WorldWideScience

Sample records for c-phycocyanin hydration water

  1. Hydration water in dynamics of a hydrated beta-lactoglobulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Longeville, S.

    2007-02-01

    Incoherent spin-echo signals of a hydrated β-lactoglobulin protein were investigated, at 275 and 293 K. The intermediate scattering functions I(Q,t) were divided in two contributions from surface water and protein, respectively. On one hand, the dynamics of the surface water follows a KWW stretched exponential function (the exponent is ~0.5), on the other hand, that of the protein follows a single exponential. The present results are consistent with our previous results of hydrated C-phycocyanin combining elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering and by molecular dynamics simulation.

  2. Dynamics of hydration water in protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incoherent quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of in vivo deuterated C-phycocyanin, at different levels of hydration, have been made. We show that the mobility at high temperature, (∝300 K) of the water molecules near the protein surface can be described by relatively simple models. At full hydration the high temperature data can be interpreted using a model where each water molecule is diffusing in a confined space of 3 A in radius. At low hydration, and 298 K, the diffusional behaviour is typical of jump diffusion with a residence time 10 times larger than the one in bulk water at the same temperature. (orig.)

  3. Photodynamic action of C-phycocyanins obtained from marine and fresh water cyanobacterial cultures: a comparative study using EPR spin trapping technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bibbin Tom; Patel, Anamika; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam; Mishra, Sandhya; Ghosh, Pushpita Kumar; Murugesan, Ramachandran

    2006-08-01

    C-phycocyanins, major biliproteins of blue green algae (cyanobacteria), widely used as colourants in food and cosmetics are known for their antioxidant as well as therapeutic potential. Recent claims indicating phycobiliproteins exert stronger photodynamic action on tumor cells than clinically approved hematoporphyrin derivatives motivate us to investigate the photodynamic action of two newly isolated C-phycocyanins from Phormidium [PHR] and Lyngbya [LY] spp, respectively in comparison with known C-phycocyanin from Spirulina sp. [SPI]. Photolysis of air saturated solutions of PHR, LY and SPI in the presence of 2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl piperidinol (TEMPL) generated three line EPR spectrum characteristic of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxyl (TEMPOL). The increase in intensity of the EPR spectrum with time of irradiation and decrease in intensity, in the presence of 1O2 quencher DABCO confirm the formation of 1O2. Photoirradiation in the presence of spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) generated EPR signal characteristic of O2(-) adduct. Efficiency of 1O2 generation is of the order LY > PHR> SPI. The yield of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is found to be 1O2>O2(-) indicating type II mechanism to be the prominent pathway for photosensitation by phycocyanins.

  4. Single-particle dynamics of hydration water in protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incoherent quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies of in vivo deuterated C-phycocyanin have been made. At full hydration the high-temperature data can be interpreted using a model where each water molecule is diffusing in a confined space of 3 A in radius. The excess elastic intensity at large Q indicates that a relatively low fraction of a water molecules attached to the immediate vicinity of the protein surface is immobile, in agreement with computer simulation. The translational and librational density of states show slight up-shifts from the corresponding bulk cases. (orig.)

  5. Single-particle dynamics of hydration water in protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.C.; Teixeira, J. (Lab. Leon Brillouin (CEA-CNRS), CEN-Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Bradley, K.F.; Chen, S.H. (Nuclear Engineering Dept., M.I.T., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Crespi, H.L. (Chemistry Div., Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-06-01

    Incoherent quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies of in vivo deuterated C-phycocyanin have been made. At full hydration the high-temperature data can be interpreted using a model where each water molecule is diffusing in a confined space of 3 A in radius. The excess elastic intensity at large Q indicates that a relatively low fraction of a water molecules attached to the immediate vicinity of the protein surface is immobile, in agreement with computer simulation. The translational and librational density of states show slight up-shifts from the corresponding bulk cases. (orig.).

  6. Production of Nanofibers Containing the Bioactive Compound C-Phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Felipe da Silva; Gettens, Juliana Garcia; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque; Moraes, Caroline Costa; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2016-01-01

    C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is a water-soluble phycobiliprotein present in light-harvesting antenna system of cyanobacteria. The nanostructures have not been widely evaluated, precluding improvements in stability and application of the C-PC. Electrospun nanofibers have an extremely high specific surface area due to their small diameter, they can be produced from a wide variety of polymers, and they are successfully evaluated to increase the efficacy of antitumor drugs. The incorporation of C-PC into nanofibers would allow investigations of potential uses in alternative cancer treatments and tissue engineering scaffolds. In this paper, C-phycocyanin were incorporated into the polymer polyethylene oxide (PEO) in various concentrations for nanofiber production via an electrospinning process. Nanofibers structures were analyzed using digital optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermogravimetric analysis was performed on the pure starting compounds and the produced nanofibers. At a concentration of 2% (w/w) of PEO, nanofibers were not produced, and concentrations of 4% (w/w) of PEO failed to produce nanofibers of good quality. Solutions with 6% (w/w) PEO, 6% (w/w) PEO plus 1% (w/w) NaCI, and 8% (w/w) PEO promote the formation of bluish, homogeneous and bead-free nanofibers with average diameters varying between 542.1 and 759.9 nm, as evaluated by optical microscopy. SEM analysis showed that nanofibers produced from polymer solutions containing 6% (w/w) PEO, 1% (w/w) NaCl and 3% (w/w) C-PC have an average diameter of 295 nm. Thermogravimetric analysis detected an increase in thermal resistance with the incorporation of C-phycocyanin into nanofibers. PMID:27398551

  7. C-phycocyanin extraction from Spirulina platensis wet biomass

    OpenAIRE

    C. C. Moraes; Luisa Sala; G. P. Cerveira; S. J. Kalil

    2011-01-01

    C-Phycocyanin is a natural blue dye used in food and pharmaceutical industry. In the present study, a simple and efficient method to extract C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis wet biomass is reported. The extractions were carried out using six different methods, including chemical (organic and inorganic acid treatment), physical (freezing and thawing, sonication, homogenization) and enzymatic (lysozyme treatment) methods. The extraction using ultrasonic bath in the presence of glass pearl...

  8. Structure and dynamics of interfacial water. Role of hydratation water in the globular proteins dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This memoir includes five chapters. In the first chapter, are given the elements of the neutrons scattering theory that is used in this study. the second chapter is devoted to a general presentation of the interaction between biological macro molecule and water. The third part is dedicated to the study of the structure and the dynamics of interfacial water in the neighbouring of model systems, the vycor and the amorphous carbon. The results presented in this part are compared with these one relative to water dynamics at the C-phycocyanin surface. This study makes the object of the fourth chapter. Then, in the fifth and last chapter are discussed the results relative to the role of hydratation on the parv-albumin dynamics for which have been combined the neutron quasi elastic incoherent scattering and the nuclear magnetic resonance of the carbon 13 solid in natural abundance

  9. C-phycocyanin extraction from Spirulina platensis wet biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Moraes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available C-Phycocyanin is a natural blue dye used in food and pharmaceutical industry. In the present study, a simple and efficient method to extract C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis wet biomass is reported. The extractions were carried out using six different methods, including chemical (organic and inorganic acid treatment, physical (freezing and thawing, sonication, homogenization and enzymatic (lysozyme treatment methods. The extraction using ultrasonic bath in the presence of glass pearls in the biomass proved to be the most efficient method, 56% higher than using freezing and thawing (the method most frequently used, and presented a extraction yield of 43.75 mg.g-1 and a C-phycocyanin concentration of 0.21 mg.mL-1.

  10. ENERGY TRANSFER IN TRIMERIC C-PHYCOCYANIN STUDIED BY PICOSECOND FLUORESCENCE KINETICS

    OpenAIRE

    WENDLER, J.; John, Wolfhart; Scheer, Hugo; Holzwarth, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    The excited state kinetics of trimeric C-phycocyanin from Mastigocladus laminosus has been measured as a function of the emission and excitation wavelength by the single-photon timing technique with picosecond resolution and simultaneous data analysis. A fast decay component of 22 ps (C-phycocyanin with linker peptides) and 36 ps (C-phycocyanin lacking linker peptides) is attributed to efficient energy transfer from sensitizing to fluorescing chromophores. At long detection wavelengths the fa...

  11. FÖRSTER TRANSFER CALCULATIONS BASED ON CRYSTAL STRUCTURE DATA FROM Agmenellum quadruplicatum C-PHYCOCYANIN

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Kenneth; Scheer, Hugo; Sauer, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin is modeled using the Forster inductive resonance mechanism. Detailed calculations are carried out using coordinates and orientations of the chromophores derived from X-ray crystallographic studies of C-phycocyanin from two different species (Schirmer et al, J. Mol. Biol. 184, 257–277 (1985) and ibid., 188, 651-677 (1986)). Spectral overlap integrals are estimated from absorption and fluorescence spectra of C-phycocyanin of Mastigocladus laminosus an...

  12. Structure and dynamics of interfacial water. Role of hydratation water in the globular proteins dynamics; Structure et dynamique de l`eau interfaciale. Role de l`eau d`hydratation dans la dynamique des proteines globulaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotti, J.M.

    1997-01-27

    This memoir includes five chapters. In the first chapter, are given the elements of the neutrons scattering theory that is used in this study. the second chapter is devoted to a general presentation of the interaction between biological macro molecule and water. The third part is dedicated to the study of the structure and the dynamics of interfacial water in the neighbouring of model systems, the vycor and the amorphous carbon. The results presented in this part are compared with these one relative to water dynamics at the C-phycocyanin surface. This study makes the object of the fourth chapter. Then, in the fifth and last chapter are discussed the results relative to the role of hydratation on the parv-albumin dynamics for which have been combined the neutron quasi elastic incoherent scattering and the nuclear magnetic resonance of the carbon 13 solid in natural abundance.

  13. Kinetics of energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵井泉; 李晔

    1999-01-01

    The antenna system of algae for photosynthesis is a functional entity composed of various phycobiliproteins and the linker polypeptides. Up to now, high-resolution crystal structure data have been available only for the isolated phycobiliproteins. To have an understanding of the functional connection between different phycobiliproteins, it is necessary to study the complexes composed of different phycobiliproteins. The energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes were studied through computer simulation because it is difficult to be studied by conventional experimental methods. The main pathways of energy flow and the dynamic property of the energy transfer were obtained. A fast transfer process between two neighboring disks was observed through analyzing the distribution curves of excitation energy over time. According to the definition of the time constants for energy transfer in time-resolved spectrum techniques, for a complex with three C-phycoeyanin hexamer disks, a fluorescence-rising comp

  14. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  15. Antitumor activity of C-phycocyanin from Arthronema africanum (Cyanophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gardeva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pure C-phycocyanin (C-PC was isolated from Arthronema africanumto evaluate its potential antitumor effects in vivo and in vitro. Experimental myeloid Graffi tumor in hamsters was used as a model. The cell proliferation assay showed that C-PC treatment, at concentration of 100 µg mL-1 for 24 h, significantly inhibited the growth of Graffi tumor cells (51.4% viability. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the genomic DNA of treated cells displayed time-and concentration-dependent fragmentation pattern, typical for apoptosis. Apoptotic process was related to the increase in cellular manganese and copper/zinc superoxide dismutases and glutathione reductase activities, coupled with a low catalase activity. In vivo C-PC administration (5.0 mg kg-1 body weight suppressed the tumor transplantability and growth, while the mean survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters was increased. The results revealed promising antitumor activities of A. africanum C-PC and suggested the potential of this natural biliprotein pigment for future pharmacological and medical applications. The study provided new data on the mechanism of the C-PC induced apoptosis in which the imbalance of antioxidant enzymes that favoured hydrogen peroxide accumulation might play a leading role.

  16. Medical Application of Spirulina platensis Derived C-Phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Huang, Yinghong; Zhang, Ronghua; Cai, Tiange; Cai, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of marine biological pharmaceutical research, high-effective and low-toxic drugs and functional foods isolated from marine organisms have become a new field of pharmacy and bromatology. The pharmacological actions, such as anti-inflammation, antioxidation, antitumor, immunological enhancement, and hepatorenal protection of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) from Spirulina platensis, have been reported, and C-PC has important value of development and utilization either as drug or as functional food. There are many researches about the various pharmacological actions and mechanisms of C-PC, but related reports are only to some extent integrated deeply and accurately enough, which put some limitations to the further application of C-PC in medicine. Particularly, with the improvement of living standards and attention to health issues, C-PC being a functional food is preferred by more and more people. C-PC is easy to get, safe, and nontoxic; thus, it has a great potential of research and development as a drug or functional food. Here, the separation and purification, physicochemical properties, physiological and pharmacological activities, safety, and some applications are reviewed to provide relevant basis for the development of natural medicine and applied products. PMID:27293463

  17. Medical Application of Spirulina platensis Derived C-Phycocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of marine biological pharmaceutical research, high-effective and low-toxic drugs and functional foods isolated from marine organisms have become a new field of pharmacy and bromatology. The pharmacological actions, such as anti-inflammation, antioxidation, antitumor, immunological enhancement, and hepatorenal protection of C-phycocyanin (C-PC from Spirulina platensis, have been reported, and C-PC has important value of development and utilization either as drug or as functional food. There are many researches about the various pharmacological actions and mechanisms of C-PC, but related reports are only to some extent integrated deeply and accurately enough, which put some limitations to the further application of C-PC in medicine. Particularly, with the improvement of living standards and attention to health issues, C-PC being a functional food is preferred by more and more people. C-PC is easy to get, safe, and nontoxic; thus, it has a great potential of research and development as a drug or functional food. Here, the separation and purification, physicochemical properties, physiological and pharmacological activities, safety, and some applications are reviewed to provide relevant basis for the development of natural medicine and applied products.

  18. Kinetics and adsorption isotherm of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis on ion-exchange resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, L; F. S. Figueira; G. P. Cerveira; C. C. Moraes; S. J. Kalil

    2014-01-01

    C-phycocyanin is a natural blue dye extracted from Spirulina platensis, which has many applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this paper the effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption of C-phycocyanin onto two different ion exchange resins (Streamline DEAE and Streamline Q XL) for expanded bed adsorption chromatography was investigated. Moreover, the kinetics and adsorption isotherm were evaluated. The equilibrium for the Q XL matrix was reached after 60 min, while for...

  19. Single step aqueous two-phase extraction for downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis

    OpenAIRE

    Chethana, S.; Nayak, Chetan A.; M.C. Madhusudhan; Raghavarao, K. S. M. S.

    2014-01-01

    C-phycocyanin, a natural food colorant, is gaining importance worldwide due to its several medical and pharmaceutical applications. In the present study, aqueous two-phase extraction was shown to be an attractive alternative for the downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis. By employing differential partitioning, C-phycocyanin selectively partitioned to the polymer rich (top) phase in concentrated form and contaminant proteins to the salt rich (bottom) phase. This resul...

  20. Kinetics and adsorption isotherm of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis on ion-exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available C-phycocyanin is a natural blue dye extracted from Spirulina platensis, which has many applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this paper the effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption of C-phycocyanin onto two different ion exchange resins (Streamline DEAE and Streamline Q XL for expanded bed adsorption chromatography was investigated. Moreover, the kinetics and adsorption isotherm were evaluated. The equilibrium for the Q XL matrix was reached after 60 min, while for DEAE it was only reached after 140 min. C-phycocyanin showed the highest partition coefficient at pH 7.5 for both resins at 25 ºC. The C-phycocyanin adsorption isotherm was very well represented by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich models, where the estimated values for Qm and Kd obtained by the Langmuir isotherm were, respectively, 33.92 mg.mL-1 and 0.123 mg.mL-1 for DEAE, and 28.12 mg.mL-1 and 0.082 mg.mL-1 for the Q XL matrix. A negative cooperativity was observed for C-phycocyanin binding when the Q XL matrix was used, while the cooperativity was purely independent using the DEAE matrix.

  1. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  2. Energy transfer from C-phycocyanin to phthalocyanine metal complex in reverse micelles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵继全; 赵井泉; 丁西明; 蒋丽金

    1999-01-01

    A new mimic system of photosynthetic apparatus was constructed from C-phycocyanin and phthalocyanine zinc. C-PC was solubilized in the reverse micelles of non ionic surfactant Tween-80, cosurfactant pentanol, and solvent cyclohexane, in which the overall concentration of surfactant was 20% (w/v) and the mass ratio of Tween-80 to pentanol was 4:1. When the molar ratio of water to Tween-80 (Rw)≥9.0, the characteristic properties of C-PC were maintained. When it was excited, the energy transfer from C-PC to phthalocyanine zinc took place. The energy transfer efficiency was only related with the concentration of phthalocyanine, but not that of C-PC. Furthermore, the energy transfer was roughly in keeping with Perrin formulation, which indicated that the energy transfer took place approximately through dipole-dipole interaction in rigid system. The radii of the quenching sphere were calculated from the experimental results. For example, when the concentration of phthalocyanine zinc was 2.10 × 10-4 mol/

  3. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  4. Picosecond time-resolved energy transfer within C-phycocyanin aggregates of Mastigocladus laminosus

    OpenAIRE

    Sandström, A.; Gillbro, T; Sundström, V.; Fischer, R.; Scheer, Hugo

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated by picosecond absorption experiments how the size of C-phycocyanin aggregates from Mastigocladus laminosus influences the excitation energy transfer kinetics. Going from C-phycocyanin monomers to trimers the lifetime of the faster energy transfer component decreased from 57 ± 4 to 27 ± 4 ps over most of the wavelength range (580–645 nm) studied. This change was interpreted as the opening of fast transfer channels (α-84 → β-84 and/or β-84 → β-84) between two adjacent monom...

  5. Site-selective spectroscopy and level ordering in C-phycocyanin

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, W.; Friedrich, J; Fischer, R.; Scheer, Hugo

    1988-01-01

    We present a combined fluorescence and hole-burning study of the biliprotein C-phycocyanin. Sharp zero-phonon holes compare with a broad structureless fluorescence. This finding is rationalized in terms of the special level structure in this pigment, the fast energy-transfer processes and a lack of correlation of the energies of the emissive states.

  6. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  7. Chromopeptides from C-phycocyanin. Structure and linkage of a phycocyanobilin bound to the β subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The smallest cyanogen bromide fragment derived from the β subunit of Synechococcus sp. 6301 C-phycocyanin, the blue heptapeptide 2, has been investigated by 360-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The peptide portion, heptapeptide 3, was synthesized independently and used in comparative spectroscopic analysis. These studies have led to complete assignment of the structure of the peptide-linked phycocyanobilin and elucidation of the nature of the thioether chromophore-peptide linkage

  8. Interacion of Heavy Metal Ions with C-Phycocyanin: Binding Isotherms and Cooperative Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Gelagutashvili, Eteri

    2007-01-01

    The binding constant of copper(II) ions to C-PC were determined at different ionic strengths from binding isotherms by equilibrium dialysis and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Fluorescence and absorbtion spectroscopy provides insight of metal-C-phycocyanin interactions. Fluorescence measurements demonstrate C-PC quenching of heavy metal ions emission intensities. Stern-Volmer quenching constants were obtained from the linear quenching plots. Blue shifts in the fluorescence spectra were ...

  9. High-Resolution Optical Studies on C-Phycocyanin via Photochemical Hole Burning

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, J; Scheer, Hugo; Zickendraht-Wendelstadt, Barbara; Haarer, D.

    1981-01-01

    We have shown that both the native C-phycocyanin and its corresponding free biline chromophore undergo reversible, low-temperature photochemistry. We attribute this photochemistry to reversible proton-transfer processes and utilize the observed photoreaction for photochemical hole burning (PHB). Using narrow-band PHB experiments, we have been able to perform high-resolution optical studies and show that the protein-chromophore assembly forms a very rigid structure. The results lead to the ...

  10. Tyrosinase-catalyzed site-specific immobilization of engineered C-phycocyanin to surface

    OpenAIRE

    Faccio, Greta; Kämpf, Michael M.; Piatti, Chiara; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Richter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic crosslinking of proteins is often limited by the steric availability of the target residues, as of tyrosyl side chains in the case of tyrosinase. Carrying an N-terminal peptide-tag containing two tyrosine residues, the fluorescent protein C-phycocyanin HisCPC from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 was crosslinked to fluorescent high-molecular weight forms with tyrosinase. Crosslinking with tyrosinase in the presence of L-tyrosine produced non fluorescent high-molecular weight products. Incu...

  11. Recent Developments in Production and Biotechnological Applications of C-Phycocyanin

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kuddus; Singh, P; Thomas, G.; Awdah Al-Hazimi

    2013-01-01

    An extensive range of pigments including phycobiliproteins are present in algae. C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a phycobiliprotein, is one of the key pigments of Spirulina, a microalgae used in many countries as a dietary supplement. Algal pigments have massive commercial value as natural colorants in nutraceutical, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries, besides their health benefits. At present, increasing awareness of harmful effects of synthetic compounds and inclination of community towards the...

  12. Chromopeptides from C-phycocyanin. Structure and linkage of a phycocyanobilin bound to the. beta. subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagarias, J.C.; Glazer, A.N.; Rapoport, H.

    1979-08-15

    The smallest cyanogen bromide fragment derived from the ..beta.. subunit of Synechococcus sp. 6301 C-phycocyanin, the blue heptapeptide 2, has been investigated by 360-MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. The peptide portion, heptapeptide 3, was synthesized independently and used in comparative spectroscopic analysis. These studies have led to complete assignment of the structure of the peptide-linked phycocyanobilin and elucidation of the nature of the thioether chromophore-peptide linkage.

  13. X-ray crystallographic studies on C-phycocyanins from cyanobacteria from different habitats: marine and freshwater

    OpenAIRE

    Satyanarayana, L.; Suresh, C. G.; Patel, Anamika; Mishra, Sandhya; Ghosh, Pushpito Kumar

    2005-01-01

    The protein C-phycocyanin, involved in photosynthesis, has been purified from three cyanobacterial species: Spirulina, Phormidium and Lyngbya. These three proteins have been crystallized and characterized using X-ray crystallography.

  14. X-ray crystallographic studies on C-phycocyanins from cyanobacteria from different habitats: marine and freshwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protein C-phycocyanin, involved in photosynthesis, has been purified from three cyanobacterial species: Spirulina, Phormidium and Lyngbya. These three proteins have been crystallized and characterized using X-ray crystallography. C-phycocyanins from three cyanobacterial cultures of freshwater and marine habitat, Spirulina, Phormidium and Lyngbya spp., were purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Blue-coloured crystals in different crystal forms, monoclinic and hexagonal, were obtained for the three species. The crystals took 1–12 weeks to grow to full size using polyethylene glycols of different molecular weights as precipitants. The amino-acid sequences of these proteins show high similarity to other known C-phycocyanins from related organisms; however, the C-phycocyanins reported here showed different biochemical and biophysical properties, i.e. molecular weight, stability etc. The X-ray diffraction data were collected at resolutions of 3.0 Å for the monoclinic and 3.2 and 3.6 Å for the hexagonal forms. The unit-cell parameters corresponding to the monoclinic space group P21 are a = 107.33, b = 115.64, c = 183.26 Å, β = 90.03° for Spirulina sp. C-phycocyanin and are similar for crystals of Phormidium and Lyngbya spp. C-phycocyanins. Crystals belonging to the hexagonal space group P63, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 154.97, c = 40.35 Å and a = b = 151.96, c = 39.06 Å, were also obtained for the C-phycocyanins from Spirulina and Lyngbya spp., respectively. The estimated solvent content is around 50% for the monoclinic crystals of all three species assuming the presence of two hexamers per asymmetric unit. The solvent content is 66.5 and 64.1% for the hexagonal crystals of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina and Lyngbya spp. assuming the presence of one αβ monomer per asymmetric unit

  15. Computer simulation of energy migration in the C-phycocyanin of the blue-green algae Agmenellum Quadruplicatum

    OpenAIRE

    Demidov, Andrey A.; Borisov, Alexander Yu.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods for simulation of energy migration in the C-phycocyanin fragments of PBS were developed. Both methods are based on the statistical analysis of an excitation behavior in modeling complexes with a limited number (up to hundreds) of chromophores using the Monte-Carlo approach and calculation of migration rates for the system of linear balance equations. Energy migration rates were calculated in the case of C-phycocyanin of the blue-green algae Agmenellum quadruplicatum. The main chan...

  16. An electronic state of the chromophore, phycocyanobilin, and its interaction with the protein moiety in C-phycocyanin: protonation of the chromophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hiroto; Sugimoto, Tohru; Mimuro, Mamoru

    1997-08-01

    An electronic state of phycocyanobilin (PCB, a derivative of an open tetrapyrrole) in C-phycocyanin, an antenna pigment-protein complex for photosynthesis, was estimated by including the effect of an electrostatic field of protein moieties and water molecules. We adapted our unique method for calculation of the resonance integral. The observed absorption wavelength and an oscillator strength were reproduced only when the PCB was assigned to the protonated form with a net charge of 1. This was rationalized by the negative charge of a specific aspartate residue which was equidistant from the two nitrogen atoms of two central pyrrole rings.

  17. Digestion by pepsin releases biologically active chromopeptides from C-phycocyanin, a blue-colored biliprotein of microalga Spirulina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, Simeon L; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; Mihailovic, Jelena; Krstic, Maja; Nikolic, Milan R; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja

    2016-09-16

    C-phycocyanin, the major protein of cyanobacteria Spirulina, possesses significant antioxidant, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, ascribed to covalently attached linear tetrapyrrole chromophore phycocyanobilin. There are no literature data about structure and biological activities of released peptides with bound chromophore in C-phycocyanin digest. This study aims to identify chromopeptides obtained after pepsin digestion of C-phycocyanin and to examine their bioactivities. C-phycocyanin is rapidly digested by pepsin in simulated gastric fluid. The structure of released chromopeptides was analyzed by high resolution tandem mass spectrometry and peptides varying in size from 2 to 13 amino acid residues were identified in both subunits of C-phycocyanin. Following separation by HPLC, chromopeptides were analyzed for potential bioactivities. It was shown that all five chromopeptide fractions have significant antioxidant and metal-chelating activities and show cytotoxic effect on human cervical adenocarcinoma and epithelial colonic cancer cell lines. In addition, chromopeptides protect human erythrocytes from free radical-induced hemolysis in antioxidative capacity-dependant manner. There was a positive correlation between antioxidative potency and other biological activities of chromopeptides. Digestion by pepsin releases biologically active chromopeptides from C-phycocyanin whose activity is mostly related to the antioxidative potency provided by chromophore. PMID:27084687

  18. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  19. Pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria: Rapid hydrate growth versus slow hydrate dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, N.; Bohrmann, G.; Ruffine, L.; Pape, T.; Riboulot, V.; Colliat, J.-L.; De Prunelé, A.; Dennielou, B.; Garziglia, S.; Himmler, T.; Marsset, T.; Peters, C. A.; Rabiu, A.; Wei, J.

    2014-04-01

    In previous works, it has been suggested that dissolution of gas hydrate can be responsible for pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria. It was shown that those pockmarks which are at different stages of maturation are characterized by a common internal architecture associated to gas hydrate dynamics. New results obtained by drilling into gas hydrate-bearing sediments with the MeBo seafloor drill rig in concert with geotechnical in situ measurements and pore water analyses indicate that pockmark formation and evolution in the study area are mainly controlled by rapid hydrate growth opposed to slow hydrate dissolution. On one hand, positive temperature anomalies, free gas trapped in shallow microfractures near the seafloor and coexistence of free gas and gas hydrate indicate rapid hydrate growth. On the other hand, slow hydrate dissolution is evident by low methane concentrations and almost constant sulfate values 2 m above the Gas Hydrate Occurrence Zone.

  20. CD59 Underlines the Antiatherosclerotic Effects of C-Phycocyanin on Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Li; Xian-Ming Chu; Ying-Jie Xu; Fan Yang; Cong-Yi Lv; Shu-min Nie

    2013-01-01

    The effects of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) on atherosclerosis and the regulatory effects of CD59 gene on anti-atherosclerotic roles of C-PC were investigated. Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(−/−)) mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group, C-PC treatment group, CD59 transfection group and C-PC+CD59 synergy group. The mice were fed with high-fat-diet and treated with drug intervention at the same time. Results showed the atherosclerotic mouse model was successfully established. CD59 ...

  1. Interacion of Heavy Metal Ions with C-Phycocyanin: Binding Isotherms and Cooperative Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Gelagutashvili, Eteri

    2007-01-01

    The binding constant of copper(II) ions to C-PC were determined at different ionic strengths from binding isotherms by equilibrium dialysis and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Fluorescence and absorbtion spectroscopy provides insight of metal-C-phycocyanin interactions. Fluorescence measurements demonstrate C-PC quenching of heavy metal ions emission intensities. Stern-Volmer quenching constants were obtained from the linear quenching plots. Blue shifts in the fluorescence spectra were observed during metal binding to C-PC. It was shown, that between bound metal ions in C-PC there exists positive cooperativity.

  2. Effects of C-phycocyanin and Spirulina on salicylate-induced tinnitus, expression of NMDA receptor and inflammatory genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juen-Haur Hwang

    Full Text Available Effects of C-phycocyanin (C-PC, the active component of Spirulina platensis water extract on the expressions of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, and cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2 genes in the cochlea and inferior colliculus (IC of mice were evaluated after tinnitus was induced by intraperitoneal injection of salicylate. The results showed that 4-day salicylate treatment (unlike 4-day saline treatment caused a significant increase in NR2B, TNF-α, and IL-1β mRNAs expression in the cochlea and IC. On the other hand, dietary supplementation with C-PC or Spirulina platensis water extract significantly reduced the salicylate-induced tinnitus and down-regulated the mRNAs expression of NR2B, TNF-α, IL-1β mRNAs, and COX-2 genes in the cochlea and IC of mice. The changes of protein expression levels were generally correlated with those of mRNAs expression levels in the IC for above genes.

  3. Effects of C-phycocyanin and Spirulina on Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus, Expression of NMDA Receptor and Inflammatory Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Juen-Haur; Chen, Jin-Cherng; Chan, Yin-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Effects of C-phycocyanin (C-PC), the active component of Spirulina platensis water extract on the expressions of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) genes in the cochlea and inferior colliculus (IC) of mice were evaluated after tinnitus was induced by intraperitoneal injection of salicylate. The results showed that 4-day salicylate treatment (unlike 4-day saline treatment) caused a significant increase in NR2B, TNF-α, and IL-1β mRNAs expression in the cochlea and IC. On the other hand, dietary supplementation with C-PC or Spirulina platensis water extract significantly reduced the salicylate-induced tinnitus and down-regulated the mRNAs expression of NR2B, TNF-α, IL-1β mRNAs, and COX-2 genes in the cochlea and IC of mice. The changes of protein expression levels were generally correlated with those of mRNAs expression levels in the IC for above genes. PMID:23533584

  4. X-ray crystallographic studies on C-phycocyanins from cyanobacteria from different habitats: marine and freshwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyanarayana, L.; Suresh, C. G., E-mail: cgsuresh@ncl.res.in [Division of Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008, Maharashtra (India); Patel, Anamika; Mishra, Sandhya, E-mail: cgsuresh@ncl.res.in; Ghosh, Pushpito Kumar [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, G. B. Marg, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India); Division of Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008, Maharashtra (India)

    2005-09-01

    The protein C-phycocyanin, involved in photosynthesis, has been purified from three cyanobacterial species: Spirulina, Phormidium and Lyngbya. These three proteins have been crystallized and characterized using X-ray crystallography. C-phycocyanins from three cyanobacterial cultures of freshwater and marine habitat, Spirulina, Phormidium and Lyngbya spp., were purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Blue-coloured crystals in different crystal forms, monoclinic and hexagonal, were obtained for the three species. The crystals took 1–12 weeks to grow to full size using polyethylene glycols of different molecular weights as precipitants. The amino-acid sequences of these proteins show high similarity to other known C-phycocyanins from related organisms; however, the C-phycocyanins reported here showed different biochemical and biophysical properties, i.e. molecular weight, stability etc. The X-ray diffraction data were collected at resolutions of 3.0 Å for the monoclinic and 3.2 and 3.6 Å for the hexagonal forms. The unit-cell parameters corresponding to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} are a = 107.33, b = 115.64, c = 183.26 Å, β = 90.03° for Spirulina sp. C-phycocyanin and are similar for crystals of Phormidium and Lyngbya spp. C-phycocyanins. Crystals belonging to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 154.97, c = 40.35 Å and a = b = 151.96, c = 39.06 Å, were also obtained for the C-phycocyanins from Spirulina and Lyngbya spp., respectively. The estimated solvent content is around 50% for the monoclinic crystals of all three species assuming the presence of two hexamers per asymmetric unit. The solvent content is 66.5 and 64.1% for the hexagonal crystals of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina and Lyngbya spp. assuming the presence of one αβ monomer per asymmetric unit.

  5. Water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2013-11-01

    water retention curve plays a central role in numerical algorithms that model hydrate dissociation in sediments. The determination of the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments faces experimental difficulties, and most studies assume constant water retention curves regardless of hydrate saturation. This study employs network model simulation to investigate the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments. Results show that (1) hydrate in pores shifts the curve to higher capillary pressures and the air entry pressure increases as a power function of hydrate saturation; (2) the air entry pressure is lower in sediments with patchy rather than distributed hydrate, with higher pore size variation and pore connectivity or with lower specimen slenderness along the flow direction; and (3) smaller specimens render higher variance in computed water retention curves, especially at high water saturation Sw > 0.7. Results are relevant to other sediment pore processes such as bioclogging and mineral precipitation.

  6. Pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria: Rapid hydrate growth versus slow hydrate dissolution

    OpenAIRE

    Sultan, Nabil; Bohrmann, G.; Ruffine, Livio; Pape, T.; Riboulot, Vincent; Colliat, J. -l.; De Prunele, Alexis; Dennielou, Bernard; Garziglia, Sebastien; Himmler, Tobias; Marsset, Tania; Peters, C. A.; Rabiu, A.; J. Wei

    2014-01-01

    In previous works, it has been suggested that dissolution of gas hydrate can be responsible for pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria. It was shown that those pockmarks which are at different stages of maturation are characterized by a common internal architecture associated to gas hydrate dynamics. New results obtained by drilling into gas hydrate-bearing sediments with the MeBo seafloor drill rig in concert with geotechnical in situ measurements and pore water analyses indi...

  7. Application of various water soluble polymers in gas hydrate inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.; Sultan, Abdullah S.;

    2016-01-01

    Formation of hydrates in gas transmission lines due to high pressures and low temperatures is a serious problem in the oil and gas industry with potential hazards and/or economic losses. Kinetic hydrate inhibitors are water soluble polymeric compounds that prevent or delay hydrate formation. This...

  8. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2016-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  9. Recent Developments in Production and Biotechnological Applications of C-Phycocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kuddus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An extensive range of pigments including phycobiliproteins are present in algae. C-phycocyanin (C-PC, a phycobiliprotein, is one of the key pigments of Spirulina, a microalgae used in many countries as a dietary supplement. Algal pigments have massive commercial value as natural colorants in nutraceutical, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries, besides their health benefits. At present, increasing awareness of harmful effects of synthetic compounds and inclination of community towards the usage of natural products have led to the exploitation of microalgae as a source of natural pigments/colors. This review describes recent findings about the sources and production of C-PC, with emphasis on specific techniques for extraction and purification, along with potential industrial applications in diagnostics, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries.

  10. Recent developments in production and biotechnological applications of C-phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuddus, M; Singh, P; Thomas, G; Al-Hazimi, Awdah

    2013-01-01

    An extensive range of pigments including phycobiliproteins are present in algae. C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a phycobiliprotein, is one of the key pigments of Spirulina, a microalgae used in many countries as a dietary supplement. Algal pigments have massive commercial value as natural colorants in nutraceutical, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries, besides their health benefits. At present, increasing awareness of harmful effects of synthetic compounds and inclination of community towards the usage of natural products have led to the exploitation of microalgae as a source of natural pigments/colors. This review describes recent findings about the sources and production of C-PC, with emphasis on specific techniques for extraction and purification, along with potential industrial applications in diagnostics, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries.

  11. Tyrosinase-catalyzed site-specific immobilization of engineered C-phycocyanin to surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccio, Greta; Kämpf, Michael M.; Piatti, Chiara; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Richter, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Enzymatic crosslinking of proteins is often limited by the steric availability of the target residues, as of tyrosyl side chains in the case of tyrosinase. Carrying an N-terminal peptide-tag containing two tyrosine residues, the fluorescent protein C-phycocyanin HisCPC from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 was crosslinked to fluorescent high-molecular weight forms with tyrosinase. Crosslinking with tyrosinase in the presence of L-tyrosine produced non fluorescent high-molecular weight products. Incubated in the presence of tyrosinase, HisCPC could also be immobilized to amino-modified polystyrene beads thus conferring a blue fluorescence. Crosslinking and immobilization were site-specific as both processes required the presence of the N-terminal peptide in HisCPC.

  12. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes. PMID:26678758

  13. C-phycocyanin prevents cisplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rojas, Berenice; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Sarai; Granados-Castro, Luis Fernando; Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Reyes, José L; Zazueta, Cecilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-08-01

    The potential of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) to prevent cisplatin (CP)-induced kidney mitochondrial dysfunction was determined in CD-1 male mice. The CP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction was characterized by ultrastructural abnormalities and by decrease in the following parameters in isolated kidney mitochondria: adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced oxygen consumption (state 3), respiratory control ratio, ADP/oxygen (ADP/O) ratio, adenosine triphosphate synthesis, membrane potential, calcium retention, glutathione (GSH) content, and activity of respiratory complex I, aconitase, catalase, and GSH peroxidase. These mitochondria also showed increase in hydrogen peroxide production, malondialdehyde, and 3-nitrotyrosine protein adducts content. The above-described changes, as well as CP-induced nephrotoxicity, were attenuated in mice pretreated with a single injection of C-PC. Our data suggest that the attenuation of mitochondrial abnormalities is involved in the protective effect of C-PC against CP-induced nephrotoxicity. This is the first demonstration that C-PC pretreatment prevents CP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in mice. PMID:25971372

  14. The Stability of C-phycocyanin Doped Silica Biomaterials in UV Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ye; YANG Hui; CAO Fangming; ZHAO Xiaodong; WANG Jing

    2009-01-01

    The synthesized C-phycocyanins(C-PCs)doped silica biomaterials were charac-terized by the SEM and BET surface area analysis measurement.The morphology of C-PCs doped silica biomaterials indicates that the surface of the silica cluster is formed by a great number of silica particles with an average size of between 30 and 40 nm.Silica itself is a porous structure with the av-erage pore diameter of 2.95 nm.Pores with their diameter less than 5 nm account for 84.07%.In ad-dition,the C-PCs can be utilized as a fluorescent protein probe to monitor influence of the protein encapsulation and to study matrix and protein interaction and stability of protein in silica matrix.Ap-plication of protein encapsulation silica materials requires biomolecules to keep bioactivity and sta-bility on potentially unfavorable industrial conditions.The C-PCs in solution or in silicate matrix ir-radiated by ultraviolet ray can result in photobleaching,whereas the protein in the silica is less affected.The measured photodamage rate constant of C-PCs in buffer solution is 25 times faster than that of C-PCs in silica matrix.However,the lifetime of C-PCs in silica matrix or phosphate buffer is unaf-fected.These studies suggest that entrapment of C-PCs into silica matrixes not only can maintain their biological activity but also noticeably improve their photostability.

