreement between τν determined by dielectric, NMR, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and neutron scattering... phycocyanin systems is the hydration water. According to our interpretation like in other non-aqueous and aqueous mixtures, and nano-confined water, the...Relaxation times from neutron scattering from hydration water in hydrated c- phycocyanin (C-PC) (black closed triangles) [r093]. For relaxation times

  4. Production of Nanofibers Containing the Bioactive Compound C-Phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Felipe da Silva; Gettens, Juliana Garcia; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque; Moraes, Caroline Costa; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2016-01-01

    C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is a water-soluble phycobiliprotein present in light-harvesting antenna system of cyanobacteria. The nanostructures have not been widely evaluated, precluding improvements in stability and application of the C-PC. Electrospun nanofibers have an extremely high specific surface area due to their small diameter, they can be produced from a wide variety of polymers, and they are successfully evaluated to increase the efficacy of antitumor drugs. The incorporation of C-PC into nanofibers would allow investigations of potential uses in alternative cancer treatments and tissue engineering scaffolds. In this paper, C-phycocyanin were incorporated into the polymer polyethylene oxide (PEO) in various concentrations for nanofiber production via an electrospinning process. Nanofibers structures were analyzed using digital optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermogravimetric analysis was performed on the pure starting compounds and the produced nanofibers. At a concentration of 2% (w/w) of PEO, nanofibers were not produced, and concentrations of 4% (w/w) of PEO failed to produce nanofibers of good quality. Solutions with 6% (w/w) PEO, 6% (w/w) PEO plus 1% (w/w) NaCI, and 8% (w/w) PEO promote the formation of bluish, homogeneous and bead-free nanofibers with average diameters varying between 542.1 and 759.9 nm, as evaluated by optical microscopy. SEM analysis showed that nanofibers produced from polymer solutions containing 6% (w/w) PEO, 1% (w/w) NaCl and 3% (w/w) C-PC have an average diameter of 295 nm. Thermogravimetric analysis detected an increase in thermal resistance with the incorporation of C-phycocyanin into nanofibers.

  5. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles stabilized with C-phycocyanin and for fluorimetric detection of copper ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nana; Hou, Yanhua; Lu, Zongbao; Yu, Huatong; Wang, Quanfu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, C-phycocyanin as protective agent, AgNO3 as raw material and NaBH4 as reducing agent synthesized C-phycocyanin-Ag nanoparticles (PC-AgNPs). The synthesis conditions of PC-AgNPs were determined by optimization. The maximum UV absorption peak of PC-AgNPs at 400 nm. The fluorescence excitation wavelength was 580 nm and the emission wavelength was 625 nm. PC-AgNPs was spherical in transmission electron microscope and the particles sizes were about 10-25 nm. In addition, fluorescence quenching was observed after adding copper ions to PC-AgNPs, which indicated that PC-AgNPs has potential applications in the detection of copper ions in diverse water environment.

  6. C-phycocyanin extraction from Spirulina platensis wet biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Moraes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available C-Phycocyanin is a natural blue dye used in food and pharmaceutical industry. In the present study, a simple and efficient method to extract C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis wet biomass is reported. The extractions were carried out using six different methods, including chemical (organic and inorganic acid treatment, physical (freezing and thawing, sonication, homogenization and enzymatic (lysozyme treatment methods. The extraction using ultrasonic bath in the presence of glass pearls in the biomass proved to be the most efficient method, 56% higher than using freezing and thawing (the method most frequently used, and presented a extraction yield of 43.75 mg.g-1 and a C-phycocyanin concentration of 0.21 mg.mL-1.

  7. Structure and dynamics of interfacial water. Role of hydratation water in the globular proteins dynamics; Structure et dynamique de l`eau interfaciale. Role de l`eau d`hydratation dans la dynamique des proteines globulaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotti, J.M.

    1997-01-27

    This memoir includes five chapters. In the first chapter, are given the elements of the neutrons scattering theory that is used in this study. the second chapter is devoted to a general presentation of the interaction between biological macro molecule and water. The third part is dedicated to the study of the structure and the dynamics of interfacial water in the neighbouring of model systems, the vycor and the amorphous carbon. The results presented in this part are compared with these one relative to water dynamics at the C-phycocyanin surface. This study makes the object of the fourth chapter. Then, in the fifth and last chapter are discussed the results relative to the role of hydratation on the parv-albumin dynamics for which have been combined the neutron quasi elastic incoherent scattering and the nuclear magnetic resonance of the carbon 13 solid in natural abundance.

  8. Antitumor activity of C-phycocyanin from Arthronema africanum (Cyanophyceae

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    Elena Gardeva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pure C-phycocyanin (C-PC was isolated from Arthronema africanumto evaluate its potential antitumor effects in vivo and in vitro. Experimental myeloid Graffi tumor in hamsters was used as a model. The cell proliferation assay showed that C-PC treatment, at concentration of 100 µg mL-1 for 24 h, significantly inhibited the growth of Graffi tumor cells (51.4% viability. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the genomic DNA of treated cells displayed time-and concentration-dependent fragmentation pattern, typical for apoptosis. Apoptotic process was related to the increase in cellular manganese and copper/zinc superoxide dismutases and glutathione reductase activities, coupled with a low catalase activity. In vivo C-PC administration (5.0 mg kg-1 body weight suppressed the tumor transplantability and growth, while the mean survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters was increased. The results revealed promising antitumor activities of A. africanum C-PC and suggested the potential of this natural biliprotein pigment for future pharmacological and medical applications. The study provided new data on the mechanism of the C-PC induced apoptosis in which the imbalance of antioxidant enzymes that favoured hydrogen peroxide accumulation might play a leading role.

  9. Medical Application of Spirulina platensis Derived C-Phycocyanin

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    Qian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of marine biological pharmaceutical research, high-effective and low-toxic drugs and functional foods isolated from marine organisms have become a new field of pharmacy and bromatology. The pharmacological actions, such as anti-inflammation, antioxidation, antitumor, immunological enhancement, and hepatorenal protection of C-phycocyanin (C-PC from Spirulina platensis, have been reported, and C-PC has important value of development and utilization either as drug or as functional food. There are many researches about the various pharmacological actions and mechanisms of C-PC, but related reports are only to some extent integrated deeply and accurately enough, which put some limitations to the further application of C-PC in medicine. Particularly, with the improvement of living standards and attention to health issues, C-PC being a functional food is preferred by more and more people. C-PC is easy to get, safe, and nontoxic; thus, it has a great potential of research and development as a drug or functional food. Here, the separation and purification, physicochemical properties, physiological and pharmacological activities, safety, and some applications are reviewed to provide relevant basis for the development of natural medicine and applied products.

  10. C-phycocyanin modulates selenite-induced cataractogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rasiah Pratheepa; Sivakumar, Jeyarajan; Thankappan, Bency; Anbarasu, Kumarasamy

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation is aimed to evaluate the anticataractogenic potential of C-phycocyanin (C-PC), extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis. Enucleated rat lenses were maintained in vitro in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM). Group I contained DMEM, Group II and Group III contained 100 μM of sodium selenite, Group III was subdivided into three viz IIIa, IIIb, IIIc supplemented with 100, 150, 200 μg of C-PC respectively. In the in vivo study, on tenth day post partum: Group I rat pups received an intraperitoneal injection of saline, Group II, IIIa, IIIb, and IIIc rat pups received a subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (19 μmol/kg bodyweight) Group IIIa, IIIb, IIIc also received an intraperitoneal injection of 100, 150, 200 mg/kg body weight of C-PC, respectively, from postpartum days 9-14. On termination of the experiment, the lenses from both in vitro and in vivo studies were subjected to morphological examination and subsequently processed to estimate the activities of antioxidant enzymes namely superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, levels of reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation products. Sodium selenite-exposed, C-PC-treated rat lenses (Group IIIc), showed significant restoration of antioxidant enzyme activity (p < 0.05) when compared to their counterpart Group II. Group IIIc conserved the levels of GSH and lipid peroxidation products at near to normal levels as compared with Group II. Results conclude the possible role of C-PC in modulating the antioxidant enzyme status, thereby retarding sodium selenite-induced cataract incidence both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Kinetics and adsorption isotherm of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis on ion-exchange resins

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    L. Sala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available C-phycocyanin is a natural blue dye extracted from Spirulina platensis, which has many applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this paper the effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption of C-phycocyanin onto two different ion exchange resins (Streamline DEAE and Streamline Q XL for expanded bed adsorption chromatography was investigated. Moreover, the kinetics and adsorption isotherm were evaluated. The equilibrium for the Q XL matrix was reached after 60 min, while for DEAE it was only reached after 140 min. C-phycocyanin showed the highest partition coefficient at pH 7.5 for both resins at 25 ºC. The C-phycocyanin adsorption isotherm was very well represented by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich models, where the estimated values for Qm and Kd obtained by the Langmuir isotherm were, respectively, 33.92 mg.mL-1 and 0.123 mg.mL-1 for DEAE, and 28.12 mg.mL-1 and 0.082 mg.mL-1 for the Q XL matrix. A negative cooperativity was observed for C-phycocyanin binding when the Q XL matrix was used, while the cooperativity was purely independent using the DEAE matrix.

  12. Spirulina and C-phycocyanin reduce cytotoxicity and inflammation-related genes expression of microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Cherng; Liu, Kris Sun; Yang, Ting-Ju; Hwang, Juen-Haur; Chan, Yin-Ching; Lee, I-Te

    2012-11-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effects of Spirulina on BV-2 microglial cell cytotoxicity and inflammatory genes expression. BV-2 microglial cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (1 µg/ml) and various concentrations of Spirulina platensis water extract or its active component (C-phycocyanin (C-PC)) for 24 hours. Cytotoxicity (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release) and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNAs were assayed. LPS increased LDH production and up-regulated expression of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-6 by BV-2 microglial cells. However, Spirulina platensis water extract and C-PC significantly reduced LPS-induced LDH release, and expression of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-6 mRNAs. Spirulina can reduce the cytotoxicity and inhibit expression of inflammation-related genes of LPS-stimulated BV-2 microglial cells.

  13. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  14. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin

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    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  15. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: 2H NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  16. C-phycocyanin extraction assisted by pulsed electric field from Artrosphira platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Juan Manuel; Luengo, Elisa; Saldaña, Guillermo; Álvarez, Ignacio; Raso, Javier

    2017-09-01

    This paper assesses the application of pulsed electric fields (PEF) to the fresh biomass of Artrhospira platensis in order to enhance the extraction of C-phycocyanin into aqueous media. Electroporation of A. platensis depended on both electric field strength and treatment duration. The minimum electric field intensity for detecting C-phycocyanin in the extraction medium was 15kV/cm after the application of a treatment time 150μs (50 pulses of 3μs). However higher electric field strength were required when shorter treatment times were applied. Response surface methodology was used in order to investigate the influence of electric field strength (15-25kV/cm), treatment time (60-150μs), and temperature of application of PEF (10-40°C) on C-phycocyanin extraction yield (PEY). The increment of the temperature PEF treatment reduced the electric field strength and the treatment time required to obtain a given PEY and, consequently decreased the total specific energy delivered by the treatment. For example, the increment of temperature from 10°C to 40°C permitted to reduce the electric field strength required to extract 100mg/g d w of C-phycocyanin from 25 to 18kV/cm, and the specific energy input from 106.7 to 67.5kJ/Kg. Results obtained in this investigation demonstrated PEF's potential for selectively extraction C-phycocyanin from fresh A. platensis biomass. The purity of the C-phycocyanin extract obtained from the electroporated cells was higher than that obtained using other techniques based on the cell complete destruction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of an Ultrafine Shearing Method for the Extraction of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis

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    Jianfeng Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell disruption is an important step during the extraction of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis. An ultrafine shearing method is introduced and combined with soaking and ultrasonication to disrupt the cell walls of S. platensis efficiently and economically. Five kinds of cell disruption method, including soaking, ultrasonication, freezing-thawing, soaking-ultrafine shearing and soaking-ultrafine shearing-ultrasonication were applied to break the cell walls of S. platensis. The effectiveness of cell breaking was evaluated based on the yield of the C-phycocyanin. The results show that the maximum C-phycocyanin yield was 9.02%, achieved by the soaking-ultrafine shearing-ultrasonication method, followed by soaking (8.43%, soaking-ultrafine shearing (8.89%, freezing and thawing (8.34%, and soaking-ultrasonication (8.62%. The soaking-ultrafine shearing-ultrasonication method is a novel technique for breaking the cell walls of S. platensis for the extraction of C-phycocyanin.

  18. Site-selective spectroscopy and level ordering in C-phycocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, W.; Friedrich, J.; Fischer, R.; Scheer, H.

    1988-01-01

    We present a combined fluorescence and hole-burning study of the biliprotein C-phycocyanin. Sharp zero-phonon holes compare with a broad structureless fluorescence. This finding is rationalized in terms of the special level structure in this pigment, the fast energy-transfer processes and a lack of correlation of the energies of the emissive states.

  19. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  20. Fed-batch strategy for enhancing cell growth and C-phycocyanin production of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis under phototrophic cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Youping; Jin, Yiwen; Zeng, Xianhai; Chen, Jianfeng; Lu, Yinghua; Jing, Keju

    2015-03-01

    The C-phycocyanin generated in blue-green algae Arthrospira platensis is gaining commercial interest due to its nutrition and healthcare value. In this study, the light intensity and initial biomass concentration were manipulated to improve cell growth and C-phycocyanin production of A.platensis in batch cultivation. The results show that low light intensity and high initial biomass concentration led to increased C-phycocyanin accumulation. The best C-phycocyanin productivity occurred when light intensity and initial biomass concentration were 300μmol/m(2)/s and 0.24g/L, respectively. The fed-batch cultivation proved to be an effective strategy to further enhance C-phycocyanin production of A.platensis. The results indicate that C-phycocyanin accumulation not only requires nitrogen-sufficient condition, but also needs other nutrients. The highest C-phycocyanin content (16.1%), production (1034mg/L) and productivity (94.8mg/L/d) were obtained when using fed-batch strategy with 5mM medium feeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physical-chemical properties of C-phycocyanin isolated from an acido-thermophilic eukaryote, Cyanidium caldarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, O H; Edwards, M R; Berns, D S

    1975-01-01

    C-Phycocyanin from an acido-thermophilic eukaryotic alga, Cyanidium caldarium, was characterized with respect to subunit structure, absorption spectrum and fluorescence properties and was found to be similar to C-phycocyanins from mesophilic sources. The pH-dependence of fluorescence polarization and the changes in sedimentation velocity as a function of pH, concentration and temperature indicate the presence of extremely large amounts of unusually stable 19S aggregates. It was not possible to disaggregate this phycocyanin completely to monomer under normal conditions. The amino acid composition is similar to that of phycocyanins from other thermophilic and halophilic sources. The isoelectric point of this C-phycocyanin was 5.11, an unusually high value. The properties of this C-phycocyanin suggest an increase in protein stability as its mode of adaptation to the environmental stress of high temperature. Images Fig. 7. PMID:239703

  2. Chitosomes as drug delivery systems for C-phycocyanin: preparation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, M; Mura, S; Manca, M L; Fadda, A M; Dolz, M; Hernandez, M J; Casanovas, A; Díez-Sales, O

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate chitosomes, i.e. liposomes coated by a polyelectrolyte complex between chitosan (CH) and xantan gum (XG), as potential delivery system for oral administration of the protein C-phycocyanin. To this purpose several CH-XG-microcomplexes were prepared in aqueous lactic acid at different chitosan-xanthan gum percent ratios and rheological properties of the microcomplexes were studied to analyse the contribution of chitosan and xanthan gum in the reaction of microcomplexation. After establishing the best microcomplexes, chitosomes were prepared by coating C-phycocyanin loaded liposomes with the CH-XG hydrogels using spray-drying or freeze-drying. The chitosomes were characterized in terms of morphology, size distribution, zeta potential, swelling properties, drug release, and mucoadhesive properties. Rheological studies showed the influence of xanthan gum in the microcomplex properties. Moreover, obtained results demonstrated the effects of formulation and process variables on particle size, drug content, swelling, drug release, and especially on the mucoadhesiveness of C-PC chitosomes of CH-XG. In particular, chitosomes prepared by spray-drying technique using CH-XG in 0.5/8.0 (w/w) ratio showed a regular surface and a drug release characteristic for a Fickian diffusion of the active ingredient. The in vitro mucoadhesive study revealed that the spray-drying method is advantageous to prepare C-phycocyanin loaded chitosomes with excellent mucoadhesive properties for colonic drug delivery. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. HYDRATION STRUCTURE AND WATER EXCHANGE DYNAMICS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    was carried out for Fe(II) in water using the 2-body potential and its 3-body correction function to study hydration structure of the Fe(II) ion. Furthermore, the present study investigates the water exchange processes around the Fe(II) ion in the aqueous solution. Emphasis is given on the illumination of the structural changes at ...

  4. Piroxicam and C-phycocyanin mediated apoptosis in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride induced colon carcinogenesis: exploring the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath; Vaiphei, Kim

    2012-04-01

    Apoptosis is a synchronized procedure of cell death that is regulated by caspases and proapoptotic proteins. During apoptosis, translocation of cytochrome c, an electron carrier, from mitochondria into the cytosol is regulated by Bcl-2 family members. Cytochrome c in association with an apoptotic protease activating factor (Apaf), a proapoptotic protein essential for cell differentiation and procaspase-9 form the apoptosome complex, which consecutively activates effector caspase, caspase-3, and coordinate the implementation of apoptosis. In the current study, an attempt has been made to gain insight into piroxicam, a traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug and c-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis (cyanobacterium) mediated apoptosis in DMH-induced colon cancer. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were segregated into 5 groups: control, DMH, DMH + piroxicam, DMH + c-phycocyanin, and DMH + piroxicam + c-phycocyanin. Results illustrated that piroxicam and c-phycocyanin treatments stimulate cytochrome c release by downregulating the Bcl-2 (an antiapoptotic protein) expression significantly, while promoting the level of Bax (a proapoptotic protein), thereby activating caspases (caspases-9 and -3) and Apaf-1. The outcomes of the present study clearly signify that piroxicam and c-phycocyanin may mediate mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in DMH-induced colon cancer. Moreover, apoptosis induction was more apparent in the combination regimen of piroxicam and c-phycocyanin than the individual drugs alone.

  5. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A [San Francisco, CA; Bradshaw, Robert W [Livermore, CA; Dedrick, Daniel E [Berkeley, CA; Anderson, David W [Riverbank, CA

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  6. Effects of C-Phycocyanin on the representative genes of tumor development in mouse skin exposed to 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Naresh Kumar; Gupta, Krishna P

    2012-11-01

    C-Phycocyanin (C-PC), a biliprotein from the sea weed, has been shown to have the beneficial effects like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and hepatoprotective properties and is used as food supplement. We are showing the effect of C-Phycocyanin on the early events altered by tumor promoter. TPA induced the expression of critical events of tumorigenesis like ornithine decarboxylase, cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-6 and pSTAT3 in mouse skin after 5h of application, whereas expression of transglutaminase2 was decreased at this time point. This TPA-caused altered expression of genes was prevented in presence of C-Phycocyanin. This prevention by C-Phycocyanin appeared to be dependent on the dose of C-Phycocyanin used. The results are useful for the detailed study on the preventive effect of C-Phycocyanin on TPA induced tumor promotion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Methane hydrate formation in partially water-saturated Ottawa sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediment strongly depend on whether hydrate forms primarily in the pore fluid, becomes a load-bearing member of the sediment matrix, or cements sediment grains. Our compressional wave speed measurements through partially water-saturated, methane hydrate-bearing Ottawa sands suggest hydrate surrounds and cements sediment grains. The three Ottawa sand packs tested in the Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument (GHASTLI) contain 38(1)% porosity, initially with distilled water saturating 58, 31, and 16% of that pore space, respectively. From the volume of methane gas produced during hydrate dissociation, we calculated the hydrate concentration in the pore space to be 70, 37, and 20% respectively. Based on these hydrate concentrations and our measured compressional wave speeds, we used a rock physics model to differentiate between potential pore-space hydrate distributions. Model results suggest methane hydrate cements unconsolidated sediment when forming in systems containing an abundant gas phase.

  8. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  9. Search for memory effects in methane hydrate: structure of water before hydrate formation and after hydrate decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Piers; Soper, Alan K; Thompson, Helen; Westacott, Robin E; Creek, Jefferson L; Hobson, Greg; Koh, Carolyn A

    2005-10-22

    Neutron diffraction with HD isotope substitution has been used to study the formation and decomposition of the methane clathrate hydrate. Using this atomistic technique coupled with simultaneous gas consumption measurements, we have successfully tracked the formation of the sI methane hydrate from a water/gas mixture and then the subsequent decomposition of the hydrate from initiation to completion. These studies demonstrate that the application of neutron diffraction with simultaneous gas consumption measurements provides a powerful method for studying the clathrate hydrate crystal growth and decomposition. We have also used neutron diffraction to examine the water structure before the hydrate growth and after the hydrate decomposition. From the neutron-scattering curves and the empirical potential structure refinement analysis of the data, we find that there is no significant difference between the structure of water before the hydrate formation and the structure of water after the hydrate decomposition. Nor is there any significant change to the methane hydration shell. These results are discussed in the context of widely held views on the existence of memory effects after the hydrate decomposition.

  10. Effects of C-phycocyanin and Spirulina on Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus, Expression of NMDA Receptor and Inflammatory Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Juen-Haur; Chen, Jin-Cherng; Chan, Yin-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Effects of C-phycocyanin (C-PC), the active component of Spirulina platensis water extract on the expressions of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) genes in the cochlea and inferior colliculus (IC) of mice were evaluated after tinnitus was induced by intraperitoneal injection of salicylate. The results showed that 4-day salicylate treatment (unlike 4-day saline treatment) caused a significant increase in NR2B, TNF-α, and IL-1β mRNAs expression in the cochlea and IC. On the other hand, dietary supplementation with C-PC or Spirulina platensis water extract significantly reduced the salicylate-induced tinnitus and down-regulated the mRNAs expression of NR2B, TNF-α, IL-1β mRNAs, and COX-2 genes in the cochlea and IC of mice. The changes of protein expression levels were generally correlated with those of mRNAs expression levels in the IC for above genes. PMID:23533584

  11. Effects of C-phycocyanin and Spirulina on salicylate-induced tinnitus, expression of NMDA receptor and inflammatory genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juen-Haur Hwang

    Full Text Available Effects of C-phycocyanin (C-PC, the active component of Spirulina platensis water extract on the expressions of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, and cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2 genes in the cochlea and inferior colliculus (IC of mice were evaluated after tinnitus was induced by intraperitoneal injection of salicylate. The results showed that 4-day salicylate treatment (unlike 4-day saline treatment caused a significant increase in NR2B, TNF-α, and IL-1β mRNAs expression in the cochlea and IC. On the other hand, dietary supplementation with C-PC or Spirulina platensis water extract significantly reduced the salicylate-induced tinnitus and down-regulated the mRNAs expression of NR2B, TNF-α, IL-1β mRNAs, and COX-2 genes in the cochlea and IC of mice. The changes of protein expression levels were generally correlated with those of mRNAs expression levels in the IC for above genes.

  12. X-ray crystallographic studies on C-phycocyanins from cyanobacteria from different habitats: marine and freshwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyanarayana, L.; Suresh, C. G., E-mail: cgsuresh@ncl.res.in [Division of Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008, Maharashtra (India); Patel, Anamika; Mishra, Sandhya, E-mail: cgsuresh@ncl.res.in; Ghosh, Pushpito Kumar [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, G. B. Marg, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India); Division of Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008, Maharashtra (India)

    2005-09-01

    The protein C-phycocyanin, involved in photosynthesis, has been purified from three cyanobacterial species: Spirulina, Phormidium and Lyngbya. These three proteins have been crystallized and characterized using X-ray crystallography. C-phycocyanins from three cyanobacterial cultures of freshwater and marine habitat, Spirulina, Phormidium and Lyngbya spp., were purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Blue-coloured crystals in different crystal forms, monoclinic and hexagonal, were obtained for the three species. The crystals took 1–12 weeks to grow to full size using polyethylene glycols of different molecular weights as precipitants. The amino-acid sequences of these proteins show high similarity to other known C-phycocyanins from related organisms; however, the C-phycocyanins reported here showed different biochemical and biophysical properties, i.e. molecular weight, stability etc. The X-ray diffraction data were collected at resolutions of 3.0 Å for the monoclinic and 3.2 and 3.6 Å for the hexagonal forms. The unit-cell parameters corresponding to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} are a = 107.33, b = 115.64, c = 183.26 Å, β = 90.03° for Spirulina sp. C-phycocyanin and are similar for crystals of Phormidium and Lyngbya spp. C-phycocyanins. Crystals belonging to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 154.97, c = 40.35 Å and a = b = 151.96, c = 39.06 Å, were also obtained for the C-phycocyanins from Spirulina and Lyngbya spp., respectively. The estimated solvent content is around 50% for the monoclinic crystals of all three species assuming the presence of two hexamers per asymmetric unit. The solvent content is 66.5 and 64.1% for the hexagonal crystals of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina and Lyngbya spp. assuming the presence of one αβ monomer per asymmetric unit.

  13. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes.

  14. Recent Developments in Production and Biotechnological Applications of C-Phycocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuddus, M.; Singh, P.; Thomas, G.; Al-Hazimi, Awdah

    2013-01-01

    An extensive range of pigments including phycobiliproteins are present in algae. C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a phycobiliprotein, is one of the key pigments of Spirulina, a microalgae used in many countries as a dietary supplement. Algal pigments have massive commercial value as natural colorants in nutraceutical, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries, besides their health benefits. At present, increasing awareness of harmful effects of synthetic compounds and inclination of community towards the usage of natural products have led to the exploitation of microalgae as a source of natural pigments/colors. This review describes recent findings about the sources and production of C-PC, with emphasis on specific techniques for extraction and purification, along with potential industrial applications in diagnostics, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:24063013

  15. Recent Developments in Production and Biotechnological Applications of C-Phycocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kuddus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An extensive range of pigments including phycobiliproteins are present in algae. C-phycocyanin (C-PC, a phycobiliprotein, is one of the key pigments of Spirulina, a microalgae used in many countries as a dietary supplement. Algal pigments have massive commercial value as natural colorants in nutraceutical, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries, besides their health benefits. At present, increasing awareness of harmful effects of synthetic compounds and inclination of community towards the usage of natural products have led to the exploitation of microalgae as a source of natural pigments/colors. This review describes recent findings about the sources and production of C-PC, with emphasis on specific techniques for extraction and purification, along with potential industrial applications in diagnostics, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries.

  16. Recent developments in production and biotechnological applications of C-phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuddus, M; Singh, P; Thomas, G; Al-Hazimi, Awdah

    2013-01-01

    An extensive range of pigments including phycobiliproteins are present in algae. C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a phycobiliprotein, is one of the key pigments of Spirulina, a microalgae used in many countries as a dietary supplement. Algal pigments have massive commercial value as natural colorants in nutraceutical, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries, besides their health benefits. At present, increasing awareness of harmful effects of synthetic compounds and inclination of community towards the usage of natural products have led to the exploitation of microalgae as a source of natural pigments/colors. This review describes recent findings about the sources and production of C-PC, with emphasis on specific techniques for extraction and purification, along with potential industrial applications in diagnostics, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries.

  17. Modeling of ion exchange expanded-bed chromatography for the purification of C-phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Caroline Costa; Mazutti, Marcio A; Maugeri, Francisco; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2013-03-15

    This work is focused on the experimental evaluation and mathematical modeling of ion exchange expanded-bed chromatography for the purification of C-phycocyanin from crude fermentative broth containing Spirulina platensis cells. Experiments were carried out in different expansion degree to evaluate the process performance. The experimental breakthrough curves were used to estimate the mass transfer and kinetics parameters of the proposed model, using the Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (PSO). The proposed model satisfactorily fitted the experimental data. The results from the model application pointed out that the increase in the initial bed height does not influence the process efficiency, however enables the operation of expanded-bed column at high volumetric flow rates, improving the productivity. It was also shown that the use of mathematical modeling was a good and promising tool for the optimization of chromatographic processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tyrosinase-catalyzed site-specific immobilization of engineered C-phycocyanin to surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccio, Greta; Kämpf, Michael M.; Piatti, Chiara; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Richter, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Enzymatic crosslinking of proteins is often limited by the steric availability of the target residues, as of tyrosyl side chains in the case of tyrosinase. Carrying an N-terminal peptide-tag containing two tyrosine residues, the fluorescent protein C-phycocyanin HisCPC from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 was crosslinked to fluorescent high-molecular weight forms with tyrosinase. Crosslinking with tyrosinase in the presence of L-tyrosine produced non fluorescent high-molecular weight products. Incubated in the presence of tyrosinase, HisCPC could also be immobilized to amino-modified polystyrene beads thus conferring a blue fluorescence. Crosslinking and immobilization were site-specific as both processes required the presence of the N-terminal peptide in HisCPC.

  19. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2016-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  20. Chemoprevention of DMH-induced rat colon carcinoma initiation by combination administration of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Vaiphei, Kim; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2012-02-01

    Cancer research illustrated that combinatorial studies can provide significant improvement in safety and effectiveness over the monotherapy regimens. A combination of two drugs may restrain precancerous colon polyps, opening a new possible opportunity for chemoprevention of colon cancer. In this context, chemopreventive efficacy of a combination regimen of C-phycocyanin, a biliprotein present in Spirulina platensis, a cyanobacterium, which is a selective cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor and piroxicam, a traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug was considered in 1,2 dimethylhyadrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, DNA fragmentation, fluorescent staining, PGE(2) enzyme immunoassay, and carrageenan-induced paw edema test were performed along with morphological and histological analysis. DMH treatment showed a rich presence of preneoplastic lesions such as multiple plaque lesions, aberrant crypt foci, and well-characterized dysplasia. These features were reduced with piroxicam and C-phycocyanin administration. The number of apoptotic cells was featured prominently in all the groups compared with DMH. DMH treatment revealed intact high molecular weight genomic DNA with no signs of laddering/DNA fragmentation while it was noticeable significantly in control and DMH + piroxicam + C-phycocyanin. DMH group showed highest COX-2 expression and PGE(2) level in comparison with other groups. Doses of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin used in the present study were established at an anti-inflammatory range. A combination regimen of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin, rather than individually has the much greater potential for reduction of DMH-induced colon cancer development and COX-2 being the prime possible target in such chemoprevention.

  1. Water Dynamics in the Hydration Shells of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and function of biomolecules are strongly influenced by their hydration shells. Structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules cover a broad range in space and time, from individual water molecules to larger pools and from femtosecond to microsecond time scales. Recent progress in theory and molecular dynamics simulations as well as in ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces, and processes of vibrational relaxation and energy dissipation. Here, we review recent advances in both theory and experiment, focusing on hydrated DNA, proteins, and phospholipids, and compare dynamics in the hydration shells to bulk water. PMID:28248491

  2. Interactions of water in ionic and nonionic hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleeberg, H. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    This softbound book contains a large number of typescript papers grouped under five headings: Hydration of Ions; Hydration of Nonionic Substances; Hydration of Biological and Macromolecular Substances; Water and Surfactants; and Methods, Models and Theories. For each of these subject headings, there is a plenary lecture of about 20 pages, as well as short reports of original research. The symposium that generated these was held in Marburg in 1987, to honor the 65th birthday of Werner A. P. Luck.

  3. Hydration and nutrition knowledge in adolescent swimmers. Does water intake affect urine hydration markers after swimming?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Altavilla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little data exists regarding nutritional knowledge and hydration in adolescent swimmers. The aim of this study was to assess the level of nutrition and hydration knowledge and to describe the fluid balance in adolescent swimmers during training. A study was carried out with a cross-sectional descriptive part and a longitudinal part with repeated measurements over five swimming sessions. Eighty-six adolescent swimmers completed a questionnaire to assess their sport nutrition and hydration knowledge. Fluid balance and urine hydration markers were studied during training. Swimmers showed a limited nutrition knowledge (33.26 % ± SD 12.59 and meagre hydration knowledge (28.61 % ± SD 28.59. Females showed lower scores than male swimmers in nutrition and hydration knowledge. Based on urine specific gravity, swimmers started the training close to the euhydrated threshold (1.019 g/mL ± SD 0.008. Although urine specific gravity and urine colour were reduced after the training, there were minimal changes in body mass (-0.12 Kg ± SD 0.31. Sweat loss (2.67 g/min ± SD 3.23 and the net changes in the fluid balance (-0.22 % ± SD 0.59 were low. The poor knowledge in nutrition and hydration encountered in the swimmers can justify the development of a strategy to incorporate nutritional education programmes for this group. Body water deficit from swimming activity seems to be easily replaced with the water intake to maintain hydration. After the training, the urine of swimmers was diluted regardless of their water intake. Dilution of urine did not reflect real hydration state in swimming.

  4. Targeting angiogenic pathway for chemoprevention of experimental colon cancer using C-phycocyanin as cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-06-01

    An angiogenic pathway was studied that involved stromal tissue degradation with matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), vesicular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) mediated growth regulation in a complex interaction with chemokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β). Gene and protein expression was studied with real-time PCR, Western immunoblot, and immunofluorescence. Morphological and histopathological analysis of tumor was done, as also the activity of MMPs and HIF-1α by gelatin zymography and ELISA. Binding interactions of proteins were studied by molecular docking. Piroxicam, a traditional NSAID and C-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis, were utilized in the chemoprevention of DMH-induced rat colon cancer. A significant number of tumors was evident in DMH treated animals, while with piroxicam and C-phycocyanin, the number and size of tumors/lesions were reduced. Colonic tissues showed severe dysplasia, tubular adenoma, and adenocarcinoma from DMH, with invasive features along with signet ring cell carcinoma. No occurrence of carcinoma was detected in either of the drug treatments or in a combination regimen. An elevated VEGF-A, MMP-2, and MMP-9 level was observed, which is required for metastasis and invasion into surrounding tissues. Drugs induced chemoprevention by down-regulating these proteins. Piroxicam docked in VEGF-A binding site of VEGF-A receptors i.e., VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, while phycocyanobilin (a chromophore of C-phycocyanin) docked with VEGFR1 alone. HIF-1α is up-regulated which is associated with increased oxygen demand and angiogenesis. MCP-1 and MIP-1β expression was also found altered in DMH and regulated by the drugs. Anti-angiogenic role of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin is well demonstrated.

  5. Purification of the photosynthetic pigment C-phycocyanin from heterotrophic Galdieria sulphuraria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Laila; Hantke, Andrea; Eriksen, Niels T

    2013-09-01

    The phycobiliprotein C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is used in cosmetics, diagnostics and foods and also as a nutraceutical or biopharmaceutical. It is produced in the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis grown phototrophically in open cultures. C-PC may alternatively be produced heterotrophically in the unicellular rhodophyte Galdieria sulphuraria at higher productivities and under improved hygienic standards if it can be purified as efficiently as C-PC from A. platensis. Ammonium sulfate fractionation, aqueous two-phase extraction, tangential flow ultrafiltration and anion exchange chromatography were evaluated with respect to the purification of C-PC from G. sulphuraria extracts. Galdieria sulphuraria C-PC showed similar properties to those described for cyanobacterial C-PC with respect to separation by all methodologies. The presence of micelles in G. sulphuraria extracts influenced the different procedures. Only chromatography was able to separate C-PC from a second phycobiliprotein, allophycocyanin. C-PC from heterotrophic G. sulphuraria shows similar properties to cyanobacterial C-PC and can be purified to the same standards, despite initial C-PC concentrations being low and impurity concentrations high in G. sulphuraria extracts. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. C-phycocyanin prevents cisplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rojas, Berenice; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Sarai; Granados-Castro, Luis Fernando; Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Reyes, José L; Zazueta, Cecilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-08-01

    The potential of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) to prevent cisplatin (CP)-induced kidney mitochondrial dysfunction was determined in CD-1 male mice. The CP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction was characterized by ultrastructural abnormalities and by decrease in the following parameters in isolated kidney mitochondria: adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced oxygen consumption (state 3), respiratory control ratio, ADP/oxygen (ADP/O) ratio, adenosine triphosphate synthesis, membrane potential, calcium retention, glutathione (GSH) content, and activity of respiratory complex I, aconitase, catalase, and GSH peroxidase. These mitochondria also showed increase in hydrogen peroxide production, malondialdehyde, and 3-nitrotyrosine protein adducts content. The above-described changes, as well as CP-induced nephrotoxicity, were attenuated in mice pretreated with a single injection of C-PC. Our data suggest that the attenuation of mitochondrial abnormalities is involved in the protective effect of C-PC against CP-induced nephrotoxicity. This is the first demonstration that C-PC pretreatment prevents CP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.

  7. Biosynthesis of a fluorescent cyanobacterial C-phycocyanin holo-α subunit in a heterologous host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Aaron J.; Cai, Yuping A.; Glazer, Alexander N.

    2001-01-01

    The entire pathway for the synthesis of a fluorescent holophycobiliprotein subunit from a photosynthetic cyanobacterium (Synechocystis sp. PCC6803) was reconstituted in Escherichia coli. Cyanobacterial genes encoding enzymes required for the conversion of heme to the natural chromophore 3Z-phycocyanobilin, namely, heme oxygenase 1 and 3Z-phycocyanobilin:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, were expressed from a plasmid under control of the hybrid trp-lac (trc) promoter. Genes for the apoprotein (C-phycocyanin α subunit; cpcA) and the heterodimeric lyase (cpcE and cpcF) that catalyzes chromophore attachment were expressed from the trc promoter on a second plasmid. Upon induction, recombinant E. coli used the cellular pool of heme to produce holo-CpcA with spectroscopic properties qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of the same protein produced endogenously in cyanobacteria. About a third of the apo-CpcA was converted to holo-CpcA. No significant bilin addition took place in a similarly engineered E. coli strain that lacks cpcE and cpcF. This approach should permit incisive analysis of many remaining questions in phycobiliprotein biosynthesis. These studies also demonstrate the feasibility of generating constructs of these proteins in situ for use as fluorescent protein probes in living cells. PMID:11553806

  8. C-phycocyanin prevents cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through inhibition of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rojas, Berenice; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the antioxidant C-phycocyanin (C-PC, 5-30 mg kg(-1) i.p.) was able to prevent cisplatin (CP, 18 mg kg(-1) i.p.) induced nephrotoxicity by reducing oxidative stress in CD-1 mice. Nephrotoxicity was assessed by measuring blood urea nitrogen, plasma glutathione peroxidase, plasma creatinine, the renal activity of N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase, apoptosis and histopathological changes. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring the content of glutathione, malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal and oxidized proteins in renal tissue. C-PC prevented CP-induced renal damage and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, C-PC prevented the decrease in the renal activity of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase and catalase induced by cisplatin. In vitro assays showed that C-PC was an effective scavenger of the following reactive species: hypochlorous acid, peroxynitrite anions, peroxyl radicals, diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions, singlet oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. It is concluded that the protective effect of the nutraceutical C-PC against CP-induced nephrotoxicity was associated with the attenuation of oxidative stress and the preservation of the activity of antioxidant enzymes.

  9. C-phycocyanin protects against low fertility by inhibiting reactive oxygen species in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Jiao; Han, Zhe; Ge, Lei; Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Zhao, Yue-Fang; Wang, Dong-Hui; Ren, Jing; Niu, Xin-Xin; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2016-04-05

    Women over 35 have higher rates of infertility, largely due to deterioration of oocyte quality characterized by fragmentation, abnormal meiotic spindle-chromosome complexes, and oxidative stress. C-phycocyanin (PC) is a biliprotein enriched in Spirulina platensis that is known to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and radical-scavenging properties. D-galactose-induced aging acceleration in mice has been extensively used to study aging mechanisms and for pharmaceutical screening. In this study, adult female B6D2F/1 mice injected with D-galactose were used as a model to test the age-reversing effects of PC on degenerated reproductive ability. Our results show that PC can prevent oocyte fragmentation and aneuploidy by maintaining cytoskeletal integrity. Moreover, PC can reverse the expression of antioxidant genes, increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and decrease methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content, and normalize mitochondria distribution. PC exerts its benefit by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which decreases apoptosis. Finally, we observe a significant increase in litter size after PC administration to D-galactose-induced aging mice. Our study demonstrates for the first time that D-galactose-induced impaired female reproductive capability can be partially rescued by the antioxidant effects of PC.

  10. Purification of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis in aqueous two-phase systems using an experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Silva Antelo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis was purified in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS of polyethylene glycol (PEG/potassium phosphate, varying the molar mass of the PEG. Results using a full factorial design showed that an increase in the concentration of salt and decrease in the concentration of PEG caused an increment in the purification factor for all the ATPS studied. Optimization of the conditions of the purification was studied using a central composite rotatable design for each molar mass of PEG. The ATPS composed of 7% (w/w PEG 1500 or 4% (w/w PEG 8000 (g/gmol and 23 or 22.5% (w/w of phosphate resulted a purification factor of 1.6-fold for C-phycocyanin, with total and 57% recovery, respectively. Process conditions were optimized for the purification factor for the system with PEG 1500. The ATPS with 4% (w/w PEG 4000 or 4% (w/w PEG 6000 and 21% (w/w phosphate resulted purification factors of 2.1 and 2.2-fold, recovering 100% and 73.5%, respectively of C-phycocyanin in the top phase.

  11. CD59 Underlines the Antiatherosclerotic Effects of C-Phycocyanin on Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xian-Ming; Xu, Ying-Jie; Yang, Fan; Lv, Cong-Yi; Nie, Shu-min

    2013-01-01

    The effects of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) on atherosclerosis and the regulatory effects of CD59 gene on anti-atherosclerotic roles of C-PC were investigated. Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(−/−)) mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group, C-PC treatment group, CD59 transfection group and C-PC+CD59 synergy group. The mice were fed with high-fat-diet and treated with drug intervention at the same time. Results showed the atherosclerotic mouse model was successfully established. CD59 was over-expressed in blood and tissue cells. Single CD59 or C-PC could reduce blood lipid levels and promote the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 but inhibit pro-apoptotic Fas proteins in endothelial cells. The expression levels of cell cycle protein D1 (Cyclin D1) and mRNA levels of cyclin dependent protein kinase 4 (CDK4) in smooth muscle cells were restrained by CD59 and C-PC. CD59 or C-PC alone could inhibit the formation of atherosclerotic plaque by suppressing MMP-2 protein expression. In addition, C-PC could promote CD59 expression. So both CD59 and C-PC could inhibit the progress of atherosclerosis, and the anti-atherosclerotic effects of C-PC might be fulfilled by promoting CD59 expression, preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation and the apoptosis of endothelial cells, reducing blood fat levels, and at last inhibiting the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:24319687

  12. Vibronic effects in the spectroscopy and dynamics of C-phycocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womick, Jordan M.; West, Brantley A.; Scherer, Norbert F.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2012-08-01

    Femtosecond laser spectroscopies are used to investigate the influence of intramolecular nuclear modes on electronic relaxation in the cyanobacterial light harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin (CPC). Of particular interest are sub-ps dynamics localized on pairs of closely spaced phycocyanobilin pigments (i.e. dimers). Experiments conducted under different polarization conditions are used to distinguish isotropic and anisotropic vibrational modes within the dimers. Two isotropic nuclear modes are detected near 185 and 260 cm-1 using two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy. In addition, a transient absorption anisotropy measurement reveals vibrational resonances associated with (out-of-plane) anisotropic nuclear modes near 640 and 815 cm-1. We investigate two possible origins for the recurrences in the anisotropy. A mechanism involving ground state nuclear coherences in the Condon approximation is ruled out by comparing the potential energy surfaces of the excitons to the direction of wavepacket motion. Electronic structure calculations suggest that non-Condon effects are the most likely explanation for the beats observed in the anisotropy. Such non-Condon effects also hold interesting implications for the vibronic exciton electronic structure of CPC. We calculate non-Condon intermolecular couplings in the dimer as large as 10 cm-1, which suggests that these effects are not negligible and deserve further consideration. Our findings provide additional insights into the sub-100 fs vibronic relaxation channel found in the closely related protein, allophycocyanin, whose pigment dimers possess nearly the same geometry and intermolecular Coulombic interactions as CPC. This study underscores the complex interplay of intramolecular vibronic coupling and site energy tuning in photosynthetic light harvesting.

  13. CD59 Underlines the Antiatherosclerotic Effects of C-Phycocyanin on Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of C-phycocyanin (C-PC on atherosclerosis and the regulatory effects of CD59 gene on anti-atherosclerotic roles of C-PC were investigated. Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(−/− mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group, C-PC treatment group, CD59 transfection group and C-PC+CD59 synergy group. The mice were fed with high-fat-diet and treated with drug intervention at the same time. Results showed the atherosclerotic mouse model was successfully established. CD59 was over-expressed in blood and tissue cells. Single CD59 or C-PC could reduce blood lipid levels and promote the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 but inhibit pro-apoptotic Fas proteins in endothelial cells. The expression levels of cell cycle protein D1 (Cyclin D1 and mRNA levels of cyclin dependent protein kinase 4 (CDK4 in smooth muscle cells were restrained by CD59 and C-PC. CD59 or C-PC alone could inhibit the formation of atherosclerotic plaque by suppressing MMP-2 protein expression. In addition, C-PC could promote CD59 expression. So both CD59 and C-PC could inhibit the progress of atherosclerosis, and the anti-atherosclerotic effects of C-PC might be fulfilled by promoting CD59 expression, preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation and the apoptosis of endothelial cells, reducing blood fat levels, and at last inhibiting the development of atherosclerosis.

  14. Ion-water clusters, bulk medium effects, and ion hydration

    CERN Document Server

    Merchant, Safir; Dean, Kelsey R; Asthagiri, D

    2011-01-01

    Thermochemistry of gas-phase ion-water clusters together with estimates of the hydration free energy of the clusters and the water ligands are used to calculate the hydration free energy of the ion. Often the hydration calculations use a continuum model of the solvent. The primitive quasichemical approximation to the quasichemical theory provides a transparent framework to anchor such efforts. Here we evaluate the approximations inherent in the primitive quasichemical approach and elucidate the different roles of the bulk medium. We find that the bulk medium can stabilize configurations of the cluster that are usually not observed in the gas phase, while also simultaneously lowering the excess chemical potential of the ion. This effect is more pronounced for soft ions. Since the coordination number that minimizes the excess chemical potential of the ion is identified as the optimal or most probable coordination number, for such soft ions, the optimum cluster size and the hydration thermodynamics obtained with...

  15. Investigation of the Structure and Element Composition of C-Phycocyanin Extracted from the Microalgae Spirulina platensis

    CERN Document Server

    Mosulishvili, L M; Kirkesali, E I; Khizanishvili, A I; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, S S; Gundorina, S F

    2002-01-01

    The structure and element composition of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) extracted from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis were studied. The behavior of structural subunits forming phycobilisomes in the purification process was studied by capillary electrophoresis. Their proportion in high-purity C-PC was determined. The element composition of C-PC of different purity was studied by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis, and metals which may form macromolecular complexes with C-PC were determined (Zn, Cr, Ni, Co, As, Sr, Mo, Ag, Hg). It was shown that contents of toxic metals did not exceed accepted permissible levels for the human organism.

  16. uPA dependent and independent mechanisms of wound healing by C-phycocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhyastha, H K; Radha, K S; Nakajima, Y; Omura, S; Maruyama, M

    2008-01-01

    Wound repair requires both recruitment and well co-ordinated actions of many cell types including inflammatory cells, endothelial cells, epithelial cells and importantly fibroblast cells. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system plays a vital role in wound healing phenomenon. We have previously demonstrated that C-phycocyanin (C-pc), a biliprotein from blue-green algae, transcriptionally regulates uPA through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. To date, a role for C-pc in wound-healing scenario is not elucidated. This study was designed to examine the wound-healing property of C-pc in relation to fibroblast proliferation and migration. C-pc increased fibroblast proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. It also enhanced G1 phase of cell cycle and increased the expressions of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2, which facilitate cell cycle progression, in a uPA-independent manner. In vitro wound healing and migration assays revealed the pro-migratory properties of C-pc. Short-interference RNA studies demonstrated that uPA was necessary for C-pc-induced fibroblast migration. C-pc also significantly elevated the expressions of chemokines (MDC, RANTES, Eotaxin, GRO α, ENA78 and TARC) and Rho-GTPases (Cdc 42 and Rac 1) in a uPA-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of C-pc-stimulated cells with pharmacological inhibitor of PI-3K (LY294002) annulled the expression of GTPases implying that Rac 1 and Cdc 42 were induced through PI-3K pathway. C-pc-induced cellular migration towards wounded area was also negatively affected by PI-3K inhibition. In vivo wound-healing experiments in mice validated our finding that C-pc accelerates wound healing. Our data provides conclusive evidence of a novel therapeutic usage for C-pc as a wound-healing agent. C-pc is a food and drug administration (FDA)-approved health supplement. We believe this compound can also be beneficial in healing of internal wounds, such as ulcers. PMID:18266963

  17. Hydration structure and water exchange dynamics of Fe(II) ion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computer simulation studies of the hydration structure and water exchange dynamics in the first hydration shell for Fe(II) in water are presented. The structure of the hydrated ion is discussed in terms of radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distributions. The average first-shell hydration structure is ...

  18. Water Intake and Hydration Indices in Healthy European Adults: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Pepa, Alex; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F.; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E.; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Hydration status is linked with health, wellness, and performance. We evaluated hydration status, water intake, and urine output for seven consecutive days in healthy adults. Volunteers living in Spain, Germany, or Greece (n = 573, 39 ± 12 years (51.1% males), 25.0 ± 4.6 kg/m2 BMI) participated in an eight-day study protocol. Total water intake was estimated from seven-day food and drink diaries. Hydration status was measured in urine samples collected over 24 h for seven days and in blood samples collected in fasting state on the mornings of days 1 and 8. Total daily water intake was 2.75 ± 1.01 L, water from beverages 2.10 ± 0.91 L, water from foods 0.66 ± 0.29 L. Urine parameters were: 24 h volume 1.65 ± 0.70 L, 24 h osmolality 631 ± 221 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο, 24 h specific gravity 1.017 ± 0.005, 24 h excretion of sodium 166.9 ± 54.7 mEq, 24 h excretion of potassium 72.4 ± 24.6 mEq, color chart 4.2 ± 1.4. Predictors for urine osmolality were age, country, gender, and BMI. Blood indices were: haemoglobin concentration 14.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, hematocrit 43% ± 4% and serum osmolality 294 ± 9 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο. Daily water intake was higher in summer (2.8 ± 1.02 L) than in winter (2.6 ± 0.98 L) (p = 0.019). Water intake was associated negatively with urine specific gravity, urine color, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations (p hydration level. PMID:27058557

  19. Spectroscopic study of the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin associated with colorless linker peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizarro, Shelly Ann [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The phycobilisome (PBS) light-harvesting antenna is composed of chromophore-containing biliproteins and 'colorless' linker peptides and is structurally designed to support unidirectional transfer of excitation energy from the periphery of the PBS to its core. The linker peptides have a unique role in this transfer process by modulating the spectral properties of the associated biliprotein. There is only one three-dimensional structure of a biliprotein/linker complex available to date (APC/LC7.8) and the mechanism of interaction between these two proteins remains unknown. This study brings together a detailed spectroscopic characterization of C-Phycocyanin (PC)-linker complexes (isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002) with proteomic analysis of the linker amino acid sequences to produce a model for biliprotein/linker interaction. The amino acid sequences of the rod linkers [LR8.9, LR32.3 and LRC28.5] were examined to identify evolutionarily conserved regions important to either the structure or function of this protein family. Although there is not one common homologous site among all the linkers, there are strong trends across each separate subset (LC, LR and LRC) and the N-terminal segments of both LR32.3 and LRC28.5 display multiple regions of similarity with other linkers. Predictions of the secondary structure of LR32.3 and LRC28.5, and comparison to the crystal structure of LC7.8, further narrowed the candidates for interaction sites with the PC chromophores. Measurements of the absorption, fluorescence, CD and excitation anisotropy of PC trimer, PC/LR32.3, and PC/LRC28.5, document the spectroscopic effect of each linker peptide on the PC chromophores at a series of temperatures (298 to 77 K

  20. Correlation Between Chain Architecture and Hydration Water Structure in Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossutti, Michael; Dutcher, John R

    2016-03-14

    The physical properties of confined water can differ dramatically from those of bulk water. Hydration water associated with polysaccharides provides a particularly interesting example of confined water, because differences in polysaccharide structure provide different spatially confined environments for water sorption. We have used attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of hydration water in films of three different polysaccharides under controlled relative humidity (RH) conditions. We compare the results obtained for films of highly branched, dendrimer-like phytoglycogen nanoparticles to those obtained for two unbranched polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid (HA), and chitosan. We find similarities between the water structuring in the two linear polysaccharides and significant differences for phytoglycogen. In particular, the results suggest that the high degree of branching in phytoglycogen leads to a much more well-ordered water structure (low density, high connectivity network water), indicating the strong influence of chain architecture on the structuring of water. These measurements provide unique insight into the relationship between the structure and hydration of polysaccharides, which is important for understanding and exploiting these sustainable nanomaterials in a wide range of applications.

  1. Thermodynamics of Hydration Water around an Antifreeze Protein: A Molecular Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Hari Datt; Leitner, David M

    2017-10-19

    We investigate by molecular simulations thermodynamic properties of hydration water and protein, the sensitivity of hydrogen bonds to change in temperature, and hydration water distribution at varying levels of hydration of a hyperactive antifreeze protein, DAFP-1. Hydration water coverage of the protein and partial thermodynamic properties of the hydration water are heterogeneous, different for the water near the ice-binding site (IBS) and the rest of the protein, particularly at low levels of hydration. Overall, we find the partial specific heat of water to be larger at low hydration levels than in the fully hydrated limit, with the separation corresponding roughly to one hydration layer. Differences in the specific heat in the low- and fully hydrated regions are accounted for by the varying sensitivity of water-water and water-protein hydrogen bonds to change in temperature as a function of hydration, most strikingly near the IBS. Using values computed for the specific heat, we estimate the partial entropy of the water and protein. We find the partial entropy of DAFP-1 to be greater in the fully hydrated limit than at low levels of hydration, whereas the partial entropy of water is somewhat smaller.

  2. Application of various water soluble polymers in gas hydrate inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.; Sultan, Abdullah S.

    2016-01-01

    . This review presents the various types of water soluble polymers used for hydrate inhibition, including conventional and novel polymeric inhibitors along with their limitations. The review covers the relevant properties of vinyl lactam, amide, dendrimeric, fluorinated, and natural biodegradable polymers....... The factors affecting the performance of these polymers and the structure-property relationships are reviewed. A comprehensive review of the techniques used to evaluate the performance of the polymeric inhibitors is given. This review also addresses recent developments, current and future challenges......, and field applications of a range of polymeric kinetic hydrate inhibitors....

  3. Carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles coupled with CD59-specific ligand peptide for targeted delivery of C-phycocyanin to HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Li, Bing; Yin, Qi-Feng; Wang, Yu-Juan

    2017-03-01

    The combination of nanotechnology and medicine will be the next generation of vehicles for targeted drug delivery. Carboxymethyl chitosan loaded with the anticancer drug C-phycocyanin and the CD59-specific ligand peptide for cancer cell targeting were used to create C-phycocyanin/carboxymethyl chitosan-CD59-specific ligand peptide nanoparticles using the ionic-gelation method. Optimal synthesis conditions, selected by response surface methodology, comprised the ratio carboxymethyl chitosan:C-phycocyanin = 3:1, and carboxymethyl chitosan and CaCl2 concentrations of 2.0 and 1.0 mg/mL, respectively. The resulting nanoparticles were spherical, with diameters of approximately 200 nm; the entrapment efficient was about 65%; and the drug loading was about 20%. The release of C-phycocyanin from C-phycocyanin/carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles was pH sensitive and had a sustainable effect in vitro. Guided by the CD59-specific ligand peptide, the nanoparticles efficiently targeted the surface of HeLa cells and had an obvious inhibitory effect on HeLa cell proliferation as determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assays. The nanoparticles were hemocompatible and induced apoptosis by upregulation of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved polyADP-ribose polymerase proteins, and downregulation of Bcl-2 proteins. Our study provides a novel approach to the research and development of marine drugs, and support for targeted therapy using anticancer drugs.

  4. Comparison of calculated and experimentally resolved rate constants for excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin. 2. Trimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, M.F.; Sauer, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-05-18

    Resolution of the absorption spectrum of the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore in C-phycocyanin (PC) trimers is achieved by comparison of the steady state absorption spectra of ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup PC}){sub 3} and ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup *}){sub 3}. Comparison of the anisotropy decays of ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup PC}){sub 3} and ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup *}){sub 3} also greatly aids in the assignment of the dominant kinetic processes in PC trimers. A comparison is made of calculated Foerster rate constants for energy transfer with those rate constants resolved experimentally in the PC trimers. 35 refs.., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Comparison of calculated and experimentally resolved rate constants for excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin. 1. Monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-05-18

    Rate constants for excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric aggregation state, isolated from the cyanobacterium cynechococcus sp. PCC 7002, are calculated, using Foerster theory and compared with the results of time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The assignments of the energy-transfer rate constants in PC monomers are confirmed here by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of the PC monomers isolated from both the wild-type and a mutant strain (cpcB/C155S) whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore. It is concluded that the Foerster model of resonant energy transfer in the weak coupling limit successfully describes the dominant energy-transfer processes in this protein in the monomeric state. 31 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Water Intake and Hydration Indices in Healthy European Adults: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Malisova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydration status is linked with health, wellness, and performance. We evaluated hydration status, water intake, and urine output for seven consecutive days in healthy adults. Volunteers living in Spain, Germany, or Greece (n = 573, 39 ± 12 years (51.1% males, 25.0 ± 4.6 kg/m2 BMI participated in an eight-day study protocol. Total water intake was estimated from seven-day food and drink diaries. Hydration status was measured in urine samples collected over 24 h for seven days and in blood samples collected in fasting state on the mornings of days 1 and 8. Total daily water intake was 2.75 ± 1.01 L, water from beverages 2.10 ± 0.91 L, water from foods 0.66 ± 0.29 L. Urine parameters were: 24 h volume 1.65 ± 0.70 L, 24 h osmolality 631 ± 221 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο, 24 h specific gravity 1.017 ± 0.005, 24 h excretion of sodium 166.9 ± 54.7 mEq, 24 h excretion of potassium 72.4 ± 24.6 mEq, color chart 4.2 ± 1.4. Predictors for urine osmolality were age, country, gender, and BMI. Blood indices were: haemoglobin concentration 14.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, hematocrit 43% ± 4% and serum osmolality 294 ± 9 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο. Daily water intake was higher in summer (2.8 ± 1.02 L than in winter (2.6 ± 0.98 L (p = 0.019. Water intake was associated negatively with urine specific gravity, urine color, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations (p < 0.01. Applying urine osmolality cut-offs, approximately 60% of participants were euhydrated and 20% hyperhydrated or dehydrated. Most participants were euhydrated, but a substantial number of people (40% deviated from a normal hydration level.

  7. Isolation, characterization and antioxidative activity of C-phycocyanin from Limnothrix sp. strain 37-2-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantar, Miroslav; Simović, Dragan; Djilas, Sonja; Gonzalez, Walter W; Miksovska, Jaroslava

    2012-05-31

    C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is a blue colored accessory photosynthetic pigment found in cyanobacteria. Some of the medicinal properties of Spirulina have been attributed to this pigment, which includes anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity. We have screened cyanobacteria isolated from freshwater habitats in Florida for their high content of C-PC. Of 125 strains tested, one filamentous strain identified as Limnothrix sp. was selected for further research. This strain produced 18% C-PC of total dry biomass. Here we describe a simple method for obtaining C-PC of high purity without the use of ion exchange chromatography. The procedure is based on pigment precipitation from the cell lysate with an appropriate concentration of ammonium sulfate, then purification with activated carbon and chitosan, followed by a sample concentration using tangential flow filtration. We have shown that when the lower concentration of ammonium sulfate was used, C-PC with higher purity index was recovered. Characterization of C-PC from Limnothrix showed that it had an absorbance maximum at 620nm and fluorescence at 639nm. The molecular mass of intact C-PC was estimated to be ~50kDa with α and β subunits forming dimmers. When C-PC content per unit biomass was compared to that of marketed Spirulina powder, we found that Limnothrix was superior. C-phycocyanin from Limnothrix had an antioxidative activity on DPPH free radicals similar to that found in a natural antioxidant - rutin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural insights into the cold adaptation of the photosynthetic pigment-protein C-phycocyanin from an Arctic cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hai-Nan; Wang, Qian-Min; Li, Chun-Yang; Li, Kang; Luo, Wei; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Xie, Bin-Bin

    2017-04-01

    The cold adaptation mechanism of phycobiliproteins, the major photosynthetic pigment-proteins in cyanobacteria and red algae, has rarely been studied. Here we reported the biochemical, structural, and molecular dynamics simulation study of the C-phycocyanin from Arctic cyanobacterial strain Pseudanabaena sp. LW0831. We characterized the phycobilisome components of LW0831 and obtained their gene sequences. Compared to the mesophilic counterpart from Arthrospira platensis (Ar-C-PC), LW0831 C-phycocyanin (Ps-C-PC) has a decreased thermostability (∆Tm of -16°C), one of the typical features of cold-adapted enzymes. To uncover its structural basis, we resolved the crystal structure of Ps-C-PC 1 at 2.04Å. Consistent with the decrease in thermostability, comparative structural analyses revealed decreased intra-trimer and inter-trimer interactions in Ps-C-PC 1, compared to Ar-C-PC. However, comparative molecular dynamics simulations indicated that Ps-C-PC 1 shows similar flexibilities to Ar-C-PC for both the (αβ)3 trimer and (αβ)6 hexamer. Therefore, the optimization mode is clearly different from cold-adapted enzymes, which usually have increased flexibilities. Detailed analyses demonstrated different optimization modes for the α and β subunits and it was revealed that hydrophobic interactions are key to this difference, though salt bridges, hydrogen bonds, and surface hydrophobicity are also involved. This study is the first report of the structure of cold-adapted phycobiliproteins and provides insights into the cold-adaptation strategies of non-enzyme proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacological effects of a C-phycocyanin-based multicomponent nutraceutical in an in-vitro canine chondrocyte model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Stephanie E; Chen, Yufei; Ho, Emmanuel A; Martinez, Steven A; Davies, Neal M

    2015-07-01

    Multicomponent nutraceuticals are becoming increasingly popular treatments or adjunctive therapies for osteoarthritis in veterinary medicine despite lack of evidence of efficacy for many products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of a commercially available C-phycocyanin-based nutraceutical and select constituent ingredients in an in-vitro model of canine osteoarthritis. Normal canine articular chondrocytes were used in an in-vitro model of osteoarthritis. Inflammatory conditions were induced using interleukin-1β. The nutraceutical preparation as a whole, its individual constituents, as well as carprofen were evaluated at concentrations of 0 to 250 μg/mL for reduction of the following inflammatory mediators and indicators of catabolism of the extracellular matrix: prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TFN-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), nitric oxide, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs). Validated, commercially available assay kits were used for quantitation of inflammatory mediators. The antioxidant capacities, as well as cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitory activities of the whole nutraceutical preparation and select constituents, were also assessed using validated commercially available assay kits. The antioxidant capacity of the nutraceutical and constituents was concentration-dependent. The nutraceutical and constituents appear to display anti-inflammatory activity primarily through the inhibition of COX-2. The nutraceutical displayed similar strength to carprofen in reducing TNF-α, IL-6, MMP-3, nitric oxide, and sGAGs at select concentration ranges. The C-phycocyanin (CPC)-based nutraceutical and constituents may be able to mediate 3 primary pathogenic mechanisms of osteoarthritis: inflammation, chondral degeneration, and oxidative stress in vitro. The nutraceutical may be clinically useful in veterinary

  10. Production of the α and β Subunits of Spirulina Allophycocyanin and C-Phycocyanin in Escherichia coli : A Comparative Study of Their Antioxidant Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherdkiatikul, Thiti; Suwanwong, Yaneenart

    2014-07-01

    Allophycocyanin and c-phycocyanin have been reported to be potent antioxidants. In this work, the genes encoding the apo-proteins of allophycocyanin α (ApcA), allophycocyanin β (ApcB), c-phycocyanin α (CpcA), and c-phycocyanin β (CpcB) from Spirulina platensis were cloned, and the recombinant proteins were produced in Escherichia coli to study their antioxidant effects. All four recombinant phycocyanins could be produced in the soluble form and purified to more than 97% purity. The results of radical scavenging assays showed that the Trolox equivalent values for peroxyl radical scavenging by the ApcA, ApcB, CpcA, and CpcB proteins were 1.81 ± 0.2 µM, 1.98 ± 0.22 µM, 0.95 ± 0.15 µM, and 1.49 ± 0.15 µM, respectively. The IC50 values for hydroxyl radical scavenging of ApcA, ApcB, CpcA, CpcB, and Trolox were 269 ± 9 µg/mL, 190 ± 5 µg/mL, 129 ± 8 µg/mL, 108 ± 4 µg/mL, and 195 ± 12 µg/mL, respectively. These results indicated that allophycocyanin exhibited higher activity than c-phycocyanin in scavenging peroxyl radicals, whereas c-phycocyanin exhibited higher activity than allophycocyanin in scavenging hydroxyl radicals. All of the apo-phycocyanin subunits possessed strong antioxidant activities and can be further developed and applied to the food and drug industries. However, the selection of the most useful antioxidant should depend on the type of targeted free radical to obtain the highest efficiency. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. Hydration and Nanoconfined Water: Insights from Computer Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Laureano M; Rodríguez Fris, J A; Morini, Marcela A; Sierra, M Belén; Accordino, S A; Montes de Oca, J M; Pedroni, Viviana I; Appignanesi, Gustavo A

    2015-01-01

    The comprehension of the structure and behavior of water at interfaces and under nanoconfinement represents an issue of major concern in several central research areas like hydration, reaction dynamics and biology. From one side, water is known to play a dominant role in the structuring, the dynamics and the functionality of biological molecules, governing main processes like protein folding, protein binding and biological function. In turn, the same principles that rule biological organization at the molecular level are also operative for materials science processes that take place within a water environment, being responsible for the self-assembly of molecular structures to create synthetic supramolecular nanometrically-sized materials. Thus, the understanding of the principles of water hydration, including the development of a theory of hydrophobicity at the nanoscale, is imperative both from a fundamental and an applied standpoint. In this work we present some molecular dynamics studies of the structure and dynamics of water at different interfaces or confinement conditions, ranging from simple model hydrophobic interfaces with different geometrical constraints (in order to single out curvature effects), to self-assembled monolayers, proteins and phospholipid membranes. The tendency of the water molecules to sacrifice the lowest hydrogen bond (HB) coordination as possible at extended interfaces is revealed. This fact makes the first hydration layers to be highly oriented, in some situations even resembling the structure of hexagonal ice. A similar trend to maximize the number of HBs is shown to hold in cavity filling, with small subnanometric hydrophobic cavities remaining empty while larger cavities display an alternation of filled and dry states with a significant inner HB network. We also study interfaces with complex chemical and geometrical nature in order to determine how different conditions affect the local hydration properties. Thus, we show some

  12. Dietary water affects human skin hydration and biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lídia Palma,1 Liliana Tavares Marques,1 Julia Bujan,2,3 Luís Monteiro Rodrigues1,4 1CBIOS – Research Center for Health Science and Technologies, Universidade Lusófona, Campo Grande, Lisboa, Portugal; 2Department of Medicine and Medical Specialities, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain; 3CIBER-BBN, Madrid, España, Spain; 4Department of Pharmacological Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal Abstract: It is generally assumed that dietary water might be beneficial for the health, especially in dermatological (age preventing terms. The present study was designed to quantify the impact of dietary water on major indicators of skin physiology. A total of 49 healthy females (mean 24.5±4.3 years were selected and characterized in terms of their dietary daily habits, especially focused in water consumption, by a Food Frequency Questionnaire. This allowed two groups to be set – Group 1 consuming less than 3,200 mL/day (n=38, and Group 2 consuming more than 3,200 mL/day (n=11. Approximately 2 L of water were added to the daily diet of Group 2 individuals for 1 month to quantify the impact of this surplus in their skin physiology. Measurements involving epidermal superficial and deep hydration, transepidermal water loss, and several biomechanical descriptors were taken at day 0 (T0, 15 (T1, and 30 (T2 in several anatomical sites (face, upper limb, and leg. This stress test (2 L/day for 30 days significantly modified superficial and deep skin hydration, especially in Group 1. The same impact was registered with the most relevant biomechanical descriptors. Thus, in this study, it is clear that higher water inputs in regular diet might positively impact normal skin physiology, in particular in those individuals with lower daily water consumptions. Keywords: dietary water, water consume, skin hydration, TEWL, skin biomechanics

  13. Assessing the genotoxicity of two commonly occurring byproducts of water disinfection: Chloral hydrate and bromal hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasfi, Tarek; De Méo, Michel; Di Giorgio, Carole; Coulomb, Bruno; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Water disinfection treatments result in the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that have been linked to adverse human health outcomes including higher incidence of bladder and colorectal cancer. However, data about the genotoxicity of DBPs is limited to only a small fraction of compounds. Chloral hydrate (CH) and bromal hydrate (BH) are two trihaloacetaldehydes commonly detected in disinfected waters, but little is known about their genotoxicity, especially BH. We investigated the genotoxicity of CH and BH using a test battery that includes three in vitro genotoxicity assays. We conducted the Ames test using Salmonella bacterial strains TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102, and the alkaline comet assay and the micronucleus test both using Chinese hamster ovary cells. We carried out the tests in the absence and presence of the metabolic fraction S9 mix. CH did not exhibit statistically significant genotoxic effects in any of the three assays. In contrast, BH exhibited mutagenic activity in the Salmonella strain TA100 and induced statistically significant DNA lesions in CHO cells as appeared in the comet assay. The genotoxic potential of BH in both assays decreased in the presence of the metabolic fraction S9 mix. BH did not induce chromosomal damage in CHO cells. Our results show that BH exhibited genotoxic activity by causing mutations and primary DNA damage while CH did not induce genotoxic effects. Our findings highlight concerns about the higher genotoxicity of brominated DBPs in comparison to their chlorinated analogues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dietary water affects human skin hydration and biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Lídia; Marques, Liliana Tavares; Bujan, Julia; Rodrigues, Luís Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    It is generally assumed that dietary water might be beneficial for the health, especially in dermatological (age preventing) terms. The present study was designed to quantify the impact of dietary water on major indicators of skin physiology. A total of 49 healthy females (mean 24.5±4.3 years) were selected and characterized in terms of their dietary daily habits, especially focused in water consumption, by a Food Frequency Questionnaire. This allowed two groups to be set – Group 1 consuming less than 3,200 mL/day (n=38), and Group 2 consuming more than 3,200 mL/day (n=11). Approximately 2 L of water were added to the daily diet of Group 2 individuals for 1 month to quantify the impact of this surplus in their skin physiology. Measurements involving epidermal superficial and deep hydration, transepidermal water loss, and several biomechanical descriptors were taken at day 0 (T0), 15 (T1), and 30 (T2) in several anatomical sites (face, upper limb, and leg). This stress test (2 L/day for 30 days) significantly modified superficial and deep skin hydration, especially in Group 1. The same impact was registered with the most relevant biomechanical descriptors. Thus, in this study, it is clear that higher water inputs in regular diet might positively impact normal skin physiology, in particular in those individuals with lower daily water consumptions. PMID:26345226

  15. Water in the Martian Crust Locked in Hydrated Minerals: A Significant Planetary Reservoir of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, J. F.

    2017-10-01

    Calculations for a reservoir of water locked in hydrated minerals is estimated to range from a low of < 20 m global equivalent layer to approximately 1 km for the high end. This is sufficient to strongly impact surface geomorphic processes.

  16. Surface hydration drives rapid water imbibition into strongly hydrophilic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chao; Qiao, Rui

    2017-08-09

    The imbibition of liquids into nanopores plays a critical role in numerous applications, and most prior studies focused on imbibition due to capillary flows. Here we report molecular simulations of the imbibition of water into single mica nanopores filled with pressurized gas. We show that, while capillary flow is suppressed by the high gas pressure, water is imbibed into the nanopore through surface hydration in the form of monolayer liquid films. As the imbibition front moves, the water film behind it gradually densifies. Interestingly, the propagation of the imbibition front follows a simple diffusive scaling law. The effective diffusion coefficient of the imbibition front, however, is more than ten times larger than the diffusion coefficient of the water molecules in the water film adsorbed on the pore walls. We clarify the mechanism for the rapid water imbibition observed here.

  17. Therapeutic Effect of C-Phycocyanin Extracted from Blue Green Algae in a Rat Model of Acute Lung Injury Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Pak-on; Lee, Hao-Hsien; Kung, Yu-Chien; Tsai, Ming-Fan; Chou, Tz-Chong

    2013-01-01

    C-Phycocyanin (CPC), extracted from blue green algae, is a dietary nutritional supplement due to its several beneficial pharmacological effects. This study was conducted to evaluate whether CPC protects against lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats. Rats were challenged with LPS (5?mg/kg body weight) intratracheally to induce ALI. After 3?h LPS instillation, rats were administrated with CPC (50?mg/kg body weight, i.p.) for another 3?h. Our results showed that post...

  18. Anti-oxidant activity of holo- and apo-c-phycocyanin and their protective effects on human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleonsil, Pornthip; Soogarun, Suphan; Suwanwong, Yaneenart

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the anti-oxidant activity of the recombinant apo-c-phycocyanin (c-PC) β-subunit compared to native c-PC purified from Spirulina sp. The gene encoding the β-subunit of c-PC was successfully cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The anti-oxidant capacities of recombinant apo-c-PC(β) and native c-PC were evaluated by measuring their Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacities and examining their protective effects on erythrocytes from normal and homozygous haemoglobin E individuals against peroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The results demonstrated that the anti-oxidant capacities are native c-PC≫Trolox>recombinant apo-c-PC(β). Both anti-oxidant proteins can potentially protect erythrocytes from oxidative damage. Expression of c-PC in bacteria reduces the cost and time for protein production, and the recombinant protein could be further developed to obtain a more efficient protein for therapeutic purposes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Engineering strategies for simultaneous enhancement of C-phycocyanin production and CO2 fixation with Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Kao, Pei-Chun; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-10-01

    Spirulina platensis produces nutraceutical product C-phycocyanin (C-PC) and simultaneously mitigates CO2 emissions during its growth. Using a designed flat-type photobioreactor, the S. platensis biomass production was markedly enhanced, leading to a CO2 removal rate and a biomass concentration of 0.23 g/L/d and 2.25 g/L, respectively. The cell growth, CO2 fixation rate and C-PC production of S. platensis were investigated when it was cultivated under different irradiation conditions. As the light intensity increased from 100 to 700 μmol/m(2)/s, the overall biomass productivity, CO2 consumption rate and maximal C-PC productivity increased significantly to 0.74, 1.53 and 0.11 g/L/d, respectively. After determining the suitable light intensity, the nitrogen concentration was also adjusted to further enhance the performance of CO2 fixation and C-PC production. The results show that with an optimal nitrogen concentration of 0.045 M, the CO2 consumption rate and maximal C-PC productivity were further increased to 1.58 and 0.13 g/L/d, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. C-phycocyanin confers protection against oxalate-mediated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shukkur M; Boppana, Nithin B; Devarajan, Asokan; Asokan, Devarajan; Sekaran, Shamala D; Shankar, Esaki M; Li, Chunying; Gopal, Kaliappan; Bakar, Sazaly A; Karthik, Harve S; Ebrahim, Abdul S

    2014-01-01

    Oxalate toxicity is mediated through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via a process that is partly dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether C-phycocyanin (CP) could protect against oxidative stress-mediated intracellular damage triggered by oxalate in MDCK cells. DCFDA, a fluorescence-based probe and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL), an oxidative stress marker were used to investigate the effect of CP on oxalate-induced ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO). The role of CP against oxalate-induced oxidative stress was studied by the evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential by JC1 fluorescein staining, quantification of ATP synthesis and stress-induced MAP kinases (JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2). Our results revealed that oxalate-induced cells show markedly increased ROS levels and HEL protein expression that were significantly decreased following pre-treatment with CP. Further, JC1 staining showed that CP pre-treatment conferred significant protection from mitochondrial membrane permeability and increased ATP production in CP-treated cells than oxalate-alone-treated cells. In addition, CP treated cells significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2 as compared to oxalate-alone-treated cells. We concluded that CP could be used as a potential free radical-scavenging therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-associated diseases including urolithiasis.

  1. C-phycocyanin confers protection against oxalate-mediated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in MDCK cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukkur M Farooq

    Full Text Available Oxalate toxicity is mediated through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS via a process that is partly dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether C-phycocyanin (CP could protect against oxidative stress-mediated intracellular damage triggered by oxalate in MDCK cells. DCFDA, a fluorescence-based probe and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL, an oxidative stress marker were used to investigate the effect of CP on oxalate-induced ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO. The role of CP against oxalate-induced oxidative stress was studied by the evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential by JC1 fluorescein staining, quantification of ATP synthesis and stress-induced MAP kinases (JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2. Our results revealed that oxalate-induced cells show markedly increased ROS levels and HEL protein expression that were significantly decreased following pre-treatment with CP. Further, JC1 staining showed that CP pre-treatment conferred significant protection from mitochondrial membrane permeability and increased ATP production in CP-treated cells than oxalate-alone-treated cells. In addition, CP treated cells significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2 as compared to oxalate-alone-treated cells. We concluded that CP could be used as a potential free radical-scavenging therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-associated diseases including urolithiasis.

  2. C-phycocyanin alleviates osteoarthritic injury in chondrocytes stimulated with H2O2 and compressive stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, In-Chi; Chuang, Sung-Ting; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Sun, Yu-Jun; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2016-12-01

    During the progression of osteoarthritis (OA), dysregulation of extracellular matrix anabolism, abnormal generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory cytokines have been shown to accelerate the degradation process of cartilage. The potency of c-phycocyanin (C-PC) to protect cellular components against oxidative stress, along with its anti-inflammation and anti-apoptosis effects, are well documented; however, effects of C-PC on OA are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of C-PC on OA using H2O2 or compression-stimulated OA-like porcine chondrocyte models. The results showed that C-PC had the ability to inhibit ROS production, reverse caspase-3 activity, and reduce apoptosis cell population. C-PC also reversed aggrecan and type II collagen gene expressions after stimulation with 1mM H2O2 or 60psi of compression. Inhibition of IL-6 and MMP-13 genes was observed in compression-stimulated chondrocytes but not in H2O2-treated cells. In dimethylmethylene blue assay and alcian blue staining, C-PC maintained the sulfated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content after stimulation with compression. We concluded that C-PC can prevent early signs of OA caused by compressive stress and attenuate H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Therefore, we suggest that C-PC can be used as a potential drug candidate for chronic OA treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. C-phycocyanin suppresses transforming growth factor-β1-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition in human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajarajan, Dheeran; Ayyanar, Sivanantham; Palanichamy, Rajaguru; Subbiah, Rajasekaran

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process through which epithelial cells undergo multiple biochemical changes, causing them to differentiate into a mesenchymal-cell phenotype. This process has been shown to contribute to the development of fibrotic diseases. C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is a phycobiliprotein extracted from Spirulina platensis. This study was done to investigate the effect of C-PC on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced EMT and an EMT associated proliferation in human epithelial cell lines. Human adenocarcinoma cell line, A549 and breast cancer cell line, MCF-7 were treated with TGF-β1, and EMT-related genes expression, cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest were examined. C-PC suppressed the EMT as assessed by reduced expression of vimentin, type-1-collagen and fibronectin, and increased E-cadherin expression in TGF-β1 treated cells. Further, TGF-β1 treatment induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phase in A549 cells. However, TGF-β1-mediated cell cycle arrest was significantly reversed by combined treatment with C-PC. The overall data suggested that C-PC suppresses TGF- β1-induced EMT and warrants further in vivo studies for future evaluation of C-PC as a potential antifibrotic agent. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  4. Phycobiliproteins or C-phycocyanin of Arthrospira (Spirulina) maxima protect against HgCl(2)-caused oxidative stress and renal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, R; Ortiz-Butrón, R; Blas-Valdivia, V; Hernández-García, A; Cano-Europa, E

    2012-12-15

    Our objective was to determine if the phycobiliproteins of Arthrospira (Spirulina) maxima protect renal cells against mercury-caused oxidative stress and cellular damage in the kidney. We used 40 male mice that were assigned into eight groups: (1) a control group that received 100mM phosphate buffer (PB) ig and 0.9% saline ip, (2) PB+HgCl(2) (5mg/kg ip), (3) PB plus phycobiliproteins (100mg/kg ig), (4) PB plus C-phycocyanin (100mg/kg ig), and four groups receiving HgCl(2)+phycobiliproteins or C-phycocyanin (50, and 100mg/kg ig). The left kidneys were used to determine lipid peroxidation, quantification of reactive oxygen species, and reduced glutathione and oxidised content. The right kidneys were processed for histology. The HgCl(2) caused oxidative stress and cellular damage. All doses of phycobiliproteins or C-phycocyanin prevented enhancement of oxidative markers and they protected against HgCl(2)-caused cellular damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Visual observation of gas hydrates nucleation and growth at a water - organic liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoporev, Andrey S.; Semenov, Anton P.; Medvedev, Vladimir I.; Sizikov, Artem A.; Gushchin, Pavel A.; Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Manakov, Andrey Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Visual observation of nucleation sites of methane and methane-ethane-propane hydrates and their further growth in water - organic liquid - gas systems with/without surfactants was carried out. Sapphire Rocking Cell RCS6 with transparent sapphire cells was used. The experiments were conducted at the supercooling ΔTsub = 20.2 °C. Decane, toluene and crude oils were used as organics. Gas hydrate nucleation occurred on water - metal - gas and water - sapphire - organic liquid three-phase contact lines. At the initial stage of growth hydrate crystals rapidly covered the water - gas or water - organics interfaces (depending on the nucleation site). Further hydrate phase accrete on cell walls (sapphire surface) and into the organics volume. At this stage, growth was accompanied by water «drawing out» from under initial hydrate film formed at water - organic interface. Apparently, it takes place due to water capillary inflow in the reaction zone. It was shown that the hydrate crystal morphology depends on the organic phase composition. In the case of water-in-decane emulsion relay hydrate crystallization was observed in the whole sample, originating most likely due to the hydrate crystal intergrowth through decane. Contacts of such crystals with adjacent water droplets result in rapid hydrate crystallization on this droplet.

  6. Solubility of paroxetine hydrochloride hemi-hydrate in (water + acetone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Guobin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: renguobin2557@sohu.com; Wang Jingkang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Guizhi [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2005-08-15

    Using a laser monitoring observation technique, the solubilities of paroxetine hydrochloride hemi-hydrate in (water + acetone) were determined by the synthetic method from (294.45 to 323.20) K, respectively. Results of these measurements were correlated by the three variants of the combined nearly ideal binary solvent/Redlich-Kister (CNIBS/R-K) model. For the seven group data studied, three variants of the (CNIBS/R-K) equation were found to provide accurate mathematical representations of the experimental data and variant 2 is the best of the three variants.

  7. Hydration and nutrition knowledge in adolescent swimmers. Does water intake affect urine hydration markers after swimming?

    OpenAIRE

    Altavilla, Cesare; Prats Moya, Soledad; Caballero, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Little data exists regarding nutritional knowledge and hydration in adolescent swimmers. The aim of this study was to assess the level of nutrition and hydration knowledge and to describe the fluid balance in adolescent swimmers during training. A study was carried out with a cross-sectional descriptive part and a longitudinal part with repeated measurements over five swimming sessions. Eighty-six adolescent swimmers completed a questionnaire to assess their sport nutrition and hydration know...

  8. Numerical analysis of wellbore instability in gas hydrate formation during deep-water drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaiwen; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Qingchao; Yan, Chuanliang; Han, Xiuting

    2018-02-01

    Gas hydrate formation may be encountered during deep-water drilling because of the large amount and wide distribution of gas hydrates under the shallow seabed of the South China Sea. Hydrates are extremely sensitive to temperature and pressure changes, and drilling through gas hydrate formation may cause dissociation of hydrates, accompanied by changes in wellbore temperatures, pore pressures, and stress states, thereby leading to wellbore plastic yield and wellbore instability. Considering the coupling effect of seepage of drilling fluid into gas hydrate formation, heat conduction between drilling fluid and formation, hydrate dissociation, and transformation of the formation framework, this study established a multi-field coupling mathematical model of the wellbore in the hydrate formation. Furthermore, the influences of drilling fluid temperatures, densities, and soaking time on the instability of hydrate formation were calculated and analyzed. Results show that the greater the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and hydrate formation is, the faster the hydrate dissociates, the wider the plastic dissociation range is, and the greater the failure width becomes. When the temperature difference is greater than 7°C, the maximum rate of plastic deformation around the wellbore is more than 10%, which is along the direction of the minimum horizontal in-situ stress and associated with instability and damage on the surrounding rock. The hydrate dissociation is insensitive to the variation of drilling fluid density, thereby implying that the change of the density of drilling fluids has a minimal effect on the hydrate dissociation. Drilling fluids that are absorbed into the hydrate formation result in fast dissociation at the initial stage. As time elapses, the hydrate dissociation slows down, but the risk of wellbore instability is aggravated due to the prolonged submersion in drilling fluids. For the sake of the stability of the wellbore in deep-water

  9. Anomalous dynamics of hydration water in carbohydrate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomata, Matías H H; Sonoda, Milton T; Skaf, Munir S; Elola, M Dolores

    2009-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate the dynamics of fructose aqueous solutions up to 70 wt % concentration. We find that the hydrogen (H)-bonded network of fructose molecules extends with increasing sugar content and forms a structurally heterogeneous system around and above 45 wt % concentration, characterized as a percolated-like solute domain permeated by patchy regions of solvent. The presence of such aggregates in concentrated solutions promotes the slowing down of water translational, reorientational, and H-bonding dynamics, typical of many biomolecular environments. Analysis of the effects of the topological and energetic disorder of the sugar aggregates on vicinal water dynamics, similar to that recently carried out for the hydration layer of proteins by Pizzitutti et al. (J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 7584), reveals many similarities between the dynamical anomaly of the hydration layers of both systems. Like a protein surface, topological and energetic disorders of the sugar aggregates both contribute to the translational diffusion anomaly. However, unlike in the vicinity of a protein surface, the rotational relaxation is also hindered by the topological disorder created by the intertwined, percolating sugar clusters in concentrated solutions.

  10. Local Structure and Dynamics of Hydration Water in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-08-27

    Hydration water around protein surface plays a key role in structure, folding and dynamics of proteins. Intrinsically disordered proteins lack secondary and/or tertiary structure in their native state. Thus, characterizing the local structure and dynamics of hydration water around disordered proteins is challenging for both experimentalists and theoreticians. The local structure, orientation and dynamics of hydration water in the vicinity of intrinsically disordered proteins is investigated through molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the hydration capacity reveals that the disordered proteins have much larger binding capacity for hydration water than globular proteins. The surface and radial distribution of water molecules around the disordered proteins depict a similar trend. The local structure of the hydration water evaluated in terms of the tetrahedral order parameter, shows a higher order among the water molecules surrounding disordered proteins/regions. The residence time of water molecules clearly exhibits slow dynamics of hydration water around the surface of disordered proteins/regions as compared to globular proteins. The orientation of water molecules is found to be distinctly different for ordered and disordered proteins/regions. This analysis provides a better insight into the structure and dynamics of hydration water around disordered proteins.

  11. Water anomalous thermodynamics, attraction, repulsion, and hydrophobic hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A., E-mail: calvarez@uvigo.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo—Campus del Agua, Ourense 32004 (Spain); Debenedetti, Pablo G., E-mail: pdebene@princeton.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    A model composed of van der Waals-like and hydrogen bonding contributions that simulates the low-temperature anomalous thermodynamics of pure water while exhibiting a second, liquid-liquid critical point [P. H. Poole et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 1632 (1994)] is extended to dilute solutions of nonionic species. Critical lines emanating from such second critical point are calculated. While one infers that the smallness of the water molecule may be a relevant factor for those critical lines to move towards experimentally accessible regions, attention is mainly focused on the picture our model draws for the hydration thermodynamics of purely hydrophobic and amphiphilic non-electrolyte solutes. We first focus on differentiating solvation at constant volume from the corresponding isobaric process. Both processes provide the same viewpoint for the low solubility of hydrophobic solutes: it originates from the combination of weak solute-solvent attractive interactions and the specific excluded-volume effects associated with the small molecular size of water. However, a sharp distinction is found when exploring the temperature dependence of hydration phenomena since, in contrast to the situation for the constant-V process, the properties of pure water play a crucial role at isobaric conditions. Specifically, the solubility minimum as well as enthalpy and entropy convergence phenomena, exclusively ascribed to isobaric solvation, are closely related to water’s density maximum. Furthermore, the behavior of the partial molecular volume and the partial molecular isobaric heat capacity highlights the interplay between water anomalies, attraction, and repulsion. The overall picture presented here is supported by experimental observations, simulations, and previous theoretical results.

  12. Calculation of Liquid Water-Hydrate-Methane Vapor Phase Equilibria from Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for determining fluid- and crystal-phase chemical potentials are used for the first time to calculate liquid water-methane hydrate-methane vapor phase equilibria from knowledge of atomistic interaction potentials alone. The water and methane molecules are modeled...... potential of the zero-occupancy hydrate system using thermodynamic integration from an Einstein crystal reference state, and (iii) thermodynamic integration to obtain the water and guest molecules' chemical potentials as a function of the hydrate occupancy. The three-phase equilibrium curve is calculated...... value at corresponding conditions. While computationally intensive, simulations such as these are essential to map the thermodynamically stable conditions for hydrate systems....

  13. Desalination of Produced Water via Gas Hydrate Formation and Post Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a two-step desalination process, in which produced water is cleaned by forming gas hydrate in it and subsequently dewatering the hydrate to remove the residual produced water trapped in between the hydrate crystals. All experiments were performed with pressure in the range of 450 to 800psi and temperature in the range of -1 to 1°C using CO? as guest molecule for the hydrate crystals. The experiments were conducted using artificial produced waters containing different amoun...

  14. Transcriptional regulation of crystallin, redox, and apoptotic genes by C-Phycocyanin in the selenite-induced cataractogenic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rasiah Pratheepa; Ramkumar, Srinivasagan; Thankappan, Bency; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy; Balaji, Sadhasivam; Anbarasu, Kumarasamy

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the constrictive potential of C-Phycocyanin (C-PC) in regulating changes imposed on gene expression in the selenite-induced cataract model. Wistar rat pups were divided into three groups of eight each. On P10, Group I received an intraperitoneal injection of normal saline. Groups II and III received a subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (19 μmol/kg bodyweight); Group III also received an intraperitoneal injection of C-PC (200 mg/kg bodyweight) on P9-14. Total RNA was isolated on P16, and the relative abundance of mRNA of the crystallin structural genes, redox components, and apoptotic cascade were ascertained with real-time PCR with reference to the internal control β-actin. Real-time PCR analysis showed the crystallin genes (αA-, βB1-, γD-) and redox cycle components (Cat, SOD-1, Gpx) were downregulated, the apoptotic components were upregulated, and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 was downregulated in Group II. Treatment with 200 mg/kg bodyweight C-PC (Group III) transcriptionally regulated the instability of the expression of these genes, thus ensuring C-PC is a prospective anticataractogenic agent that probably delays the onset and progression of cataractogenesis induced by sodium selenite. C-PC treatment possibly prevented cataractogenesis triggered by sodium selenite, by regulating the lens crystallin, redox genes, and apoptotic cascade mRNA expression and thus maintains lens transparency. C-PC may be developed as a potential antioxidant compound applied in the future to prevent and treat age-related cataract.

  15. Antihyperlipidemic and Antioxidant Effects of C-phycocyanin in Golden Syrian Hamsters Fed with a Hypercholesterolemic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jyh Sheu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia and oxidation play major roles upon cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. C-phycocyanin (CPC, the major component in blue-green algae, possesses antiinflammatory and radical scavenging properties. Herein we aimed to investigate the effect of CPC upon lipid metabolism and its antioxidant effects. Golden Syrian hamsters were randomly assigned to five groups: (1 control; (2 0.2% cholesterol; (3 0.2% cholesterol+1% lopid; (4 0.2% cholesterol+0.25% CPC; and (5 0.2% cholesterol+1.25% CPC. All animals were sacrificed after 8-week feeding. Serum cholesterol, triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT, and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT were examined. The diene conjugation in the Cu2+-mediated oxidation of LDL was measured. The protein levels of several antioxidative enzymes including catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutases (SOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx of liver were assayed. HepG2 cells were cultured in medium containing various concentrations of CPC (0, 1, 15, and 30 μM. The mRNA concentrations of LDL receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase, SOD-1 and GPx of HepG2 cells in each group were analyzed. CPC was effective in lowering serum cholesterol, total cholesterol (TC, TG, LDL, GOT, and GPT. CPC was found to decrease the malondialdehyde (MDA equivalents and delay the diene conjugation in the Cu2+-mediated oxidation of LDL. CPC increase the enzyme expressions of CAT, SOD, and GPx. CPC concentrations were positively correlated with the mRNA level of LDL receptor while the mRNA levels of HMG CoA reductase, SOD-1, and GPx in HepG2 cells were not affected. The lipid-lowering and antioxidation effects of CPC suggest its roles in prevention of CVD and atherosclerotic formation.

  16. Comparative Neuroregenerative Effects of C-Phycocyanin and IFN-Beta in a Model of Multiple Sclerosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentón-Rol, Giselle; Lagumersindez-Denis, Nielsen; Muzio, Luca; Bergami, Alessandra; Furlan, Roberto; Fernández-Massó, Julio R; Nazabal-Galvez, Marcelo; Llópiz-Arzuaga, Alexey; Herrera-Rolo, Tania; Veliz-Rodriguez, Tania; Polentarutti, Nadia; Marín-Prida, Javier; Raíces-Cruz, Ivette; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Pentón-Arias, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) therapies approved so far are unable to effectively reverse the chronic phase of the disease or improve the remyelination process. Here our aim is to evaluate the effects of C-Phycocyanin (C-Pc), a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties, in a chronic model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice. C-Pc (2, 4 or 8 mg/kg i.p.) or IFN-beta (2000 IU, s.c.) was administered daily once a day or every other day, respectively, starting at disease onset, which differ among EAE mice between 11 and 15 days postinduction. Histological and immunohistochemistry (anti-Mac-3, anti-CD3 and anti-APP) assessments were performed in spinal cord in the postinduction time. Global gene expression in the brain was analyzed with the Illumina Mouse WG-6_V2 BeadChip microarray and the expression of particular genes, assessed by qPCR using the Fast SYBR Green RT-PCR Master Mix. Oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde, peroxidation potential, CAT/SOD ratio and GSH) were determined spectrophoto-metrically. Results showed that C-Pc ameliorates the clinical deterioration of animals, an effect that expresses the reduction of the inflammatory infiltrates invading the spinal cord tissue, the axonal preservation and the down-regulation of IL-17 expression in brain tissue and serum. C-Pc and IFN-beta improved the redox status in mice subjected to EAE, while microarray analysis showed that both treatments shared a common subset of differentially expressed genes, although they also differentially modulated another subset of genes. Specifically, C-Pc mainly modulated the expression of genes related to remyelination, gliogenesis and axon-glia processes. Taken together, our results indicate that C-Pc has significant therapeutic effects against EAE, mediated by the dynamic regulation of multiple biological processes.

  17. Lysozyme in water-acetonitrile mixtures: Preferential solvation at the inner edge of excess hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A.; Kuchierskaya, Alexandra A.

    2017-06-01

    Preferential solvation/hydration is an effective way for regulating the mechanism of the protein destabilization/stabilization. Organic solvent/water sorption and residual enzyme activity measurements were performed to monitor the preferential solvation/hydration of hen egg-white lysozyme at high and low water content in acetonitrile at 25 °C. The obtained results show that the protein destabilization/stabilization depends essentially on the initial hydration level of lysozyme and the water content in acetonitrile. There are three composition regimes for the dried lysozyme. At high water content, the lysozyme has a higher affinity for water than for acetonitrile. The residual enzyme activity values are close to 100%. At the intermediate water content, the dehydrated lysozyme has a higher affinity for acetonitrile than for water. A minimum on the residual enzyme activity curve was observed in this concentration range. At the lowest water content, the organic solvent molecules are preferentially excluded from the dried lysozyme, resulting in the preferential hydration. The residual catalytic activity is ˜80%, compared with that observed after incubation in pure water. Two distinct schemes are operative for the hydrated lysozyme. At high and intermediate water content, lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. However, in contrast to the dried protein, at the intermediate water content, the initially hydrated lysozyme has the increased preferential hydration parameters. At low water content, the preferential binding of the acetonitrile molecules to the initially hydrated lysozyme was detected. No residual enzyme activity was observed in the water-poor acetonitrile. Our data clearly show that the initial hydration level of the protein macromolecules is one of the key factors that govern the stability of the protein-water-organic solvent systems.

  18. Hydration, hydration, hydration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Veronica S; Bates, Graham P

    2010-01-01

    .... Although the importance of adequate hydration in combating heat stress is universally recognized, studies in a range of worker groups have demonstrated a disturbingly poor hydration level in a high...

  19. Rheological properties of methane hydrate slurries formed from AOT + water + oil microemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Eric B; Koh, Carolyn A; Liberatore, Matthew W

    2013-09-03

    The in situ formation and flow properties of methane hydrates formed from water-in-oil microemulsions composed of water, dodecane, and aerosol OT surfactant (AOT) were studied using a unique high pressure rheometer. AOT microemulsions have high stability (order of months), well-characterized composition, and yield reproducible results compared to hydrate studies in water-in-crude oil emulsions. Viscosity increases on the order of minutes upon hydrate formation, and then decreases on the order of hours. If significant unconverted water remained after the initial formation event, then viscosity increases for a time as methane slowly dissolves and converts additional water to hydrate. In addition to transient formation measurements, yield stresses and flow curves are measured for a set of experimental conditions. Hydrate slurry viscosity and yield stress increase with increasing water volume fraction, increasing initial pressure, decreasing temperature, and decreasing formation shear rate.

  20. Modelling membrane hydration and water balance of a pem fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2015-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells requires an appropriate hydration in order to ensure high efficiency and long durability. As water is essential for promoting proton conductivity in the membrane, it is important to control membrane water hydration to avoid flooding. In this study we...

  1. Measurements of Water Permeability in Unconsolidated Porous Media with Methane Hydrate Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Sen Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Permeability is one of the key factors that determine the fluids flow capacity and production potential of hydrate deposits. In this study, an experimental setup is developed to investigate the flow properties of the porous media, and the permeabilities to water are measured in the unconsolidated porous media with or without hydrate deposition in the pores. A specialized method of precisely controlling the amount of injected methane gas is employed to form methane hydrate in the core sample, and the hydrate formation process is described by the change characteristics of the gas and hydrate saturations. It is found that the residual gas plays an obstructive role in the water flow and it tends to slightly reduce the water permeability in the porous media, especially under high pressure conditions. After hydrate formation in the core sample, relatively steady flow state can be obtained under suitable water injection rate Q at which hydrate dissociation rate is very slow. The absolute permeability of the porous sample is reduced from 49.2 to 1.2 Darcies when the hydrate saturation increases from 0 to 9.3% in this study, indicating a strong dependence of k on the hydrate saturation.

  2. Water Transfer Characteristics during Methane Hydrate Formation Processes in Layered Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousheng Deng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrate formation processes in porous media are always accompanied by water transfer. To study the transfer characteristics comprehensively, two kinds of layered media consisting of coarse sand and loess were used to form methane hydrate in them. An apparatus with three PF-meter sensors detecting water content and temperature changes in media during the formation processes was applied to study the water transfer characteristics. It was experimentally observed that the hydrate formation configurations in different layered media were similar; however, the water transfer characteristics and water conversion ratios were different.

  3. Submarine Slope Failure Primed and Triggered by Bottom Water Warming in Oceanic Hydrate-Bearing Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyuk Kwon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many submarine slope failures in hydrate-bearing sedimentary deposits might be directly triggered, or at least primed, by gas hydrate dissociation. It has been reported that during the past 55 years (1955–2010 the 0–2000 m layer of oceans worldwide has been warmed by 0.09 °C because of global warming. This raises the following scientific concern: if warming of the bottom water of deep oceans continues, it would dissociate natural gas hydrates and could eventually trigger massive slope failures. The present study explored the submarine slope instability of oceanic gas hydrate-bearing deposits subjected to bottom water warming. One-dimensional coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (T-H-M finite difference analyses were performed to capture the underlying physical processes initiated by bottom water warming, which includes thermal conduction through sediments, thermal dissociation of gas hydrates, excess pore pressure generation, pressure diffusion, and hydrate dissociation against depressurization. The temperature rise at the seafloor due to bottom water warming is found to create an excess pore pressure that is sufficiently large to reduce the stability of a slope in some cases. Parametric study results suggest that a slope becomes more susceptible to failure with increases in thermal diffusivity and hydrate saturation and decreases in pressure diffusivity, gas saturation, and water depth. Bottom water warming can be further explored to gain a better understanding of the past methane hydrate destabilization events on Earth, assuming that more reliable geological data is available.

  4. Hydrated Excess Protons Can Create Their Own Water Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuxing; Swanson, Jessica M J; Kang, Seung-gu; Zhou, Ruhong; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-07-23

    Grotthuss shuttling of an excess proton charge defect through hydrogen bonded water networks has long been the focus of theoretical and experimental studies. In this work we show that there is a related process in which water molecules move ("shuttle") through a hydrated excess proton charge defect in order to wet the path ahead for subsequent proton charge migration. This process is illustrated through reactive molecular dynamics simulations of proton transport through a hydrophobic nanotube, which penetrates through a hydrophobic region. Surprisingly, before the proton enters the nanotube, it starts "shooting" water molecules into the otherwise dry space via Grotthuss shuttling, effectively creating its own water wire where none existed before. As the proton enters the nanotube (by 2-3 Å), it completes the solvation process, transitioning the nanotube to the fully wet state. By contrast, other monatomic cations (e.g., K(+)) have just the opposite effect, by blocking the wetting process and making the nanotube even drier. As the dry nanotube gradually becomes wet when the proton charge defect enters it, the free energy barrier of proton permeation through the tube via Grotthuss shuttling drops significantly. This finding suggests that an important wetting mechanism may influence proton translocation in biological systems, i.e., one in which protons "create" their own water structures (water "wires") in hydrophobic spaces (e.g., protein pores) before migrating through them. An existing water wire, e.g., one seen in an X-ray crystal structure or MD simulations without an explicit excess proton, is therefore not a requirement for protons to transport through hydrophobic spaces.

  5. Hydrate Formation/Dissociation in (Natural Gas + Water + Diesel Oil Emulsion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Yu Sun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrate formation/dissociation of natural gas in (diesel oil + water emulsion systems containing 3 wt% anti-agglomerant were performed for five water cuts: 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 vol%. The natural gas solubilities in the emulsion systems were also examined. The experimental results showed that the solubility of natural gas in emulsion systems increases almost linearly with the increase of pressure, and decreases with the increase of water cut. There exists an initial slow hydrate formation stage for systems with lower water cut, while rapid hydrate formation takes place and the process of the gas-liquid dissolution equilibrium at higher water cut does not appear in the pressure curve. The gas consumption amount due to hydrate formation at high water cut is significantly higher than that at low water cut. Fractional distillation for natural gas components also exists during the hydrate formation process. The experiments on hydrate dissociation showed that the dissociation rate and the amount of dissociated gas increase with the increase of water cut. The variations of temperature in the process of natural gas hydrate formation and dissociation in emulsion systems were also examined.

  6. Optimization of medium components for increased production of C-phycocyanin from Phormidium ceylanicum and its purification by single step process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Parmar, Asha; Madamwar, Datta

    2009-02-01

    Phycocyanin is a major protein produced by cyanobacteria, but very few phycocyanin-producing strains have been reported. In the present study, response surface methodology (RSM) involving a central composite design for four factors was successfully employed to optimize medium components for increased production of phycocyanin from Phormidium ceylanicum. The production of phycocyanin and interactions between sodium nitrate, calcium chloride, trace metal mix and citric acid stock were investigated and modeled. Under optimized condition P. ceylanicum was able to give 2.3-fold increase in phycocyanin production in comparison to commonly used BG 11 medium in 32 days. We have demonstrated the extraction, purification and characterization of C-phycocyanin using novel method based on filtration and single step chromatography. The protein was extracted by repeated freeze-thaw cycles and the crude extract was filtered and concentrated in stirred ultrafiltration cell (UFC). The UFC concentrate was then subjected to a single ion exchange chromatographic step. A purity ratio of 4.15 was achieved from a starting value of 1.05. The recovery efficiency of C-phycocyanin from crude extract was 63.50%. The purity was checked by electrophoresis and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  7. Water Dynamics in Protein Hydration Shells: The Molecular Origins of the Dynamical Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra. PMID:24479585

  8. Water dynamics in protein hydration shells: the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Laage, Damien

    2014-07-17

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra.

  9. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-09-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  10. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, N.