  15. Purification of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis in aqueous two-phase systems using an experimental design

    OpenAIRE

    Francine Silva Antelo; Jorge Alberto Vieira Costa; Susana Juliano Kalil

    2015-01-01

    C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis was purified in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/potassium phosphate, varying the molar mass of the PEG. Results using a full factorial design showed that an increase in the concentration of salt and decrease in the concentration of PEG caused an increment in the purification factor for all the ATPS studied. Optimization of the conditions of the purification was studied using a central composite rotatable design for each mola...

  16. Targeting angiogenic pathway for chemoprevention of experimental colon cancer using C-phycocyanin as cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-06-01

    An angiogenic pathway was studied that involved stromal tissue degradation with matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), vesicular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) mediated growth regulation in a complex interaction with chemokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β). Gene and protein expression was studied with real-time PCR, Western immunoblot, and immunofluorescence. Morphological and histopathological analysis of tumor was done, as also the activity of MMPs and HIF-1α by gelatin zymography and ELISA. Binding interactions of proteins were studied by molecular docking. Piroxicam, a traditional NSAID and C-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis, were utilized in the chemoprevention of DMH-induced rat colon cancer. A significant number of tumors was evident in DMH treated animals, while with piroxicam and C-phycocyanin, the number and size of tumors/lesions were reduced. Colonic tissues showed severe dysplasia, tubular adenoma, and adenocarcinoma from DMH, with invasive features along with signet ring cell carcinoma. No occurrence of carcinoma was detected in either of the drug treatments or in a combination regimen. An elevated VEGF-A, MMP-2, and MMP-9 level was observed, which is required for metastasis and invasion into surrounding tissues. Drugs induced chemoprevention by down-regulating these proteins. Piroxicam docked in VEGF-A binding site of VEGF-A receptors i.e., VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, while phycocyanobilin (a chromophore of C-phycocyanin) docked with VEGFR1 alone. HIF-1α is up-regulated which is associated with increased oxygen demand and angiogenesis. MCP-1 and MIP-1β expression was also found altered in DMH and regulated by the drugs. Anti-angiogenic role of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin is well demonstrated. PMID:24861078

  17. Purification of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis in aqueous two-phase systems using an experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Silva Antelo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis was purified in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS of polyethylene glycol (PEG/potassium phosphate, varying the molar mass of the PEG. Results using a full factorial design showed that an increase in the concentration of salt and decrease in the concentration of PEG caused an increment in the purification factor for all the ATPS studied. Optimization of the conditions of the purification was studied using a central composite rotatable design for each molar mass of PEG. The ATPS composed of 7% (w/w PEG 1500 or 4% (w/w PEG 8000 (g/gmol and 23 or 22.5% (w/w of phosphate resulted a purification factor of 1.6-fold for C-phycocyanin, with total and 57% recovery, respectively. Process conditions were optimized for the purification factor for the system with PEG 1500. The ATPS with 4% (w/w PEG 4000 or 4% (w/w PEG 6000 and 21% (w/w phosphate resulted purification factors of 2.1 and 2.2-fold, recovering 100% and 73.5%, respectively of C-phycocyanin in the top phase.

  18. Kinetics of hydrate formation using gas bubble suspended in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马昌峰; 陈光进; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    An innovative experimental technique, which was devised to study the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate of hydrate formation at the surface of a gas bubble suspended in a stagnant water phase, was adapted in this work. Under such conditions, the hydrate-growth process is free from dynamic mass transfer factors. The rate of hydrate formation of methane and carbon dioxide has been systematically studied. The measured hydrate-growth data were correlated by using the molar Gibbs free energy as driving force. In the course of the experiments, some interesting surface phenomena were observed.

  19. Vibronic effects in the spectroscopy and dynamics of C-phycocyanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Femtosecond laser spectroscopies are used to investigate the influence of intramolecular nuclear modes on electronic relaxation in the cyanobacterial light harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin (CPC). Of particular interest are sub-ps dynamics localized on pairs of closely spaced phycocyanobilin pigments (i.e. dimers). Experiments conducted under different polarization conditions are used to distinguish isotropic and anisotropic vibrational modes within the dimers. Two isotropic nuclear modes are detected near 185 and 260 cm−1 using two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy. In addition, a transient absorption anisotropy measurement reveals vibrational resonances associated with (out-of-plane) anisotropic nuclear modes near 640 and 815 cm−1. We investigate two possible origins for the recurrences in the anisotropy. A mechanism involving ground state nuclear coherences in the Condon approximation is ruled out by comparing the potential energy surfaces of the excitons to the direction of wavepacket motion. Electronic structure calculations suggest that non-Condon effects are the most likely explanation for the beats observed in the anisotropy. Such non-Condon effects also hold interesting implications for the vibronic exciton electronic structure of CPC. We calculate non-Condon intermolecular couplings in the dimer as large as 10 cm−1, which suggests that these effects are not negligible and deserve further consideration. Our findings provide additional insights into the sub-100 fs vibronic relaxation channel found in the closely related protein, allophycocyanin, whose pigment dimers possess nearly the same geometry and intermolecular Coulombic interactions as CPC. This study underscores the complex interplay of intramolecular vibronic coupling and site energy tuning in photosynthetic light harvesting. (paper)

  20. Vibronic effects in the spectroscopy and dynamics of C-phycocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womick, Jordan M.; West, Brantley A.; Scherer, Norbert F.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2012-08-01

    Femtosecond laser spectroscopies are used to investigate the influence of intramolecular nuclear modes on electronic relaxation in the cyanobacterial light harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin (CPC). Of particular interest are sub-ps dynamics localized on pairs of closely spaced phycocyanobilin pigments (i.e. dimers). Experiments conducted under different polarization conditions are used to distinguish isotropic and anisotropic vibrational modes within the dimers. Two isotropic nuclear modes are detected near 185 and 260 cm-1 using two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy. In addition, a transient absorption anisotropy measurement reveals vibrational resonances associated with (out-of-plane) anisotropic nuclear modes near 640 and 815 cm-1. We investigate two possible origins for the recurrences in the anisotropy. A mechanism involving ground state nuclear coherences in the Condon approximation is ruled out by comparing the potential energy surfaces of the excitons to the direction of wavepacket motion. Electronic structure calculations suggest that non-Condon effects are the most likely explanation for the beats observed in the anisotropy. Such non-Condon effects also hold interesting implications for the vibronic exciton electronic structure of CPC. We calculate non-Condon intermolecular couplings in the dimer as large as 10 cm-1, which suggests that these effects are not negligible and deserve further consideration. Our findings provide additional insights into the sub-100 fs vibronic relaxation channel found in the closely related protein, allophycocyanin, whose pigment dimers possess nearly the same geometry and intermolecular Coulombic interactions as CPC. This study underscores the complex interplay of intramolecular vibronic coupling and site energy tuning in photosynthetic light harvesting.

  1. CD59 Underlines the Antiatherosclerotic Effects of C-Phycocyanin on Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of C-phycocyanin (C-PC on atherosclerosis and the regulatory effects of CD59 gene on anti-atherosclerotic roles of C-PC were investigated. Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(−/− mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group, C-PC treatment group, CD59 transfection group and C-PC+CD59 synergy group. The mice were fed with high-fat-diet and treated with drug intervention at the same time. Results showed the atherosclerotic mouse model was successfully established. CD59 was over-expressed in blood and tissue cells. Single CD59 or C-PC could reduce blood lipid levels and promote the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 but inhibit pro-apoptotic Fas proteins in endothelial cells. The expression levels of cell cycle protein D1 (Cyclin D1 and mRNA levels of cyclin dependent protein kinase 4 (CDK4 in smooth muscle cells were restrained by CD59 and C-PC. CD59 or C-PC alone could inhibit the formation of atherosclerotic plaque by suppressing MMP-2 protein expression. In addition, C-PC could promote CD59 expression. So both CD59 and C-PC could inhibit the progress of atherosclerosis, and the anti-atherosclerotic effects of C-PC might be fulfilled by promoting CD59 expression, preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation and the apoptosis of endothelial cells, reducing blood fat levels, and at last inhibiting the development of atherosclerosis.

  2. Oxygen-18 enrichment in the water of a clathrate hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, D.W.; Leaist, D.G. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Div. of Chemistry); Hesse, R. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept of Geological Sciences)

    1983-12-01

    The equilibrium constants for the fractionation of H/sub 2//sup 18/O and H/sub 2//sup 16/O between liquid and solid phases were determined by slow freezing of ice and by slow formation of the clathrate hydrate of tetrahydrofuran from liquid solution. Both systems gave ..cap alpha.. = 1.0026/sub 8/. It is likely that oxygen-18 enrichment of the water in clathrate hydrates generally is essentially the same as for ice and that the relatively high oxygen-18 content observed in pore waters from some deep-sea sediments arises from the recent presence of methane hydrate.

  3. Insights into methane hydrate formation, agglomeration, and dissociation in water + diesel oil dispersed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hydrate agglomeration occurs at initial hydrate formation or under shutting down stages. • The agglomeration of hydrate is inhibited and dispersed with the action of anti-agglomerants. • The appearance of surface water may cause the agglomeration of hydrate during hydrate dissociation. • A mechanism was proposed to describe hydrate dissociation from water in oil dispersed system. - Abstract: Methane hydrate formation and dissociation in (5 vol% water + 95 vol% diesel oil) dispersed system containing a combined anti-agglomerant were experimentally studied using a high pressure autoclave installed with particle video microscope and focused beam reflectance measurement probes. The agglomeration of hydrate was found to occur at the initial hydrate formation stage. With the continuous formation of hydrate, the agglomeration of hydrate will be inhibited and hydrate was dispersed with the action of the anti-agglomerant. The agglomeration of hydrate also occurs when the hydrate containing fluid is under static state for a certain time. Larger hydrate particles attached by gas bubble with grape-like shape were found during hydrate dissociation. The dissociated surface water would contact with un-dissociated hydrate and accumulate to larger water/hydrate particles may be the reason that causes the agglomeration during initial hydrate dissociation process. A mechanism was proposed to describe hydrate dissociation from water in oil dispersed system

  4. Investigation of the structure and element composition of C-phycocyanin extracted from the microalgae Spirulina platensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and element composition of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) extracted from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis were studied. The behavior of structural subunits forming phycobilisomes in the purification process was studied by capillary electrophoresis. Their proportion in high-purity C-PC was determined. The element composition of C-PC of different purity was studied by means of the epithermal neutron activation analysis, and metals which may form macromolecular complexes with C-PC were determined (Zn, Cr, Ni, Co, As, Sr, Mo, Ag, Hg). It was shown that contents of toxic metals did not exceed accepted permissible levels for the human organism. (author)

  5. Investigation of the Structure and Element Composition of C-Phycocyanin Extracted from the Microalgae Spirulina platensis

    CERN Document Server

    Mosulishvili, L M; Kirkesali, E I; Khizanishvili, A I; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, S S; Gundorina, S F

    2002-01-01

    The structure and element composition of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) extracted from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis were studied. The behavior of structural subunits forming phycobilisomes in the purification process was studied by capillary electrophoresis. Their proportion in high-purity C-PC was determined. The element composition of C-PC of different purity was studied by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis, and metals which may form macromolecular complexes with C-PC were determined (Zn, Cr, Ni, Co, As, Sr, Mo, Ag, Hg). It was shown that contents of toxic metals did not exceed accepted permissible levels for the human organism.

  6. Ion-water clusters, bulk medium effects, and ion hydration

    CERN Document Server

    Merchant, Safir; Dean, Kelsey R; Asthagiri, D

    2011-01-01

    Thermochemistry of gas-phase ion-water clusters together with estimates of the hydration free energy of the clusters and the water ligands are used to calculate the hydration free energy of the ion. Often the hydration calculations use a continuum model of the solvent. The primitive quasichemical approximation to the quasichemical theory provides a transparent framework to anchor such efforts. Here we evaluate the approximations inherent in the primitive quasichemical approach and elucidate the different roles of the bulk medium. We find that the bulk medium can stabilize configurations of the cluster that are usually not observed in the gas phase, while also simultaneously lowering the excess chemical potential of the ion. This effect is more pronounced for soft ions. Since the coordination number that minimizes the excess chemical potential of the ion is identified as the optimal or most probable coordination number, for such soft ions, the optimum cluster size and the hydration thermodynamics obtained with...

  7. Macroscopic investigation of hydrate film growth at the hydrocarbon/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.J.; Miller, K.T.; Koh, C.A.; Sloan, E.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates are ice-like crystalline compounds that form as thin porous crystalline films at the interface between the water phase and the hydrocarbon guest molecule phase. The growth characteristics of these hydrate films are important in seafloor carbon dioxide sequestration, gas hydrate transport, and flow assurance in oil and gas pipelines. This paper presented a study that employed digital video microscopy to investigate the hydrate film thickness as a function of time, as well as the propagation rate for methane and cyclopentane hydrate. The purpose of the study was to enhance past measurements of hydrate film growth by incorporating gas consumption measurements simultaneously with film thickness measurements to determine which phase supplied the hydrate former during hydrate formation. The study also advanced the physical knowledge of hydrate formation by relating film formation with the water droplet to hydrate shell conversion. The paper included a schematic of the hydrate film growth apparatus and image acquisition and analysis as well as an illustration of the nucleation of a water droplet immersed in cyclopentane. The results were presented for cyclopentane hydrate film growth; methane hydrate film growth; film growth in an oil/methane/ water system; film growth/development into water phase; and gas consumption for hydrate film growth. The paper also discussed the source of methane for hydrate formation; solubility of methane in water; growth rates; proposed mechanism of hydrate film growth at the hydrocarbon/water interface; and, transferability between hydrate formation for a pool of liquid versus a water droplet. It was concluded that gas consumption data during hydrate formation presented evidence of an aqueous phase supply of hydrate former to the initial hydrate growth, followed by a vapor phase supply of hydrate former in the thickening stage of hydrate film formation. 25 refs., 18 figs.,.

  8. Water in volcanic glass: From volcanic degassing to secondary hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Angela N.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watkins, James M.; Ross, Abigail M.

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic glass is deposited with trace amounts (0.1-0.6 wt.%) of undegassed magmatic water dissolved in the glass. After deposition, meteoric water penetrates into the glass structure mostly as molecular H2O. Due to the lower δD (‰) values of non-tropical meteoric waters and the ∼30‰ offset between volcanic glass and environmental water during hydration, secondary water imparts lighter hydrogen isotopic values during secondary hydration up to a saturation concentration of 3-4 wt.% H2O. We analyzed compositionally and globally diverse volcanic glass from 0 to 10 ka for their δD and H2Ot across different climatic zones, and thus different δD of precipitation, on a thermal conversion elemental analyzer (TCEA) furnace attached to a mass spectrometer. We find that tephrachronologically coeval rhyolite glass is hydrated faster than basaltic glass, and in the majority of glasses an increase in age and total water content leads to a decrease in δD (‰), while a few equatorial glasses have little change in δD (‰). We compute a magmatic water correction based on our non-hydrated glasses, and calculate an average 103lnαglass-water for our hydrated felsic glasses of -33‰, which is similar to the 103lnαglass-water determined by Friedman et al. (1993a) of -34‰. We also determine a smaller average 103lnαglass-water for all our mafic glasses of -23‰. We compare the δD values of water extracted from our glasses to local meteoric waters following the inclusion of a -33‰ 103lnαglass-water. We find that, following a correction for residual magmatic water based on an average δD and wt.% H2Ot of recently erupted ashes from our study, the δD value of water extracted from hydrated volcanic glass is, on average, within 4‰ of local meteoric water. To better understand the difference in hydration rates of mafic and felsic glasses, we imaged 6 tephra clasts ranging in age and chemical composition with BSE (by FEI SEM) down to a submicron resolution. Mafic tephra

  9. Spectroscopic study of the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin associated with colorless linker peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizarro, Shelly A.

    2000-05-12

    The phycobilisome (PBS) light-harvesting antenna is composed of chromophore-containing biliproteins and 'colorless' linker peptides and is structurally designed to support unidirectional transfer of excitation energy from the periphery of the PBS to its core. The linker peptides have a unique role in this transfer process by modulating the spectral properties of the associated biliprotein. There is only one three-dimensional structure of a biliprotein/linker complex available to date (APC/LC7.8) and the mechanism of interaction between these two proteins remains unknown. This study brings together a detailed spectroscopic characterization of C-Phycocyanin (PC)-linker complexes (isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002) with proteomic analysis of the linker amino acid sequences to produce a model for biliprotein/linker interaction. The amino acid sequences of the rod linkers [LR8.9, LR32.3 and LRC28.5] were examined to identify evolutionarily conserved regions important to either the structure or function of this protein family. Although there is not one common homologous site among all the linkers, there are strong trends across each separate subset (LC, LR and LRC) and the N-terminal segments of both LR32.3 and LRC28.5 display multiple regions of similarity with other linkers. Predictions of the secondary structure of LR32.3 and LRC28.5, and comparison to the crystal structure of LC7.8, further narrowed the candidates for interaction sites with the PC chromophores. Measurements of the absorption, fluorescence, CD and excitation anisotropy of PC trimer, PC/LR32.3, and PC/LRC28.5, document the spectroscopic effect of each linker peptide on the PC chromophores at a series of temperatures (298 to 77 K). Because LR32.3 and LRC28.5 modulate the PC trimer spectral properties in distinct manners, it suggests different chromophore-interaction mechanisms for each linker. The low temperature absorbance spectrum of the PC trimer is consistent with an excitonic

  10. Correlation Between Chain Architecture and Hydration Water Structure in Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossutti, Michael; Dutcher, John R

    2016-03-14

    The physical properties of confined water can differ dramatically from those of bulk water. Hydration water associated with polysaccharides provides a particularly interesting example of confined water, because differences in polysaccharide structure provide different spatially confined environments for water sorption. We have used attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of hydration water in films of three different polysaccharides under controlled relative humidity (RH) conditions. We compare the results obtained for films of highly branched, dendrimer-like phytoglycogen nanoparticles to those obtained for two unbranched polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid (HA), and chitosan. We find similarities between the water structuring in the two linear polysaccharides and significant differences for phytoglycogen. In particular, the results suggest that the high degree of branching in phytoglycogen leads to a much more well-ordered water structure (low density, high connectivity network water), indicating the strong influence of chain architecture on the structuring of water. These measurements provide unique insight into the relationship between the structure and hydration of polysaccharides, which is important for understanding and exploiting these sustainable nanomaterials in a wide range of applications.

  11. Correlation Between Chain Architecture and Hydration Water Structure in Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossutti, Michael; Dutcher, John R

    2016-03-14

    The physical properties of confined water can differ dramatically from those of bulk water. Hydration water associated with polysaccharides provides a particularly interesting example of confined water, because differences in polysaccharide structure provide different spatially confined environments for water sorption. We have used attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of hydration water in films of three different polysaccharides under controlled relative humidity (RH) conditions. We compare the results obtained for films of highly branched, dendrimer-like phytoglycogen nanoparticles to those obtained for two unbranched polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid (HA), and chitosan. We find similarities between the water structuring in the two linear polysaccharides and significant differences for phytoglycogen. In particular, the results suggest that the high degree of branching in phytoglycogen leads to a much more well-ordered water structure (low density, high connectivity network water), indicating the strong influence of chain architecture on the structuring of water. These measurements provide unique insight into the relationship between the structure and hydration of polysaccharides, which is important for understanding and exploiting these sustainable nanomaterials in a wide range of applications. PMID:26859153

  12. Comparison of calculated and experimentally resolved rate constants for excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin. 1. Monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-05-18

    Rate constants for excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric aggregation state, isolated from the cyanobacterium cynechococcus sp. PCC 7002, are calculated, using Foerster theory and compared with the results of time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The assignments of the energy-transfer rate constants in PC monomers are confirmed here by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of the PC monomers isolated from both the wild-type and a mutant strain (cpcB/C155S) whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore. It is concluded that the Foerster model of resonant energy transfer in the weak coupling limit successfully describes the dominant energy-transfer processes in this protein in the monomeric state. 31 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Comparison of calculated and experimentally resolved rate constants for excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin. 2. Trimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, M.F.; Sauer, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-05-18

    Resolution of the absorption spectrum of the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore in C-phycocyanin (PC) trimers is achieved by comparison of the steady state absorption spectra of ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup PC}){sub 3} and ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup *}){sub 3}. Comparison of the anisotropy decays of ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup PC}){sub 3} and ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup *}){sub 3} also greatly aids in the assignment of the dominant kinetic processes in PC trimers. A comparison is made of calculated Foerster rate constants for energy transfer with those rate constants resolved experimentally in the PC trimers. 35 refs.., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Direct measurement of excitation transfer dynamics between two trimers in C-phycocyanin hexamer from cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingmin; Zhao, Fuli; Zheng, Xiguang; Wang, Hezhou

    1999-05-01

    We provide the first experimental evidence for the excitation transfers between two trimers of an isolated C-phycocyanin hexamer (αβ) 6PCL RC27, at the end of the rod proximal to the core of PBS in cyanobacterium of Anabaena variabilis, with picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Our results strongly suggest that the observed fluorescence decay constants around 20 and 10 ps time scales, shown in anisotropy decay, not in isotropic decay experiments arose from the excitation transfers between two trimers via two types of transfer pathways such as 1β 155↔6β 155 (2β 155↔5β 155 and 3β 155↔4β 155) and 2α 84↔5α 84 (3α 84↔6α 84 and 1α 84↔4α 84) channels and these could be described by Föster dipole-dipole resonance mechanism.

  15. Pharmacological effects of a C-phycocyanin-based multicomponent nutraceutical in an in-vitro canine chondrocyte model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Stephanie E; Chen, Yufei; Ho, Emmanuel A; Martinez, Steven A; Davies, Neal M

    2015-07-01

    Multicomponent nutraceuticals are becoming increasingly popular treatments or adjunctive therapies for osteoarthritis in veterinary medicine despite lack of evidence of efficacy for many products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of a commercially available C-phycocyanin-based nutraceutical and select constituent ingredients in an in-vitro model of canine osteoarthritis. Normal canine articular chondrocytes were used in an in-vitro model of osteoarthritis. Inflammatory conditions were induced using interleukin-1β. The nutraceutical preparation as a whole, its individual constituents, as well as carprofen were evaluated at concentrations of 0 to 250 μg/mL for reduction of the following inflammatory mediators and indicators of catabolism of the extracellular matrix: prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TFN-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), nitric oxide, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs). Validated, commercially available assay kits were used for quantitation of inflammatory mediators. The antioxidant capacities, as well as cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitory activities of the whole nutraceutical preparation and select constituents, were also assessed using validated commercially available assay kits. The antioxidant capacity of the nutraceutical and constituents was concentration-dependent. The nutraceutical and constituents appear to display anti-inflammatory activity primarily through the inhibition of COX-2. The nutraceutical displayed similar strength to carprofen in reducing TNF-α, IL-6, MMP-3, nitric oxide, and sGAGs at select concentration ranges. The C-phycocyanin (CPC)-based nutraceutical and constituents may be able to mediate 3 primary pathogenic mechanisms of osteoarthritis: inflammation, chondral degeneration, and oxidative stress in vitro. The nutraceutical may be clinically useful in veterinary

  16. Transformation of deep-water methane bubbles into hydrate

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, Alexander V; Rozhkov, Aleksey N

    2013-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the mechanics of the methane bubbles in the gas hydrate stability zone of the basin. Transformation of deep-water methane bubbles into solid hydrate was investigated in Lake Baikal in situ. Released from the bottom methane bubbles were caught by different traps with transparent walls. It was observed that when bubbles entered into internal space of the trap, the bubbles could be transformed into two different solid hydrate structures depending on ambient conditions. The first structure is hydrate granular matter consisted of solid fragments with sizes of order of 1 mm. The second structure is high porous solid foam consisted of solid bubbles with sizes of order of 5 mm. The formed granular matter did not change during trap lifting up to top border of gas hydrate stability zone, whereas free methane intensively released from solid foam sample during it lifting. It was concluded that the decrease of the depth of bubble sampling and the decrease of the bubble flux rate assist to formati...

  17. Water Intake and Hydration Indices in Healthy European Adults: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Pepa, Alex; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Hydration status is linked with health, wellness, and performance. We evaluated hydration status, water intake, and urine output for seven consecutive days in healthy adults. Volunteers living in Spain, Germany, or Greece (n = 573, 39 ± 12 years (51.1% males), 25.0 ± 4.6 kg/m² BMI) participated in an eight-day study protocol. Total water intake was estimated from seven-day food and drink diaries. Hydration status was measured in urine samples collected over 24 h for seven days and in blood samples collected in fasting state on the mornings of days 1 and 8. Total daily water intake was 2.75 ± 1.01 L, water from beverages 2.10 ± 0.91 L, water from foods 0.66 ± 0.29 L. Urine parameters were: 24 h volume 1.65 ± 0.70 L, 24 h osmolality 631 ± 221 mOsmol/kg Η₂Ο, 24 h specific gravity 1.017 ± 0.005, 24 h excretion of sodium 166.9 ± 54.7 mEq, 24 h excretion of potassium 72.4 ± 24.6 mEq, color chart 4.2 ± 1.4. Predictors for urine osmolality were age, country, gender, and BMI. Blood indices were: haemoglobin concentration 14.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, hematocrit 43% ± 4% and serum osmolality 294 ± 9 mOsmol/kg Η₂Ο. Daily water intake was higher in summer (2.8 ± 1.02 L) than in winter (2.6 ± 0.98 L) (p = 0.019). Water intake was associated negatively with urine specific gravity, urine color, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations (p < 0.01). Applying urine osmolality cut-offs, approximately 60% of participants were euhydrated and 20% hyperhydrated or dehydrated. Most participants were euhydrated, but a substantial number of people (40%) deviated from a normal hydration level. PMID:27058557

  18. Water Intake and Hydration Indices in Healthy European Adults: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Malisova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydration status is linked with health, wellness, and performance. We evaluated hydration status, water intake, and urine output for seven consecutive days in healthy adults. Volunteers living in Spain, Germany, or Greece (n = 573, 39 ± 12 years (51.1% males, 25.0 ± 4.6 kg/m2 BMI participated in an eight-day study protocol. Total water intake was estimated from seven-day food and drink diaries. Hydration status was measured in urine samples collected over 24 h for seven days and in blood samples collected in fasting state on the mornings of days 1 and 8. Total daily water intake was 2.75 ± 1.01 L, water from beverages 2.10 ± 0.91 L, water from foods 0.66 ± 0.29 L. Urine parameters were: 24 h volume 1.65 ± 0.70 L, 24 h osmolality 631 ± 221 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο, 24 h specific gravity 1.017 ± 0.005, 24 h excretion of sodium 166.9 ± 54.7 mEq, 24 h excretion of potassium 72.4 ± 24.6 mEq, color chart 4.2 ± 1.4. Predictors for urine osmolality were age, country, gender, and BMI. Blood indices were: haemoglobin concentration 14.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, hematocrit 43% ± 4% and serum osmolality 294 ± 9 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο. Daily water intake was higher in summer (2.8 ± 1.02 L than in winter (2.6 ± 0.98 L (p = 0.019. Water intake was associated negatively with urine specific gravity, urine color, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations (p < 0.01. Applying urine osmolality cut-offs, approximately 60% of participants were euhydrated and 20% hyperhydrated or dehydrated. Most participants were euhydrated, but a substantial number of people (40% deviated from a normal hydration level.

  19. Water-biomolecule systems under extreme conditions: from confinement to pressure effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    Water is a unique liquid, many of whose properties are critical for the continued support of life. In living systems, essential water-related phenomena occur in restricted geometries in cells, and at active sites of proteins and membranes or at their surface. The effects of hydration on equilibrium protein structure and dynamics are fundamental to the relationship between structure and biological function. In particular, the configuration of water molecules near the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces is of considerable relevance. The structure and dynamics of water confined in model systems developing hydrophilic interactions are compared with that of bulk water as determined by hydrophilic interactions are compared with that of bulk water as determined by neutron scattering. It is well known that hydration, internal dynamics, and function in proteins are intimately associated. Studies of dynamics of water molecules at surface of a C-phycocyanin protein are presented.

  20. Absolute Hydration Free Energies of Ions, Ion-Water Clusters, and Quasi-chemical Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Asthagiri, D; Ashbaugh, H S; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental studies on ion-water clusters have provided insights into the microscopic aspects of hydration phenomena. One common view is that extending those experimental studies to larger cluster sizes would give the single ion absolute hydration free energies not obtainable by classical thermodynamic methods. This issue is reanalyzed in the context of recent computations and molecular theories on ion hydration, particularly considering the hydration of H$^+$, Li$^+$, Na$^+$, and HO$^-$ ions and thence the hydration of neutral ion pairs. The hydration free energies of neutral pairs computed here are in good agreement with experimental results, whereas the calculated absolute hydration free energies, and the excess chemical potentials, deviate consistently from some recently tabulated hydration free energies based on ion-water cluster data. We show how the single ion absolute hydration free energies are not separated from the potential of the phase in recent analyses of ion-water cluster data, even in the li...

  1. Hydrate phase equilibrium and structure for (methane + ethane + tetrahydrofuran + water) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of methane and ethane through forming hydrate is a possible choice in natural gas, oil processing, or ethylene producing. The hydrate formation conditions of five groups of (methane + ethane) binary gas mixtures in the presence of 0.06 mole fraction tetrahydrofuran (THF) in water were obtained at temperatures ranging from (277.7 to 288.2) K. In most cases, the presence of THF in water can lower the hydrate formation pressure of (methane + ethane) remarkably. However, when the composition of ethane is as high as 0.832, it is more difficult to form hydrate than without THF system. Phase equilibrium model for hydrates containing THF was developed based on a two-step hydrate formation mechanism. The structure of hydrates formed from (methane + ethane + THF + water) system was also determined by Raman spectroscopy. When THF concentration in initial aqueous solution was only 0.06 mole fraction, the coexistence of structure I hydrate dominated by ethane and structure II hydrate dominated by THF in the hydrate sample was clearly demonstrated by Raman spectroscopic data. On the contrary, only structure II hydrate existed in the hydrate sample formed from (methane + ethane + THF + water) system when THF concentration in initial aqueous solution was increased to 0.10 mole fraction. It indicated that higher THF concentration inhibited the formation of structure I hydrate dominated by ethane and therefore lowered the trapping of ethane in hydrate. It implies a very promising method to increase the separation efficiency of methane and ethane.

  2. Dynamical Transition of Protein-Hydration Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doster, W.; Busch, S.; Gaspar, A. M.; Appavou, M.-S.; Wuttke, J.; Scheer, H.

    2010-03-01

    Thin layers of water on biomolecular and other nanostructured surfaces can be supercooled to temperatures not accessible with bulk water. Chen et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 9012 (2006)]PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.0602474103 suggested that anomalies near 220 K observed by quasielastic neutron scattering can be explained by a hidden critical point of bulk water. Based on more sensitive measurements of water on perdeuterated phycocyanin, using the new neutron backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, and an improved data analysis, we present results that show no sign of such a fragile-to-strong transition. The inflection of the elastic intensity at 220 K has a dynamic origin that is compatible with a calorimetric glass transition at 170 K. The temperature dependence of the relaxation times is highly sensitive to data evaluation; it can be brought into perfect agreement with the results of other techniques, without any anomaly.

  3. C-phycocyanin confers protection against oxalate-mediated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in MDCK cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukkur M Farooq

    Full Text Available Oxalate toxicity is mediated through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS via a process that is partly dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether C-phycocyanin (CP could protect against oxidative stress-mediated intracellular damage triggered by oxalate in MDCK cells. DCFDA, a fluorescence-based probe and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL, an oxidative stress marker were used to investigate the effect of CP on oxalate-induced ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO. The role of CP against oxalate-induced oxidative stress was studied by the evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential by JC1 fluorescein staining, quantification of ATP synthesis and stress-induced MAP kinases (JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2. Our results revealed that oxalate-induced cells show markedly increased ROS levels and HEL protein expression that were significantly decreased following pre-treatment with CP. Further, JC1 staining showed that CP pre-treatment conferred significant protection from mitochondrial membrane permeability and increased ATP production in CP-treated cells than oxalate-alone-treated cells. In addition, CP treated cells significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2 as compared to oxalate-alone-treated cells. We concluded that CP could be used as a potential free radical-scavenging therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-associated diseases including urolithiasis.

  4. Assessment of C-phycocyanin effect on astrocytes-mediated neuroprotection against oxidative brain injury using 2D and 3D astrocyte tissue model

    OpenAIRE

    Seul Ki Min; Jun Sang Park; Lidan Luo; Yeo Seon Kwon; Hoo Cheol Lee; Hyun Jung Shim; Il-Doo Kim; Ja-Kyeong Lee; Hwa Sung Shin

    2015-01-01

    Drugs are currently being developed to attenuate oxidative stress as a treatment for brain injuries. C-phycocyanin (C-Pc) is an antioxidant protein of green microalgae known to exert neuroprotective effects against oxidative brain injury. Astrocytes, which compose many portions of the brain, exert various functions to overcome oxidative stress; however, little is known about how C-Pc mediates the antioxidative effects of astrocytes. In this study, we revealed that C-Pc intranasal administrati...

  5. Antimelanogenic effect of c-phycocyanin through modulation of tyrosinase expression by upregulation of ERK and downregulation of p38 MAPK signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Weng Yu-Ting; Yang Szu-Yen; Lin Yu-Yun; Wu Li-Chen; Tsai Yi-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Pigmentation is one of the essential defense mechanisms against oxidative stress or UV irradiation; however, abnormal hyperpigmentation in human skin may pose a serious aesthetic problem. C-phycocyanin (Cpc) is a phycobiliprotein from spirulina and functions as an antioxidant and a light harvesting protein. Though it is known that spirulina has been used to reduce hyperpigmentation, little literature addresses the antimelanogenic mechanism of Cpc. Herein, we investigated t...

  6. Solubility of paroxetine hydrochloride hemi-hydrate in (water + acetone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Guobin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: renguobin2557@sohu.com; Wang Jingkang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Guizhi [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2005-08-15

    Using a laser monitoring observation technique, the solubilities of paroxetine hydrochloride hemi-hydrate in (water + acetone) were determined by the synthetic method from (294.45 to 323.20) K, respectively. Results of these measurements were correlated by the three variants of the combined nearly ideal binary solvent/Redlich-Kister (CNIBS/R-K) model. For the seven group data studied, three variants of the (CNIBS/R-K) equation were found to provide accurate mathematical representations of the experimental data and variant 2 is the best of the three variants.

  7. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiec, Andrew; Kirkegaard, Marie C; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth W; Trowbridge, Lee; Rondinone, Adam; Anderson, Brian

    2015-12-10

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxyfluoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7]·4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl fluoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures followed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7]·4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous structure), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielastic neutron scattering results compare well with previous measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform restricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O-H bond (r = 0.92 Å). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps(-1)) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps(-1)). PMID:26575434

  8. An optical linewidth study of a chromoprotein-C-phycocyanin in a low-temperature glass

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, W.; Friedrich, J; Fischer, R.; Scheer, Hugo

    1988-01-01

    The temperature dependence of spectral holes burnt into a phycocyanin-doped ethylene glycol/water glass is investigated in the temperature range between 1.5 and 15 K. The data are well described by a power law with an exponent of 1.16 ± 0.1. Chromoproteins thus behave very much the same as glasses doped with small impurity molecules.

  9. Distribution of Water in Synthetic Calcium Silicate Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosz, C; Gaboreau, S; Grangeon, S; Prêt, D; Montouillout, V; Maubec, N; Ory, S; Blanc, P; Vieillard, P; Henocq, P

    2016-07-12

    Understanding calcium silicate hydrates (CSHs) is of paramount importance for understanding the behavior of cement materials because they control most of the properties of these man-made materials. The atomic scale water content and structure have a major influence on their properties, as is analogous with clay minerals, and we should assess these. Here, we used a multiple analytical approach to quantify water distribution in CSH samples and to determine the relative proportions of water sorbed on external and internal (interlayer) surfaces. Water vapor isotherms were used to explain the water distribution in the CSH microstructure. As with many layered compounds, CSHs have external and internal (interlayer) surfaces displaying multilayer adsorption of water molecules on external surfaces owing to the hydrophilic surfaces. Interlayer water was also quantified from water vapor isotherm, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal gravimetric analyses (TGA) data, displaying nonreversible swelling/shrinkage behavior in response to drying/rewetting cycles. From this quantification and balance of water distribution, we were able to explain most of the widely dispersed data already published according to the various relative humidity (RH) conditions and measurement techniques. Stoichiometric formulas were proposed for the different CSH samples analyzed (0.6 < Ca/Si < 1.6), considering the interlayer water contribution. PMID:27281114

  10. Adsorption of Methane on Water under Hydrate Formation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG,Baozi; SUN,Changyu; LIU,Peng; CHEN,Guangjin

    2009-01-01

    The variation of interfacial tension with pressure has been determined systemically for water in equilibrium with compressed methane at temperature from 274.2 to 282.2 K in the range of pressure from 0.1 to 10.1 MPa using the pendant-drop method.The results show that the interface tension decreased with increasing pressure when temperature was specified.Pressure has a great influence upon the interface tension at higher pressure.The surface excess concentrations of methane on water at different temperatures and pressures were calculated.The results showed that higher pressure and lower temperature corresponded to higher adsorption concentration of methane.At the same time,the surface adsorption free energies of methane were also calculated,indicating that the adsorption of methane on water under hydrate formation condition is more preferable than that at 298.2 K.