    2016-09-06

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  11. Formation of Structured Water and Gas Hydrate by the Use of Xenon Gas in Vegetable Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hiroko; Suzuki, Toru; Kawagoe, Yoshinori; Makino, Yoshio; Oshita, Seiichi

    Freezing is a valuable technique for food preservation. However, vegetables are known to be softening remarkably after freezing and thawing process. It is expected to find alternative technique instead of freezing. Recently, the application of structured water and/or gas hydrate had been attempted to prolong the preservation of vegetable. In this study, the formation process of structure water and/or gas hydrate in pure water and carrot tissue was investigated by using NMR relaxation times, T1 and T2, of which applying condition was up to 0.4MPa and 0.8MPa at 5oC. Under the pressure of 0.4MPa, no gas hydrate was appeared, however, at 0.8MPa, formation of gas hydrate was recognized in both water and carrot tissue. Once the gas hydrate formation process in carrot tissue started, T1 and T2 increased remarkably. After that, as the gas hydrate developed, then T1 and T2 turned to decrease. Since this phenomenon was not observed in pure water, it is suggested that behavior of NMR relaxation time just after the formation of gas hydrate in carrot tissue may be peculiar to compartment system such as inter and intracellular spaces.

  12. α-chymotrypsin in water-acetone and water-dimethyl sulfoxide mixtures: Effect of preferential solvation and hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A; Kuchierskaya, Alexandra A

    2017-10-01

    We investigated water/organic solvent sorption and residual enzyme activity to simultaneously monitor preferential solvation/hydration of protein macromolecules in the entire range of water content at 25°C. We applied this approach to estimate protein destabilization/stabilization due to the preferential interactions of bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin with water-acetone (moderate-strength H-bond acceptor) and water-DMSO (strong H-bond acceptor) mixtures. There are three concentration regimes for the dried α-chymotrypsin. α-Chymotrypsin is preferentially hydrated at high water content. The residual enzyme activity values are close to 100%. At intermediate water content, the dehydrated α-chymotrypsin has a higher affinity for acetone/DMSO than for water. Residual enzyme activity is minimal in this concentration range. The acetone/DMSO molecules are preferentially excluded from the protein surface at the lowest water content, resulting in preferential hydration. The residual catalytic activity in the water-poor acetone is ∼80%, compared with that observed after incubation in pure water. This effect is very small for the water-poor DMSO. Two different schemes are operative for the hydrated enzyme. At high and intermediate water content, α-chymotrypsin exhibits preferential hydration. However, at intermediate water content, in contrast to the dried enzyme, the initially hydrated α-chymotrypsin possesses increased preferential hydration parameters. At low water content, no residual enzyme activity was observed. Preferential binding of DMSO/acetone to α-chymotrypsin was detected. Our data clearly demonstrate that the hydrogen bond accepting ability of organic solvents and the protein hydration level constitute key factors in determining the stability of protein-water-organic solvent systems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Geochemical anomaly of pore waters and implications for gas hydrate occurrence in the South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, S.Y.; Yang, T.; Ge, L.; Yang, J.H. [Nanjing Univ., State Key Laboratory for Mineral Deposits Research and Center for Marine Geochemistry Research, Nanjing (China). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Wu, N.Y.; Liu, J.; Zhang, G.X.; Chen, D.H. [China Geological Survey, Guangzhou (China). Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrate is an ice-like solid substance primarily composed of water and methane, which commonly occurs in deep-water marine sediments under appropriate pressure, temperature, and salinity conditions. Gas hydrate deposits have been found in oceans around the world and in permafrost regions. With the exception of direct drilling and sampling of marine gas hydrates, the occurrence of gas hydrates has been identified mainly by indirect evidence determined from geological, geophysical, and geochemical data. This paper discussed the geochemical anomalies of pore waters and their implications for gas hydrate occurrence in the northern continental slope of the South China Sea. The paper provided background on the northern continental slope of the South China Sea as it contains many sedimentary basins with large sources of oil and natural gas which is a favourable place for the formation of gas hydrates. It also discussed gas compositions; sulphate gradients and sulphate-methane interface depths; chlorinity; ammonia and phosphate concentrations; cations; bromine and iodine concentrations; oxygen and hydrogen isotopes; dissolved inorganic carbon and carbon isotopes; and seep carbonates and their carbon and oxygen isotopes. It was concluded that geochemical anomalies occurred in three prospecting target areas including the Xisha Trough, Shenhu and Dongsha areas. The geochemical evidence indicated that the Dongsha area was also one of the most promising target areas for gas hydrate occurrence in the South China Sea. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Dynamic crossover in hydration water of curing cement paste: the effect of superplasticizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Chiang, Wei-Shan; Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Bausi, Francesco; Baglioni, Piero; Tyagi, Madhu; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    The influence of a new comb-shaped polycarboxylate-based superplasticizer (CSSP) on the hydration kinetics and transport properties of aged cement pastes has been investigated by high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and low temperature differential scanning calorimetry (LT-DSC). A new method of analysis of QENS spectra is proposed. By applying the refined method we were able to access to four independent physical parameters including the self-diffusion coefficient of the hydration water confined in the cement paste. Mean squared displacement (MSD) of the hydrogen atom for mobile water molecules displays a dynamic crossover temperature in agreement with DSC data. The experimental results indicate that CSSP polymer added into cement paste moderates the hydration process and decreases the dynamic crossover temperature of the hydration water.

  15. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaconescu, C.C. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; National Institute for Earth Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Kieckhefer, R.M. [Chevron Overseas Petroluem Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Knapp, J.H. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    2001-07-01

    New 2-D seismic reflection data from the South Caspian Sea, offshore Azerbaijan, document for the first time in the deep water (up to 650m) of this area, the presence of gas hydrates. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates consists of a shallow (300-500m below seafloor) zone of pronounced high velocity ({approx}2,100m/s) as compared with the surrounding sediments (1550-1600m/s). This zone appears on the seismic data as a depth-limited ({approx}200m thick) layer extending down the flank of an elongated structural high, and displays seismic blanking effects on the sedimentary section. A strong positive-polarity (R{sub c}{approx}0.123) reflector marks the top of this velocity anomaly, and is interpreted as the top of the gas hydrate layer. Similarly, a high-amplitude (R{sub c}{approx}0.11), negative polarity reflector coincides with the base of the high velocity layer, and is interpreted as the base of the hydrate zone. Both the top and bottom of the hydrate layer approximately parallel the seafloor bathymetry, and cut discordantly across the stratigraphic section, suggesting that the two reflectors are thermobaric and not stratigraphic interfaces. Decreasing amplitude with offset at the base of the gas hydrate layer may indicate the accumulation of free gas beneath this interface. These gas hydrates fall within the hydrate stability field predicted from thermobaric modelling for the South Caspian Basin, but typically in thinner layers than would be expected from theoretical calculations. The minimum predicted water depth that allows hydrate formation is {approx}150m, and the maximum predicted thickness of the gas hydrate stability field is {approx}1350m. (Author)

  16. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  17. Hydration water dynamics around a protein surface: a first passage time approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivangi; Biswas, Parbati

    2018-01-01

    A stochastic noise-driven dynamic model is proposed to study the diffusion of water molecules around a protein surface, under the effect of thermal fluctuations that arise due to the collision of water molecules with the surrounding environment. The underlying dynamics of such a system may be described in the framework of the generalized Langevin equation, where the thermal fluctuations are assumed to be algebraically correlated in time, which governs the non-Markovian behavior of the system. Results of the calculations of mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function reveal that the hydration water around the protein surface follows subdiffusive dynamics at long times. Analytical expressions for the first passage time distribution, survival probability, mean residence time and mean first passage time of water molecules are derived for different boundary conditions, to analyze hydration water dynamics under the effect of thermally correlated noise. The results depict a unimodal distribution of the first passage time unlike Brownian motion. The survival probability of hydration water follows a stretched exponential decay for both boundary conditions. The mean residence time of the hydration water molecule for different initial positions increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the surrounding environment for both boundary conditions. The mean first passage time of the water molecule to reach the absorbing/reflecting boundary follows an asymptotic power law with respect to the thickness of the hydration layer, and increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the environment.

  18. Hydration Simulations of a Carbon Nanotube, Immersed in Water, according to the 3-Attractor Water Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis F. Muguet

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available MC simulations of a set of zigzag ((9,0-(14,0 and armchair ((6,6-(10,10carbon nanotubes immersed in water have been carried out in an NpT-ensemble (512 watermolecules, p=1 bar, T=298 K. Intermolecular interactions were described by BMWpotential according to which, besides the well-known linear water dimer bifurcated andinverted water dimers are metastable. In all cases, it was found that there are large periodicfluctuations of water occupancy inside the nanotubes. Decrease in the size of the nanotubediameter leads to a significant destruction of the H-bond network, and to a bifucarted dimerpopulation increase. Inverted dimer concentration relationship with the nanotube diameter ismore complicated. Population maximum for inverted dimers occurs for diameters of 10-11 å. Water features different intermolecular structures not only inside carbon nanotubesbut also in the outer first hydration shells. The amount of bifurcated and inverted dimers issignificantly more important in the first hydration shell than in bulk water.

  19. Adsorption of water and carbon dioxide on hematite and consequences for possible hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kivelae, Pilvi-Helina

    2012-04-07

    The interest in carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery is increasing proportional to the decline in naturally driven oil production and also due to the increasing demand for reduced emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Transport of carbon dioxide in offshore pipelines involves high pressure and low temperatures, conditions which may lead to formation of hydrates from residual water dissolved in carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide. The critical question is whether the water at certain temperatures and pressures will drop out as liquid droplets first, and then form hydrates, or alternatively, adsorb on the pipeline surfaces, and subsequently form hydrates heterogeneously. In this work, we used several different basis sets of density functional theory in ab initio calculations to estimate the charge distribution of hematite (the dominating component of rust) crystals. These rust particles were embedded in water and chemical potential for adsorbed water molecules was estimated through thermodynamic integration and compared to similar estimates for water clusters of the same size. While the generated charges were not unique, the use of high order approximations and different basis sets provides a range of likely charge distributions. Values obtained for the chemical potential of water in different surroundings indicated that it would be thermodynamically favorable for water to adsorb on hematite, and that evaluation of potential carbon dioxide hydrate formation conditions and kinetics should be based on this formation mechanism. Depending on the basis set and approximations, the estimated gain for water to adsorb on the hematite surface rather than condense as droplets varied between -1.7 kJ mole(-1) and -3.4 kJ mole(-1). The partial charge distribution on the hematite surface is incompatible with the hydrate structure, and thus hydrates will be unable to attach to the surface. The behavior of water outside the immediate vicinity of hematite (beyond 3

  20. Hydration kinetics of direct expanded tef flour breakfast cereals in water and milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, W K

    2014-01-01

    Hydration kinetics of tef flour breakfast cereals extruded at barrel temperatures of 110, 130, and 150°C was investigated by hydrating them in water and whole milk at 25°C (±1°C). The normalized Weibull model described the rehydration characteristics of the extrudates in water and milk adequately (R2 = 0.98–0.99). Water absorption rate was significantly (P Hydration rate and equilibrium moisture content were higher for samples hydrated in water than those in milk. In view of the values of the shape parameter β, the hydration process is predominantly controlled by diffusion (β = 0.40–0.51) for samples extruded at 110°C whereas external resistance to mass transfer dominated (β = 0.60–0.73) those extruded using 150 and 130°C. Extrudates processed at 130 and 150°C exhibited better hydration characteristics. Thus, these temperature ranges could be used to produce extruded products from tef. PMID:24804063

  1. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V., E-mail: aneimark@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8058 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  2. Hydration status moderates the effects of drinking water on children's cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clinton S; Rapinett, Gertrude; Glaser, Nicole S; Ghetti, Simona

    2015-12-01

    Changes in hydration status throughout the day may affect cognitive performance with implications for learning success in the classroom. Our study tested the hypothesis that the benefit of drinking water on working memory and attention depends upon children's hydration status and renal response to water intake. Fifty-two children aged 9-12 years old were tested under two experimental conditions. The treatment session (Water session) consisted of a standard breakfast with 200 ml water, a baseline test, consumption of 750 ml of water over a period of two hours and subsequently retested. No water was provided after breakfast during the control session. Changes in hydration were assessed via urine samples. Cognitive testing consisted of digit span, pair cancellation, and delayed match to sample tasks. Children who exhibited smaller decreases in urine osmolality following water intake performed significantly better on the water day compared to the control day on a digit-span task and pair-cancellation task. Children who exhibited larger decreases in urine osmolality following water intake performed better on the control day compared to the water day on the digit-span task and pair-cancellation task. These results suggest that focusing on adequate hydration over time may be key for cognitive enhancement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Preferential Solvation/Hydration of α-Chymotrypsin in Water-Acetonitrile Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A; Kuchierskaya, Alexandra A

    2017-05-04

    The aim of our study is to monitor the preferential hydration/solvation of the protein macromolecules at low and high water content in water-organic mixtures. Our approach is based on the analysis of the absolute values of the water/organic solvent sorption. We applied this approach to estimate the protein stabilization/destabilization due to the preferential interactions of α-chymotrypsin with water-acetonitrile mixtures. At high water content, α-chymotrypsin is preferentially hydrated. At the intermediate water content, the preferential interaction changed from preferential hydration to preferential binding of acetonitrile. From infrared spectra, changes in the structure of α-chymotrypsin were determined through an analysis of the structure of the amide I band. Acetonitrile augments the intensity of the 1626 cm(-1) band assigned to the intermolecular β-sheet aggregates. At low water content, the protein is in a glassy (rigid) state. The H-bond accepting acetonitrile molecules are not effective in solvating the dehydrated protein molecules alone. Therefore, the acetonitrile molecules are preferentially excluded from the protein surface, resulting in the preferential hydration. Advantages of our approach: (i) The preferential interaction parameters can be determined in the entire range of water content in water-organic mixtures. (ii) Our approach facilitates the individual evaluation of the Gibbs energies of water, protein, and organic solvent.

  4. The effect of the water/methane interface on methane hydrate cages: the potential of mean force and cage lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastny, Ethan A; Miller, Clark A; de Pablo, Juan J

    2008-07-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to determine the influence of a methane-water interface on the position and stability of methane hydrate cages. A potential of mean force was calculated as a function of the separation of a methane hydrate cage and a methane-water interface. The hydrate cages are found to be strongly repelled from the methane gas into the water phase. At low enough temperatures, however, the most favorable location for the hydrate cage is at the interface on the water side. Cage lifetime simulations were performed in bulk water and near a methane-water interface. The methane-water interface increases the cage lifetime by almost a factor of 2 compared to cage lifetimes of cages in bulk water. The potential of mean force and the cage lifetime results give additional explanations for the proposed nucleation of gas hydrates at gas-water interfaces.

  5. Communication: Protein dynamical transition vs. liquid-liquid phase transition in protein hydration water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fomina, Margarita; Cupane, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we compare experimental data on myoglobin hydrated powders from elastic neutron scattering, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Our aim is to obtain new insights on the connection between the protein dynamical transition, a fundamental phenomenon observed in proteins whose physical origin is highly debated, and the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) possibly occurring in protein hydration water and related to the existence of a low temperature critical point in supercooled water. Our results provide a consistent thermodynamic/dynamic description which gives experimental support to the LLPT hypothesis and further reveals how fundamental properties of water and proteins are tightly related.

  6. Effect of bubble formation on the dissociation of methane hydrate in water: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-02-20

    We investigate the dissociation of methane hydrate in liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. As dissociation of the hydrate proceeds, methane molecules are released into the aqueous phase and eventually they form bubbles. It is shown that this bubble formation, which causes change in the methane concentration in the aqueous phase, significantly affects the dissociation kinetics of methane hydrate. A large system size employed in this study makes it possible to analyze the effects of the change in the methane concentration and the formation of bubbles on the dissociation kinetics in detail. It is found that the dissociation rate decreases with time until the bubble formation and then it turns to increase. It is also demonstrated that methane hydrate can exist as a metastable superheated solid if there exists no bubble.

  7. Temperature effects in deep-water hydrate foam

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, Alexander V; Rozhkov, Aleksey N

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on heat and mass exchange processes in hydrate foam during its formation from methane bubbles in gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) of the Lake Baikal and following delivery of it in open container to the lake surface. The foam was formed as a result of methane bubble collection with a trap/container. The trap was inverted glass beaker of diameter of 70 mm and 360 mm long. Open bottom end of the beaker used as enter for bubbles ascended from the lakebed. At a depth of 1400 m all bubbles which fed to the trap were transformed here into solid hydrate foam. The sensitive thermometer was mounted in the middle of the trap and recorded the temperature inside trap. The fate of the bubbles in the trap was recorded by video-camera. During ascend within GHSZ with velocity of about 0.375 m/s we observed the continuous decrease of the temperature in the foam up to a level of negative magnitude in a depth interval of 1400 - 750 meters. Above 750 m temperature decrease was changed by small growth. However...

  8. Nitrogen-assisted Three-phase Equilibrium in Hydrate Systems Composed of Water, Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Guest molecule exchange is a new and promising methane hydrate production technique in which methane gas is produced by injection of another gas without requiring depressurization or thermal stimulation. The technique is generally associated with injection of carbon dioxide, but injection of nitrogen and carbon dioxide mixtures are the most efficient and economical. However, thermodynamic behavior of injection mixtures is poorly understood, and it is unclear how nitrogen affects the exchange process. Here, we describe thermodynamic stability of hydrate systems that contain water, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen. We present a series of ternary and quaternary phase diagrams and show the impact nitrogen has on hydrate stability. Our results demonstrate that nitrogen can either stabilize hydrate, de-stabilize hydrate, or produce three-phase equilibrium (gas, water, and hydrate) depending on its relative abundance. At low abundance nitrogen forms hydrate and directly contributes to the exchange process. At high abundance nitrogen de-stabilizes hydrate akin to traditional hydrate inhibitors, such as salt, alcohol, or mono-ethylene glycol. We show how the dual properties of nitrogen lead to three-phase equilibrium and how three-phase equilibrium may explain much of the behavior observed in methane production from nitrogen-rich injections. We apply our analysis to laboratory experiments and the methane hydrate field test on the northern Alaskan slope at Ignik Sikumi. These results can be extended to analyze dynamic evolution of mixed hydrate systems.

  9. The inhibition of methane hydrate formation by water alignment underneath surface adsorption of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2017-06-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been widely shown to strongly promote the formation of methane hydrate. Here we show that SDS displays an extraordinary inhibition effect on methane hydrate formation when the surfactant is used in sub-millimolar concentration (around 0.3 mM). We have also employed Sum Frequency Generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this inhibition. The SFG and MDS results revealed a strong alignment of water molecules underneath surface adsorption of SDS in its sub-millimolar solution. Interestingly, both the alignment of water and the inhibition effect (in 0.3 mM SDS solution) went vanishing when an oppositely-charged surfactant (tetra-n-butylammonium bromide, TBAB) was suitably added to produce a mixed solution of 0.3 mM SDS and 3.6 mM TBAB. Combining structural and kinetic results, we pointed out that the alignment of water underneath surface adsorption of dodecyl sulfate (DS-) anions gave rise to the unexpected inhibition of methane hydration formation in sub-millimolar solution of SDS. The adoption of TBAB mitigated the SDS-induced electrostatic field at the solution’s surface and, therefore, weakened the alignment of interfacial water which, in turn, erased the inhibition effect. We discussed this finding using the concept of activation energy of the interfacial formation of gas hydrate. The main finding of this work is to reveal the interplay of interfacial water in governing gas hydrate formation which sheds light on a universal molecular-scale understanding of the influence of surfactants on gas hydrate formation. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  10. Dynamical behaviors of structural, constrained and free water in calcium- and magnesium-silicate-hydrate gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Peisi; Fratini, Emiliano; Ito, Kanae; Wang, Zhe; Mamontov, Eugene; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical properties of cement pastes depend strongly on their porosities. In a saturated paste, the porosity links to the free water volume after hydration. Structural water, constrained water, and free water have different dynamical behavior. Hence, it should be possible to extract information on pore system by exploiting the water dynamics. We investigated the slow dynamics of hydration water confined in calcium- and magnesium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H and M-S-H) gels using high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. C-S-H and M-S-H are the chemical binders present in calcium rich and magnesium rich cements. We measured three M-S-H samples: pure M-S-H, M-S-H with aluminum-silicate nanotubes (ASN), and M-S-H with carboxyl group functionalized ASN (ASN-COOH). A C-S-H sample with the same water content (i.e. 0.3) is also studied for comparison. Structural water in the gels contributes to the elastic component of the QENS spectrum, while constrained water and free water contribute the quasi-elastic component. The quantitative analysis suggests that the three components vary for different samples and indicate the variance in the system porosity, which controls the mechanical properties of cement pastes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of methane hydrate formation at a water/methane interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfang; Hawtin, R W; Yang, Ye; Nakagava, Edson; Rivero, M; Choi, S K; Rodger, P M

    2008-08-28

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results of a liquid water/methane interface, with and without an oligomer of poly(methylaminoethylmethacrylate), PMAEMA. PMAEMA is an active component of a commercial low dosage hydrate inhibitor (LDHI). Simulations were performed in the constant NPT ensemble at temperatures of 220, 235, 240, 245, and 250 K and a pressure of 300 bar. The simulations show the onset of methane hydrate growth within 30 ns for temperatures below 245 K in the methane/water systems; at 240 K there is an induction period of ca. 20 ns, but at lower temperatures growth commences immediately. The simulations were analyzed to calculate hydrate content, the propensity for hydrogen bond formation, and how these were affected by both temperature and the presence of the LDHI. As expected, both the hydrogen bond number and hydrate content decreased with increasing temperature, though little difference was observed between the lowest two temperatures considered. In the presence of PMAEMA, the temperature below which sustained hydrate growth occurred was observed to decrease. Some of the implications for the role of PMAEMA in LDHIs are discussed.

  12. Prediction of hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water using a numerical cement hydration model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, R.J.; Brouwers, Jos

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D numerical cement hydration model is used for predicting alkali and hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water. First, this numerical model is calibrated for Dutch cement employing both chemical shrinkage and calorimetric experiments. Secondly, the strength development of some

  13. Hydration and translocation of an excess proton in water clusters: An ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The hydration structure and translocation of an excess proton in hydrogen bonded water clusters of two different sizes are investigated by means of finite temperature quantum simulations. The simulations are performed by employing the method of Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics where the forces on the nuclei are ...

  14. Catalytic enantioselective syn hydration of enones in water using a DNA-based catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Arnold J.; Coquière, David; Geerdink, Danny; Rosati, Fiora; Roelfes, Gerard; Feringa, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The enantioselective addition of water to olefins in an aqueous environment is a common transformation in biological systems, but was beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Here, we present the first examples of a non-enzymatic catalytic enantioselective hydration of enones, for which we used a

  15. X-ray computed-tomography observations of water flow through anisotropic methane hydrate-bearing sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2009-06-01

    We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to image and quantify the effect of a heterogeneous sand grain-size distribution on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate, as well as the effect on water flow through the heterogeneous hydrate-bearing sand. A 28 cm long sand column was packed with several segments having vertical and horizontal layers with sands of different grain-size distributions. During the hydrate formation, water redistribution occurred. Observations of water flow through the hydrate-bearing sands showed that water was imbibed more readily into the fine sand, and that higher hydrate saturation increased water imbibition in the coarse sand due to increased capillary strength. Hydrate dissociation induced by depressurization resulted in different flow patterns with the different grain sizes and hydrate saturations, but the relationships between dissociation rates and the grain sizes could not be identified using the CT images. The formation, presence, and dissociation of hydrate in the pore space dramatically impact water saturation and flow in the system.

  16. Antimelanogenic effect of c-phycocyanin through modulation of tyrosinase expression by upregulation of ERK and downregulation of p38 MAPK signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Yu-Ting

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigmentation is one of the essential defense mechanisms against oxidative stress or UV irradiation; however, abnormal hyperpigmentation in human skin may pose a serious aesthetic problem. C-phycocyanin (Cpc is a phycobiliprotein from spirulina and functions as an antioxidant and a light harvesting protein. Though it is known that spirulina has been used to reduce hyperpigmentation, little literature addresses the antimelanogenic mechanism of Cpc. Herein, we investigated the rationale for the Cpc-induced inhibitory mechanism on melanin synthesis in B16F10 melanoma cells. Methods Cpc-induced inhibitory effects on melanin synthesis and tyrosinase expression were evaluated. The activity of MAPK pathways-associated molecules such as MAPK/ERK and p38 MAPK, were also examined to explore Cpc-induced antimelanogenic mechanisms. Additionally, the intracellular localization of Cpc was investigated by confocal microscopic analysis to observe the migration of Cpc. Results Cpc significantly (P Conclusions Cpc exerted dual antimelanogenic mechanisms by upregulation of MAPK/ERK-dependent degradation of MITF and downregulation of p38 MAPK-regulated CREB activation to modulate melanin formation. Cpc may have potential applications in biomedicine, food, and cosmetic industries.

  17. Assessment of C-phycocyanin effect on astrocytes-mediated neuroprotection against oxidative brain injury using 2D and 3D astrocyte tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seul Ki; Park, Jun Sang; Luo, Lidan; Kwon, Yeo Seon; Lee, Hoo Cheol; Shim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Ja-Kyeong; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2015-09-24

    Drugs are currently being developed to attenuate oxidative stress as a treatment for brain injuries. C-phycocyanin (C-Pc) is an antioxidant protein of green microalgae known to exert neuroprotective effects against oxidative brain injury. Astrocytes, which compose many portions of the brain, exert various functions to overcome oxidative stress; however, little is known about how C-Pc mediates the antioxidative effects of astrocytes. In this study, we revealed that C-Pc intranasal administration to the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats ensures neuroprotection of ischemic brain by reducing infarct size and improving behavioral deficits. C-Pc also enhanced viability and proliferation but attenuated apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of oxidized astrocytes, without cytotoxicity to normal astrocytes and neurons. To elucidate how C-Pc leads astrocytes to enhance neuroprotection and repair of ischemia brain, we firstly developed 3D oxidized astrocyte model. C-Pc had astrocytes upregulate antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and catalase and neurotrophic factors BDNF and NGF, while alleviating inflammatory factors IL-6 and IL-1β and glial scar. Additionally, C-Pc improved viability of 3D oxidized neurons. In summary, C-Pc was concluded to activate oxidized astrocytes to protect and repair the ischemic brain with the combinatorial effects of improved antioxidative, neurotrophic, and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  18. Higher production of C-phycocyanin by nitrogen-free (diazotrophic) cultivation of Nostoc sp. NK and simplified extraction by dark-cold shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Kyeong; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik; Ahn, Chi-Yong

    2017-03-01

    Nostoc sp. NK (KCTC 12772BP) was isolated and cultivated in a BG11 medium and a nitrate-free BG11 medium (BG110). To enhance C-phycocyanin (C-PC) content in the cells, different fluorescent lamps (white, plant, and red) were used as light sources for complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA). The maximum biomass productivity was 0.42g/L/d and 0.32g/L/d under BG11 and BG110 conditions, respectively. The maximum C-PC contents were 8.4% (w/w) under white lamps, 13.6% (w/w) under plant lamps, and 18% (w/w) under BG110 and the red light condition. The maximum C-PC productivity was 57.4mg/L/d in BG110 under the red lamp condition. These results indicate that a higher C-PC content could be obtained under a diazotrophic condition and a CCA reaction. The C-PC could be released naturally from cells without any extraction processes, when Nostoc sp. NK was cultivated in the BG110 medium with CO2 aeration and put in dark conditions at 5°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. C-Phycocyanin from Oscillatoria tenuis exhibited an antioxidant and in vitro antiproliferative activity through induction of apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangam, R; Suresh, V; Asenath Princy, W; Rajkumar, M; Senthilkumar, N; Gunasekaran, P; Rengasamy, R; Anbazhagan, C; Kaveri, K; Kannan, S

    2013-09-01

    This study was undertaken to develop an efficient single step chromatographic method for purification of C-phycocyanin (CPC) from species of Oscillatoria tenuis. Purification of CPC involves a multistep treatment of the crude extract by precipitation with ammonium sulphate, followed by gel filtration chromatography. Pure CPC was finally obtained from O. tenuis with purity ratio (A620/A280) 4.88. SDS-PAGE of pure CPC yielded two bands corresponding to α and β subunits; the molecular weight of α subunit is 17.0 kDa, whereas the molecular weight of β subunit is 19.5 kDa. Fluorescence and phase contrast microscopy revealed characteristic apoptotic features like cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. CPC exhibited antioxidant and antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells through apoptosis; nuclear apoptosis induction was accompanied by G0/G1 phase arrest and DNA fragmentation. CPC is a natural pigment with potential as an anticancer agent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of the Effects of Betaine and/or C-Phycocyanin on the Growth of Lung Cancer A549 Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rea Bingula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of betaine, C-phycocyanin (C-PC, and their combined use on the growth of A549 lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo. When cells were coincubated with betaine and C-PC, an up to 60% decrease in viability was observed which is significant compared to betaine (50% or C-PC treatment alone (no decrease. Combined treatment reduced the stimulation of NF-κB expression by TNF-α and increased the amount of the proapoptotic p38 MAPK. Interestingly, combined treatment induced a cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase for ~60% of cells. In vivo studies were performed in pathogen-free male nude rats injected with A549 cells in their right flank. Their daily food was supplemented with either betaine, C-PC, both, or neither. Compared to the control group, tumour weights and volumes were significantly reduced in either betaine- or C-PC-treated groups and no additional decrease was obtained with the combined treatment. This data indicates that C-PC and betaine alone may efficiently inhibit tumour growth in rats. The synergistic activity of betaine and C-PC on A549 cells growth observed in vitro remains to be further confirmed in vivo. The reason behind the nature of their interaction is yet to be sought.

  1. A role for subducted super-hydrated kaolinite in Earth’s deep water cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Huijeong; Seoung, Donghoon; Lee, Yongjae; Liu, Zhenxian; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Cynn, Hyunchae; Vogt, Thomas; Kao, Chi-Chang; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2017-11-20

    Water is the most abundant volatile component in the Earth. It continuously enters the mantle through subduction zones, where it reduces the melting temperature of rocks to generate magmas. The dehydration process in subduction zones, which determines whether water is released from the slab or transported into the deeper mantle, is an essential component of the deep water cycle. Here we use in situ and time-resolved high-pressure/high-temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction and infrared spectra to characterize the structural and chemical changes of the clay mineral kaolinite. At conditions corresponding to a depth of about 75 km in a cold subducting slab (2.7 GPa and 200 °C), and in the presence of water, we observe the pressure-induced insertion of water into kaolinite. This super-hydrated phase has a unit cell volume that is about 31% larger, a density that is about 8.4% lower than the original kaolinite and, with 29 wt% H2O, the highest water content of any known aluminosilicate mineral in the Earth. As pressure and temperature approach 19 GPa and about 800 °C, we observe the sequential breakdown of super-hydrated kaolinite. The formation and subsequent breakdown of super-hydrated kaolinite in cold slabs subducted below 200 km leads to the release of water that may affect seismicity and help fuel arc volcanism at the surface.

  2. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-16

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  3. The dynamics of water in hydrated white bread investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoestroem, J [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Kargl, F [Institute of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Wales, Aberystwyth SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Fernandez-Alonso, F [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Swenson, J [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2007-10-17

    The dynamics of water in fresh and in rehydrated white bread is studied using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). A diffusion constant for water in fresh bread, without temperature gradients and with the use of a non-destructive technique, is presented here for the first time. The self-diffusion constant for fresh bread is estimated to be D{sub s} = 3.8 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} and the result agrees well with previous findings for similar systems. It is also suggested that water exhibits a faster dynamics than previously reported in the literature using equilibration of a hydration-level gradient monitored by vibrational spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the dynamics of low hydration bread is also investigated for T = 280-350 K. The average relaxation time at constant momentum transfer (Q) shows an Arrhenius behavior in the temperature range investigated.

  4. Hydrogen bond breaking mechanism and water reorientational dynamics in the hydration layer of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Biman; Pal, Subrata; Bagchi, Biman

    2008-07-31

    The mechanism and the rate of hydrogen bond-breaking in the hydration layer surrounding an aqueous protein are important ingredients required to understand the various aspects of protein dynamics, its function, and stability. Here, we use computer simulation and a time correlation function technique to understand these aspects in the hydration layer of lysozyme. Water molecules in the layer are found to exhibit three distinct bond-breaking mechanisms. A large angle orientational jump of the donor water molecule is common among all of them. In the most common ( approximately 80%) bond-breaking event in the layer, the new acceptor water molecule comes from the first coordination shell (initially within 3.5 A of the donor), and the old acceptor water molecule remains within the first coordination shell, even after the bond-breaking. This is in contrast to that in bulk water, in which both of the acceptor molecules involve the second coordination shell. Additionally, the motion of the incoming and the outgoing acceptor molecules involved is not diffusive in the hydration layer, in contrast to their observed diffusive motion in the bulk. The difference in rotational dynamics between the bulk and the hydration layer water molecules is clearly manifested in the calculated time-dependent angular van Hove self-correlation function ( G(theta, t)) which has a pronounced two-peak structure in the layer, and this can be traced to the constrained translational motion in the layer. The longevity of the surrounding hydrogen bond network is found to be significantly enhanced near a hydrophilic residue.

  5. Study of the synergistic effects of all-transretinoic acid and C-phycocyanin on the growth and apoptosis of A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Gao, Mei-Hua; Lv, Cong-Yi; Yang, Peng; Yin, Qi-Feng

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of the combination of all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) and natural nontoxic C-phycocyanin (C-PC) on the growth of A549 lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the anticancer mechanism of the drug combination was revealed. Results showed both C-PC and ATRA could inhibit the growth of A549 cells in vivo. The combination of ATRA+C-PC could yield a higher inhibition rate. C-PC exerted a major effect on the proliferation of human embryo lung cells, but ATRA at a high concentration exerted an inhibitory effect. In addition, ATRA+C-PC could decrease the CDK4 mRNA level, but upregulated caspase-3 protein expression and induced cell apoptosis. A mouse model with tumor was constructed by a subcutaneous injection to the left axilla of nu nude (NU/NU) mice. Compared with the control group, the tumor weight was decreased in the single-drug treatment group and was the lowest in the combination group. C-PC+ATRA could upregulate tumor necrosis factor levels and downregulate Bcl-2 expression and the cyclin D1 gene in the tumor. C-PC could promote T cells' activities and spleen weight, but a single use of ATRA exerted an opposite effect. The dosage of ATRA could be reduced when combined with C-PC to reduce the toxic side-effects. In summary, the antitumor effects of the C-PC+ATRA combination were more significant than a single drug in vivo and in vitro.

  6. Molecular mechanism of inhibitory effects of C-phycocyanin combined with all-trans-retinoic acid on the growth of HeLa cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Li, Bing; Chu, Xian-Ming; Lv, Cong-Yi; Xu, Ying-Jie; Yang, Peng

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effects of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), C-phycocyanin (C-PC), or ATRA+C-PC on the growth of cervical cells (HeLa cells), cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis. The anticancer mechanism of the drug combination was revealed. MTT assay was adopted to determine the effects of C-PC and ATRA on the growth of HeLa cells. The expression quantities of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, caspase-3, and CD59 were determined by in situ hybridization, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry staining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. TUNEL assay was adopted to determine the cellular apoptosis levels. Both C-PC and ATRA could inhibit the growth of HeLa cells, and the combination of ATRA+C-PC functioned cooperatively to induce apoptosis in HeLa cells. The dosage of ATRA was reduced when it cooperated with C-PC to reduce the toxicity. ATRA treated with C-PC could induce more cell cycle arrests than the single drug used by decrease in cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression. The combination of the two drugs could upregulate caspase-3 and downregulate the Bcl-2 gene and induce cell apoptosis. Moreover, the combination therapy has an important immunological significance in decreased expression of the CD59 protein. Singly, C-PC or ATRA could inhibit the growth of HeLa cells, and the effects of treatment were further enhanced in the combination group. In combination with C-PC, the dosage of ATRA was effectively reduced. The C-PC + ATRA combination might take effect by inhibiting the progress of the cell cycle, inducing cell apoptosis and promoting complement-mediated cytolysis.

  7. Antimelanogenic effect of c-phycocyanin through modulation of tyrosinase expression by upregulation of ERK and downregulation of p38 MAPK signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigmentation is one of the essential defense mechanisms against oxidative stress or UV irradiation; however, abnormal hyperpigmentation in human skin may pose a serious aesthetic problem. C-phycocyanin (Cpc) is a phycobiliprotein from spirulina and functions as an antioxidant and a light harvesting protein. Though it is known that spirulina has been used to reduce hyperpigmentation, little literature addresses the antimelanogenic mechanism of Cpc. Herein, we investigated the rationale for the Cpc-induced inhibitory mechanism on melanin synthesis in B16F10 melanoma cells. Methods Cpc-induced inhibitory effects on melanin synthesis and tyrosinase expression were evaluated. The activity of MAPK pathways-associated molecules such as MAPK/ERK and p38 MAPK, were also examined to explore Cpc-induced antimelanogenic mechanisms. Additionally, the intracellular localization of Cpc was investigated by confocal microscopic analysis to observe the migration of Cpc. Results Cpc significantly (P < 0.05) reduced both tyrosinase activity and melanin production in a dose-dependent manner. This phycobiliprotein elevated the abundance of intracellular cAMP leading to the promotion of downstream ERK1/2 phosphorylation and the subsequent MITF (the transcription factor of tyrosinase) degradation. Further, Cpc also suppressed the activation of p38 causing the consequent disturbed activation of CREB (the transcription factor of MITF). As a result, Cpc negatively regulated tyrosinase gene expression resulting in the suppression of melanin synthesis. Moreover, the entry of Cpc into B16F10 cells was revealed by confocal immunofluorescence localization and immunoblot analysis. Conclusions Cpc exerted dual antimelanogenic mechanisms by upregulation of MAPK/ERK-dependent degradation of MITF and downregulation of p38 MAPK-regulated CREB activation to modulate melanin formation. Cpc may have potential applications in biomedicine, food, and cosmetic industries. PMID:21988805

  8. The synergistic antitumor effects of all-trans retinoic acid and C-phycocyanin on the lung cancer A549 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Gao, Mei-Hua; Chu, Xian-Ming; Teng, Lei; Lv, Cong-Yi; Yang, Peng; Yin, Qi-Feng

    2015-02-15

    The anticancer effects and mechanism of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), C-phycocyanin (C-PC) or ATRA+C-PC on the growth of A549 cells were studied in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The effects of C-PC and ATRA on the growth of A549 cells were determined. The expression of CDK-4 and caspase-3, and the cellular apoptosis levels were detected. The tumor model was established by subcutaneous injection of A549 cells to the left axilla of the NU/NU mice. The weights of tumor and the spleen were tested. The viabilities of T-cells and spleen cells, TNF levels, the expression of Bcl-2 protein and Cyclin D1 gene were examined. Results showed both C-PC and ATRA could inhibit the growth of tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. ATRA+C-PC cooperatively showed a higher antitumor activity. The dosage of ATRA was reduced when it was administered with C-PC together, and the toxicity was reduced as well. ATRA+C-PC could decrease CDK-4 but increase caspase-3 protein expression level and induce cell apoptosis. ATRA alone could lower the activities of T lymphocytes and spleen weights, but the combination with C-PC could effectively promote viability of T cells and spleen. C-PC+ATRA could up-regulate TNF, and down-regulate Bcl-2 and Cyclin D1 gene. The combination might inhibit tumor growth by inhibiting the progress of cell cycle, inducing cell apoptosis and enhancing the body immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Differences of cations and anions: their hydration, surface adsorption, and impact on water dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijiang; Fan, Yubo; Gao, Yi Qin

    2011-11-03

    The higher tendency for anions to accumulate at the salt aqueous solution/air interface than that of cations has been observed experimentally and theoretically, suggesting that the size and polarizability of the ions play essential roles in this effect. Here, we investigate the influence of the nonsymmetrical positive-vs-negative charge distribution in water molecules to the hydration and surface/bulk partition of the solvated positively and negatively charged particles by using molecular dynamics simulations with hypothetical ions to validate our theoretical models. The results indicate that positive and negative charges (called cations and anions, respectively, although they may not really exist in experiments) with all other properties identical are hydrated differently and that the anions are more likely to populate at the surface. The simulation on a combination series of cations and anions in aqueous solution shows significant variations on water dynamics, likely due to the specific cooperativity between oppositely charged ions.

  10. Modeling hydration water and its role in polymer folding

    OpenAIRE

    Bruscolini, P.; Casetti, L.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrophobic effect is the dominant force which drives a protein towards its native state, but its physics has not been thoroughly understood yet. We introduce an exactly solvable model of the solvation of non-polar molecules in water, which shows that the reduced number of allowed configurations of water molecules when the solute is present is enough to give rise to hydrophobic behaviour. We apply our model to a non-polar homopolymer in aqueous solution, obtaining a clear evidence of both...

  11. STUDY ON THE FACTORS INFLUENCING HYDRATION AND WATER RETENTION CAPACITY OF MEAT

    OpenAIRE

    DANIELA IANIłCHI; CARMEN NICOLAE; CRISTIANA DIACONESCU; GABRIELA MALOS; I. G. MALOS

    2013-01-01

    Top-quality food produce and high profitability in processing requires high quality in raw materials. Therefore, to achieve these objectives, it is imperative to know the properties of the war materials, and the factors that influence these properties.The properties of the meat directly involved in increasing economic efficiency and final produce quality are the so-called technological properties: hydration capacity and water retention capacity of meat. These properties are determined by some...

  12. Protocol for Measuring the Thermal Properties of a Supercooled Synthetic Sand-water-gas-methane Hydrate Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Michihiro; Susuki, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Tsuji, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-21

    Methane hydrates (MHs) are present in large amounts in the ocean floor and permafrost regions. Methane and hydrogen hydrates are being studied as future energy resources and energy storage media. To develop a method for gas production from natural MH-bearing sediments and hydrate-based technologies, it is imperative to understand the thermal properties of gas hydrates. The thermal properties' measurements of samples comprising sand, water, methane, and MH are difficult because the melting heat of MH may affect the measurements. To solve this problem, we performed thermal properties' measurements at supercooled conditions during MH formation. The measurement protocol, calculation method of the saturation change, and tips for thermal constants' analysis of the sample using transient plane source techniques are described here. The effect of the formation heat of MH on measurement is very small because the gas hydrate formation rate is very slow. This measurement method can be applied to the thermal properties of the gas hydrate-water-guest gas system, which contains hydrogen, CO2, and ozone hydrates, because the characteristic low formation rate of gas hydrate is not unique to MH. The key point of this method is the low rate of phase transition of the target material. Hence, this method may be applied to other materials having low phase-transition rates.

  13. The hydration ability of three commercially available sports drinks and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rebecca J; Bluck, Leslie J C; Davies, Peter S W

    2008-04-01

    This paper compares the hydration ability of three commercially-available sports drinks with water under conditions of rest and exercise, using a deuterium dilution technique. For the rest group, 0.05g/kg of body weight of deuterium, contained in gelatine capsules, was ingested with one of the test solutions and saliva samples were collected every five minutes for an hour while the subject remained seated. The deuterium was administered as above for the exercise group but sample collection was during one hour of exercise on a treadmill at 55% of the subject's maximum heart rate. The enrichment data for each subject were mathematically modelled to describe the kinetics of hydration and the parameters obtained were compared across drinks using a basic Anova. At rest, significant differences were found for t(1), t(1/2), and the percent of drink absorbed at t(1). The differences between drinks were not significant for t(2) or the maximum absorption rate. For the exercise group, the only significant difference was found between water and the sports drinks at t(1). Therefore, we conclude that labelling with a deuterium tracer is a good measure of the relative rate ingested fluids are absorbed by the body. Because of the lack of differences found at t(2), which is indicative of the 100% absorption time, both at rest and during exercise, it may be speculated that, compared to water, the sports drinks studied in this paper did not hydrate the body at a faster rate.

  14. Membrane dipole potentials, hydration forces, and the ordering of water at membrane surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrisch, K; Ruston, D; Zimmerberg, J; Parsegian, V A; Rand, R P; Fuller, N

    1992-01-01

    We have compared hydration forces, electrical dipole potentials, and structural parameters of dispersions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) to evaluate the influence of fatty acid carbonyl groups on phospholipid bilayers. NMR and x-ray investigations performed over a wide range of water concentrations in the samples show, that in the liquid crystalline lamellar phase, the presence of carbonyl groups is not essential for lipid structure and hydration. Within experimental error, the two lipids have identical repulsive hydration forces between their bilayers. The higher transport rate of the negatively charged tetraphenylboron over the positively charged tetraphenylarsonium indicates that the dipole potential is positive inside the membranes of both lipids. However, the lack of fatty acid carbonyl groups in the ether lipid DHPC decreased the potential by (118 +/- 15) mV. By considering the sign of the potential and the orientation of carbonyl groups and headgroups, we conclude that the first layer of water molecules at the lipid water interface makes a major contribution to the dipole potential. PMID:1600081

  15. Educational intervention on water intake improves hydration status and enhances exercise performance in athletic youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavouras, S A; Arnaoutis, G; Makrillos, M; Garagouni, C; Nikolaou, E; Chira, O; Ellinikaki, E; Sidossis, L S

    2012-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether an intervention program emphasizing in increased fluid intake can improve exercise performance in children exercising in the heat. Ninety-two young athletes participated in the study (age: 13.8 ± 0.4 years, weight: 54.9 ± 1.5 kg). Thirty-one (boys: 13, girls: 18) children served as the control group (CON) and 61 (boys: 30, girls: 31) as the intervention (INT). Volunteers had free access to fluids. Hydration was assessed on the basis of first morning urine. A series of field tests were used to evaluate exercise performance. All tests occurred outdoors in the morning (mean ambient temperature=28°C). After baseline testing, INT attended a lecture on hydration, and urine color charts were mounted in all bathrooms. Additionally, water accessibility was facilitated in training, dining and resting areas. Hydration status was improved significantly in the INT [USG: pre=1.031 ± 0.09, post=1.023 ± 0.012, P0.05; urine osmolality (mOsm/kg water) 970 ± 38 vs 961 ± 38, P>0.05]. Performance in an endurance run was improved significantly only in INT (time for 600 m: pre=189 ± 5 s, post=167 ± 4 s, Phydration status by ad libitum consumption of water can enhance performance in young children exercising in the heat. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Analysis of the hydration water around bovine serum albumin using terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Jordan W; Meliga, Stefano; Ferachou, Denis; Cinque, Gianfelice; Zeitler, J Axel; Falconer, Robert J

    2014-01-09

    Terahertz spectroscopy was used to study the absorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in water. The Diamond Light Source operating in a low alpha mode generated coherent synchrotron radiation that covered a useable spectral bandwidth of 0.3-3.3 THz (10-110 cm(-1)). As the BSA concentration was raised, there was a nonlinear change in absorption inconsistent with Beer's law. At low BSA concentrations (0-1 mM), the absorption remained constant or rose slightly. Above a concentration of 1 mM BSA, a steady decrease in absorption was observed, which was followed by a plateau that started at 2.5 mM. Using a overlapping hydration layer model, the hydration layer was estimated to extend 15 Å from the protein. Calculation of the corrected absorption coefficient (αcorr) for the water around BSA by subtracting the excluded volume of the protein provides an alternative approach to studying the hydration layer that provides evidence for complexity in the population of water around BSA.

  17. Hydration and hydrogen bond network of water around hydrophobic surface investigated by terahertz spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, K; Suzuki, T; Kondo, N; Ogawa, Y

    2014-12-21

    Water conformation around hydrophobic side chains of four amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-aminobutyric acid, and L-norvaline) was investigated via changes in complex dielectric constant in the terahertz (THz) region. Each of these amino acids has the same hydrophilic backbone, with successive additions of hydrophobic straight methylene groups (-CH2-) to the side chain. Changes in the degree of hydration (number of dynamically retarded water molecules relative to bulk water) and the structural conformation of the water hydrogen bond (HB) network related to the number of methylene groups were quantitatively measured. Since dielectric responses in the THz region represent water relaxations and water HB vibrations at a sub-picosecond and picosecond timescale, these measurements characterized the water relaxations and HB vibrations perturbed by the methylene apolar groups. We found each successive straight -CH2- group on the side chain restrained approximately two hydrophobic hydration water molecules. Additionally, the number of non-hydrogen-bonded (NHB) water molecules increased slightly around these hydrophobic side chains. The latter result seems to contradict the iceberg model proposed by Frank and Evans, where water molecules are said to be more ordered around apolar surfaces. Furthermore, we compared the water-hydrophilic interactions of the hydrophilic amino acid backbone with those with the water-hydrophobic interactions around the side chains. As the hydrophobicity of the side chain increased, the ordering of the surrounding water HB network was altered from that surrounding the hydrophilic amino acid backbone, thereby diminishing the fraction of NHB water and ordering the surrounding tetrahedral water HB network.

  18. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  19. Effects of polar solvents on the fracture resistance of dentin: Role of water hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, R O; Nalla, R K; Balooch, M; Ager III, J W; Kruzic, J J; Kinney, J H

    2004-12-10

    Although healthy dentin is invariably hydrated in vivo, from a perspective of examining the mechanisms of fracture in dentin, it is interesting to consider the role of water hydration. Furthermore, it is feasible that exposure to certain polar solvents, e.g., those found in clinical adhesives, can induce dehydration. In the present study, in vitro deformation and fracture experiments, the latter involving a resistance-curve (R-curve) approach (i.e., toughness evolution with crack extension), were conducted in order to assess changes in the constitutive and fracture behavior induced by three common solvents - acetone, ethanol and methanol. In addition, nanoindentation-based experiments to evaluate the deformation behavior at the level of individual collagen fibers and ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy to evaluate changes in bonding were performed. The results indicate a reversible effect of chemical dehydration, with increased fracture resistance, strength, and stiffness associated with lower hydrogen bonding ability of the solvent. These results are analyzed both in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic toughening phenomena to further understand the micromechanisms of fracture in dentin and the specific role of water hydration.

  20. A hydrated ion model of [UO2] 2 + in water: Structure, dynamics, and spectroscopy from classical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Conesa, Sergio; Torrico, Francisco; Martínez, José M.; Pappalardo, Rafael R.; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    A new ab initio interaction potential based on the hydrated ion concept has been developed to obtain the structure, energetics, and dynamics of the hydration of uranyl in aqueous solution. It is the first force field that explicitly parameterizes the interaction of the uranyl hydrate with bulk water molecules to accurately define the second-shell behavior. The [UO2(H2O)5 ] 2 + presents a first hydration shell U-O average distance of 2.46 Å and a second hydration shell peak at 4.61 Å corresponding to 22 molecules using a coordination number definition based on a multisite solute cavity. The second shell solvent molecules have longer mean residence times than those corresponding to the divalent monatomic cations. The axial regions are relatively de-populated, lacking direct hydrogen bonding to apical oxygens. Angle-solved radial distribution functions as well as the spatial distribution functions show a strong anisotropy in the ion hydration. The [UO2(H2O)5 ] 2 + solvent structure may be regarded as a combination of a conventional second hydration shell in the equatorial and bridge regions, and a clathrate-like low density region in the axial region. Translational diffusion coefficient, hydration enthalpy, power spectra of the main vibrational modes, and the EXAFS spectrum simulated from molecular dynamics trajectories agree fairly well with the experiment.

  1. The Hydration Structure at Yttria-Stabilized Cubic Zirconia (110)-Water Interface with Sub-Ångström Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Binyang; Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Taeho; Kim, Jongjin; Hong, Seungbum; Bahn, Chi Bum; Park, Changyong; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-06-01

    The interfacial hydration structure of yttria-stabilized cubic zirconia (110) surface in contact with water was determined with ~0.5 Å resolution by high-resolution X-ray reflectivity measurement. The terminal layer shows a reduced electron density compared to the following substrate lattice layers, which indicates there are additional defects generated by metal depletion as well as intrinsic oxygen vacancies, both of which are apparently filled by water species. Above this top surface layer, two additional adsorbed layers are observed forming a characteristic interfacial hydration structure. The first adsorbed layer shows abnormally high density as pure water and likely includes metal species, whereas the second layer consists of pure water. The observed interfacial hydration structure seems responsible for local equilibration of the defective surface in water and eventually regulating the long-term degradation processes. The multitude of water interactions with the zirconia surface results in the complex but highly ordered interfacial structure constituting the reaction front.

  2. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  3. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Membrane Hydration by Direct Liquid Water Contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    An effective means of providing direct liquid hydration of the membrane tends to improve performance particularly of cells with thicker membranes or at elevated temperatures. Supplying the water to the membrane from the anode flow-field through the anode backing via wicks would appear to have advantages over delivering the water through the thickness of the membrane with regards to the uniformity and stability of the supply and the use of off-the-shelf membranes or MEAs. In addition to improving cell performance, an important contribution of direct liquid hydration approaches may be that the overall fuel cell system becomes simpler and more effective. The next steps in the evolution of this approach are a demonstration of the effectiveness of this technique with larger active area cells as well as the implementation of an internal flow-field water reservoir (to eliminate the injection method). Scale-up to larger cell sizes and the use of separate water channels within the anode flow-field is described.

  4. Comparison of the effects of hydration with water or isotonic solution on the recovery of cardiac autonomic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Moreno, Isadora Lessa; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Ferreira, Celso

    2015-04-01

    Despite the importance of hydration during exercise, the impact of ingesting water or isotonic solution during and after exercise on the regulation of autonomic modulation is unclear. The study aimed to compare the effect of ingesting water or isotonic solution (Gatorade®, Brazil) on cardiac autonomic modulation in young people after submaximal aerobic exercise. Thirty-one young men were subjected to a protocol consisting of 4 steps: 1) incremental test, 2) control protocol without hydration, 3) protocol with ingestion of water, and 4) protocol with ingestion of isotonic solution. The protocol consisted of 10 min of rest, 90 min of treadmill exercise at 60% VO2peak, and 60 min of recovery at rest. In the hydration protocols, hydration occurred during and after exercise, every 15 min beginning after the 15th minute of exercise, with the amount ingested proportional to body mass lost in the control protocol. Autonomic modulation was evaluated by heart rate variability. The hydration protocols promoted a more efficient recovery of autonomic modulation, and for the exercise performed, regardless of the hydration administered, the effect on autonomic modulation was similar.

  5. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Pilon, Laurent; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-12-28

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C-S-H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C-S-H's nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C-S-H's atomic network. Taken together, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  6. Acid-base balance and hydration status following consumption of mineral-based alkaline bottled water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heil Daniel P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study sought to determine whether the consumption of a mineral-rich alkalizing (AK bottled water could improve both acid-base balance and hydration status in young healthy adults under free-living conditions. The AK water contains a naturally high mineral content along with Alka-PlexLiquid™, a dissolved supplement that increases the mineral content and gives the water an alkalizing pH of 10.0. Methods Thirty-eight subjects were matched by gender and self-reported physical activity (SRPA, hrs/week and then split into Control (12 women, 7 men; Mean +/- SD: 23 +/- 2 yrs; 7.2 +/- 3.6 hrs/week SRPA and Experimental (13 women, 6 men; 22 +/- 2 yrs; 6.4 +/- 4.0 hrs/week SRPA groups. The Control group consumed non-mineralized placebo bottled water over a 4-week period while the Experimental group consumed the placebo water during the 1st and 4th weeks and the AK water during the middle 2-week treatment period. Fingertip blood and 24-hour urine samples were collected three times each week for subsequent measures of blood and urine osmolality and pH, as well as total urine volume. Dependent variables were analyzed using multivariate repeated measures ANOVA with post-hoc focused on evaluating changes over time within Control and Experimental groups (alpha = 0.05. Results There were no significant changes in any of the dependent variables for the Control group. The Experimental group, however, showed significant increases in both the blood and urine pH (6.23 to 7.07 and 7.52 to 7.69, respectively, a decreased blood and increased urine osmolality, and a decreased urine output (2.51 to 2.05 L/day, all during the second week of the treatment period (P Conclusions Consumption of AK water was associated with improved acid-base balance (i.e., an alkalization of the blood and urine and hydration status when consumed under free-living conditions. In contrast, subjects who consumed the placebo bottled water showed no changes over the

  7. Redox and electrochemical water splitting catalytic properties of hydrated metal oxide modified electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Richard L; Godwin, Ian J; Brandon, Michael P; Lyons, Michael E G

    2013-09-07

    This paper presents a review of the redox and electrocatalytic properties of transition metal oxide electrodes, paying particular attention to the oxygen evolution reaction. Metal oxide materials may be prepared using a variety of methods, resulting in a diverse range of redox and electrocatalytic properties. Here we describe the most common synthetic routes and the important factors relevant to their preparation. The redox and electrocatalytic properties of the resulting oxide layers are ascribed to the presence of extended networks of hydrated surface bound oxymetal complexes termed surfaquo groups. This interpretation presents a possible unifying concept in water oxidation catalysis - bridging the fields of heterogeneous electrocatalysis and homogeneous molecular catalysis.

  8. STUDY ON THE FACTORS INFLUENCING HYDRATION AND WATER RETENTION CAPACITY OF MEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA IANIłCHI

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Top-quality food produce and high profitability in processing requires high quality in raw materials. Therefore, to achieve these objectives, it is imperative to know the properties of the war materials, and the factors that influence these properties.The properties of the meat directly involved in increasing economic efficiency and final produce quality are the so-called technological properties: hydration capacity and water retention capacity of meat. These properties are determined by some factors belonging to the intrinsic quality of meat, animal slaughter methods, technological operations applied to the meat, and the auxiliary materials used.

  9. Piroxicam and c-phycocyanin prevent colon carcinogenesis by inhibition of membrane fluidity and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling while up-regulating ligand dependent transcription factor PPARγ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-06-01

    The colon cancer tissues from DMH treated rats exhibited higher membrane potential, fluidity and changed lipid order as examined by Merocyanine 540 and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, respectively. A transition from gel to liquid crystalline state was observed by Laurdan fluorescence and also reduced fluorescence quenching of NBD-PE as contributed in the decreased membrane lipid phase separation. With piroxicam, a traditional NSAID and c-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis, these effects were normalized. An augmented intracellular Ca(+2) had contributed to the drug mediated apoptosis which is supported by an elevated calpain-9 expression. Histopathologically, a large pool of secreted acid/neutral mucopolysaccrides as well as the presence of blood vessels and dysplastic crypts signifies invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma while both the drugs reduced these neoplastic alterations. Wnt/β-catenin pathway was also found to be up-regulated which served as a crucial indicator for cancer cell growth. A concomitant down regulation of PPARγ was noted in DMH treatment which is associated with tumor progression. The expression of PPARα and δ, the other two isoforms of PPAR family was also modulated. We conclude that piroxicam and c-phycocyanin exert their anti-neoplastic effects via regulating membrane properties, raising calpain-9 and PPARγ expression while suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in experimental colon carcinogenesis. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydration level is an internal variable for computing motivation to obtain water rewards in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamimoto, Takafumi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Hori, Yukiko; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2012-05-01

    In the process of motivation to engage in a behavior, valuation of the expected outcome is comprised of not only external variables (i.e., incentives) but also internal variables (i.e., drive). However, the exact neural mechanism that integrates these variables for the computation of motivational value remains unclear. Besides, the signal of physiological needs, which serves as the primary internal variable for this computation, remains to be identified. Concerning fluid rewards, the osmolality level, one of the physiological indices for the level of thirst, may be an internal variable for valuation, since an increase in the osmolality level induces drinking behavior. Here, to examine the relationship between osmolality and the motivational value of a water reward, we repeatedly measured the blood osmolality level, while 2 monkeys continuously performed an instrumental task until they spontaneously stopped. We found that, as the total amount of water earned increased, the osmolality level progressively decreased (i.e., the hydration level increased) in an individual-dependent manner. There was a significant negative correlation between the error rate of the task (the proportion of trials with low motivation) and the osmolality level. We also found that the increase in the error rate with reward accumulation can be well explained by a formula describing the changes in the osmolality level. These results provide a biologically supported computational formula for the motivational value of a water reward that depends on the hydration level, enabling us to identify the neural mechanism that integrates internal and external variables.

  11. Effects of Water Provision and Hydration on Cognitive Function among Primary-School Pupils in Zambia: A Randomized Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Trinies

    Full Text Available There is a well-established link between hydration and improved cognitive performance among adults, with evidence of similar findings among children. No trials have investigated the impact of water provision on cognitive performance among schoolchildren in hot and arid low-resource settings. We conducted a randomized-controlled trial in five schools with limited water access in Chipata district in Eastern province, Zambia, to assess the efficacy of water provision on cognition. Pupils in grades 3-6 were randomly assigned to either receive a bottle of drinking water that they could refill throughout the day (water group, n = 149 or only have access to drinking water that was normally available at the school (control group, n = 143. Hydration was assessed in the morning before provision of water and in the afternoon through urine specific gravity (Usg measured with a portable refractometer. In the afternoon we administered six cognitive tests to assess short-term memory, concentration, visual attention, and visual motor skills. Morning prevalence of dehydration, defined as Usg≥1.020, was 42%. Afternoon dehydration increased to 67% among the control arm and dropped to 10% among the intervention arm. We did not find that provision of water or hydration impacted cognitive test scores, although there were suggestive relationships between both water provision and hydration and increased scores on tests measuring visual attention. We identified key improvements to the study design that are warranted to further investigate this relationship.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01924546.

  12. Structural Interpretation of the Large Slowdown of Water Dynamics at Stacked Phospholipid Membranes for Decreasing Hydration Level: All-Atom Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Calero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydration water determines the stability and function of phospholipid membranes as well as the interaction of membranes with other molecules. Experiments and simulations have shown that water dynamics slows down dramatically as the hydration decreases, suggesting that the interfacial water that dominates the average dynamics at low hydration is slower than water away from the membrane. Here, based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we provide an interpretation of the slowdown of interfacial water in terms of the structure and dynamics of water–water and water–lipid hydrogen bonds (HBs. We calculate the rotational and translational slowdown of the dynamics of water confined in stacked phospholipid membranes at different levels of hydration, from completely hydrated to poorly hydrated membranes. For all hydrations, we analyze the distribution of HBs and find that water–lipids HBs last longer than water–water HBs and that at low hydration most of the water is in the interior of the membrane. We also show that water–water HBs become more persistent as the hydration is lowered. We attribute this effect (i to HBs between water molecules that form, in turn, persistent HBs with lipids; (ii to the hindering of the H-bonding switching between water molecules due to the lower water density at the interface; and (iii to the higher probability of water–lipid HBs as the hydration decreases. Our interpretation of the large dynamic slowdown in water under dehydration is potentially relevant in understanding membrane biophysics at different hydration levels.

  13. Electrostatic polarization effects and hydrophobic hydration in ethanol-water solutions from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-01-22

    Nonadditive electrostatic force fields based on the charge equilibration formalism coupled with long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the microscopic structural aspects of hydrophobic hydration in ethanol-water solutions. Employing a combination of polarizable ethanol and water force fields (developed independently), we find that solution properties are satisfactorily reproduced across the ethanol mole fraction range between 0.1 and 0.9. Solution densities are predicted within 3.6% of experimental measurements, while excess mixing enthalpies are overestimated as in earlier studies. The solvation free energy of ethanol in infinite dilution is determined via thermodynamic integration to be 5.70 +/- 0.23 kcal/mol, overestimating the free energetics of solvation relative to experiment (5.01 kcal/mol). Bulk solution dielectric constants and diffusion constants reproduce experimental trends and are in reasonable agreement across the ethanol concentration range studied. Because of explicit accounting of induction effects, ethanol and water exhibit varying molecular dipole moment distributions with concentration. The polarizable ethanol model, possessing higher condensed-phase polarizability relative to the TIP4P-FQ water model (4.54 A(3) versus 1.1 A(3), respectively), displays greater variation upon perturbation by the electric field of water. With regard to hydrophobic hydration, the current force fields indicate positive hydrogen bonding excess for water in the dilute ethanol concentration range, consistent with previous theoretical and experimental studies. Strikingly, we find that there are both positive and negative hydrogen bond excess contributions within the first hydration shell of both the ethanol hydroxyl oxygen and ethylene carbon atoms. The larger positive contributions dominate the overall hydrogen bonding patterns to yield overall net positive excesses. Moreover, we do not find evidence of excess hydrogen bonding vicinal to

  14. Distinguishing dynamical features of water inside protein hydration layer: Distribution reveals what is hidden behind the average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Saumyak; Mondal, Sayantan; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-07-01

    Since the pioneering works of Pethig, Grant, and Wüthrich on a protein hydration layer, many studies have been devoted to find out if there are any "general and universal" characteristic features that can distinguish water molecules inside the protein hydration layer from bulk. Given that the surface itself varies from protein to protein, and that each surface facing the water is heterogeneous, search for universal features has been elusive. Here, we perform an atomistic molecular dynamics simulation in order to propose and demonstrate that such defining characteristics can emerge if we look not at average properties but the distribution of relaxation times. We present results of calculations of distributions of residence times and rotational relaxation times for four different protein-water systems and compare them with the same quantities in the bulk. The distributions in the hydration layer are unusually broad and log-normal in nature due to the simultaneous presence of peptide backbones that form weak hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic amino acid side chains that form no hydrogen bond, and charged polar groups that form a strong hydrogen bond with the surrounding water molecules. The broad distribution is responsible for the non-exponential dielectric response and also agrees with large specific heat of the hydration water. Our calculations reveal that while the average time constant is just about 2-3 times larger than that of bulk water, it provides a poor representation of the real behaviour. In particular, the average leads to the erroneous conclusion that water in the hydration layer is bulk-like. However, the observed and calculated lower value of static dielectric constant of hydration layer remained difficult to reconcile with the broad distribution observed in dynamical properties. We offer a plausible explanation of these unique properties.

  15. Increasing the sensitivity of headspace analysis of low volatility solutes through water removal by hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui-Chao; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Wei, Chao-Hai; Barnes, Donald

    2014-05-23

    This paper reports on the development of a new headspace analytical technique that is based on water removal by hydrate formation (WRHF). By adding anhydrous salt, the liquid water in an aqueous sample will be removed leaving behind volatile analytes that are fully vaporized at temperatures well below their boiling points. With WRHF, the amount of sample in the headspace can be significantly increased, thereby dramatically improving the detection sensitivity. The technique reduces the risk of possible column damage in gas chromatography (GC) systems. The technique was applied to the determination of phenol at different stages of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The results showed that up to mL-levels of sample solution can be used in WRHF HS-GC analysis when 5g of CaCl2 were used as the anhydrous salt. The detection sensitivity for phenol content was 500 times greater than that in earlier HS-GC work that did not incorporate hydrate formation. The proposed WRHF headspace analysis technique is simple and practical, making it a useful tool for quantifying low concentrations of volatile analytes in aqueous samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Martí, J., E-mail: jordi.marti@upc.edu [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia-Barcelona Tech, B4-B5 Northern Campus, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Calero, C. [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia-Barcelona Tech, B4-B5 Northern Campus, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Center for Polymer Studies, Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −8} cm{sup 2}/s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2–8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of

  17. Total allowable concentrations of monomeric inorganic aluminum and hydrated aluminum silicates in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2012-05-01

    Maximum contaminant levels are used to control potential health hazards posed by chemicals in drinking water, but no primary national or international limits for aluminum (Al) have been adopted. Given the differences in toxicological profiles, the present evaluation derives total allowable concentrations for certain water-soluble inorganic Al compounds (including chloride, hydroxide, oxide, phosphate and sulfate) and for the hydrated Al silicates (including attapulgite, bentonite/montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) in drinking water. The chemistry, toxicology and clinical experience with Al materials are extensive and depend upon the particular physical and chemical form. In general, the water solubility of the monomeric Al materials depends on pH and their water solubility and gastrointestinal bioavailability are much greater than that of the hydrated Al silicates. Other than Al-containing antacids and buffered aspirin, food is the primary source of Al exposure for most healthy people. Systemic uptake of Al after ingestion of the monomeric salts is somewhat greater from drinking water (0.28%) than from food (0.1%). Once absorbed, Al accumulates in bone, brain, liver and kidney, with bone as the major site for Al deposition in humans. Oral Al hydroxide is used routinely to bind phosphate salts in the gut to control hyperphosphatemia in people with compromised renal function. Signs of chronic Al toxicity in the musculoskeletal system include a vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia (deranged membranous bone formation characterized by accumulation of the osteoid matrix and reduced mineralization, reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, decreased lamellar and osteoid bands with elevated Al concentrations) presenting as bone pain and proximal myopathy. Aluminum-induced bone disease can progress to stress fractures of the ribs, femur, vertebrae, humerus and metatarsals. Serum Al ≥100 µg/L has a 75-88% positive predictive value for Al bone disease. Chronic Al

  18. Experimental Investigation of Gas Hydrate Production at Injection of Liquid Nitrogen into Water with Bubbles of Freon 134A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meleshkin Anton V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic processes during the injection of the cryogenic liquid into the volume of water with bubbles of gas freon 134a are studding experimentally. A processes during the explosive boiling of liquid nitrogen in the volume of water are registered. Video recording of identified gas hydrate flakes formed during this process is carried out by high speed camera. These results may be useful for the study of the new method of producing gas hydrates, based on the shock-wave method.

  19. A Theoretical Study of the Hydration of Methane, from the Aqueous Solution to the sI Hydrate-Liquid Water-Gas Coexistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Porfirio Luis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations were done with three recent water models TIP4P/2005 (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/2005, TIP4P/Ice (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/ Ice and TIP4Q (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 charges combined with two models for methane: an all-atom one OPLS-AA (Optimal Parametrization for the Liquid State and a united-atom one (UA; a correction for the C–O interaction was applied to the latter and used in a third set of simulations. The models were validated by comparison to experimental values of the free energy of hydration at 280, 300, 330 and 370 K, all under a pressure of 1 bar, and to the experimental radial distribution functions at 277, 283 and 291 K, under a pressure of 145 bar. Regardless of the combination rules used for σC,O, good agreement was found, except when the correction to the UA model was applied. Thus, further simulations of the sI hydrate were performed with the united-atom model to compare the thermal expansivity to the experiment. A final set of simulations was done with the UA methane model and the three water models, to study the sI hydrate-liquid water-gas coexistence at 80, 230 and 400 bar. The melting temperatures were compared to the experimental values. The results show the need to perform simulations with various different models to attain a reliable and robust molecular image of the systems of interest.

  20. A Theoretical Study of the Hydration of Methane, from the Aqueous Solution to the sI Hydrate-Liquid Water-Gas Coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Daniel Porfirio; García-González, Alcione; Saint-Martin, Humberto

    2016-05-26

    Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations were done with three recent water models TIP4P/2005 (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/2005), TIP4P/Ice (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/ Ice) and TIP4Q (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 charges) combined with two models for methane: an all-atom one OPLS-AA (Optimal Parametrization for the Liquid State) and a united-atom one (UA); a correction for the C-O interaction was applied to the latter and used in a third set of simulations. The models were validated by comparison to experimental values of the free energy of hydration at 280, 300, 330 and 370 K, all under a pressure of 1 bar, and to the experimental radial distribution functions at 277, 283 and 291 K, under a pressure of 145 bar. Regardless of the combination rules used for σC,O, good agreement was found, except when the correction to the UA model was applied. Thus, further simulations of the sI hydrate were performed with the united-atom model to compare the thermal expansivity to the experiment. A final set of simulations was done with the UA methane model and the three water models, to study the sI hydrate-liquid water-gas coexistence at 80, 230 and 400 bar. The melting temperatures were compared to the experimental values. The results show the need to perform simulations with various different models to attain a reliable and robust molecular image of the systems of interest.

  1. Supplementation of Acqua Lete® (Bicarbonate Calcic Mineral Water improves hydration status in athletes after short term anaerobic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancaccio Paola

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies suggest that mineral waters with high concentrations of calcium and bicarbonate can impact acid–base balance. The purpose of this study was to test the effect on acid–base balance and specific urine gravity, of a bicarbonate calcic mineral water (Acqua Lete® compared to a minimally mineralized water. Methods 88 amateur male athletes underwent two experimental trials with a modified Wingate test: the first was carried out without hydration (Control Test, Test C, n = 88; the second was carried out after one week of controlled hydration (Test with hydration, Test H, n = 88, with 1.5 L/day of a very low mineral content water (Group A, n = 44 or 1.5 L/day of Acqua Lete® (Group B, n = 44. Measure of body temperature, bioimpedance analysis, muscular ultrasound, and urinalysis were taken before (t0, immediately after (t1, 5’ (t2, and 30’ (t3 after exercise. Results Hydration results in a decreased core temperature; muscular ultrasound showed increased muscle thickness after exercise related to content of body water. Regarding urinalysis, in test H, we found in both groups after exercise a significant decrease of specific urine gravity with significantly lower levels in Group B. We also found a significant increase of pH in the same Group B. Conclusions In conclusion all the athletes hydrated with Acqua Lete® showed a positive impact on hydration status after anaerobic exercise with significant decrease of specific urine gravity and a positive effect on pH.

  2. Supplementation of Acqua Lete® (Bicarbonate Calcic Mineral Water) improves hydration status in athletes after short term anaerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, Paola; Limongelli, Francesco Mario; Paolillo, Iride; D'Aponte, Antonio; Donnarumma, Vincenzo; Rastrelli, Luca

    2012-07-26

    Experimental studies suggest that mineral waters with high concentrations of calcium and bicarbonate can impact acid-base balance. The purpose of this study was to test the effect on acid-base balance and specific urine gravity, of a bicarbonate calcic mineral water (Acqua Lete®) compared to a minimally mineralized water. 88 amateur male athletes underwent two experimental trials with a modified Wingate test: the first was carried out without hydration (Control Test, Test C, n = 88); the second was carried out after one week of controlled hydration (Test with hydration, Test H, n = 88), with 1.5 L/day of a very low mineral content water (Group A, n = 44) or 1.5 L/day of Acqua Lete® (Group B, n = 44). Measure of body temperature, bioimpedance analysis, muscular ultrasound, and urinalysis were taken before (t0), immediately after (t1), 5' (t2), and 30' (t3) after exercise. Hydration results in a decreased core temperature; muscular ultrasound showed increased muscle thickness after exercise related to content of body water. Regarding urinalysis, in test H, we found in both groups after exercise a significant decrease of specific urine gravity with significantly lower levels in Group B. We also found a significant increase of pH in the same Group B. In conclusion all the athletes hydrated with Acqua Lete® showed a positive impact on hydration status after anaerobic exercise with significant decrease of specific urine gravity and a positive effect on pH.

  3. Hydrogen bond network in the hydration layer of the water confined in nanotubes increasing the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenpeng; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-09-21

    The water confined in nanotubes has been extensively studied, because of the potential usages in drug delivery and desalination. The radial distribution of the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis was obtained by molecular dynamics simulations in a carbon nanotube and a nanotube with a very small van der Waals potential. The confined water was divided into two parts, the middle part water and the hydration water. In both cases, the hydrogen bond orientation of the middle water is isotropic, while the hydrogen bonds in hydration layers are apt to parallel along the nanotube axis. Therefore, the hydration water has higher dipole correlations increasing the dielectric constant along the nanotube axis.

  4. 13C MAS NMR studies of the effects of hydration on the cell walls of potatoes and Chinese water chestnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H; Belton, P S; Ng, A; Ryden, P

    1999-02-01

    13C NMR with magic angle spinning (MAS) has been employed to investigate the cell walls of potatoes and Chinese water chestnuts over a range of hydration levels. Both single-pulse excitation (SPEMAS) and cross-polarization (CPMAS) experiments were carried out. Hydration led to a substantial increase in signal intensities of galactan and galacturonan in the SPEMAS spectra and a decrease in line width, implying mobilization in the backbone and side chains of pectin. In CPMAS spectra of both samples, noncellulose components showed signal loss as hydration increased. However, the signals of some galacturonan in the 3(1) helix configuration remained in the spectra even when the water content was as high as 110%. Cellulose was unaffected. It is concluded that the pectic polysaccharides experience a distribution of molecular conformations and mobility, whereas cellulose remained as typical rigid solid.

  5. Phase equilibria in ternary (carbon dioxide + tetrahydrofuran + water) system in hydrate-forming region: Effects of carbon dioxide concentration and the occurrence of pseudo-retrograde hydrate phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabil, Khalik M. [Delft University of Technology, Laboratory of Process Equipment, Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Eng, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Chemical Engineering Programme, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Witkamp, Geert-Jan [Delft University of Technology, Laboratory of Process Equipment, Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Eng, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Peters, Cor J., E-mail: C.J.Peters@tudelft.n [Delft University of Technology, Laboratory of Process Equipment, Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Eng, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Chemical Engineering Programme, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); The Petroleum Institute, Chemical Engineering Program, Bu Hasa Building, Room 2203, P.O. Box 2203, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-01-15

    In the present work, the three- and four-phase hydrate equilibria of (carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) + tetrahydrofuran (THF) + water) system are measured by using Cailletet equipment in the temperature and pressure range of (272 to 292) K and (1.0 to 7.5) MPa, respectively, at different CO{sub 2} concentration. Throughout the study, the concentration of THF is kept constant at 5 mol% in the aqueous solution. In addition, the fluid phase transitions of L{sub W}-L{sub V}-V -> L{sub W}-L{sub V} (bubble point) and L{sub W}-L{sub V}-V -> L{sub W}-V (dew point) are determined when they are present in the ternary system. For comparison, the three-phase hydrate equilibria of binary (CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O) are also measured. Experimental measurements show that the addition of THF as a hydrate promoter extends hydrate stability region by elevating the hydrate equilibrium temperature at a specified pressure. The three-phase equilibrium line H-L{sub W}-V is found to be independent of the overall concentration of CO{sub 2}. Contradictory, at higher pressure, the phase equilibria of the systems are significantly influenced by the overall concentration of CO{sub 2} in the systems. A liquid-liquid phase split is observed at overall concentration of CO{sub 2} as low as 3 mol% at elevated pressure. The region is bounded by the bubble-points line (L{sub W}-L{sub V}-V -> L{sub W}-L{sub V}), dew points line (L{sub W}-L{sub V}-V -> L{sub W} + V) and the four-phase equilibrium line (H + L{sub W} + L{sub V} + V). At higher overall concentration of CO{sub 2} in the ternary system, experimental measurements show that pseudo-retrograde behaviour exists at pressure between (2.5 and 5) MPa at temperature of 290.8 K.

  6. Site-specific hydration dynamics of globular proteins and the role of constrained water in solvent exchange with amphiphilic cosolvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, John T; Arthur, Evan J; Brooks, Charles L; Kubarych, Kevin J

    2012-05-17

    The thermodynamic driving forces for protein folding, association, and function are often determined by protein-water interactions. With a novel covalently bound labeling approach, we have used sensitive vibrational probes, site-selectively conjugated to two lysozyme variants-in conjunction with ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy-to investigate directly the protein-water interface. By probing alternatively a topologically flat, rigid domain and a flexible domain, we find direct experimental evidence for spatially heterogeneous hydration dynamics. The hydration environment around globular proteins can vary from exhibiting bulk-like hydration dynamics to dynamically constrained water, which results from stifled hydrogen bond switching dynamics near extended hydrophobic surfaces. Furthermore, we leverage preferential solvation exchange to demonstrate that the liberation of dynamically constrained water is a sufficient driving force for protein-surface association reactions. These results provide an intuitive picture of the dynamic aspects of hydrophobic hydration of proteins, illustrating an essential function of water in biological processes.

  7. The binding of the primary water of hydration to nucleosides, CsDNA and potassium hyaluronate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukan, A. M.; Cavanaugh, D.; Whitson, K. B.; Marlowe, R. L.; Lee, S. A.; Anthony, L.; Rupprecht, A.; Mohan, V.

    1998-03-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to study the eight nucleosides, CsDNA and KHA hydrated at 59% relative humidity. Thermograms were measured between 25 and 180 ^oC for scan rates of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 K/min. A broad endothermic transition (due to the desorption of the water) near 80 ^oC was observed for all runs. The average enthalpy of desorption per water molecule was evaluated from the area under the peak. A Kissinger analysis of these data yielded the net activation energy for desorption. Both parameters were very similar for the two biopolymers. Rayleigh scattering of Mossbauer radiation (RSMR) data(G. Albanese et al. ) Hyperfine Int. 95, 97 (1995) were analyzed via a simple harmonic oscillator model to evaluate the effective force constant of the water bound to the biopolymer. This analysis suggests that the effective force constant of water bound to HA is much larger (about 5 times) than for water bound to DNA.

  8. Evaluation of Hydrate Inhibition Performance of Water-soluble Polymers using Torque Measurement and Differential Scanning Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyuchul; Park, Juwoon; Kim, Jakyung; Kim, Hyunho; Seo, Yutaek [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yohan; Seo, Yongwon [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, hydrate inhibition performance of water-soluble polymers including pyrrolidone, caprolactam, acrylamide types were evaluated using torque measurement and high pressure differential scanning calorimeter (HP µ-DSC). The obtained experimental results suggest that the studied polymers represent the kinetic hydrate inhibition (KHI) performance. 0.5 wt% polyvinylcaprolactam (PVCap) solution shows the hydrate onset time of 34.4 min and subcooling temperature of 15.9 K, which is better KHI performance than that of pure water - hydrate onset time of 12.3 min and subcooling temperature of 6.0 K. 0.5 wt% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution shows the hydrate onset time of 27.6 min and the subcooling temperature of 13.2 K while polyacrylamide-co-acrylic acid partial sodium salt (PAM-co-AA) solution shows less KHI performance than PVP solution at both 0.5 and 5.0 wt%. However, PAM-co-AA solution shows slow growth rate and low hydrate amount than PVCap. In addition to hydrate onset and growth condition, torque change with time was investigated as one of KHI evaluation methods. 0.5 wt% PVCap solution shows the lowest average torque of 6.4 N cm and 0.5 wt% PAM-co-AA solution shows the average torque of 7.2 N cm. For 0.5 wt% PVP solution, it increases 11.5 N cm and 5.0 wt% PAM-co-AA solution shows the maximum average torque of 13.4 N cm, which is similar to the average torque of pure water, 15.2 N cm. Judging from the experimental results obtained by both an autoclave and a HP µ-DSC, the PVCap solution shows the best performance among the KHIs in terms of delaying hydrate nucleation. From these results, it can be concluded that the torque change with time is useful to identify the flow ability of tested solution, and the further research on the inhibition of hydrate formation can be approached in various aspects using a HP µ-DSC.

  9. Multiple-pressure-tapped core holder combined with X-ray computed tomography scanning for gas-water permeability measurements of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Jin, Yusuke; Uchiumi, Takashi; Nagao, Jiro

    2013-06-01

    We present a novel setup for measuring the effective gas-water permeability of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments. We developed a core holder with multiple pressure taps for measuring the pressure gradient of the gas and water phases. The gas-water flooding process was simultaneously detected using an X-ray computed tomography scanner. We successfully measured the effective gas-water permeability of an artificial sandy core with methane hydrate during the gas-water flooding test.

  10. Mantle hydration and the role of water in the generation of large igneous provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Xia, Qun-Ke; Kuritani, Takeshi; Hanski, Eero; Yu, Hao-Ran

    2017-11-28

    The genesis of large igneous provinces (LIP) is controlled by multiple factors including anomalous mantle temperatures, the presence of fusible fertile components and volatiles in the mantle source, and the extent of decompression. The lack of a comprehensive examination of all these factors in one specific LIP makes the mantle plume model debatable. Here, we report estimates of the water content in picrites from the Emeishan LIP in southwestern China. Although these picrites display an island arc-like H 2 O content (up to 3.4 by weight percent), the trace element characteristics do not support a subduction zone setting but point to a hydrous reservoir in the deep mantle. Combining with previous studies, we propose that hydrous and hot plumes occasionally appeared in the Phanerozoic era to produce continental LIPs (e.g., Tarim, Siberian Trap, Karoo). The wide sampling of hydrous reservoirs in the deep mantle by mantle plumes thus indicates that the Earth's interior is largely hydrated.

  11. Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, Martin Paul [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

  12. Experimental Study on Hydrate Induction Time of Gas-Saturated Water-in-Oil Emulsion using a High-Pressure Flow Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv X.F.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrate is one of the critical precipitates which have to be controlled for subsea flow assurance. The induction time of hydrate is therefore a significant parameter. However, there have been few studies on the induction time of the natural gas hydrate formation in a flow loop system. Consequently, a series of experiments were firstly performed, including water, natural gas and Diesel oil, on the hydrate induction time under various conditions such as the supercooling and supersaturation degree, water cut, anti-agglomerant dosage, etc. The experiments were conducted in a high-pressure hydrate flow loop newly constructed in the China University of Petroleum (Beijing, and dedicated to flow assurance studies. Then, based on previous research, this study puts forward a method for induction time, which is characterized by clear definition, convenient measurement and good generality. Furthermore, we investigated the influences of the experimental parameters and analyzed the experimental phenomena for the hydrate induction time in a flowing system.

  13. New Insights into the Dynamics of Zwitterionic Micelles and Their Hydration Waters by Gigahertz-to-Terahertz Dielectric Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    George, Deepu K; Hull, Olivia A; Mishra, Archana; Capelluto, Daniel G S; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R; Vinh, Nguyen Q

    2016-01-01

    Gigahertz-to-terahertz spectroscopy of macromolecules in aqueous environments provides an important approach for identifying their global and transient molecular structures, as well as directly assessing hydrogen-bonding. We report dielectric properties of zwitterionic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles in aqueous solutions over a wide frequency range, from 50 MHz to 1.12 THz. The dielectric relaxation spectra reveal different polarization mechanisms at the molecular level, reflecting the complexity of DPC micelle-water interactions. We have made a deconvolution of the spectra into different components and combined them with the effective-medium approximation to separate delicate processes of micelles in water. Our measurements demonstrate reorientational motion of the DPC surfactant head groups within the micelles, and two levels of hydration water shells, including tightly- and loosely-bound hydration water layers. From the dielectric strength of bulk water in DPC solutions, we found that the number of wa...

  14. Initial hydration steps in lipase studied by means of water sorption isotherms, FTIR spectroscopy and thermally stimulated depolarization currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridelli, M. G.; Capelletti, R.; Maraia, F.; Mora, C.; Pirola, L.

    2002-05-01

    The role of water in lipases, a class of proteins endowed with a large external hydrophobic surface, is not yet fully understood. To analyse the water-related structural properties and the possible implications for the protein functionality, three experimental techniques such as water sorption isotherms, thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDCs), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were applied to pellets and/or films of lipase from Candida lipolytica, prepared at very low hydration degrees h, ranging between 0.003 and 0.457 gwater/gprotein. Two main broad TSDC bands (a weak one peaking at T≅160 K and a strong one at T≅260 K) were detected. The peak amplitudes and positions critically depend not only on the water content, but also on the previous hydration history of the sample. FTIR spectra monitored: (1) the amplitude and position changes of the characteristic optical absorption bands (amide A, B, I, and II) as a function of the humidity level, (2) the presence of a considerable amount of β-sheet structure at high hydration degrees, and (3) a conformational transition induced by drastic dehydration treatments. Complementary sorption isotherms, performed by means of a gravimetric method, showed a marked hysteresis in the lipase-aqueous solvent interaction. The whole set of results provides a model for the initial steps of the lipase hydration kinetics. At h = 0.009, 13 water molecules are buried in the macromolecule, probably bound to the peptidic backbone. At h = 0.037 all polar and charged free groups are hydrated. At higher h a solution phase begins, and at h = 0.457 about 660 water molecules are accommodated around the protein, giving rise to three to four complete layer coverages.

  15. The Effects of Hot Water Treatment, Hydration and Order of Nursery Operations on Cuttings of Vitis vinifera Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Waite

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Hot water treatment (HWT is an effective control for endogenous pathogens, including Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, in grapevine propagating material. However sporadic unexplained failures of HWT material do occur. In order to determine the most reliable HWT protocols the effects of HWT at 50°C for 30 min., order of HWT and storage (store/HWT and HWT/store, and 3 hydration times (0, 4 and 6 h on root and shoot development and final condition in dormant cuttings of Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay were evaluated. After incubation callus, root and shoot development were assessed. Cuttings were potted into cardboard plant bands, grown to marketable size in a protected environment, and assessed as “A” grade, “B” grade or dead. Callus development in Chardonnay was affected by an interaction between HWT protocols and hydration times. Callus was least developed in cuttings hydrated for 15 h and stored before HWT. Callus development in all other treatments was greater (P<0.05 regardless of HWT or hydration. By contrast, callus development in Cabernet Sauvignon was greater (P<0.05 in HWT than in non-HWT cuttings regardless of the duration of hydration or the order of operations. Root development in Chardonnay was furthest advanced in cuttings hydrated for 15 h. (regardless of HWT and in HWT cuttings not hydrated. HWT was the only factor that affected root development in Cabernet Sauvignon. Root development was greatest in non-HWT cuttings. There were no differences between any of the treatments in either variety at final assessment. On this evidence nurseries could apply any of the above protocols successfully. However the benign conditions of the protected environment may have enabled the cuttings to recover from the stresses imposed by the various treatments. Had the cuttings been grown in a field nursery there might have been differences between treatments at final assessment.

  16. Multicomponent seismic methods for characterizing gas hydrate occurrences and systems in deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.; Hardage, Bob A.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ characterization and quantification of natural gas hydrate occurrences remain critical research directions, whether for energy resource, drilling hazard, or climate-related studies. Marine multicomponent seismic data provide the full seismic wavefield including partial redundancy, and provide a promising set of approaches for gas hydrate characterization. Numerous authors have demonstrated the possibilities of multicomponent data at study sites around the world. We expand on this work by investigating the utility of very densely spaced (10’s of meters) multicomponent receivers (ocean-bottom cables, OBC, or ocean-bottom seismometers, OBS) for gas hydrate studies in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. Advanced processing techniques provide high-resolution compressional-wave (PP) and converted shearwave (PS) reflection images of shallow stratigraphy, as well as P-wave and S-wave velocity estimates at each receiver position. Reflection impedance estimates can help constrain velocity and density, and thus gas hydrate saturation. Further constraint on velocity can be determined through identification of the critical angle and associated phase reversal in both PP and PS wideangle data. We demonstrate these concepts with examples from OBC data from the northeast Green Canyon area and numerically simulated OBS data that are based on properties of known gas hydrate occurrences in the southeast (deeper water) Green Canyon area. These multicomponent data capabilities can provide a wealth of characterization and quantification information that is difficult to obtain with other geophysical methods.

  17. Ternary phase behaviour and vesicle formation of a sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate/1-decanol/water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Nasima; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Reza, Mohammad Imam Hasan

    2011-08-01

    The phase behaviour of a system composed of amino acid-based surfactant (sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate), 1-decanol and deionised water was investigated for vesicle formation. Changing the molar ratio of the amphiphiles, two important aggregate structures were observed in the aqueous corner of the phase diagram. Two different sizes of microemulsions were found at two amphiphile-water boundaries. A stable single vesicle lobe was found for 1∶2 molar ratios in 92 wt% water with vesicles approximately 100 nm in size and with high zeta potential value. Structural variation arises due to the reduction of electrostatic repulsions among the ionic headgroups of the surfactants and the hydration forces due to adsorbed water onto monolayer's. The balance of these two forces determines the aggregate structures. Analysis was followed by the molecular geometrical structure. These findings may have implications for the development of drug delivery systems for cancer treatments, as well as cosmetic and food formulations.

  18. Quantitative nanoscale water mapping in frozen-hydrated skin by low-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovlev, Sergey [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Misra, Manoj; Shi, Shanling [Unilever Research and Development, Trumbull, CT 06611 (United States); Firlar, Emre [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Libera, Matthew, E-mail: mlibera@stevens.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Spatially resolved low-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a powerful method to quantitatively determine the water distribution in frozen-hydrated biological materials at high spatial resolution. However, hydrated tissue, particularly its hydrophilic protein-rich component, is very sensitive to electron radiation. This sensitivity has traditionally limited the achievable spatial resolution because of the relatively high noise associated with low-dose data acquisition. We show that the damage caused by high-dose data acquisition affects the accuracy of a multiple-least-squares (MLS) compositional analysis because of inaccuracies in the reference spectrum used to represent the protein. Higher spatial resolution combined with more accurate compositional analysis can be achieved if a reference spectrum is used that better represents the electron-beam-damaged protein component under frozen-hydrated conditions rather than one separately collected from dry protein under low-dose conditions. We thus introduce a method to extract the best-fitting protein reference spectrum from an experimental spectrum dataset. This method can be used when the MLS-fitting problem is sufficiently constrained so that the only unknown is the reference spectrum for the protein component. We apply this approach to map the distribution of water in cryo-sections obtained from frozen-hydrated tissue of porcine skin. The raw spectral data were collected at doses up to 10{sup 5} e/nm{sup 2} despite the fact that observable damage begins at doses as low as 10{sup 3} e/nm{sup 2}. The resulting spatial resolution of 10 nm is 5-10 times better than that in previous studies of frozen-hydrated tissue and is sufficient to resolve sub-cellular water fluctuations as well as the inter-cellular lipid-rich regions of skin where water-mediated processes are believed to play a significant role in the phenotype of keratinocytes in the stratum corneum.

  19. Can the dodecahedral water cluster naturally form in methane aqueous solutions? A molecular dynamics study on the hydrate nucleation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Gang; Li, Meng; Wu, Chang-Hua

    2008-05-21

    By performing a large scale of molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze 60 x 10(6) hydration shells of methane to examine whether the dodecahedral water cluster (DWC) can naturally form in methane aqueous solutions--a fundamental question relevant to the nucleation mechanisms of methane hydrate. The analyzing method is based on identifying the incomplete cages (ICs) from the hydration shells and quantifying their cagelike degrees (zetaC=0-1). Here, the zetaC is calculated according to the H-bond topological network of IC and reflects how the IC resembles the complete polyhedral cage. In this study, we obtain the zetaC distributions of ICs in methane solutions and find the occurrence probabilities of ICs reduce with zetaC very rapidly. The ICs with zetaC>or=0.65 are studied, which can be regarded as the acceptable cagelike structures in appearance. Both increasing the methane concentration and lowering the temperature can increase their occurrence probabilities through slowing down the water molecules. Their shapes, cage-maker numbers, and average radii are also discussed. About 13-14 of these ICs are face saturated, meaning that every edges are shared by two faces. The face-saturated ICs have the potential to act as precursors of hydrate nucleus because they can prevent the encaged methane from directly contacting other dissolved methane when an event of methane aggregation occurs. The complete cages, i.e., the ICs with zetaC=1, form only in the solutions with high methane concentration, and their occurrence probabilities are about 10(-6). Most of their shapes are different from the known hydrate cages, but we indeed observe a standard 5(12)6(2) hydrate cage. We do not find the expected DWC, and its occurrence probability is estimated to be far less than 10(-7). Additionally, the IC analysis proposed in this work is also very useful in other studies not only on the formation, dissociation, and structural transition of hydrates but also on the hydrophobic

  20. Racial/Ethnic and Socioeconomic Disparities in Hydration Status Among US Adults and the Role of Tap Water and Other Beverage Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Carolyn J; Gortmaker, Steven L; Long, Michael W; Cradock, Angie L; Kenney, Erica L

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate whether differences in tap water and other beverage intake explain differences in inadequate hydration among US adults by race/ethnicity and income. We estimated the prevalence of inadequate hydration (urine osmolality ≥ 800 mOsm/kg) by race/ethnicity and income of 8258 participants aged 20 to 74 years in the 2009 to 2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Using multivariable regression models, we estimated associations between demographic variables, tap water intake, and inadequate hydration. The prevalence of inadequate hydration among US adults was 29.5%. Non-Hispanic Blacks (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17, 1.76) and Hispanics (AOR = 1.42; 95% CI = 1.21, 1.67) had a higher risk of inadequate hydration than did non-Hispanic Whites. Lower-income adults had a higher risk of inadequate hydration than did higher-income adults (AOR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.04, 1.45). Differences in tap water intake partially attenuated racial/ethnic differences in hydration status. Differences in total beverage and other fluid intake further attenuated sociodemographic disparities. Racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in inadequate hydration among US adults are related to differences in tap water and other beverage intake. Policy action is needed to ensure equitable access to healthy beverages.

  1. Elimination of urine in response to water intake is consistent in well-hydrated individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Capitán Jiménez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple method has been recently proposed to assess acute hydration status in humans; however, several questions remain regarding its reliability, validity, and practicality. Objective: Establish reliability of a simple method to assess euhydration, that is, to analyze whether this method can be used as a consistent indicator of a person´s hydration status. In addition, the study sought to assess the effect exercise has on urine volume when euhydration is maintained and a standardized volume of water is ingested.Methods: Five healthy physically active men and five healthy physically active women, 22.5 ± 2.3 years of age (mean ± standard deviation reported to the laboratory after fasting for 10 hours or more on three occasions, each one week apart. During the two identical resting euhydration conditions (EuA and EuB, participants remained seated for 45 minutes. During the exercise condition (EuExer, participants exercised intermittently in an environmental chamber (average temperature and relative humidity = 32 ± 3°C and 65 ± 7%, respectively for a period of 45 minutes and drank water to offset loss due to sweating. The order of treatments was randomized. Upon finishing the treatment period, they ingested a volume of water equivalent to 1.43% body mass (BM within 30 minutes. Urine was collected and measured henceforth every 30 minutes for 3 hours.Results: Urine volume eliminated during EuExer (1205 ± 399.5 ml was not different from EuB (1072.2±413.1 ml or EuA (1068 ± 382.87 ml (p-value = 0.44. Both resting conditions were practically identical (p-value = 0.98 and presented a strong intraclass correlation (r = 0.849, p-value = 0.001. Conclusions: This method, besides simple, proved to be consistent in all conditions; therefore, it can be used with the certainty that measurements are valid and reliable.

  2. Interaction of Simple Ions with Water: Theoretical Models for the Study of Ion Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancheff, Jorge S.; Kremer, Carlos; Ventura, Oscar N.

    2009-01-01

    A computational experiment aimed to create and systematically analyze models of simple cation hydrates is presented. The changes in the structure (bond distances and angles) and the electronic density distribution of the solvent and the thermodynamic parameters of the hydration process are calculated and compared with the experimental data. The…

  3. Differential Scanning Calorimetric Study and Potential Model of the Binding of the Primary Water of Hydration to K-Hyaluronate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, K. B.; Marlowe, R. L.; Lukan, A. M.; Lee, S. A.; Anthony, L.; Rupprecht, A.

    1997-11-01

    DSC was performed on samples of K-hyaluronate (KHA) through a temperature range of 25-180^oC. A transition peak was observed which is due to the desorption of the primary water of hydration. The maximum position of the peak was observed to change with different scan rates. The average energy of activation, E_A, and enthalpy for desorption of the primary water of hydration was determined to be 0.62 and 0.17 eV per water molecule, respectively. Analysis of Mossbauer data(G. Albanese et al., Hyperfine Int.,) 95, 97 (1995) allowed us to determine the effective force constant, k_eff, of the water bound to KHA to be approximately 19.4 eV/nm^2. The parameters E_A, ΔH,and k_eff allow us to construct a potential model for the primary water of hydration of KHA. Comparison of these parameters with the same parameters for HA and DNA with different counterions reveal that the energy of activation is similar, as well as the enthalpy change.

  4. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  5. A novel continuous colour mapping approach for visualization of facial skin hydration and transepidermal water loss for four ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegeli, R; Rawlings, A V; Seroul, P; Summers, B

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to develop a novel colour mapping approach to visualize and interpret the complexity of facial skin hydration and barrier properties of four ethnic groups (Caucasians, Indians, Chinese and Black Africans) living in Pretoria, South Africa. We measured transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin capacitance on 30 pre-defined sites on the forehead, cheek, jaw and eye areas of sixteen women (four per ethnic group) and took digital images of their faces. Continuous colour maps were generated by interpolating between each measured value and superimposing the values on the digital images. The complexity of facial skin hydration and skin barrier properties is revealed by these measurements and visualized by the continuous colour maps of the digital images. Overall, the Caucasian subjects had the better barrier properties followed by the Black African subjects, Chinese subjects and Indian subjects. Nevertheless, the two more darkly pigmented ethnic groups had superior skin hydration properties. Subtle differences were seen when examining the different facial sites. There exists remarkable skin capacitance and TEWL gradients within short distances on selected areas of the face. These gradients are distinctive in the different ethnic groups. In contrast to other reports, we found that darkly pigmented skin does not always have a superior barrier function and differences in skin hydration values are complex on the different parts of the face among the different ethnic groups. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  6. Methane Venting in Gas Hydrate Potential Area Offshore of SW Taiwan: Evidence of Gas Analysis of Water Column Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsanyao Frank Yang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Water column samples were collected systematically in several potential gas hydrate areas offshore of SW Taiwan for analysis of dissolved gases. Some these samples show unusually high dissolved methane concentrations at sites A, B, C, and H of cruise ORI-765. The profiles of helium concentrations in the dissolved gases of the water column also exhibit consistent results with an increasing trend toward the seafloor. The 3He/4He ratios range from 0.2 to 0.4 times that of the atmospheric air ratio after air correction, which fall in the range of typical crustal gas composition and are similar to those of on-shore mud volcanoes in SW Taiwan. This indicates that gases are venting actively from the seafloor in the region and may share similar gas sources to on-shore mud volcanoes. The venting gases are considered to have originated from dissociation of gas hydrates and/or a deeper gas reservoir.

  7. Shale hydration inhibition characteristics and mechanism of a new amine-based additive in water-based drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezhman Barati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, shale hydration Inhibition performance of tallow amine ethoxylate as a shale stabilizer in water based drilling fluid, was investigated through these tests: bentonite hydration inhibition test, bentonite sedimentation test, drill cutting recovery test, dynamic linear swelling test, wettability test, isothermal water adsorption test, and zeta potential test. The results showed that bentonite particles are not capable of being hydrated or dispersed in the mediums containing tallow amine ethoxylate; tallow amine ethoxylate had shown a comparable and competitive inhibition performance with potassium chloride as a common shale stabilizer in drilling industry. Some amine functional groups exist in tallow amine ethoxylate structure which are capable of forming hydrogen bonding with surfaces of bentonite particles. This phenomenon decreased the water adsorption on bentonite particles' surfaces which results in reduction of swelling. Tallow amine ethoxylate is also compatible with other common drilling fluid additives. Keywords: Drilling fluids, Dynamic linear swelling, Hydrogen bond, Mechanism, Shale stabilizer, Tallow amine ethoxylate, Wettability, Zeta potential, Amine-based additive

  8. Diffusion and reaction pathways of water near fully hydrated TiO2 surfaces from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Lorenzo; Brandt, Erik G.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.

    2017-07-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are reported for water-embedded TiO2 surfaces to determine the diffusive and reactive behavior at full hydration. A three-domain model is developed for six surfaces [rutile (110), (100), and (001), and anatase (101), (100), and (001)] which describes waters as "hard" (irreversibly bound to the surface), "soft" (with reduced mobility but orientation freedom near the surface), or "bulk." The model explains previous experimental data and provides a detailed picture of water diffusion near TiO2 surfaces. Water reactivity is analyzed with a graph-theoretic approach that reveals a number of reaction pathways on TiO2 which occur at full hydration, in addition to direct water splitting. Hydronium (H3O+) is identified to be a key intermediate state, which facilitates water dissociation by proton hopping between intact and dissociated waters near the surfaces. These discoveries significantly improve the understanding of nanoscale water dynamics and reactivity at TiO2 interfaces under ambient conditions.

  9. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of hydrated electrons near a liquid water surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yo-ichi; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Tomasello, Gaia; Horio, Takuya; Karashima, Shutaro; Mitríc, Roland; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2014-05-09

    We present time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of trapped electrons near liquid surfaces. Photoemission from the ground state of a hydrated electron at 260 nm is found to be isotropic, while anisotropic photoemission is observed for the excited states of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane and I- in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that surface and subsurface species create hydrated electrons in the bulk side. No signature of a surface-bound electron has been observed.

  10. Triple oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of gypsum hydration water for quantitative paleo-humidity reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gázquez, Fernando; Morellón, Mario; Bauska, Thomas; Herwartz, Daniel; Surma, Jakub; Moreno, Ana; Staubwasser, Michael; Valero-Garcés, Blas; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Hodell, David A.

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric relative humidity is an important parameter affecting vegetation yet paleo-humidity proxies are scarce and difficult to calibrate. Here we use triple oxygen (δ17O and δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes of structurally-bound gypsum hydration water (GHW) extracted from lacustrine gypsum to quantify past changes in atmospheric relative humidity. An evaporation isotope-mass-balance model is used together with Monte Carlo simulations to determine the range of climatological conditions that simultaneously satisfy the stable isotope results of GHW, and with statistically robust estimates of uncertainty. We apply this method to reconstruct the isotopic composition of paleo-waters of Lake Estanya (NE Spain) and changes in normalized atmospheric relative humidity (RHn) over the last glacial termination and Holocene (from ∼15 to 0.6 cal. kyrs BP). The isotopic record indicates the driest conditions occurred during the Younger Dryas (YD; ∼12-13 cal. kyrs BP). We estimate a RHn of ∼40-45% during the YD, which is ∼30-35% lower than today. Because of the southward displacement of the Polar Front to ∼42°N, it was both windier and drier during the YD than the Bølling-Allerød period and Holocene. Mean atmospheric moisture gradually increased from the Preboreal to Early Holocene (∼11 to 8 cal. kyrs BP, 50-60%), reaching 70-75% RHn from ∼7.5 cal. kyrs BP until present-day. We demonstrate that combining hydrogen and triple oxygen isotopes in GHW provides a powerful tool for quantitative estimates of past changes in relative humidity.