  11. Comparative Neuroregenerative Effects of C-Phycocyanin and IFN-Beta in a Model of Multiple Sclerosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentón-Rol, Giselle; Lagumersindez-Denis, Nielsen; Muzio, Luca; Bergami, Alessandra; Furlan, Roberto; Fernández-Massó, Julio R; Nazabal-Galvez, Marcelo; Llópiz-Arzuaga, Alexey; Herrera-Rolo, Tania; Veliz-Rodriguez, Tania; Polentarutti, Nadia; Marín-Prida, Javier; Raíces-Cruz, Ivette; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Pentón-Arias, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) therapies approved so far are unable to effectively reverse the chronic phase of the disease or improve the remyelination process. Here our aim is to evaluate the effects of C-Phycocyanin (C-Pc), a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties, in a chronic model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice. C-Pc (2, 4 or 8 mg/kg i.p.) or IFN-beta (2000 IU, s.c.) was administered daily once a day or every other day, respectively, starting at disease onset, which differ among EAE mice between 11 and 15 days postinduction. Histological and immunohistochemistry (anti-Mac-3, anti-CD3 and anti-APP) assessments were performed in spinal cord in the postinduction time. Global gene expression in the brain was analyzed with the Illumina Mouse WG-6_V2 BeadChip microarray and the expression of particular genes, assessed by qPCR using the Fast SYBR Green RT-PCR Master Mix. Oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde, peroxidation potential, CAT/SOD ratio and GSH) were determined spectrophoto-metrically. Results showed that C-Pc ameliorates the clinical deterioration of animals, an effect that expresses the reduction of the inflammatory infiltrates invading the spinal cord tissue, the axonal preservation and the down-regulation of IL-17 expression in brain tissue and serum. C-Pc and IFN-beta improved the redox status in mice subjected to EAE, while microarray analysis showed that both treatments shared a common subset of differentially expressed genes, although they also differentially modulated another subset of genes. Specifically, C-Pc mainly modulated the expression of genes related to remyelination, gliogenesis and axon-glia processes. Taken together, our results indicate that C-Pc has significant therapeutic effects against EAE, mediated by the dynamic regulation of multiple biological processes. PMID:26556034

  12. Water anomalous thermodynamics, attraction, repulsion, and hydrophobic hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2016-04-01

    A model composed of van der Waals-like and hydrogen bonding contributions that simulates the low-temperature anomalous thermodynamics of pure water while exhibiting a second, liquid-liquid critical point [P. H. Poole et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 1632 (1994)] is extended to dilute solutions of nonionic species. Critical lines emanating from such second critical point are calculated. While one infers that the smallness of the water molecule may be a relevant factor for those critical lines to move towards experimentally accessible regions, attention is mainly focused on the picture our model draws for the hydration thermodynamics of purely hydrophobic and amphiphilic non-electrolyte solutes. We first focus on differentiating solvation at constant volume from the corresponding isobaric process. Both processes provide the same viewpoint for the low solubility of hydrophobic solutes: it originates from the combination of weak solute-solvent attractive interactions and the specific excluded-volume effects associated with the small molecular size of water. However, a sharp distinction is found when exploring the temperature dependence of hydration phenomena since, in contrast to the situation for the constant-V process, the properties of pure water play a crucial role at isobaric conditions. Specifically, the solubility minimum as well as enthalpy and entropy convergence phenomena, exclusively ascribed to isobaric solvation, are closely related to water's density maximum. Furthermore, the behavior of the partial molecular volume and the partial molecular isobaric heat capacity highlights the interplay between water anomalies, attraction, and repulsion. The overall picture presented here is supported by experimental observations, simulations, and previous theoretical results.

  13. Hydrophobic hydration and the anomalous partial molar volumes in ethanol-water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Miller, Benjamin T.; Te, Jerez; Cendagorta, Joseph R.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2015-02-01

    The anomalous behavior in the partial molar volumes of ethanol-water mixtures at low concentrations of ethanol is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous work indicates that the striking minimum in the partial molar volume of ethanol VE as a function of ethanol mole fraction XE is determined mainly by water-water interactions. These results were based on simulations that used one water model for the solute-water interactions but two different water models for the water-water interactions. This is confirmed here by using two more water models for the water-water interactions. Furthermore, the previous work indicates that the initial decrease is caused by association of the hydration shells of the hydrocarbon tails, and the minimum occurs at the concentration where all of the hydration shells are touching each other. Thus, the characteristics of the hydration of the tail that cause the decrease and the features of the water models that reproduce this type of hydration are also examined here. The results show that a single-site multipole water model with a charge distribution that mimics the large quadrupole and the p-orbital type electron density out of the molecular plane has "brittle" hydration with hydrogen bonds that break as the tails touch, which reproduces the deep minimum. However, water models with more typical site representations with partial charges lead to flexible hydration that tends to stay intact, which produces a shallow minimum. Thus, brittle hydration may play an essential role in hydrophobic association in water.

  14. Modelling membrane hydration and water balance of a pem fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2015-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells requires an appropriate hydration in order to ensure high efficiency and long durability. As water is essential for promoting proton conductivity in the membrane, it is important to control membrane water hydration to avoid flooding. In this study we...

  15. Dynamics of Protein and its Hydration Water: Neutron Scattering Studies on Fully Deuterated GFP

    OpenAIRE

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; O’Neill, Hugh; Hong, Liang; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Ehlers, Georg; Weiss, Kevin L.; Zhang, Qiu; Yi, Zheng; Mamontov, Eugene; Smith, Jeremy C.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the picosecond-to-nanosecond motions of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its hydration water using neutron scattering spectroscopy and hydrogen/deuterium contrast. The analysis reveals that hydration water suppresses protein motions at lower temperatures (

  16. Simulation of gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is proposed,which can overcome the deficiency of single production method.Based on the combination production method,the physical and mathematical models are developed to simulate the hydrate dissociation.The mathematical model can be used to analyze the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,the convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production.The mechanism of gas production by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is revealed by the numerical simulation.The evolutions of such physical variables as pressure,temperature,saturations and gas and water rates are analyzed.Numerical results show that under certain conditions the combination method has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single producing method.

  17. Cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding the alpha and beta subunits of C-phycocyanin from the cyanobacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum.

    OpenAIRE

    Pilot, T J; Fox, J L

    1984-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotide probes were used to identify a cloned DNA fragment from the cyanobacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum that contains the genes for the alpha and beta subunits of C-phycocyanin. The coding region for the alpha-subunit gene begins 108 base pairs downstream from the 3' end of the beta-subunit structural gene. The sequences of the coding regions for both genes have been determined as well as 379 base pairs of 5' flanking region, 204 base pairs of 3' flanking region, and th...

  18. Water Transfer Characteristics during Methane Hydrate Formation Processes in Layered Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousheng Deng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrate formation processes in porous media are always accompanied by water transfer. To study the transfer characteristics comprehensively, two kinds of layered media consisting of coarse sand and loess were used to form methane hydrate in them. An apparatus with three PF-meter sensors detecting water content and temperature changes in media during the formation processes was applied to study the water transfer characteristics. It was experimentally observed that the hydrate formation configurations in different layered media were similar; however, the water transfer characteristics and water conversion ratios were different.

  19. Identification of Clathrate Hydrates, Hexagonal Ice, Cubic Ice, and Liquid Water in Simulations: the CHILL+ Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Andrew H; Molinero, Valeria

    2015-07-23

    Clathrate hydrates and ice I are the most abundant crystals of water. The study of their nucleation, growth, and decomposition using molecular simulations requires an accurate and efficient algorithm that distinguishes water molecules that belong to each of these crystals and the liquid phase. Existing algorithms identify ice or clathrates, but not both. This poses a challenge for cases in which ice and hydrate coexist, such as in the synthesis of clathrates from ice and the formation of ice from clathrates during self-preservation of methane hydrates. Here we present an efficient algorithm for the identification of clathrate hydrates, hexagonal ice, cubic ice, and liquid water in molecular simulations. CHILL+ uses the number of staggered and eclipsed water-water bonds to identify water molecules in cubic ice, hexagonal ice, and clathrate hydrate. CHILL+ is an extension of CHILL (Moore et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2010, 12, 4124-4134), which identifies hexagonal and cubic ice but not clathrates. In addition to the identification of hydrates, CHILL+ significantly improves the detection of hexagonal ice up to its melting point. We validate the use of CHILL+ for the identification of stacking faults in ice and the nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates. To our knowledge, this is the first algorithm that allows for the simultaneous identification of ice and clathrate hydrates, and it does so in a way that is competitive with respect to existing methods used to identify any of these crystals. PMID:25389702

  20. Submarine Slope Failure Primed and Triggered by Bottom Water Warming in Oceanic Hydrate-Bearing Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyuk Kwon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many submarine slope failures in hydrate-bearing sedimentary deposits might be directly triggered, or at least primed, by gas hydrate dissociation. It has been reported that during the past 55 years (1955–2010 the 0–2000 m layer of oceans worldwide has been warmed by 0.09 °C because of global warming. This raises the following scientific concern: if warming of the bottom water of deep oceans continues, it would dissociate natural gas hydrates and could eventually trigger massive slope failures. The present study explored the submarine slope instability of oceanic gas hydrate-bearing deposits subjected to bottom water warming. One-dimensional coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (T-H-M finite difference analyses were performed to capture the underlying physical processes initiated by bottom water warming, which includes thermal conduction through sediments, thermal dissociation of gas hydrates, excess pore pressure generation, pressure diffusion, and hydrate dissociation against depressurization. The temperature rise at the seafloor due to bottom water warming is found to create an excess pore pressure that is sufficiently large to reduce the stability of a slope in some cases. Parametric study results suggest that a slope becomes more susceptible to failure with increases in thermal diffusivity and hydrate saturation and decreases in pressure diffusivity, gas saturation, and water depth. Bottom water warming can be further explored to gain a better understanding of the past methane hydrate destabilization events on Earth, assuming that more reliable geological data is available.

  1. Water Density Fluctuations Relevant to Hydrophobic Hydration are Unaltered by Attractions

    CERN Document Server

    Remsing, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of density fluctuations in bulk water has made significant contributions to our understanding of the hydration and interactions of idealized, purely repulsive hydrophobic solutes. To similarly inform the hydration of realistic hydrophobic solutes that have dispersive interactions with water, here we characterize water density fluctuations in the presence of attractive fields that correspond to solute-water attractions. We find that when the attractive field acts only in the solute hydration shell, but not in the solute core, it does not significantly alter water density fluctuations in the solute core region. We further find that for a wide range of solute sizes and attraction strengths, the free energetics of turning on the attractive fields in bulk water are accurately captured by linear response theory. Our results also suggest strategies for more efficiently estimating hydration free energies of realistic solutes in bulk water and at interfaces.

  2. Pressure Dependence of the Dynamic Crossover Temperatures in Protein and its Hydration Water

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Xiang-qiang; Kim, Chansoo; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero; Leao, Juscelino B; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2008-01-01

    Recently we have shown experimental evidence for a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon in hydration water around a globular protein (lysozyme) at ambient pressure. In this letter we show that when applying pressure to the protein-water system, the FSC crossover temperatures in hydration water of lysozyme tracks the similar Widom line emanating from the existence of a liquid-liquid critical point in a 1-D confined water (in MCM-41-S). The mean squared displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms in lysozyme and in its hydration water show a sudden change of slopes at the same characteristic temperature, which decreases with an increasing pressure. These results taken together give support of the idea that the dynamic crossover (or so-called glass transition) of the protein is a function of both temperature and pressure, following the FSC of its hydration water.

  3. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Formation in Pure Water and Inhibitor Containing Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIUJunhong; GUOTianmin

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic data of methane hydrate formation in the presence of pure water,brines with single salt and mixed salts,and aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol(EG) and salt+EG were measured.A new kinetic model of hydrate formation for the methane+water systems was developed based on a four-step formation mechanism and reaction kinetic approach.The proposed kinetic model predicts the kinetic behavior of methane hydrate formation in pure water with good accuracy.The feasibility of extending the kenetic model of salt(s) and EG containing systems was explored.

  4. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, N; Michoud, G; Cario, A; Ollivier, J; Franzetti, B; Jebbar, M; Oger, P; Peters, J

    2016-01-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:27595789

  5. Annular multiphase flow behavior during deep water drilling and the effect of hydrate phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhiyuan; Sun Baojiang

    2009-01-01

    It is very important to understand the annular multiphase flow behavior and the effect of hydrate phase transition during deep water drilling. The basic hydrodynamic models, including mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations, were established for annular flow with gas hydrate phase transition during gas kick. The behavior of annular multiphase flow with hydrate phase transition was investigated by analyzing the hydrate-forming region, the gas fraction in the fluid flowing in the annulus, pit gain, bottom hole pressure, and shut-in casing pressure. The simulation shows that it is possible to move the hydrate-forming region away from sea floor by increasing the circulation rate. The decrease in gas volume fraction in the annulus due to hydrate formation reduces pit gain, which can delay the detection of well kick and increase the risk of hydrate plugging in lines. Caution is needed when a well is monitored for gas kick at a relatively low gas production rate, because the possibility of hydrate presence is much greater than that at a relatively high production rate. The shut-in casing pressure cannot reflect the gas kick due to hydrate formation, which increases with time.

  6. Hydrophobic hydration and the anomalous partial molar volumes in ethanol-water mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Te, Jerez; Cendagorta, Joseph R. [Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia 20057 (United States); Miller, Benjamin T.; Brooks, Bernard R. [Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20892 (United States); Ichiye, Toshiko, E-mail: ti9@georgetown.edu [Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia 20057 (United States); Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2015-02-14

    The anomalous behavior in the partial molar volumes of ethanol-water mixtures at low concentrations of ethanol is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous work indicates that the striking minimum in the partial molar volume of ethanol V{sub E} as a function of ethanol mole fraction X{sub E} is determined mainly by water-water interactions. These results were based on simulations that used one water model for the solute-water interactions but two different water models for the water-water interactions. This is confirmed here by using two more water models for the water-water interactions. Furthermore, the previous work indicates that the initial decrease is caused by association of the hydration shells of the hydrocarbon tails, and the minimum occurs at the concentration where all of the hydration shells are touching each other. Thus, the characteristics of the hydration of the tail that cause the decrease and the features of the water models that reproduce this type of hydration are also examined here. The results show that a single-site multipole water model with a charge distribution that mimics the large quadrupole and the p-orbital type electron density out of the molecular plane has “brittle” hydration with hydrogen bonds that break as the tails touch, which reproduces the deep minimum. However, water models with more typical site representations with partial charges lead to flexible hydration that tends to stay intact, which produces a shallow minimum. Thus, brittle hydration may play an essential role in hydrophobic association in water.

  7. Hydrophobic hydration and the anomalous partial molar volumes in ethanol-water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anomalous behavior in the partial molar volumes of ethanol-water mixtures at low concentrations of ethanol is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous work indicates that the striking minimum in the partial molar volume of ethanol VE as a function of ethanol mole fraction XE is determined mainly by water-water interactions. These results were based on simulations that used one water model for the solute-water interactions but two different water models for the water-water interactions. This is confirmed here by using two more water models for the water-water interactions. Furthermore, the previous work indicates that the initial decrease is caused by association of the hydration shells of the hydrocarbon tails, and the minimum occurs at the concentration where all of the hydration shells are touching each other. Thus, the characteristics of the hydration of the tail that cause the decrease and the features of the water models that reproduce this type of hydration are also examined here. The results show that a single-site multipole water model with a charge distribution that mimics the large quadrupole and the p-orbital type electron density out of the molecular plane has “brittle” hydration with hydrogen bonds that break as the tails touch, which reproduces the deep minimum. However, water models with more typical site representations with partial charges lead to flexible hydration that tends to stay intact, which produces a shallow minimum. Thus, brittle hydration may play an essential role in hydrophobic association in water

  8. Kinetics of gas hydrate formation in a water-oil-gas system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talatori, S.; Barth, T. [Bergen Univ., Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry; Fotland, P. [StatoilHydro Research and Development Centre, Sandsli (Norway)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds consisting of polyhedral water cavities which enclathrate small gas molecules. They are formed at certain pressure-temperature conditions where gas and water are present. Gas hydrate formation is of significant importance for flow assurance in oil pipelines at high pressures and/or low temperatures. It is therefore necessary to understand the kinetics of gas hydrate formation for the kinetic inhibition of the hydrates. This paper presented a kinetic model for the growth of gas hydrates and tested it against experimental hydrate kinetic data. The model was based on the Kolmogorov Johnson Mehl Avrami (KJMA) formula employed for a polynuclear mechanism and was found to fit the experimental data. A method was developed in which the mass of formed hydrates was calculated at different stirring rates from the experimental pressure and temperature recorded during the hydrate formation. The gas compositions predicted by the method were verified by comparison with the real compositions as obtained by analysis using a Hewlett Packard HP 6890 Series GC Plus. The paper described the experimental materials, procedures, and methods. It was concluded that linearization of the model specified the type of the nucleation and growth for all the kinetic data at each stirring rate. The effect of stirring rate on the kinetics of hydrate formation for the three stirring rates in the system showed acceleration of the hydrate formation when increasing the stirring rate from 300 to 600 rpm. More hydrates nucleated as stirring rates increased. It was recommended that in order to reach more definite conclusions, it would be necessary to repeat the measurements as well as conduct testing of other oils. 11 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Measurements of gas hydrate formation probability distributions on a quasi-free water droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Nobuo

    2014-06-01

    A High Pressure Automated Lag Time Apparatus (HP-ALTA) can measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions from water in a glass sample cell. In an HP-ALTA gas hydrate formation originates near the edges of the sample cell and gas hydrate films subsequently grow across the water-guest gas interface. It would ideally be desirable to be able to measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions of a single water droplet or mist that is freely levitating in a guest gas, but this is technically challenging. The next best option is to let a water droplet sit on top of a denser, immiscible, inert, and wall-wetting hydrophobic liquid to avoid contact of a water droplet with the solid walls. Here we report the development of a second generation HP-ALTA which can measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions of a water droplet which sits on a perfluorocarbon oil in a container that is coated with 1H,1H,2H,2H-Perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane. It was found that the gas hydrate formation probability distributions of such a quasi-free water droplet were significantly lower than those of water in a glass sample cell.

  10. Kinetic and Phase Behaviors of Catalytic Cracking Dry Gas Hydrate in Water-in-Oil Emulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qinglan; HUANG Qiang; CHEN Guangjin; WANG Xiulin; SUN Changyu; YANG Lanying

    2013-01-01

    The systematic experimental studies were performed on the hydrate formation kinetics and gas-hydrate equilibrium for a simulated catalytic cracking gas in the water-in-oil emulsion.The effect of temperature,pressure and initial gas-liquid ratio on the hydrate formation was studied,respectively.The data were obtained at pressures ranging from 3.5 to 5 MPa and temperatures from 274.15 to 277.15 K.The results showed that hydrogen and methane can be separated from the C2+ fraction by forming hydrate at around 273.15 K which is much higher temperature than that of the cryogenic separation method,and the hydrate formation rate can be enhanced in the water-in-oil emulsion compared to pure water.The experiments provided the basic data for designing the industrial process,and setting the suitable operational conditions.The measured data of gas-hydrate equilibria were compared with the predictions by using the Chen-Guo hydrate thermodynamic model.

  11. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  12. Submarine Slope Failure Primed and Triggered by Bottom Water Warming in Oceanic Hydrate-Bearing Deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Tae-Hyuk Kwon; Gye-Chun Cho

    2012-01-01

    Many submarine slope failures in hydrate-bearing sedimentary deposits might be directly triggered, or at least primed, by gas hydrate dissociation. It has been reported that during the past 55 years (1955–2010) the 0–2000 m layer of oceans worldwide has been warmed by 0.09 °C because of global warming. This raises the following scientific concern: if warming of the bottom water of deep oceans continues, it would dissociate natural gas hydrates and could eventually trigger massive slope f...

  13. Hydration Simulations of a Carbon Nanotube, Immersed in Water, according to the 3-Attractor Water Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis F. Muguet

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available MC simulations of a set of zigzag ((9,0-(14,0 and armchair ((6,6-(10,10carbon nanotubes immersed in water have been carried out in an NpT-ensemble (512 watermolecules, p=1 bar, T=298 K. Intermolecular interactions were described by BMWpotential according to which, besides the well-known linear water dimer bifurcated andinverted water dimers are metastable. In all cases, it was found that there are large periodicfluctuations of water occupancy inside the nanotubes. Decrease in the size of the nanotubediameter leads to a significant destruction of the H-bond network, and to a bifucarted dimerpopulation increase. Inverted dimer concentration relationship with the nanotube diameter ismore complicated. Population maximum for inverted dimers occurs for diameters of 10-11 å. Water features different intermolecular structures not only inside carbon nanotubesbut also in the outer first hydration shells. The amount of bifurcated and inverted dimers issignificantly more important in the first hydration shell than in bulk water.

  14. Isotope Effect on Eutectic and Hydrate Melting Temperatures in the Water-THF System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Jones

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential scanning calorimetry was used to study the effect of isotopic substitution on the eutectic and melting temperatures in the water-tetrahydrofuran (THF system with THF molar fractions near the stoichiometry of the hydrate phase. Deuteration of the host causes an opposite effect from that of the guest with respect to the hydrate liquidus curve and eutectic melting temperature. The eutectic temperature in D2O-containing systems is approximately 3.7 K higher than that in H2O-containing systems. The melting temperatures of THF and deuterated THF hydrates increase by roughly 3.5 K with heavy water. The inclusion of deuterated THF causes a depression of the hydrate liquidus temperatures and a small but measurable effect on the eutectic temperature.

  15. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  16. Hydration status moderates the effects of drinking water on children's cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clinton S; Rapinett, Gertrude; Glaser, Nicole S; Ghetti, Simona

    2015-12-01

    Changes in hydration status throughout the day may affect cognitive performance with implications for learning success in the classroom. Our study tested the hypothesis that the benefit of drinking water on working memory and attention depends upon children's hydration status and renal response to water intake. Fifty-two children aged 9-12 years old were tested under two experimental conditions. The treatment session (Water session) consisted of a standard breakfast with 200 ml water, a baseline test, consumption of 750 ml of water over a period of two hours and subsequently retested. No water was provided after breakfast during the control session. Changes in hydration were assessed via urine samples. Cognitive testing consisted of digit span, pair cancellation, and delayed match to sample tasks. Children who exhibited smaller decreases in urine osmolality following water intake performed significantly better on the water day compared to the control day on a digit-span task and pair-cancellation task. Children who exhibited larger decreases in urine osmolality following water intake performed better on the control day compared to the water day on the digit-span task and pair-cancellation task. These results suggest that focusing on adequate hydration over time may be key for cognitive enhancement.

  17. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments. PMID:26747818

  18. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V., E-mail: aneimark@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8058 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  19. Hydration status moderates the effects of drinking water on children's cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clinton S; Rapinett, Gertrude; Glaser, Nicole S; Ghetti, Simona

    2015-12-01

    Changes in hydration status throughout the day may affect cognitive performance with implications for learning success in the classroom. Our study tested the hypothesis that the benefit of drinking water on working memory and attention depends upon children's hydration status and renal response to water intake. Fifty-two children aged 9-12 years old were tested under two experimental conditions. The treatment session (Water session) consisted of a standard breakfast with 200 ml water, a baseline test, consumption of 750 ml of water over a period of two hours and subsequently retested. No water was provided after breakfast during the control session. Changes in hydration were assessed via urine samples. Cognitive testing consisted of digit span, pair cancellation, and delayed match to sample tasks. Children who exhibited smaller decreases in urine osmolality following water intake performed significantly better on the water day compared to the control day on a digit-span task and pair-cancellation task. Children who exhibited larger decreases in urine osmolality following water intake performed better on the control day compared to the water day on the digit-span task and pair-cancellation task. These results suggest that focusing on adequate hydration over time may be key for cognitive enhancement. PMID:26271221

  20. Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BC Technologies

    2009-12-30

    Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL

  1. Hydration of methanol in water. A DFT-based molecular dynamics study

    CERN Document Server

    Van Erp, T S; Erp, Titus S. van; Meijer, Evert Jan

    2000-01-01

    We studied the hydration of a single methanol molecule in aqueous solution by first-principle DFT-based molecular dynamics simulation. The calculations show that the local structural and short-time dynamical properties of the water molecules remain almost unchanged by the presence of the methanol, confirming the observation from recent experimental structural data for dilute solutions. We also see, in accordance with this experimental work, a distinct shell of water molecules that consists of about 15 molecules. We found no evidence for a strong tangential ordering of the water molecules in the first hydration shell.

  2. Hydration water and peptide dynamics--two sides of a coin. A neutron scattering and adiabatic calorimetry study at low hydration and cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Margarida; Alves, Nuno; Maia, Sílvia; Gomes, Paula; Inaba, Akira; Miyazaki, Yuji; Zanotti, Jean-Marc

    2013-10-21

    In the present work we bridge neutron scattering and calorimetry in the study of a low-hydration sample of a 15-residue hybrid peptide from cecropin and mellitin CA(1-7)M(2-9) of proven antimicrobial activity. Quasielastic and low-frequency inelastic neutron spectra were measured at defined hydration levels - a nominally 'dry' sample (specific residual hydration h = 0.060 g/g), a H2O-hydrated (h = 0.49) and a D2O-hydrated one (h = 0.51). Averaged mean square proton mobilities were derived over a large temperature range (50-300 K) and the vibrational density of states (VDOS) were evaluated for the hydrated samples. The heat capacity of the H2O-hydrated CA(1-7)M(2-9) peptide was measured by adiabatic calorimetry in the temperature range 5-300 K, for different hydration levels. The glass transition and water crystallization temperatures were derived in each case. The existence of different types of water was inferred and their amounts calculated. The heat capacities as obtained from direct calorimetric measurements were compared to the values derived from the neutron spectroscopy by way of integrating appropriately normalized VDOS functions. While there is remarkable agreement with respect to both temperature dependence and glass transition temperatures, the results also show that the VDOS derived part represents only a fraction of the total heat capacity obtained from calorimetry. Finally our results indicate that both hydration water and the peptide are involved in the experimentally observed transitions.

  3. Hydration water and peptide dynamics--two sides of a coin. A neutron scattering and adiabatic calorimetry study at low hydration and cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Margarida; Alves, Nuno; Maia, Sílvia; Gomes, Paula; Inaba, Akira; Miyazaki, Yuji; Zanotti, Jean-Marc

    2013-10-21

    In the present work we bridge neutron scattering and calorimetry in the study of a low-hydration sample of a 15-residue hybrid peptide from cecropin and mellitin CA(1-7)M(2-9) of proven antimicrobial activity. Quasielastic and low-frequency inelastic neutron spectra were measured at defined hydration levels - a nominally 'dry' sample (specific residual hydration h = 0.060 g/g), a H2O-hydrated (h = 0.49) and a D2O-hydrated one (h = 0.51). Averaged mean square proton mobilities were derived over a large temperature range (50-300 K) and the vibrational density of states (VDOS) were evaluated for the hydrated samples. The heat capacity of the H2O-hydrated CA(1-7)M(2-9) peptide was measured by adiabatic calorimetry in the temperature range 5-300 K, for different hydration levels. The glass transition and water crystallization temperatures were derived in each case. The existence of different types of water was inferred and their amounts calculated. The heat capacities as obtained from direct calorimetric measurements were compared to the values derived from the neutron spectroscopy by way of integrating appropriately normalized VDOS functions. While there is remarkable agreement with respect to both temperature dependence and glass transition temperatures, the results also show that the VDOS derived part represents only a fraction of the total heat capacity obtained from calorimetry. Finally our results indicate that both hydration water and the peptide are involved in the experimentally observed transitions. PMID:23986181

  4. Temperature effects in deep-water hydrate foam

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, Alexander V; Rozhkov, Aleksey N

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on heat and mass exchange processes in hydrate foam during its formation from methane bubbles in gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) of the Lake Baikal and following delivery of it in open container to the lake surface. The foam was formed as a result of methane bubble collection with a trap/container. The trap was inverted glass beaker of diameter of 70 mm and 360 mm long. Open bottom end of the beaker used as enter for bubbles ascended from the lakebed. At a depth of 1400 m all bubbles which fed to the trap were transformed here into solid hydrate foam. The sensitive thermometer was mounted in the middle of the trap and recorded the temperature inside trap. The fate of the bubbles in the trap was recorded by video-camera. During ascend within GHSZ with velocity of about 0.375 m/s we observed the continuous decrease of the temperature in the foam up to a level of negative magnitude in a depth interval of 1400 - 750 meters. Above 750 m temperature decrease was changed by small growth. However...

  5. Calculation of Liquid Water-Hydrate-Methane Vapor Phase Equilibria from Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas;

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for determining fluid- and crystal-phase chemical potentials are used for the first time to calculate liquid water-methane hydrate-methane vapor phase equilibria from knowledge of atomistic interaction potentials alone. The water and methane molecules are modeled...... using the TIP4P/ice potential and a united-atom Lennard-Jones potential. respectively. The equilibrium calculation method for this system has three components, (i) thermodynamic integration from a supercritical ideal gas to obtain the fluid-phase chemical potentials. (ii) calculation of the chemical...... potential of the zero-occupancy hydrate system using thermodynamic integration from an Einstein crystal reference state, and (iii) thermodynamic integration to obtain the water and guest molecules' chemical potentials as a function of the hydrate occupancy. The three-phase equilibrium curve is calculated...

  6. Effect of Hydration Aging and Water Binder Ratio on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Sprayed Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Ditao; WANG Jiabin; WANG Yan

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the durability of sprayed concrete (shotcrete), effects of different hydration aging and water-binder ratio (w/b) on the microstructure of cement paste and basic mechanical properties of test specimens were investigated. The phase composition, mass percentage of ettringite and portland in hydration production and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo gravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The experimental results showed that changes in phase composition was more signiifcant than those of water-binder ratio. With hydration aging and water-binder ratio increased, the mass percentage of ettringite and portland was decreased from 4.42%, 1.49% to 3.31%, 1.35%, respectively and the microstructure of paste was signiifcantly compacted. Likewise, the mechanical properties including cubic compressive strength and splitting tensile strength were rised obviously.

  7. In silico studies of the properties of water hydrating a small protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Chakraborty, Kausik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy, E-mail: sanjoy@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Molecular Modeling Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur - 721302 (India); Jana, Madhurima [Molecular Simulation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela - 769008 (India)

    2014-12-14

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of an aqueous solution of the small protein HP-36 has been carried out with explicit solvent at room temperature. Efforts have been made to explore the influence of the protein on the relative packing and ordering of water molecules around its secondary structures, namely, three α-helices. The calculations reveal that the inhomogeneous water ordering and density distributions around the helices are correlated with their relative hydrophobicity. Importantly, we have identified the existence of a narrow relatively dehydrated region containing randomly organized “quasi-free” water molecules beyond the first layer of “bound” waters at the protein surface. These water molecules with relatively weaker binding energies form the transition state separating the “bound” and “free” water molecules at the interface. Further, increased contribution of solid-like caging motions of water molecules around the protein is found to be responsible for reduced fluidity of the hydration layer. Interestingly, we notice that the hydration layer of helix-3 is more fluidic with relatively higher entropy as compared to the hydration layers of the other two helical segments. Such characteristics of helix-3 hydration layer correlate well with the activity of HP-36, as helix-3 contains the active site of the protein.

  8. Methane hydrate stability in the presence of water-soluble hydroxyalkyl cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mohammad-Taheri; A. Zarringhalam Moghaddam; K. Nazari; N. Gholipour Zanjani

    2012-01-01

    The effect of low-dosage water-soluble hydroxyethyl cellulose (approximate Mw~90,000 and 250,000) as a member ofhydroxyalkyl cellulosic polymer group on methane hydrate stability was investigated by monitoring hydrate dissociation at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure in a closed vessel.In particular,the influence of molecular weight and mass concentration of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) was studied with respect to hydrate formation and dissociation.Methane hydrate formation was performed at 2 ℃ and at a pressure greater than 100 bar.Afterwards,hydrate dissociation was initiated by step heating from - 10 ℃ at a mild pressure of 13 bar to -3 ℃,0 ℃ and 2 ℃.With respect to the results obtained for methane hydrate formation/dissociation and the amount of gas uptake,we concluded that HEC 90,000 at 5000 ppm is suitable for long-term gas storage and transportation under a mild pressure of 13 bar and at temperatures below the freezing point.

  9. Hydration evolution of pre-cast concrete with steam and water curing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巴明芳; 钱春香

    2013-01-01

    The hydration characteristics of pre-cast concrete considering the effects of effective initial steam-curing and water-curing duration were measured and analyzed with XRD, TG, X-ray CT, SEM-BSE and MIP techniques. The results show that the effective initial steam-curing duration for pre-cast concrete with lower water-binder ratio was 10 14 h at 50 °C and the initial water-curing duration was 7 14 d. And the hydration evolution of cement, fly ash and slag in pre-cast concrete was obtained respectively by combining the hydrochlorides and EDTA selecting dissolution methods, based on which the contents of hydrated and anhydrate in concrete were calculated and the corresponding dynamic capillary porosity was also determined. Moreover, the comparison between calculated results and experimental ones indicates that the proposed evolution models of microscopic characteristics corresponding to hydration kinetics of cemented materials could be adopted to predict the developing trend of capillary porosity and hydration-products content in pre-cast concrete with fly ash and slag under certain curing conditions.

  10. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering and Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics.

  11. Anomalous and anisotropic nanoscale diffusion of hydration water molecules in fluid lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppozini, Laura; Roosen-Runge, Felix; Bewley, Robert I; Dalgliesh, Robert M; Perring, Toby; Seydel, Tilo; Glyde, Henry R; García Sakai, Victoria; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-11-14

    We have studied nanoscale diffusion of membrane hydration water in fluid-phase lipid bilayers made of 1,2-dimyristoyl-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) using incoherent quasi-elastic neutron scattering. Dynamics were fit directly in the energy domain using the Fourier transform of a stretched exponential. By using large, 2-dimensional detectors, lateral motions of water molecules and motions perpendicular to the membranes could be studied simultaneously, resulting in 2-dimensional maps of relaxation time, τ, and stretching exponent, β. We present experimental evidence for anomalous (sub-diffusive) and anisotropic diffusion of membrane hydration water molecules over nanometer distances. By combining molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics simulations, the potential microscopic origins for the anomaly and anisotropy of hydration water were investigated. Bulk water was found to show intrinsic sub-diffusive motion at time scales of several picoseconds, likely related to caging effects. In membrane hydration water, however, the anisotropy of confinement and local dynamical environments leads to an anisotropy of relaxation times and stretched exponents, indicative of anomalous dynamics. PMID:26338138

  12. Selective and reactive hydration of nitriles to amides in water using silver nanoparticles stabilized by organic ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Koji [Hokkaido University, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Japan); Kawakami, Hayato [Miyoshi Oil & Fat Co., Ltd. (Japan); Narushima, Takashi; Yonezawa, Tetsu, E-mail: tetsu@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Water-dispersible silver nanoparticles stabilized by silver–carbon covalent bonds were prepared. They exhibited high catalytic activities for the selective hydration of nitriles to amides in water. The activation of a nitrile group by the functional groups of the substrates and the hydrophobic layer on the nanoparticles influenced the catalyzed reaction were confirmed. Alkyl nitriles could also be selectively hydrated.

  13. Antimelanogenic effect of c-phycocyanin through modulation of tyrosinase expression by upregulation of ERK and downregulation of p38 MAPK signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Yu-Ting

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigmentation is one of the essential defense mechanisms against oxidative stress or UV irradiation; however, abnormal hyperpigmentation in human skin may pose a serious aesthetic problem. C-phycocyanin (Cpc is a phycobiliprotein from spirulina and functions as an antioxidant and a light harvesting protein. Though it is known that spirulina has been used to reduce hyperpigmentation, little literature addresses the antimelanogenic mechanism of Cpc. Herein, we investigated the rationale for the Cpc-induced inhibitory mechanism on melanin synthesis in B16F10 melanoma cells. Methods Cpc-induced inhibitory effects on melanin synthesis and tyrosinase expression were evaluated. The activity of MAPK pathways-associated molecules such as MAPK/ERK and p38 MAPK, were also examined to explore Cpc-induced antimelanogenic mechanisms. Additionally, the intracellular localization of Cpc was investigated by confocal microscopic analysis to observe the migration of Cpc. Results Cpc significantly (P Conclusions Cpc exerted dual antimelanogenic mechanisms by upregulation of MAPK/ERK-dependent degradation of MITF and downregulation of p38 MAPK-regulated CREB activation to modulate melanin formation. Cpc may have potential applications in biomedicine, food, and cosmetic industries.

  14. Therapeutic Effect of C-Phycocyanin Extracted from Blue Green Algae in a Rat Model of Acute Lung Injury Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-on Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available C-Phycocyanin (CPC, extracted from blue green algae, is a dietary nutritional supplement due to its several beneficial pharmacological effects. This study was conducted to evaluate whether CPC protects against lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced acute lung injury (ALI in rats. Rats were challenged with LPS (5 mg/kg body weight intratracheally to induce ALI. After 3 h LPS instillation, rats were administrated with CPC (50 mg/kg body weight, i.p. for another 3 h. Our results showed that posttreatment with CPC significantly inhibited LPS-induced elevation of protein concentration, nitrite/nitrate level, release of proinflammatory cytokines, the number of total polymorphonuclear cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung edema evidenced by decrease of lung wet/dry weight ratio accompanied by a remarkable improvement of lung histopathological alterations. Furthermore, CPC significantly attenuated LPS-induced myeloperoxidase activity, O2− formation, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 as well as nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation in lungs. Additionally, CPC significantly downregulated proapoptotic proteins such as caspase-3 and Bax, but upregulated antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL in lungs exposed to LPS. These findings indicate that CPC could be potentially useful for treatment of LPS-related ALI by inhibiting inflammatory responses and apoptosis in lung tissues.

  15. Assessment of C-phycocyanin effect on astrocytes-mediated neuroprotection against oxidative brain injury using 2D and 3D astrocyte tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seul Ki; Park, Jun Sang; Luo, Lidan; Kwon, Yeo Seon; Lee, Hoo Cheol; Shim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Ja-Kyeong; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2015-01-01

    Drugs are currently being developed to attenuate oxidative stress as a treatment for brain injuries. C-phycocyanin (C-Pc) is an antioxidant protein of green microalgae known to exert neuroprotective effects against oxidative brain injury. Astrocytes, which compose many portions of the brain, exert various functions to overcome oxidative stress; however, little is known about how C-Pc mediates the antioxidative effects of astrocytes. In this study, we revealed that C-Pc intranasal administration to the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats ensures neuroprotection of ischemic brain by reducing infarct size and improving behavioral deficits. C-Pc also enhanced viability and proliferation but attenuated apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of oxidized astrocytes, without cytotoxicity to normal astrocytes and neurons. To elucidate how C-Pc leads astrocytes to enhance neuroprotection and repair of ischemia brain, we firstly developed 3D oxidized astrocyte model. C-Pc had astrocytes upregulate antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and catalase and neurotrophic factors BDNF and NGF, while alleviating inflammatory factors IL-6 and IL-1β and glial scar. Additionally, C-Pc improved viability of 3D oxidized neurons. In summary, C-Pc was concluded to activate oxidized astrocytes to protect and repair the ischemic brain with the combinatorial effects of improved antioxidative, neurotrophic, and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:26399322

  16. Study of the Effects of Betaine and/or C-Phycocyanin on the Growth of Lung Cancer A549 Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rea Bingula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of betaine, C-phycocyanin (C-PC, and their combined use on the growth of A549 lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo. When cells were coincubated with betaine and C-PC, an up to 60% decrease in viability was observed which is significant compared to betaine (50% or C-PC treatment alone (no decrease. Combined treatment reduced the stimulation of NF-κB expression by TNF-α and increased the amount of the proapoptotic p38 MAPK. Interestingly, combined treatment induced a cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase for ~60% of cells. In vivo studies were performed in pathogen-free male nude rats injected with A549 cells in their right flank. Their daily food was supplemented with either betaine, C-PC, both, or neither. Compared to the control group, tumour weights and volumes were significantly reduced in either betaine- or C-PC-treated groups and no additional decrease was obtained with the combined treatment. This data indicates that C-PC and betaine alone may efficiently inhibit tumour growth in rats. The synergistic activity of betaine and C-PC on A549 cells growth observed in vitro remains to be further confirmed in vivo. The reason behind the nature of their interaction is yet to be sought.