  11. Toward a microscopic understanding of the calcium–silicate–hydrates/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbert, Christoph [Department of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Grundmeier, Guido; Buitkamp, Nadine; Kröger, Alexander [Technical Chemistry and Coating Science, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Messerschmidt, Florian [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Institut für Mikroverfahrenstechnik, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Thissen, Peter, E-mail: peter.thissen@kit.edu [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Institut für Funktionelle Grenzflächen, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-01-30

    Calcium–Silicate–Hydrates (C–S–H) are the main binding phases in most concrete which is the primarily used composite construction material in the world. However, a big lack is cleaving between the actual knowledge about C–S–H, compared to what could be reached using state-of-the-art technologies of modern research. In this article, the formation of a C–S–H phase on a native oxide covered silicon wafer is investigated by means of in-situ attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR–IR) and ex-situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The total thickness of the C–S–H phase is determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to be 3 nm. The formation appears to be reversible depending on the environment pH value and can be performed at room temperature. Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations, it is shown that the C–S–H phase in the presence of water will change its chemical composition in order to reach the thermodynamic ground state of the system. This change is achieved by a metal–proton exchange reaction. The stoichiometry of these metal–proton exchange reactions is nearly independent of the environment pH value. Electrokinetic measurements yield isoelectric points of 2.0 and 2.6 for the native oxide covered silicon wafer (SiO{sub 2}) and the C–S–H phase. This is consistent with a predominance of Si–O sites at the C–S–H/water interface.

  12. Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men

    OpenAIRE

    Kalman, Douglas S; Feldman, Samantha; Krieger, Diane R; Bloomer, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Sport drinks are ubiquitous within the recreational and competitive fitness and sporting world. Most are manufactured and artificially flavored carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages. Recently, attention has been given to coconut water, a natural alternative to manufactured sport drinks, with initial evidence indicating efficacy with regard to maintaining hydration. We compared coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical perfo...

  13. The Hydrated Electron at the Surface of Neat Liquid Water Appears To Be Indistinguishable from the Bulk Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, Marc P; You, Zhi-Qiang; Herbert, John M

    2016-08-31

    Experiments have suggested that the aqueous electron, e(-)(aq), may play a significant role in the radiation chemistry of DNA. A recent measurement of the energy (below vacuum level) of the putative "interfacial" hydrated electron at the water/vacuum interface, performed using liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy, has been interpreted to suggest that aqueous electrons at the water/biomolecule interface may possess the appropriate energetics to induce DNA strand breaks, whereas e(-)(aq) in bulk water lies too far below the vacuum level to induce such reactions. Other such experiments, however, find no evidence of a long-lived feature at low binding energy. We employ a variety of computational strategies to demonstrate that the energetics of the hydrated electron at the surface of neat liquid water are not significantly different from those of e(-)(aq) in bulk water and as such are incompatible with dissociative electron attachment reactions in DNA. We furthermore suggest that no stable interfacial species may exist at all, consistent with the interpretation of certain surface-sensitive spectroscopy measurements, and that even if a short-lived, metastable species does exist at the vacuum/water interface, it would be extremely difficult to distinguish, experimentally, from e(-)(aq) in bulk water, using either optical absorption or photoelectron spectroscopy.

  14. On the activation energy for the formation of a critical size water cluster in structure I and structure II gas hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Høvring, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering In the present thesis, experiments have been performed in order to study the activation energy for the formation of a stable, critical size water cluster in structure I and structure II gas hydrates. This activation energy represents an energy barrier for the nucleation process forming the required particle (nuclei) size to trigger macroscopic hydrate growth. The experiments were carried out in different laboratory high pressure cells, but of eq...

  15. On the activation energy for the formation of a critical size water cluster in structure I and structure II gas hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Høvring, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    In the present thesis, experiments have been performed in order to study the activation energy for the formation of a stable, critical size water cluster in structure I and structure II gas hydrates. This activation energy represents an energy barrier for the nucleation process forming the required particle (nuclei) size to trigger macroscopic hydrate growth. The experiments were carried out in different laboratory high pressure cells, but of equal size and geometry. Studies were conducte...

  16. PRODUCTION OF HYDRATED ELECTRONS FROM PHOTOIONIZATION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN NATURAL WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under UV irradiation, an important primary photochemical reaction of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is electron ejection, producing hydrated electrons (e-aq). The efficiency of this process has been studied in both fresh and seawater samples with both steady-state scave...

  17. Hydration lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klein, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The hydration lubrication paradigm, whereby hydration layers are both strongly held by the charges they surround, and so can support large pressures without being squeezed out, and at the same time...

  18. Why can water cages adsorb aqueous methane? A potential of mean force calculation on hydrate nucleation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang-Jun; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yi-Gang; Wu, Chang-Hua

    2009-11-28

    By performing constrained molecular dynamics simulations in the methane-water system, we successfully calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) between a dodecahedral water cage (DWC) and dissolved methane for the first time. As a function of the distance between DWC and methane, this is characterized by a deep well at approximately 6.2 A and a shallow well at approximately 10.2 A, separated by a potential barrier at approximately 8.8 A. We investigated how the guest molecule, cage rigidity and the cage orientation affected the PMF. The most important finding is that the DWC itself strongly adsorbs methane and the adsorption interaction is independent of the guests. Moreover, the activation energy of the DWC adsorbing methane is comparable to that of hydrogen bonds, despite differing by a factor of approximately 10% when considering different water-methane interaction potentials. We explain that the cage-methane adsorption interaction is a special case of the hydrophobic interaction between methane molecules. The strong net attraction in the DWC shell with radii between 6.2 and 8.8 A may act as the inherent driving force that controls hydrate formation. A cage adsorption hypothesis for hydrate nucleation is thus proposed and discussed.

  19. The impact of post-exercise hydration with deep-ocean mineral water on rehydration and exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Douglas A; Constantopoulos, Eleni; Konhilas, John P

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration caused by prolonged exercise impairs thermoregulation, endurance and exercise performance. Evidence from animal and human studies validates the potential of desalinated deep-ocean mineral water to positively impact physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we hypothesize that deep-ocean mineral water drawn from a depth of 915 m off the Kona, HI coast enhances recovery of hydration and exercise performance following a dehydrating exercise protocol compared to mountain spring water and a carbohydrate-based sports drink. Subjects (n = 8) were exposed to an exercise-dehydration protocol (stationary biking) under warm conditions (30 °C) to achieve a body mass loss of 3 % (93.4 ± 21.7 total exercise time). During the post-exercise recovery period, subjects received deep-ocean mineral water (Kona), mountain spring water (Spring) or a carbohydrate-based sports drink (Sports) at a volume (in L) equivalent to body mass loss (in Kg). Salivary samples were collected at regular intervals during exercise and post-exercise rehydration. Additionally, each participant performed peak torque knee extension as a measure of lower body muscle performance. Subjects who received Kona during the rehydrating period showed a significantly more rapid return to pre-exercise (baseline) hydration state, measured as the rate of decline in peak to baseline salivary osmolality, compared to Sports and Spring groups. In addition, subjects demonstrated significantly improved recovery of lower body muscle performance following rehydration with Kona versus Sports or Spring groups. Deep-ocean mineral water shows promise as an optimal rehydrating source over spring water and/or sports drink.

  20. Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water using multivariate curve resolution of near-infrared spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba, M. Isabel [Group of Research in Applied Thermal Engineering-CREVER, Mechanical Engineering Dept. (Spain); Larrechi, M. Soledad, E-mail: mariasoledad.larrechi@urv.cat [Analytical and Organic Chemistry Dept., Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Coronas, Alberto [Group of Research in Applied Thermal Engineering-CREVER, Mechanical Engineering Dept. (Spain)

    2016-05-05

    The hydration process of lithium iodide, lithium bromide, lithium chloride and lithium nitrate in water was analyzed quantitatively by applying multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to their near infrared spectra recorded between 850 nm and 1100 nm. The experiments were carried out using solutions with a salt mass fraction between 0% and 72% for lithium bromide, between 0% and 67% for lithium nitrate and between 0% and 62% for lithium chloride and lithium iodide at 323.15 K, 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. Three factors were determined for lithium bromide and lithium iodide and two factors for the lithium chloride and lithium nitrate by singular value decomposition (SVD) of their spectral data matrices. These factors are associated with various chemical environments in which there are aqueous clusters containing the ions of the salts and non-coordinated water molecules. Spectra and concentration profiles of non-coordinated water and cluster aqueous were retrieved by MCR-ALS. The amount of water involved in the process of hydration of the various salts was quantified. The results show that the water absorption capacity increases in the following order LiI < LiBr < LiNO{sub 3} < LiCl. The salt concentration at which there is no free water in the medium was calculated at each one of the temperatures considered. The values ranged between 62.6 and 65.1% for LiBr, 45.5–48.3% for LiCl, 60.4–61.2% for LiI and 60.3–63.7% for LiNO{sub 3}. These values are an initial approach to determining the concentration as from which crystal formation is favored. - Highlights: • Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water. • The absorption capacity of the electrolytes in function of the salt is evaluated. • The lithium salt concentration is estimated when the crystal formation is favored.

  1. The Inhibitory Effect of C-phycocyanin Containing Protein Extract (C-PC Extract) on Human Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in Hepatocellular Cancer Cell Line (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunte, Mugdha; Desai, Krutika

    2017-06-01

    Spirulina platensis :have been studied for several biological activities. In the current study C-phycocyanin containing protein extract (C-PC extract) of Spirulina platensis have been studied for its effect on human matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9) and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2). In the present study, breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB 231) and hepatocellular cancer cell line (HepG2) were examined for inhibition of MMPs at different levels of expression after C-PC extract treatment. Herein, we have demonstrated that C-PC extract significantly reduced activity of MMP-2 by 55.13% and MMP-9 by 57.9% in HepG2 cells at 15 μg concentration. Additionally, the treatment has reduced mRNA expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 at 20 μg concentration by 1.65-folds and 1.66-folds respectively. The C-PC extract treatment have also downregulated a mRNA expression of TIMP-2 by 1.12 folds at 20 μg concentration in HepG2 cells. Together, these results indicate that C-PC, extract successfully inhibited MMP-2 and -9 at different levels of expression and TIMP-2 at a mRNA expression level; however, extract did not have any effect on MMP-1 expressed in MDA-MB231 and TIMP-1 expressed in HepG2 cells as well as the exact mechanism of inhibition of MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-2 remained unclear.

  2. C-Phycocyanin protects against acute tributyltin chloride neurotoxicity by modulating glial cell activity along with its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory property: A comparative efficacy evaluation with N-acetyl cysteine in adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumonto; Siddiqui, Waseem A; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2015-08-05

    Spirulina is a widely used health supplement and is a dietary source of C-Phycocyanin (CPC), a potent anti-oxidant. We have previously reported the neurotoxic potential of tributyltin chloride (TBTC), an environmental pollutant and potent biocide. In this study, we have evaluated the protective efficacy of CPC against TBTC induced neurotoxicity. To evaluate the extent of neuroprotection offered by CPC, its efficacy was compared with the degree of protection offered by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (a well known neuroprotective drug, taken as a positive control). Male Wistar rats (28 day old) were administered with 20mg/kg TBTC (oral) and 50mg/kg CPC or 50mg/kg NAC (i.p.), alone or in combination, and various parameters were evaluated. These include blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage; redox parameters (ROS, GSH, redox pathway associated enzymes, oxidative stress markers); inflammatory, cellular, and stress markers; apoptotic proteins and in situ cell death assay (TUNEL). We observed increased CPC availability in cortical tissue following its administration. Although BBB associated proteins like claudin-5, p-glycoprotein and ZO-1 were restored, CPC/NAC failed to protect against TBTC induced overall BBB permeability (Evans blue extravasation). Both CPC and NAC remarkably reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. NAC effectively modulated redox pathway associated enzymes whereas CPC countered ROS levels efficiently. Interestingly, CPC and NAC were equivalently capable of reducing apoptotic markers, astroglial activation and cell death. This study illustrates the various pathways involved in CPC mediated neuroprotection against this environmental neurotoxicant and highlights its capability to modulate glial cell activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. C-Phycocyanin protects SH-SY5Y cells from oxidative injury, rat retina from transient ischemia and rat brain mitochondria from Ca2+/phosphate-induced impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Prida, Javier; Pentón-Rol, Giselle; Rodrigues, Fernando Postalli; Alberici, Luciane Carla; Stringhetta, Karina; Leopoldino, Andréia Machado; Naal, Zeki; Polizello, Ana Cristina Morseli; Llópiz-Arzuaga, Alexey; Rosa, Marcela Nunes; Liberato, José Luiz; Santos, Wagner Ferreira Dos; Uyemura, Sergio Akira; Pentón-Arias, Eduardo; Curti, Carlos; Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment are essential in the ischemic stroke cascade and eventually lead to tissue injury. C-Phycocyanin (C-PC) has previously been shown to have strong antioxidant and neuroprotective actions. In the present study, we assessed the effects of C-PC on oxidative injury induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, on transient ischemia in rat retinas, and in the calcium/phosphate-induced impairment of isolated rat brain mitochondria (RBM). In SH-SY5Y cells, t-BOOH induced a significant reduction of cell viability as assessed by an MTT assay, and the reduction was effectively prevented by treatment with C-PC in the low micromolar concentration range. Transient ischemia in rat retinas was induced by increasing the intraocular pressure to 120mmHg for 45min, which was followed by 15min of reperfusion. This event resulted in a cell density reduction to lower than 50% in the inner nuclear layer (INL), which was significantly prevented by the intraocular pre-treatment with C-PC for 15min. In the RBM exposed to 3mM phosphate and/or 100μM Ca(2+), C-PC prevented in the low micromolar concentration range, the mitochondrial permeability transition as assessed by mitochondrial swelling, the membrane potential dissipation, the increase of reactive oxygen species levels and the release of the pro-apoptotic cytochrome c. In addition, C-PC displayed a strong inhibitory effect against an electrochemically-generated Fenton reaction. Therefore, C-PC is a potential neuroprotective agent against ischemic stroke, resulting in reduced neuronal oxidative injury and the protection of mitochondria from impairment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Deep-Water Acoustic Anomalies from Methane Hydrate in the Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Warren T.; Barth, Ginger A.; Scholl, David W.; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina

    2015-01-01

    A recent expedition to the central Bering Sea, one of the most remote locations in the world, has yielded observations confirming gas and gas hydrates in this deep ocean basin. Significant sound speed anomalies found using inversion of pre-stack seismic data are observed in association with variable seismic amplitude anomalies in the thick sediment column. The anomalously low sound speeds below the inferred base of methane hydrate stability indicate the presence of potentially large quantities of gas-phase methane associated with each velocity-amplitude anomaly (VAMP). The data acquired are of such high quality that quantitative estimates of the concentrations of gas hydrates in the upper few hundred meters of sediment are also possible, and analyses are under way to make these estimates. Several VAMPs were specifically targeted in this survey; others were crossed incidentally. Indications of many dozens or hundreds of these features exist throughout the portion of the Bering Sea relevant to the U.S. extended continental shelf (ECS) consistent with the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. 

  5. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  6. Influence of supplementary cementitious materials on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime and cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ince, C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is an investigation of the possible role of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime (CL90 and Portland cement (PC mortars. The properties of hydrated lime are significantly different from those of cement and therefore modifying fresh and hardened properties of these mortars are vital for mortar/substrate optimisation in masonry construction. The parameters investigated in this paper often are the main barriers to the use of hydrated lime in construction practice. The results show that transfer sorptivity and time to dewater freshly-mixed hydrated lime mortars can be modified when binder is partially replaced with SCMs. Compressive strength of CL90 mortars is increased systematically with the increased replacement levels of SCMs and the results are supported with the microstructural images. The ability to modify the water transport kinetics and mechanical properties allows compatibility between the mortar and the substrate unit in masonry construction.El objetivo de este artículo es investigar el papel de los materiales cementantes suplementarios (SCMs en la cinética de transporte del agua y en las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros de cal hidratada (CL90 y cemento Portland. Las propiedades de la cal hidratada son significativamente diferentes a las del cemento y por lo tanto el control de las propiedades de los morteros frescos y endurecidos es fundamental en la optimización mortero/substrato en albañilería. Los parámetros estudiados en este trabajo son a menudo las principales barreras para el uso de la cal hidratada en la práctica de la construcción. Los resultados indican que la absortividad y el tiempo necesario para deshidratar morteros de cal hidratada recién mezclados pueden ser controlados cuando el conglomerante es parcialmente remplazado por SCMs. La resistencia a compresión de los morteros CL90 aumenta sistem

  7. Massively parallel molecular dynamics simulation of formation of clathrate-hydrate precursors at planar water-methane interfaces: insights into heterogeneous nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J; Lauricella, Marco; Meloni, Simone

    2014-05-28

    The formation of methane-hydrate precursors at large planar water-methane interfaces has been studied using massively parallel molecular dynamics in systems of varying size from around 10 000 to almost 7 × 10(6) molecules. This process took two distinct steps. First, the concentration of solvated methane clusters increases just inside the aqueous domain via slow diffusion from the methane-water interface, forming "clusters" of solvated methane molecules. Second, the re-ordering process of solvated methane and water molecules takes place in a manner very roughly consistent with the "blob" hypothesis, although with important differences, to form hydrate precursors, necessary for subsequent hydrate nucleation and crystallisation. It was found that larger system sizes serve to promote the formation rate of precursors.

  8. Distribution of B, Cl and Their Isotopes in Pore Waters Separated from Gas Hydrate Potential Areas, Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chun Chao Chen-Feng You

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron (B and chlorine (Cl are widely distributed on the Earth’s surface and show distinctive geochemical behaviors. Cl behaves rather conservatively in oceanic environments while B is an excess-volatile and its distribution is sensitive to sediment absorption and organic matter degradation. The distribution of B, Cl and their isotopes in pore waters provide useful information for distinguishing between shallow circulation and deep origin fluid sources. Thirty-six sediment cores 0 - 5 m in length were sampled from a foreland accretionary prism offshore Southwestern Taiwan where strong bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs and an abundance of mud diapirs were discovered. More than 350 pore water samples were separated and analyzed for B, Cl and other major ions. Four long cores were selected for B and Cl isotopic analysis. We found that the Cl in all cores varied less than 10%, suggesting no major hydrate dissolution or formation involvement at shallow depths in the study area. However, the B concentration changed greatly, ranging between 360 and 650 μM, indicating a possible sedimentary contribution during the early diagenesis stage. The B isotopic compositions were relatively depleted (~25 to 37‰ in these pore waters, implying the addition of sedimentary exchangeable B with low δ11B. The Cl isotopes showed rather large variations, more than 8‰, possibly related to the addition of deep situated fluids. In summary, the chemical and isotopic characteristics of pore waters separated from piston cores off Southwestern Taiwan suggest strong influence from organic matter degradation during diagenesis at shallow depths and the possible addition of deep fluids advecting through mud diapir channels at greater depths, causing a minor degree of hydrate dissolution / formation to occur at shallow depths. Further systematic investigation of pore waters δ18O and δD are needed in a future study.

  9. Direct phase coexistence molecular dynamics study of the phase equilibria of the ternary methane-carbon dioxide-water hydrate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalis, Vasileios K; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-09-14

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to predict the phase equilibrium conditions of a ternary hydrate system. In particular, the direct phase coexistence methodology is implemented for the determination of the three-phase coexistence temperature of the methane-carbon dioxide-water hydrate system at elevated pressures. The TIP4P/ice, TraPPE-UA and OPLS-UA forcefields for water, carbon dioxide and methane respectively are used, in line with our previous studies of the phase equilibria of the corresponding binary hydrate systems. The solubility in the aqueous phase of the guest molecules of the respective binary and ternary systems is examined under hydrate-forming conditions, providing insight into the predictive capability of the methodology as well as the combination of these forcefields to accurately describe the phase behavior of the ternary system. The three-phase coexistence temperature is calculated at 400, 1000 and 2000 bar for two compositions of the methane-carbon dioxide mixture. The predicted values are compared with available calculations with satisfactory agreement. An estimation is also provided for the fraction of the guest molecules in the mixed hydrate phase under the conditions examined.

  10. Hydration and Hydrogen Bond Network of Water during the Coil-to-Globule Transition in Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Aqueous Solution at Cloud Point Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, Keiichiro; Naito, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Tetsuhito; Kondo, Naoshi; Ogawa, Yuichi

    2015-04-30

    Aqueous solutions of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), P-NIPAAm, exhibit a noticeable temperature responsive change in molecular conformation at a cloud point temperature (Tcp). As the temperature rises above Tcp, the extended coil-like P-NIPAAm structure changes into a swollen globule-like conformation as hydration levels decrease and hydrophobic interactions increase. Though water plays an important role in this coil-to-globule transition of P-NIPAAm, the behavior of water molecules and the associated hydrogen-bond (HB) network of the surrounding bulk water are still veiled in uncertainty. In this study, we elucidate changes in the hydration state and the dynamical structure of the water HB network of P-NIPAAm aqueous solutions during the coil-to-globule transition by analyzing the complex dielectric constant in the terahertz region (0.25-12 THz), where bulk water reorientations and intermolecular vibrations of water can be selectively probed. The structural properties of the water HB network were examined in terms of the population of the non-HB water molecules (not directly engaged in the HB network or hydrated to P-NIPAAm) and the tetrahedral coordination of the water molecules engaged in the HB network. We found the hydration number below Tcp (≈10) was decreased to approximately 6.5 as temperature increased, in line with previous studies. The HB network of bulk water becomes more structured as the coil-to-globule phase transition takes place, via decreases in non-HB water and reduction in the orderliness of the tetrahedral HB architecture. Together these results indicate that the coil-to-globule transition is associated with a shift to hydrophobic-dominated interactions that drive thermoresponsive structural changes in the surrounding water molecules.

  11. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  12. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  13. The effect of mineral-based alkaline water on hydration status and the metabolic response to short-term anaerobic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Chycki

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Previously it was demonstrated that mineralization and alkalization properties of mineral water are important factors influencing acid-base balance and hydration in athletes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of drinking different types of water on urine pH, specific urine gravity, and post-exercise lactate utilization in response to strenuous exercise. Thirty-six male soccer players were divided into three intervention groups, consuming around 4.0 l/day of different types of water for 7 days: HM (n=12; highly mineralized water, LM (n=12; low mineralized water, and CON (n=12; table water. The athletes performed an exercise protocol on two occasions (before and after intervention. The exercise protocol consisted of 5 bouts of intensive 60-s (120% VO2max cycling separated by 60 s of passive rest. Body composition, urinalysis and lactate concentration were evaluated – before (t0, immediately after (t1, 5’ (t2, and 30’ (t3 after exercise. Total body water and its active transport (TBW – total body water / ICW – intracellular water / ECW – extracellular water showed no significant differences in all groups, at both occasions. In the post-hydration state we found a significant decrease of specific urine gravity in HM (1021±4.2 vs 1015±3.8 g/L and LM (1022±3.1 vs 1008±4.2 g/L. We also found a significant increase of pH and lactate utilization rate in LM. In conclusion, the athletes hydrated with alkaline, low mineralized water demonstrated favourable changes in hydration status in response to high-intensity interval exercise with a significant decrease of specific urine gravity, increased urine pH and more efficient utilization of lactate after supramaximal exercise.

  14. The effect of mineral-based alkaline water on hydration status and the metabolic response to short-term anaerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chycki, Jakub; Zając, Tomasz; Maszczyk, Adam; Kurylas, Anna

    2017-09-01

    Previously it was demonstrated that mineralization and alkalization properties of mineral water are important factors influencing acid-base balance and hydration in athletes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of drinking different types of water on urine pH, specific urine gravity, and post-exercise lactate utilization in response to strenuous exercise. Thirty-six male soccer players were divided into three intervention groups, consuming around 4.0 l/day of different types of water for 7 days: HM (n=12; highly mineralized water), LM (n=12; low mineralized water), and CON (n=12; table water). The athletes performed an exercise protocol on two occasions (before and after intervention). The exercise protocol consisted of 5 bouts of intensive 60-s (120% VO2max) cycling separated by 60 s of passive rest. Body composition, urinalysis and lactate concentration were evaluated - before (t0), immediately after (t1), 5' (t2), and 30' (t3) after exercise. Total body water and its active transport (TBW - total body water / ICW - intracellular water / ECW - extracellular water) showed no significant differences in all groups, at both occasions. In the post-hydration state we found a significant decrease of specific urine gravity in HM (1021±4.2 vs 1015±3.8 g/L) and LM (1022±3.1 vs 1008±4.2 g/L). We also found a significant increase of pH and lactate utilization rate in LM. In conclusion, the athletes hydrated with alkaline, low mineralized water demonstrated favourable changes in hydration status in response to high-intensity interval exercise with a significant decrease of specific urine gravity, increased urine pH and more efficient utilization of lactate after supramaximal exercise.

  15. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Characterizing the Response of the Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrate Reservoir to Bottom Water Warming Along the Upper Continental Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, Evan A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Johnson, H. Paul [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Salmi, Marie [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Whorley, Theresa [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-11-10

    The objective of this project is to understand the response of the WA margin gas hydrate system to contemporary warming of bottom water along the upper continental slope. Through pre-cruise analysis and modeling of archive and recent geophysical and oceanographic data, we (1) inventoried bottom simulating reflectors along the WA margin and defined the upper limit of gas hydrate stability, (2) refined margin-wide estimates of heat flow and geothermal gradients, (3) characterized decadal scale temporal variations of bottom water temperatures at the upper continental slope of the Washington margin, and (4) used numerical simulations to provide quantitative estimates of how the shallow boundary of methane hydrate stability responds to modern environmental change. These pre-cruise results provided the context for a systematic geophysical and geochemical survey of methane seepage along the upper continental slope from 48° to 46°N during a 10-day field program on the R/V Thompson from October 10-19, 2014. This systematic inventory of methane emissions along this climate-sensitive margin corridor and comprehensive sediment and water column sampling program provided data and samples for Phase 3 of this project that focused on determining fluid and methane sources (deep-source vs. shallow; microbial, thermogenic, gas hydrate dissociation) within the sediment, and how they relate to contemporary intermediate water warming. During the 2014 research expedition, we sampled nine seep sites between ~470 and 520 m water depth, within the zone of predicted methane hydrate retreat over the past 40 years. We imaged 22 bubble plumes with heights commonly rising to ~300 meters below sea level with one reaching near the sea surface. We collected 22 gravity cores and 20 CTD/hydrocasts from the 9 seeps and at background locations (no acoustic evidence of seepage) within the depth interval of predicted downslope retreat of the methane hydrate stability zone. Approximately 300 pore water

  16. Determination of methane concentrations in water in equilibrium with sI methane hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Most submarine gas hydrates are located within the two-phase equilibrium region of hydrate and interstitial water with pressures (P) ranging from 8 to 60 MPa and temperatures (T) from 275 to 293 K. However, current measurements of solubilities of methane in equilibrium with hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase are limited below 20 MPa and 283.15 K, and the differences among these data are up to 30%. When these data were extrapolated to other P-T conditions, it leads to large and poorly known uncertainties. In this study, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to measure methane concentrations in pure water in equilibrium with sI (structure one) methane hydrate, in the absence of a vapor phase, at temperatures from 276.6 to 294.6 (??0.3) K and pressures at 10, 20, 30 and 40 (??0.4%) MPa. The relationship among concentration of methane in water in equilibrium with hydrate, in mole fraction [X(CH4)], the temperature in K, and pressure in MPa was derived as: X(CH4) = exp [11.0464 + 0.023267 P - (4886.0 + 8.0158 P)/T]. Both the standard enthalpy and entropy of hydrate dissolution at the studied T-P conditions increase slightly with increasing pressure, ranging from 41.29 to 43.29 kJ/mol and from 0.1272 to 0.1330 kJ/K ?? mol, respectively. When compared with traditional sampling and analytical methods, the advantages of our method include: (1) the use of in situ Raman signals for methane concentration measurements eliminates possible uncertainty caused by sampling and ex situ analysis, (2) it is simple and efficient, and (3) high-pressure data can be obtained safely. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of carbon isotopic compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in pore waters in two sites of the South China Sea and significances for gas hydrate occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, T.; Jiang, S.Y.; Yang, J.H.; Ge, L. [Nanjing Univ., Nanjing (China). Dept. of Earth Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Mineral Deposits Research and Center for Marine Geochemistry; Wu, N.Y.; Zhang, G.X.; Liu, J. [China Geological Survey, Guangzhou (China). Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey

    2008-07-01

    Although gas hydrates occur world-wide, they are restricted to polar regions and deep-water continental slopes. Hydrate exploration in the South China Sea has provided geological, geophysical and geochemical evidence that supports the occurrence of gas hydrates in the Xisha Trough and Dongsha areas. This paper presented geochemical and isotopic data obtained from both areas. Core water samples were collected in two piston cores and the concentrations of sulfate and carbon isotopic compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were measured. The results showed different geochemical characteristics at the two sites. The core from the Xisha Trough showed relatively constant {delta}13C-DIC values and sulfate concentrations, which suggest that anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) processes did not occur in this site. However, very large variation in {delta}13C-DIC values and sulfate concentrations were found in the core from the Dongsha area. Good linear correlations for sulfate gradients and {delta}13C-DIC values were also observed. The calculated sulfate-methane interface (SMI) depth was 9.6 meters below sea floor (mbsf). These data indicate that an AMO process occurred in sediments with large methane flux from depth in the Dongsha area, which are comparable to other deep-water gas hydrate locations. It was concluded that while both areas are favourable places for the occurrence of gas hydrates, the Dongsha area is considered to be among the best prospecting targets for future gas hydrate on the northern margin of the South China Sea.19 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  19. Distribution of gas hydrate inhibitor monoethylene glycol in condensate and water systems: Experimental measurement and thermodynamic modeling using the cubic-plus-association equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Yussuf, Mustafe A.; Frost, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The deepwater energy sector represents one of the major growth areas of the oil and gas industry today. To meet the challenges of hydrate formation, corrosion, scaling, and foaming, the oil and gas industry uses many chemicals and their use has increased significantly over the years. To inhibit gas...... hydrate formation in subsea pipelines, monoethylene glycol (MEG) and methanol are injected in large amounts. It is important to know the distribution of these chemicals in oil and water systems for economical operation of a production facility and environmental perspective. In this work, we present new...

  20. Crystal structures of hydrates of simple inorganic salts. III. Water-rich aluminium halide hydrates: AlCl3 · 15H2O, AlBr3 · 15H2O, AlI3 · 15H2O, AlI3 · 17H2O and AlBr3 · 9H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Horst; Hennings, Erik; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Water-rich aluminium halide hydrate structures are not known in the literature. The highest known water content per Al atom is nine for the perchlorate and fluoride. The nonahydrate of aluminium bromide, stable pentadecahydrates of aluminium chloride, bromide and iodide, and a metastable heptadecahydrate of the iodide have now been crystallized from low-temperature solutions. The structures of these hydrates were determined and are discussed in terms of the development of cation hydration spheres. The pentadecahydrate of the chloride and bromide are isostructural. In AlI(3) · 15H2O, half of the Al(3+) cations are surrounded by two complete hydration spheres, with six H2O in the primary and 12 in the secondary. For the heptadecahydrate of aluminium iodide, this hydration was found for every Al(3+).

  1. The effects of silica fume and hydrated lime on the strength development and durability characteristics of concrete under hot water curing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is considered to be highly important for preserving continued industrial growth and human development. Concrete, being the world’s largest manufacturing material comprises cement as an essential binding component for strength development. However, excessive production of cement due to high degree of construction practices around the world frames cement as a leading pollutant of releasing significant amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere. To overcome this environmental degradation, silica fume and hydrated lime are used as partial replacements to cement. This paper begins with the examination of the partial replacement levels of hydrated lime and silica fume in concrete and their influence on the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete. The effect of hot water curing on concrete incorporated with both silica fume and hydrated lime is also investigated in this paper. The results reported in this paper show that the use of silica fume as a partial replacement material improved both the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete due to the formation of calcium silica hydrate crystals through the pozzolanic reaction. Although the hydrated lime did not significantly contribute in the development of strength, its presence enhanced the durability of concrete especially at long-term. The results also showed that hot water curing enhanced the strength development of concrete incorporated with silica fume due to the accelerated rate of both the hydration and pozzolanic reaction that takes place between silica fume and calcium hydroxide of the cement matrix particularly at early times. The results reported in this paper have significant contribution in the development of sustainable concrete. The paper does not only address the use of alternative binders as a partial replacement material in concrete but also suggest proper curing conditions for the proposed replacement materials. These practices

  2. Naphthenic acids hydrates of gases: influence of the water/oil interface on the dispersing properties of an acidic crude oil; Acides naphteniques hydrates de gaz de l'interface eau/huile sur les proprietes dispersantes d'un brut acide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arla, D.

    2006-01-15

    Nowadays, the development of offshore oil production under increasing water depths (high pressures and low temperatures) has led oil companies to focus on gas hydrates risks. Hydrates are crystals containing gas and water molecules which can plug offshore pipelines. It has been shown that some asphaltenic crude oils stabilize water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) during several months and exhibit very good anti-agglomerant properties avoiding hydrate plugs formation. In this work, we have studied the 'anti-hydrate' properties of a West African acidic crude oil called crude AH. This oil contains naphthenic acids, RCOOH hydrocarbons which are sensitive to both the pH and the salinity of the water phase.The emulsifying properties of the crude AH have firstly been explored. It has been shown that heavy resins and asphaltenes are the main compounds of the crude AH responsible for the long term stability of the W/O emulsions whereas the napthenates RCOO{sup -} lead to less stable W/O emulsions. Dealing with hydrates, the crude AH exhibits moderate anti-agglomerant properties due to the presence of heavy resins and asphaltenes. However, the naphthenates RCOO{sup -} drastically increase the formation of hydrate plugs. Moreover, it has been pointed out that hydrate particles agglomeration accelerates the kinetics of hydrate formation and enhances the water/oil separation. In order to explain these behaviours, a mechanism of agglomeration by 'sticking' between a hydrate particle and a water droplet has been proposed. Finally, we have developed a model which describes the physico-chemical equilibria of the naphthenic acids in the binary system water/crude AH, in order to transpose the results obtained in the laboratory to the real oil field conditions. (author)

  3. Binding of the water of primary hydration to the sodium and cesium salts of deoxyribonucleic acid and potassium hyaluronate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, K. B.; Lukan, A. M.; Marlowe, R. L.; Lee, S. A.; Anthony, L.; Rupprecht, A.

    1998-08-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to evaluate the average enthalpy of desorption of the water of primary hydration bound to wet-spun films of potassium hyaluronate (KHA) and CsDNA. The enthalpies were measured to be 0.24+/-0.08 eV/H2O molecule for KHA and 0.32+/-0.10 eV/H2O molecule for CsDNA. A Kissinger analysis was used to extract the net activation energy (0.61+/-0.04 eV) for the desorption of this water from KHA by analyzing DSC data acquired at different heating rates. The average effective force constants at 295 K of this water bound to KHA (63+/-3 μdyn/Å) and NaDNA (17+/-4 μdyn/Å) are determined from Rayleigh scattering of Mossbauer radiation data [G. Albanese, A. Deriu, F. Cavatorta, and A. Rupprecht, Hyperfine Interact. 95, 97 (1995)] via a harmonic approximation.

  4. An Evaluation of Common Cleaning Methodologies on the Persistence of a Clinical Isolate of Escherichia coli in Personal Hydration System Water-Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    limited sunlight for two weeks. It was found that only the distilled water reservoir maintained viable organisms. No organisms could be recovered from...Douglas D. Lancaster, COL, DC Army Post Graduate Dental School 3 August 2016 Pages: 4 Words : 1950...Isolate of Escherichia coli in Personal Hydration System Water -Reservoirs CPT Stephanie Helmus DDS*, Jauchia Blythe PhD**, COL Peter Guevara DMD, MAGD

  5. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  6. Nanostructural analysis of water distribution in hydrated multicomponent gels using thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codoni, Doroty; Belton, Peter; Qi, Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Highly complex, multicomponent gels and water-containing soft materials have varied applications in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and food sciences, but the characterization of these nanostructured materials is extremely challenging. The aim of this study was to use stearoyl macrogol-32 glycerides (Gelucire 50/13) gels containing seven different species of glycerides, PEG, and PEG-esters, as model, complex, multicomponent gels, to investigate the effect of water content on the micro- and nanoarchitecture of the gel interior. Thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry were used to probe the thermal and diffusional behavior of water molecules within the gel network. For the highly concentrated gels (low water content), the water activity was significantly lowered due to entrapment in the dense gel network. For the gels with intermediate water content, multiple populations of water molecules with different thermal responses and diffusion behavior were detected, indicating the presence of water in different microenvironments. This correlated with the network architecture of the freeze-dried gels observed using SEM. For the gels with high water content, increased quantities of water with similar diffusion characteristics as free water could be detected, indicating the presence of large water pockets in these gels. The results of this study provide new insights into structure of Gelucire gels, which have not been reported before because of the complexity of the material. They also demonstrate that the combination of thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry offers insights into the structure of soft materials not available by the use of each technique alone. However, we also note that in some instances the results of these measurements are overinterpreted and we suggest limitations of the methods that must be considered when using them.

  7. Effects of rooibos tea, bottled water, and a carbohydrate beverage on blood and urinary measures of hydration after acute dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Alan C; Quindry, John C; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Valiente, J Scott

    2010-04-01

    Rooibos tea contains polyphenol antioxidants, including flavonoids and phenolic acids that are potent free radical scavengers and has purported benefits for accelerated rehydration. The objective was to evaluate the effects of three different drinks (rooibos tea, bottled water, and a carbohydrate beverage) on blood and urinary markers of hydration after acute dehydration in collegiate wrestlers. Twenty-three athletes were recruited and followed a randomized, cross-over design with three different study arms comparing the effectiveness of rooibos tea, carbohydrate beverage (6% or 60 grams l(-1)), or bottled water (placebo) in promoting rehydration after a 3% reduction in body mass. Urine specific gravity (U(sg)) urine (U(osm)) and plasma osmolarity (P(osm)), and plasma volume were measured pre- and post dehydration and at 1-h after rehydration. Statistical analyses utilized a 3 (conditions) x 3 (times) repeated measures analysis of variance to test main effects. Significant interaction effects were found for P(osm) and U(osm), both of which remained below basleline after 1-h rehydration in the rooibos tea and water trials. No significant interaction effects were found for either urine U(sg) or plasma volume shift. The findings of this study demonstrate that rooibos tea was no more effective in promoting rehydration than plain water, with significant changes being found for P(osm) and U(osm) in the carbohydrate/electrolyte solution, in collegiate wrestlers after a 3% reduction in body mass and a rehydration period of 1-h when consuming 100% of their body weight loss.

  8. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  9. Subduction of hydrated basalt of the oceanic crust: Implications for recycling of water into the upper mantle and continental growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Subduction zones are presently the dominant sites on Earth for recycling and mass transfer between the crust and mantle; they feed hydrated basaltic oceanic crust into the upper mantle, where dehydration reactions release aqueous fluids and/or hydrous melts. The loci for fluid and/or melt generation will be determined by the intersection of dehydration reaction boundaries of primary hydrous minerals within the subducted lithosphere with slab geotherms. For metabasalt of the oceanic crust, amphibole is the dominant hydrous mineral. The dehydration melting solidus, vapor-absent melting phase relationships; and amphibole-out phase boundary for a number of natural metabasalts have been determined experimentally, and the pressure-temperature conditions of each of these appear to be dependent on bulk composition. Whether or not the dehydration of amphibole is a fluid-generating or partial melting reaction depends on a number of factors specific to a given subduction zone, such as age and thickness of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, the rate of convergence, and the maturity of the subduction zone. In general, subduction of young, hot oceanic lithosphere will result in partial melting of metabasalt of the oceanic crust within the garnet stability field; these melts are characteristically high-Al2O3 trondhjemites, tonalites and dacites. The presence of residual garnet during partial melting imparts a distinctive trace element signature (e.g., high La/Yb, high Sr/Y and Cr/Y combined with low Cr and Y contents relative to demonstrably mantle-derived arc magmas). Water in eclogitized, subducted basalt of the oceanic crust is therefore strongly partitioned into melts generated below about 3.5 GPa in 'hot' subduction zones. Although phase equilibria experiments relevant to 'cold' subduction of hydrated natural basalts are underway in a number of high-pressure laboratories, little is known with respect to the stability of more exotic hydrous minerals (e.g., ellenbergite) and

  10. Diurnally-Varying Lunar Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Hurley, D.; Retherford, K. D.; Mandt, K.; Greathouse, T. K.; Farrell, W. M.; Vilas, F.

    2016-12-01

    Dayside, non-polar lunar hydration signatures have been observed by a handful of instruments and present insights into the lunar water cycle. In this study, we utilize the unique measurements from the current Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission to study the phenomenon of diurnally-varying dayside lunar hydration. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) onboard LRO senses a strong far-ultraviolet water absorption edge indicating hydration in small abundances in the permanently shadowed regions as well as on the lunar dayside. We report on diurnal variability in hydration in different terrain types. We investigate the importance of different sources of hydration, including solar wind bombardment and meteoroid bombardment, by observing trends during magnetotail and meteor stream crossings.

  11. The water exchange mechanism in thorium (IV) hydrates as studied by quantum chemical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianxiao; Tsushima, Satoru; Suzuki, Atsuyuki

    2003-02-01

    The water exchange mechanisms in [Th(H 2O) 10] 4+ and [Th(H 2O) 9] 4+ along dissociative ( D), associative ( A) and interchange ( I) pathways have been investigated using the ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. Water exchange in [Th(H 2O) 10] 4+ probably proceeds via the D mechanism, the activation energy is 3.06 kcal/mol. The water exchange in [Th(H 2O) 9] 4+ probably proceeds via the A pathway, the activation energy is 3.62 kcal/mol. Deprotonation of one coordinated water molecule of [Th(H 2O) 10] 4+ leads to the formation of hydroxo-aquo complex [Th(OH)(H 2O) 9] 3+, which has a more dissociative mechanism and lower activation energy.

  12. Hydration of AN Acid Anhydride: the Water Complex of Acetic Sulfuric Anhydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, CJ; Huff, Anna; Mackenzie, Becca; Leopold, Ken

    2017-06-01

    The water complex of acetic sulfuric anhydride (ASA, CH_{3}COOSO_{2}OH) has been observed by pulsed nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. ASA is formed in situ in the supersonic jet via the reaction of SO_{3} and acetic acid and subsequently forms a complex with water during the expansion. Spectra of the parent and fully deuterated form, as well as those of the species derived from CH_{3}^{13}COOH, have been observed. The fitted internal rotation barrier of the methyl group is 219.599(21), \\wn indicating the complexation with water lowers the internal rotation barrier of the methyl group by 9% relative to that of free ASA. The observed species is one of several isomers identified theoretically in which the water inserts into the intramolecular hydrogen bond of the ASA. Aspects of the intermolecular potential energy surface are discussed.

  13. Spatial and Orientational Structure of the Hydration Shell of Benzene in Sub- and Supercritical Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Ashu; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-07-09

    The spatial and orientational structure of the solvation shell of benzene in sub- and supercritical water are investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The present study reveals different local organization of water molecules at different parts of the solute. The π-hydrogen-bonding between benzene and water along the axial direction is found to exist even at supercritical conditions although to a reduced extent. The coordination number of benzene decreases substantially on increase of temperature and decrease of density. While the π-hydrogen-bonded part in the axial region shows a slight expansion, the hydrophobically solvated part in the equatorial plane shows an opposite behavior as the temperature is increased from normal to the supercritical temperature. Two other distribution functions, namely the radial/angular and spatial orientational functions (SOFs) are calculated to explore the spatially resolved angular preferences of water molecules around the benzene solute. Water molecules located axial to the benzene are found to have strong inward orientation toward the solute, however an opposite behavior is found in the equatorial region. Although at supercritical conditions, the orientational distributions of water molecules are broadened, the preferential orientations in the axial and equatorial regions remain similar to that under ambient condition on average.

  14. Electrochemical monitoring of the co-extraction of water with hydrated ions into an organic solvent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareček, Vladimír

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 88, MAR 2018 (2018), s. 57-60 ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-09980S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Liquid/liquid interface * Water co-extraction dynamics * Emulsification Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.396, year: 2016

  15. Proton affinities in water of maingroup-element Hydrides - Effects of hydration and methyl substitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M.; Rosler, E.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We have computed the proton affinities in water of archetypal anionic and neutral bases across the periodic table using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. The main purpose of this work is to provide an intrinsically consistent set

  16. Hydrated goethite (alpha-FeOOH) (100) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, S.K.; Waychunas, G.A.; Trainor, T.P.; Eng, P.J.

    2009-12-15

    Goethite({alpha}-FeOOH), an abundant and highly reactive iron oxyhydroxide mineral, has been the subject of numerous stud-ies of environmental interface reactivity. However, such studies have been hampered by the lack of experimental constraints on aqueous interface structure, and especially of the surface water molecular arrangements. Structural information of this type is crucial because reactivity is dictated by the nature of the surface functional groups and the structure or distribution of water and electrolyte at the solid-solution interface. In this study we have investigated the goethite(100) surface using surface diffraction techniques, and have determined the relaxed surface structure, the surface functional groups, and the three dimensional nature of two distinct sorbed water layers. The crystal truncation rod (CTR) results show that the interface structure consists of a double hydroxyl, double water terminated interface with significant atom relaxations. Further, the double hydroxyl terminated surface dominates with an 89% contribution having a chiral subdomain structure on the(100) cleavage faces. The proposed interface stoichiometry is ((H{sub 2}O)-(H{sub 2}O)-OH{sub 2}-OH-Fe-O-O-Fe-R) with two types of terminal hydroxyls; a bidentate (B-type) hydroxo group and a monodentate (A-type) aquo group. Using the bond-valence approach the protonation states of the terminal hydroxyls are predicted to be OH type (bidentate hydroxyl with oxygen coupled to two Fe{sup 3+} ions) and OH{sub 2} type (monodentate hydroxyl with oxygen tied to only one Fe{sup 3+}). A double layer three dimensional ordered water structure at the interface was determined from refinement of fits to the experimental data. Application of bond-valence constraints to the terminal hydroxyls with appropriate rotation of the water dipole moments allowed a plausible dipole orientation model as predicted. The structural results are discussed in terms of protonation and H-bonding at the interface

  17. Hydration states of clays followed by water and hydroxyls vibrational analyses in the near infrared: application to saponite and bentonite systems; Etats d'hydratation d'argiles suivis par analyses vibrationnelles de l'eau et des hydroxyles dans le proche infrarouge: application aux systemes saponite et bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinnert, E

    2004-07-01

    The study of the feasibility of a deep geological disposal facility conducted by ANDRA - the French national radioactive waste management agency -, requires the knowledge of water status and water content in clays. Thanks to an original lab-built device coupling vibrational spectroscopies and water adsorption isotherms, adsorbed water and clay's structure are described quantitatively and qualitatively. A multidisciplinary approach allows the description of hydration mechanisms and water molecules network in the inter lamellar space of synthetic saponites. The effects of density and nature of inter-foliar cations and the influence of temperature on hydration are presented. Using mechanisms and important parameters established on saponites, hydration of bentonite MX80 is carried out. In order to describe and quantify simultaneously two different water states, a simple but relevant method of spectra analysis was developed. (author)

  18. Experimental Study of Methane Hydrates in Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Vyacheslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of gas hydrate formation in porous space of coal has been studied. The experiments conducted have proven the possibility of methane gas hydrate formation in moist coal. It has been demonstrated that the decomposition points of methane gas hydrates in coal are near to the phase equilibrium curve for bulk methane hydrate. Only part of water absorbed by coal can be involved in the methane gas hydrate formation. With the increase in gas pressure increases the amount of gas hydrate formed in natural coal. For formation of hydrates at a positive temperature, the pressure in the system has to be at least 2 MPa. At the same time the speed of formation and decomposition of gas hydrates in coal is big enough.

  19. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    . faulting and fluid migration, and 4. trapping of free gas beneath a hydrate seal. Experiments are being conducted to assess the impact of gas hydrate on sediment behavior, particularly with respect to slope failure and other potential geohazards....K. Paull, R. Matsumoto, P.J. Wallace, and W.P. Dillon (Eds.), Proceedings ODP, Scientific Results, v. 164 College Station, TX (Ocean Drilling Program), pp. 179-191. Dallimore, S. R., T. Uchida, and T. S. Collett, 1999, Summary, in S. R. Dallimore, T...

  20. Shifting Focus: From Hydration for Performance to Hydration for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Erica T

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, literature on hydration biomarkers has evolved considerably - from (de)hydration assessment towards a more global definition of biomarkers of hydration in daily life. This shift in thinking about hydration markers was largely driven by investigating the differences that existed between otherwise healthy individuals whose habitual, ad-libitum drinking habits differ, and by identifying physiological changes in low-volume drinkers who subsequently increase their water intake. Aside from obvious differences in urinary volume and concentration, a growing body of evidence is emerging that links differences in fluid intake with small, but biologically significant, differences in vasopressin (copeptin), glomerular filtration rate, and markers of metabolic dysfunction or disease. Taken together, these pieces of the puzzle begin to form a picture of how much water intake should be considered adequate for health, and represent a shifting focus from hydration for performance, toward hydration for health outcomes. This narrative review outlines the key areas of research in which the global hydration process - including water intake, urinary hydration markers, and vasopressin - has been associated with health outcomes, focusing on kidney and metabolic endpoints. It will also provide a commentary on how various hydration biomarkers may be used in hydration for health assessment. Finally, if adequate water intake can play a role in maintaining health, how might we tell if we are drinking enough? Urine output is easily measured, and can take into account differences in daily physical activity, climate, dietary solute load, and other factors that influence daily water needs. Today, targets have been proposed for urine osmolality, specific gravity, and color that may be used by researchers, clinicians, and individuals as simple indicators of optimal hydration. However, there remain a large number of incomplete or unanswered research questions regarding the

  1. Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Douglas S; Feldman, Samantha; Krieger, Diane R; Bloomer, Richard J

    2012-01-18

    Sport drinks are ubiquitous within the recreational and competitive fitness and sporting world. Most are manufactured and artificially flavored carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages. Recently, attention has been given to coconut water, a natural alternative to manufactured sport drinks, with initial evidence indicating efficacy with regard to maintaining hydration. We compared coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men. Following a 60-minute bout of dehydrating treadmill exercise, 12 exercise-trained men (26.6 ± 5.7 yrs) received bottled water (BW), pure coconut water (VitaCoco®: CW), coconut water from concentrate (CWC), or a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink (SD) [a fluid amount based on body mass loss during the dehydrating exercise] on four occasions (separated by at least 5 days) in a random order, single blind (subject and not investigators), cross-over design. Hydration status (body mass, fluid retention, plasma osmolality, urine specific gravity) and performance (treadmill time to exhaustion; assessed after rehydration) were determined during the recovery period. Subjective measures of thirst, bloatedness, refreshed, stomach upset, and tiredness were also determined using a 5-point visual analog scale. Subjects lost approximately 1.7 kg (~2% of body mass) during the dehydrating exercise and regained this amount in a relatively similar manner following consumption of all conditions. No differences were noted between coconut water (CW or CWC) and SD for any measures of fluid retention (p > 0.05). Regarding exercise performance, no significant difference (p > 0.05) was noted between BW (11.9 ± 5.9 min), CW (12.3 ± 5.8 min), CWC (11.9 ± 6.0 min), and SD (12.8 ± 4.9 min). In general, subjects reported feeling more bloated and experienced greater stomach upset with the CW and CWC conditions. All tested beverages are capable of promoting rehydration and supporting

  2. Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalman Douglas S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sport drinks are ubiquitous within the recreational and competitive fitness and sporting world. Most are manufactured and artificially flavored carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages. Recently, attention has been given to coconut water, a natural alternative to manufactured sport drinks, with initial evidence indicating efficacy with regard to maintaining hydration. We compared coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men. Methods Following a 60-minute bout of dehydrating treadmill exercise, 12 exercise-trained men (26.6 ± 5.7 yrs received bottled water (BW, pure coconut water (VitaCoco®: CW, coconut water from concentrate (CWC, or a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink (SD [a fluid amount based on body mass loss during the dehydrating exercise] on four occasions (separated by at least 5 days in a random order, single blind (subject and not investigators, cross-over design. Hydration status (body mass, fluid retention, plasma osmolality, urine specific gravity and performance (treadmill time to exhaustion; assessed after rehydration were determined during the recovery period. Subjective measures of thirst, bloatedness, refreshed, stomach upset, and tiredness were also determined using a 5-point visual analog scale. Results Subjects lost approximately 1.7 kg (~2% of body mass during the dehydrating exercise and regained this amount in a relatively similar manner following consumption of all conditions. No differences were noted between coconut water (CW or CWC and SD for any measures of fluid retention (p > 0.05. Regarding exercise performance, no significant difference (p > 0.05 was noted between BW (11.9 ± 5.9 min, CW (12.3 ± 5.8 min, CWC (11.9 ± 6.0 min, and SD (12.8 ± 4.9 min. In general, subjects reported feeling more bloated and experienced greater stomach upset with the CW and CWC conditions. Conclusion All tested beverages are

  3. Modeling of Polarization Transfer Kinetics in Protein Hydration Using Hyperpolarized Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihyun; Liu, Mengxiao; Hilty, Christian

    2017-07-13

    Water-protein interactions play a central role in protein structure, dynamics, and function. These interactions, traditionally, have been studied using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by measuring chemical exchange and nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE). Polarization transferred from hyperpolarized water can result in substantial transient signal enhancements of protein resonances due to these processes. Here, we use dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization and flow-NMR for measuring the pH dependence of transferred signals to the protein trypsin. A maximum enhancement of 20 is visible in the amide proton region of the spectrum at pH 6.0, and of 47 at pH 7.5. The aliphatic region is enhanced up to 2.3 times at pH 6.0 and up to 2.5 times at pH 7.5. The time dependence of these observed signals can be modeled quantitatively using rate equations incorporating chemical exchange to amide sites and, optionally, intramolecular NOE to aliphatic protons. On the basis of these two- and three-site models, average exchange (kex) and cross-relaxation rates (σ) obtained were kex = 12 s-1, σ = -0.33 s-1 for pH 7.5 and kex = 1.8 s-1, σ = -0.72 s-1 for pH 6.0 at a temperature of 304 K. These values were validated using conventional EXSY and NOESY measurements. In general, a rapid measurement of exchange and cross-relaxation rates may be of interest for the study of structural changes of the protein occurring on the same time scale. Besides protein-water interactions, interactions with cosolvent or solutes can further be investigated using the same methods.

  4. Distinct role of hydration water in protein misfolding and aggregation revealed by fluctuating thermodynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2015-04-21

    Protein aggregation in aqueous cellular environments is linked to diverse human diseases. Protein aggregation proceeds through a multistep process initiated by conformational transitions, called protein misfolding, of monomer species toward aggregation-prone structures. Various forms of aggregate species are generated through the association of misfolded monomers including soluble oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms and driving forces involved in the misfolding and subsequent association has been a central issue for understanding and preventing protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and type II diabetes. In this Account, we provide a thermodynamic perspective of the misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease through the application of fluctuating thermodynamics. This approach "dissects" the conventional thermodynamic characterization of the end states into the one of the fluctuating processes connecting them, and enables one to analyze variations in the thermodynamic functions that occur during the course of protein conformational changes. The central quantity in this approach is the solvent-averaged effective energy, f = Eu + Gsolv, comprising the protein potential energy (Eu) and the solvation free energy (Gsolv), whose time variation reflects the protein dynamics on the free energy landscape. Protein configurational entropy is quantified by the magnitude of fluctuations in f. We find that misfolding of the Aβ monomer when released from a membrane environment to an aqueous phase is driven by favorable changes in protein potential energy and configurational entropy, but it is also accompanied by an unfavorable increase in solvation free energy. The subsequent dimerization of the misfolded Aβ monomers occurs in two steps. The first step, where two widely separated monomers come into contact distance, is driven by water-mediated attraction, that is, by a

  5. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  6. Study of hydration process on silica hydride surfaces by microcalorimetry and water adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian, Szymon; Rychlicki, Gerhard; Matyska, Maria; Pesek, Joseph; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2014-02-15

    A series of hydrosilated stationary phases were compared with respect to their hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties. The stationary phases were also compared to the bare silica gel used for this synthesis. The investigations were done using microcalorimetric measurements of methanol and acetonitrile heats of immersion. Because these stationary phases are used in both the reversed-phase and aqueous normal phase modes of liquid chromatography, the excess isotherm of water from acetonitrile solution was measured. From the materials tested the highest polarity was exhibited by the silica hydride and the bare silica. The Diamond Hydride is less polar. The highest hydrophobicity is exhibited by the hydrosilated stationary phase which contains bonded octadecyl ligands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  8. Chord length distributions measurements during agglomeration of gas hydrate from a water-in-oil emulsion under laminar flow : simulation and experimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Ba, H.; Cameirao, A.; Herri, J.M. [Ecole des Mine de Saint Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France). Centre SPIN; Darbouret, M. [IFP, Lyon (France). Dept. of Fluid Mechanics; Peytavy, J.L.; Glenat, P. [Total, Pau (France)

    2008-07-01

    Flow loop experiments were conducted to study methane hydrate formation. A focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) was used to analyze in situ particle size and chord length distributions during the crystallization process. The aim of the study was to estimate the fractal parameters of gas hydrate aggregates circulating in a pressurized loop. Results of the analysis showed that hydrate aggregates that appeared during the crystallization of water droplets formed as a result of contact between primary particles and water droplets. The agglomeration process was associated with changes in the mean chord length as well as the appearance of shoulders in the chord length distribution. The agglomerates were modelled as fractal objects comprised of spherical primary particles. An algorithm was developed to simulate chord length distributions of random agglomerates characterized by fractal dimension, primary particle diameter and the number of primary particles. Results of the study showed that the diameter of the primary particles is related to sharp peaks in distribution that corresponded to the mode of the smallest chord lengths. Shoulders in larger chords indicated the compactness of the aggregates through its fractal dimensions and the maximum chord length of the number of primary particles within each agglomerate. 9 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs.

  9. Gas Hydrate Occurrence Inferred from Dissolved Cl− Concentrations and δ18O Values of Pore Water and Dissolved Sulfate in the Shallow Sediments of the Pockmark Field in Southwestern Xisha Uplift, Northern South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Luo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-water pockmarks are frequently accompanied by the occurrence of massive gas hydrates in shallow sediments. A decline in pore-water Cl− concentration and rise in δ18O value provide compelling evidence for the gas hydrate dissociation. Mega-pockmarks are widely scattered in the southwestern Xisha Uplift, northern South China Sea (SCS. Pore water collected from a gravity-core inside of a mega-pockmark exhibits a downward Cl− concentration decrease concomitant with an increase in δ18O value at the interval of 5.7–6.7 mbsf. Concentrations of Cl−, Na+, and K+ mainly cluster along the seawater freshening line without distinct Na+ enrichment and K+ depletion. Thus, we infer that the pore water anomalies of Cl− concentrations and δ18O values are attributed to gas hydrate dissociation instead of clay mineral dehydration. Moreover, the lower δ18O values of sulfate in the target core (C14 than those in the reference core (C9 may be associated with the equilibrium oxygen fractionation during sulfate reduction between sulfate and the relatively 18O-depleted ambient water resulting from gas hydrate formation. The gas hydrate contents are estimated to be 6%–10% and 7%–15%, respectively, according to the offset of Cl− concentrations and δ18O values from the baselines. This pockmark field in southwestern Xisha Uplift is likely to be a good prospective area for the occurrence of gas hydrate in shallow sediments.

  10. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  11. Hydration of portland cement, natural zeolite mortar in water and sulphate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janotka, I.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to characterise sulphate resistance of mortars made from ordinary Portland cement ( PC and Portland-pozzolan cement with 35 wt.% of zeolite addition (zeolite-blended cement-ZBC . Mortars with two different cement types were tested in water and 5% sodium sulphate solution for 720 days. A favourable effect of zeolite on increased sulphate resistance of the cement is caused by decrease in free Ca(OH2 content of the mortar There is not sufficient of Ca(OH2 available for reacting with the sulphate solution to form voluminous reaction products. A decreased C3A, content due to 35 wt.% replacement of PC by zeolite is the next pronounced factor improving resistance of the mortar with such blended cement.

    El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido estudiar la resistencia a los sulfatos de morteros preparados con cemento portland ordinario (PC y cemento portland puzolánico, con un 35% en peso de zeolita (zeolite-blended cement (ZBC. Ambos tipos de morteros fueron conservados en agua y en una disolución de sulfato sódico al 5% durante 720 días. Se observó una mayor resistencia a los sulfatos en el mortero preparado con el cemento que contenía zeolita debido a su menor contenido en Ca(OH2. No hay cantidad suficiente de Ca(OH2 para que se produzca la reacción de los constituyentes de la pasta con la disolución de sulfato sódico y formar así productos de naturaleza expansiva. La disminución en el contenido de C,3A, debida a la sustitución de un 35% en peso de PC por zeolita, es el factor más determinante en el aumento de la resistencia del mortero en los cementos con adición.

  12. Observations related to tetrahydrofuran and methane hydrates for laboratory studies of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction among water molecules, guest gas molecules, salts, and mineral particles determines the nucleation and growth behavior of gas hydrates in natural sediments. Hydrate of tetrahydrofuran (THF) has long been used for laboratory studies of gas hydrate-bearing sediments to provide close control on hydrate concentrations and to overcome the long formation history of methane hydrate from aqueous phase methane in sediments. Yet differences in the polarizability of THF (polar molecule) compared to methane (nonpolar molecule) raise questions about the suitability of THF as a proxy for methane in the study of hydrate-bearing sediments. From existing data and simple macroscale experiments, we show that despite its polar nature, THF's large molecular size results in low permittivity, prevents it from dissolving precipitated salts, and hinders the solvation of ions on dry mineral surfaces. In addition, the interfacial tension between water and THF hydrate is similar to that between water and methane hydrate. The processes that researchers choose for forming hydrate in sediments in laboratory settings (e.g., from gas, liquid, or ice) and the pore-scale distribution of the hydrate that is produced by each of these processes likely have a more pronounced effect on the measured macroscale properties of hydrate-bearing sediments than do differences between THF and methane hydrates themselves.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  14. Hydrate prevention during formation test of gas in deep water; Prevencao de formacao de hidratos durante teste de formacao de poco de gas em lamina d'agua profunda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Renato Cunha [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work shows a scenery of formation test in deep water, for a well of gas, for which, there were made simulations with objective of identifying possible pairs of points (Pressure x Temperature), favorable to the hydrates formation. Besides, they were made comparisons of the values obtained in the simulation with the values registered during the formation test for the well Alfa of the field Beta. Of ownership of those information, we made an evaluation of the real needs of injection of inhibitors with intention of preventing the hydrates formation in each phase of the test. In an including way, the work has as objective recommends the volumes of hydrates inhibitors to be injected in each phase of a test of formation of well of gas in deep water, in way to assure that the operations are made without there is risk of hydrates formation. (author)

  15. Hydration in soccer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo; Guerra Isabela; Barros Turíbio Leite de

    2003-01-01

    Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. Th...

  16. Hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles such as hydrated ions and transient hydrated electrons, the simplest anionic reducing agents in water, and the special hydronium and hydroxide ions at water interfaces play an important role in many fields of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, radiation chemistry, and biology, as well as biochemistry. This article focuses on these species near hydrophobic interfaces of water, such as the air or vacuum interface of water or water protein/membrane interfaces. Ions at interfaces as well as solvated electrons have been reviewed frequently during the past decade. Although all species have been known for some time with seemingly familiar features, recently the picture in all cases became increasingly diffuse rather than clearer. The current account gives a critical state-of-the art overview of what is known and what remains to be understood and investigated about hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

  17. The self-consistent charge density functional tight binding method applied to liquid water and the hydrated excess proton: benchmark simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, C Mark; Aradi, Bálint; Voth, Gregory A

    2010-05-27

    The self-consistent charge density functional tight binding (SCC-DFTB) method is a relatively new approximate electronic structure method that is increasingly used to study biologically relevant systems in aqueous environments. There have been several gas phase cluster calculations that indicate, in some instances, an ability to predict geometries, energies, and vibrational frequencies in reasonable agreement with high level ab initio calculations. However, to date, there has been little validation of the method for bulk water properties, and no validation for the properties of the hydrated excess proton in water. Presented here is a detailed SCC-DFTB analysis of the latter two systems. This work focuses on the ability of the original SCC-DFTB method, and a modified version that includes a hydrogen bonding damping function (HBD-SCC-DFTB), to describe the structural, energetic, and dynamical nature of these aqueous systems. The SCC-DFTB and HBD-SCC-DFTB results are compared to experimental data and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations using the HCTH/120 gradient-corrected exchange-correlation energy functional. All simulations for these systems contained 128 water molecules, plus one additional proton in the case of the excess proton system, and were carried out in a periodic simulation box with Ewald long-range electrostatics. The liquid water structure for the original SCC-DFTB is shown to poorly reproduce bulk water properties, while the HBD-SCC-DFTB somewhat more closely represents bulk water due to an improved ability to describe hydrogen bonding energies. Both SCC-DFTB methods are found to underestimate the water dimer interaction energy, resulting in a low heat of vaporization and a significantly elevated water oxygen diffusion coefficient as compared to experiment. The addition of an excess hydrated proton to the bulk water resulted in the Zundel cation (H(5)O(2)(+)) stabilized species being the stable form of the charge defect, which

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation study of hydration of uranyl nitrate in supercritical water: Dissecting the effect of uranyl ion concentration from solvent density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Manish; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2017-09-01

    All atom molecular dynamics simulations of uranyl ions in supercritical water are used to dissect the effects of concentration of uranyl ions and density of water on various structural and dynamic properties of the solutions. The analyses of radial distribution functions as a function of concentration of the uranyl ion and water density reveal that the effect of the former on the local structure is negligible as compared to the same of the later. The number of hydration water of the uranyl ion has been observed to increase with increasing density of the water, but it decreases with the increasing concentration of the uranyl ions. The orientational distributions are observed to be independent of variation in concentration of the uranyl ion, same as the case was with water density. The translational and rotational dynamics of the water molecules have been investigated from the respective mean squared displacements and time correlation functions. Although increase of both the concentration of the uranyl ions and the density of water reduces translational diffusivity of water as well as uranyl ions, the effect of changing water density is more than that of uranyl concentrations. However, orientational relaxation of various molecular vectors of the water molecule is practically unchanged with any variation in concentration of the uranyl ions and it changes only slightly with the change in water density. Unlike at ambient condition, orientational dynamics at supercritical conditions remains virtually unchanged with the change in uranyl ion concentration.

  19. Perturbation of second and farther hydration shells of alkali cations and bromide in concentrated aqueous protein as a water-shortage medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Takumi; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2008-09-25

    The Gibbs free energies of transfer of selected ions from water to concentrated aqueous ovalbumin and albumin (DeltaW(W') G degrees j) have been determined by ion-transfer voltammetry. Negative values for the tetrabutylammonium ion suggest its direct binding to ovalbumin. In contrast, for alkali cations and bromide, the DeltaW(W') G degrees j values are positive and increase with increasing ovalbumin concentration. Positive values are confirmed for concentrated aqueous albumin and poly(styrenesulfonate) as well. The largest value (ca. 10 kJ mol(-1)) is found for the transfer of K(+) from water to 30 wt % ovalbumin. To reveal the solvation structure of these ions in ovalbumin solutions, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements have been performed at the K, Rb, and Br K-edges. Interestingly, the spectra obtained in 30 wt % ovalbumin solutions are identical to those for the corresponding hydrated ions. This strongly suggests that the first coordination shell structures of these ions are not affected by a large concentration of ovalbumin. The detected positive free energy of transfer is slightly lower than the hydrogen bonding energy of a water molecule and should thus come from the perturbation of the second and farther hydration shells of the ions under a water-shortage condition caused by a high concentration of ovalbumin.

  20. Initiation of gas-hydrate pockmark in deep-water Nigeria: Geo-mechanical analysis and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboulot, V.; Sultan, N.; Imbert, P.; Ker, S.

    2016-01-01

    A review of recent literature shows that two geomorphologically different types of pockmarks, contribute to gas seepage at the seafloor. Type-1 pockmarks are defined as seafloor craters associated to fluid seepage and are the most classical type referred to as ;pockmarks; in the literature. In contrast, Type-2 pockmarks reveal a complex seafloor morphology that may result from the formation/decomposition of gas hydrates in underlying sedimentary layers. Interpretation of very-high-resolution seismic data, sedimentological analyses and geotechnical measurements acquired from the Eastern Niger Submarine Delta reveal that Type-2 pockmarks are associated to the presence at depth of a conical body of massive gas hydrates. Based on acquired data, theoretical analysis and numerical modelling, it was possible to propose a novel geo-mechanical mechanism controlling the irregular seafloor deformations associated to Type-2 pockmark and to show that pockmark shapes and sizes are directly linked to the initial growth and distribution of sub-seafloor gas hydrates. The study illustrates the role of gas hydrates formation in the fracturation, deformation of the subsurface sediment and the formation of Type-2 pockmarks.

  1. Thermal properties of methane gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, William F.

    2007-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline solids in which molecules of a “guest” species occupy and stabilize cages formed by water molecules. Similar to ice in appearance (fig. 1), gas hydrates are stable at high pressures and temperatures above freezing (0°C). Methane is the most common naturally occurring hydrate guest species. Methane hydrates, also called simply “gas hydrates,” are extremely concentrated stores of methane and are found in shallow permafrost and continental margin sediments worldwide. Brought to sea-level conditions, methane hydrate breaks down and releases up to 160 times its own volume in methane gas. The methane stored in gas hydrates is of interest and concern to policy makers as a potential alternative energy resource and as a potent greenhouse gas that could be released from sediments to the atmosphere and ocean during global warming. In continental margin settings, methane release from gas hydrates also is a potential geohazard and could cause submarine landslides that endanger offshore infrastructure. Gas hydrate stability is sensitive to temperature changes. To understand methane release from gas hydrate, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a laboratory investigation of pure methane hydrate thermal properties at conditions relevant to accumulations of naturally occurring methane hydrate. Prior to this work, thermal properties for gas hydrates generally were measured on analog systems such as ice and non-methane hydrates or at temperatures below freezing; these conditions limit direct comparisons to methane hydrates in marine and permafrost sediment. Three thermal properties, defined succinctly by Briaud and Chaouch (1997), are estimated from the experiments described here: - Thermal conductivity, λ: if λ is high, heat travels easily through the material. - Thermal diffusivity, κ: if κ is high, it takes little time for the temperature to rise in the material. - Specific heat, cp: if cp is high, it takes a great deal of heat to

  2. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  3. New insight into probe-location dependent polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces: comparison between gel- and fluid-phases of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Moirangthem Kiran; Shweta, Him; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan

    2016-09-21

    Environment polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces play important roles in membrane biology, which are investigated here using a new homologous series of 4-aminophthalimide-based fluorescent molecules (4AP-Cn; n = 2-10, 12) having different lipophilicities (octanol/water partition coefficient - log P). We show that 4AP-Cn molecules probe a peculiar stepwise polarity (E) profile at the lipid/water interface of the gel-phase (Lβ') DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature, which was not anticipated in earlier studies. However, the same molecules probe only a subtle but continuous polarity change at the interface of water and the fluid-phase (Lα) DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature. Fluorescence quenching experiments indicate that solutes with different log P values adsorb at different depths across DPPC/water and DOPC/water interfaces, which correlate with the polarity profiles observed at the interfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations performed on eight probe-lipid systems (four in each of the DPPC and DOPC bilayers - a total run of 2.6 μs) support experimental results, providing further information on the relative position and angle distributions as well as hydration of probes at the interfaces. Simulation results indicate that besides positions, probe orientations also play an important role in defining the local dielectric environment by controlling the probes' exposure to water at the interfaces especially of the gel-phase DPPC bilayer. The results suggest that 4AP-Cn probes are well suited for studying solvation properties at lipid/water interfaces of gel- and fluid-phases simultaneously.

  4. Microstructure and Physical Properties of Sulfate Hydrate/Ice Eutectic Aggregates in the Binary System Sodium-Sulfate/Water at Planetary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C. M.; Kirby, S.; Durham, W.; Stern, L.

    2004-12-01

    Reflectance spectra data from Mars Odyssey, Galileo and potentially from Cassini suggest the presence of hydrated salts on numerous satellites in environments such as evaporate beds or combined with water ice. Improved mission data on these occurrences indicate that grain structures and properties of such materials merit a closer look using laboratory methods. Here we report the synthesis of a two-phase aggregate of sodium sulfate hydrate and water ice made by eutectic solidification from solution, characterization of its microstructure using cryogenic SEM, and comparison of its physical properties to those of its end-member components. Samples are crystallized from solution using a precision cryobath and seeded growth. The reaction is a "simple" one meaning that there is no solid solution formation in either of the two solid phases. The eutectic composition we studied for the sodium sulfate hydrate is 4wt% Na2SO4, which corresponds to about .06 volume fraction of Na2SO4ṡ10H2O, mirabilite, and .94 ice I. The eutectic microstructure observed with this volume fraction, which is termed "broken lamellar", consists of fairly uniform blade-like mirabilite grains arranged in roughly parallel columns within a water ice matrix. The blades and matrix material form a lamella that alternates with lamellae of pure ice. Energy dispersive spectroscopy of these eutectic mixtures confirms the presence of the two crystalline phases. Also, we find that lamellar spacing decreases with increasing growth rate. Constant-strain-rate tests in compression are carried out in the cryogenic gas deformation apparatus at LLNL in a pressure-temperature range appropriate to the icy satellites. We report the rheology of the two-phase aggregate and compare it to the strength properties of pure water ice and pure mirabilite. With the aid of numerous studies on similar structures in the literature on metals, we analyze the deformation mechanics from the perspective of defect and crack propagation

  5. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  6. Coconut Water Does Not Improve Markers of Hydration During Sub-maximal Exercise and Performance in a Subsequent Time Trial Compared with Water Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Daniel J; Hensby, Andy; Shaw, Matthew P

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare markers of hydration during submaximal exercise and subsequent time trial performance when consuming water (PW) or coconut water (CW). There was also a secondary aim to assess the palatability of CW during exercise and voluntary intake during intense exercise. 10 males (age 27.9 ± 4.9 years, body mass 78.1 ± 10.1kg, average max minute power 300.2 ± 28.2W) completed 60-min of submaximal cycling followed by a 10-km time trial on two occasions. During these trials participants consumed either PW or CW in a randomized manner, drinking a 250 ml of the assigned drink between 10-15 min, 25-30 min and 40-45 min, and then drinking ad libitum from 55-min until the end of the time trial. Body mass and urine osmolality were recorded preexercise and then after 30-min, 60-min, and post time trial. Blood glucose, lactate, heart rate, rate of perceived exertion (RPE; 6-20) and ratings of thirst, sweetness, nausea, fullness and stomach upset (1 =very low/none, 5= very high) were recorded during each drink period. CW did not significantly improve time trial performance compared with PW (971.4 ± 50.5 and 966.6 ± 44.8 s respectively; p = .698) and there was also no significant differences between trials for any of the physiological variables measured. However there were subjective differences between the beverages for taste, resulting in a significantly reduced volume of voluntary intake in the CW trial (115 ± 95.41 ml and 208.7 ± 86.22 ml; p < .001).

  7. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  8. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...... of hydration and with temperature for the 50% sample. The 10% water sample was relatively insensitive to temperature variation. The results indicate that hydrated DNA containing up to 10% water behaves as a rigid crystalline solid but that the rigidity markedly decreases with a further increase in water...

  9. Natural Gas Hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Ersland, Geir

    2010-01-01

    The experimental set-up with the MRI monitoring apparatus was capable of forming large quantities of methane hydrates in sandstone pores and monitor hydrate growth patterns for various initial conditions. Spontaneous conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate occurred when methane hydrate, in porous media, was exposed to liquid carbon dioxide. The MRI images did not detect any significant increase in signal in the hydrate saturated cores that would indicate the presence of free w...

  10. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  11. Elevated Serum Osmolality and Total Water Deficit Indicate Impaired Hydration Status in Long Term Care Residents Regardless of Low or High Body Mass Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Melissa Ventura; Hudson, Abbie L.; Hollingsworth, Emily K.; Long, Emily; Kuertz, Britt; Simmons, Sandra F.; Shotwell, Matthew S.; Silver, Heidi J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dehydration is typically associated with underweight and malnutrition in long term care (LTC) settings. Evidence is lacking regarding the influence of the rising prevalence of overweight and obesity on risk factors, prevalence and presentation of dehydration. Objective The aim of this study was to objectively assess hydration status and the adequacy of total water intake, and determine relationships between hydration status, total water intake, and body mass index (BMI) in LTC residents. Design A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data was performed. Participants and setting Baseline data from 247 subjects recruited from 8 community-based LTC facilities participating in two randomized trials comparing nutrient and cost efficacy of between-meal snacks versus oral nutrition supplements. Main outcomes Hydration status was assessed by serum osmolality concentration and total water intakes were quantified by weighed food, beverage, water and oral nutrition supplement (ONS) intake. Statistical analyses Simple and multiple linear regression methods were applied. Results Forty-nine (38.3%) subjects were dehydrated (>300 mOsm/kg) and another 39 (30.5%) had impending dehydration (295–300 mOsm/kg). The variance in serum osmolality was significantly accounted for by blood urea nitrogen level, mental status score, and having diabetes (R2 = 0.46, P < 0.001). Total water intake averaged 1147.2 ± 433.1 mL/d. Thus, 96–100% subjects did not meet estimated requirements, with a deficit range of 700–1800 mL/d. The variance in total water intake was significantly accounted for by type of liquid beverages (thin vs thick), type of ONS, total energy intake, total activities of daily living dependence, sex and BMI (R2 = 0.56, P < 0.001). Conclusions Dehydration and inadequate total water intake is prevalent in LTC residents across all BMI categories. Type of liquid beverages, type of ONS, and type of between-meal snacks are factors that could be targeted for nutrition

  12. Thermodynamic properties of methane hydrate in quartz powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, Vitaly P; Gorodetskii, Evgeny E; Safonov, Sergey S

    2007-10-04

    Using the experimental method of precision adiabatic calorimetry, the thermodynamic (equilibrium) properties of methane hydrate in quartz sand with a grain size of 90-100 microm have been studied in the temperature range of 260-290 K and at pressures up to 10 MPa. The equilibrium curves for the water-methane hydrate-gas and ice-methane hydrate-gas transitions, hydration number, latent heat of hydrate decomposition along the equilibrium three-phase curves, and the specific heat capacity of the hydrate have been obtained. It has been experimentally shown that the equilibrium three-phase curves of the methane hydrate in porous media are shifted to the lower temperature and high pressure with respect to the equilibrium curves of the bulk hydrate. In these experiments, we have found that the specific heat capacity of the hydrate, within the accuracy of our measurements, coincides with the heat capacity of ice. The latent heat of the hydrate dissociation for the ice-hydrate-gas transition is equal to 143 +/- 10 J/g, whereas, for the transition from hydrate to water and gas, the latent heat is 415 +/- 15 J/g. The hydration number has been evaluated in the different hydrate conditions and has been found to be equal to n = 6.16 +/- 0.06. In addition, the influence of the water saturation of the porous media and its distribution over the porous space on the measured parameters has been experimentally studied.

  13. An oil-soluble extract of Rubus idaeus cells enhances hydration and water homeostasis in skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tito, A; Bimonte, M; Carola, A; De Lucia, A; Barbulova, A; Tortora, A; Colucci, G; Apone, F

    2015-12-01

    Raspberry plants, belonging to the species of Rubus idaeus, are known for their excellent therapeutic properties as they are particularly rich in compounds with strong antioxidant activity, which promote health and well-being of human cells. Besides their high content of phenolic compounds, Rubus plants are rich in oil-soluble compounds, which are also primary components of the hydrolipidic film barrier of the skin. As plant cell cultures represented a valuable system to produce interesting compounds and ingredients for cosmetic applications, we developed liquid suspension cultures from Rubus idaeus leaves and used them to obtain an active ingredient aimed at improving hydration and moisturization capacity in the skin. Rubus idaeus cells, grown in the laboratory under sterile and controlled conditions as liquid suspension cultures, were processed to obtain an oil-soluble (liposoluble) extract, containing phenolic compounds and a wide range of fatty acids. The extract was tested on cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts and then on the skin in vivo, to assess its cosmetic activities. When tested on skin cell cultures, the extract induced the genes responsible for skin hydration, such as aquaporin 3, filaggrin, involucrin and hyaluronic acid synthase, and stimulated the expression and the activity of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, involved in ceramide production. Moreover, the liposoluble extract increased the synthesis of the extracellular matrix components in cultured fibroblasts and showed a remarkable skin-hydrating capacity when tested on human skin in vivo. Thanks to these activities, the Rubus idaeus liposoluble extract has several potential applications in skin care cosmetics: it can be used as hydrating and moisturizing ingredient in face and body lotions, and as anti-ageing product in face creams specifically designed to fight wrinkle formation. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  14. [Progress in Raman spectroscopic measurement of methane hydrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Li-hua; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Long-jun

    2009-09-01

    Complex thermodynamics and kinetics problems are involved in the methane hydrate formation and decomposition, and these problems are crucial to understanding the mechanisms of hydrate formation and hydrate decomposition. However, it was difficult to accurately obtain such information due to the difficulty of measurement since methane hydrate is only stable under low temperature and high pressure condition, and until recent years, methane hydrate has been measured in situ using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy, a non-destructive and non-invasive technique, is used to study vibrational modes of molecules. Studies of methane hydrate using Raman spectroscopy have been developed over the last decade. The Raman spectra of CH4 in vapor phase and in hydrate phase are presented in this paper. The progress in the research on methane hydrate formation thermodynamics, formation kinetics, decomposition kinetics and decomposition mechanism based on Raman spectroscopic measurements in the laboratory and deep sea are reviewed. Formation thermodynamic studies, including in situ observation of formation condition of methane hydrate, analysis of structure, and determination of hydrate cage occupancy and hydration numbers by using Raman spectroscopy, are emphasized. In the aspect of formation kinetics, research on variation in hydrate cage amount and methane concentration in water during the growth of hydrate using Raman spectroscopy is also introduced. For the methane hydrate decomposition, the investigation associated with decomposition mechanism, the mutative law of cage occupancy ratio and the formulation of decomposition rate in porous media are described. The important aspects for future hydrate research based on Raman spectroscopy are discussed.

  15. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  16. Kinetics of formation and dissociation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakov, A. Yu; Penkov, N. V.; Rodionova, T. V.; Nesterov, A. N.; Fesenko, E. E., Jr.

    2017-09-01

    The review covers a wide range of issues related to the nucleation, growth and dissociation of gas hydrates. The attention is focused on publications of the last 10-15 years. Along with the mathematical models used to describe these processes, the results of relevant experimental studies are surveyed. Particular sections are devoted to the gas hydrate self-preservation effect, the water memory effect in the hydrate formation, development of catalysts for hydrate formation and the effect of substances dissolved in the aqueous phase on the formation of hydrates. The main experimental techniques used to study gas hydrates are briefly considered. The bibliography includes 230 references.

  17. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  18. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. Hydrated electron, supplemental data. [Reactions with transients from water, with inorganic solutes, and with solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, A.B.

    1975-06-01

    A compilation of rates of reactions of hydrated electrons with other transients and with organic and inorganic solutes in aqueous solution appeared in NSRDS-NBS 43, and covered the literature up to early 1971. This supplement includes additional rates which have been published through July 1973.

  19. Amorphous boron-doped sodium titanates hydrates: Efficient and reusable adsorbents for the removal of Pb{sup 2+} from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Bitonto, Luigi; Volpe, Angela; Pagano, Michele; Bagnuolo, Giuseppe; Mascolo, Giuseppe [CNR-IRSA, Via de Blasio 5, 70132 Bari (Italy); La Parola, Valeria [CNR-ISMN, Via U. La Malfa, 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Di Leo, Paola [CNR-IMAA, Via S. Loja, Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy); Pastore, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.pastore@ba.irsa.cnr.it [CNR-IRSA, Via de Blasio 5, 70132 Bari (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Amorphous B-doped sodium titanates hydrates were mildly synthesized. • These compounds resulted efficiently used in removing Pb{sup 2+} from natural water. • Adsorption occurs with a partial ionic exchange mechanism. • Adsorbents were easily recoverable and reusable for further new cycles. - Abstract: Amorphous titanium hydroxide and boron-doped (B-doped) sodium titanates hydrates were synthetized and used as adsorbents for the removal of Pb{sup 2+} from water. The use of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) and titanium(IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) as precursors permits a very easy synthesis of B-doped adsorbents at 298 K. The new adsorbent materials were first chemically characterized (XRD, XPS, SEM, DRIFT and elemental analysis) and then tested in Pb{sup 2+} adsorption batch experiments, in order to define kinetics and equilibrium studies. The nature of interaction between such sorbent materials and Pb{sup 2+} was also well defined: besides a pure adsorption due to hydroxyl interaction functionalities, there is also an ionic exchange between Pb{sup 2+} and sodium ions even working at pH 4.4. Langmuir model presented the best fitting with a maximum adsorption capacity up to 385 mg/g. The effect of solution pH and common ions (i.e. Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}) onto Pb{sup 2+} sorption were also investigated. Finally, recovery was positively conducted using EDTA. Very efficient adsorption (>99.9%) was verified even using tap water spiked with traces of Pb{sup 2+} (50 ppb).

  20. HYDRATION IN THE SAND SHRIMP CRANGON SEPTEMSPINOSA: RELATION TO DIET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, J Ross; Jeffries, H Perry

    1976-06-01

    Tissue hydration in the estuarine sand shrimp Crangon septemspinosa is correlated with nutritional conditions. Hydration levels of shrimp who are ingesting food remain normal. In starved shrimp or in individuals who are not ingesting adequate amounts of food, hydration levels are high. Presumably, water replaces metabolized tissues.

  1. Investigation of water mobility and diffusivity in hydrating micronized low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, and hydroxypropyl cellulose matrix tablets by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Masazumi; Nakagami, Hiroaki [Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co., Tokyo (Japan). Pharmaceutical Technology Research Lab.

    2002-12-01

    The water mobility and diffusivity in the gel-layer of hydrating low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (LH41) tablets with or without a drug were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compared with those properties in the gel-layer of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) tablets. For this purpose, a localized image-analysis method was newly developed, and the spin-spin relaxation time (T{sub 2}) and apparent self-diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water in the gel-layer were visualized in one-dimensional maps. Those maps showed that the extent of gel-layer growth in the tablets was in the order of HPC>HPMC>>LH41, and there was a water mobility gradient across the gel-layers of all three tablet formulations. The T{sub 2} and ADC in the outer parts of the gel-layers were close to those of free water. In contrast, these values in the inner parts of the gel-layer decreased progressively; suggesting that the water mobility and diffusivity around the core interface were highly restricted. Furthermore, the correlation between the T{sub 2} of {sup 1}H proton in the gel-layer of the tablets and the drug release rate from the tablets was observed. (author)

  2. Hydrated-electron population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, MS; Baltuska, A; Wiersma, DA; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Baltuška, Andrius

    2004-01-01

    A detailed frequency-resolved pump-probe study of hydrated electron dynamics, performed with 5-fs pulses, is presented. We show that the experimental data can be successfully described with a model in which the excited state lifetime is similar to50 fs in regular water and similar to70 A in heavy

  3. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  4. Rapid rates of aerobic methane oxidation at the feather edge of gas hydrate stability in the waters of Hudson Canyon, US Atlantic Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonte, Mihai; Kessler, John D.; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Arrington, Eleanor C.; Valentine, David L.; Sylva, Sean P.

    2017-05-01

    Aerobic oxidation is an important methane sink in seawater overlying gas seeps. Recent surveys have identified active methane seeps in the waters of Hudson Canyon, US Atlantic Margin near the updip limit of methane clathrate hydrate stability. The close proximity of these seeps to the upper stability limit of methane hydrates suggests that changing bottom water temperatures may influence the release rate of methane into the overlying water column. In order to assess the significance of aerobic methane oxidation in limiting the atmospheric expression of methane released from Hudson Canyon, the total extent of methane oxidized along with integrated oxidation rates were quantified. These calculations were performed by combining the measurements of the natural levels of methane concentrations, stable carbon isotopes, and water current velocities into kinetic isotope models yielding rates ranging from 22.8 ± 17 to 116 ± 76 nM/day with an average of 62.7 ± 37 nM/day. Furthermore, an average of 63% of methane released into the water column from an average depth of 515 m was oxidized before leaving this relatively small study area (6.5 km2). Results from the kinetic isotope model were compared to previously-published but concurrently-sampled ex situ measurements of oxidation potential performed using 13C-labeled methane. Ex situ rates were substantially lower, ranging from 0.1 to 22.5 nM/day with an average of 5.6 ± 2.3 nM/day, the discrepancy likely due to the inherent differences between these two techniques. Collectively, the results reveal exceptionally-rapid methane oxidation, with turnover times for methane as low as 0.3-3.7 days, indicating that methane released to the water column is removed quantitatively within the greater extent of Hudson Canyon. The red line represents the original Rayleigh model output, Eq. (1), detailed in the text. The red line represents the original Rayleigh model output, Eq. (1), detailed in the text.

  5. Modeling the fate of methane hydrates under global warming

    OpenAIRE

    Kretschmer, Kerstin; Biastoch, Arne; Rüpke, Lars; Burwicz, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Large amounts of methane hydrate locked up within marine sediments are vulnerable to climate change. Changes in bottom water temperatures may lead to their destabilization and the release of methane into the water column or even the atmosphere. In a multimodel approach, the possible impact of destabilizing methane hydrates onto global climate within the next century is evaluated. The focus is set on changing bottom water temperatures to infer the response of the global methane hydrate invento...

  6. Hydration education: developing, piloting and evaluating a hydration education package for general practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCotter, L; Douglas, P; Laur, C; Gandy, J; Fitzpatrick, L; Rajput-Ray, M; Ray, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To (1) assess the hydration knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of doctors; (2) develop an evidence-based training package; and (3) evaluate the impact of the training package. Design Educational intervention with impact evaluation. Setting Cambridgeshire, UK. Participants General practitioners (GPs (primary care physicians)). Interventions Hydration and healthcare training. Main outcome measures Hydration KAP score before and immediately after the training session. Results Knowledge gaps of doctors identified before the teaching were the definition of dehydration, European Food Safety Authority water intake recommendations, water content of the human body and proportion of water from food and drink. A face-to-face teaching package was developed on findings from the KAP survey and literature search. 54 questionnaires were completed before and immediately after two training sessions with GPs. Following the training, total hydration KAP scores increased significantly (phydration care to allow policymakers to incorporate hydration awareness and care with greater precision in local and national policies. PMID:27927656

  7. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  8. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  9. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  10. Variation of corneal refractive index with hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young L; Walsh, Joseph T Jr.; Goldstick, Thomas K; Glucksberg, Matthew R [Biomedical Engineering Department, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2004-03-07

    We report the effect of changes in the corneal hydration on the refractive index of the cornea. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT), the geometrical thickness and the group refractive index of the bovine cornea were derived simultaneously as the corneal hydration was varied. The corneal hydration was then calculated from the corneal thickness. The group refractive index of the cornea increased non-linearly as the cornea dehydrated. In addition, a simple mathematical model was developed, based on the assumption that changes in corneal hydration occur only in the interfibrilar space with constant water content within the collagen fibrils. Good agreement between the experimental results and the mathematical model supports the assumption. The results also demonstrate that the measurement of refractive index is a quantitative indicator of corneal hydration.

  11. Production of Hydrated Metal Ions by Fast Ion or Atom Beam Sputtering. Collision-Induced Dissociation and Successive Hydration Energies of Gaseous Cu+ with 1-4 Water Molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnera, Thomas F.; David, Donald E.; Stulik, Dusan; Orth, Robert G.; Jonkman, Harry T.; Michl, Josef

    1989-01-01

    Low-temperature sputtering of frozen aqueous solutions of metal salts, of hydrated crystalline transition-metal salts, of frosted metal surfaces, and of frosted metal salts with kiloelectronvolt energy rare gas atoms or ions produces copious amounts of cluster ions, among which M+(H2O)n and/or

  12. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  13. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  14. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  15. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  16. Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau of Economic Geology

    2009-04-30

    The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability

  17. Effects of hydration on plasma copeptin, glycemia and gluco-regulatory hormones: a water intervention in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enhörning, Sofia; Tasevska, Irina; Roussel, Ronan; Bouby, Nadine; Persson, Margaretha; Burri, Philippe; Bankir, Lise; Melander, Olle

    2017-12-14

    High plasma copeptin, a marker of vasopressin, predicts diabetes mellitus. We tested if copeptin could be suppressed by increased water intake in healthy individuals, and if a water-induced change in copeptin was accompanied by altered concentrations of glucose, insulin or glucagon. Thirty-nine healthy individuals underwent, in random order, 1 week of high water intake (3 L/day on top of habitual intake) and 1 week of normal (habitual) fluid intake (control). Fasting plasma concentrations of copeptin, glucose, insulin and glucagon were compared between the ends of both periods. Furthermore, acute copeptin kinetics were mapped for 4 h after ingestion of 1 L of water. After acute intake of 1 L water, copeptin was significantly reduced within 30 min, and reached maximum reduction within 90 min with on average 39% reduction (95% confidence interval (95 CI) 34-45) (p copeptin compared to control week. The greatest reduction occurred among subjects with habitually high copeptin and concentrated urine ("water-responders"). Water-responders had significant water-induced reduction of glucagon, but glucose and insulin were unaffected. Both acute and 1 week extra water intake potently reduced copeptin concentration. In those with the greatest decline (water-responders), who are typically low drinkers with high baseline copeptin, water induced a reduction in fasting glucagon. Long-term trials assessing the effect of water on glucometabolic traits should focus on low-water drinkers with high copeptin concentration.

  18. Raman studies of methane-ethane hydrate metastability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroshi; Strobel, Timothy A; Dec, Steven F; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-03-05

    The interconversion of methane-ethane hydrate from metastable to stable structures was studied using Raman spectroscopy. sI and sII hydrates were synthesized from methane-ethane gas mixtures of 65% or 93% methane in ethane and water, both with and without the kinetic hydrate inhibitor, poly(N-vinylcaprolactam). The observed faster structural conversion rate in the higher methane concentration atmosphere can be explained in terms of the differences in driving force (difference in chemical potential of water in sI and sII hydrates) and kinetics (mass transfer of gas and water rearrangement). The kinetic hydrate inhibitor increased the conversion rate at 65% methane in ethane (sI is thermodynamically stable) but retards the rate at 93% methane in ethane (sII is thermodynamically stable), implying there is a complex interaction between the polymer, water, and hydrate guests at crystal surfaces.

  19. Kinetic of formation for single carbon dioxide and mixed carbon dioxide and tetrahydrofuran hydrates in water and sodium chloride aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabil, K.M.; Duarte, A.R.C.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Ahmad, M.M.; Yusup, S.; Omar, A.A.; Peters, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory-scale reactor system is built and operated to measure the kinetic of formation for single and mixed carbon dioxide-tetrahydrofuran hydrates. The T-cycle method, which is used to collect the kinetic data, is briefly discussed. For single carbon dioxide hydrate, the induction time

  20. Hydraulic and Mechanical Effects from Gas Hydrate Conversion and Secondary Gas Hydrate Formation during Injection of CO2 into CH4-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, N.; Deusner, C.; Kossel, E.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Priegnitz, M.; Heeschen, K. U.; Abendroth, S.; Thaler, J.; Haeckel, M.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into CH4-hydrate-bearing sediments has the potential to drive natural gas production and simultaneously sequester CO2 by hydrate conversion. The process aims at maintaining the in situ hydrate saturation and structure and causing limited impact on soil hydraulic properties and geomechanical stability. However, to increase hydrate conversion yields and rates it must potentially be assisted by thermal stimulation or depressurization. Further, secondary formation of CO2-rich hydrates from pore water and injected CO2 enhances hydrate conversion and CH4 production yields [1]. Technical stimulation and secondary hydrate formation add significant complexity to the bulk conversion process resulting in spatial and temporal effects on hydraulic and geomechanical properties that cannot be predicted by current reservoir simulation codes. In a combined experimental and numerical approach, it is our objective to elucidate both hydraulic and mechanical effects of CO2 injection and CH4-CO2-hydrate conversion in CH4-hydrate bearing soils. For the experimental approach we used various high-pressure flow-through systems equipped with different online and in situ monitoring tools (e.g. Raman microscopy, MRI and ERT). One particular focus was the design of triaxial cell experimental systems, which enable us to study sample behavior even during large deformations and particle flow. We present results from various flow-through high-pressure experimental studies on different scales, which indicate that hydraulic and geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are drastically altered during and after injection of CO2. We discuss the results in light of the competing processes of hydrate dissociation, hydrate conversion and secondary hydrate formation. Our results will also contribute to the understanding of effects of temperature and pressure changes leading to dissociation of gas hydrates in ocean and permafrost systems. [1] Deusner C, Bigalke N, Kossel E

  1. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Constable, Steven; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of our DOE-funded proposal to characterize gas hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico using marine electromagnetic methods, a collaboration between SIO, LLNL, and USGS with the goal of measuring the electrical properties of lab-created methane (CH4) hydrate and sediment mixtures was formed. We examined samples with known characteristics to better relate electrical properties measured in the field to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns. Here we discuss first-ever electrical conductivity (σ) measurements on unmixed CH4 hydrate (Du Frane et al., 2011): 6 x 10-5 S/m at 5 °C, which is ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater. This difference allows electromagnetic (EM) techniques to distinguish highly resistive gas hydrate deposits from conductive water saturated sediments in EM field surveys. More recently, we performed measurements on CH4 hydrate mixed with sediment and we also discuss those initial findings here. Our results on samples free of liquid water are important for predicting conductivity of sediments with pores highly saturated with gas hydrate, and are an essential starting point for comprehensive mixing models.

  2. Types of Gas Hydrates in Marine Environments and Their Thermodynamic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo-Fu Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrates in marine environment can be grouped into two categories,diffusion gas hydrates and vent gas hydrates. The diffusion gas hydrates occur widely in an area where bottom simulation reflector (BSR was recorded in seismic profiles, and is a thermodynamic equilibrium system of hydrates and water with dissolved methane within gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ. The hydrates are buried in a distance apart from the seafloor and are characterized by low concentrations. The vent gas hydrates occur in an area where gas vents out of the seafloor. It is a thermodynamic disequilibrium system of hydrate, water and free gas, occurs in a zone that extends from the base of GHSZ to the seafloor, and is characterized by high concentration. Reported evidences show that these two types of hydrates are possibly occurring in the South China Sea.

  3. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  4. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, D.

    2007-01-01

    Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO<...

  5. Structural characteristics of hydration sites in lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Kunitsugu; Shimbo, Yudai; Seki, Yasutaka; Taiji, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    A new method is presented for determining the hydration site of proteins, where the effect of structural fluctuations in both protein and hydration water is explicitly considered by using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The whole hydration sites (HS) of lysozyme are composed of 195 single HSs and 38 clustered ones (CHS), and divided into 231 external HSs (EHS) and 2 internal ones (IHS). The largest CHSs, 'Hg' and 'Lβ', are the IHSs having 2.54 and 1.35 mean internal hydration waters respectively. The largest EHS, 'Clft', is located in the cleft region. The real hydration structure of a CHS is an ensemble of multiple structures. The transition between two structures occurs through recombinations of some H-bonds. The number of the experimental X-ray crystal waters is nearly the same as that of the estimated MDS hydration waters for 70% of the HSs, but significantly different for the rest of HSs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Entrapment of Hydrate-coated Gas Bubbles into Oil and Separation of Gas and Hydrate-film; Seafloor Experiments with ROV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, A.; Matsumoto, R.

    2015-12-01

    We trapped gas bubbles emitted from the seafloor into oil-containing collector and observed an unique phenomena. Gas hydrate formation needs water for the crystal lattice; however, gas hydrates in some areas are associated with hydrophobic crude oil or asphalt. In order to understand gas hydrate growth in oil-bearing sediments, an experiment with cooking oil was made at gas hydrate stability condition. We collected venting gas bubbles into a collector with canola oil during ROV survey at a gas hydrate area in the eastern margin of the Sea of Japan. When the gas bubbles were trapped into collector with oil, gas phase appeared above the oil and gas hydrates, between oil and gas phase. At this study area within gas hydrate stability condition, control experiment with oil-free collector suggested that gas bubbles emitted from the seafloor were quickly covered with gas hydrate film. Therefore it is improbable that gas bubbles entered into the oil phase before hydrate skin formation. After the gas phase formation in oil-containing collector, the ROV floated outside of hydrate stability condition for gas hydrate dissociation and re-dived to the venting site. During the re-dive within hydrate stability condition, gas hydrate was not formed. The result suggests that moisture in the oil is not enough for hydrate formation. Therefore gas hydrates that appeared at the oil/gas phase boundary were already formed before bubbles enter into the oil. Hydrate film is the only possible origin. This observation suggests that hydrate film coating gas hydrate was broken at the sea water/oil boundary or inside oil. Further experiments may contribute for revealing kinetics of hydrate film and formation. This work was a part of METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry)'s project entitled "FY2014 Promoting research and development of methane hydrate". We also appreciate support of AIST (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology).

  7. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 % is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very important for sportsmen to provide adequate hydration during and after the time of bodily activities. A symptom of water shortage is thirst. However, thirst is a late response of an organism and it occurs when dehydration has already taken place. Minimum in take of fluids in humans should range between one-and-half to two liters. It has been known for a long time that there is no success in sport without proper hydration in a sportsman.

  8. CO2 Hydration Shell Structure and Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Samual R; Mitev, Pavlin D; Hermansson, Kersti; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2017-07-06

    The hydration-shell of CO2 is characterized using Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopy combined with ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) vibrational density of states simulations, to validate our assignment of the experimentally observed high-frequency OH band to a weak hydrogen bond between water and CO2. Our results reveal that while the hydration-shell of CO2 is highly tetrahedral, it is also occasionally disrupted by the presence of entropically stabilized defects associated with the CO2-water hydrogen bond. Moreover, we find that the hydration-shell of CO2 undergoes a temperature-dependent structural transformation to a highly disordered (less tetrahedral) structure, reminiscent of the transformation that takes place at higher temperatures around much larger oily molecules. The biological significance of the CO2 hydration shell structural transformation is suggested by the fact that it takes place near physiological temperatures.

  9. Probing methane hydrate nucleation through the forward flux sampling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Li, Tianshu

    2014-11-26

    Understanding the nucleation of hydrate is the key to developing effective strategies for controlling methane hydrate formation. Here we present a computational study of methane hydrate nucleation, by combining the forward flux sampling (FFS) method and the coarse-grained water model mW. To facilitate the application of FFS in studying the formation of methane hydrate, we developed an effective order parameter λ on the basis of the topological analysis of the tetrahedral network. The order parameter capitalizes the signature of hydrate structure, i.e., polyhedral cages, and is capable of efficiently distinguishing hydrate from ice and liquid water while allowing the formation of different hydrate phases, i.e., sI, sII, and amorphous. Integration of the order parameter λ with FFS allows explicitly computing hydrate nucleation rates and obtaining an ensemble of nucleation trajectories under conditions where spontaneous hydrate nucleation becomes too slow to occur in direct simulation. The convergence of the obtained hydrate nucleation rate was found to depend crucially on the convergence of the spatial distribution for the spontaneously formed hydrate seeds obtained from the initial sampling of FFS. The validity of the approach is also verified by the agreement between the calculated nucleation rate and that inferred from the direct simulation. Analyzing the obtained large ensemble of hydrate nucleation trajectories, we show hydrate formation at 220 K and 500 bar is initiated by the nucleation events occurring in the vicinity of water-methane interface, and facilitated by a gradual transition from amorphous to crystalline structure. The latter provides the direct support to the proposed two-step nucleation mechanism of methane hydrate.

  10. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    OpenAIRE

    Goran Vasić; Dragoslav Jakonić

    2008-01-01

    Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 %) is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very importa...

  11. Skin hydration effects, film formation time, and physicochemical properties of a moisture mask containing Monostroma nitidium water-soluble mucilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong Huei; Chen, Weei Yuu

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to explore the effects of using the water-soluble mucilage of Monostroma nitidium to replace the humectant and half of the thickening agent on the rheological properties, color, storage stability, water-holding capacity, and film formation time of moisture masks thus prepared. Results showed that moisture masks containing water-soluble mucilage were pseudoplaxtic fluids. The apparent viscosity of these moisture masks decreased with increasing shear rate but increased with increasing concentration of the aqueous extracts used. The water-holding capacity of moisture masks containing 1% aqueous extracts and 1% hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) were similar to those containing 2% HEC and 5% 1-3 butadiene (humectant) but better than those containing 2% methyl cellulose (MC) and 5% humectant. The film formation time of moisture masks containing different concentrations of aqueous extracts decreased with increasing concentration of the aqueous extract used. The storage stability of a moisture mask containing 1% aqueous extract and 1% HEC was similar to that containing 2% HEC and 5% humectant and better than those containing 2% MC and 5% humectant. The safety test resulted in no erythema based on the Draize score test. The pH was between 7.1 and 7.5 for all moisture masks studied.

  12. Influence of temperature on methane hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Qingbai; Mu, Cuicui

    2017-08-11

    During gas hydrate formation process, a phase transition of liquid water exists naturally, implying that temperature has an important influence on hydrate formation. In this study, methane hydrate was formed within the same media. The experimental system was kept at 1.45, 6.49, and 12.91 °C respectively, and then different pressurization modes were applied in steps. We proposed a new indicator, namely the slope of the gas flow rates against time (dν g /dt), to represent the intrinsic driving force for hydrate formation. The driving force was calculated as a fixed value at the different stages of formation, including initial nucleation/growth, secondary nucleation/growth, and decay. The amounts of gas consumed at each stage were also calculated. The results show that the driving force during each stage follows an inverse relation with temperature, whereas the amount of consumed gas is proportional to temperature. This opposite trend indicates that the influences of temperature on the specific formation processes and final amounts of gas contained in hydrate should be considered separately. Our results also suggest that the specific ambient temperature under which hydrate is formed should be taken into consideration, when explaining the formation of different configurations and saturations of gas hydrates in natural reservoirs.