  17. Is the first hydration shell of lysozyme of higher density than bulk water?

    OpenAIRE

    Merzel, Franci; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2002-01-01

    Characterization of the physical properties of protein surface hydration water is critical for understanding protein structure and folding. Here, using molecular dynamics simulation, we provide an explanation of recent x-ray and neutron solution scattering data that indicate that the density of water on the surface of lysozyme is significantly higher than that of bulk water. The simulation-derived scattering profiles are in excellent agreement with the experiment. In the ...

  18. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J; Weik, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  19. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J.; Weik, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  20. Isotope Effect on Eutectic and Hydrate Melting Temperatures in the Water-THF System

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. W.; Zhang, J. S.; Jones, C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to study the effect of isotopic substitution on the eutectic and melting temperatures in the water-tetrahydrofuran (THF) system with THF molar fractions near the stoichiometry of the hydrate phase. Deuteration of the host causes an opposite effect from that of the guest with respect to the hydrate liquidus curve and eutectic melting temperature. The eutectic temperature in D2O-containing systems is approximately 3.7 K higher than that in H2O-containi...

  1. X-ray computed-tomography observations of water flow through anisotropic methane hydrate-bearing sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2009-06-01

    We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to image and quantify the effect of a heterogeneous sand grain-size distribution on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate, as well as the effect on water flow through the heterogeneous hydrate-bearing sand. A 28 cm long sand column was packed with several segments having vertical and horizontal layers with sands of different grain-size distributions. During the hydrate formation, water redistribution occurred. Observations of water flow through the hydrate-bearing sands showed that water was imbibed more readily into the fine sand, and that higher hydrate saturation increased water imbibition in the coarse sand due to increased capillary strength. Hydrate dissociation induced by depressurization resulted in different flow patterns with the different grain sizes and hydrate saturations, but the relationships between dissociation rates and the grain sizes could not be identified using the CT images. The formation, presence, and dissociation of hydrate in the pore space dramatically impact water saturation and flow in the system.

  2. PORE STRUCTURE MODEL OF CEMENT HYDRATES CONSIDERING PORE WATER CONTENT AND REACTION PROCESS UNDER ARBITRARY HUMIDITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Yusuke; Oshita, Hideki

    A simulation model to estimate the pore structure of cement hydrates by curing in arbitrary relative humidity is presented. This paper describes procedures for predicting phase compositions based on the classical hydration model of Portland cement, calculating the particle size distribution of constituent phases and evaluating the pore size distribution by stereological and statistical considerations. And to estimate the water content in pore structure under any relative humidity, we proposed the simulation model of adsorption isotherm model based on the pore structure. To evaluate the effectiveness of this model, simulation results were compared with experimental results of the pore size distribution measured by mercury porosimetry. As a result, it was found that the experimental and simulated results were in close agreement, and the simulated results indicated characterization of the po re structure of cement hydrates.

  3. Gas chromatographic thermodynamics on hydration processes of magnesium chloride with low water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建军; 陈关城; 马培华; 保积庆; 马玉涛; 陈丰秋

    2003-01-01

    The dehydration and hydration processes of magnesium chloride hydrates were studied by means of frontal chromatography analysis, calorimetry, thermogravimetry and chemical analysis. The mathematical imitation for the adsorption isotherms of MgCl2*4H2O and MgCl2*2H2O at different temperatures indicates that Boltzmann Function is the ideal equation to describe those adsorption isotherms. Its adsorption heat is -13.06kJ/mol and -16.11kJ/mol, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium constants are also given. From the data obtained, there is a thermodynamical possibility to use partial dehydrated magnesium chloride hydrates as an absorbance to clean water vapor contained in bischophite dehydration equipment and let the protection gas HCl recycle in the fluid bed reaction system.

  4. The thermodynamics of proton hydration and the electrochemical surface potential of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, Travis P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Beck, Thomas L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    The free energy change for transferring a single ion across the water liquid/vapor interface includes an electrochemical surface potential contribution. Since this potential is not directly accessible to thermodynamic measurement, several extra-thermodynamic approaches have been employed to infer its sign and magnitude, with a resulting wide spread of values. Here, we examine further the thermodynamics of proton hydration and the electrochemical surface potential of water along three directions: (1) a basic relation of interfacial electrostatics and experimental results on ion distributions near a water/organic interface are employed to infer a solvent contribution to the electrochemical surface potential, (2) a re-analysis is performed of the existing bulk and cluster ion hydration data, and (3) extensive computational modeling is conducted to examine the size dependence of hydration enthalpy differences for the NaF ion pair between the small cluster and the converged bulk limits. The computational studies include classical polarizable models and high-level quantum chemical methods. The new theoretical analysis of existing experimental data and the combined classical/quantum modeling lead to results consistent with our previously derived proton hydration quantities.

  5. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  6. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  7. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-16

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  8. Modelling and Validation of Water Hydration of PEM Fuel Cell Membrane in Dynamic Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2015-01-01

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy of hydrogen and oxygen directly in to electricity. High efficiency and the possibility of zero emission operation have made them a prime candidate for powering the next generation of electric vehicles. PEM fuel cells require good hydration in order to deliver high...... performance and ensure long life operation. Water is essential for membrane proton conductivity which increases by nearly six orders of magnitude from dry to fully hydrated. Adequate water management in PEM fuel cell is crucial in order to avoid an imbalance between water production and water removal from...... non-Ficknian behavior of the cell membrane. The present model considers the absorption/desorption mechanism typical of dynamic process and for this reason it becomes useful when studying a PEM fuel cell system in dynamic conditions....

  9. Gas hydrates in the deep water Ulleung Basin, East Sea, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae

    2016-04-01

    Studies on gas hydrates in the deep-water Ulleung Basin, East Sea, Korea was initiated by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) to secure the future energy resources in 1996. Bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) were first identified on seismic data collected in the southwestern part of the basin from 1998 to 1999. Regional geophysical surveys and geological studies of gas hydrates in the basin have been carried out by KIGAM from 2000 to 2004. The work included 12,367 km of 2D multi-channel seismic reflection lines and 38 piston cores 5 to 8 m long. As a part of the Korean National Gas Hydrate Program that has been performed since 2005, 6690 km of 2D multi-channel reflection seismic lines, 900 km2 of 3D seismic data, 69 piston cores and three PROD cores were additionally collected. In addition, two gas hydrate drilling expeditions were performed in 2007 and 2010. Cracks generally parallel to beddings caused by the dissociation of gas hydrate were often observed in cores. The lack of higher hydrocarbons and the carbon isotope ratios indicate that the methane is primarily biogenic. The seismic data showed clear and wide-spread bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs). The BSR was identified by (a) its polarity opposite to the seafloor, (b) its seafloor-parallel reflection behavior, and (c) its occurrence at a sub-bottom depth corresponding to the expected base of gas hydrate stability zone. Several vertical to sub-vertical chimney-like blank zones up to several kilometers in diameter were also identified in the study area. They are often associated with velocity pull-up structures that are interpreted due to higher velocity in gas hydrate-bearing deposits. Seismic velocity analysis also showed a high velocity anomaly within the pull-up structure. Gas hydrate samples were collected from the shallow sedimentary section of blanking zone by piston coring in 2007. BSRs mainly occur in the southern part of the basin. They also locally observed in the

  10. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Feng; Wang, Hong, E-mail: hwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, International Center for Applied Mechanics and School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Suo, Zhigang, E-mail: hwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Kavli Institute of Bionano Science and Technology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-13

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  11. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 43 Gas Hydrates T. Ramprasad National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403 004 rprasad@nio.org A gas hydrate is a crystalline solid; its building blocks consist of a gas molecule... surrounded by a cage of water molecules. Thus it is similar to ice, except that the crystalline structure is stabilized by the guest gas molecule within the cage of water molecules. Many gases have molecular sizes suitable to form hydrate, including...

  12. Dynamics of Hydration Water around Native and Misfolded α-Lactalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotzakis, Z F; Groot, C C M; Brandeburgo, W H; Bakker, H J; Bolhuis, P G

    2016-06-01

    As water is an essential ingredient in protein structure, dynamics, and functioning, knowledge of its behavior near proteins is crucial. We investigate water dynamics around bovine α-lactalbumin by combining molecular dynamics simulations with polarization-resolved femtosecond infrared (fs-IR) spectroscopy. We identify slowly reorienting surface waters and establish their hydrogen-bond lifetime and reorientation dynamics, which we compare to the experimentally measured anisotropy decay. The calculated number of slow surface waters is in reasonable agreement with the results of fs-IR experiments. While surface waters form fewer hydrogen bonds than the bulk, within the hydration layer water is slower when donating more hydrogen bonds. At concave sites the protein-water hydrogen bonds break preferably via translational diffusion rather than via a hydrogen-bond jump mechanism. Water molecules reorient slower near these sites than at convex water-exposed sites. Protein misfolding leads to an increased exposure of hydrophobic groups, inducing relatively faster surface water dynamics. Nevertheless, the larger exposed surface slows down a larger amount of water. While for native proteins hydrating water is slower near hydrophobic than near hydrophilic residues, mainly due to stronger confinement, misfolding causes hydrophobic water to reorient relatively faster because exposure of hydrophobic groups destroys concave protein cavities with a large excluded volume. PMID:27137845

  13. Two structural relaxations in protein hydration water and their dynamic crossovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camisasca, G; De Marzio, M; Corradini, D; Gallo, P

    2016-07-28

    We study the translational single particle dynamics of hydration water of lysozyme upon cooling by means of molecular dynamics simulations. We find that water close to the protein exhibits two distinct relaxations. By characterizing their behavior upon cooling, we are able to assign the first relaxation to the structural α-relaxation also present in bulk water and in other glass-forming liquids. The second, slower, relaxation can be ascribed to a dynamic coupling of hydration water motions to the fluctuations of the protein structure. Both relaxation times exhibit crossovers in the behavior upon cooling. For the α-process, we find upon cooling a crossover from a fragile behavior to a strong behavior at a temperature which is about five degrees higher than that of bulk water. The long-relaxation time appears strictly connected to the protein motion as it shows upon cooling a temperature crossover from a strong behavior with a lower activation energy to a strong behavior with a higher activation energy. The crossover temperature coincides with the temperature of the protein dynamical transition. These findings can help experimentalists to disentangle the different information coming from total correlators and to better characterize hydration water relaxations in different biomolecules. PMID:27475377

  14. Hydration, Orientation, and Conformation of Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Sumi N; Gordon, Brittany P; Valley, Nicholas A; McWilliams, Laura E; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2015-06-18

    Aqueous-phase processing of methylglyoxal (MG) has been suggested to constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected because its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form geminal diols, as well as because MG and its hydration products can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active, but an improved description of its surface behavior is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation. These studies investigate MG adsorption, focusing on its hydration state at the air-water interface, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach that involves vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. Together, the experimental and theoretical data show that MG exists predominantly in a singly hydrated state (diol) at the interface, with a diol-tetrol ratio at the surface higher than that for the bulk. In addition to exhibiting a strong surface activity, we find that MG significantly perturbs the water structure at the interface. The results have implications for understanding the atmospheric fate of methylglyoxal. PMID:25989368

  15. Study of the synergistic effects of all-transretinoic acid and C-phycocyanin on the growth and apoptosis of A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Gao, Mei-Hua; Lv, Cong-Yi; Yang, Peng; Yin, Qi-Feng

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of the combination of all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) and natural nontoxic C-phycocyanin (C-PC) on the growth of A549 lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the anticancer mechanism of the drug combination was revealed. Results showed both C-PC and ATRA could inhibit the growth of A549 cells in vivo. The combination of ATRA+C-PC could yield a higher inhibition rate. C-PC exerted a major effect on the proliferation of human embryo lung cells, but ATRA at a high concentration exerted an inhibitory effect. In addition, ATRA+C-PC could decrease the CDK4 mRNA level, but upregulated caspase-3 protein expression and induced cell apoptosis. A mouse model with tumor was constructed by a subcutaneous injection to the left axilla of nu nude (NU/NU) mice. Compared with the control group, the tumor weight was decreased in the single-drug treatment group and was the lowest in the combination group. C-PC+ATRA could upregulate tumor necrosis factor levels and downregulate Bcl-2 expression and the cyclin D1 gene in the tumor. C-PC could promote T cells' activities and spleen weight, but a single use of ATRA exerted an opposite effect. The dosage of ATRA could be reduced when combined with C-PC to reduce the toxic side-effects. In summary, the antitumor effects of the C-PC+ATRA combination were more significant than a single drug in vivo and in vitro. PMID:25812039

  16. Monomeric C-phycocyanin at room temperature and 77 K. Resolution of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the individual chromophores and the energy-transfer rate constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1993-09-23

    At both room temperature (RT) and 77 K, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the three individual chromophore types ([alpha][sub 84], [beta][sub 84], and [beta][sub 155]) found in monomeric C-phycocyanin ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]), isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, were resolved along with the rates of energy transfer between the chromophores. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the [beta][sub 155] chromophore, was useful in effecting this resolution. At RT, the single broad peak in the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) was resolved into its three-component spectra by comparing the steady-state absorption spectra of the isolated wild-type [alpha] subunit of PC ([alpha][sup PC]) (containing only the [alpha][sub 84] chromophore) with those of the monomeric PCs isolated from the mutant strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) and the wild-type strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]). At 77 K, the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) splits into two peaks. This partial resolution at 77 K of the chromophore spectra of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) when compared with the 77 K absorption spectra of [alpha][sup PC], [beta][sup PC], and ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) provided a confirmation of our RT assignments of the chromophore absorption spectra. 38 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. ATR-FTIR study of water in Nafion membrane combined with proton conductivity measurements during hydration/dehydration cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimatsu, Keiji; Bae, Byungchan; Miyatake, Kenji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2011-04-21

    We have conducted combined time-resolved attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and proton conductivity measurements of Nafion NRE211 membrane during hydration/dehydration cycles at room temperature. Conductivity change was interpreted in terms of different states of water in the membrane based on its δ(HOH) vibrational spectra. It was found that hydration of a dry membrane leads first to complete dissociation of the sulfonic acid groups to liberate hydrated protons, which are isolated from each other and have δ(HOH) vibrational frequency around 1740 cm(-1). The initial hydration is not accompanied by a significant increase of the proton conductivity. Further hydration gives rise to a rapid increase of the conductivity in proportion to intensity of a new δ(HOH) band around 1630 cm(-1). This was interpreted in terms of formation of channels of weakly hydrogen-bonded water to combine the isolated hydrophilic domains containing hydrated protons and hydrated sulfonate ions produced during the initial stage of hydration. Upon dehydration, proton conductivity drops first very rapidly due to loss of the weakly hydrogen bonded water from the channels to leave hydrophilic domains isolated in the membrane. Dehydration of the protons proceeds very slowly after significant loss of the proton conductivity.

  18. Coupling of the hydration water dynamics and the internal dynamics of actin detected by quasielastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Quasielastic neutron scattering spectra of F-actin and G-actin were measured. ► Analysis of the samples in D2O and H2O provided the spectra of hydration water. ► The first layer hydration water around F-actin is less mobile than around G-actin. ► This difference in hydration water is in concert with the internal dynamics of actin. ► Water outside the first layer behaves bulk-like but influenced by the first layer. -- Abstract: In order to characterize dynamics of water molecules around F-actin and G-actin, quasielastic neutron scattering experiments were performed on powder samples of F-actin and G-actin, hydrated either with D2O or H2O, at hydration ratios of 0.4 and 1.0. By combined analysis of the quasielastic neutron scattering spectra, the parameter values characterizing the dynamics of the water molecules in the first hydration layer and those of the water molecules outside of the first layer were obtained. The translational diffusion coefficients (DT) of the hydration water in the first layer were found to be 1.2 × 10−5 cm2/s and 1.7 × 10−5 cm2/s for F-actin and G-actin, respectively, while that for bulk water was 2.8 × 10−5 cm2/s. The residence times were 6.6 ps and 5.0 ps for F-actin and G-actin, respectively, while that for bulk water was 0.62 ps. These differences between F-actin and G-actin, indicating that the hydration water around G-actin is more mobile than that around F-actin, are in concert with the results of the internal dynamics of F-actin and G-actin, showing that G-actin fluctuates more rapidly than F-actin. This implies that the dynamics of the hydration water is coupled to the internal dynamics of the actin molecules. The DT values of the water molecules outside of the first hydration layer were found to be similar to that of bulk water though the residence times are strongly affected by the first hydration layer. This supports the recent observation on intracellular water that shows bulk-like behavior

  19. Cooperative water-SOM interactions derived from the organic compound effect on SOM hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisover, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Interactions of water molecules with soil organic matter (SOM) may affect the ability of SOM to participate in multiple physical, chemical and biological processes. Specifically, water-SOM interactions may have a profound effect on interactions of organic compounds with SOM which is often considered as a major natural sorbent controlling the environmental fate of organic pollutants in the soil environment. Quantification of water - SOM interactions may be carried out by using water vapor sorption isotherms. However, water sorption isotherms providing macroscopic thermodynamic data do not allow examining water-SOM interactions on a microenvironment scale. The examination of water-SOM interactions in a local SOM environment may be carried out by determining the response of the SOM hydration to sorption of probe organic compounds. Recently, the model-free approach was proposed which allows quantifying effects of sorbing organic molecules on water - SOM interactions, by using relatively more available data on the effect of water activity on organic compound - SOM interactions. Therefore, this thermodynamic approach was applied to the experimental data describing sorption of organic compounds by SOM, both from the vapor and liquid phases, at various water activities. Hence, the response of water interactions with the model SOM materials such as a humic acid and an organic matter-rich peat soil to the presence of various organic sorbates was evaluated. Depending on a molecular structure of organic sorbates probing various molecular environments in SOM, the SOM-bound water may be driven in or out of the SOM sorbents. Organic compounds containing the atoms of oxygen, nitrogen or sulfur and preferring a relatively "polar" SOM microenvironment demonstrate the distinct enhancing effect on water-SOM interactions. In contrast, the "low-polarity" organic compounds, e.g., hydrocarbons or their halogen-substituted derivatives, produce a weakening effect on water-SOM interactions

  20. Water proton configurations in structures I, II, and H clathrate hydrate unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Fumihito; Hiratsuka, Masaki; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2013-03-28

    Position and orientation of water protons need to be specified when the molecular simulation studies are performed for clathrate hydrates. Positions of oxygen atoms in water are experimentally determined by X-ray diffraction analysis of clathrate hydrate structures, but positions of water hydrogen atoms in the lattice are disordered. This study reports a determination of the water proton coordinates in unit cell of structure I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH) clathrate hydrates that satisfy the ice rules, have the lowest potential energy configuration for the protons, and give a net zero dipole moment. Possible proton coordinates in the unit cell were chosen by analyzing the symmetry of protons on the hexagonal or pentagonal faces in the hydrate cages and generating all possible proton distributions which satisfy the ice rules. We found that in the sI and sII unit cells, proton distributions with small net dipole moments have fairly narrow potential energy spreads of about 1 kJ∕mol. The total Coulomb potential on a test unit charge placed in the cage center for the minimum energy∕minimum dipole unit cell configurations was calculated. In the sI small cages, the Coulomb potential energy spread in each class of cage is less than 0.1 kJ∕mol, while the potential energy spread increases to values up to 6 kJ∕mol in sH and 15 kJ∕mol in the sII cages. The guest environments inside the cages can therefore be substantially different in the sII case. Cartesian coordinates for oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the sI, sII, and sH unit cells are reported for reference.

  1. Direct measurement of the correlated dynamics of the protein-backbone and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Cheng; Huang, Jiaxin; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of the correlation times of the protein backbone carbons and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The experimental data indicate a decrease in the correlation times of the carbonyl carbons as the strain on the biopolymer is increased. These observations are in good agreement with short 4ns molecular dynamics simulations of (VPGVG)3, a well studied mimetic peptide of elastin. The experimental results also indicate a reduction in the correlation time of proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain applied to the elastomer. A simple model is suggested that correlates the increase in the motion of proximal waters of hydration to the increase in frequency of libration of the protein backbone that develops with increasing strain. Together, the reduction in the protein entropy accompanied with the increase in entropy of the proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain, support the notion that the source ...

  2. Coordination variation of hydrated Cu2+/Br1- ions traversing the interfacial water in mesopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Huang, X. F.; Li, C. X.; Pan, L. Q.; Wu, Z. H.; Hu, T. D.; Jiang, Z.; Huang, Y. Y.; Cao, Z. X.; Sun, G.; Lu, K. Q.

    2012-06-01

    Resolution of the atomistic and electronic details about the coordination structure variation of hydrated ions in the interfacial water is still a tough challenge, which is, however, essentially important for the understanding of ion adsorption, permeation and other similar processes in aqueous solutions. Here we report the tracing of coordination structure variation for hydrated Cu2+/Br1- ions traversing the interfacial water in Vycor mesopores (ϕ = 7.6 nm) by employing both X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. By controlled desorption/adsorption of water, the filling fraction of the mesopores, thus the water layer thickness, can be adjusted, which in turn effects the variation of coordination structure of the ions therein. It is found that both Cu2+ and Br1- ions prefer staying exclusively in the core water, and in this circumstance no ion pairs have been detected in the solution of concentrations up to 1.0 M. Following capillary decondensation occurring at a filling fraction of ˜35% which corresponds to a water layer of about three monolayers, Br1- ions begin immediately to reconstruct their first coordination shell, characterized by ionic dehydration, shrinkage of ion-water bond length, and formation of ion pairs. In contrast, Cu2+ ions can retain a bulk-like coordination structure till being driven to bond directly to the pore surface when the filling fraction is below 20%. At the final stage of dehydration via thermal vacuum treatment at 110°C, Cu2+ ions can be completely reduced to the Cu1+ state, and recover at room temperature only when the filling fraction is above 14%. These results may be inspirable for the investigation of similar problems concerning hydrated ions in water solution under different confining conditions.

  3. Coordination variation of hydrated Cu2+/Br1− ions traversing the interfacial water in mesopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resolution of the atomistic and electronic details about the coordination structure variation of hydrated ions in the interfacial water is still a tough challenge, which is, however, essentially important for the understanding of ion adsorption, permeation and other similar processes in aqueous solutions. Here we report the tracing of coordination structure variation for hydrated Cu2+/Br1- ions traversing the interfacial water in Vycor mesopores (ϕ = 7.6 nm by employing both X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. By controlled desorption/adsorption of water, the filling fraction of the mesopores, thus the water layer thickness, can be adjusted, which in turn effects the variation of coordination structure of the ions therein. It is found that both Cu2+ and Br1- ions prefer staying exclusively in the core water, and in this circumstance no ion pairs have been detected in the solution of concentrations up to 1.0 M. Following capillary decondensation occurring at a filling fraction of ∼35% which corresponds to a water layer of about three monolayers, Br1- ions begin immediately to reconstruct their first coordination shell, characterized by ionic dehydration, shrinkage of ion-water bond length, and formation of ion pairs. In contrast, Cu2+ ions can retain a bulk-like coordination structure till being driven to bond directly to the pore surface when the filling fraction is below 20%. At the final stage of dehydration via thermal vacuum treatment at 110°C, Cu2+ ions can be completely reduced to the Cu1+ state, and recover at room temperature only when the filling fraction is above 14%. These results may be inspirable for the investigation of similar problems concerning hydrated ions in water solution under different confining conditions.

  4. Hydration and hydrogen bond network of water around hydrophobic surface investigated by terahertz spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, K; Suzuki, T; Kondo, N; Ogawa, Y

    2014-12-21

    Water conformation around hydrophobic side chains of four amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-aminobutyric acid, and L-norvaline) was investigated via changes in complex dielectric constant in the terahertz (THz) region. Each of these amino acids has the same hydrophilic backbone, with successive additions of hydrophobic straight methylene groups (-CH2-) to the side chain. Changes in the degree of hydration (number of dynamically retarded water molecules relative to bulk water) and the structural conformation of the water hydrogen bond (HB) network related to the number of methylene groups were quantitatively measured. Since dielectric responses in the THz region represent water relaxations and water HB vibrations at a sub-picosecond and picosecond timescale, these measurements characterized the water relaxations and HB vibrations perturbed by the methylene apolar groups. We found each successive straight -CH2- group on the side chain restrained approximately two hydrophobic hydration water molecules. Additionally, the number of non-hydrogen-bonded (NHB) water molecules increased slightly around these hydrophobic side chains. The latter result seems to contradict the iceberg model proposed by Frank and Evans, where water molecules are said to be more ordered around apolar surfaces. Furthermore, we compared the water-hydrophilic interactions of the hydrophilic amino acid backbone with those with the water-hydrophobic interactions around the side chains. As the hydrophobicity of the side chain increased, the ordering of the surrounding water HB network was altered from that surrounding the hydrophilic amino acid backbone, thereby diminishing the fraction of NHB water and ordering the surrounding tetrahedral water HB network.

  5. Purification and Characterization of C-phycocyanin from Liquid Cultured Nostoc flagelliforme Cells%发状念珠藻藻蓝蛋白分离纯化及性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳思君; 贾士儒; 丁文杰; 戴玉杰

    2011-01-01

    It's useful measure for the protection of the endangered natural resources to extract useful substances from artificial cultured species. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted from liquid-cultured Nostoc flagelliforme cells with repeated frost thawing followed by frozen ultrasonic method. The crude extract was successfully purified by procedure of ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography with DEAE 650M column, and gel filtration chromatography with Sephadex G200 column. The purity ratio and purity factor of the purified C-phycocyanin reached 5. 321 and 7. 623 respectively after successive purification procedure. It has a maximum absorption at 615nm and a maximum fluorescence emission at 646nm. There are two bands appeared at about 15.7ku and 16.8 ku for SDS-PAGE, which are attributed to α and βsubunits of C-phycocyanin. The stability tests indicated that C-phyeoeyanin is stable in the range pH 6 to 8 with temperature below 30℃ in the dark or indoor light conditions. These results help the further study on exploitation of C-phycocyanin from N. flagelliforme cells.%采用冻融法破碎发状念珠藻细胞,经过磷酸缓冲液提取、硫酸铵分步沉淀、离子交换层析和凝胶层析分离纯化发状念珠藻藻蓝蛋白,其纯度(A615/A280)达到5.321,纯化因子为7.623。纯化的藻蓝蛋白最大吸收峰为615nm,其室温荧光发射峰为646nm,SDS—PAGE电泳显示其d和13亚基的分子质量在14.4~18.4ku。稳定性实验表明,低温、避光、pH6~8以及低浓度的蔗糖等条件下发状念珠藻藻蓝蛋白是稳定的。实验结果将为开发利用发状念珠藻藻蓝蛋白提供参考。

  6. Effects of polar solvents on the fracture resistance of dentin: Role of water hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, R O; Nalla, R K; Balooch, M; Ager III, J W; Kruzic, J J; Kinney, J H

    2004-12-10

    Although healthy dentin is invariably hydrated in vivo, from a perspective of examining the mechanisms of fracture in dentin, it is interesting to consider the role of water hydration. Furthermore, it is feasible that exposure to certain polar solvents, e.g., those found in clinical adhesives, can induce dehydration. In the present study, in vitro deformation and fracture experiments, the latter involving a resistance-curve (R-curve) approach (i.e., toughness evolution with crack extension), were conducted in order to assess changes in the constitutive and fracture behavior induced by three common solvents - acetone, ethanol and methanol. In addition, nanoindentation-based experiments to evaluate the deformation behavior at the level of individual collagen fibers and ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy to evaluate changes in bonding were performed. The results indicate a reversible effect of chemical dehydration, with increased fracture resistance, strength, and stiffness associated with lower hydrogen bonding ability of the solvent. These results are analyzed both in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic toughening phenomena to further understand the micromechanisms of fracture in dentin and the specific role of water hydration.

  7. Hydrated Electrons in Water Clusters: Inside or Outside, Cavity or Noncavity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turi, László

    2015-04-14

    In this work, we compare the applicability of three electron–water molecule pseudopotentials in modeling the physical properties of hydrated electrons. Quantum model calculations illustrate that the recently suggested Larsen–Glover–Schwartz (LGS) model and its modified m-LGS version have a too-attractive potential in the vicinity of the oxygen. As a result, LGS models predict a noncavity hydrated electron structure in clusters at room temperature, as seen from mixed one-electron quantum–classical molecular dynamics simulations of water cluster anions, with the electron localizing exclusively in the interior of the clusters. Comparative calculations using the cavity-preferring Turi–Borgis (TB) model predict interior-state and surface-state cluster isomers. The computed associated physical properties are also analyzed and compared to available experimental data. We find that the LGS and m-LGS potentials provide results that appear to be inconsistent with the size dependence of the experimental data. The simulated TB tendencies are qualitatively correct. Furthermore, ab initio calculations on static LGS noncavity structures indicate weak stabilization of the excess electron in regions where the LGS potential preferably and strongly binds the electron. TB calculations give stabilization energies that are in line with the ab initio results. In conclusion, we observe that the cavity-preferring pseudopotential model predicts cluster physical properties in better agreement with experimental data and ab initio calculations than the models predicting noncavity structures for the hydrated electron.

  8. Gas hydrate formation and dissociation from water-in-oil emulsions studied using PVM and FBRM particle size analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxall, J.; Greaves, D.; Mulligan, J.; Koh, C.; Dendy Sloan, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Center for Hydrate Research

    2008-07-01

    Anti-agglomerant and cold flow techniques are now being used to manage hydrate formation in pipelines. However, a greater understanding of hydrate and agglomeration processes is need to prevent plug formation. In this study, hydrate formation and agglomeration in a stirred system was used studied using particle video microscope (PVM) and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) techniques. The PVM was used to obtain qualitative visual data through digital images of the black oil illuminated by lasers, while the FBRM provided details of the quantitative chord length distribution of the particles in the systems. Experiments using the techniques were conducted with crude oils with a small asphaltene content and low emulsion stability as well as with a Caratinga oil sample with higher stability and asphaltene contents. The morphology of the hydrates was analyzed and the effects of droplet size on hydrate formation and agglomeration were investigated. Experiments were also conducted to study the dissociation process using PVM and in situ conductivity measurements. An analysis of data obtained during the experiments showed that droplet size has a significant impact on the agglomeration potential. Hydrate suspensions formed from very small droplet sizes did not have the same destabilizing effect. The dissociation of agglomerates resulted in a significant destabilization of the suspension into a water-hydrate phase at the bottom of the cell until the dissociation was completed. It was concluded that dissociation within the pipeline should be prevented until the hydrates are removed from the flow line. 11 refs., 17 figs.

  9. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  10. Observation of a Dynamic Crossover in RNA Hydration Water which Triggers the Glass Transition in the Biopolymer

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, X; Chen, S H; Faraone, A; Fratini, E; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Chu, Xiang-qiang; Faraone, Antonio; Fratini, Emiliano

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering spectroscopy was used to measure H2O and D2O hydrated RNA samples. The contribution of scattering from RNA was subtracted out by taking the difference of the signals between the two samples. The measurements were made at a series of temperatures from 270 K down to 180 K. The Relaxing-Cage Model was used to analyze the difference quasi-elastic spectra. We observed clear evidence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) at TL = 220 K in RNA hydration water. We further show that the mean-square displacement of the hydrogen atoms in both RNA and its hydration water exhibit a sharp change in slope at approximately the same temperature 220 K. This latter fact suggests that the dynamic transition (or the glass transition) in RNA is triggered by the abrupt change of mobility of the hydration water at its FSC temperature TL.

  11. Hydration and translocation of an excess proton in water clusters: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arindam Bankura; Amalendu Chandra

    2005-10-01

    The hydration structure and translocation of an excess proton in hydrogen bonded water clusters of two different sizes are investigated by means of finite temperature quantum simulations. The simulations are performed by employing the method of Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics where the forces on the nuclei are obtained directly from `on the fly' quantum electronic structure calculations. Since no predefined interaction potentials are used in this scheme, it is ideally suited to study proton translocation processes which proceed through breaking and formation of chemical bonds. The coordination number of the hydrated proton and the index of oxygen to which the excess proton is attached are calculated along the simulation trajectories for both the clusters.

  12. Types and characteristics of drinking water for hydration in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Ángela; Ramos, Primitivo; Rodríguez, Jaime; Moreno, Norberto; Gil, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The role of hydration in the maintenance of health is increasingly recognized. Hydration requirements vary for each person, depending on physical activity, environmental conditions, dietary patterns, alcohol intake, health problems, and age. Elderly individuals have higher risk of developing dehydration than adults. Diminution of liquid intake and increase in liquid losses are both involved in causing dehydration in the elderly. The water used for drinking is provided through regular public water supply and the official sanitary controls ensure their quality and hygiene, granting a range of variation for most of its physical and chemical characteristics, being sometimes these differences, though apparently small, responsible for some disorders in sensitive individuals. Hence, the advantages of using bottled water, either natural mineral water or spring water, are required by law to specify their composition, their major components, and other specific parameters. It is essential to take this into account to understand the diversity of indications and favorable effects on health that certain waters can offer. PMID:24915336

  13. PMR Characterization of the Water Structure in Tibetan Milk Mushroom Zooglea: Influence of Medium Hydration and Hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupskaya, T. V.; Prylutskyy, Yu. I.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Tsapko, M. D.; Turov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The state of water in Tibetan milk mushroom zooglea with different degrees of hydration (h) was investigated using low-temperature PMR spectroscopy in air and in contact with the hydrophobic media polydimethylsiloxane PDMS-1000 and CHCl3 with added trifl uoroacetic acid (TFA). The maximum hydration of the zooglea amounted to h = 32 g/g (of dry matter). Water existed as polyassociates (clusters or domains) of strongly and weakly associated water. Bound water decomposed into clusters in the presence of TFA. The NMR spectra showed six types of bound water at h = 0.3 g/g.

  14. Water around fullerene shape amphiphiles: A molecular dynamics simulation study of hydrophobic hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerene C60 sub-colloidal particle with diameter ∼1 nm represents a boundary case between small and large hydrophobic solutes on the length scale of hydrophobic hydration. In the present paper, a molecular dynamics simulation is performed to investigate this complex phenomenon for bare C60 fullerene and its amphiphilic/charged derivatives, so called shape amphiphiles. Since most of the unique properties of water originate from the pattern of hydrogen bond network and its dynamics, spatial, and orientational aspects of water in solvation shells around the solute surface having hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are analyzed. Dynamical properties such as translational-rotational mobility, reorientational correlation and occupation time correlation functions of water molecules, and diffusion coefficients are also calculated. Slower dynamics of solvent molecules—water retardation—in the vicinity of the solutes is observed. Both the topological properties of hydrogen bond pattern and the “dangling” –OH groups that represent surface defects in water network are monitored. The fraction of such defect structures is increased near the hydrophobic cap of fullerenes. Some “dry” regions of C60 are observed which can be considered as signatures of surface dewetting. In an effort to provide molecular level insight into the thermodynamics of hydration, the free energy of solvation is determined for a family of fullerene particles using thermodynamic integration technique

  15. Prediction of Water Binding to Protein Hydration Sites with a Discrete, Semiexplicit Solvent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setny, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Buried water molecules are ubiquitous in protein structures and are found at the interface of most protein-ligand complexes. Determining their distribution and thermodynamic effect is a challenging yet important task, of great of practical value for the modeling of biomolecular structures and their interactions. In this study, we present a novel method aimed at the prediction of buried water molecules in protein structures and estimation of their binding free energies. It is based on a semiexplicit, discrete solvation model, which we previously introduced in the context of small molecule hydration. The method is applicable to all macromolecular structures described by a standard all-atom force field, and predicts complete solvent distribution within a single run with modest computational cost. We demonstrate that it indicates positions of buried hydration sites, including those filled by more than one water molecule, and accurately differentiates them from sterically accessible to water but void regions. The obtained estimates of water binding free energies are in fair agreement with reference results determined with the double decoupling method. PMID:26642995

  16. Water around fullerene shape amphiphiles: A molecular dynamics simulation study of hydrophobic hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varanasi, S. R., E-mail: s.raovaranasi@uq.edu.au, E-mail: guskova@ipfdd.de; John, A. [Institut Theorie der Polymere, Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, Dresden D-01069 (Germany); Guskova, O. A., E-mail: s.raovaranasi@uq.edu.au, E-mail: guskova@ipfdd.de [Institut Theorie der Polymere, Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, Dresden D-01069 (Germany); Dresden Center for Computational Materials Science (DCMS), Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden D-01069 (Germany); Sommer, J.-U. [Institut Theorie der Polymere, Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, Dresden D-01069 (Germany); Dresden Center for Computational Materials Science (DCMS), Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden D-01069 (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Technische Universität Dresden, Zellescher Weg 17, Dresden D-01069 (Germany)

    2015-06-14

    Fullerene C{sub 60} sub-colloidal particle with diameter ∼1 nm represents a boundary case between small and large hydrophobic solutes on the length scale of hydrophobic hydration. In the present paper, a molecular dynamics simulation is performed to investigate this complex phenomenon for bare C{sub 60} fullerene and its amphiphilic/charged derivatives, so called shape amphiphiles. Since most of the unique properties of water originate from the pattern of hydrogen bond network and its dynamics, spatial, and orientational aspects of water in solvation shells around the solute surface having hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are analyzed. Dynamical properties such as translational-rotational mobility, reorientational correlation and occupation time correlation functions of water molecules, and diffusion coefficients are also calculated. Slower dynamics of solvent molecules—water retardation—in the vicinity of the solutes is observed. Both the topological properties of hydrogen bond pattern and the “dangling” –OH groups that represent surface defects in water network are monitored. The fraction of such defect structures is increased near the hydrophobic cap of fullerenes. Some “dry” regions of C{sub 60} are observed which can be considered as signatures of surface dewetting. In an effort to provide molecular level insight into the thermodynamics of hydration, the free energy of solvation is determined for a family of fullerene particles using thermodynamic integration technique.

  17. Relation between soil matrix potential changes and water conversion ratios during methane hydrate formation processes in loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhang; Qingbai Wu; Guanli Jiang; Yibin Pu

    2011-01-01

    With a new apparatus designed and assembled by ourselves,the matrix potential of non-saturated loess was firstly measured and studied during methane hydrate formation processes.The experimental results showed that during two formation processes,the matrix potential changes of the loess all presented a good linear relationship with water conversion ratios.In addition,although it was well known that the secondary gas hydrate formation was easier than the initial,our experimental results showed that the initial hydrate formation efficiency in non-saturated loess was higher than that of the secondary.

  18. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of gas hydrate- and pore-water samples obtained from gas hydrate-bearing sediment cores retrieved from a mud volcano in the Kukuy Canyon, Lake Baikal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, H.; Hachikubo, A.; Krylov, A.; Sakagami, H.; Ohashi, M.; Bai, J.; Kataoka, S.; Yamashita, S.; Takahashi, N.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan); Khlystov, O.; Zemskaya, T.; Grachev, M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Irkutsk (Russian Federation). Limnological Inst.

    2008-07-01

    This paper provided details of a method developed to obtain gas hydrate water samples from a mud volcano in Lake Baikal, Russia. Chemical and isotopic analyses were conducted to examine the hydrate and pore water samples as well as to evaluate the original water involved in shallow gas hydrate accumulations in the region. Lake sediment core samples were retrieved from the bottom of the lake with gravity corers. A squeezer was used to take pore water samples from the sediments. Hydrate samples were taken from a gas hydrate placed on a polyethylene funnel. Dissolved hydrate water was filtered through a membrane into bottles. Both samples were kept under chilled or liquid nitrogen temperatures. Ion chromatography was used to determine concentrations of anions and hydrogen carbonate ions. Sodium and magnesium concentrations were determined using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. An absorption spectrometer was used to determine potassium and calcium concentrations, and a mass spectrometer was used to analyze stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. Results of the study suggested that the gas dissolved in pore water and adsorbed on the surfaces of sediment particles was not the original gas from the hydrates retrieved at the mud volcano. Original gas hydrate-forming fluids were chemically different from the pore- and lake-water samples. The oxygen isotopic composition of the gas hydrate water samples correlated well with hydrogen values. It was concluded that ascending fluid and water delivered the gas into the gas stability zone, and is the main gas hydrate-forming fluid in the area of study. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Experimental Study on Hydrate Induction Time of Gas-Saturated Water-in-Oil Emulsion using a High-Pressure Flow Loop

    OpenAIRE

    Lv X.F.; Shi B.H.; Wang Y; Tang Y.X.; Wang L.Y.; Gong J

    2015-01-01

    Hydrate is one of the critical precipitates which have to be controlled for subsea flow assurance. The induction time of hydrate is therefore a significant parameter. However, there have been few studies on the induction time of the natural gas hydrate formation in a flow loop system. Consequently, a series of experiments were firstly performed, including water, natural gas and Diesel oil, on the hydrate induction time under various conditions such as the supercooling and supersaturation degr...

  20. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Membrane Hydration by Direct Liquid Water Contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    An effective means of providing direct liquid hydration of the membrane tends to improve performance particularly of cells with thicker membranes or at elevated temperatures. Supplying the water to the membrane from the anode flow-field through the anode backing via wicks would appear to have advantages over delivering the water through the thickness of the membrane with regards to the uniformity and stability of the supply and the use of off-the-shelf membranes or MEAs. In addition to improving cell performance, an important contribution of direct liquid hydration approaches may be that the overall fuel cell system becomes simpler and more effective. The next steps in the evolution of this approach are a demonstration of the effectiveness of this technique with larger active area cells as well as the implementation of an internal flow-field water reservoir (to eliminate the injection method). Scale-up to larger cell sizes and the use of separate water channels within the anode flow-field is described.

  1. A molecular dynamics study of model SI clathrate hydrates: the effect of guest size and guest-water interaction on decomposition kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhadip; Baghel, Vikesh Singh; Roy, Sudip; Kumar, Rajnish

    2015-04-14

    One of the options suggested for methane recovery from natural gas hydrates is molecular replacement of methane by suitable guests like CO2 and N2. This approach has been found to be feasible through many experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies. However, the long term stability of the resultant hydrate needs to be evaluated; the decomposition rate of these hydrates is expected to depend on the interaction between these guest and water molecules. In this work, molecular dynamics simulation has been performed to illustrate the effect of guest molecules with different sizes and interaction strengths with water on structure I (SI) hydrate decomposition and hence the stability. The van der Waals interaction between water of hydrate cages and guest molecules is defined by Lennard Jones potential parameters. A wide range of parameter spaces has been scanned by changing the guest molecules in the SI hydrate, which acts as a model gas for occupying the small and large cages of the SI hydrate. All atomistic simulation results show that the stability of the hydrate is sensitive to the size and interaction of the guest molecules with hydrate water. The increase in the interaction of guest molecules with water stabilizes the hydrate, which in turn shows a slower rate of hydrate decomposition. Similarly guest molecules with a reasonably small (similar to Helium) or large size increase the decomposition rate. The results were also analyzed by calculating the structural order parameter to understand the dynamics of crystal structure and correlated with the release rate of guest molecules from the solid hydrate phase. The results have been explained based on the calculation of potential energies felt by guest molecules in amorphous water, hydrate bulk and hydrate-water interface regions. PMID:25767053

  2. Water of Hydration Dynamics in Minerals Gypsum and Bassanite: Ultrafast 2D IR Spectroscopy of Rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chang; Nishida, Jun; Yuan, Rongfeng; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Water of hydration plays an important role in minerals, determining their crystal structures and physical properties. Here ultrafast nonlinear infrared (IR) techniques, two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) spectroscopies, were used to measure the dynamics and disorder of water of hydration in two minerals, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O). 2D IR spectra revealed that water arrangement in freshly precipitated gypsum contained a small amount of inhomogeneity. Following annealing at 348 K, water molecules became highly ordered; the 2D IR spectrum became homogeneously broadened (motional narrowed). PSPP measurements observed only inertial orientational relaxation. In contrast, water in bassanite's tubular channels is dynamically disordered. 2D IR spectra showed a significant amount of inhomogeneous broadening caused by a range of water configurations. At 298 K, water dynamics cause spectral diffusion that sampled a portion of the inhomogeneous line width on the time scale of ∼30 ps, while the rest of inhomogeneity is static on the time scale of the measurements. At higher temperature, the dynamics become faster. Spectral diffusion accelerates, and a portion of the lower temperature spectral diffusion became motionally narrowed. At sufficiently high temperature, all of the dynamics that produced spectral diffusion at lower temperatures became motionally narrowed, and only homogeneous broadening and static inhomogeneity were observed. Water angular motions in bassanite exhibit temperature-dependent diffusive orientational relaxation in a restricted cone of angles. The experiments were made possible by eliminating the vast amount of scattered light produced by the granulated powder samples using phase cycling methods. PMID:27385320

  3. Acid-base balance and hydration status following consumption of mineral-based alkaline bottled water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heil Daniel P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study sought to determine whether the consumption of a mineral-rich alkalizing (AK bottled water could improve both acid-base balance and hydration status in young healthy adults under free-living conditions. The AK water contains a naturally high mineral content along with Alka-PlexLiquid™, a dissolved supplement that increases the mineral content and gives the water an alkalizing pH of 10.0. Methods Thirty-eight subjects were matched by gender and self-reported physical activity (SRPA, hrs/week and then split into Control (12 women, 7 men; Mean +/- SD: 23 +/- 2 yrs; 7.2 +/- 3.6 hrs/week SRPA and Experimental (13 women, 6 men; 22 +/- 2 yrs; 6.4 +/- 4.0 hrs/week SRPA groups. The Control group consumed non-mineralized placebo bottled water over a 4-week period while the Experimental group consumed the placebo water during the 1st and 4th weeks and the AK water during the middle 2-week treatment period. Fingertip blood and 24-hour urine samples were collected three times each week for subsequent measures of blood and urine osmolality and pH, as well as total urine volume. Dependent variables were analyzed using multivariate repeated measures ANOVA with post-hoc focused on evaluating changes over time within Control and Experimental groups (alpha = 0.05. Results There were no significant changes in any of the dependent variables for the Control group. The Experimental group, however, showed significant increases in both the blood and urine pH (6.23 to 7.07 and 7.52 to 7.69, respectively, a decreased blood and increased urine osmolality, and a decreased urine output (2.51 to 2.05 L/day, all during the second week of the treatment period (P Conclusions Consumption of AK water was associated with improved acid-base balance (i.e., an alkalization of the blood and urine and hydration status when consumed under free-living conditions. In contrast, subjects who consumed the placebo bottled water showed no changes over the

  4. Interplay of Ion-Water and Water-Water Interactions within the Hydration Shells of Nitrate and Carbonate Directly Probed with 2D IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Joseph A; Carpenter, William; De Marco, Luigi; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-08-01

    The long-range influence of ions in solution on the water hydrogen-bond (H-bond) network remains a topic of vigorous debate. Recent spectroscopic and theoretical studies have, for the most part, reached the consensus that weakly coordinating ions only affect water molecules in the first hydration shell. Here, we apply ultrafast broadband two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy to aqueous nitrate and carbonate in neat H2O to study the solvation structure and dynamics of ions on opposite ends of the Hofmeister series. By exciting both the water OH stretches and ion stretches and probing the associated cross-peaks between them, we are afforded a comprehensive view into the complex nature of ion hydration. We show in aqueous nitrate that weak ion-water H-bonding leads to water-water interactions in the ion solvation shells dominating the dynamics. In contrast, the carbonate CO stretches show significant mixing with the water OH stretches due to strong ion-water H-bonding such that the water and ion modes are intimately correlated. Further, the excitonic nature of vibrations in neat H2O, which spans multiple water molecules, is an important factor in describing ion hydration. We attribute these complex dynamics to the likely presence of intermediate-range effects influenced by waters beyond the first solvation shell. PMID:27404015

  5. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinglong [ORNL; Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  6. Effects of Water Provision and Hydration on Cognitive Function among Primary-School Pupils in Zambia: A Randomized Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Trinies

    Full Text Available There is a well-established link between hydration and improved cognitive performance among adults, with evidence of similar findings among children. No trials have investigated the impact of water provision on cognitive performance among schoolchildren in hot and arid low-resource settings. We conducted a randomized-controlled trial in five schools with limited water access in Chipata district in Eastern province, Zambia, to assess the efficacy of water provision on cognition. Pupils in grades 3-6 were randomly assigned to either receive a bottle of drinking water that they could refill throughout the day (water group, n = 149 or only have access to drinking water that was normally available at the school (control group, n = 143. Hydration was assessed in the morning before provision of water and in the afternoon through urine specific gravity (Usg measured with a portable refractometer. In the afternoon we administered six cognitive tests to assess short-term memory, concentration, visual attention, and visual motor skills. Morning prevalence of dehydration, defined as Usg≥1.020, was 42%. Afternoon dehydration increased to 67% among the control arm and dropped to 10% among the intervention arm. We did not find that provision of water or hydration impacted cognitive test scores, although there were suggestive relationships between both water provision and hydration and increased scores on tests measuring visual attention. We identified key improvements to the study design that are warranted to further investigate this relationship.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01924546.

  7. Dynamical Coupling of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins and Their Hydration Water: Comparison with Folded Soluble and Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallat, F.-X.; Laganowsky, A.; Wood, K.; Gabel, F.; van Eijck, L.; Wuttke, J.; Moulin, M.; Härtlein, M.; Eisenberg, D.; Colletier, J.-P.; Zaccai, G.; Weik, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hydration water is vital for various macromolecular biological activities, such as specific ligand recognition, enzyme activity, response to receptor binding, and energy transduction. Without hydration water, proteins would not fold correctly and would lack the conformational flexibility that animates their three-dimensional structures. Motions in globular, soluble proteins are thought to be governed to a certain extent by hydration-water dynamics, yet it is not known whether this relationship holds true for other protein classes in general and whether, in turn, the structural nature of a protein also influences water motions. Here, we provide insight into the coupling between hydration-water dynamics and atomic motions in intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP), a largely unexplored class of proteins that, in contrast to folded proteins, lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. We investigated the human IDP tau, which is involved in the pathogenic processes accompanying Alzheimer disease. Combining neutron scattering and protein perdeuteration, we found similar atomic mean-square displacements over a large temperature range for the tau protein and its hydration water, indicating intimate coupling between them. This is in contrast to the behavior of folded proteins of similar molecular weight, such as the globular, soluble maltose-binding protein and the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin, which display moderate to weak coupling, respectively. The extracted mean square displacements also reveal a greater motional flexibility of IDP compared with globular, folded proteins and more restricted water motions on the IDP surface. The results provide evidence that protein and hydration-water motions mutually affect and shape each other, and that there is a gradient of coupling across different protein classes that may play a functional role in macromolecular activity in a cellular context. PMID:22828339

  8. A feasibility study for the use of kinetic hydrate inhibitors in deep water drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelland, M.A. [Stavanger Univ., Stavanger (Norway). Dept. of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; Monig, K.; Iversen, J.E.; Lekvam, K. [International Research Inst. of Stavanger, Stavanger (Norway)

    2008-07-01

    Kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs) are water-soluble polymers used to delay the nucleation and growth of gas hydrate crystals. This study evaluated the feasibility of using KHIs in deep water drilling fluids. Laboratory experiments were conducted to test a range of neutral, anionic, and cationic commercial and non-commercial KHIs for their compatibility with saline drilling fluids. The KHIs were then tested in a sapphire cell at pressures of up to 300 bar and at temperatures as low as 0.9 degrees C. Tests were also conducted to determine the effect of different types of clay on the KHI fluids. Performance tests were conducted with KHIs dissolved in drilling mud at 6000 ppm placed within the magnet housing of the cell. Results of the study showed that both pressure and subcooling have a significant influence on KHI performance. The study showed that several KHIs provided subcooling protection in the presence of low-active clays or drilling cuttings. However, the performance of the KHIs was greatly reduced in the presence of highly active clays such as Wyoming bentonite. It was concluded that additions of xanthan to bentonite and KHI mixtures improved KHI performance due to the preferential adsorption of the xanthan on the clay surface. 14 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs.

  9. Total allowable concentrations of monomeric inorganic aluminum and hydrated aluminum silicates in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2012-05-01

    Maximum contaminant levels are used to control potential health hazards posed by chemicals in drinking water, but no primary national or international limits for aluminum (Al) have been adopted. Given the differences in toxicological profiles, the present evaluation derives total allowable concentrations for certain water-soluble inorganic Al compounds (including chloride, hydroxide, oxide, phosphate and sulfate) and for the hydrated Al silicates (including attapulgite, bentonite/montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) in drinking water. The chemistry, toxicology and clinical experience with Al materials are extensive and depend upon the particular physical and chemical form. In general, the water solubility of the monomeric Al materials depends on pH and their water solubility and gastrointestinal bioavailability are much greater than that of the hydrated Al silicates. Other than Al-containing antacids and buffered aspirin, food is the primary source of Al exposure for most healthy people. Systemic uptake of Al after ingestion of the monomeric salts is somewhat greater from drinking water (0.28%) than from food (0.1%). Once absorbed, Al accumulates in bone, brain, liver and kidney, with bone as the major site for Al deposition in humans. Oral Al hydroxide is used routinely to bind phosphate salts in the gut to control hyperphosphatemia in people with compromised renal function. Signs of chronic Al toxicity in the musculoskeletal system include a vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia (deranged membranous bone formation characterized by accumulation of the osteoid matrix and reduced mineralization, reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, decreased lamellar and osteoid bands with elevated Al concentrations) presenting as bone pain and proximal myopathy. Aluminum-induced bone disease can progress to stress fractures of the ribs, femur, vertebrae, humerus and metatarsals. Serum Al ≥100 µg/L has a 75-88% positive predictive value for Al bone disease. Chronic Al

  10. A Theoretical Study of the Hydration of Methane, from the Aqueous Solution to the sI Hydrate-Liquid Water-Gas Coexistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Porfirio Luis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations were done with three recent water models TIP4P/2005 (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/2005, TIP4P/Ice (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/ Ice and TIP4Q (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 charges combined with two models for methane: an all-atom one OPLS-AA (Optimal Parametrization for the Liquid State and a united-atom one (UA; a correction for the C–O interaction was applied to the latter and used in a third set of simulations. The models were validated by comparison to experimental values of the free energy of hydration at 280, 300, 330 and 370 K, all under a pressure of 1 bar, and to the experimental radial distribution functions at 277, 283 and 291 K, under a pressure of 145 bar. Regardless of the combination rules used for σC,O, good agreement was found, except when the correction to the UA model was applied. Thus, further simulations of the sI hydrate were performed with the united-atom model to compare the thermal expansivity to the experiment. A final set of simulations was done with the UA methane model and the three water models, to study the sI hydrate-liquid water-gas coexistence at 80, 230 and 400 bar. The melting temperatures were compared to the experimental values. The results show the need to perform simulations with various different models to attain a reliable and robust molecular image of the systems of interest.

  11. Hydration water dynamics in bovine serum albumin at low temperatures as studied by deuterium solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatou, Tatsuya; Araya, Takashi; Ohashi, Ryutaro; Ida, Tomonori; Mizuno, Motohiro

    2016-10-01

    Solid state 2H NMR was used to investigate changes in the structure and dynamics of hydration waters of bovine serum albumin (BSA) due to glass transitions. The 2H NMR spectra were separated into fast and slow components based on differences in spin-lattice relaxation time T1. The fast components corresponded to water molecules interacting with protein while the slow components were the water molecules similar to bulk water and deuterons of the protein backbone. Simulation analysis of the 2H NMR spectra of the fast components was used to assess the mode and rate of motions of hydration waters around the protein. At low temperatures, the water molecules underwent a 180° flip and slow reorientation in the tetrahedral sites. The distribution of the rate of the 180° flip and the D-O-D angle of water molecules were clarified. The distribution of the D-O-D angle of water molecules spread with decreasing temperature. The marked slowing down in the reorientation of water molecules was observed at a glass transition of around 200 K, which is linked to the disordered region of the protein. In contrast, the 180° flip of water molecules occurred frequently, even below 200 K. A freeze of the 180° flip of water molecules was observed around the glass transition temperature of 110 K, where primary hydrate water formed a direct hydrogen bond with the protein, making it perfectly immobile.

  12. Sequentially sampled gas hydrate water, coupled with pore water and bottom water isotopic and ionic signatures at the Kukuy mud volcano, Lake Baikal: ambiguous deep-rooted source of hydrate-forming water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hirotsugu; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Soramoto, Yusuke; Kotake, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Shoji, Hitoshi; Pogodaeva, Tatyana; Khlystov, Oleg; Khabuev, Andrey; Naudts, Lieven; De Batist, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic and ionic composition of pure gas hydrate (GH) water was examined for GHs recovered in three gravity cores (165-193 cm length) from the Kukuy K-9 mud volcano (MV) in Lake Baikal. A massive GH sample from core St6GC4 (143-165 cm core depth interval) was dissociated progressively over 6 h in a closed glass chamber, and 11 sequentially collected fractions of dissociated GH water analyzed. Their hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions, and the concentrations of Cl- and HCO3 - remained essentially constant over time, except that the fraction collected during the first 50 minutes deviated partly from this pattern. Fraction #1 had a substantially higher Cl- concentration, similar to that of pore water sampled immediately above (135-142 cm core depth) the main GH-bearing interval in that core. Like the subsequent fractions, however, the HCO3 - concentration was markedly lower than that of pore water. For the GH water fractions #2 to #11, an essentially constant HCO3 -/Cl- ratio of 305 differed markedly from downcore pore water HCO3 -/Cl- ratios of 63-99. Evidently, contamination of the extracted GH water by ambient pore water probably adhered to the massive GH sample was satisfactorily restricted to the initial phase of GH dissociation. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of hydrate-forming water was estimated using the measured isotopic composition of extracted GH water combined with known isotopic fractionation factors between GH and GH-forming water. Estimated δD of -126 to -133‰ and δ18O of -15.7 to -16.7‰ differed partly from the corresponding signatures of ambient pore water (δD of -123‰, δ18O of -15.6‰) and of lake bottom water (δD of -121‰, δ18O of -15.8‰) at the St6GC4 coring site, suggesting that the GH was not formed from those waters. Observations of breccias in that core point to a possible deep-rooted water source, consistent with published thermal measurements for the neighboring Kukuy K-2 MV. By contrast, the pore

  13. Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, M.P.

    1994-05-01

    We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

  14. ELIMINATION OF URINE IN RESPONSE TO WATER INTAKE IS CONSISTENT IN WELL-HYDRATED INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Capitán-Jiménez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple method has been recently proposed to assess acute hydration status in humans; however, several questions remain regarding its reliability, validity, and practicality. Objective: Establish reliability of a simple method to assess euhydration, that is, to analyze whether this method can be used as a consistent indicator of a person´s hydration status. In addition, the study sought to assess the effect exercise has on urine volume when euhydration is maintained and a standardized volume of water is ingested. Methods: Five healthy physically active men and five healthy physically active women, 22.5 ± 2.3 years of age (mean ± standard deviation reported to the laboratory after fasting for 10 hours or more on three occasions, each one week apart. During the two identical resting euhydration conditions (EuA and EuB, participants remained seated for 45 minutes. During the exercise condition (EuExer, participants exercised intermittently in an environmental chamber (average temperature and relative humidity = 32 ± 3°C and 65 ± 7%, respectively for a period of 45 minutes and drank water to offset loss due to sweating. The order of treatments was randomized. Upon finishing the treatment period, they ingested a volume of water equivalent to 1.43% body mass (BM within 30 minutes. Urine was collected and measured henceforth every 30 minutes for 3 hours. Results: Urine volume eliminated during EuExer (1205 ± 399.5 ml was not different from EuB (1072.2±413.1 ml or EuA (1068 ± 382.87 ml (p-value = 0.44. Both resting conditions were practically identical (p-value = 0.98 and presented a strong intraclass correlation (r = 0.849, p-value = 0.001. Conclusions: This method, besides simple, proved to be consistent in all conditions; therefore, it can be used with the certainty that measurements are valid and reliable.

  15. The direct crystallographic evidences of undissociated HCl hydrates and unconventional cis-linear conformation of the water dimer in an organic crystal determined at ambient condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cong; Feng, Ya; Shen, Chen; Yong, Guoping

    2016-08-01

    The unprecedentedly undissociated HCl hydrates, and unconventional cis-linear conformation of the water dimer at ambient condition were found in a novel organic crystal by direct crystallographic evidences. The peculiar tricyclo[6.2.0.0]-type configuration of hydrogen-bonding network induces such unexpected undissociated HCl hydrates, and unusual cis-linear conformation of the water dimer.

  16. Evaluation of Hydrate Inhibition Performance of Water-soluble Polymers using Torque Measurement and Differential Scanning Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyuchul; Park, Juwoon; Kim, Jakyung; Kim, Hyunho; Seo, Yutaek [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yohan; Seo, Yongwon [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, hydrate inhibition performance of water-soluble polymers including pyrrolidone, caprolactam, acrylamide types were evaluated using torque measurement and high pressure differential scanning calorimeter (HP µ-DSC). The obtained experimental results suggest that the studied polymers represent the kinetic hydrate inhibition (KHI) performance. 0.5 wt% polyvinylcaprolactam (PVCap) solution shows the hydrate onset time of 34.4 min and subcooling temperature of 15.9 K, which is better KHI performance than that of pure water - hydrate onset time of 12.3 min and subcooling temperature of 6.0 K. 0.5 wt% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution shows the hydrate onset time of 27.6 min and the subcooling temperature of 13.2 K while polyacrylamide-co-acrylic acid partial sodium salt (PAM-co-AA) solution shows less KHI performance than PVP solution at both 0.5 and 5.0 wt%. However, PAM-co-AA solution shows slow growth rate and low hydrate amount than PVCap. In addition to hydrate onset and growth condition, torque change with time was investigated as one of KHI evaluation methods. 0.5 wt% PVCap solution shows the lowest average torque of 6.4 N cm and 0.5 wt% PAM-co-AA solution shows the average torque of 7.2 N cm. For 0.5 wt% PVP solution, it increases 11.5 N cm and 5.0 wt% PAM-co-AA solution shows the maximum average torque of 13.4 N cm, which is similar to the average torque of pure water, 15.2 N cm. Judging from the experimental results obtained by both an autoclave and a HP µ-DSC, the PVCap solution shows the best performance among the KHIs in terms of delaying hydrate nucleation. From these results, it can be concluded that the torque change with time is useful to identify the flow ability of tested solution, and the further research on the inhibition of hydrate formation can be approached in various aspects using a HP µ-DSC.

  17. Evaluation of Hydrate Inhibition Performance of Water-soluble Polymers using Torque Measurement and Differential Scanning Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, hydrate inhibition performance of water-soluble polymers including pyrrolidone, caprolactam, acrylamide types were evaluated using torque measurement and high pressure differential scanning calorimeter (HP µ-DSC). The obtained experimental results suggest that the studied polymers represent the kinetic hydrate inhibition (KHI) performance. 0.5 wt% polyvinylcaprolactam (PVCap) solution shows the hydrate onset time of 34.4 min and subcooling temperature of 15.9 K, which is better KHI performance than that of pure water - hydrate onset time of 12.3 min and subcooling temperature of 6.0 K. 0.5 wt% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution shows the hydrate onset time of 27.6 min and the subcooling temperature of 13.2 K while polyacrylamide-co-acrylic acid partial sodium salt (PAM-co-AA) solution shows less KHI performance than PVP solution at both 0.5 and 5.0 wt%. However, PAM-co-AA solution shows slow growth rate and low hydrate amount than PVCap. In addition to hydrate onset and growth condition, torque change with time was investigated as one of KHI evaluation methods. 0.5 wt% PVCap solution shows the lowest average torque of 6.4 N cm and 0.5 wt% PAM-co-AA solution shows the average torque of 7.2 N cm. For 0.5 wt% PVP solution, it increases 11.5 N cm and 5.0 wt% PAM-co-AA solution shows the maximum average torque of 13.4 N cm, which is similar to the average torque of pure water, 15.2 N cm. Judging from the experimental results obtained by both an autoclave and a HP µ-DSC, the PVCap solution shows the best performance among the KHIs in terms of delaying hydrate nucleation. From these results, it can be concluded that the torque change with time is useful to identify the flow ability of tested solution, and the further research on the inhibition of hydrate formation can be approached in various aspects using a HP µ-DSC

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of trehalose as a 'dynamic reducer' for solvent water molecules in the hydration shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngjin; Cho, Kum Won; Jeong, Karpjoo; Jung, Seunho

    2006-06-12

    Systematic computational work for a series of 13 disaccharides was performed to provide an atomic-level insight of unique biochemical role of the alpha,alpha-(1-->1)-linked glucopyranoside dimer over the other glycosidically linked sugars. Superior osmotic and cryoprotective abilities of trehalose were explained on the basis of conformational and hydration characteristics of the trehalose molecule. Analyses of the hydration number and radial distribution function of solvent water molecules showed that there was very little hydration adjacent to the glycosidic oxygen of trehalose and that the dynamic conformation of trehalose was less flexible than any of the other sugars due to this anisotropic hydration. The remarkable conformational rigidity that allowed trehalose to act as a sugar template was required for stable interactions with hydrogen-bonded water molecules. Trehalose made an average of 2.8 long-lived hydrogen bonds per each MD step, which was much larger than the average of 2.1 for the other sugars. The stable hydrogen-bond network is derived from the formation of long-lived water bridges at the expense of decreasing the dynamics of the water molecules. Evidence for this dynamic reduction of water by trehalose was also established based on each of the lowest translational diffusion coefficients and the lowest intermolecular coulombic energy of the water molecules around trehalose. Overall results indicate that trehalose functions as a 'dynamic reducer' for solvent water molecules based on its anisotropic hydration and conformational rigidity, suggesting that macroscopic solvent properties could be modulated by changes in the type of glycosidic linkages in sugar molecules.

  19. Experimental Study on Hydrate Induction Time of Gas-Saturated Water-in-Oil Emulsion using a High-Pressure Flow Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv X.F.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrate is one of the critical precipitates which have to be controlled for subsea flow assurance. The induction time of hydrate is therefore a significant parameter. However, there have been few studies on the induction time of the natural gas hydrate formation in a flow loop system. Consequently, a series of experiments were firstly performed, including water, natural gas and Diesel oil, on the hydrate induction time under various conditions such as the supercooling and supersaturation degree, water cut, anti-agglomerant dosage, etc. The experiments were conducted in a high-pressure hydrate flow loop newly constructed in the China University of Petroleum (Beijing, and dedicated to flow assurance studies. Then, based on previous research, this study puts forward a method for induction time, which is characterized by clear definition, convenient measurement and good generality. Furthermore, we investigated the influences of the experimental parameters and analyzed the experimental phenomena for the hydrate induction time in a flowing system.

  20. Initial hydration steps in lipase studied by means of water sorption isotherms, FTIR spectroscopy and thermally stimulated depolarization currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of water in lipases, a class of proteins endowed with a large external hydrophobic surface, is not yet fully understood. To analyse the water-related structural properties and the possible implications for the protein functionality, three experimental techniques such as water sorption isotherms, thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDCs), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were applied to pellets and/or films of lipase from Candida lipolytica, prepared at very low hydration degrees h, ranging between 0.003 and 0.457 gwater/gprotein. Two main broad TSDC bands (a weak one peaking at T≅160 K and a strong one at T≅260 K) were detected. The peak amplitudes and positions critically depend not only on the water content, but also on the previous hydration history of the sample. FTIR spectra monitored: (1) the amplitude and position changes of the characteristic optical absorption bands (amide A, B, I, and II) as a function of the humidity level, (2) the presence of a considerable amount of β-sheet structure at high hydration degrees, and (3) a conformational transition induced by drastic dehydration treatments. Complementary sorption isotherms, performed by means of a gravimetric method, showed a marked hysteresis in the lipase-aqueous solvent interaction. The whole set of results provides a model for the initial steps of the lipase hydration kinetics. At h=0.009, 13 water molecules are buried in the macromolecule, probably bound to the peptidic backbone. At h = 0.037 all polar and charged free groups are hydrated. At higher h a solution phase begins, and at h=0.457 about 660 water molecules are accommodated around the protein, giving rise to three to four complete layer coverages. (author)

  1. New Insights into the Dynamics of Zwitterionic Micelles and Their Hydration Waters by Gigahertz-to-Terahertz Dielectric Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    George, Deepu K; Hull, Olivia A; Mishra, Archana; Capelluto, Daniel G S; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R; Vinh, Nguyen Q

    2016-01-01

    Gigahertz-to-terahertz spectroscopy of macromolecules in aqueous environments provides an important approach for identifying their global and transient molecular structures, as well as directly assessing hydrogen-bonding. We report dielectric properties of zwitterionic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles in aqueous solutions over a wide frequency range, from 50 MHz to 1.12 THz. The dielectric relaxation spectra reveal different polarization mechanisms at the molecular level, reflecting the complexity of DPC micelle-water interactions. We have made a deconvolution of the spectra into different components and combined them with the effective-medium approximation to separate delicate processes of micelles in water. Our measurements demonstrate reorientational motion of the DPC surfactant head groups within the micelles, and two levels of hydration water shells, including tightly- and loosely-bound hydration water layers. From the dielectric strength of bulk water in DPC solutions, we found that the number of wa...

  2. In Situ Characterization of Hydrated Proteins in Water by SALVI and ToF-SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jiachao; Zhou, Yufan; Hua, Xin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate in situ chemical imaging of protein biomolecules in the aqueous solution using System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface (SALVI) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The fibronectin protein film was immobilized on the silicon nitride (SiN) membrane forming the SALVI detection area. During ToF-SIMS analysis, three modes of analysis were conducted including high spatial resolution mass spectra, two-dimensional (2D) imaging, and depth profiling. Mass spectra were acquired in both positive and negative modes. Deionized water was also analyzed as a reference sample. Our results show that fibronectin film in water has more distinct and stronger water cluster peaks compared to water alone. Characteristic peaks of amino acid fragments are also observable in the hydrated protein ToF-SIMS spectra. These results illustrate that protein molecule adsorption on a surface can be studied dynamically using SALVI and ToF-SIMS in the liquid environment.

  3. Solid and liquid phase equilibria and solid-hydrate formation in binary mixtures of water with amines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车冠全; 彭文烈; 黄良恩; 古喜兰; 车飙

    1997-01-01

    Solid and liquid phase diagrams have been constructed for {water+triethylamine,or+N,N-dimethylformamide(DMF) or+N,N-dimethlacetamide (DMA)} Solid-hydrates form with the empirical formulae N(C2H5)3 3H2O,DMF 3H2O,DMF 2H2O,DMA 3H2O and (DMA)2 3H2O.All are congruently melting except the first which melts incongruently.The solid-hydrate formation is attributed to hydrogen bond.The results are compared with the references

  4. Multicomponent seismic methods for characterizing gas hydrate occurrences and systems in deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.; Hardage, Bob A.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ characterization and quantification of natural gas hydrate occurrences remain critical research directions, whether for energy resource, drilling hazard, or climate-related studies. Marine multicomponent seismic data provide the full seismic wavefield including partial redundancy, and provide a promising set of approaches for gas hydrate characterization. Numerous authors have demonstrated the possibilities of multicomponent data at study sites around the world. We expand on this work by investigating the utility of very densely spaced (10’s of meters) multicomponent receivers (ocean-bottom cables, OBC, or ocean-bottom seismometers, OBS) for gas hydrate studies in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. Advanced processing techniques provide high-resolution compressional-wave (PP) and converted shearwave (PS) reflection images of shallow stratigraphy, as well as P-wave and S-wave velocity estimates at each receiver position. Reflection impedance estimates can help constrain velocity and density, and thus gas hydrate saturation. Further constraint on velocity can be determined through identification of the critical angle and associated phase reversal in both PP and PS wideangle data. We demonstrate these concepts with examples from OBC data from the northeast Green Canyon area and numerically simulated OBS data that are based on properties of known gas hydrate occurrences in the southeast (deeper water) Green Canyon area. These multicomponent data capabilities can provide a wealth of characterization and quantification information that is difficult to obtain with other geophysical methods.

  5. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

  6. Ternary phase behaviour and vesicle formation of a sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate/1-decanol/water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Nasima; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Reza, Mohammad Imam Hasan

    2011-08-01

    The phase behaviour of a system composed of amino acid-based surfactant (sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate), 1-decanol and deionised water was investigated for vesicle formation. Changing the molar ratio of the amphiphiles, two important aggregate structures were observed in the aqueous corner of the phase diagram. Two different sizes of microemulsions were found at two amphiphile-water boundaries. A stable single vesicle lobe was found for 1∶2 molar ratios in 92 wt% water with vesicles approximately 100 nm in size and with high zeta potential value. Structural variation arises due to the reduction of electrostatic repulsions among the ionic headgroups of the surfactants and the hydration forces due to adsorbed water onto monolayer's. The balance of these two forces determines the aggregate structures. Analysis was followed by the molecular geometrical structure. These findings may have implications for the development of drug delivery systems for cancer treatments, as well as cosmetic and food formulations.

  7. Hydration or dehydration: competing effects of upper tropospheric cloud radiation on the TTL water vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A tropical channel version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model is used to investigate the radiative impacts of upper tropospheric clouds on water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL. The WRF simulations of cloud radiative effects and water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere show reasonable agreement with observations, including approximate reproduction of the water vapor "tape recorder" signal. By turning on and off the upper tropospheric cloud radiative effect (UTCRE above 200 hPa, we find that UTCRE induces a warming of 0.76 K and a moistening of 9% in the upper troposphere at 215 hPa. However, UTCRE cools and dehydrates the TTL, with a cooling of 0.82 K and a dehydration of 16% at 100 hPa. The enhanced vertical ascent due to UTCRE contributes substantially to mass transport and the dehydration in the TTL. The hydration due to the enhanced vertical transport is counteracted by the dehydration from adiabatic cooling associated with the enhanced vertical motion. UTCRE also substantially changes the horizontal winds in the TTL, resulting in shifts of the strongest dehydration away from the lowest temperature anomalies in the TTL. UTCRE increases in-situ cloud formation in the TTL. A seasonal variation is shown in the simulated UTCRE, with stronger impact in the moist phase from June to November than in the dry phase from December to May.

  8. Hydration or dehydration: competing effects of upper tropospheric cloud radiation on the TTL water vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A tropical channel version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model is used to investigate the radiative impacts of upper tropospheric clouds on water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL. The WRF simulations of cloud radiative effects and water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere show reasonable agreement with observations, including approximate reproduction of the water vapor "tape recorder" signal. By turning on and off the upper tropospheric cloud radiative effect (UTCRE above 200 hPa, we find that the UTCRE induces a warming of 0.76 K and a moistening of 9% in the upper troposphere at 215 hPa. However, the UTCRE cools and dehydrates the TTL, with a cooling of 0.82 K and a dehydration of 16% at 100 hPa. The enhanced vertical ascent due to the UTCRE contributes substantially to mass transport and the dehydration in the TTL. The hydration due to the enhanced vertical transport is counteracted by the dehydration from adiabatic cooling associated with the enhanced vertical motion. The UTCRE also substantially changes the horizontal winds in the TTL, resulting in shifts of the strongest dehydration away from the lowest temperature anomalies in the TTL. The UTCRE increases in-situ cloud formation in the TTL. A seasonal variation is shown in the simulated UTCRE, with stronger impact in the moist phase from June to November than in the dry phase from December to May.

  9. Hydration water and peptide dynamics - two sides of a coin. A neutron scattering and adiabatic calorimetry study at low hydration and cryogenic temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Margarida Bastos; Nuno Alves; Silvia Maia; Paula Gomes; Akira Inaba; Yuji Miyazaki; Jean Marc Zanotti

    2013-01-01

    In the present work we bridge neutron scattering and calorimetry in the study of a low-hydration sample of a 15-residue hybrid peptide from cecropin and mellitin CA(1-7)M(2-9) of proven antimicrobial activity. Quasielastic and low-frequency inelastic neutron spectra were measured at defined hydration levels a nominally dry sample (specific residual hydration h = 0.060 g/g), a H2O-hydrated (h = 0.49) and a D2O-hydrated one (h = 0.51). Averaged mean square proton mobilities were derived over a ...

  10. Compressive Strength and Hydration Process of Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) mixed with Sea Water, Marine Sand and Portland Composite Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Tjaronge, Wihardi; Irmawaty, Rita

    2014-01-01

    In order to eliminate the main problems of shortage of clean water and fine aggregate in the low land areas and the distant islands, this research utilized sea water and marine sand and Portland composite cement to produce high performance of Self Compacting Concrete (SCC). Portland composite cement containing of fly ash. The evaluation result on the mix design, workability (slumpflow, segregation), mechanical properties (compressive strength-static modulus) and hydration process of SCC were ...