  13. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  14. Aquaporins are critical for provision of water during lactation and intrauterine progeny hydration to maintain tsetse fly reproductive success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua B Benoit

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies undergo drastic fluctuations in their water content throughout their adult life history due to events such as blood feeding, dehydration and lactation, an essential feature of the viviparous reproductive biology of tsetse. Aquaporins (AQPs are transmembrane proteins that allow water and other solutes to permeate through cellular membranes. Here we identify tsetse aquaporin (AQP genes, examine their expression patterns under different physiological conditions (blood feeding, lactation and stress response and perform functional analysis of three specific genes utilizing RNA interference (RNAi gene silencing. Ten putative aquaporins were identified in the Glossina morsitans morsitans (Gmm genome, two more than has been previously documented in any other insect. All organs, tissues, and body parts examined had distinct AQP expression patterns. Two AQP genes, gmmdripa and gmmdripb ( = gmmaqp1a and gmmaqp1b are highly expressed in the milk gland/fat body tissues. The whole-body transcript levels of these two genes vary over the course of pregnancy. A set of three AQPs (gmmaqp5, gmmaqp2a, and gmmaqp4b are expressed highly in the Malpighian tubules. Knockdown of gmmdripa and gmmdripb reduced the efficiency of water loss following a blood meal, increased dehydration tolerance and reduced heat tolerance of adult females. Knockdown of gmmdripa extended pregnancy length, and gmmdripb knockdown resulted in extended pregnancy duration and reduced progeny production. We found that knockdown of AQPs increased tsetse milk osmolality and reduced the water content in developing larva. Combined knockdown of gmmdripa, gmmdripb and gmmaqp5 extended pregnancy by 4-6 d, reduced pupal production by nearly 50%, increased milk osmolality by 20-25% and led to dehydration of feeding larvae. Based on these results, we conclude that gmmDripA and gmmDripB are critical for diuresis, stress tolerance and intrauterine lactation through the regulation of water and

  15. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  16. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  17. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: a new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W J; Chou, I M; Burruss, R C; Yang, M Z

    2006-02-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition.

  18. Critical pressure and multiphase flow in Blake Ridge gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, P.B.; Liu, Xiuying; Winters, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    We use core porosity, consolidation experiments, pressure core sampler data, and capillary pressure measurements to predict water pressures that are 70% of the lithostatic stress, and gas pressures that equal the lithostatic stress beneath the methane hydrate layer at Ocean Drilling Program Site 997, Blake Ridge, offshore North Carolina. A 29-m-thick interconnected free-gas column is trapped beneath the low-permeability hydrate layer. We propose that lithostatic gas pressure is dilating fractures and gas is migrating through the methane hydrate layer. Overpressured gas and water within methane hydrate reservoirs limit the amount of free gas trapped and may rapidly export methane to the seafloor.

  19. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. The effect of hydrate formation on the elastic properties of unconsolidated sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzy, Marisa B.

    Natural gas hydrates exist in unconsolidated marine or permafrost sediments and can adopt many morphologies. In this study, the effect of hydrate formation on the wave velocities of unconsolidated sediment was investigated in a series of laboratory studies, with particular focus on the extent to which the initial water saturation controls the manner in which hydrate is distributed, and thus the extent to which hydrate formation increases the wave velocity in sands. Ultrasonic p- and s-wave velocities (vp, vs) were measured in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in hydrate-bearing Ottawa Sand F110 during hydrate formation and dissociation. vp and vs were determined as functions of gas hydrate saturation (Sh). Hydrates were formed out of solution using tetrahydrofuran (THF) and through CH 4 injection into partially water-saturated samples. For the latter, samples with low and high initial water saturation (Swi) were tested. The recorded velocities exhibited a noticeable dependence on Swi. At low Swi (~20%) the hydrate stiffened the sediment and increased the ultrasonic velocities dramatically. Comparing measured velocities to those calculated with existing rock physics models links the initial water saturation, which determines the gas-water distribution in the sediment and hence the location of initial hydrate formation, to the evolution of wave velocity during hydrate formation. We concluded that at low Swi, the water is evenly distributed and located at the grain contacts. The resulting hydrate cements the grains, dramatically increasing the wave velocities even at low hydrate saturations. To test the dependence of the initial water distribution on the initial water saturation, micro X-ray CT images were also acquired of partially saturated glass-bead packs without hydrate but with varying amounts of water. At low water saturations, water occurred as bridges between adjacent glass beads or was located at the glass-bead contacts. At high water

  1. Hydration of urea and alkylated urea derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo

    2018-01-07

    Compressibility data and broadband dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of urea and some of its alkylated derivatives have been evaluated to yield their numbers Nh of hydration water molecules per molecule of solute. Nh values in a broad range of solute concentrations are discussed and are compared to hydration numbers of other relevant molecules and organic ions. Consistent with previous results, it is found that urea differs from other solutes in its unusually small hydration number, corresponding to just one third of the estimated number of nearest neighbor molecules. This remarkable hydration behavior is explained by the large density φH of hydrogen bonding abilities offered by the urea molecule. In terms of currently discussed models of reorientational motions and allied dynamics in water and related associating liquids, the large density φH causes a relaxation time close to that of undisturbed water with most parts of water encircling the solute. Therefore only a small part of disturbed ("hydration") water is left around each urea molecule. Adding alkyl groups to the basic molecule leads to Nh values which, within the series of n-alkylurea derivatives, progressively increase with the number of methyl groups per solute. With n-butylurea, Nh from dielectric spectra, in conformity with many other organic solutes, slightly exceeds the number of nearest neighbors. Compared to such Nh values, hydration numbers from compressibility data are substantially smaller, disclosing incorrect assumptions in the formula commonly used to interpret the experimental compressibilities. Similar to other series of organic solutes, effects of isomerization have been found with alkylated urea derivatives, indicating that factors other than the predominating density φH of hydrogen bond abilities contribute also to the hydration properties.

  2. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  3. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  4. Methane Production and Carbon Capture by Hydrate Swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Liang; von Solms, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    gas molecules in the structural lattice. In this work, we quantitatively investigate the swapping behavior from injection of pure carbon dioxide and the (CO2 + N2) binary gas mixture through artificial hydrate-bearing sandstone samples by use of a core-flooding experimental apparatus. A total of 13...... of pure carbon dioxide in swapping methane from its hydrate phase; the methane recovery efficiency in brine water systems is enhanced relative to pure water systems. The replenishment of a fresh (CO2 + N2) gas mixture into the vapor phase can be considered as an efficient extraction method because 46...... in small hydrate cages, as long as the equilibrium formation pressure of (CO2 + N2) binary gas hydrate is below that of methane hydrate, even though adding nitrogen to carbon dioxide reduces the thermodynamic driving force for the formation of a new hydrate. When other conditions are similar, the methane...

  5. Worldwide distribution of subaquatic gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Ginsburg, G.D.; Soloviev, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Sediments containing natural gas hydrates occur worldwide on continental and insular slopes and rises of active and passive margins, on continental shelves of polar regions, and in deep-water (> 300 m) environments of inland lakes and seas. The potential amount of methane in natural gas hydrates is enormous, with current estimates at about 1019 g of methane carbon. Subaquatic gas hydrates have been recovered in 14 different areas of the world, and geophysical and geochemical evidence for them has been found in 33 other areas. The worldwide distribution of natural gas hydrates is updated here; their global importance to the chemical and physical properties of near-surface subaquatic sediments is affirmed. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Kinetics of phycocyanobilin cleavage from C-phycocyanin by methanolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malwade, Chandrakant Ramkrishna; Roda Serrat, Maria Cinta; Christensen, Knud Villy

    2016-01-01

    Phycocyanobilin (PCB) is an important linear tetrapyrrolic molecule for food as well as pharmaceutical industry. It is obtained from blue-green algae, where it is attached covalently to phycobiliproteins (C-PC and APC) present in the light harvesting complexes. In this work, cleavage of PCB from...

  7. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures: The σ of CH4 Hydrate + Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stern, Laura A. [U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Constable, Steven [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Weitemeyer, Karen A. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom), Univ. of Southampton Waterfront Campus, Southampton (United Kingdom); Smith, Megan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, Jeffery J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. We built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. We report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. Finally, these results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  9. Building a Gas Hydrate Information System in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Xiao; Runqiang Wang; Jianhui Li

    2007-01-01

    Gas hydrates, low molecular weight gas molecules trapped in water-ice "cages," have gained international attention over the last few years for energy, safety, and environmental reasons. In 2000 CODATA (Committee on Data for Science and Technology, International Council for Science) established a task group for Data on Natural Gas Hydrates, which aims to develop a comprehensive information system of all aspects of natural gas hydrates. As important participants of this task group, Chinese scie...

  10. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  11. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Soumpasis, D.M. [Max Planck Inst. for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  12. Ethylene Separation via Hydrate Formation in W/O Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An hybrid absorption-hydration method was adopted to recover C2H4 from C2H4/CH4 binary gas mixtures and the hydrate formation conditions of C2H4/CH4 mixtures was studied experimentally in diesel in water (w/o emulsions. Span 20 at a concentration of 1.0 wt% in the aqueous phase was added to form water in diesel emulsions before hydrate formation and then hydrate in diesel slurry was separated after hydrate formation. The influences of initial gas-liquid volume ratio (53–142, pressure (3.4–5.4 MPa, temperature (274.15–278.15 K, water cuts (10–30 vol%, and the mole fraction of C2H4 in feed gas (13.19–80.44 mol% upon the C2H4 separation efficiency were systematically investigated. The experimental results show that ethylene can be enriched in hydrate slurry phase with high separation factor (S and recovery ratio (R. Most hydrate formation finished in 20 min, after that, the hydrate formation rate became very slow. The conclusion is useful for determining the suitable operation conditions when adopting an absorption-hydration method to separate C2H4/CH4.

  13. Hydrate pingoes at Nyegga: some characteristic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrate pingoes were observed on the seafloor during two different remotely operated vehicle (ROV)-dives, conducted by Statoil at complex-pockmark G11, at Nyegga, off Mid-Norway. Confirmation that these structures actually represent hydrate ice-cored sediment mounds (pingoes), was done by other investigators (Ivanov et al., 2006). Because it is expected that hydrate pingoes represent relatively dynamic seafloor topographic structures and that their shape and size most probably will change over relatively short time, it is important to know how to recognise them visually. Hovland and Svensen (2006) highlighted five different characteristic aspects that define hydrate pingoes on the sea floor: 1) They are dome- or disc-shaped features, which may attain any size from ~0.5 m in height and upwards. Inside pockmark G11, they were up to 1 m high. 2) They are circular or oval in plan view and may attain lateral sizes on the seafloor ranging upwards from ~0.5 m. Inside G11 they had lengths of several metres and widths of up to 4 m. 3) They have dense communities of organisms growing on their surfaces. At G11, they were overgrown with small pogonophoran tube-worms. 4) They have patches of white or grey bacterial mats growing on their surface, indicating advection (seepage) of reduced pore-waters. 5) They have small pits and patches of fluidized sediments on their surface, indicating pit corrosion of the sub-surface gas hydrate. Because gas hydrates often form in high-porosity, near-surface sediments, where water is readily available, it is thought that they will build up at locations where gases are actively migrating upwards from depth. However, gas hydrates are not stable in the presence of ambient seawater, as seawater is deficient in guest molecule gases (normally methane). Therefore, they tend to build up below surface above conduits for gas flow from depth. But, the near-surface hydrate ice-lenses will continually be corroded by seawater circulating into the sediments

  14. Development of individual hydration strategies for athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ronald J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2008-10-01

    Athletes are encouraged to begin exercise well hydrated and to consume sufficient amounts of appropriate fluids during exercise to limit water and salt deficits. Available evidence suggests that many athletes begin exercise already dehydrated to some degree, and although most fail to drink enough to match sweat losses, some drink too much and a few develop hyponatremia. Some simple advice can help athletes assess their hydration status and develop a personalized hydration strategy that takes account of exercise, environment, and individual needs. Preexercise hydration status can be assessed from urine frequency and volume, with additional information from urine color, specific gravity, or osmolality. Change in hydration during exercise can be estimated from the change in body mass that occurs during a bout of exercise. Sweat rate can be estimated if fluid intake and urinary losses are also measured. Sweat salt losses can be determined by collection and analysis of sweat samples, but athletes losing large amounts of salt are likely to be aware of the taste of salt in sweat and the development of salt crusts on skin and clothing where sweat has evaporated. An appropriate drinking strategy will take account of preexercise hydration status and of fluid, electrolyte, and substrate needs before, during, and after a period of exercise. Strategies will vary greatly between individuals and will also be influenced by environmental conditions, competition regulations, and other factors.

  15. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  16. What are gas hydrates?: Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Y.C.; Waite, W.; Boswell, R.; Dallimore, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The English chemistry pioneer Sir Humphry Davy first combined gas and water to produce a solid substance in his lab in 1810. For more than a century after that landmark moment, a small number of scientists catalogued various solid “hydrates” formed by combining water with an assortment of gases and liquids. Sloan and Koh (2007) review this early research, which was aimed at discerning the chemical structures of gas hydrates (Fig. 1.1), as well as the pressures and temperatures at which they are stable. Because no practical applications were found for these synthetic gas hydrates, they remained an academic curiosity.

  17. Experimental Simulation of the Exploitation of Natural Gas Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Yu Sun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates are cage-like crystalline compounds in which a large amount of methane is trapped within a crystal structure of water, forming solids at low temperature and high pressure. Natural gas hydrates are widely distributed in permafrost regions and offshore. It is estimated that the worldwide amounts of methane bound in gas hydrates are total twice the amount of carbon to be found in all known fossil fuels on earth. A proper understanding of the relevant exploitation technologies is then important for natural gas production applications. In this paper, the recent advances on the experimental simulation of natural gas hydrate exploitation using the major hydrate production technologies are summarized. In addition, the current situation of the industrial exploitation of natural gas hydrate is introduced, which are expected to be useful for establishing more safe and efficient gas production technologies.

  18. Decomposition of Protein Experimental Compressibility into Intrinsic and Hydration Shell Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadarlat, Voichita M.; Post, Carol Beth

    2006-01-01

    The experimental determination of protein compressibility reflects both the protein intrinsic compressibility and the difference between the compressibility of water in the protein hydration shell and bulk water. We use molecular dynamics simulations to explore the dependence of the isothermal compressibility of the hydration shell surrounding globular proteins on differential contributions from charged, polar, and apolar protein-water interfaces. The compressibility of water in the protein hydration shell is accounted for by a linear combination of contributions from charged, polar, and apolar solvent-accessible surfaces. The results provide a formula for the deconvolution of experimental data into intrinsic and hydration contributions when a protein of known structure is investigated. The physical basis for the model is the variation in water density shown by the surface-specific radial distribution functions of water molecules around globular proteins. The compressibility of water hydrating charged atoms is lower than bulk water compressibility, the compressibility of water hydrating apolar atoms is somewhat larger than bulk water compressibility, and the compressibility of water around polar atoms is about the same as the compressibility of bulk water. We also assess whether hydration water compressibility determined from small compound data can be used to estimate the compressibility of hydration water surrounding proteins. The results, based on an analysis from four dipeptide solutions, indicate that small compound data cannot be used directly to estimate the compressibility of hydration water surrounding proteins. PMID:16997864

  19. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane and methane-derived carbon that escape from sediments and soils and reach the atmosphere could exacerbate greenhouse warming. The synergy between warming climate and gas hydrate dissociation feeds a popular perception that global warming could drive catastrophic methane releases from the contemporary gas hydrate reservoir. Appropriate evaluation of the two sides of the climate-methane hydrate synergy requires assessing direct and indirect observational data related to gas hydrate dissociation phenomena and numerical models that track the interaction of gas hydrates/methane with the ocean and/or atmosphere. Methane hydrate is likely undergoing dissociation now on global upper continental slopes and on continental shelves that ring the Arctic Ocean. Many factors—the depth of the gas hydrates in sediments, strong sediment and water column sinks, and the inability of bubbles emitted at the seafloor to deliver methane to the sea-air interface in most cases—mitigate the impact of gas hydrate dissociation on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations though. There is no conclusive proof that hydrate-derived methane is reaching the atmosphere now, but more observational data and improved numerical models will better characterize the climate-hydrate synergy in the future.

  20. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-03-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane and methane-derived carbon that escape from sediments and soils and reach the atmosphere could exacerbate greenhouse warming. The synergy between warming climate and gas hydrate dissociation feeds a popular perception that global warming could drive catastrophic methane releases from the contemporary gas hydrate reservoir. Appropriate evaluation of the two sides of the climate-methane hydrate synergy requires assessing direct and indirect observational data related to gas hydrate dissociation phenomena and numerical models that track the interaction of gas hydrates/methane with the ocean and/or atmosphere. Methane hydrate is likely undergoing dissociation now on global upper continental slopes and on continental shelves that ring the Arctic Ocean. Many factors—the depth of the gas hydrates in sediments, strong sediment and water column sinks, and the inability of bubbles emitted at the seafloor to deliver methane to the sea-air interface in most cases—mitigate the impact of gas hydrate dissociation on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations though. There is no conclusive proof that hydrate-derived methane is reaching the atmosphere now, but more observational data and improved numerical models will better characterize the climate-hydrate synergy in the future.

  1. Fitness professionals' knowledge and perceptions on hydration and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This descriptive study examined the extent of hydration knowledge and fluid intake pattern in people who work within fitness industry. Fourty fitness professionals were asked to complete a questionnaire about their perspectives on hydration, thirst and fluid intake pattern. Water was the most preferred drink before (75.0%), ...

  2. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Gas Hydrates Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    The Gas Hydrates Project at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) focuses on the study of methane hydrates in natural environments. The project is a collaboration between the USGS Energy Resources and the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Programs and works closely with other U.S. Federal agencies, some State governments, outside research organizations, and international partners. The USGS studies the formation and distribution of gas hydrates in nature, the potential of hydrates as an energy resource, and the interaction between methane hydrates and the environment. The USGS Gas Hydrates Project carries out field programs and participates in drilling expeditions to study marine and terrestrial gas hydrates. USGS scientists also acquire new geophysical data and sample sediments, the water column, and the atmosphere in areas where gas hydrates occur. In addition, project personnel analyze datasets provided by partners and manage unique laboratories that supply state-of-the-art analytical capabilities to advance national and international priorities related to gas hydrates.

  3. Effect of localized water uptake on backfill hydration and water movement in a backfilled tunnel: half-scale tests at Aespoe Bentonite Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River (Canada); Jonsson, E. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hansen, J. [Posiva Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland); Hedin, M. [Aangpannefoereningen, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramqvist, G. [Eltekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden)

    2011-04-15

    The report describes the outcome of the work within the project 'SU508.20 Impact of water inflow in deposition tunnels'. Project decision SKB doc 1178871 Version 3.0. Two activity plans have been used for the field work: AP TD SU50820-09-019 and AP TD SU 50820-09-071. SKB and Posiva have been examining those processes that may have particularly strong effects on the evolution of a newly backfilled deposition tunnel in a KBS-3V repository. These assessments have involved the conduct of increasingly large and complex laboratory tests and simulations of a backfilled tunnel section. In this series of four tests, the effect of water inflow into a backfilled tunnel section via an intersecting fracture feature was evaluated. The tests included the monitoring of mock-ups where water entered via the simulated fractures as well as evaluation of what the effect of isolated tunnel sections caused by localized water inflow would have on subsequent evolution of these isolated sections. It was found that even a slowly seeping fracture can have a substantial effect on the backfill evolution as it will cause development of a gasket-like feature that effectively cuts of air and water movement from inner to outer regions of the backfilled tunnel. Water entering via these fractures will ultimately move out of the tunnel via a single discrete flow path, in a manner similar to what was observed in previous 1/2-scale and smaller simulations. If the low-rate of water inflow from fracture is the only source of water inflow to the tunnel this will result in hydraulic behaviour similar to that observed for a single inflow point in previous tests. The presence of a fracture feature will however result in a larger proportion of water uptake by the process of suction than might occur in a point inflow situation and hence a more uniform water distribution will be present in the pellet fill. This also results in a greater tendency for water to be absorbed into the adjacent block fill

  4. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  5. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    In this work the nucleation kinetics of propane gas hydrate has been investigated experimentally using a stirred batch reactor. The experiments have been performed isothermally recording the pressure as a function of time. Experiments were conducted at different stirring rates, but in the same...... supersaturation region. The experiments showed that the gas dissolution rate rather than the induction time of propane hydrate is influenced by a change in agitation. This was especially valid at high stirring rates when the water surface was severely disturbed.Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP...... the presence of additives. In most cases reasonable agreement between the data and the model could be obtained. The results revealed that especially the effective surface energy between propane hydrate and water is likely to change when the stirring rate varies from very high to low. The prolongation...

  6. Molecular modeling of the dissociation of methane hydrate in contact with a silica surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Englezos, Peter; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2012-03-15

    We use constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissociation of the fully occupied structure I methane hydrate in a confined geometry between two hydroxylated silica surfaces between 36 and 41 Å apart, at initial temperatures of 283, 293, and 303 K. Simulations of the two-phase hydrate/water system are performed in the presence of silica, with and without a 3 Å thick buffering water layer between the hydrate phase and silica surfaces. Faster decomposition is observed in the presence of silica, where the hydrate phase is prone to decomposition from four surfaces, as compared to only two sides in the case of the hydrate/water simulations. The existence of the water layer between the hydrate phase and the silica surface stabilizes the hydrate phase relative to the case where the hydrate is in direct contact with silica. Hydrates bound between the silica surfaces dissociate layer-by-layer in a shrinking core manner with a curved decomposition front which extends over a 5-8 Å thickness. Labeling water molecules shows that there is exchange of water molecules between the surrounding liquid and intact cages in the methane hydrate phase. In all cases, decomposition of the methane hydrate phase led to the formation of methane nanobubbles in the liquid water phase. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  7. Hydration testing of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppliger, Robert A; Bartok, Cynthia

    2002-01-01

    Dehydration not only reduces athletic performance, but also places athletes at risk of health problems and even death. For athletes, monitoring hydration has significant value in maximising performance during training and competition. It also offers medical personnel the opportunity to reduce health risks in situations where athletes engage in intentional weight loss. Simple non-invasive techniques, including weight monitoring and urine tests, can provide useful information. Bioimpedance methods tend to be easy to use and fairly inexpensive, but generally lack the precision and accuracy necessary for hydration monitoring. Blood tests appear to be the most accurate monitoring method, but are impractical because of cost and invasiveness. Although future research is needed to determine which hydration tests are the most accurate, we encourage sports teams to develop and implement hydration monitoring protocols based on the currently available methods. Medical personnel can use this information to maximise their team's athletic performance and minimise heat- and dehydration-related health risks to athletes.

  8. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  9. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  10. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  11. Effect of Hydration Forces on Protein Fouling of Ultrafiltration Membranes: The Role of Protein Charge, Hydrated Ion Species, and Membrane Hydrophilicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Rui; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Miao; Deng, Dongxu; Li, Songshan; Wang, Jiaxuan; Liu, Tingting; Lv, Yongtao

    2017-01-03

    To investigate the influence of hydration forces on the protein fouling of membranes and the major influence factors of hydration forces during the ultrafiltration process, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was chosen as model foulant. For various pH levels and hydrated ion and membrane species, the membrane-BSA and BSA-BSA interaction forces, and fouling experiments with BSA, as a function of ionic strength, were measured. Results showed that hydration forces were a universal phenomenon during the membrane filtration process, when the levels of pH, ion species, and membrane performances were appropriate. First, for the BSA negatively charged or neutral, hydration forces caused a decrease in the membrane fouling. Conversely, for the BSA positively charged, the hydration forces were absent because the counterions were not hydrated, and membrane fouling was enhanced. For different hydrated ions, the smaller the radii of the ions were, the stronger the hydration forces that were produced, and the membrane fouling observed was less, indicating that hydration forces are closely correlated with the size of the hydrated ions. Moreover, in comparison with a hydrophobic membrane, it is more difficult to observe hydrophilic membrane-BSA hydration forces because the hydrophilic membrane surface adsorbs water molecules, which weakens its binding efficiency to hydrated ions.

  12. First Study of Poly(3-Methylene-2-Pyrrolidone) as a Kinetic Hydrate Inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Eirin; Heyns, Ingrid Marié; von Solms, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Formation of gas hydrates is a problem in the petroleum industry where the gas hydrates can cause blockage of the flowlines. Kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs) are water-soluble polymers, sometimes used in combination synergistically or with non-polymeric synergists, that are used to prevent gas...

  13. Temporal constraints on hydrate-controlled methane seepage off Svalbard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, C; Feseker, T; Treude, T; Krastel, S; Liebetrau, V; Niemann, H; Bertics, V J; Dumke, I; Dünnbier, K; Ferré, B; Graves, C; Gross, F; Hissmann, K; Hühnerbach, V; Krause, S; Lieser, K; Schauer, J; Steinle, L

    2014-01-17

    Methane hydrate is an icelike substance that is stable at high pressure and low temperature in continental margin sediments. Since the discovery of a large number of gas flares at the landward termination of the gas hydrate stability zone off Svalbard, there has been concern that warming bottom waters have started to dissociate large amounts of gas hydrate and that the resulting methane release may possibly accelerate global warming. Here, we corroborate that hydrates play a role in the observed seepage of gas, but we present evidence that seepage off Svalbard has been ongoing for at least 3000 years and that seasonal fluctuations of 1° to 2°C in the bottom-water temperature cause periodic gas hydrate formation and dissociation, which focus seepage at the observed sites.

  14. Hydration in the Pediatric Athlete - How to Guide Your Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Hydration is arguably among the foremost priorities youth athletes, parents, and coaches habitually consider as vital for sports. Insufficient hydration and a resultant measurable sweat-induced body water deficit can negatively affect performance and, in some athletic scenarios, can be a danger to a young athlete's health and safety, especially during vigorous physical activity in a warm-to-hot environment. Accordingly, it is essential to be well hydrated prior to practice, training, and competition and minimize total body water deficits incurred while being mindful of the greater sweat losses and hydration needs/challenges that accompany physical growth and maturation. Informed clinicians can play a key role as trusted resources in providing the most effective guidelines and making the best overall individual recommendations regarding hydration for youth athletes.

  15. Examination of Cement Pastes Hydrated Phases, and Synthetic Products by X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-04-01

    F. E. Jones, Hydration of Calcium Aluminates and Ferrites , Fourth International Symposium on the Chemistry of Cement, Washington, D. C., 1960, Vol 1...hydrated calcium aluminates and ferrites , Proc Fifth Inte-national Symposium on the Chemistry of Cement, Tokyo, 1968, 196-. pp 37-67; discussion by M. H...water-cement ratio contained ettringite, tetracalcium aluminate inonos-2;irate-12-hydrate, calcium hydroxide, calcium silicate hydrate gel, and

  16. Dipolar response of hydrated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2012-02-28

    The paper presents an analytical theory and numerical simulations of the dipolar response of hydrated proteins in solution. We calculate the effective dielectric constant representing the average dipole moment induced at the protein by a uniform external field. The dielectric constant shows a remarkable variation among the proteins, changing from 0.5 for ubiquitin to 640 for cytochrome c. The former value implies a negative dipolar susceptibility, that is a dia-electric dipolar response and negative dielectrophoresis. It means that ubiquitin, carrying an average dipole of ≃240 D, is expected to repel from the region of a stronger electric field. This outcome is the result of a negative cross-correlation between the protein and water dipoles, compensating for the positive variance of the intrinsic protein dipole in the overall dipolar susceptibility. In contrast to the neutral ubiquitin, charged proteins studied here show para-electric dipolar response and positive dielectrophoresis. The study suggests that the dipolar response of proteins in solution is strongly affected by the coupling of the protein surface charge to the hydration water. The protein-water dipolar cross-correlations are long-ranged, extending ~2 nm from the protein surface into the bulk. A similar correlation length of about 1 nm is seen for the electrostatic potential produced by the hydration water inside the protein. The analysis of numerical simulations suggests that the polarization of the protein-water interface is highly heterogeneous and does not follow the standard dielectric results for cavities carved in dielectrics. The polarization of the water shell gains in importance, relative to the intrinsic protein dipole, at high frequencies, above the protein Debye peak. The induced interfacial dipole can be either parallel or antiparallel to the protein dipole, depending on the distribution of the protein surface charge. As a result, the high-frequency absorption of the protein solution can

  17. Gold(III)-Catalyzed Hydration of Phenylacetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, J. Michelle; Tzeel, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    A guided inquiry-based experiment exploring the regioselectivity of the hydration of phenylacetylene is described. The experiment uses an acidic gold(III) catalyst in a benign methanol/water solvent system to introduce students to alkyne chemistry and key principles of green chemistry. The experiment can be easily completed in approximately 2 h,…

  18. Methane gas hydrate effect on sediment acoustic and strength properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Pecher, I.A.

    2007-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the interaction of methane gas hydrate with host sediment, we studied: (1) the effects of gas hydrate and ice on acoustic velocity in different sediment types, (2) effect of different hydrate formation mechanisms on measured acoustic properties (3) dependence of shear strength on pore space contents, and (4) pore pressure effects during undrained shear.A wide range in acoustic p-wave velocities (Vp) were measured in coarse-grained sediment for different pore space occupants. Vp ranged from less than 1 km/s for gas-charged sediment to 1.77–1.94 km/s for water-saturated sediment, 2.91–4.00 km/s for sediment with varying degrees of hydrate saturation, and 3.88–4.33 km/s for frozen sediment. Vp measured in fine-grained sediment containing gas hydrate was substantially lower (1.97 km/s). Acoustic models based on measured Vp indicate that hydrate which formed in high gas flux environments can cement coarse-grained sediment, whereas hydrate formed from methane dissolved in the pore fluid may not.The presence of gas hydrate and other solid pore-filling material, such as ice, increased the sediment shear strength. The magnitude of that increase is related to the amount of hydrate in the pore space and cementation characteristics between the hydrate and sediment grains. We have found, that for consolidation stresses associated with the upper several hundred meters of sub-bottom depth, pore pressures decreased during shear in coarse-grained sediment containing gas hydrate, whereas pore pressure in fine-grained sediment typically increased during shear. The presence of free gas in pore spaces damped pore pressure response during shear and reduced the strengthening effect of gas hydrate in sands.

  19. Evaluation of Gas Hydrate at Alaminos Canyon 810, Northern Gulf of Mexico Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Cook, A.; Sawyer, D.; Hillman, J. I. T.

    2016-12-01

    We characterize the gas hydrate reservoir in Alaminos Canyon Block 810 (AC810) on the northern Gulf of Mexico slope, approximately 400 km southeast of Houston, Texas, USA. Three-dimensional seismic data shows a bottom-simulating-reflection (BSR), over 30 km2, which suggests that a significant gas hydrate accumulation may occur at AC810. Furthermore, logging while drilling (LWD) data acquired from a Statoil well located that penetrated the BSR near the crest of the regional anticline indicates two possible gas hydrate units (Hydrate Unit A and Hydrate Unit B). LWD data in this interval are limited to gamma ray and resistivity only. Resistivity curve separations are observed in Hydrate Unit A (131 to 253 mbsf) suggesting hydrate-filled fractures in marine mud. A spiky high resistivity response in Hydrate Unit B (308 to 354 mbsf) could either be a marine mud or a sand-prone interval. The abrupt decrease (from 7 to 1 Ωm) in resistivity logs at 357 mbsf generally corresponds with the interpreted base of hydrate stability, as the BSR is observed near 350 mbsf on the seismic data. To further investigate the formation characteristics, we generate synthetic traces using general velocity and density trends for marine sediments to match the seismic trace extracted at the Statoil well. We consider models with 1) free gas and 2) water only below the base of hydrate stability. In our free gas-below models, we find the velocity of Hydrate Unit A and Hydrate Unit B is generally low and does not deviate significantly from the general velocity trends, suggesting that gas hydrate is present in a marine mud. In the water-below model, the compressional velocity of Hydrate Unit B ranges from 2450 m/s to 3150 m/s. This velocity is similar to the velocity of high hydrate saturation in sand; typically greater than 2500 m/s. This may indicate that Hydrate Unit B is sand with high hydrate saturation; however, to achieve a suitable match between the water-below synthetic seismogram and the

  20. Morphology of methane hydrate host sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Eaton, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2005-01-01

    The morphological features including porosity and grains of methane hydrate host sediments were investigated using synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) technique. The sediment sample was obtained during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 on the Blake Ridge at water depth of 2278.5 m. The CMT experiment was performed at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source facility. The analysis gave ample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity. The method was found to be highly effective for the study of methane hydrate host sediments.

  1. Investigation of Kinetic Hydrate Inhibition Using a High Pressure Micro Differential Scanning Calorimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Malmos, Christine; von Solms, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    . These investigations were performed using small samples in four different capillary tubes in the calorimeter cell. When the isothermal method was employed, it was found that Luvicap EG significantly delays the hydrate nucleation time as compared to water. The results obtained from the ramping method demonstrated...... of hydrate growth. Additionally, hydrate formed in the presence of inhibitor decomposed at higher temperatures compared to pure water, indicating that while hydrate formation is initially inhibited; once hydrates form, they are more stable in the presence of inhibitor. Overall, this method proved a viable...

  2. Improved reliability of the urine lactate concentration under controlled hydration after maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kosmidis, Ioannis; Koulidou, Triantafullia; Panagakis, Sotiris; Tsalis, George; Loupos, Dimitris; Mougios, Vassilis

    2017-11-01

    Urine lactate may be a novel biomarker of lactate production capacity but its reliability has been unsatisfactory so far. To compare the reliability of urine lactate between controlled hydration and no hydration after maximal exercise. Athletes performed swimming exercise four times: two followed by consumption of 1 L of water and two followed by no water intake. Blood and urine lactate was measured. The reliability of urine lactate was good and similar to that in blood only after controlled hydration. Blood and urine lactate were correlated under both hydration conditions. Controlled hydration after exercise provides satisfactory reliability of urine lactate.

  3. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F.; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E.; Kapsokefalou, Maria; Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA) and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20–60 years) from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake which was subtracted from daily urine volume to allow calculation of non-renal water loss (i.e., mostly sweating). Hydration status was assessed by urine and blood osmolality. A negative association was seen between ambient temperature and PA (r = −0.277; p hydration status (i.e., lower urine and blood osmolality). PMID:27128938

  4. Characteristics of SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation mechanisms (kinetics) and surfactants effects on hydrate formation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.; Lee, H.; Kim, Y.D. [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of). School of Materials Science and Engineering; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, J.D. [Korea Inst. of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of). Advanced Energy Resource Development Team

    2008-07-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is used as an insulating gas in a variety of industrial applications, and is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Gas hydrates are stable crystalline compounds formed by water and natural gas molecules that have relatively large cavities that can be occupied by guest molecules. SF{sub 6} gas is able to form hydrates at relatively mild conditions. This study investigated the hydrate formation mechanisms of SF{sub 6} gas, and presented a potential hydration treatment for the gas. The effects of surface active agents on SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation were examined experimentally using Tween 20, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS). The surfactants showed promoter behaviour for SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation. Formation rates occurred in 2 stages, with rates rapidly increasing during the second phase. The inflection point occurred approximately 30 minutes after the hydrate nucleation point. Results indicated the existence of a critical concentration of surfactants. It was concluded that SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation rates were increased by the addition of surfactants. Further studies are needed to investigate 2-stage hydrate formation rates. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Seepage from an arctic shallow marine gas hydrate reservoir is insensitive to momentary ocean warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Li; Torres, Marta E.; Carroll, Jolynn; Crémière, Antoine; Panieri, Giuliana; Yao, Haoyi; Serov, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    Arctic gas hydrate reservoirs located in shallow water and proximal to the sediment-water interface are thought to be sensitive to bottom water warming that may trigger gas hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. Here, we evaluate bottom water temperature as a potential driver for hydrate dissociation and methane release from a recently discovered, gas-hydrate-bearing system south of Spitsbergen (Storfjordrenna, ~380 m water depth). Modelling of the non-steady-state porewater profiles and observations of distinct layers of methane-derived authigenic carbonate nodules in the sediments indicate centurial to millennial methane emissions in the region. Results of temperature modelling suggest limited impact of short-term warming on gas hydrates deeper than a few metres in the sediments. We conclude that the ongoing and past methane emission episodes at the investigated sites are likely due to the episodic ventilation of deep reservoirs rather than warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation in this shallow water seep site.

  6. Predicting hydration energies for multivalent ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    We have predicted the free energy of hydration for 40 monovalent and multivalent cations and anions using density functional theory and the implicit solvent model COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) at the Becke-Perdew (BP)/Triple zeta valence with polarization functions...... errors. Our results indicate that quantum chemical calculations combined with COSMO-RS solvent treatment is a reliable method for treating multivalent ions in solution, provided one hydration shell of explicit water molecules is included for metal cations. The accuracy is not high enough to allow...... absolute predictions of hydration energies but could be used to investigate trends for several ions, thanks to the low computational cost, in particular for ligand exchange reactions....

  7. N-Acetylcysteine plus Saline Hydration versus Saline Hydration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) in patients undergoing coronary angiography pretreated with N-acetylcysteine NAC plus saline hydration or saline hydration alone and to determine the association between various risk factors and RCIN. Methods: Patients were ...

  8. Isotopic fractionation of hydrate-bound hydrocarbons in the sub-bottom sediments of Lake Baikal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachikubo, A.; Khlystov, O.; Sakagami, H.; Minami, H.; Yamashita, S.; Takahashi, N.; Shoji, H.; Kalmychkov, G.; Poort, J.

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the molecular and stable isotope composition of hydrate-bound and dissolved hydrocarbons in pore water in subsurface sediments of Lake Baikal. Hydrate-bearing sediment cores were retrieved at southern and central Baikal basins in 2002-2009. Gas hydrates exist at the mud volcanoes at Malenky, Bolshoy, Malyutka and Peschanka in the southern Baikal basin and Kukuy in the central Baikal basin. The Goloustnoye seepage site in the southern Baikal basin seems active and gas plumes are ascending from the lake bottom. Delta 13C of hydrate-bound methane is several permil lower than that of dissolved methane in pore water at most places, however, delta 13C values of hydrate-bound and dissolved methane are almost the same each other and delta D values of hydrate-bound methane was about 5 permil lower than that of dissolved methane at Goloustnoye. Hachikubo et al. [2007] revealed in their laboratory experiments that delta D of hydrate-bound methane and ethane becomes several permil lower than that of the original gases at a formation of gas hydrate, whereas delta 13C of hydrate-bound and original gases remains almost constant. Based on their results, the current gas dissolved in pore water is not the source of the gas hydrates at most hydrate-bearing sites in Lake Baikal. On the contrary, the gas hydrate at Goloustnoye seems to be rather new crystal. Although isotopic fractionation of ethane also occurs at the formation of gas hydrate in the laboratory experiments, isotopic differences between hydrate-bound and dissolved ethane differ from each other according to the sediment cores. Hachikubo, A., T. Kosaka, M. Kida, A. Krylov, H. Sakagami, H. Minami, N. Takahashi, and H. Shoji (2007), Isotopic fractionation of methane and ethane hydrates between gas and hydrate phases, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L21502, doi:10.1029/2007GL030557.

  9. Geo-scientific investigations of gas-hydrates in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sain, K.; Gupta, H.; Mazumdar, A.; Bhaumik, A.K.; Bhowmick, P.K.

    The best solution to meet India's overwhelming energy requirement is to tap the nuclear and solar power to the maximum extent possible. Another feasible major energy resource is gas-hydrates (crystalline substances of methane and water) that have...

  10. Perspective: Structure and ultrafast dynamics of biomolecular hydration shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laage, Damien; Elsaesser, Thomas; Hynes, James T

    2017-07-01

    The structure and function of biomolecules can be strongly influenced by their hydration shells. A key challenge is thus to determine the extent to which these shells differ from bulk water, since the structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules within these shells can cover a broad range in both space and time. Recent progress in theory, molecular dynamics simulations, and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into the fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, and electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces. Here, we discuss some central aspects of these advances, focusing on elementary molecular mechanisms and processes of hydration on a femto- to picosecond time scale, with some special attention given to several issues subject to debate.

  11. Perspective: Structure and ultrafast dynamics of biomolecular hydration shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Laage

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure and function of biomolecules can be strongly influenced by their hydration shells. A key challenge is thus to determine the extent to which these shells differ from bulk water, since the structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules within these shells can cover a broad range in both space and time. Recent progress in theory, molecular dynamics simulations, and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into the fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, and electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces. Here, we discuss some central aspects of these advances, focusing on elementary molecular mechanisms and processes of hydration on a femto- to picosecond time scale, with some special attention given to several issues subject to debate.

  12. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We

  13. Well log characterization of natural gas-hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 25 years there have been significant advancements in the use of well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrates in nature: whereas wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs were formerly used to identify gas-hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments, more advanced wireline and logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools are now routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas-hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Resistivity- and acoustic-logging tools are the most widely used for estimating the gas-hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical-resistivity and acoustic-velocity data can yield accurate gas-hydrate saturations in sediment grain-supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log-analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. New well-logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation-resistivity log measurements provide the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly interbedded and fracture-dominated gas-hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing (WFT) also allow for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids(i.e., free water along with clay- and capillary-bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms

  14. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  15. Arctic Gas hydrate, Environment and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienert, Jurgen; Andreassen, Karin; Bünz, Stefan; Carroll, JoLynn; Ferre, Benedicte; Knies, Jochen; Panieri, Giuliana; Rasmussen, Tine; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2015-04-01

    Arctic methane hydrate exists on land beneath permafrost regions and offshore in shelf and continental margins sediments. Methane or gas hydrate, an ice-like substrate, consists mainly of light hydrocarbons (mostly methane from biogenic sources but also ethane and propane from thermogenic sources) entrapped by a rigid cage of water molecules. The pressure created by the overlying water and sediments offshore stabilizes the CH4 in continental margins at a temperature range well above freezing point; consequently CH4 exists as methane ice beneath the seabed. Though the accurate volume of Arctic methane hydrate and thus the methane stored in hydrates throughout the Quaternary is still unknown it must be enormous if one considers the vast regions of Arctic continental shelves and margins as well as permafrost areas offshore and on land. Today's subseabed methane hydrate reservoirs are the remnants from the last ice age and remain elusive targets for both unconventional energy and as a natural methane emitter influencing ocean environments and ecosystems. It is still contentious at what rate Arctic warming may govern hydrate melting, and whether the methane ascending from the ocean floor through the hydrosphere reaches the atmosphere. As indicated by Greenland ice core records, the atmospheric methane concentration rose rapidly from ca. 500 ppb to ca. 750 ppb over a short time period of just 150 years at the termination of the younger Dryas period ca. 11600 years ago, but the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor have not been documented yet (Brook et al., 2014 and references within). But with the major projected warming and sea ice melting trend (Knies et al., 2014) one may ask, for how long will CH4 stay trapped in methane hydrates if surface and deep-ocean water masses will warm and permafrost continuous to melt (Portnov et al. 2014). How much of the Arctic methane will be consumed by the micro- and macrofauna, how much will

  16. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  17. Methane Hydrate Distribution from Prolonged and Repeated Formation in Natural and Compacted Sand Samples: X-Ray CT Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily V. L. Rees

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

  18. Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

    2010-07-01

    To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

  19. Observation of the growth characteristics of gas hydrate in the quiescent-type formation method using surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, Tatsunori; Ikeda, Koya

    2017-11-01

    We have observed the growth behavior of gas hydrate with addition of surfactants by several observation methods, and we discuss the mechanism of gas hydrate formation along the wall surface. From observation using colored water, the water moves up through the porous hydrate structure and unreacted water remains in the middle of the porous hydrate. In contrast to previous studies which observed growth from the side, we observed the growth behavior from the top. The hydrate height agrees well with that of water pulled up by capillary action. These results confirm that the driving force for hydrate growth in the vertical direction is capillary action. We discuss the driving force for hydrate growth in the horizontal direction. We suggest that the driving force in the horizontal direction is different because the initial concentration of the surfactant solution affects the growth behavior in the horizontal direction while it does not affect the hydrate height.

  20. Beaufort Sea Methane Hydrate Exploration: Energy and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6110--11-9330 Beaufort Sea Methane Hydrate Exploration: Energy and Climate Change May 27...OF ABSTRACT Beaufort Sea Methane Hydrate Exploration: Energy and Climate Change R.B. Coffin, L.J. Hamdan, J.P. Smith, R. Plummer,* L. Millholland,* R...coastal ocean geophysics, sediment geochemistry, dissolved and free methane fluxes through the water column and into the atmosphere, sediment and water

  1. Fundamental challenges to methane recovery from gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servio, P.; Eaton, M.W.; Mahajan, D.; Winters, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental challenges, the location, magnitude, and feasibility of recovery, which must be addressed to recover methane from dispersed hydrate sources, are presented. To induce dissociation of gas hydrate prior to methane recovery, two potential methods are typically considered. Because thermal stimulation requires a large energy input, it is less economically feasible than depressurization. The new data will allow the study of the effect of pressure, temperature, diffusion, porosity, tortuosity, composition of gas and water, and porous media on gas-hydrate production. These data also will allow one to improve existing models related to the stability and dissociation of sea floor hydrates. The reproducible kinetic data from the planned runs together with sediment properties will aid in developing a process to economically recover methane from a potential untapped hydrate source. The availability of plentiful methane will allow economical and large-scale production of methane-derived clean fuels to help avert future energy crises.

  2. Dissociation of methane hydrate in aqueous NaCl solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-10-09

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the dissociation of methane hydrate in aqueous NaCl solutions are performed. It is shown that the dissociation of the hydrate is accelerated by the formation of methane bubbles both in NaCl solutions and in pure water. We find two significant effects on the kinetics of the hydrate dissociation by NaCl. One is slowing down in an early stage before bubble formation, and another is swift bubble formation that enhances the dissociation. These effects arise from the low solubility of methane in NaCl solution, which gives rise to a nonuniform spatial distribution of solvated methane in the aqueous phase. We also demonstrate that bubbles form near the hydrate interface in dense NaCl solutions and that the hydrate dissociation proceeds inhomogeneously due to the bubbles.

  3. Gas hydrate phase equilibria measurement techniques and phase rule considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, Juan G. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada); Bruusgaard, Hallvard [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Servio, Phillip, E-mail: phillip.servio@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > Inconsistencies found in hydrate literature. > Clarification to the number of variables needed to satisfy and justify equilibrium data. > Application of phase rule to mixed hydrate systems. > Thermodynamically consistent format to present data. - Abstract: A brief review of the Gibbs phase rule for non-reacting systems and its correct application to clathrate hydrates is presented. Clarification is provided for a common mistake found in hydrate phase-equilibria literature, whereby initial compositions are used as intensive variables to satisfy the Gibbs phase rule instead of the equilibrium values. The system of (methane + carbon dioxide + water) under (hydrate + liquid + vapor) equilibrium is used as a case study to illustrate key points and suggestions to improve experimental techniques are proposed.

  4. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasol, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  5. Density dependence of the yield of hydrated electrons in the low-LET radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C: influence of the geminate recombination of subexcitation-energy electrons prior to thermalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesungnoen, Jintana; Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2013-10-21

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the yield of hydrated electrons (eaq(-)) in the low-linear energy transfer radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C as a function of water density over the range of ~0.15 to 0.6 g cm(-3). Very good agreement was found between our calculations and picosecond pulse radiolysis experimental data at ~60 ps and 1 ns at high density (>0.35 g cm(-3)). At densities lower than ~0.35 g cm(-3), our eaq(-) yields were lower than the experimental data, especially at ~60 ps. However, if we incorporated into the simulations a prompt geminate electron-cation (H2O˙(+)) recombination (prior thermalization of the electron) that decreased as the density decreased, our computed eaq(-) yields at ~60 ps and 1 ns compared fairly well with the experimental data for the entire density range studied.

  6. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  7. Prospects of gas hydrate presence in the Chukchi sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. В. Матвеева

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to forecast the scale and distribution character of gas hydrate stability zone in the Chukchi Sea under simulated natural conditions and basing on these results to estimate resource potential of gas hydrates within this area. Three types of stability zone have been identified. A forecast map of gas hydrate environment and potentially gas hydrate-bearing water areas in the Chukchi Sea has been plotted to a scale of 1:5 000 000. Mapping of gas hydrate stability zone allowed to give a justified forecast based on currently available data on geologic, fluid dynamic, cryogenic, geothermal and pressure-temperature conditions of gas hydrate formation in the Chukchi Sea. It is the first forecast of such kind that focuses on formation conditions for hydrates of various types and compositions in the Arctic seas offshore Russia. Potential amount of gas, stored beneath the Chukchi Sea in the form of hydrates, is estimated based on mapping of their stability zone and falls into the interval of 7·1011-11.8·1013 m3.

  8. Exploitation of marine gas hydrates: Benefits and risks (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Vast amounts of natural gas are stored in marine gas hydrates deposited at continental margins. The global inventory of carbon bound as methane in gas hydrates is currently estimated as 1000 × 500 Gt. Large-scale national research projects located mostly in South-East Asia but also in North America and Europe are aiming to exploit these ice-like solids as new unconventional resource of natural gas. Japan, South Korea and other Asian countries are taking the lead because their national waters harbor exploitable gas hydrate deposits which could be developed to reduce the dependency of these nations on costly LGN imports. In 2013, the first successful production test was performed off Japan at water depths of ca. 1000 m demonstrating that natural gas can be released and produced from marine hydrates by lowering the pressure in the sub-seabed hydrate reservoirs. In an alternative approach, CO2 from coal power plans and other industrial sources is used to release natural gas (methane) from hydrates while CO2 is bound and stored in the sub-surface as solid hydrate. These new approaches and technologies are still in an early pre-commercial phase; the costs of field development and gas production exceed the value of natural gas being produced from the slowly dissociating hydrates. However, new technologies are currently under development in the German SUGAR project and elsewhere to reduce costs and enhance gas production rates such that gas hydrates may become commercially exploitable over the coming decade(s). The exploitation of marine gas hydrates may help to reduce CO2 emissions from the fossil fuel sector if the produced natural gas is used to replace coal and/or LNG. Hydrate development could also provide important incentives for carbon capture technologies since CO2 can be used to produce natural gas from hydrates. However, leakage of gas may occur during the production process while slope failure may be induced by the accompanying dissociation/conversion of gas

  9. Preliminary discussion on gas hydrate reservoir system of Shenhu Area, North Slope of South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, N.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.; Wang, H.; Fu, S. [Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, H. [China Geological Survey, Beijing (China); Su, X. [China Univ. of Geosciences, Beijing (China)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrate is a type of ice-like solid substance formed by the combination of certain low-molecular-weight gases such as methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide with water. Gas hydrate primarily occurs naturally in sediments beneath the permafrost and the sediments of the continental slope with the water depth greater than 300 m. Marine gas hydrate geological systems are important because they may be sufficiently concentrated in certain locations to be an economically viable fossil fuel resource. However, gas hydrates can cause geo-hazards through large-scale slope destabilization and can release methane, a potential greenhouse gas, into the environment. This paper discussed the hydrate drilling results from a geological and geophysical investigation of the gas hydrate reservoir system of the Shenhu Area, located in the north slope of South China Sea. The paper identified the basic formation conditions, and discussed the pore-water geochemical features of shallow sediments and their inflected gas sources, gas hydrate distribution and seismic characteristics. It was concluded that the gas hydrate was heterogeneously distributed in space, and mainly distributed in certain ranges above the bottom of the gas hydrate stability zone. It was also concluded that methane gas that formed hydrate was likely from in-situ micro-biogenic methane. Last, it was found that distributed and in-situ micro-biogenic methane resulted in low methane flux, and formed the distributed pattern of gas hydrate system with the features of differential distribution and saturation. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  10. Gas hydrate saturation from acoustic impedance and resistivity logs in the shenhu area, south china sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Wu, S.; Lee, M.; Guo, Y.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.