  11. Interaction of Simple Ions with Water: Theoretical Models for the Study of Ion Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancheff, Jorge S.; Kremer, Carlos; Ventura, Oscar N.

    2009-01-01

    A computational experiment aimed to create and systematically analyze models of simple cation hydrates is presented. The changes in the structure (bond distances and angles) and the electronic density distribution of the solvent and the thermodynamic parameters of the hydration process are calculated and compared with the experimental data. The…

  12. Engineering properties of water/wastewater-treatment sludge modified by hydrated lime, fly ash and loess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sungjin; Jeon, Wangi; Lee, Jaebok; Lee, Kwanho; Kim, Namho

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to present engineering properties of modified sludge from water/wastewater treatment by modifiers such as hydrated lime, loess, and fly ash. The proper mixing ratio was determined to hold the pH of the modified sludge above 12.0 for 2 h. Laboratory tests carried out in this research included particle analysis, compaction and CBR, SEM and X-ray diffraction, unconfined compression test, permeability test, and TCLP test. The main role of lime was to sterilize microorganisms in the sludge. The unconfined strength of the modified sludge by fly ash and loess satisfied the criteria for construction materials, which was above 100 kPa. The permeability of all the mixtures was around 1.0 x 10(-7) cm/s. Extraction tests for hazardous components in modified sludge revealed below the regulated criteria, especially for cadmium, copper, and lead. The present study suggested that the use of lime, fly ash, and loess be an another alternative to modify or stabilize water/wastewater treatment sludge as construction materials in civil engineering. PMID:12420922

  13. Beaufort Sea deep-water gas hydrate recovery from a seafloor mound in a region of widespread BSR occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Patrick E.; Pohlman, John W.; Lorenson, T.D.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Gas hydrate was recovered from the Alaskan Beaufort Sea slope north of Camden Bay in August 2010 during a U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy expedition (USCG cruise ID HLY1002) under the direction of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Interpretation of multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected in 1977 by the USGS across the Beaufort Sea continental margin identified a regional bottom simulating reflection (BSR), indicating that a large segment of the Beaufort Sea slope is underlain by gas hydrate. During HLY1002, gas hydrate was sampled by serendipity with a piston core targeting a steep-sided bathymetric high originally thought to be an outcrop of older, exposed strata. The feature cored is an approximately 1100m diameter, 130 m high conical mound, referred to here as the Canning Seafloor Mound (CSM), which overlies the crest of a buried anticline in a region of sub-parallel compressional folds beneath the eastern Beaufort outer slope. An MCS profile shows a prominent BSR upslope and downslope from the mound. The absence of a BSR beneath the CSM and occurrence of gas hydrate near the summit indicates that free gas has migrated via deep-rooted thrust faults or by structural focusing up the flanks of the anticline to the seafloor. Gas hydrate recovered from near the CSM summit at a subbottom depth of about 5.7 meters in a water depth of 2538 m was of nodular and vein-filling morphology. Although the hydrate was not preserved, residual gas from the core liner contained >95% methane by volume when corrected for atmospheric contamination. The presence of trace C4+hydrocarbons (inflation of the seafloor caused by formation and accumulation of shallow hydrate lenses is also a likely factor in CSM growth. Pore water analysis shows the sulfate-methane transition to be very shallow (0-1 mbsf), also supporting an active high-flux interpretation. Pore water with chloride concentrations as low as 160 mM suggest fluid migration pathways may extend to the mound from buried

  14. Exploring the ab initio/classical free energy perturbation method: The hydration free energy of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakane, Shinichi; Yezdimer, Eric M.; Liu, Wenbin; Barriocanal, Jose A.; Doren, Douglas J.; Wood, Robert H.

    2000-08-01

    The ab initio/classical free energy perturbation (ABC-FEP) method proposed previously by Wood et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 110, 1329 (1999)] uses classical simulations to calculate solvation free energies within an empirical potential model, then applies free energy perturbation theory to determine the effect of changing the empirical solute-solvent interactions to corresponding interactions calculated from ab initio methods. This approach allows accurate calculation of solvation free energies using an atomistic description of the solvent and solute, with interactions calculated from first principles. Results can be obtained at a feasible computational cost without making use of approximations such as a continuum solvent or an empirical cavity formation energy. As such, the method can be used far from ambient conditions, where the empirical parameters needed for approximate theories of solvation may not be available. The sources of error in the ABC-FEP method are the approximations in the ab initio method, the finite sample of configurations, and the classical solvent model. This article explores the accuracy of various approximations used in the ABC-FEP method by comparing to the experimentally well-known free energy of hydration of water at two state points (ambient conditions, and 973.15 K and 600 kg/m3). The TIP4P-FQ model [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 6141 (1994)] is found to be a reliable solvent model for use with this method, even at supercritical conditions. Results depend strongly on the ab initio method used: a gradient-corrected density functional theory is not adequate, but a localized MP2 method yields excellent agreement with experiment. Computational costs are reduced by using a cluster approximation, in which ab initio pair interaction energies are calculated between the solute and up to 60 solvent molecules, while multi-body interactions are calculated with only a small cluster (5 to 12 solvent molecules). Sampling errors for the ab initio contribution to

  15. Theoretical study on the hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration on large solutes: The case of phthalocyanines in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Elisa I; Martínez, José M; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2015-07-28

    A theoretical study on the hydration phenomena of three representative Phthalocyanines (Pcs): the metal-free, H2Pc, and the metal-containing, Cu-phthalocyanine, CuPc, and its soluble sulphonated derivative, [CuPc(SO3)4](4-), is presented. Structural and dynamic properties of molecular dynamics trajectories of these Pcs in solution were evaluated. The hydration shells of the Pcs were defined by means of spheroids adapted to the solute shape. Structural analysis of the axial region compared to the peripheral region indicates that there are no significant changes among the different macrocycles, but that of [CuPc(SO3)4](4-), where the polyoxoanion presence induces a typically hydrophilic hydration structure. The analyzed water dynamic properties cover mean residence times, translational and orientational diffusion coefficients, and hydrogen bond network. These properties allow a thorough discussion about the simultaneous existence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration in these macrocycles, and indicate the trend of water structure to well define shells in the environment of hydrophobic solutes. The comparison between the structural and dynamical analysis of the hydration of the amphipathic [CuPc(SO3)4](4-) and the non-soluble Cu-Pc shows a very weak coupling among the hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments of the macrocycle. Quantitative results are employed to revisit the iceberg model proposed by Frank and Evans, leading to conclude that structure and dynamics support a non-strict interpretation of the iceberg view, although the qualitative trends pointed out by the model are supported.

  16. Hydration, phase separation and nonlinear rheology of temperature-sensitive water-soluble polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Koga, Tsuyoshi; Kaneda, Isamu; Winnik, Françoise M

    2011-07-20

    The collapse of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) chain upon heating and the phase diagrams of aqueous PNIPAM solutions with a very flat lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase separation line are theoretically studied on the basis of cooperative dehydration (simultaneous dissociation of bound water molecules in a group of correlated sequence), and compared with the experimental observation of temperature-induced coil-globule transition by light scattering methods. The transition becomes sharper with the cooperativity parameter σ of hydration. The reentrant coil-globule-coil transition and cononsolvency in a mixed solvent of water and methanol are also studied from the viewpoint of competitive hydrogen bonds between polymer-water and polymer-methanol. The downward shift of the cloud-point curves (LCST cononsolvency) with the mol fraction of methanol due to the competition is calculated and compared with the experimental data. Aqueous solutions of hydrophobically modified PNIPAM carrying short alkyl chains at both chain ends (telechelic PNIPAM) are theoretically and experimentally studied. The LCST of these solutions is found to shift downward along the sol-gel transition curve as a result of end-chain association (association-induced phase separation), and separate from the coil-globule transition line. Associated structures in the solution, such as flower micelles, mesoglobules, and higher fractal assembly, are studied by ultra small-angle neutron scattering with theoretical modeling of the scattering function. Dynamic-mechanical modulus, nonlinear stationary viscosity, and stress build-up in start-up shear flows of the associated networks are studied on the basis of the affine and non-affine transient network theory. The molecular conditions for thickening, strain hardening, and stress overshoot are found in terms of the nonlinear amplitude A of the chain tension and the tension-dissociation coupling constant g.

  17. A consistent and verifiable macroscopic model for the dissolution of liquid CO2 in water under hydrate forming conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct injection of liquid CO2 into the ocean has been proposed as one method to reduce the emission levels of CO2 into the atmosphere. When liquid CO2 is injected (normally as droplets) at ocean depths >500 m, a solid interfacial region between the CO2 and the water is observed to form. This region consists of hydrate clathrates and hinders the rate of dissolution of CO2. It is, therefore, expected to have a significant impact on the injection of liquid CO2 into the ocean. Up until now, no consistent and predictive model for the shrinking of droplets of CO2 under hydrate forming conditions has been proposed. This is because all models proposed to date have had too many unknowns. By computing rates of the physical and chemical processes in hydrates via molecular dynamics simulations, we have been able to determine independently some of these unknowns. We then propose the most reasonable model and use it to make independent predictions of the rates of mass transfer and thickness of the hydrate region. These predictions are compared to measurements, and implications to the rates of shrinkage of CO2 droplets under varying flow conditions are discussed. (author)

  18. Flow strength of highly hydrated Mg- and Na-sulfate hydrate salts, pure and in mixtures with water ice, with application to Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kubo, T.; Kirby, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    We selected two Europan-ice-shell candidate highly hydrated sulfate salts for a laboratory survey of ductile flow properties: MgSO4 ?? 7H2O (epsomite) and Na2SO4 ?? 10H2O (mirabilite), called MS7 and NS10, respectively. Polycrystalline samples in pure form and in mixtures with water ice I were tested using our cryogenic high-pressure creep apparatus at temperatures 232 ??? T ??? 294 K, confining pressures P = 50 and 100 MPa, and strain rates 4 ?? 10-8 ??? ???dot;e ??? 7 ?? 10-5 s-1. Grain size of NS10 samples was > 100 ??m. The flow strength ?? of pure MS7 was over 100 times that of polycrystalline ice I at comparable conditions; that of pure NS10 over 20 times that of ice. In terms of the creep law ???dot;e = A??n e-Q/RT, where R is the gas constant, we determine parameter values of A = 1012.1 MPa-ns-1, n = 5.4, and Q = 128 kJ/mol for pure NS10. Composites of ice I and NS10 of volume fraction ?? NS10 have flow strength ??c = [??NS10??NS10J + (1 - ?? NS10)??iceIJ]1/J where J ??? -0.5, making the effect on the flow of ice with low volume fractions of NS10 much like that of virtually undeformable hard rock inclusions. Being much stronger and denser than ice, massive sulfate inclusions in the warmer, ductile layer of the Europan ice shell are less likely to be entrained in convective ice flow and more likely to be drawn to the base of the ice shell by gravitational forces and eventually expelled. With only smaller, dispersed sulfate inclusions, at probable sulfate ?? high density and low thermal conductivity of the hydrated salts. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Hydrogen-bonding and vibrational coupling of water in a hydrophobic hydration shell as observed by Raman-MCR and isotopic dilution spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A

    2016-01-28

    Hydrogen-bonding and intra/intermolecular vibrational coupling of water next to a hydrophobic molecule (tert-butyl alcohol, TBA) have been studied by Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) and isotopic dilution spectroscopy. Raman-MCR provides the vibrational spectrum of water pertinent to the hydration shell of TBA, which shows a distinct Raman band at around 3660 cm(-1) corresponding to the dangling OH in the hydration shell. The presence of positive charge on the hydrophobe decreases the propensity of dangling OH in the hydration shell, presumably due to unfavorable electrostatic interaction. Analysis of the dangling OH band with isotopic dilution reveals that the 'dangling OH' is intramolecularly coupled with the 'H-bonded OH' of the same water molecule. The hydration water spectrum in the H-bonded OH stretch region (3000-3600 cm(-1)) shows a depletion of weakly H-bonded water (∼3580 cm(-1)) and an increase of strongly H-bonded water (∼3250 cm(-1)), making the average H-bonding stronger in a hydrophobic hydration shell than that in bulk. This strongly H-bonded hydration water exhibits weaker intra- and intermolecular vibrational coupling than that of bulk water. PMID:26725484

  20. ELIMINATION OF URINE IN RESPONSE TO WATER INTAKE IS CONSISTENT IN WELL-HYDRATED INDIVIDUALS

    OpenAIRE

    Catalina Capitán-Jiménez; Luis Fernando Aragón-Vargas

    2010-01-01

    A simple method has been recently proposed to assess acute hydration status in humans; however, several questions remain regarding its reliability, validity, and practicality. Objective: Establish reliability of a simple method to assess euhydration, that is, to analyze whether this method can be used as a consistent indicator of a person´s hydration status. In addition, the study sought to assess the effect exercise has on urine volume when euhydration is maintained and a standardized volume...

  1. Development and preliminary testing of a standardized method for quantifying excess water in over-hydrated skin using evaporimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, M; Clark-O'Neill, S R; Wong, W K R; Runeman, B; Farbrot, A; Cottenden, A M

    2011-03-01

    Although evaporimetry (the measurement of water vapour flux density from the skin) has often been used to study the impact on skin hydration of using products such as baby diapers and incontinence pads, it is difficult to interpret results and to compare data from different studies because of the diversity of unvalidated methodologies used. The aim of this work was to develop a robust methodology for measuring the excess water in over-hydrated skin and test it on volar forearm and hip skin which had been occluded with saline soaked patches. Three repeat measurements were made on the volar forearm and the hip of five young (31-44 years) and six older (67-85 years) women and moderately good within-subject repeatability was found for both skin sites for both subject groups. Measurements taken from the hip were significantly higher (P = 0.001) than those from the arm and had larger coefficients of variation (3.5-22.1%) compared to arms (3.0-14.0%). There were no significant differences between young and older skin, implying that women for future studies could be recruited without regard to age. This is the first time that a robust evaporimetric methodology for quantifying excess water in over-hydrated skin has been described and validated, and it will form a solid basis for future work. PMID:21285481

  2. Development and preliminary testing of a standardized method for quantifying excess water in over-hydrated skin using evaporimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although evaporimetry (the measurement of water vapour flux density from the skin) has often been used to study the impact on skin hydration of using products such as baby diapers and incontinence pads, it is difficult to interpret results and to compare data from different studies because of the diversity of unvalidated methodologies used. The aim of this work was to develop a robust methodology for measuring the excess water in over-hydrated skin and test it on volar forearm and hip skin which had been occluded with saline soaked patches. Three repeat measurements were made on the volar forearm and the hip of five young (31–44 years) and six older (67–85 years) women and moderately good within-subject repeatability was found for both skin sites for both subject groups. Measurements taken from the hip were significantly higher (P = 0.001) than those from the arm and had larger coefficients of variation (3.5–22.1%) compared to arms (3.0–14.0%). There were no significant differences between young and older skin, implying that women for future studies could be recruited without regard to age. This is the first time that a robust evaporimetric methodology for quantifying excess water in over-hydrated skin has been described and validated, and it will form a solid basis for future work

  3. On-line monitoring of methane hydrate crystallization process in water-in-oil emulsion using in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ouabbas, Yamina; Cameirão, Ana; Herri, Jean-Michel; Glénat, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The formation of gas hydrates in water-in-oil flowing emulsion was studied in a flow loop pilot at 80 bar and 1°C. The Archimede flow loop (30 m long, 1 cm diameter) has been built to reproduce the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic conditions encountered in pipelines. The crystallization of methane hydrate was investigated for two water contents (5%vol. and 30%vol.) in liquid Kerdane (C1-C14). The hydrate formation was determined from differential pressure drop and temperature measurements and g...

  4. Comparison of the water change characteristics between the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate and the freezing and thawing of ice in sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhang; Qingbai Wu; Yingmei Wang

    2009-01-01

    Hydrate formation and dissociation processes are always accompanied by water migration in porous media, which is similar to the ice. In our study, a novel pF-meter sensor which could detect the changes of water content inside sand was first applied to hydrate formation and dissociation processes. It also can study the water change characteristics in the core scale of a partially saturated silica sand sample and compare the differences of water changes between the processes of formation and dissociation of methane hydrate and freezing and thawing of ice. The experimental results showed that the water changes in the processes of formation and dissociation of methane hydrate were basically similar to that of the freezing and thawing of ice in sand. When methane hydrate or ice was formed, water changes showed the decrease in water content on the whole and the pF values rose following the formation processes. However, there were very obvious differences between the ice thawing and hydrate dissociation.

  5. Toward a microscopic understanding of the calcium–silicate–hydrates/water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium–Silicate–Hydrates (C–S–H) are the main binding phases in most concrete which is the primarily used composite construction material in the world. However, a big lack is cleaving between the actual knowledge about C–S–H, compared to what could be reached using state-of-the-art technologies of modern research. In this article, the formation of a C–S–H phase on a native oxide covered silicon wafer is investigated by means of in-situ attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR–IR) and ex-situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The total thickness of the C–S–H phase is determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to be 3 nm. The formation appears to be reversible depending on the environment pH value and can be performed at room temperature. Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations, it is shown that the C–S–H phase in the presence of water will change its chemical composition in order to reach the thermodynamic ground state of the system. This change is achieved by a metal–proton exchange reaction. The stoichiometry of these metal–proton exchange reactions is nearly independent of the environment pH value. Electrokinetic measurements yield isoelectric points of 2.0 and 2.6 for the native oxide covered silicon wafer (SiO2) and the C–S–H phase. This is consistent with a predominance of Si–O sites at the C–S–H/water interface.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip. PMID:27018633

  7. δD values of hydrated volcanic glass : a potential record of ancient meteoric water and climate in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tephra beds that are well drained and have been buried by thin paleosols become hydrated within 2-3000 yr on reaction with meteoric waters. Hence, the absorbed water within silicic volcanic glass shards provides a potential record of δD values of ancient meteoric water. Such isotopic records have previously received little investigation. We demonstrate that 1.5-2 m thick tephra beds in central North Island, New Zealand, display uniform δD values vertically through their profiles and laterally up to 250 m in outcrop. Reproducibility is not influenced by grain size or age of the tephra. We obtained an average δD value of -48 ± 3 permille for water within the 1.8 ka Taupo Tephra. This is similar to the composition of present-day surface waters. δD values of -73 ± 2 and -60 ± 2 permille for the 25 ka Kawakawa and 30 ka Mangaone Tephra beds are significantly lower than present waters, indicating that they have been hydrated under different surficial conditions. This is consistent with other proxy paleoclimatic indicators that suggest a cooler, drier, and windier climate at the time of their eruption. Tephra beds are a potential source of paleoclimatic data in terrestrial environments that otherwise may lack proxy records. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Hydration states of clays followed by water and hydroxyls vibrational analyses in the near infrared: application to saponite and bentonite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the feasibility of a deep geological disposal facility conducted by ANDRA - the French national radioactive waste management agency -, requires the knowledge of water status and water content in clays. Thanks to an original lab-built device coupling vibrational spectroscopies and water adsorption isotherms, adsorbed water and clay's structure are described quantitatively and qualitatively. A multidisciplinary approach allows the description of hydration mechanisms and water molecules network in the inter lamellar space of synthetic saponites. The effects of density and nature of inter-foliar cations and the influence of temperature on hydration are presented. Using mechanisms and important parameters established on saponites, hydration of bentonite MX80 is carried out. In order to describe and quantify simultaneously two different water states, a simple but relevant method of spectra analysis was developed. (author)

  9. Exploring the role of water in molecular recognition: predicting protein ligandability using a combinatorial search of surface hydration sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Brennan, Paul E.; Huggins, David J.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between any two biological molecules must compete with their interaction with water molecules. This makes water the most important molecule in medicine, as it controls the interactions of every therapeutic with its target. A small molecule binding to a protein is able to recognize a unique binding site on a protein by displacing bound water molecules from specific hydration sites. Quantifying the interactions of these water molecules allows us to estimate the potential of the protein to bind a small molecule. This is referred to as ligandability. In the study, we describe a method to predict ligandability by performing a search of all possible combinations of hydration sites on protein surfaces. We predict ligandability as the summed binding free energy for each of the constituent hydration sites, computed using inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory. We compared the predicted ligandability with the maximum observed binding affinity for 20 proteins in the human bromodomain family. Based on this comparison, it was determined that effective inhibitors have been developed for the majority of bromodomains, in the range from 10 to 100 nM. However, we predict that more potent inhibitors can be developed for the bromodomains BPTF and BRD7 with relative ease, but that further efforts to develop inhibitors for ATAD2 will be extremely challenging. We have also made predictions for the 14 bromodomains with no reported small molecule K d values by isothermal titration calorimetry. The calculations predict that PBRM1(1) will be a challenging target, while others such as TAF1L(2), PBRM1(4) and TAF1(2), should be highly ligandable. As an outcome of this work, we assembled a database of experimental maximal K d that can serve as a community resource assisting medicinal chemistry efforts focused on BRDs. Effective prediction of ligandability would be a very useful tool in the drug discovery process.

  10. Exploring the role of water in molecular recognition: predicting protein ligandability using a combinatorial search of surface hydration sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Brennan, Paul E; Huggins, David J

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between any two biological molecules must compete with their interaction with water molecules. This makes water the most important molecule in medicine, as it controls the interactions of every therapeutic with its target. A small molecule binding to a protein is able to recognize a unique binding site on a protein by displacing bound water molecules from specific hydration sites. Quantifying the interactions of these water molecules allows us to estimate the potential of the protein to bind a small molecule. This is referred to as ligandability. In the study, we describe a method to predict ligandability by performing a search of all possible combinations of hydration sites on protein surfaces. We predict ligandability as the summed binding free energy for each of the constituent hydration sites, computed using inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory. We compared the predicted ligandability with the maximum observed binding affinity for 20 proteins in the human bromodomain family. Based on this comparison, it was determined that effective inhibitors have been developed for the majority of bromodomains, in the range from 10 to 100 nM. However, we predict that more potent inhibitors can be developed for the bromodomains BPTF and BRD7 with relative ease, but that further efforts to develop inhibitors for ATAD2 will be extremely challenging. We have also made predictions for the 14 bromodomains with no reported small molecule K d values by isothermal titration calorimetry. The calculations predict that PBRM1(1) will be a challenging target, while others such as TAF1L(2), PBRM1(4) and TAF1(2), should be highly ligandable. As an outcome of this work, we assembled a database of experimental maximal K d that can serve as a community resource assisting medicinal chemistry efforts focused on BRDs. Effective prediction of ligandability would be a very useful tool in the drug discovery process. PMID:27367338

  11. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  12. The Structure of Hydrated Electron. Part 1. Magnetic Resonance of Internally Trapping Water Anions: A Density Functional Theory Study

    CERN Document Server

    Shkrob, I A

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to rationalize magnetic parameters of hydrated electron trapped in alkaline glasses as observed using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies. To this end, model water cluster anions (n=4-8 and n=20,24) that localize the electron internally are examined. It is shown that EPR parameters of such water anions (such as hyperfine coupling tensors of H/D nuclei in the water molecules) are defined mainly by the cavity size and the coordination number of the electron; the water molecules in the second solvation shell play a relatively minor role. An idealized model of hydrated electron (that is usually attributed to L. Kevan) in which six hydroxyl groups arranged in an octahedral pattern point towards the common center is shown to provide the closest match to the experimental parameters, such as isotropic and anisotropic hyperfine coupling constants for the protons (estimated from ESEEM), the second moment of the E...

  13. Methane consumption in waters overlying a hydrate-associated mound in the Santa Monica Basin : a project synopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, M.B.; Mau, S.; Valentine, D.L.; Reed, J.H. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Hallam, S.J.; Yang, J. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the role of methane hydrates in the global carbon cycle and climate change requires an understanding of methane consumption in hydrate-associated environments. A dual-component microbial biofilter consumes up to 80 per cent of methane produced in the marine environment. Throughout most of the oceans around the world, anaerobic methane oxidation within sediment prevents large quantities of methane from leaving the seafloor. However, in regions of increased methane production, methane is released to the water column. The water column component of the marine biofilter for methane is the largest uncharacterized global sink for methane. This study combined geochemical and molecular biology to develop a quantitative understanding of methane consumption in the marine water column of the Southern California Bight. The paper presented geochemical data demonstrating that the degree of basin enclosure and basin-scale circulation patterns, were first order controls on methane oxidation rates in the Santa Monica Basin (SMB). The paper also presented genetic data showing similarities and differences in methanotrophic communities in distinctive horizons within the SMB water column. It described the study site, sampling, and methods as well as the preliminary findings. A contrast was observed between methane concentration and methane turnover time profiles. It was concluded that although methane concentration is a first-order control on methanotrophic activity, community concentration, dilution and seeding control the broad scale efficacy of methane consumption. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  14. C-Phycocyanin protects against acute tributyltin chloride neurotoxicity by modulating glial cell activity along with its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory property: A comparative efficacy evaluation with N-acetyl cysteine in adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumonto; Siddiqui, Waseem A; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2015-08-01

    Spirulina is a widely used health supplement and is a dietary source of C-Phycocyanin (CPC), a potent anti-oxidant. We have previously reported the neurotoxic potential of tributyltin chloride (TBTC), an environmental pollutant and potent biocide. In this study, we have evaluated the protective efficacy of CPC against TBTC induced neurotoxicity. To evaluate the extent of neuroprotection offered by CPC, its efficacy was compared with the degree of protection offered by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (a well known neuroprotective drug, taken as a positive control). Male Wistar rats (28 day old) were administered with 20mg/kg TBTC (oral) and 50mg/kg CPC or 50mg/kg NAC (i.p.), alone or in combination, and various parameters were evaluated. These include blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage; redox parameters (ROS, GSH, redox pathway associated enzymes, oxidative stress markers); inflammatory, cellular, and stress markers; apoptotic proteins and in situ cell death assay (TUNEL). We observed increased CPC availability in cortical tissue following its administration. Although BBB associated proteins like claudin-5, p-glycoprotein and ZO-1 were restored, CPC/NAC failed to protect against TBTC induced overall BBB permeability (Evans blue extravasation). Both CPC and NAC remarkably reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. NAC effectively modulated redox pathway associated enzymes whereas CPC countered ROS levels efficiently. Interestingly, CPC and NAC were equivalently capable of reducing apoptotic markers, astroglial activation and cell death. This study illustrates the various pathways involved in CPC mediated neuroprotection against this environmental neurotoxicant and highlights its capability to modulate glial cell activity. PMID:26079211

  15. Why can water cages adsorb aqueous methane? A potential of mean force calculation on hydrate nucleation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang-Jun; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yi-Gang; Wu, Chang-Hua

    2009-11-28

    By performing constrained molecular dynamics simulations in the methane-water system, we successfully calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) between a dodecahedral water cage (DWC) and dissolved methane for the first time. As a function of the distance between DWC and methane, this is characterized by a deep well at approximately 6.2 A and a shallow well at approximately 10.2 A, separated by a potential barrier at approximately 8.8 A. We investigated how the guest molecule, cage rigidity and the cage orientation affected the PMF. The most important finding is that the DWC itself strongly adsorbs methane and the adsorption interaction is independent of the guests. Moreover, the activation energy of the DWC adsorbing methane is comparable to that of hydrogen bonds, despite differing by a factor of approximately 10% when considering different water-methane interaction potentials. We explain that the cage-methane adsorption interaction is a special case of the hydrophobic interaction between methane molecules. The strong net attraction in the DWC shell with radii between 6.2 and 8.8 A may act as the inherent driving force that controls hydrate formation. A cage adsorption hypothesis for hydrate nucleation is thus proposed and discussed.

  16. Why can water cages adsorb aqueous methane? A potential of mean force calculation on hydrate nucleation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang-Jun; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yi-Gang; Wu, Chang-Hua

    2009-11-28

    By performing constrained molecular dynamics simulations in the methane-water system, we successfully calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) between a dodecahedral water cage (DWC) and dissolved methane for the first time. As a function of the distance between DWC and methane, this is characterized by a deep well at approximately 6.2 A and a shallow well at approximately 10.2 A, separated by a potential barrier at approximately 8.8 A. We investigated how the guest molecule, cage rigidity and the cage orientation affected the PMF. The most important finding is that the DWC itself strongly adsorbs methane and the adsorption interaction is independent of the guests. Moreover, the activation energy of the DWC adsorbing methane is comparable to that of hydrogen bonds, despite differing by a factor of approximately 10% when considering different water-methane interaction potentials. We explain that the cage-methane adsorption interaction is a special case of the hydrophobic interaction between methane molecules. The strong net attraction in the DWC shell with radii between 6.2 and 8.8 A may act as the inherent driving force that controls hydrate formation. A cage adsorption hypothesis for hydrate nucleation is thus proposed and discussed. PMID:19890529

  17. The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

    2012-01-01

    A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of thermal,salt and depressurization on gas hydrate dissociation.The method has the advantage of high efficiency,low cost and enhanced safety.Based on the proposed conceptual method,the physical and mathematical models are established,in which the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,salt inhibition,dispersion,convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production are considered.The gas and water rates,formation pressure for the combination method are compared with that of the single depressurization,which is referred to the method in which only depressurization is used.The results show that the combination method can remedy the deficiency of individual producing methods.It has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single depressurization.It can also reduce the geologic hazard caused by the formation deformation due to the maintaining of the formation pressure by injected ocean warm water.

  18. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  19. Hydration of Volcanic Glass with Super-Critical Water and its Effect on Permeability of Volcanic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.

    2006-12-01

    Behavior of high-temperature, high-pressure fluid flow in volcanoes depends on permeability of rocks in fluid paths. High pressure fluids or vapors in volcanoes, which are in super-critical states, are essential factors of volcanic eruptions. Especially, phreatomagmatic eruptions are caused by excess pressures of the fluid degassed from magma body or heated water contacted with magma or high temperature rocks in volcanoes. Alteration processes of rocks and minerals with super-critical fluid can change permeability of rocks by spreading of the fluid path or obstruction with precipitated minerals. In this study, experimental reproduction on the hydration and alteration processes of rocks and minerals with super-critical fluid flow were carried out with a fluid flow apparatus. Starting materials of the experiments are powdered rhyolitic obsidian and dacite. Approximately 55g of the starting material are placed in a SUS316 sample tube. Inner diameter and length of the sample tube are 9.4mm and 572mm, respectively. Temperature gradient of the pressure vessel is controlled by triple electric furnaces. Run products are retrieved by cutting off the sample tube and observed by SEM. Permeability of run products are also measured by gas flow method. Experimental pressure is 50MPa. Flow rate of distilled water at room temperature is 0.1ml / minute pumped by a low speed high-pressure pump. Temperature of the sample is approximately 450°C for rhyolitic glass powder or 420°C for dacite powder at the first half of the sample tube, then decreased to approximately 310°C at the outlet of the sample tube. Run durations are 3 to 8 days. Obsidian grains and groundmass glass of dacite partially dissolved and changed to porous at higher than approximately 400°C. Alteration products of the volcanic glass including clay minerals, cristobalite and plagioclase occur in grain boundaries and cemented grains within a few centimeters from the outlet of the sample tube. Volcanic glass

  20. Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water using multivariate curve resolution of near-infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, M Isabel; Larrechi, M Soledad; Coronas, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    The hydration process of lithium iodide, lithium bromide, lithium chloride and lithium nitrate in water was analyzed quantitatively by applying multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to their near infrared spectra recorded between 850 nm and 1100 nm. The experiments were carried out using solutions with a salt mass fraction between 0% and 72% for lithium bromide, between 0% and 67% for lithium nitrate and between 0% and 62% for lithium chloride and lithium iodide at 323.15 K, 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. Three factors were determined for lithium bromide and lithium iodide and two factors for the lithium chloride and lithium nitrate by singular value decomposition (SVD) of their spectral data matrices. These factors are associated with various chemical environments in which there are aqueous clusters containing the ions of the salts and non-coordinated water molecules. Spectra and concentration profiles of non-coordinated water and cluster aqueous were retrieved by MCR-ALS. The amount of water involved in the process of hydration of the various salts was quantified. The results show that the water absorption capacity increases in the following order LiI < LiBr < LiNO3 < LiCl. The salt concentration at which there is no free water in the medium was calculated at each one of the temperatures considered. The values ranged between 62.6 and 65.1% for LiBr, 45.5-48.3% for LiCl, 60.4-61.2% for LiI and 60.3-63.7% for LiNO3. These values are an initial approach to determining the concentration as from which crystal formation is favored. PMID:27086095

  1. Neutrons describe ectoine effects on water H-bonding and hydration around a soluble protein and a cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccai, Giuseppe; Bagyan, Irina; Combet, Jérôme; Cuello, Gabriel J.; Demé, Bruno; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, François-Xavier; Galvan Josa, Victor M.; von Gronau, Susanne; Haertlein, Michael; Martel, Anne; Moulin, Martine; Neumann, Markus; Weik, Martin; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2016-08-01

    Understanding adaptation to extreme environments remains a challenge of high biotechnological potential for fundamental molecular biology. The cytosol of many microorganisms, isolated from saline environments, reversibly accumulates molar concentrations of the osmolyte ectoine to counterbalance fluctuating external salt concentrations. Although they have been studied extensively by thermodynamic and spectroscopic methods, direct experimental structural data have, so far, been lacking on ectoine-water-protein interactions. In this paper, in vivo deuterium labeling, small angle neutron scattering, neutron membrane diffraction and inelastic scattering are combined with neutron liquids diffraction to characterize the extreme ectoine-containing solvent and its effects on purple membrane of H. salinarum and E. coli maltose binding protein. The data reveal that ectoine is excluded from the hydration layer at the membrane surface and does not affect membrane molecular dynamics, and prove a previous hypothesis that ectoine is excluded from a monolayer of dense hydration water around the soluble protein. Neutron liquids diffraction to atomic resolution shows how ectoine enhances the remarkable properties of H-bonds in water—properties that are essential for the proper organization, stabilization and dynamics of biological structures.

  2. Influence of supplementary cementitious materials on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime and cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ince, C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is an investigation of the possible role of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime (CL90 and Portland cement (PC mortars. The properties of hydrated lime are significantly different from those of cement and therefore modifying fresh and hardened properties of these mortars are vital for mortar/substrate optimisation in masonry construction. The parameters investigated in this paper often are the main barriers to the use of hydrated lime in construction practice. The results show that transfer sorptivity and time to dewater freshly-mixed hydrated lime mortars can be modified when binder is partially replaced with SCMs. Compressive strength of CL90 mortars is increased systematically with the increased replacement levels of SCMs and the results are supported with the microstructural images. The ability to modify the water transport kinetics and mechanical properties allows compatibility between the mortar and the substrate unit in masonry construction.El objetivo de este artículo es investigar el papel de los materiales cementantes suplementarios (SCMs en la cinética de transporte del agua y en las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros de cal hidratada (CL90 y cemento Portland. Las propiedades de la cal hidratada son significativamente diferentes a las del cemento y por lo tanto el control de las propiedades de los morteros frescos y endurecidos es fundamental en la optimización mortero/substrato en albañilería. Los parámetros estudiados en este trabajo son a menudo las principales barreras para el uso de la cal hidratada en la práctica de la construcción. Los resultados indican que la absortividad y el tiempo necesario para deshidratar morteros de cal hidratada recién mezclados pueden ser controlados cuando el conglomerante es parcialmente remplazado por SCMs. La resistencia a compresión de los morteros CL90 aumenta sistem

  3. Educational intervention on water intake improves hydration status and enhances exercise performance in athletic youth

    OpenAIRE

    Kavouras, S. A.; Arnaoutis, G; Makrillos, M; Garagouni, C; Nikolaou, E; Chira, O; Ellinikaki, E; Sidossis, L S

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether an intervention program emphasizing in increased fluid intake can improve exercise performance in children exercising in the heat. Ninety-two young athletes participated in the study (age: 13.8 ± 0.4 years, weight: 54.9 ± 1.5 kg). Thirty-one (boys: 13, girls: 18) children served as the control group (CON) and 61 (boys: 30, girls: 31) as the intervention (INT). Volunteers had free access to fluids. Hydration was assessed on the basis of first morning urine. A serie...

  4. Direct phase coexistence molecular dynamics study of the phase equilibria of the ternary methane-carbon dioxide-water hydrate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalis, Vasileios K; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-09-14

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to predict the phase equilibrium conditions of a ternary hydrate system. In particular, the direct phase coexistence methodology is implemented for the determination of the three-phase coexistence temperature of the methane-carbon dioxide-water hydrate system at elevated pressures. The TIP4P/ice, TraPPE-UA and OPLS-UA forcefields for water, carbon dioxide and methane respectively are used, in line with our previous studies of the phase equilibria of the corresponding binary hydrate systems. The solubility in the aqueous phase of the guest molecules of the respective binary and ternary systems is examined under hydrate-forming conditions, providing insight into the predictive capability of the methodology as well as the combination of these forcefields to accurately describe the phase behavior of the ternary system. The three-phase coexistence temperature is calculated at 400, 1000 and 2000 bar for two compositions of the methane-carbon dioxide mixture. The predicted values are compared with available calculations with satisfactory agreement. An estimation is also provided for the fraction of the guest molecules in the mixed hydrate phase under the conditions examined. PMID:27507133

  5. Direct phase coexistence molecular dynamics study of the phase equilibria of the ternary methane-carbon dioxide-water hydrate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalis, Vasileios K; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-09-14

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to predict the phase equilibrium conditions of a ternary hydrate system. In particular, the direct phase coexistence methodology is implemented for the determination of the three-phase coexistence temperature of the methane-carbon dioxide-water hydrate system at elevated pressures. The TIP4P/ice, TraPPE-UA and OPLS-UA forcefields for water, carbon dioxide and methane respectively are used, in line with our previous studies of the phase equilibria of the corresponding binary hydrate systems. The solubility in the aqueous phase of the guest molecules of the respective binary and ternary systems is examined under hydrate-forming conditions, providing insight into the predictive capability of the methodology as well as the combination of these forcefields to accurately describe the phase behavior of the ternary system. The three-phase coexistence temperature is calculated at 400, 1000 and 2000 bar for two compositions of the methane-carbon dioxide mixture. The predicted values are compared with available calculations with satisfactory agreement. An estimation is also provided for the fraction of the guest molecules in the mixed hydrate phase under the conditions examined.

  6. Methane plumes over a marine gas hydrate system in the eastern margin of Japan Sea: A possible mechanism for the transportation of subsurface methane to shallow waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, R.; Okuda, Y.; Aoyama, C. [and others

    2005-07-01

    Large pockmarks and mud volcanoes, 50 to 500 m in diameter, have been observed on a small ridge at water depth of 900-1000 m in the Naoetsu basin of the eastern margin of Japan Sea. The ridge sediments recovered by 5.5 m long piston cores were variably fizzling and bubbling, with occasional nodular/massive gas hydrates and methane-induced nodular carbonates. Gas hydrate methane, ca. -39 PDB, was mostly derived from deep-seated thermogenic sources. Echo-sounding survey has revealed a number of magnificent methane plumes, 600 to 750 m high, reaching up to shallow waters of 200-300 m. Methane concentration of the sea waters over the area are generally high, 4 to 180 nmol/L, with sharp and significant anomalies of 18-35 nmol/L at around 200-300 m. Methane hydrate crystals would be formed at methane seep sites, then float upward until they reach the warm shallow waters, where gas hydrate would be dissociated to supply methane to shallow waters. (Author)

  7. Determination of methane concentrations in water in equilibrium with sI methane hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Most submarine gas hydrates are located within the two-phase equilibrium region of hydrate and interstitial water with pressures (P) ranging from 8 to 60 MPa and temperatures (T) from 275 to 293 K. However, current measurements of solubilities of methane in equilibrium with hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase are limited below 20 MPa and 283.15 K, and the differences among these data are up to 30%. When these data were extrapolated to other P-T conditions, it leads to large and poorly known uncertainties. In this study, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to measure methane concentrations in pure water in equilibrium with sI (structure one) methane hydrate, in the absence of a vapor phase, at temperatures from 276.6 to 294.6 (??0.3) K and pressures at 10, 20, 30 and 40 (??0.4%) MPa. The relationship among concentration of methane in water in equilibrium with hydrate, in mole fraction [X(CH4)], the temperature in K, and pressure in MPa was derived as: X(CH4) = exp [11.0464 + 0.023267 P - (4886.0 + 8.0158 P)/T]. Both the standard enthalpy and entropy of hydrate dissolution at the studied T-P conditions increase slightly with increasing pressure, ranging from 41.29 to 43.29 kJ/mol and from 0.1272 to 0.1330 kJ/K ?? mol, respectively. When compared with traditional sampling and analytical methods, the advantages of our method include: (1) the use of in situ Raman signals for methane concentration measurements eliminates possible uncertainty caused by sampling and ex situ analysis, (2) it is simple and efficient, and (3) high-pressure data can be obtained safely. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of hydrating water on the physical characteristics and the diffusion release of cesium nitrate immobilized in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the preparation procedure --- variable amounts of hydrating water on the leachability of a soluble contaminant (CsNO3) from cement samples immersed in water, as well as the physical characteristics of cement samples such as density, pore volume, and compressive strength --- were considered in this paper. Leach tests of cement specimens containing 2% in weight of cesium nitrate (CsNO3), prepared at different water-to-cement ratios, W/C = 0.35, 0.40, 0.45, and 0.55, were curred for 60 degrees C, 98% RH, for eleven days. The leaching standard procedure suggested by the International organization for Standardization (ISO) was used to follow the kinetics for the Cs+, NO3-, and Ca3+ releases from cement right cylinders, 20 mm in diameter and 20 mm high, leached in water at a solid surface-to-liquid volume (S/V) = 0.1/cm. The results of the cumulative fraction release (CFR) versus time (t) in days indicate that the leaching of soluble elements like NO3- and cesium follows a diffusion mechanism

  9. Crystal structures of hydrates of simple inorganic salts. III. Water-rich aluminium halide hydrates: AlCl3 · 15H2O, AlBr3 · 15H2O, AlI3 · 15H2O, AlI3 · 17H2O and AlBr3 · 9H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Horst; Hennings, Erik; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Water-rich aluminium halide hydrate structures are not known in the literature. The highest known water content per Al atom is nine for the perchlorate and fluoride. The nonahydrate of aluminium bromide, stable pentadecahydrates of aluminium chloride, bromide and iodide, and a metastable heptadecahydrate of the iodide have now been crystallized from low-temperature solutions. The structures of these hydrates were determined and are discussed in terms of the development of cation hydration spheres. The pentadecahydrate of the chloride and bromide are isostructural. In AlI(3) · 15H2O, half of the Al(3+) cations are surrounded by two complete hydration spheres, with six H2O in the primary and 12 in the secondary. For the heptadecahydrate of aluminium iodide, this hydration was found for every Al(3+).

  10. Gas hydrates of Lake Baikal

    OpenAIRE

    Khlystov, O.; De Batist, M.; Shoji, H; Nishio, S.; L. Naudts; J. Poort

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We give a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. The importance of mapping mud volcanoes and gas seeps is stressed, as these are currently the only locations where gas hydrates at or very close to the f...

  11. Naphthenic acids hydrates of gases: influence of the water/oil interface on the dispersing properties of an acidic crude oil; Acides naphteniques hydrates de gaz de l'interface eau/huile sur les proprietes dispersantes d'un brut acide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arla, D.

    2006-01-15

    Nowadays, the development of offshore oil production under increasing water depths (high pressures and low temperatures) has led oil companies to focus on gas hydrates risks. Hydrates are crystals containing gas and water molecules which can plug offshore pipelines. It has been shown that some asphaltenic crude oils stabilize water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) during several months and exhibit very good anti-agglomerant properties avoiding hydrate plugs formation. In this work, we have studied the 'anti-hydrate' properties of a West African acidic crude oil called crude AH. This oil contains naphthenic acids, RCOOH hydrocarbons which are sensitive to both the pH and the salinity of the water phase.The emulsifying properties of the crude AH have firstly been explored. It has been shown that heavy resins and asphaltenes are the main compounds of the crude AH responsible for the long term stability of the W/O emulsions whereas the napthenates RCOO{sup -} lead to less stable W/O emulsions. Dealing with hydrates, the crude AH exhibits moderate anti-agglomerant properties due to the presence of heavy resins and asphaltenes. However, the naphthenates RCOO{sup -} drastically increase the formation of hydrate plugs. Moreover, it has been pointed out that hydrate particles agglomeration accelerates the kinetics of hydrate formation and enhances the water/oil separation. In order to explain these behaviours, a mechanism of agglomeration by 'sticking' between a hydrate particle and a water droplet has been proposed. Finally, we have developed a model which describes the physico-chemical equilibria of the naphthenic acids in the binary system water/crude AH, in order to transpose the results obtained in the laboratory to the real oil field conditions. (author)

  12. EFFECT OF MAGNETIZATION OF WATER ON INDUCTION TIME AND GROWTH PERIOD OF NATURAL GAS HYDRATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Li; FAN Shuanshi

    2003-01-01

    The effect of diluted solution's magnetization on induction time and growth period of natural gas hydrate (NGH) has been investigated in quiescent reaction system at pressure of 4. 5 MPa and temperature of 274 K with SDS as surfactant, by using volume fixed and pressure falling method. Experimental results show that magnetization will have effect on the induction time of NGH. After magnetization with magnetic field intensity of 0.33 T, the induction time of NGH has been reduced to 47 min (average) from 99 min (average) in which there is no magnetization. On the other hand, the induction time has been prolonged after magnetization of the diluted solution with magnetic field intensity of 0.05 T, 0. 11 T, 0.22 T, 0.44T. Especially with magnetic field intensity of 0.11 T, the induction time had even been prolonged to 431min (average). The effect of magnetization on the growth period of NGH has not been found at the experimental condition.

  13. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations and...... experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  14. Geochemical characteristics of sediment pore water from Site XS-01 in the Xisha trough of South China Sea and their significance for gas hydrate occurrence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tao; JIANG Shaoyong; GE Lu; YANG Jinghong; LING Hongfei; WU Nengyou; ZHANG Guangxue; LIU Jian; CHEN Daohua

    2007-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a recently-found new source of energy that mostly exists in marine sediments. In recent years, we have conducted gas hydrate exploration in the South China Sea. The Xisha trough, one of the promising target areas for gas hydrate, is located in the northern margin of the South China Sea, adjacent to several large oil and gas fields. The Xisha trough extends 420 km long with the water depth of 1 500 m in the west part and 3 400 m in the east part and deposits thick sediments with organic matter content of 0.41%-1.02%. Previous studies on topographical features, geological P-T conditions, structural geology, sedimentary geology and geophysical bottom simulating reflectors (BSR) in the Xisha trough suggest that this area is favorable for the formation and accumulation of gas hydrate. In this paper, we present geochemical analyses for the sediment and pore water from a piston core at Site XS-01 in the Xisha trough. Seven pore water samples were analyzed for their anion (Cl-, SO42-, Br-, I-) contents, cation (Na, K, Ca, Mg) contents and trace element (Li, B, Sr, Ba, Rb, Mn) contents. Eight sediment samples were analyzed for stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions. A number of geochemical anomalies such as anions (e.g. Cl-, SO42-), cations (e.g. Ca, Mg) and trace elements (e.g. Sr, Ba, B) were found in this study. For example, the concentrations of Cl- and SO42- in pore water show a decreasing trend with depth. The estimated sulfate/ methane interface (SMI) is only 18 m, which is quite similar to the SMI value of 23 m in the ODP164 Leg 997 at Blake Ridge. The Ca, Mg and Sr concentrations of pore water also decrease with depth, but concentrations of Ba, and Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios increase with depth. These geochemical anomalies are quite similar to those found in gas hydrate loca- tions in the world such as the Blake Ridge and may be related to the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates. The salt exclusion effect during the gas hydrate formation

  15. Nanostructural analysis of water distribution in hydrated multicomponent gels using thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codoni, Doroty; Belton, Peter; Qi, Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Highly complex, multicomponent gels and water-containing soft materials have varied applications in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and food sciences, but the characterization of these nanostructured materials is extremely challenging. The aim of this study was to use stearoyl macrogol-32 glycerides (Gelucire 50/13) gels containing seven different species of glycerides, PEG, and PEG-esters, as model, complex, multicomponent gels, to investigate the effect of water content on the micro- and nanoarchitecture of the gel interior. Thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry were used to probe the thermal and diffusional behavior of water molecules within the gel network. For the highly concentrated gels (low water content), the water activity was significantly lowered due to entrapment in the dense gel network. For the gels with intermediate water content, multiple populations of water molecules with different thermal responses and diffusion behavior were detected, indicating the presence of water in different microenvironments. This correlated with the network architecture of the freeze-dried gels observed using SEM. For the gels with high water content, increased quantities of water with similar diffusion characteristics as free water could be detected, indicating the presence of large water pockets in these gels. The results of this study provide new insights into structure of Gelucire gels, which have not been reported before because of the complexity of the material. They also demonstrate that the combination of thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry offers insights into the structure of soft materials not available by the use of each technique alone. However, we also note that in some instances the results of these measurements are overinterpreted and we suggest limitations of the methods that must be considered when using them.

  16. Surfactants at Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Water Interface: Physics of Surfactants, Counter-Ions, and Hydration Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ketan S.; Phelan, Frederick R., Jr.

    Specialized applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) require an efficient and reliable method to sort these materials into monodisperse fractions with respect to their defining metrics (chirality, length, etc.) while retaining their physical and chemical integrity. A popular method to achieve this goal is to use surfactants that individually disperse SWCNTs in water and then to separate the resulting colloidal mixture into fractions that are enriched in monodisperse SWCNTs. Recently, experiments at NIST have shown that subtle point mutations of chemical groups in bile salt surfactants have a large impact on the hydrodynamic properties of SWCNT-surfactant complexes during ultracentrifugation. These results provide strong motivation for understanding the rich physics underlying the assembly of surfactants around SWCNTs, the structure and dynamics of counter ions around the resulting complex, and propagation of these effects into the first hydration shell. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the thermodynamics of SWCNT-bile salt surfactant complexes in water with an emphasis on the buoyant characteristics of the SWCNT-surfactant complexes. Simulation results will be presented along with a comparison with experimental data. Official contribution of the National Institute of Standards and Technology; not subject to copyright in the United States.

  17. Communication: Librational dynamics in water, sI and sII clathrate hydrates, and ice Ih: Molecular-dynamics insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Christian J; English, Niall J

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations have been performed for liquid water, and on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to ice Ih, in order to study the dynamical properties of librational motion (rotation oscillation) depicted by protons in water molecules. In particular, hydrate lattices were found to display prominent "bifurcated" features, or peaks, at circa 70 and 80-95 meV (or ∼560 and 640-760 cm(-1), respectively), also displayed by ice, in essentially quantitative agreement with experimental neutron-scattering data. However, observed differences in dispersion between these librational modes between these two structures (both hydrate polymorphs vis-à-vis ice), owing primarily to density effects, have been decomposed into contributions arising from angular-velocity dynamics about axes in the local molecular frame of water molecules, with in-plane "wagging" and "twisting" rationalising one mode at ∼70 meV, and out-of-plane motion for the higher-frequency band. This was confirmed explicitly by a type of de facto normal-mode analysis, in which only immediate layers of water molecules about the one under consideration were allowed to move. In contrast, liquid water displayed no marked preference for such local in- or out-of-plane modes characterising librational motion, owing to the marked absence of rigid, pentamers or hexamers therein.

  18. Water exchange at a hydrated platinum electrode is rare and collective

    CERN Document Server

    Limmer, David T; Madden, Paul A; Chandler, David

    2015-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the exchange kinetics of water molecules at a model metal electrode surface -- exchange between water molecules in the bulk liquid and water molecules bound to the metal. This process is a rare event, with a mean residence time of a bound water of about 40 ns for the model we consider. With analysis borrowed from the techniques of rare-event sampling, we show how this exchange or desorption is controlled by (1) reorganization of the hydrogen bond network within the adlayer of bound water molecules, and by (2) interfacial density fluctuations of the bulk liquid adjacent to the adlayer. We define collective coordinates that describe the desorption mechanism. Spatial and temporal correlations associated with a single event extend over nanometers and tens of picoseconds.

  19. Effects of rooibos tea, bottled water, and a carbohydrate beverage on blood and urinary measures of hydration after acute dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Alan C; Quindry, John C; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Valiente, J Scott

    2010-04-01

    Rooibos tea contains polyphenol antioxidants, including flavonoids and phenolic acids that are potent free radical scavengers and has purported benefits for accelerated rehydration. The objective was to evaluate the effects of three different drinks (rooibos tea, bottled water, and a carbohydrate beverage) on blood and urinary markers of hydration after acute dehydration in collegiate wrestlers. Twenty-three athletes were recruited and followed a randomized, cross-over design with three different study arms comparing the effectiveness of rooibos tea, carbohydrate beverage (6% or 60 grams l(-1)), or bottled water (placebo) in promoting rehydration after a 3% reduction in body mass. Urine specific gravity (U(sg)) urine (U(osm)) and plasma osmolarity (P(osm)), and plasma volume were measured pre- and post dehydration and at 1-h after rehydration. Statistical analyses utilized a 3 (conditions) x 3 (times) repeated measures analysis of variance to test main effects. Significant interaction effects were found for P(osm) and U(osm), both of which remained below basleline after 1-h rehydration in the rooibos tea and water trials. No significant interaction effects were found for either urine U(sg) or plasma volume shift. The findings of this study demonstrate that rooibos tea was no more effective in promoting rehydration than plain water, with significant changes being found for P(osm) and U(osm) in the carbohydrate/electrolyte solution, in collegiate wrestlers after a 3% reduction in body mass and a rehydration period of 1-h when consuming 100% of their body weight loss.

  20. Thermodynamic insight into spontaneous hydration and rapid water permeation in aquaporins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barati Farimani, A.; Aluru, N. R. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Tajkhorshid, Emad [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-08-25

    We report here a detailed thermodynamic description of water molecules inside a biological water channel. Taking advantage of high-resolution molecular dynamics trajectories calculated for an aquaporin (AQP) channel, we compute the spatial translational and rotational components of water diffusion and entropy in AQP. Our results reveal that the spontaneous filling and entry of water into the pore in AQPs are driven by an entropic gain. Specifically, water molecules exhibit an elevated degree of rotational motion inside the pore, while their translational motion is slow compared with bulk. The partial charges of the lining asparagine residues at the conserved signature Asn-Pro-Ala motifs play a key role in enhancing rotational diffusion and facilitating dipole flipping of water inside the pore. The frequencies of the translational and rotational motions in the power spectra overlap indicating a strong coupling of these motions in AQPs. A shooting mechanism with diffusive behavior is observed in the extracellular region which might be a key factor in the fast conduction of water in AQPs.

  1. HYDRATING THE PLANET THROUGH BUSINESS INNOVATION: A STUDY OF ISRAEL'S WATER INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Nirenberg, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to analyse Israel?s water industry and explore global export opportunities. The first section outlines the development of Israel?s water industry through a historical, ideological and political scan of the country. The Key Success Factors that made Israel?s water management successful are identified at the end of the section. The second part of the paper conducts an industry analysis using Porter?s 5-force analysis plus government. The analysis identifies the threats...

  2. Protein hydration and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inelastic neutron scattering can measure the protein thermal fluctuations under the physiological aqueous environment, especially it is powerful to observe the low-energy protein dynamics in THz region, which are revealed theoretically to be coupled with solvations. Neutron enables the selective observation of protein and hydration water by deuteration. The complementary analysis with molecular dynamics simulation is also effective for the study of protein hydration. Some examples of the application toward the understanding of molecular basis of protein functions will be introduced. (author)

  3. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    OpenAIRE

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Robert J. Flatt; D'Espinose De Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measuremen...

  4. Water reorientation in the hydration shells of hydrophilic and hydrophobic solutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAAGE; Damien; STIRNEMANN; Guillaume; HYNES; James; T.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss some key aspects of our recent theoretical work on water reorientation dynamics,which is important in a wide range of phenomena,including aqueous phase chemical reactions,protein folding,and drug binding to proteins and DNA. It is shown that,contrary to the standard conception that these dynamics are diffusional,the reorientation of a water molecule occurs by sudden,large amplitude angular jumps. The mechanism involves the exchange of one hydrogen bond for another by the reorienting water,and the process can be fruitfully viewed as a chemical reaction. The results for reorientation times,which can be well described analytically,are discussed in the context of the molecular level interpretation of recent ultrafast infrared spectroscopic results,focusing on the concepts of structure making/breaking and solvent ’icebergs’.

  5. Binding of Divalent Cations to Polygalacturonate: A Mechanism Driven by the Hydration Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Uyen T D; Lerbret, Adrien; Neiers, Fabrice; Chambin, Odile; Assifaoui, Ali

    2016-02-11

    We have investigated the interactions between polygalacturonate (polyGal) and four divalent cations (M(2+) = Ba(2+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+)) that differ in size and affinity for water. Our results evidence that M(2+)-polyGal interactions are intimately linked to the affinity of M(2+) for water. Mg(2+) interacts so strongly with water that it remains weakly bound to polyGal (polycondensation) by sharing water molecules from its first coordination shell with the carboxylate groups of polyGal. In contrast, the other cations form transient ionic pairs with polyGal by releasing preferentially one water molecule (for Zn(2+)) or two (for Ca(2+) and Ba(2+)), which corresponds to monodentate and bidentate binding modes with carboxylates, respectively. The mechanism for the binding of these three divalent cations to polyGal can be described by two steps: (i) monocomplexation and formation of point-like cross-links between polyGal chains (at low M(2+)/Gal molar ratios, R) and (ii) dimerization (at higher R). The threshold molar ratio, R*, between these two steps depends on the nature of divalent cations and is lower for calcium ions (R* barium ions (R* > 0.3). This difference may be explained by the intermediate affinity of Ca(2+) for water with respect to those of Zn(2+) and Ba(2+), which may induce the formation of cross-links of intermediate flexibility. By comparison, the lower and higher flexibilities of the cross-links formed by Zn(2+) and Ba(2+), respectively, may shift the formation of dimers to higher molar ratios (R*). PMID:26771109

  6. Hydrated goethite (alpha-FeOOH) (100) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, S.K.; Waychunas, G.A.; Trainor, T.P.; Eng, P.J.

    2009-12-15

    Goethite({alpha}-FeOOH), an abundant and highly reactive iron oxyhydroxide mineral, has been the subject of numerous stud-ies of environmental interface reactivity. However, such studies have been hampered by the lack of experimental constraints on aqueous interface structure, and especially of the surface water molecular arrangements. Structural information of this type is crucial because reactivity is dictated by the nature of the surface functional groups and the structure or distribution of water and electrolyte at the solid-solution interface. In this study we have investigated the goethite(100) surface using surface diffraction techniques, and have determined the relaxed surface structure, the surface functional groups, and the three dimensional nature of two distinct sorbed water layers. The crystal truncation rod (CTR) results show that the interface structure consists of a double hydroxyl, double water terminated interface with significant atom relaxations. Further, the double hydroxyl terminated surface dominates with an 89% contribution having a chiral subdomain structure on the(100) cleavage faces. The proposed interface stoichiometry is ((H{sub 2}O)-(H{sub 2}O)-OH{sub 2}-OH-Fe-O-O-Fe-R) with two types of terminal hydroxyls; a bidentate (B-type) hydroxo group and a monodentate (A-type) aquo group. Using the bond-valence approach the protonation states of the terminal hydroxyls are predicted to be OH type (bidentate hydroxyl with oxygen coupled to two Fe{sup 3+} ions) and OH{sub 2} type (monodentate hydroxyl with oxygen tied to only one Fe{sup 3+}). A double layer three dimensional ordered water structure at the interface was determined from refinement of fits to the experimental data. Application of bond-valence constraints to the terminal hydroxyls with appropriate rotation of the water dipole moments allowed a plausible dipole orientation model as predicted. The structural results are discussed in terms of protonation and H-bonding at the interface

  7. An Evaluation of Common Cleaning Methods for the Removal of a Clinical Isolate of Escherichia coli in Personal Hydration System Water Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmus, Stephanie; Blythe, Jauchia; Guevara, Peter; Washington, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Waterborne infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Personal hydration packs have been used by military personnel since the Gulf War and are now a common issue item. Since military personnel tend to operate under austere conditions and may use a variety of water sources, preventing the acquisition of waterborne infections is extremely important. Further, since hydration pack water reservoir replacements may not be available during combat operations, the development of a reliable cleaning protocol for use in the field is essential. Several methods for cleaning have been described. In the current study, three common cleaning methodologies-bleach treatment, baking soda treatment, and proprietary CAMELBAK Cleaning Tabs™-were evaluated for the ability to remove Escherichia coli contamination from hydration pack water reservoirs. The study results suggest that the use of bleach and proprietary CAMELBAK tablets should be encouraged since they both operate by releasing bactericidal chlorine compounds into solution, which is more effective at reducing post-treatment bacterial burden. It should be noted that no method was 100% effective at completely eliminating bacteria from the reservoirs and that mechanical cleaning was not attempted. PMID:27450612

  8. Correlation between yields of positronium and hydrogen, excited molecules, hydrated electron appearing during water radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytic expression for dependences of the yields of positronium (Ps) and radiolytic hydrogen (H2) on concentration of dissolved in water substances (acetone, H2O2, inorganic acids, salts of various metals) under 60Coγ-irradiation were obtained on the basis of assumptions about similarity of the mechanism of Ps and H2 formation - intratrack recombination with participation of nonhydrated electron. Found equations were used for analyzing large amount of experimental results. In majority of cases the dissolved substances effect alike on Ps and H2 yields. Some exceptions are explained in the framework of considered model. It was established that nonhydrated electron represents the direct precursor of not only Ps and radiolytic hydrogen but solvated electron and excited molecules appearing during radiolysis of water and organoaqueous solutions

  9. 甲烷水合物在纯水和抑制剂体系中的生成动力学%Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Formation in Pure Water and Inhibitor Containing Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裘俊红; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic data of methane hydrate formation in the presence of pure water, brines with single salt and mixed salts, and aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol(EG) and salt+EG were measured. A new kinetic model of hydrate formation for the methane-Fwater systems was developed based on a four-step formation mechanism and reaction kinetics approach. The proposed kinetic model predicts the kinetic behavior of methane hydrate formation in pure water with good accuracy. The feasibility of extending the kinetic model to salt(s) and EG containing systems was explored.

  10. Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalman Douglas S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sport drinks are ubiquitous within the recreational and competitive fitness and sporting world. Most are manufactured and artificially flavored carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages. Recently, attention has been given to coconut water, a natural alternative to manufactured sport drinks, with initial evidence indicating efficacy with regard to maintaining hydration. We compared coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men. Methods Following a 60-minute bout of dehydrating treadmill exercise, 12 exercise-trained men (26.6 ± 5.7 yrs received bottled water (BW, pure coconut water (VitaCoco®: CW, coconut water from concentrate (CWC, or a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink (SD [a fluid amount based on body mass loss during the dehydrating exercise] on four occasions (separated by at least 5 days in a random order, single blind (subject and not investigators, cross-over design. Hydration status (body mass, fluid retention, plasma osmolality, urine specific gravity and performance (treadmill time to exhaustion; assessed after rehydration were determined during the recovery period. Subjective measures of thirst, bloatedness, refreshed, stomach upset, and tiredness were also determined using a 5-point visual analog scale. Results Subjects lost approximately 1.7 kg (~2% of body mass during the dehydrating exercise and regained this amount in a relatively similar manner following consumption of all conditions. No differences were noted between coconut water (CW or CWC and SD for any measures of fluid retention (p > 0.05. Regarding exercise performance, no significant difference (p > 0.05 was noted between BW (11.9 ± 5.9 min, CW (12.3 ± 5.8 min, CWC (11.9 ± 6.0 min, and SD (12.8 ± 4.9 min. In general, subjects reported feeling more bloated and experienced greater stomach upset with the CW and CWC conditions. Conclusion All tested beverages are

  11. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  12. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  13. Mean-Field Approximation to the Hydrophobic Hydration in the Liquid-Vapor Interface of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kiharu; Sumi, Tomonari; Koga, Kenichiro

    2016-03-01

    A mean-field approximation to the solvation of nonpolar solutes in the liquid-vapor interface of aqueous solutions is proposed. It is first remarked with a numerical illustration that the solvation of a methane-like solute in bulk liquid water is accurately described by the mean-field theory of liquids, the main idea of which is that the probability (Pcav) of finding a cavity in the solvent that can accommodate the solute molecule and the attractive interaction energy (uatt) that the solute would feel if it is inserted in such a cavity are both functions of the solvent density alone. It is then assumed that the basic idea is still valid in the liquid-vapor interface, but Pcav and uatt are separately functions of different coarse-grained local densities, not functions of a common local density. Validity of the assumptions is confirmed for the solvation of the methane-like particle in the interface of model water at temperatures between 253 and 613 K. With the mean-field approximation extended to the inhomogeneous system the local solubility profiles across the interface at various temperatures are calculated from Pcav and uatt obtained at a single temperature. The predicted profiles are in excellent agreement with those obtained by the direct calculation of the excess chemical potential over an interfacial region where the solvent local density varies most rapidly. PMID:26595441

  14. Electrical measurement of the water content of the stratum corneum in vivo and in vitro under various conditions: comparison between skin surface hygrometer and corneometer in evaluation of the skin surface hydration state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto-Kumasaka, K; Takahashi, K; Tagami, H

    1993-10-01

    Two commercially available electrical instruments which evaluate the hydration state of the skin surface were compared in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The skin surface hygrometer (Skicon-200) employs high-frequency conductance, whereas the corneometer (CM 420, CM 820) uses electrical capacitance to determine the level of hydration. In a simulation model of in vivo stratum corneum (SC), the high frequency conductance device showed a much closer correlation with the hydration state of the surface SC (r = 0.99) than the capacitance device (r = 0.79), suggesting that the former can accurately assess the hydration dynamics of SC, particularly that due to the accumulation of easily releasable secondary bound water and free water. Both devices were insensitive to changes of hydration taking place in deeper viable skin tissues, e.g. the accumulated tissue fluids in suction blisters. Although the capacitance device correlated poorly with the hydration dynamics in normal SC, its sensitivity to changes occurring in extremely dry skin, such as scaly psoriatic lesions, suggests its measurements characteristics at an extremely low state of hydration, consisting of mostly bound water, such as noted in pathologic SC. PMID:7904396

  15. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  16. Free Radical Chemistry of Disinfection Byproducts 1: Kinetics of Hydrated Electron and Hydroxyl Radical Reactions with Halonitromethanes in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. J. Mincher; R. V. Fox; S. P. Mezyk; T. Helgeson; S. K. Cole; W. J. Cooper; P. R. Gardinali

    2006-01-01

    Halonitromethanes are disinfection-byproducts formed during ozonation and chlorine/chloramine treatment of waters that contain bromide ion and natural organic matter. In this study, the chemical kinetics of the free-radical-induced degradations of a series of halonitromethanes were determined. Absolute rate constants for hydroxyl radical, OH, and hydrated electron, eaq-, reaction with both chlorinated and brominated halonitromethanes were measured using the techniques of electron pulse radiolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy. The bimolecular rate constants obtained, k (M-1 s-1), for eaq-/OH, respectively, were the following: chloronitromethane (3.01 ± 0.40) × 1010/(1.94 ± 0.32) × 108; dichloronitromethane (3.21 ± 0.17) × 1010/(5.12 ± 0.77) × 108; bromonitromethane (3.13 ± 0.06) × 1010/(8.36 ± 0.57) × 107; dibromonitromethane (3.07 ± 0.40) × 1010/(4.75 ± 0.98) × 108; tribromonitromethane (2.29 ± 0.39) × 1010/(3.25 ± 0.67) × 108; bromochloronitromethane (2.93 ± 0.47) × 1010/(4.2 ± 1.1) × 108; bromodichloronitromethane (2.68 ± 0.13) × 1010/(1.02 ± 0.15) × 108; and dibromochloronitromethane (2.95 ± 0.43) × 1010 / (1.80 ± 0.31) × 108 at room temperature and pH ~7. Comparison data were also obtained for hydroxyl radical reaction with bromoform (1.50 ± 0.05) × 108, bromodichloromethane (7.11 ± 0.26) × 107, and chlorodibromomethane (8.31 ± 0.25) × 107 M-1 s-1, respectively. These rate constants are compared to recently obtained data for trichloronitromethane and bromonitromethane, as well as to other established literature data for analogous compounds.

  17. Hydrophobic hydration driven self-assembly of curcumin in water: Similarities to nucleation and growth under large metastability, and an analysis of water dynamics at heterogeneous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Milan Kumar; Roy, Susmita; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-11-01

    As the beneficial effects of curcumin have often been reported to be limited to its small concentrations, we have undertaken a study to find the aggregation properties of curcumin in water by varying the number of monomers. Our molecular dynamics simulation results show that the equilibrated structure is always an aggregated state with remarkable structural rearrangements as we vary the number of curcumin monomers from 4 to 16 monomers. We find that the curcumin monomers form clusters in a very definite pattern where they tend to aggregate both in parallel and anti-parallel orientation of the phenyl rings, often seen in the formation of β-sheet in proteins. A considerable enhancement in the population of parallel alignments is observed with increasing the system size from 12 to 16 curcumin monomers. Due to the prevalence of such parallel alignment for large system size, a more closely packed cluster is formed with maximum number of hydrophobic contacts. We also follow the pathway of cluster growth, in particular the transition from the initial segregated to the final aggregated state. We find the existence of a metastable structural intermediate involving a number of intermediate-sized clusters dispersed in the solution. We have constructed a free energy landscape of aggregation where the metatsable state has been identified. The course of aggregation bears similarity to nucleation and growth in highly metastable state. The final aggregated form remains stable with the total exclusion of water from its sequestered hydrophobic core. We also investigate water structure near the cluster surface along with their orientation. We find that water molecules form a distorted tetrahedral geometry in the 1st solvation layer of the cluster, interacting rather strongly with the hydrophilic groups at the surface of the curcumin. The dynamics of such quasi-bound water molecules near the surface of curcumin cluster is considerably slower than the bulk signifying a restricted

  18. Dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance studies of hydration and local water dynamics in micelle and vesicle assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarney, Evan R; Armstrong, Brandon D; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

    2008-09-16

    We present a unique analysis tool for the selective detection of local water inside soft molecular assemblies (hydrophobic cores, vesicular bilayers, and micellar structures) suspended in bulk water. Through the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), the (1)H NMR signal of water is amplified, as it interacts with stable radicals that possess approximately 658 times higher spin polarization. We utilized stable nitroxide radicals covalently attached along the hydrophobic tail of stearic acid molecules that incorporate themselves into surfactant-based micelle or vesicle structures. Here, we present a study of local water content and fluid viscosity inside oleate micelles and vesicles and Triton X-100 micelles to serve as model systems for soft molecular assemblies. This approach is unique because the amplification of the NMR signal is performed in bulk solution and under ambient conditions with site-specific spin labels that only detect the water that is directly interacting with the localized spin labels. Continuous wave (cw) electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis provides rotational dynamics of the spin-labeled molecular chain segments and local polarity parameters that can be related to hydration properties, whereas we show that DNP-enhanced (1)H NMR analysis of fluid samples directly provides translational water dynamics and permeability of the local environment probed by the spin label. Our technique therefore has the potential to become a powerful analysis tool, complementary to cw ESR, to study hydration characteristics of surfactant assemblies, lipid bilayers, or protein aggregates, where water dynamics is a key parameter of their structure and function. In this study, we find that there is significant penetration of water inside the oleate micelles with a higher average local water viscosity (approximately 1.8 cP) than in bulk water, and Triton X-100 micelles and oleate vesicle bilayers mostly exclude water while allowing for considerable surfactant chain

  19. Hydration of portland cement, natural zeolite mortar in water and sulphate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janotka, I.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to characterise sulphate resistance of mortars made from ordinary Portland cement ( PC and Portland-pozzolan cement with 35 wt.% of zeolite addition (zeolite-blended cement-ZBC . Mortars with two different cement types were tested in water and 5% sodium sulphate solution for 720 days. A favourable effect of zeolite on increased sulphate resistance of the cement is caused by decrease in free Ca(OH2 content of the mortar There is not sufficient of Ca(OH2 available for reacting with the sulphate solution to form voluminous reaction products. A decreased C3A, content due to 35 wt.% replacement of PC by zeolite is the next pronounced factor improving resistance of the mortar with such blended cement.

    El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido estudiar la resistencia a los sulfatos de morteros preparados con cemento portland ordinario (PC y cemento portland puzolánico, con un 35% en peso de zeolita (zeolite-blended cement (ZBC. Ambos tipos de morteros fueron conservados en agua y en una disolución de sulfato sódico al 5% durante 720 días. Se observó una mayor resistencia a los sulfatos en el mortero preparado con el cemento que contenía zeolita debido a su menor contenido en Ca(OH2. No hay cantidad suficiente de Ca(OH2 para que se produzca la reacción de los constituyentes de la pasta con la disolución de sulfato sódico y formar así productos de naturaleza expansiva. La disminución en el contenido de C,3A, debida a la sustitución de un 35% en peso de PC por zeolita, es el factor más determinante en el aumento de la resistencia del mortero en los cementos con adición.

  20. Observations related to tetrahydrofuran and methane hydrates for laboratory studies of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction among water molecules, guest gas molecules, salts, and mineral particles determines the nucleation and growth behavior of gas hydrates in natural sediments. Hydrate of tetrahydrofuran (THF) has long been used for laboratory studies of gas hydrate-bearing sediments to provide close control on hydrate concentrations and to overcome the long formation history of methane hydrate from aqueous phase methane in sediments. Yet differences in the polarizability of THF (polar molecule) compared to methane (nonpolar molecule) raise questions about the suitability of THF as a proxy for methane in the study of hydrate-bearing sediments. From existing data and simple macroscale experiments, we show that despite its polar nature, THF's large molecular size results in low permittivity, prevents it from dissolving precipitated salts, and hinders the solvation of ions on dry mineral surfaces. In addition, the interfacial tension between water and THF hydrate is similar to that between water and methane hydrate. The processes that researchers choose for forming hydrate in sediments in laboratory settings (e.g., from gas, liquid, or ice) and the pore-scale distribution of the hydrate that is produced by each of these processes likely have a more pronounced effect on the measured macroscale properties of hydrate-bearing sediments than do differences between THF and methane hydrates themselves.

  1. Coupled multiphysics modeling of gas hydrate bearing sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Marcelo; Gai, Xuerui; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline clathrate compounds made of water and a low molecular gas like methane (Sloan 1998). Gas hydrates are generally present in oil-producing areas and in permafrost regions. Methane hydrate deposits can lead to large-scale submarine slope failures, blowouts, platform foundation failures, and -borehole instability. Gas hydrates constitute also an attractive source of energy as they are estimated to contain very large reserves of methane. Hydrate formation, dissociation...

  2. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Jianzhong Zhao; Yaqin Tian; Yangsheng Zhao; Wenping Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower ...

  3. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  4. Hydration in soccer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo; Guerra Isabela; Barros Turíbio Leite de

    2003-01-01

    Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. Th...

  5. Is the Surface of Gas Hydrates Dry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Maeda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion (cohesion and agglomeration properties of gas hydrate particles have been a key to hydrate management in flow assurance in natural gas pipelines. Despite its importance, the relevant data in the area, such as the surface energy and the interfacial energy of gas hydrates with gas and/or water, are scarce; presumably due to the experimental difficulties involved in the measurements. Here we review what is known about the surface energy and the interfacial energy of gas hydrates to date. In particular, we ask a question as to whether pre-melting can occur on the surface of gas hydrates. Surface thermodynamic analyses show that pre-melting is favoured to occur on the surface of gas hydrates, however, not sufficient data are available to assess its thickness. The effects of the existence of pre-melting layers on the cohesion and friction forces between gas hydrate particles are also discussed.

  6. Hydrate prevention during formation test of gas in deep water; Prevencao de formacao de hidratos durante teste de formacao de poco de gas em lamina d'agua profunda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Renato Cunha [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work shows a scenery of formation test in deep water, for a well of gas, for which, there were made simulations with objective of identifying possible pairs of points (Pressure x Temperature), favorable to the hydrates formation. Besides, they were made comparisons of the values obtained in the simulation with the values registered during the formation test for the well Alfa of the field Beta. Of ownership of those information, we made an evaluation of the real needs of injection of inhibitors with intention of preventing the hydrates formation in each phase of the test. In an including way, the work has as objective recommends the volumes of hydrates inhibitors to be injected in each phase of a test of formation of well of gas in deep water, in way to assure that the operations are made without there is risk of hydrates formation. (author)

  7. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  8. Trajectory Calculations of Hydration/Dehydration in the Lower Stratosphere from Aura/MLS Water Vapor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S.; Dessler, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    Hydration/dehydration rates at 365 K isentrope are estimated by averaging the differences of two Aura MLS H2O measurements closely linked by two-day Lagrangian trajectories. Stratospheric dehydration mainly occurs in Northern Hemispheric winter over the tropical western Pacific, where seasonally averaged rates are collocated with regions of high deep convective activity and relative humidity (RH). The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) modulates the tropical dehydration through the migration of deep convection. The dehydration rate over the western Pacific is strongest when the enhancement in deep convection migrates to about 160°E, and dehydration appears over the Indian Ocean when the convection is enhanced over 80°E. Hydration of the stratosphere mainly occurs over the summertime subtropical-extratropical continents. The Asian monsoon provides the strongest stratospheric hydration during Northern Hemispheric summer. The hydration rates associated with the Asian monsoon is modulated by the MJO, becoming larger when the tropical convection is enhanced over the Indo/Pacific region (120°-160°E), when the Asian monsoon deep convective activity is also enhanced.