    2011-01-01

    During the China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition -1 (GMGS-1), gas hydrate was discovered in layers ranging from 10 to 25 m above the base of gas hydrate stability zone in the Shenhu area, South China Sea. Water chemistry, electrical resistivity logs, and acoustic impedance were used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the chloride concentrations range from 0 to 43% of the pore space. The higher gas hydrate saturations were present in the depth from 152 to 177 m at site SH7 and from 190 to 225 m at site SH2, respectively. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity using Archie equation have similar trends to those from chloride concentrations. To examine the variability of gas hydrate saturations away from the wells, acoustic impedances calculated from the 3 D seismic data using constrained sparse inversion method were used. Well logs acquired at site SH7 were incorporated into the inversion by establishing a relation between the water-filled porosity, calculated using gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity logs, and the acoustic impedance, calculated from density and velocity logs. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from acoustic impedance of seismic data are ???10-23% of the pore space and are comparable to those estimated from the well logs. The uncertainties in estimated gas hydrate saturations from seismic acoustic impedances were mainly from uncertainties associated with inverted acoustic impedance, the empirical relation between the water-filled porosities and acoustic impedances, and assumed background resistivity. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Irrigation port hydration in phacoemulsification surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki H

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hisaharu Suzuki,1 Yoichiro Masuda,2 Yuki Hamajima,1 Hiroshi Takahashi3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School Musashikosugi Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University, Katsushika Medical Center, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Background: In most cases, hydration is performed by water injection into the stromal tissue with a needle. The technique is simple, however it is sometimes troublesome.Purpose: We describe a simple technique for hydrating the corneal stroma in cataract surgery using an irrigation port.Patients and methods: The technique began by pushing the irrigation port against the corneal stroma for a few seconds during phacoemulsification, which generated edema in the corneal incision that subsequently prevented leakage. This procedure is called the hydration using irrigation port (HYUIP technique. A total of 60 eyes were randomized and placed in two groups, 30 eyes underwent surgeries using the HYUIP technique (HYUIP group and 30 eyes underwent surgeries without the HYUIP technique (control. The three points evaluated during each surgery included 1 the occurrence of anterior chamber collapse during the pulling out of the I/A tip after inserting the intraocular lens, 2 the need for conventional hydration, and 3 watertight completion at the end stage of surgery.Results: The anterior chamber collapse and the need for conventional hydration were significantly smaller in the HYUIP group compared to the control group. Regarding the self-sealing completion, no significant difference was observed between the two groups.Conclusion: The HYUIP technique is an effective method for creating self-sealing wound. In addition, this technique helps to prevent anterior chamber collapse. Keywords: cataract surgery, hydration, irrigation and aspiration, phacoemulsification, wound, self-sealing 

  12. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-01-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant “onion-skin” fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2–3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched “hydration fronts” where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between ~110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at hydration at temperatures as low as 60 °C; prolonged exposure to high temperature of 175°–225° during water addition is less likely as the glass would lose alkalies and should alter to clays within days. A compilation of low-temperature hydration diffusion coefficients suggests ~2 orders of magnitude higher rates of diffusion at 60–110 °C temperatures, compared with values expected from extrapolation of high-temperature (>400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration rinds in perlites, measuring

  13. Effect of bubble size and density on methane conversion to hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leske, J.; Taylor, C.E.; Ladner, E.P.

    2007-03-01

    Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. One area of investigation is the storage of methane as methane hydrates. An economical and efficient means of storing methane in hydrates opens many commercial opportunities such as transport of stranded gas, off-peak storage of line gas, etc.We have observed during our investigations that the ability to convert methane to methane hydrate is enhanced by foaming of the methane–water solution using a surfactant. The density of the foam, along with the bubble size, is important in the conversion of methane to methane hydrate.

  14. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. The hydration of Portland cement is retarded in the presence of both the admixtures and nanosize hydration products are formed.

  15. Ab initio modelling of methane hydrate thermophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendi, Z M; Servio, P; Rey, A D

    2016-04-21

    The key thermophysical properties of methane hydrate were determined using ab initio modelling. Using density functional theory, the second-order elastic constants, heat capacity, compressibility, and thermal expansion coefficient were calculated. A wide and relevant range of pressure-temperature conditions were considered, and the structures were assessed for stability using the mean square displacement and radial distribution functions. Methane hydrate was found to be elastically isotropic with a linear dependence of the bulk modulus on pressure. Equally significant, multi-body interactions were found to be important in hydrates, and water-water interactions appear to strongly influence compressibility like in ice Ih. While the heat capacity of hydrate was found to be higher than that of ice, the thermal expansion coefficient was significantly lower, most likely due to the lower rigidity of hydrates. The mean square displacement gave important insight into stability, heat capacity, and elastic moduli, and the radial distribution functions further confirmed stability. The presented results provide a much needed atomistic thermoelastic characterization of methane hydrates and are essential input for the large-scale applications of hydrate detection and production.

  16. Numerical modeling of gas recovery from methane hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silpngarmlert, Suntichai

    Class 1 hydrate deposits are characterized by a hydrate bearing layer underlain by a two phase, free-gas and water, zone. A Class 1 hydrate reservoir is more preferable than class 2 and class 3 hydrate accumulations because a small change of pressure and temperature can induce hydrate dissociation. In this study, production characteristics from class 1 methane-hydrate reservoirs by means of conventional depressurization technique are studied. In this work, the production characteristics and efficiency from different production strategies (mainly focused on a constant bottom-hole pressure production scheme) such as well-completion locations, well spacing, and production scheduling are investigated. In the production of conventional gas reservoirs using a constant bottom-hole pressure production scheme, both gas and water production rates exponentially decrease with time. However, for methane-hydrate reservoirs, gas production rate exponentially declines with time whereas water production rate increases with time because methane hydrate dissociation increases water saturation of the reservoir. The effects of well-completion locations on the production performances are examined. The simulation results indicate that the moving well completion location strategy provides better gas production performance than the fixed completion location strategy. The optimum well-completion location (using a moving completion location strategy) is at the middle of free-gas zone. Due to the effects of hydrate saturation on formation permeability, one should not complete a well in the hydrate zone. The effect of well spacing on the production efficiency is also investigated. As expected, smaller well-spacing system yields more total gas production and it can dissociate gas-hydrate more rapidly than the larger well-spacing system. However, the number of wells increases when the well-spacing decreases resulting in the increase of the capital investment of the project. Based on this study

  17. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Interactions Between Minerals and Gas Hydrate Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvamme, B.; Leirvik, K. N.; Olsen, R.; Kuznetsova, T.

    2014-12-01

    The need for knowledge on gas hydrate "host" and "guest" interactions with reservoir rocks comes from the two folded exploitation of gas hydrates. On one hand natural gas hydrates represent an immense energy source, on the other hand carbon sequestration in the form of CO2 hydrates represents a long-term storage of carbon dioxide. Whether one's goal is to extract methane from natural gas hydrates or store carbon dioxide in the form of hydrates, it requires an understanding of the complex phenomena involving coupled dynamics of hydrates and hydrate stability in porous media. Hydrates can never attach directly to solid mineral surfaces because of the incompatibility of charges between the mineral surfaces and the hydrates. However, adsorption of water and carbon dioxide on mineral surfaces may favor heterogeneous nucleation of hydrate in the immediate vicinity. Different surfaces have their own specific adsorption preferences and corresponding adsorption thermodynamics. We have selected calcite, a common mineral found in porous media. Using molecular dynamics we have initially focused on the water interface in order to evaluate the "host" interactions towards the surface. We also aimed at evaluating the model before including guest molecules.

  18. Stabilization of methane hydrate by pressurization with He or N2 gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hailong; Tsuji, Yoshihiro; Ripmeester, John A

    2007-12-27

    The behavior of methane hydrate was investigated after it was pressurized with helium or nitrogen gas in a test system by monitoring the gas compositions. The results obtained indicate that even when the partial pressure of methane gas in such a system is lower than the equilibrium pressure at a certain temperature, the dissociation rate of methane hydrate is greatly depressed by pressurization with helium or nitrogen gas. This phenomenon is only observed when the total pressure of methane and helium (or nitrogen) gas in the system is greater than the equilibrium pressure required to stabilize methane hydrate with just methane gas. The following model has been proposed to explain the observed phenomenon: (1) Gas bubbles develop at the hydrate surface during hydrate dissociation, and there is a pressure balance between the methane gas inside the gas bubbles and the external pressurizing gas (methane and helium or nitrogen), as transmitted through the water film; as a result the methane gas in the gas bubbles stabilizes the hydrate surface covered with bubbles when the total gas pressure is greater than the equilibrium pressure of the methane hydrate at that temperature; this situation persists until the gas in the bubbles becomes sufficiently dilute in methane or until the surface becomes bubble-free. (2) In case of direct contact of methane hydrate with water, the water surrounding the hydrate is supersaturated with methane released upon hydrate dissociation; consequently, methane hydrate is stabilized when the hydrostatic pressure is above the equilibrium pressure of methane hydrate at a certain temperature, again until the dissolved gas at the surface becomes sufficiently dilute in methane. In essence, the phenomenon is due to the presence of a nonequilibrium state where there is a chemical potential gradient from the solid hydrate particles to the bulk solution that exists as long as solid hydrate remains.

  19. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. HYDRATION PATTERN IN THE HEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Hue

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate thermal response, hydration behaviour and performance over flatwater kayaking races in tropical conditions (36.8°C and 68 % rh. Five internationally-ranked subjects participated in the 2012 Surfski Ocean Racing World Cup in Guadeloupe to the “Ze Caribbean Race 2012” [i.e., a 35-km downwind race]. Core temperature (T°C and heart rate (HR were measured using portable telemetry units whereas water intake was deduced from backpacks absorption. The kayakers were asked to rate both their comfort sensation and thermal sensation on a scale before and after the race. The performance was related to an increase in T°C, high HR and low water intake (WI; and (2 high values of final T°C were related to high pre T°C and greater increases in T°C being obtained with low pre T°C and (3 WI being related to high pre T°C. The present study demonstrated that the fastest kayakers were those able to paddle at the highest intensities, increasing their T°C and drinking little water without any interference from thermal sensations. Water intake was positively related to pre-race T°C, which reinforces the importance of beginning surfski races with a low T°C. This study demonstrated that well-trained kayakers drinking ad libitum were able to anticipate their intensity/heat storage ratio to prevent heat illness and severe dehydration and maintain high performance.

  1. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  2. Linking basin-scale and pore-scale gas hydrate distribution patterns in diffusion-dominated marine hydrate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Hillman, Jess I. T.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study is to computationally determine the potential distribution patterns of diffusion-driven methane hydrate accumulations in coarse-grained marine sediments. Diffusion of dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate systems has been proposed as a potential transport mechanism through which large concentrations of hydrate can preferentially accumulate in coarse-grained sediments over geologic time. Using one-dimensional compositional reservoir simulations, we examine hydrate distribution patterns at the scale of individual sand layers (1-20 m thick) that are deposited between microbially active fine-grained material buried through the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). We then extrapolate to two-dimensional and basin-scale three-dimensional simulations, where we model dipping sands and multilayered systems. We find that properties of a sand layer including pore size distribution, layer thickness, dip, and proximity to other layers in multilayered systems all exert control on diffusive methane fluxes toward and within a sand, which in turn impact the distribution of hydrate throughout a sand unit. In all of these simulations, we incorporate data on physical properties and sand layer geometries from the Terrebonne Basin gas hydrate system in the Gulf of Mexico. We demonstrate that diffusion can generate high hydrate saturations (upward of 90%) at the edges of thin sands at shallow depths within the GHSZ, but that it is ineffective at producing high hydrate saturations throughout thick (greater than 10 m) sands buried deep within the GHSZ. Furthermore, we find that hydrate in fine-grained material can preserve high hydrate saturations in nearby thin sands with burial.Plain Language SummaryThis study combines one-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations to explore one potential process by which methane dissolved in water beneath the seafloor can be converted into solid methane hydrate. This work specifically examines one end-member methane transport

  3. Thermogenic methane injection via bubble transport into the upper Arctic Ocean from the hydrate-charged Vestnesa Ridge, Svalbard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.J.; Mienert, J.; Bünz, S.; Greinert, J.

    2014-01-01

    We use new gas-hydrate geochemistry analyses, echosounder data, and three-dimensional P-Cable seismic data to study a gas-hydrate and free-gas system in 1200 m water depth at the Vestnesa Ridge offshore NW Svalbard. Geochemical measurements of gas from hydrates collected at the ridge revealed a

  4. Structure and Hydration of Highly Branched, Monodisperse Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, John; Nickels, Jonathan; Stanley, Christopher; Diallo, Souleymane; Katsaras, John; Dutcher, John

    Monodisperse phytoglycogen nanoparticles are a promising, new soft colloidal nanomaterial with many applications in the personal care, food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. These applications rely on exceptional properties that emerge from the highly branched structure of phytoglycogen and its interaction with water, such as extraordinarily high water retention, and low viscosity and exceptional stability in water. The structure and hydration of the nanoparticles was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). SANS allowed us to determine the size of the nanoparticles, evaluate their radial density profile, quantify the particle-to-particle spacing, and determine their water content. The results show clearly that the nanoparticles are highly hydrated, with each nanoparticle containing 250% of its mass in water, and that aqueous dispersions approach a jamming transition at ~ 25% (w/w). QENS experiments provided an independent and consistent measure of the high level of hydration of the particles.

  5. Serrano charged up for hydrates battle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flatern, R. von

    2001-07-01

    The plugging of pipelines by paraffin and hydrate formations is an obstacle still to be overcome in the transportation of gases in deep cold water. However, a new flow assurance technique is soon to be installed in Shell's Serrano and Oregano fields in the Gulf of Mexico and this is expected to eventually impact on the entire offshore industry: it is this development which is discussed. The system uses electricity to heat the pipelines.

  6. Is the gas hydrate film growth controlled by intrinsic kinetic or heat transfer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, B.Z.; Chen, G.J.; Sun, C.Y.; Yang, L.Y.; Luo, H. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are non-stoichiometric crystalline inclusion compounds. They are composed of water molecules encaging guest gas molecules like natural gas components. When water contacts with a hydrate former in liquid or a gas state under suitable temperature and pressure conditions, hydrates usually form and grow in the form of a film at the interface between the two fluid phases. The growth behavior of this type of film is of significant importance with respect to the various components of hydrate production, such as the storage and transportation of natural gas and desalination. However, questions remain regarding the control steps of hydrate film growth. This paper discussed a study that systematically measured the lateral growth rates of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrates film by suspending individual gas bubbles in water. In order to determine the correlation between the hydrate film growth rate and the driving force, modeling of hydrate film growth by intrinsic kinetics and heat transfer was conducted. The temperature difference between the moving hydrate film front and the bulk water was calculated to evaluate the contribution of heat transfer to hydrate film growth rate. The paper discussed the experiment, with reference to the equipment and material; experimental procedure; and data processing. A simulation of the hydrate film growth revealed that heat transfer had little contribution to hydrate film growth, and the intrinsic kinetic was the main control step for CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} hydrate film growth. 16 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  7. Arctic Ocean Gas Hydrate Stability in a Changing Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Giustiniani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent estimations suggest that vast amounts of methane are locked in the Arctic Ocean bottom sediments in various forms of gas hydrates. A potential feedback from a continued warming of the Arctic region is therefore the release of methane to the atmosphere. This study addresses the relationship between a warming of the Arctic ocean and gas hydrate stability. We apply a theoretical model that estimates the base of the gas hydrate stability zone in the Arctic Ocean considering different bottom water warming and sea level scenarios. We model the present day conditions adopting two different geothermal gradient values: 30 and 40°C/km. For each geothermal gradient value, we simulate a rise and a decrease in seafloor temperature equal to 2°C and in sea level equal to 10 m. The results show that shallow gas hydrates present in water depths less than 500 m would be strongly affected by a future rise in seafloor temperature potentially resulting in large amounts of gas released to the water column due to their dissociation. We estimate that the area, where there could be complete gas hydrate dissociation, is about 4% of the area where there are the conditions for gas hydrates stability.

  8. Enhancing mung bean hydration using the ultrasound technology: description of mechanisms and impact on its germination and main components

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Claudio Miano; Jessica da Costa Pereira; Nanci Castanha; Manoel Divino da Matta Júnior; Pedro Esteves Duarte Augusto

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasound technology was successfully used to improve the mass transfer processes on food. However, the study of this technology on the grain hydration and on its main components properties was still not appropriately described. This work studied the application of the ultrasound technology on the hydration process of mung beans (Vigna radiata). This grain showed sigmoidal hydration behavior with a specific water entrance pathway. The ultrasound reduced ~25% of the hydration process time...

  9. The hydration structure of DNA and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Water-soluble proteins are surrounded by water molecules, and the water molecules mediate the biological processes: i.e. the protein folding, the enzymatic reaction, the molecular recognition via hydrogen bonds, electrostatic interactions and van der Waals interactions. It is essential to know the structural information such as orientation and dynamical behavior of water molecules including hydrogen atoms in order to characterize these interactions. The neutron analysis can determine the positions of the hydrogen atoms at the medium resolution in the protein crystallography (d{sub min}{approx}2.0 A). Recently we have constructed the high-resolution neutron diffractometer (BIX) dedicated for the biological macromolecules. By using this diffractometer, the high resolution (1.5 or 1.6A) neutron structure analyses of sperm whale myoglobin, a wild-type rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the rubredoxin mutant have been successfully carried out and their hydration structure including hydrogen atoms have been observed. Hydrogen atoms in the water molecule can be clearly identified in two boomerang-shaped water molecules and the forming of the hydrogen bonds between the two water molecules can be recognized well. It has been concluded that hydration structure observed by the high resolution neutron protein crystallography provides where a water molecule locates, and how it binds to the neighbor atoms, and how it behaves. (M.Suetake)

  10. Modelling of hydration kinetics of brown and grey African yam bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of the Peleg model was investigated for predicting hydration kinetics of brown and grey African Yam bean seed (AYB) varieties during soaking in water at temperatures 30, 40, 50 and 60oC in constant-temperature water bath for 0.5 – 12 h. Peleg's model was found to describe the hydration process of AYB seeds ...

  11. WatAA: Atlas of Protein Hydration. Exploring synergies between data mining and ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Jiří; Schneider, Bohdan; Biedermannová, Lada

    2017-07-14

    Water molecules represent an integral part of proteins and a key determinant of protein structure, dynamics and function. WatAA is a newly developed, web-based atlas of amino-acid hydration in proteins. The atlas provides information about the ordered first hydration shell of the most populated amino-acid conformers in proteins. The data presented in the atlas are drawn from two sources: experimental data and ab initio quantum-mechanics calculations. The experimental part is based on a data-mining study of a large set of high-resolution protein crystal structures. The crystal-derived data include 3D maps of water distribution around amino-acids and probability of occurrence of each of the identified hydration sites. The quantum mechanics calculations validate and extend this primary description by optimizing the water position for each hydration site, by providing hydrogen atom positions and by quantifying the interaction energy that stabilizes the water molecule at the particular hydration site position. The calculations show that the majority of experimentally derived hydration sites are positioned near local energy minima for water, and the calculated interaction energies help to assess the preference of water for the individual hydration sites. We propose that the atlas can be used to validate water placement in electron density maps in crystallographic refinement, to locate water molecules mediating protein-ligand interactions in drug design, and to prepare and evaluate molecular dynamics simulations. WatAA: Atlas of Protein Hydration is freely available without login at .

  12. Effects of ensembles on methane hydrate nucleation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Liu, Chan-Juan; Walsh, Matthew R; Guo, Guang-Jun

    2016-06-21

    By performing molecular dynamics simulations to form a hydrate with a methane nano-bubble in liquid water at 250 K and 50 MPa, we report how different ensembles, such as the NPT, NVT, and NVE ensembles, affect the nucleation kinetics of the methane hydrate. The nucleation trajectories are monitored using the face-saturated incomplete cage analysis (FSICA) and the mutually coordinated guest (MCG) order parameter (OP). The nucleation rate and the critical nucleus are obtained using the mean first-passage time (MFPT) method based on the FS cages and the MCG-1 OPs, respectively. The fitting results of MFPT show that hydrate nucleation and growth are coupled together, consistent with the cage adsorption hypothesis which emphasizes that the cage adsorption of methane is a mechanism for both hydrate nucleation and growth. For the three different ensembles, the hydrate nucleation rate is quantitatively ordered as follows: NPT > NVT > NVE, while the sequence of hydrate crystallinity is exactly reversed. However, the largest size of the critical nucleus appears in the NVT ensemble, rather than in the NVE ensemble. These results are helpful for choosing a suitable ensemble when to study hydrate formation via computer simulations, and emphasize the importance of the order degree of the critical nucleus.

  13. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Mora-Rodriguez; Juan F. Ortega; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E.; Maria Kapsokefalou; Olga Malisova; Adelais Athanasatou; Marlien Husemann; Kirsten Domnik; Hans Braun

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA) and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20–60 years) from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake whi...

  14. Study on molecular controlled mining system of methane hydrate; Methane hydrate no bunshi seigyo mining ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyagawa, M.; Saito, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Karasawa, H.; Kiyono , F.; Nagaoki, R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Komai, T.; Haneda, H.; Takahashi, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Nada, H. [Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Basic studies are conducted for the collection of methane from the methane hydrate that exists at levels deeper than 500m in the sea. The relationship between the hydrate generation mechanism and water cluster structure is examined by use of mass spectronomy. It is found that, among the stable liquid phase clusters, the (H2O)21H{sup +} cluster is the most stable. Stable hydrate clusters are in presence in quantities, and participate in the formation of hydrate crystal nuclei. For the elucidation of the nucleus formation mechanism, a kinetic simulation is conducted of molecules in the cohesion system consisting of water and methane molecules. Water molecules that array near methane molecules at the normal pressure is disarrayed under a higher pressure for rearray into a hydrate structure. Hydrate formation and breakdown in the three-phase equilibrium state of H2O, CH4, and CO2 at a low temperature and high pressure are tested, which discloses that supercooling is required for formation, that it is possible to extract CH4 first for replacement by guest molecule CO2 since CO2 is stabler than CH4 at a lower pressure or higher temperature, and that formation is easier to take place when the grain diameter is larger at the formation point since larger grain diameters result in a higher formation temperature. 3 figs.

  15. Further chemical studies on controlling gas hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelland, M.A.; Svartaas, T.M.; Dybvik, L.A. [Rogalandsforskning, Stavanger (Norway)

    1995-03-01

    Gas hydrates are clathrates in which water molecules form a hydrogen bonded network enclosing roughly spherical cavities that are filled with gas molecules. They are a menace to the oil industry in several areas, one example being their potential blocking of production lines and processing equipment. This paper reviews new technology for combating the problem. Natural gas hydrates form in several structures depending on the gas molecules, their size relative to the cavity, and the relative stability of the structures. At high pressures, gas hydrates can be stable well above the melting point of ice. Pipeline blocking can be overcome in many ways: (1) insulate the pipeline, (2) reduce pressure, (3) remove water, (4) use chemicals. These techniques are expensive. Today only thermodynamic inhibitors such as methanol or ethylene glycol are used, but cheaper methods are sought for. Kinetic Inhibitors are chemicals able to (1) delay hydrate nucleation, or (2) delay hydrate crystal growth. Anti-Agglomerators are chemicals able to prevent agglomeration of hydrates. The suitability of the various inhibitor types are discussed. It is concluded from laboratory tests that the best kinetic inhibitors are chemicals (5000 ppm) which prevent hydrate nucleation for several days at ca. 10{sup o}C subcooling, or chemicals that delay visual hydrate growth for 24 hrs at 10 {sup o}C subcooling. The best anti-agglomerators are chemicals preventing agglomeration at 30-40% water cuts at from 3{sup o}C upwards and so far tested in the pressure range 40-95 bar. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  16. Hydration shell parameters of aqueous alcohols: THz excess absorption and packing density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matvejev, V; Zizi, M; Stiens, J

    2012-12-06

    Solvation in water requires minimizing the perturbations in its hydrogen bonded network. Hence solutes distort water molecular motions in a surrounding domain, forming a molecule-specific hydration shell. The properties of those hydration shells impact the structure and function of the solubilized molecules, both at the single molecule and at higher order levels. The size of the hydration shell and the picoseconds time-scale water dynamics retardation are revealed by terahertz (THz) absorption coefficient measurements. Room-temperature absorption coefficient at f = 0.28 [THz] is measured as a function of alcohol concentration in aqueous methanol, ethanol, 1,2-propanol, and 1-butanol solutions. Highly diluted alcohol measurements and enhanced overall measurement accuracy are achieved with a THz absorption measurement technique of nL-volume liquids in a capillary tube. In the absorption analysis, bulk and interfacial molecular domains of water and alcohol are considered. THz ideal and excess absorption coefficients are defined in accordance with thermodynamics mixing formulations. The parameter extraction method is developed based on a THz excess absorption model and hydrated solute molecule packing density representation. First, the hydration shell size is deduced from the hydrated solute packing densities at two specific THz excess absorption nonlinearity points: at infinite alcohol dilution (IAD) and at the THz excess absorption extremum (EAE). Consequently, interfacial water and alcohol molecular domain absorptions are deduced from the THz excess absorption model. The hydration shell sizes obtained at the THz excess absorption extremum are in excellent agreement with other reports. The hydration shells of methanol, ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol consist of 13.97, 22.94, 22.99, and 31.10 water molecules, respectively. The hydration shell water absorption is on average 0.774 ± 0.028 times the bulk water absorption. The hydration shell parameters might shed light on

  17. 3D pore-type digital rock modeling of natural gas hydrate for permafrost and numerical simulation of electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huaimin; Sun, Jianmeng; Lin, Zhenzhou; Fang, Hui; Li, Yafen; Cui, Likai; Yan, Weichao

    2018-02-01

    Natural gas hydrate is being considered as an alternative energy source for sustainable development and has become a focus of research throughout the world. In this paper, based on CT scanning images of hydrate reservoir rocks, combined with the microscopic distribution of hydrate, a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model was used to construct 3D hydrate digital rocks of different distribution types, and the finite-element method was used to simulate their electrical characteristics in order to study the influence of different hydrate distribution types, hydrate saturation and formation of water salinity on electrical properties. The results show that the hydrate digital rocks constructed using the DLA model can be used to characterize the microscopic distribution of different types of hydrates. Under the same conditions, the resistivity of the adhesive hydrate digital rock is higher than the cemented and scattered type digital rocks, and the resistivity of the scattered hydrate digital rock is the smallest among the three types. Besides, the difference in the resistivity of the different types of hydrate digital rocks increases with an increase in hydrate saturation, especially when the saturation is larger than 55%, and the rate of increase of each of the hydrate types is quite different. Similarly, the resistivity of the three hydrate types decreases with an increase in the formation of water salinity. The single distribution hydrate digital rock constructed, combined with the law of microscopic distribution and influence of saturation on the electrical properties, can effectively improve the accuracy of logging identification of hydrate reservoirs and is of great significance for the estimation of hydrate reserves.

  18. Experimental verification of methane-carbon dioxide replacement in natural gas hydrates using a differential scanning calorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Yohan; Lee, Jaehyoung; Lee, Huen; Seo, Yongwon

    2013-11-19

    The methane (CH4) - carbon dioxide (CO2) swapping phenomenon in naturally occurring gas hydrates is regarded as an attractive method of CO2 sequestration and CH4 recovery. In this study, a high pressure microdifferential scanning calorimeter (HP μ-DSC) was used to monitor and quantify the CH4 - CO2 replacement in the gas hydrate structure. The HP μ-DSC provided reliable measurements of the hydrate dissociation equilibrium and hydrate heat of dissociation for the pure and mixed gas hydrates. The hydrate dissociation equilibrium data obtained from the endothermic thermograms of the replaced gas hydrates indicate that at least 60% of CH4 is recoverable after reaction with CO2, which is consistent with the result obtained via direct dissociation of the replaced gas hydrates. The heat of dissociation values of the CH4 + CO2 hydrates were between that of the pure CH4 hydrate and that of the pure CO2 hydrate, and the values increased as the CO2 compositions in the hydrate phase increased. By monitoring the heat flows from the HP μ-DSC, it was found that the noticeable dissociation or formation of a gas hydrate was not detected during the CH4 - CO2 replacement process, which indicates that a substantial portion of CH4 hydrate does not dissociate into liquid water or ice and then forms the CH4 + CO2 hydrate. This study provides the first experimental evidence using a DSC to reveal that the conversion of the CH4 hydrate to the CH4 + CO2 hydrate occurs without significant hydrate dissociation.

  19. Simulating the effect of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability during oil and gas development in deepwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingchao; Cheng, Yuanfang; Zhang, Huaiwen; Yan, Chuanliang; Liu, Yuwen

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that methane hydrate has been identified as an alternative resource due to its massive reserves and clean property. However, hydrate dissociation during oil and gas development (OGD) process in deep water can affect the stability of subsea equipment and formation. Currently, there is a serious lack of studies over quantitative assessment on the effects of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability. In order to solve this problem, ABAQUS finite element software was used to develop a model and to evaluate the behavior of wellhead caused by hydrate dissociation. The factors that affect the wellhead stability include dissociation range, depth of hydrate formation and mechanical properties of dissociated hydrate region. Based on these, series of simulations were carried out to determine the wellhead displacement. The results revealed that, continuous dissociation of hydrate in homogeneous and isotropic formations can causes the non-linear increment in vertical displacement of wellhead. The displacement of wellhead showed good agreement with the settlement of overlying formations under the same conditions. In addition, the shallower and thicker hydrate formation can aggravate the influence of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability. Further, it was observed that with the declining elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio, the wellhead displacement increases. Hence, these findings not only confirm the effect of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability, but also lend support to the actions, such as cooling the drilling fluid, which can reduce the hydrate dissociation range and further make deepwater operations safer and more efficient.

  20. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-11-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant "onion-skin" fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2-3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched "hydration fronts" where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between 110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at 400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration rinds in perlites, measuring hundreds of microns, preserve the original D/H values of hydrating water as a recorder of paleoclimate conditions. Measured δD values in perlitic lavas are -150 to -191 or 20-40 ‰ lower than glass hydrated by modern Yellowstone waters. This suggests that Yellowstone perlites record the low-δD signature of glacial ice. Cooling calculations, combined with the observed high water diffusion coefficients noted for 60-150 °C, suggest that if sufficient hot

  1. Major factors influencing the generation of natural gas hydrate in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Khlebnikov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current researches related to natural gas hydrate mainly focus on its physical and chemical properties, as well as the approaches to the production (decomposition of hydrate. Physical modeling of the flow process in hydrate deposits is critical to the study on the exploitation or decomposition of hydrate. However, investigation of the dynamic hydrate process by virtue of porous media like sand-packed tubes which are widely used in petroleum production research is rarely reported in literature. In this paper, physical simulation of methane hydrate generation process was conducted using river sand-packed tubes in the core displacement apparatus. During the simulation, the influences of parameters such as reservoir temperature, methane pressure and reservoir model properties on the process of hydrate generation were investigated. The following results are revealed. First, the use of ice-melted water as the immobile water in the reservoir model can significantly enhance the rate of methane hydrate generation. Second, the process driving force in porous media (i.e., extents to which the experimental pressure or temperature deviating those corresponding to the hydrate phase equilibrium plays a key role in the generation of methane hydrate. Third, the induction period of methane hydrate generation almost does not change with temperature or pressure when the methane pressure is above 1.4 folds of the hydrate phase equilibrium pressure or the laboratory temperature is lower than the phase equilibrium temperature by 3 °C or more. Fourth, the parameters such as permeability, water saturation and wettability don't have much influence on the generation of methane hydrate.

  2. Formation of methane nano-bubbles during hydrate decomposition and their effect on hydrate growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John; Englezos, Peter

    2015-06-07

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to study the conditions for methane nano-bubble formation during methane hydrate dissociation in the presence of water and a methane gas reservoir. Hydrate dissociation leads to the quick release of methane into the liquid phase which can cause methane supersaturation. If the diffusion of methane molecules out of the liquid phase is not fast enough, the methane molecules agglomerate and form bubbles. Under the conditions of our simulations, the methane-rich quasi-spherical bubbles grow to become cylindrical with a radius of ∼11 Å. The nano-bubbles remain stable for about 35 ns until they are gradually and homogeneously dispersed in the liquid phase and finally enter the gas phase reservoirs initially set up in the simulation box. We determined that the minimum mole fraction for the dissolved methane in water to form nano-bubbles is 0.044, corresponding to about 30% of hydrate phase composition (0.148). The importance of nano-bubble formation to the mechanism of methane hydrate formation, growth, and dissociation is discussed.

  3. Laboratory formation of non-cementing, methane hydrate-bearing sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, William F.; Bratton, Peter M.; Mason, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring hydrate-bearing sands often behave as though methane hydrate is acting as a load-bearing member of the sediment. Mimicking this behavior in laboratory samples with methane hydrate likely requires forming hydrate from methane dissolved in water. To hasten this formation process, we initially form hydrate in a free-gas-limited system, then form additional hydrate by circulating methane-supersaturated water through the sample. Though the dissolved-phase formation process can theoretically be enhanced by increasing the pore pressure and flow rate and lowering the sample temperature, a more fundamental concern is preventing clogs resulting from inadvertent methane bubble formation in the circulation lines. Clog prevention requires careful temperature control throughout the circulation loop.

  4. Methane Hydrates: More Than a Viable Aviation Fuel Feedstock Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Demand for hydrocarbon fuels is steadily increasing, and greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise unabated with the energy demand. Alternate fuels will be coming on line to meet that demand. This report examines the recovering of methane from methane hydrates for fuel to meet this demand rather than permitting its natural release into the environment, which will be detrimental to the planet. Some background on the nature, vast sizes, and stability of sedimentary and permafrost formations of hydrates are discussed. A few examples of the severe problems associated with methane recovery from these hydrates are presented along with the potential impact on the environment and coastal waters. Future availability of methane from hydrates may become an attractive option for aviation fueling, and so future aircraft design associated with methane fueling is considered.

  5. Homogeneous Nucleation of Methane Hydrate in Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarupria, Sapna; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2012-10-18

    We report atomistically detailed molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation of methane hydrate in bulk aqueous phase in the absence of any interface. Subcritical clusters of water and methane molecules are formed in the initial segment of the simulations, which then aggregate to give the critical hydrate nucleus. This occurs over time scales of several hundred nanoseconds, indicating that the formation and aggregation of subcritical clusters can contribute significantly to the overall rate of hydrate nucleation. The clusters have elements of sI hydrate structure, such as 5(12) and 5(12)6(2) cages as well as other uncommon 5(12)6(3) and 5(12)6(4) cages, but do not possess long-range order. Clusters are dynamic in nature and undergo continuous structural rearrangements.

  6. Postglacial response of Arctic Ocean gas hydrates to climatic amelioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Pavel; Mienert, Jürgen; Patton, Henry; Portnov, Alexey; Silyakova, Anna; Panieri, Giuliana; Carroll, Michael L.; Carroll, JoLynn; Andreassen, Karin; Hubbard, Alun

    2017-01-01

    Seafloor methane release due to the thermal dissociation of gas hydrates is pervasive across the continental margins of the Arctic Ocean. Furthermore, there is increasing awareness that shallow hydrate-related methane seeps have appeared due to enhanced warming of Arctic Ocean bottom water during the last century. Although it has been argued that a gas hydrate gun could trigger abrupt climate change, the processes and rates of subsurface/atmospheric natural gas exchange remain uncertain. Here we investigate the dynamics between gas hydrate stability and environmental changes from the height of the last glaciation through to the present day. Using geophysical observations from offshore Svalbard to constrain a coupled ice sheet/gas hydrate model, we identify distinct phases of subglacial methane sequestration and subsequent release on ice sheet retreat that led to the formation of a suite of seafloor domes. Reconstructing the evolution of this dome field, we find that incursions of warm Atlantic bottom water forced rapid gas hydrate dissociation and enhanced methane emissions during the penultimate Heinrich event, the Bølling and Allerød interstadials, and the Holocene optimum. Our results highlight the complex interplay between the cryosphere, geosphere, and atmosphere over the last 30,000 y that led to extensive changes in subseafloor carbon storage that forced distinct episodes of methane release due to natural climate variability well before recent anthropogenic warming. PMID:28584081

  7. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J A

    2010-04-14

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  8. Postglacial response of Arctic Ocean gas hydrates to climatic amelioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Pavel; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Mienert, Jürgen; Patton, Henry; Portnov, Alexey; Silyakova, Anna; Panieri, Giuliana; Carroll, Michael L.; Carroll, JoLynn; Andreassen, Karin; Hubbard, Alun

    2017-06-01

    Seafloor methane release due to the thermal dissociation of gas hydrates is pervasive across the continental margins of the Arctic Ocean. Furthermore, there is increasing awareness that shallow hydrate-related methane seeps have appeared due to enhanced warming of Arctic Ocean bottom water during the last century. Although it has been argued that a gas hydrate gun could trigger abrupt climate change, the processes and rates of subsurface/atmospheric natural gas exchange remain uncertain. Here we investigate the dynamics between gas hydrate stability and environmental changes from the height of the last glaciation through to the present day. Using geophysical observations from offshore Svalbard to constrain a coupled ice sheet/gas hydrate model, we identify distinct phases of subglacial methane sequestration and subsequent release on ice sheet retreat that led to the formation of a suite of seafloor domes. Reconstructing the evolution of this dome field, we find that incursions of warm Atlantic bottom water forced rapid gas hydrate dissociation and enhanced methane emissions during the penultimate Heinrich event, the Bølling and Allerød interstadials, and the Holocene optimum. Our results highlight the complex interplay between the cryosphere, geosphere, and atmosphere over the last 30,000 y that led to extensive changes in subseafloor carbon storage that forced distinct episodes of methane release due to natural climate variability well before recent anthropogenic warming.

  9. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  10. Gas Hydrate Stability and Sampling: The Future as Related to the Phase Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dendy Sloan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The phase diagram for methane + water is explained, in relation to hydrate applications, such as in flow assurance and in nature. For natural applications, the phase diagram determines the regions for hydrate formation for two- and three-phase conditions. Impacts are presented for sample preparation and recovery. We discuss an international study for “Round Robin” hydrate sample preparation protocols and testing.

  11. Effects of hydration in rats and mice with polycystic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hopp, Katharina; Wang, Xiaofang; YE, HONG; Irazabal, María V.; Harris, Peter C.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2014-01-01

    Vasopressin and V2 receptor signaling promote polycystic kidney disease (PKD) progression, raising the question whether suppression of vasopressin release through enhanced hydration can delay disease advancement. Enhanced hydration by adding 5% glucose to the drinking water has proven protective in a rat model orthologous to autosomal recessive PKD. We wanted to exclude a glucose effect and explore the influence of enhanced hydration in a mouse model orthologous to autosomal dominant PKD. PCK...

  12. X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

    2010-03-01

    When maintained under hydrate-stable conditions, methane hydrate in laboratory samples is often considered a stable and immobile solid material. Currently, there do not appear to be any studies in which the long-term redistribution of hydrates in sediments has been investigated in the laboratory. These observations are important because if the location of hydrate in a sample were to change over time (e.g. by dissociating at one location and reforming at another), the properties of the sample that depend on hydrate saturation and pore space occupancy would also change. Observations of hydrate redistribution under stable conditions are also important in understanding natural hydrate deposits, as these may also change over time. The processes by which solid hydrate can move include dissociation, hydrate-former and water migration in the gas and liquid phases, and hydrate formation. Chemical potential gradients induced by temperature, pressure, and pore water or host sediment chemistry can drive these processes. A series of tests were performed on a formerly natural methane-hydrate-bearing core sample from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, in order to observe hydrate formation and morphology within this natural sediment, and changes over time using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Long-term observations (over several weeks) of methane hydrate in natural sediments were made to investigate spatial changes in hydrate saturation in the core. During the test sequence, mild buffered thermal and pressure oscillations occurred within the sample in response to laboratory temperature changes. These oscillations were small in magnitude, and conditions were maintained well within the hydrate stability zone.

  13. Hydration properties of briquetted wheat straw biomass feedstock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Heng; Fredriksson, Maria; Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    process with the aim of subsequent processing for 2nd generation bioethanol production. The hydration properties of the unprocessed and briquetted wheat straw were characterized for water absorption via low field nuclear magnetic resonance and sorption balance measurements. The water was absorbed more...

  14. HYDRATION OF Cd(II): MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY Ahmed M ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    K is estimated by the transition state theory to be 4.9 x 108 s-1, assuming a transmission coefficient of unity. KEY WORDS: Molecular dynamics, Umbrella sampling, Hydration structure, Cd(II), Water exchange, Three- body corrections. INTRODUCTION. Knowledge of the structural and dynamical properties of metal ion-water ...

  15. An Assessment of Hydrazine, Hydrazine Hydrate and Liquid Ammonia as Fuels for Rocket Propulsion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooper, K. A; Wiseman, L. A

    1949-01-01

    .... More data on the system Hydrazine/water, in which the concentration of water is less than in hydrazine hydrate, are desirable, and other methods of lowering the freezing point of anhydrous hydrazine...

  16. Acoustical method of whole-body hydration status monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvazyan, A. P.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Calhoun, M.; Utter, A.

    2016-07-01

    An acoustical handheld hydration monitor (HM) for assessing the water balance of the human body was developed. Dehydration is a critical public health problem. Many elderly over age of 65 are particularly vulnerable as are infants and young children. Given that dehydration is both preventable and reversible, the need for an easy-to-perform method for the detection of water imbalance is of the utmost clinical importance. The HM is based on an experimental fact that ultrasound velocity in muscle is a linear function of water content and can be referenced to the hydration status of the body. Studies on the validity of HM for the assessment of whole-body hydration status were conducted in the Appalachian State University, USA, on healthy young adults and on elderly subjects residing at an assisted living facility. The HM was able to track changes in total body water during periods of acute dehydration and rehydration in athletes and day-to-day and diurnal variability of hydration in elderly. Results of human studies indicate that HM has a potential to become an efficient tool for detecting abnormal changes in the body hydration status.

  17. Gas Hydrate Petroleum System Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    In a gas hydrate petroleum system, the individual factors that contribute to the formation of gas hydrate accumulations, such as (1) gas hydrate pressure-temperature stability conditions, (2) gas source, (3) gas migration, and (4) the growth of the gas hydrate in suitable host sediment can identified and quantified. The study of know and inferred gas hydrate accumulations reveal the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate is mostly controlled by the presence of fractures and/or coarser grained sediments. Field studies have concluded that hydrate grows preferentially in coarse-grained sediments because lower capillary pressures in these sediments permit the migration of gas and nucleation of hydrate. Due to the relatively distal nature of the deep marine geologic settings, the overall abundance of sand within the shallow geologic section is usually low. However, drilling projects in the offshore of Japan, Korea, and in the Gulf of Mexico has revealed the occurrence of significant hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The 1999/2000 Japan Nankai Trough drilling confirmed occurrence of hydrate-bearing sand-rich intervals (interpreted as turbidite fan deposits). Gas hydrate was determined to fill the pore spaces in these deposits, reaching saturations up to 80% in some layers. A multi-well drilling program titled "METI Toaki-oki to Kumano-nada" also identified sand-rich reservoirs with pore-filling hydrate. The recovered hydrate-bearing sand layers were described as very-fine- to fine-grained turbidite sand layers measuring from several centimeters up to a meter thick. However, the gross thickness of the hydrate-bearing sand layers were up to 50 m. In 2010, the Republic of Korea conducted the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate (UBGH2) Drilling Expedition. Seismic data clearly showed the development of a thick, potential basin wide, sedimentary sections characterized by mostly debris flows. The downhole LWD logs and core data from Site UBGH2-5 reveal that each debris flows is

  18. A Sea Floor Methane Hydrate Displacement Experiment Using N2 Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Hester, K.

    2009-12-01

    The production of free methane gas from solid methane hydrate accumulations presents a considerable challenge. The presently preferred procedure is pressure reduction whereby the relief of pressure to a condition outside the hydrate phase boundary creates a gas phase. The reaction is endothermic and thus a problematic water ice phase can form if the extraction of gas is too rapid, limiting the applicability of this procedure. Additionally, the removal of the formation water in contact with the hydrate phase is required before meaningful pressure reduction can be attained -- and this can take time. An alternate approach that has been suggested is the injection of liquid CO2 into the formation, thereby displacing the formation water. Formation of a solid CO2 hydrate is thermodynamically favored under these conditions. Competition between CH4 and CO2 for the hydrate host water molecules can occur displacing CH4 from the solid to the gas phase with formation of a solid CO2 hydrate. We have investigated another alternate approach with displacement of the surrounding bulk water phase by N2 gas, resulting in rapid release of CH4 gas and complete loss of the solid hydrate phase. Our experiment was carried out at the Southern Summit of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, at 780m depth. There we harvested hydrate fragments from surficial sediments using the robotic arm of the ROV Doc Ricketts. Specimens of the hydrate were collected about 1m above the sediment surface in an inverted funnel with a mesh covered neck as they floated upwards. The accumulated hydrate was transferred to an inverted glass cylinder, and N2 gas was carefully injected into this container. Displacement of the water phase occurred and when the floating hydrate material approached the lower rim the gas injection was stopped and the cylinder placed upon a flat metal plate effectively sealing the system. We returned to this site after 7 days to measure progress, and observed complete loss of the hydrate phase

  19. Vibrational spectra of halide-water dimers: Insights on ion hydration from full-dimensional quantum calculations on many-body potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Pushp; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker; Paesani, Francesco

    2018-03-01

    Full-dimensional vibrational spectra are calculated for both X-(H2O) and X-(D2O) dimers (X = F, Cl, Br, I) at the quantum-mechanical level. The calculations are carried out on two sets of recently developed potential energy functions (PEFs), namely, Thole-type model energy (TTM-nrg) and many-body energy (MB-nrg), using the symmetry-adapted Lanczos algorithm with a product basis set including all six vibrational coordinates. Although both TTM-nrg and MB-nrg PEFs are derived from coupled-cluster single double triple-F12 data obtained in the complete basis set limit, they differ in how many-body effects are represented at short range. Specifically, while both models describe long-range interactions through the combination of two-body dispersion and many-body classical electrostatics, the relatively simple Born-Mayer functions employed in the TTM-nrg PEFs to represent short-range interactions are replaced in the MB-nrg PEFs by permutationally invariant polynomials to achieve chemical accuracy. For all dimers, the MB-nrg vibrational spectra are in close agreement with the available experimental data, correctly reproducing anharmonic and nuclear quantum effects. In contrast, the vibrational frequencies calculated with the TTM-nrg PEFs exhibit significant deviations from the experimental values. The comparison between the TTM-nrg and MB-nrg results thus reinforces the notion that an accurate representation of both short-range interactions associated with electron density overlap and long-range many-body electrostatic interactions is necessary for a correct description of hydration phenomena at the molecular level.

  20. Site selection for DOE/JIP gas hydrates drilling in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Ruppel, C. [United States Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Shelander, D.; Dai, J. [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States); McConnell, D. [AOA Geophysics Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shedd, W. [Minerals Management Service, New Orleans, LA (United States); Frye, M. [Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States); Boswell, R.; Rose, K. [United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Lab; Jones, E.; Latham, T. [Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Collett, T. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dugan, B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Science; Wood, W. [United States Naval Research Lab, Stennis Space Center, MS (United States)

    2008-07-01

    As drilling operations in the Gulf of Mexico shift from shallow water to deeper water targets, operators are encountering sediments with pressure-temperature regimes for gas hydrate stability. The Chevron-led Joint Industry Project (JIP) on methane hydrates was formed in 2001 to study the hazards associated with drilling these types of hydrate-bearing sediments and to assess the capacity of geological and geophysical tools to predict gas hydrate distributions and concentrations. Selected reservoirs units with high concentrations of gas hydrate were sampled to obtain physical data on hydrate bearing sediments. The JIP work validates methods devised to estimate gas hydrate distribution and concentrations in order to analyze the resource potential of these hydrate-bearing sediments. This paper described the geologic and geophysical setting of 3 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico that contain hydrate-bearing reservoir sands. The three sites that will undergo exploratory drilling and a logging campaign in late spring 2008 include the Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system characterized with seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets sheet sands and associated channel deposits within a small basin. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. 39 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  1. Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Methane Gas Production from Gulf of Mexico Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore Mohanty; Bill Cook; Mustafa Hakimuddin; Ramanan Pitchumani; Damiola Ogunlana; Jon Burger; John Shillinglaw

    2006-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Estimates of the amounts of methane sequestered in gas hydrates worldwide are speculative and range from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet (modified from Kvenvolden, 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In this project novel techniques were developed to form and dissociate methane hydrates in porous media, to measure acoustic properties and CT properties during hydrate dissociation in the presence of a porous medium. Hydrate depressurization experiments in cores were simulated with the use of TOUGHFx/HYDRATE simulator. Input/output software was developed to simulate variable pressure boundary condition and improve the ease of use of the simulator. A series of simulations needed to be run to mimic the variable pressure condition at the production well. The experiments can be matched qualitatively by the hydrate simulator. The temperature of the core falls during hydrate dissociation; the temperature drop is higher if the fluid withdrawal rate is higher. The pressure and temperature gradients are small within the core. The sodium iodide concentration affects the dissociation pressure and rate. This procedure and data will be useful in designing future hydrate studies.

  2. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  3. Animated molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated caesium-smectite interlayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sposito Garrison

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer animation of center of mass coordinates obtained from 800 ps molecular dynamics simulations of Cs-smectite hydrates (1/3 and 2/3 water monolayers provided information concerning the structure and dynamics of the interlayer region that could not be obtained through traditional simulation analysis methods. Cs+ formed inner sphere complexes with the mineral surface, and could be seen to jump from one attracting location near a layer charge site to the next, while water molecules were observed to migrate from the hydration shell of one ion to that of another. Neighboring ions maintained a partial hydration shell by sharing water molecules, such that a single water molecule hydrated two ions simultaneously for hundreds of picoseconds. Cs-montmorillonite hydrates featured the largest extent of this sharing interaction, because interlayer ions were able to inhabit positions near surface cavities as well as at their edges, close to oxygen triads. The greater positional freedom of Cs+ within the montmorillonite interlayer, a result of structural hydroxyl orientation and low tetrahedral charge, promoted the optimization of distances between cations and water molecules required for water sharing. Preference of Cs+ for locations near oxygen triads was observed within interlayer beidellite and hectorite. Water molecules also could be seen to interact directly with the mineral surface, entering its surface cavities to approach attracting charge sites and structural hydroxyls. With increasing water content, water molecules exhibited increased frequency and duration of both cavity habitation and water sharing interactions. Competition between Cs+ and water molecules for surface sites was evident. These important cooperative and competitive features of interlayer molecular behavior were uniquely revealed by animation of an otherwise highly complex simulation output.

  4. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mora-Rodriguez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20–60 years from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake which was subtracted from daily urine volume to allow calculation of non-renal water loss (i.e., mostly sweating. Hydration status was assessed by urine and blood osmolality. A negative association was seen between ambient temperature and PA (r = −0.277; p < 0.001. Lower PA with high temperatures did not prevent increased non-renal water losses (i.e., sweating and elevated urine and blood osmolality (r = 0.218 to 0.163 all p < 0.001. When summer and winter data were combined PA was negatively associated with urine osmolality (r = −0.153; p = 0.001. Our data suggest that environmental heat acts to reduce voluntary PA but this is not sufficient to prevent moderate dehydration (increased osmolality. On the other hand, increased PA is associated with improved hydration status (i.e., lower urine and blood osmolality.

  5. [NMF and cosmetology of cutaneous hydration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, J-P

    2002-01-01

    In the stratum corneum, the water binds to the intracellular hygroscopic and hydrosoluble substances called "natural moisturizing factors" or NMF. These "natural moisturizing factors" contained in the corneocytes are formed during epidermal differentiation and may represent up to 10 p. cent of the corneocyte mass. They are principally amino acids, carboxylic pyrrolidone acid, lactic acid, urea, glucose and mineral ions. Keratinization plays an important part in the formation of NMF that exhibit strong osmotic potential attracting the water molecules. The binding of water to NMF is the static aspect of cutaneous hydration. The second, dynamic, aspect is related to the selective permeability of the stratum corneum and to its lipid barrier properties, the permeability of which depends on the integrity and nature of the inter-corneocyte lipids and their lamellar organization between the cells. In these conditions, hydration cosmetics rely on two concepts that can be isolated or associated: the supply of hydrophilic substances to the stratum corneum, capable of attracting and retaining water (moisturizer) or capable of restoring the barrier in order to restore normal water loss or of protecting it against aggression (occlusive).

  6. THE EFFECT OF GAS HYDRATES DISSOCIATION AND DRILLING FLUIDS INVASION UPON BOREHOLE STABILITY IN OCEANIC GAS HYDRATES-BEARING SEDIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, F.; Wu, N.; Jiang, G.; Zhang, L.

    2009-12-01

    Under the condition of over-pressure drilling, the solid-phase and liquid-phase in drilling fluids immediately penetrate into the oceanic gas hydrates-bearing sediment, which causes the water content surrounding the borehole to increase largely. At the same time, the hydrates surrounding borehole maybe quickly decompose into water and gas because of the rapid change of temperature and pressure. The drilling practices prove that this two factors may change the rock characteristics of wellbore, such as rock strength, pore pressure, resistivity, etc., and then affect the logging response and evaluation, wellbore stability and well safty. The invasion of filtrate can lower the angle of friction and weaken the cohesion of hydrates-bearing sediment,which is same to the effect of invading into conventional oil and gas formation on borehole mechni