  9. The role of hydration on the mechanism of allosteric regulation: in situ measurements of the oxygen-linked kinetics of water binding to hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvay, Andrés G; Grigera, J Raúl; Colombo, Marcio F

    2003-01-01

    We report here the first direct measurements of changes in protein hydration triggered by a functional binding. This task is achieved by weighing hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin films exposed to an atmosphere of 98% relative humidity during oxygenation. The binding of the first oxygen molecules to Hb tetramer triggers a change in protein conformation, which increases binding affinity to the remaining empty sites giving rise to the appearance of cooperative phenomena. Although crystallographic data have evidenced that this structural change increases the protein water-accessible surface area, isobaric osmotic stress experiments in aqueous cosolutions have shown that water binding is linked to Hb oxygenation. Now we show that the differential hydration between fully oxygenated and fully deoxygenated states of these proteins, determined by weighing protein films with a quartz crystal microbalance, agree with the ones determined by osmotic stress in aqueous cosolutions, from the linkage between protein oxygen affinity and water activity. The agreements prove that the changes in water activity brought about by adding osmolytes to the buffer solution shift biochemical equilibrium in proportion to the number of water molecules associated with the reaction. The concomitant kinetics of oxygen and of water binding to Hb have been also determined. The data show that the binding of water molecules to the extra protein surface exposed on the transition from the low-affinity T to the high-affinity R conformations of hemoglobin is the rate-limiting step of Hb cooperative reaction. This evidences that water binding is a crucial step on the allosteric mechanism regulating cooperative interactions, and suggests the possibility that environmental water activity might be engaged in the kinetic control of some important reactions in vivo. PMID:12524309

  10. Influence of fluorosurfactants on hydrate formation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.U.; Jeong, K.E.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Reasearch Inst. of Chemical Technology, Alternative Chemicals/Fuel Research Center, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrates, are ice-like solids that forms when natural gas is in contact with liquid water or ice under high pressure and low temperature. There is significant interest in studying the storage and transportation of gas in the form of hydrates. However, a critical problem impacting the industrial application of gas hydrates for storage and transportation of natural gas is the slow formation rate of natural gas hydrate. Researchers have previously reported on the promotion effect of some additives on gas hydrate formation and hydrate gas content. Fluorosurfactants are significantly superior to nonfluorinated surfactants in wetting action, as well as stability in harsh environments, both thermal and chemical. This paper discussed an experimental investigation into the effects of fluorosurfactants with different ionic types on the formation of methane hydrate. The surfactants used were FSN-100 of DuPont Zonyl as non-ionic surfactant and FC-143 of DuPont as anionic surfactant. The paper discussed the experimental apparatus for methane hydrate formation. It also discussed hydrate formation kinetics and the series of hydrate formation experiments that were conducted in the presence of fluorosurfactants. Last, the paper explored the results of the study. It was concluded that anionic fluorosurfactant of FC-143 had a better promoting effect on methane hydrate formation compared with nonionic surfactant of FSN-100. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  11. New insight into probe-location dependent polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces: comparison between gel- and fluid-phases of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Moirangthem Kiran; Shweta, Him; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan

    2016-09-21

    Environment polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces play important roles in membrane biology, which are investigated here using a new homologous series of 4-aminophthalimide-based fluorescent molecules (4AP-Cn; n = 2-10, 12) having different lipophilicities (octanol/water partition coefficient - log P). We show that 4AP-Cn molecules probe a peculiar stepwise polarity (E) profile at the lipid/water interface of the gel-phase (Lβ') DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature, which was not anticipated in earlier studies. However, the same molecules probe only a subtle but continuous polarity change at the interface of water and the fluid-phase (Lα) DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature. Fluorescence quenching experiments indicate that solutes with different log P values adsorb at different depths across DPPC/water and DOPC/water interfaces, which correlate with the polarity profiles observed at the interfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations performed on eight probe-lipid systems (four in each of the DPPC and DOPC bilayers - a total run of 2.6 μs) support experimental results, providing further information on the relative position and angle distributions as well as hydration of probes at the interfaces. Simulation results indicate that besides positions, probe orientations also play an important role in defining the local dielectric environment by controlling the probes' exposure to water at the interfaces especially of the gel-phase DPPC bilayer. The results suggest that 4AP-Cn probes are well suited for studying solvation properties at lipid/water interfaces of gel- and fluid-phases simultaneously. PMID:27147404

  12. Natural Gas Hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Ersland, Geir

    2010-01-01

    The experimental set-up with the MRI monitoring apparatus was capable of forming large quantities of methane hydrates in sandstone pores and monitor hydrate growth patterns for various initial conditions. Spontaneous conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate occurred when methane hydrate, in porous media, was exposed to liquid carbon dioxide. The MRI images did not detect any significant increase in signal in the hydrate saturated cores that would indicate the presence of free w...

  13. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  14. Distribution of gas hydrate inhibitor monoethylene glycol in condensate and water systems: Experimental measurement and thermodynamic modeling using the cubic-plus-association equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Yussuf, Mustafe A.; Frost, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    The deepwater energy sector represents one of the major growth areas of the oil and gas industry today. To meet the challenges of hydrate formation, corrosion, scaling, and foaming, the oil and gas industry uses many chemicals and their use has increased significantly over the years. To inhibit gas...... data for liquid-liquid equilibrium of North Sea condensate + MEG and North Sea condensate + MEG + water systems for temperatures from 303.15 to 323.15 K and atmospheric pressure. These data are successfully modeled using the cubic-plus-association equation of state. © 2014 American Chemical Society....

  15. Magnetically Separable and Recyclable Fe3O4-Supported Ag Nanocatalysts for Reduction of Nitro Compounds and Selective Hydration of Nitriles to Amides in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunje Woo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As hybrid nanostructures have become more important in many fields of chemistry, Ag nanoparticles (NPs are being increasingly immobilized onto Fe3O4 microspheres in situ. Structural characterization reveals that the Ag NPs are uniformly immobilized in the Fe3O4 microsphere-based supports. Moreover, Ag NPs are more stable in the hybrid structure than in the naked state and show high catalytic activity for the reduction of nitro compounds and hydration of nitriles to amides in water. The Fe3O4 microspheres were recycled several times using an external magnet.

  16. Geo-scientific investigations of gas-hydrates in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sain, K.; Gupta, H.; Mazumdar, A.; Bhaumik, A.K.; Bhowmick, P.K.

    gradient, and geological, geophysical and microbiological studies indicate that shallow sediments in deep water regions are good hosts for gas-hydrates. First, we have prepared the gas-hydrates stability thickness map along the Indian margin, which provides...

  17. Crystal structure and hydrogen bonding in the water-stabilized proton-transfer salt brucinium 4-amino­phenyl­arsonate tetra­hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D.

    2016-01-01

    In the structure of the brucinium salt of 4-amino­phenyl­arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid), systematically 2,3-dimeth­oxy-10-oxostrychnidinium 4-amino­phenyl­ar­son­ate tetra­hydrate, (C23H27N2O4)[As(C6H7N)O2(OH)]·4H2O, the brucinium cations form the characteristic undulating and overlapping head-to-tail layered brucine substructures packed along [010]. The arsanilate anions and the water mol­ecules of solvation are accommodated between the layers and are linked to them through a primary cation N—H⋯O(anion) hydrogen bond, as well as through water O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to brucinium and arsanilate ions as well as bridging water O-atom acceptors, giving an overall three-dimensional network structure. PMID:27308034

  18. Crystal structure and hydrogen bonding in the water-stabilized proton-transfer salt brucinium 4-amino-phenyl-arsonate tetra-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2016-05-01

    In the structure of the brucinium salt of 4-amino-phenyl-arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid), systematically 2,3-dimeth-oxy-10-oxostrychnidinium 4-amino-phenyl-ar-son-ate tetra-hydrate, (C23H27N2O4)[As(C6H7N)O2(OH)]·4H2O, the brucinium cations form the characteristic undulating and overlapping head-to-tail layered brucine substructures packed along [010]. The arsanilate anions and the water mol-ecules of solvation are accommodated between the layers and are linked to them through a primary cation N-H⋯O(anion) hydrogen bond, as well as through water O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to brucinium and arsanilate ions as well as bridging water O-atom acceptors, giving an overall three-dimensional network structure. PMID:27308034

  19. INFLUENCE OF THE COMPOSITION OF PHOSPHATE ROCK ON THE AMOUNT OF WATER-INSOLUBLE PHOSPHATE IMPURITIES IN SEMI-HYDRATE PHOSPHOGYPSUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Kybartiene

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work a chemical and mineral composition of phosphate rock and phosphogypsum was investigated in order to identify which impurities of phosphate rock prevent natural phosphates from decomposing in full during the production of phosphoric acid and increase the amount of water-insoluble phosphate impurities in phosphogypsum. The analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRF, X-ray fluorescence (XRD, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-Ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS and granulometry was carried out. The results showed that phosphate rocks (Kovdor and Kirovsk apatites and the semi-hydrate phosphogypsums differ by their chemical composition. The apatites and phosphogypsums differ in the amount of the major components, as well as other components (MgO, Al2O3, SrO, BaO, ZrO2, Ln2O3. In phosphate rock, Ln2O3 can be found in the composition of the mineral monazite. The SEM-EDS analysis revealed that the minerals of the apatite group and monazite form aggregate crystals. Monazite dissolves in sulphuric and phosphoric acids very marginal, therefore it prevents the apatites from full decomposition, thus influencing the quantity of insoluble phosphates in semi-hydrate phosphogypsum. The higher is the amount of minerals containing Ln2O3 in phosphate rock, the more water-insoluble phosphates remain in phosphogypsum. It was found that influence of Ln2O3 impurity is significant higher than influence of particles size of apatite.

  20. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  1. Coupled measurement of δ18O/δD in gypsum hydration water and salinity of fluid inclusions in gypsum: A novel tool for reconstructing parent water chemistry and depositional environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nick; Gázquez, Fernando; Turchyn, Alexandra; Chapman, Hazel; Hodell, David

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in gypsum hydration water (CaSO4•2H2O) is a powerful tool to determine the isotopic composition of the parent fluid from which gypsum precipitated. To be useful, however, the hydration water must retain its original isotope signal and not have undergone postdepositional exchange. We developed a novel method to ascertain whether hydration waters have secondarily exchanged by coupling oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of gypsum hydration water with the salinities of fluid inclusions. Salinity is obtained through microthermometric analysis of the same gypsum crystals measured for hydration water by freezing the sample and then measuring the melting point of the fluid inclusions. We apply the method to Messinian gypsum deposits of Cycle 6 within the Yesares Member, Río de Aguas section, Sorbas Basin (SE Spain). After correction of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of gypsum hydration water for fractionation factors, the estimated range of the mother water is -1.8o to 2.8o for δ18O and -12.5o to 16.3o for δD. In the same samples, estimated salinity of primary fluid inclusions range from 18 to 51ppt. Salinity is highly correlated with δ18O and δD, yielding an r2 of 0.88 and 0.87, respectively. The intercepts of the regression equations (i.e., at zero salinity) define the isotope composition of the freshwater endmember, and average -4.4±1.3o for δ18O and -28.9±8.7o for δD. These values are within error of the average isotope composition of precipitation and groundwater data from the local region of Almería today (-4.3o and -22.2o for δ18O and δD, respectively). This agreement provides strong evidence that the gypsum hydration water has retained its isotope composition and has not undergone postdepositional exchange. Furthermore, the isotope and salinity values indicate a significant contribution of meteoric water during gypsum deposition. This observation contrasts with sulfur and oxygen isotopes in sulfate (21.9 > δ34S

  2. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    Subsea flowlines that transport hydrocarbons from wellhead to the processing facility face issues from solid deposits such as hydrates, waxes, asphaltenes, etc. The solid deposits not only affect the production but also pose a safety concern; thus, flow assurance is significantly important in designing and operating subsea oil and gas production. In most subsea oil and gas operations, gas hydrates form at high pressure and low temperature conditions, causing the risk of plugging flowlines, with a undesirable impact on production. Over the years, the oil and gas industry has shifted their perspective from hydrate avoidance to hydrate management given several parameters such as production facility, production chemistry, economic and environmental concerns. Thus, understanding the level of hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines is an important in developing efficient hydrate management techniques. In the past, hydrate formation models were developed for various flow-systems (e.g., oil dominated, water dominated, and gas dominated) present in the oil and gas production. The objective of this research is to extend the application of the present hydrate prediction models for assessing the hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines that are prone to hydrate formation. It involves a novel approach for developing quantitative hydrate risk models based on the conceptual models built from the qualitative knowledge obtained from experimental studies. A comprehensive hydrate risk model, that ranks the hydrate risk associated with the subsea production system as a function of time, hydrates, and several other parameters, which account for inertial, viscous, interfacial forces acting on the flow-system, is developed for oil dominated and condensate systems. The hydrate plugging risk for water dominated systems is successfully modeled using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Flow Assurance Tool (CSMHyFAST). It is found that CSMHyFAST can be used as a screening tool in

  3. Hydrate and alkoxide forms of molybdophosphoric heteropoly acid and specific features of their formation under conditions of isothermal absorption of water, methanol, and ethanol vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the gravimetry method it was ascertained that interaction of vapors of water, methanol and ethanol with solid molybdophosphoric acid at room temperature is accompanied by formation of volumetric hydrates and alcoholates proceeding in several stages, clearly defined during isotherm recording under sorption and desorption conditions. Formation of alcoholates gives rise to loosening of the acid lattice, which dictates largely more active absorption of alcohols at the first stages of sorption compared with water and, when the compositions H3PMo12O40 · 11.5 CH3OH and H3PMo12O40 · 14.7 C2H5OH is attained, it results in their liquefying

  4. Study of the action of phosphate ions contained in the mixing water on the hydration of a Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementation is considered as the most attractive solution for the conditioning of low and intermediate radioactive wastes. The species contained in these wastes can strongly influence the reactivity of the cement pastes, it is in particular the case of the ortho-phosphate ions which are found in the evaporation concentrates. The aim of our work was to determine the influence of these ions on the hydration and the rheological properties of the cement pastes at early age as well as the mechanical and physical properties on the hardened material. (author)

  5. Low pH cements based on CAC for underground repositories of HLW: long-term hydration and resistance against ground water aggression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious materials play an important role in the structural stability and integrity of a purpose built repository for the geological disposal of high level waste. However, the expected generation of an alkaline plume from the concrete by the ingress of groundwater would have detrimental effects on the intended use of a bentonite buffer. To limit this risk, low-pH cementitious materials are being developed to have a target pH < 11 corresponding to the upper stability limit of bentonite. This paper deals with the modifications generated in the chemical composition of the pore solutions of low-pH cement pastes based on Calcium Aluminates Cements (CAC) and in their solid phases after 2 years of hydration. The results show a high stability of the solid phases formed in short-term (90 days). The main modifications in the pore solution composition and in the solid phases occur before 90 days of hydration and, after that, their properties keep quite stable. This paper also deals with the resistance of these low-pH cementitious materials to long-term groundwater aggression using two types of aggressive agents: deionized water and groundwater from the real site of Aespoe (Sweden). Low-pH concretes based on CAC plus silica fume have been evaluated. It appears that their behaviour depends on the leaching agent composition but, with the 2 agents tested in this work, the produced low-pH concretes show a good resistance

  6. Water dynamics on ice and hydrate lattices studied by second-order central-line stimulated-echo oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen-17 stimulated-echo spectroscopy is a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique that allows one to investigate the time scale and geometry of ultraslow molecular motions in materials containing oxygen. The method is based on detecting orientationally encoded frequency changes within oxygen’s central-transition NMR line that are caused by second-order quadrupolar interactions. In addition to the latter, the present theoretical analysis of various two-pulse echo and stimulated-echo pulse sequences takes also heteronuclear dipolar interactions into account. As an experimental example, the ultraslow water motion in polycrystals of tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrate is studied via two-time oxygen-17 stimulated-echo correlation functions. The resulting correlation times and those of hexagonal ice are similar to those from previous deuteron NMR measurements. Calculations of the echo functions’ final-state correlations for various motional models are compared with the experimental data of the clathrate hydrate. It is found that a six-site model including the oxygen-proton dipolar interaction describes the present results

  7. Water dynamics on ice and hydrate lattices studied by second-order central-line stimulated-echo oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei-Acheamfour, Mischa; Tilly, Julius F.; Beerwerth, Joachim; Böhmer, Roland

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen-17 stimulated-echo spectroscopy is a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique that allows one to investigate the time scale and geometry of ultraslow molecular motions in materials containing oxygen. The method is based on detecting orientationally encoded frequency changes within oxygen's central-transition NMR line that are caused by second-order quadrupolar interactions. In addition to the latter, the present theoretical analysis of various two-pulse echo and stimulated-echo pulse sequences takes also heteronuclear dipolar interactions into account. As an experimental example, the ultraslow water motion in polycrystals of tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrate is studied via two-time oxygen-17 stimulated-echo correlation functions. The resulting correlation times and those of hexagonal ice are similar to those from previous deuteron NMR measurements. Calculations of the echo functions' final-state correlations for various motional models are compared with the experimental data of the clathrate hydrate. It is found that a six-site model including the oxygen-proton dipolar interaction describes the present results.

  8. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. Hydrated electron, supplemental data. [Reactions with transients from water, with inorganic solutes, and with solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, A.B.

    1975-06-01

    A compilation of rates of reactions of hydrated electrons with other transients and with organic and inorganic solutes in aqueous solution appeared in NSRDS-NBS 43, and covered the literature up to early 1971. This supplement includes additional rates which have been published through July 1973.

  9. First principles calculations on oxygen vacant hydrated α-MnO2 for activating water oxidation and its self-healing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Kruthika; Murugan, P

    2016-08-10

    Understanding the mechanism behind water oxidation is the prime requirement for designing better catalysts for electrochemical energy devices. In this work, we demonstrate by employing first principles calculations that an initial step of water oxidation is observed to be associated with the dissociation of water dimers into hydronium and hydroxide ions, in the tunnel of a hydrated α-MnO2 compound with an oxygen vacancy. The former ion is intercalated within the network, while the latter ion occupies the oxygen vacant site and interacts strongly with the Mn atoms. Based on our calculations, the factor responsible for this dissociation of water molecules is observed to be the presence of mixed charge states of Mn atoms in the triangular lattice. Further, the coulombic attraction of a hydronium ion with a water molecule leads to the formation of a Zundel cation in the tunnel, while by dehydrogenating the adsorbed hydroxide ion, the self-healing property of the compound is achieved along with another hydronium ion as a reaction product. These cations can be exchanged with Li(+) ions. Thus, the protonic moieties formed in the tunnel of α-MnO2 leads to niche applications in the field of fuel cells and lithium ion batteries. PMID:27447447

  10. Salinity-buffered methane hydrate formation and dissociation in gas-rich systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Kehua; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Polito, Peter; Bryant, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    Methane hydrate formation and dissociation are buffered by salinity in a closed system. During hydrate formation, salt excluded from hydrate increases salinity, drives the system to three-phase (gas, water, and hydrate phases) equilibrium, and limits further hydrate formation and dissociation. We developed a zero-dimensional local thermodynamic equilibrium-based model to explain this concept. We demonstrated this concept by forming and melting methane hydrate from a partially brine-saturated sand sample in a controlled laboratory experiment by holding pressure constant (6.94 MPa) and changing temperature stepwise. The modeled methane gas consumptions and hydrate saturations agreed well with the experimental measurements after hydrate nucleation. Hydrate dissociation occurred synchronously with temperature increase. The exception to this behavior is that substantial subcooling (6.4°C in this study) was observed for hydrate nucleation. X-ray computed tomography scanning images showed that core-scale hydrate distribution was heterogeneous. This implied core-scale water and salt transport induced by hydrate formation. Bulk resistivity increased sharply with initial hydrate formation and then decreased as the hydrate ripened. This study reproduced the salinity-buffered hydrate behavior interpreted for natural gas-rich hydrate systems by allowing methane gas to freely enter/leave the sample in response to volume changes associated with hydrate formation and dissociation. It provides insights into observations made at the core scale and log scale of salinity elevation to three-phase equilibrium in natural hydrate systems.

  11. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  12. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  13. Physical activity, hydration and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory diseases and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  14. HYDRATION AND ENZYME ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Poole, P.

    1984-01-01

    Hydration induced conformation and dynamic changes are followed using a variety of experimental techniques applied to hen egg white lysozyme. These changes are completed just before the onset of enzyme activity, which occurs before all polar groups are hydrated, and before monolayer coverage is attained. We suggest that these hydration induced changes are necessary for the return of enzyme activity.

  15. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  16. Raman and infrared spectroscopic studies of the structure of water (H2O, HOD, D2O) in stoichiometric crystalline hydrates and in electrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapter of reviews presents in particular the Badger-Bauer-rule, distance and angle dependence of O-H...Y hydrogen bond and the structure of aqueous electrolyte solutions. A chapter of vibrational spectroscopic investigations of crystalline hydrates - metal perchlorate hydrates follows. Two further chapters just so investigate metal halide hydrates and some sulfate hydrates and related systems. The following chapter describes near infrared spectroscopic investigations of HOD(D2O) and its electrolyte solutions. The concluding chapter contains thermodynamic consequences and some properties of electrolyte solutions from vibrational spectroscopic investigations. (SPI)

  17. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  18. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  19. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  20. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  1. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau of Economic Geology

    2009-04-30

    The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability

  3. China's Research on Non-conventional Energy Resources- Gas Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Ming; Ma Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    @@ Methane exists in ice-like formations called gas hydrate. Hydrate traps methane molecules inside a cage of frozen water. The magnitude of this previously unknown global storehouse of methane is truly staggering and has raised serious inquiry into the possibility of using methane hydrate as a substitute source of energy for oil and conventional natural gas. According to the estimation by PGC, gas hydrate deposits amount to 7.6 × 1018m3 and contain more than twice as much organic carbon as all the world's coal, oil and non-hydrate natural gas combined.

  4. Kinetic of formation for single carbon dioxide and mixed carbon dioxide and tetrahydrofuran hydrates in water and sodium chloride aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabil, K.M.; Duarte, A.R.C.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Ahmad, M.M.; Yusup, S.; Omar, A.A.; Peters, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory-scale reactor system is built and operated to measure the kinetic of formation for single and mixed carbon dioxide-tetrahydrofuran hydrates. The T-cycle method, which is used to collect the kinetic data, is briefly discussed. For single carbon dioxide hydrate, the induction time decreas

  5. Hydration characteristics of water in radiation polymerized hema-co- ionomeric controlled drug delivery matrices: a DSC study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes in the bulk (freezable) and bound (non-freezable) water contents of radiation polymerized (2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) containing two different types of ionomers have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that introduction of 5-10% of acrylic acid into PHEMA matrix affects mainly the bulk water content whereas introduction of sodium para styrene sulphonate affects both types of water significantly. (author)

  6. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  7. Hydration structure and dynamics of a hydroxide ion in water clusters of varying size and temperature: Quantum chemical and ab initio molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A theoretical study of hydroxide ion-water clusters is carried for varying cluster size and temperature. ► The structures of OH−(H2O)n are found out through quantum chemical calculations for n = 4, 8, 16 and 20. ► The finite temperature behavior of the clusters is studied through ab initio dynamical simulations. ► The spectral features of OH modes (deuterated) and their dependence on hydrogen bonding states of water are discussed. ► The mechanism and kinetics of proton transfer processes in these anionic clusters are also investigated. - Abstract: We have investigated the hydration structure and dynamics of OH−(H2O)n clusters (n = 4, 8, 16 and 20) by means of quantum chemical and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that the solvation structure of the hydroxide ion transforms from three and four-coordinated surface states to five-coordinated interior state with increase in cluster size. Several other isomeric structures with energies not very different from the most stable isomer are also found. Ab initio simulations show that the most probable configurations at higher temperatures need not be the lowest energy isomeric structure. The rates of proton transfer in these clusters are found to be slower than that in bulk water. The vibrational spectral calculations reveal distinct features for free OH (deuterated) stretch modes of water in different hydrogen bonding states. Effects of temperature on the structural and dynamical properties are also investigated for the largest cluster considered here.

  8. A method of harvesting gas hydrates from marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.Q.; Brill, J.P.; Sarica, C. [Tulsa Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Methane is known to exist in gas hydrates, but low productivity is expected for gas production from gas hydrates in marine sediments because of the shallow depths, low hydrate concentration, low permeability of the gas hydrate stability zone, lack of driving pressure and the slow melting process. This paper presented a newly developed methane harvesting method which aims to overcome technical barriers, maintain cost and energy efficiencies and minimize safety and environmental concerns. The method is based on the concept of capturing the gas released from hydrate dissociation in the sediments. The captured gases can reform hydrates inside and overhead receiver, which once full, can be lifted to shallow warm water for gas collection. This simple and open production system does not require high pressure and does not involve any flow assurance issues. As such, technical difficulties, safety issues and environmental concerns are minimized. The proposed gas harvesting method makes the best use of the nature of hydrates and the subsea pressure and temperature profiles. It combines many new concepts, including electrically adding heat inside the hydrate rich sediments to release gas, using an overhead receiver to capture the gas, allowing the gas to reform hydrates again in the overhead receiver, and lifting produced hydrates to warm water where it can be released and collected. It was concluded that this newly proposed production system enables the development of massive hydrate production fields on the sea bed with high production rates that are economically viable. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Physical properties of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliner, J.T.R.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring, solid crystalline compounds (clathrates) that encapsulate gas molecules inside the lattices of hydrogen bonded water molecules within a specific temperature-pressure stability zone. Estimates of the total quantity of available methane gas in natural occurring hydrates are based on twice the energy content of known conventional fossil fuels reservoirs. Accurate and reliable in-situ quantification techniques are essential in determining the economic viability of this potential energy yield, which is dependent upon several factors such as sensitivity of the temperature-pressure stability zone, sediment type, porosity, permeability, concentration/abundance of free gas, spatial distribution in pore spaces, specific cage occupancy, and the influence of inhibitors. Various techniques like acoustic P and S waves, time domain reflectometry, and electrical resistance have been used to analyze the quantity and spatial distribution of the gas hydrate samples. These techniques were reviewed and the results obtained in the course of gas hydrate research were presented. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Probing methane hydrate nucleation through the forward flux sampling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Li, Tianshu

    2014-11-26

    Understanding the nucleation of hydrate is the key to developing effective strategies for controlling methane hydrate formation. Here we present a computational study of methane hydrate nucleation, by combining the forward flux sampling (FFS) method and the coarse-grained water model mW. To facilitate the application of FFS in studying the formation of methane hydrate, we developed an effective order parameter λ on the basis of the topological analysis of the tetrahedral network. The order parameter capitalizes the signature of hydrate structure, i.e., polyhedral cages, and is capable of efficiently distinguishing hydrate from ice and liquid water while allowing the formation of different hydrate phases, i.e., sI, sII, and amorphous. Integration of the order parameter λ with FFS allows explicitly computing hydrate nucleation rates and obtaining an ensemble of nucleation trajectories under conditions where spontaneous hydrate nucleation becomes too slow to occur in direct simulation. The convergence of the obtained hydrate nucleation rate was found to depend crucially on the convergence of the spatial distribution for the spontaneously formed hydrate seeds obtained from the initial sampling of FFS. The validity of the approach is also verified by the agreement between the calculated nucleation rate and that inferred from the direct simulation. Analyzing the obtained large ensemble of hydrate nucleation trajectories, we show hydrate formation at 220 K and 500 bar is initiated by the nucleation events occurring in the vicinity of water-methane interface, and facilitated by a gradual transition from amorphous to crystalline structure. The latter provides the direct support to the proposed two-step nucleation mechanism of methane hydrate. PMID:24849698

  11. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON GAS HYDRATE FORMATION IN PRESENCE OF ADDITIVE COMPONENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhigao; FAN Shuanshi; GUO Kaihua

    2003-01-01

    Additives were used to increase gas hydrate formation rate and storage capacity. Experimental tests of methane hydrate formation were carried out in surfactant water solutions in a high-pressure cell.Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG) were used to increase hydrate formation. The effect of SDS on hydrate formation is more pronounced compared APG. Cyclopentane (CP) also improves hydrate formation rates while it cannot increase methane gas storage capacity.

  12. Compressive Strength and Hydration Process of Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) mixed with Sea Water, Marine Sand and Portland Composite Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Tjaronge, M.Wihardi

    2013-01-01

    As the world's largest archipelagic state, Indonesia consists with more than 18,000 islands and over 7.9 million square kilometres of sea. This present study is a part of research work to accelerate the sustainable infrastructure development in distant islands in addressing the lack of infrastructure and environment issues. The utilization of sea water and marine sand can reduce the consumption of fresh water and river sand, therefore decrease the price of concrete work in the low land area...

  13. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    OpenAIRE

    Takeshi Sugahara; Kei Takeya; Mikio Nakagoshi; Takashi Minami; Atsushi Tani; Naohiro Kobayashi; Kazunari Ohgaki

    2012-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane) hydrate (prepared with deuterated water) were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently tra...

  14. Structure and stability of phospholipid bilayers hydrated by a room-temperature ionic liquid/water solution: a neutron reflectometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Antonio; Heinrich, Frank; Gonzalez, Miguel A; Fragneto, Giovanna; Watkins, Erik; Ballone, Pietro

    2014-10-23

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) measurements were carried out to probe the structure and stability of two model biomembranes consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) phospholipid bilayers hydrated by water solutions of two prototypical room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), namely, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and choline chloride ([Chol][Cl]) at concentrations of 0.1 M and 0.5 M, respectively. The raw data were analyzed by fitting a distribution of scattering length densities arising from the different chemical species in the system. The results of this analysis show that (a) for all systems and concentrations that we considered, the thickness of the bilayers shrinks by ∼1 Å upon dissolving the ionic liquid into water and that (b) the RTIL ions enter the bilayer, finding their way to a preferred location in the lipid range that is nearly independent of the lipid and of the [bimim](+) or [Chol](+) choice. The volume fraction of RTIL sorbed in/on the bilayer, however, does depend on the lipid, but, again, is the same for [bmim][Cl] and for [Chol][Cl]. Thus, the RTIL occupies ∼5% of the bilayer volume in POPC, rising to ∼10% in DMPC. Repeating the measurements and data analysis after rinsing in pure water shows that the changes in the bilayer due to the RTIL sorption are irreversible and that a measurable amount of IL remains in the lipid fraction, that is, ∼2.5% of the bilayer volume in POPC and ∼8% in DMPC. PMID:25251987

  15. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  16. 消石灰对沥青混合料的抗水性能分析%The Effect of Hydrated Lime on Water Resistant Properties of Asphalt Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟杰

    2011-01-01

    From the theosefical analysis of the performances of asphalt mixture,it is shown that adding lime hydrate can improve its water resistance,and enhances the bond strength between asphalt and aggregate. Meanwhile,the amount of hydrated lime and the amount of asphalt are discassed. The optimal amount of hydrated lime is 1% to 2% ,and it should not be used too much. In addition,if hydrated lime is increased, the asphalt must have a corresponding increase.%根据消石灰改善沥青混合料的性能,分析了消石灰的用量对沥青混合料抵抗水损害的影响以及消石灰的用量与沥青用量之间的关系.通过试验对比证明消石灰的加入可以改善沥青混合料的抗水性能,提高沥青与集料间的粘结强度.消石灰的掺入量在1%~2%之间为宜,消石灰的加入,还须增加相应的沥青用量,提高油石比.

  17. Some theoretical considerations concerning ion hydration in the case of ion transfer between water and 1,2-dichloroethane

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, C; Baruzzi, A M; Leiva, E P M

    1997-01-01

    Some aspects of direct ion transfer across the water/1,2-dichloroethane are analyzed using a very simple model based on thermodynamic considerations. It was concluded that ion solvation by water molecules may occur in some particular cases in the organic phase, delivering an important contribution to the Gibbs free energy of ion transfer between the aqueous and the organic phase. In general terms, this particular type of transfer should be favored in the case of highly charged small ions at interfaces with a relatively low surface tension and a large difference between the reciprocal of the corresponding dielectric constants.

  18. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  19. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  20. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  1. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissocation in a Partially Saturated Sand--Measurements and Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Freifeld, Barry; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind

    2005-03-01

    We performed a sequence of tests on a partially water-saturated sand sample contained in an x-ray transparent aluminum pressure vessel that is conducive to x-ray computed tomography (CT) observation. These tests were performed to gather data for estimation of thermal properties of the sand/water/gas system and the sand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as well as data to evaluate the kinetic nature of hydrate dissociation. The tests included mild thermal perturbations for the estimation of the thermal properties of the sand/water/gas system, hydrate formation, thermal perturbations with hydrate in the stability zone, hydrate dissociation through thermal stimulation, additional hydrate formation, and hydrate dissociation through depressurization with thermal stimulation. Density changes throughout the sample were observed as a result of hydrate formation and dissociation, and these processes induced capillary pressure changes that altered local water saturation.

  2. Aquaporins are critical for provision of water during lactation and intrauterine progeny hydration to maintain tsetse fly reproductive success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua B Benoit

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies undergo drastic fluctuations in their water content throughout their adult life history due to events such as blood feeding, dehydration and lactation, an essential feature of the viviparous reproductive biology of tsetse. Aquaporins (AQPs are transmembrane proteins that allow water and other solutes to permeate through cellular membranes. Here we identify tsetse aquaporin (AQP genes, examine their expression patterns under different physiological conditions (blood feeding, lactation and stress response and perform functional analysis of three specific genes utilizing RNA interference (RNAi gene silencing. Ten putative aquaporins were identified in the Glossina morsitans morsitans (Gmm genome, two more than has been previously documented in any other insect. All organs, tissues, and body parts examined had distinct AQP expression patterns. Two AQP genes, gmmdripa and gmmdripb ( = gmmaqp1a and gmmaqp1b are highly expressed in the milk gland/fat body tissues. The whole-body transcript levels of these two genes vary over the course of pregnancy. A set of three AQPs (gmmaqp5, gmmaqp2a, and gmmaqp4b are expressed highly in the Malpighian tubules. Knockdown of gmmdripa and gmmdripb reduced the efficiency of water loss following a blood meal, increased dehydration tolerance and reduced heat tolerance of adult females. Knockdown of gmmdripa extended pregnancy length, and gmmdripb knockdown resulted in extended pregnancy duration and reduced progeny production. We found that knockdown of AQPs increased tsetse milk osmolality and reduced the water content in developing larva. Combined knockdown of gmmdripa, gmmdripb and gmmaqp5 extended pregnancy by 4-6 d, reduced pupal production by nearly 50%, increased milk osmolality by 20-25% and led to dehydration of feeding larvae. Based on these results, we conclude that gmmDripA and gmmDripB are critical for diuresis, stress tolerance and intrauterine lactation through the regulation of water and

  3. Kinetics of phycocyanobilin cleavage from C-phycocyanin by methanolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malwade, Chandrakant Ramkrishna; Roda Serrat, Maria Cinta; Christensen, Knud Villy;

    2016-01-01

    Phycocyanobilin (PCB) is an important linear tetrapyrrolic molecule for food as well as pharmaceutical industry. It is obtained from blue-green algae, where it is attached covalently to phycobiliproteins (C-PC and APC) present in the light harvesting complexes. In this work, cleavage of PCB from...... phycobiliproteins present in the extract of Arthrospira platensis by methanolysis is investigated. Different initial concentrations (25 mg/mL, 10 mg/mL, and 5 mg/mL) of proteins are used in order to investigate the effect of protein aggregation on process yield. A kinetic model is developed by fitting...... the experimental data for methanolysis. Results show that the kinetics follows a pseudo first order kinetics and remains unaffected due to the different initial concentration of phycobiliproteins. Moreover, yield of PCB in the cleavage process is found to be proportional to the initial concentration...

  4. Influence of DNA on Ag(I)-C-Phycocyanin complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Gelagutashvili, E; Kuchava, N; Bagdavadze, N

    2008-01-01

    The effects of DNA on the fluorescence of silver phycocyanin complexes were investigated. It was shown, that the fluorescence intensity of phycocyanin decreases, when silver ions are added but the following DNA addition gives rise to fluorescence buildup. Fluorescence spectroscopy provides insight of silver phycocyanin interactions. Fluorescence measurements demostrate phycocyanin quenching of silver emission intensities. SternVolmer quenching constant was obtained from the linear quenching plot. Blue shifts in the fluorescence spectra were observed during silver binding to phycocyanin.

  5. Influence of DNA on Ag(I)-C-Phycocyanin complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Gelagutashvili, E.; Ginturi, E.; Kuchava, N.; Bagdavadze, N.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of DNA on the fluorescence of silver phycocyanin complexes were investigated. It was shown, that the fluorescence intensity of phycocyanin decreases, when silver ions are added but the following DNA addition gives rise to fluorescence buildup. Fluorescence spectroscopy provides insight of silver phycocyanin interactions. Fluorescence measurements demostrate phycocyanin quenching of silver emission intensities. SternVolmer quenching constant was obtained from the linear quenching p...

  6. Origin and character of gaseous hydrocarbons in the hydrate and non-hydrate charged sediments on the Norway - Svalbard margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaular, Espen Nesheim

    2011-05-15

    Gas incubated in clathrate water-structures, stabilizes the hydrogen bonded substance termed gas hydrate. In the marine environment vast amount of carbon is stored as gas hydrates within the temperature and pressure zone these ice-like structures are stable. Natural gas hydrate mapping and characterization is important basic research that brings about critical knowledge concerning various topics. Natural gas hydrates is a vital part of the carbon cycle, it is a potential energy resource (and thereby a potential climate agent) and it is a potential geo-hazard. One of the goals the GANS initiative aimed at exploring, was the hydrate bearing sediment of the Norway -Svalbard margins, to investigate the character and expansion of natural gas hydrates. Part of the investigation was to define how the gas in the hydrated sediment was produced and where it came from. As a result this thesis addresses the matter of light hydrocarbon characterization and origin in two Norwegian hydrate deposits. On cruises to Vestnesa on the Svalbard margin and to Nyegga in the mid-Norwegian margin, samples of hydrate charged and non-hydrate charged sediments were obtained and analyzed. Through compositional and isotopic analyses the origin of the hydrate bound gas in the fluid escape feature G11 at Nyegga was determined. The hydrate incubated methane is microbial produced as well as parts of the hydrate bound ethane. The compositional analysis in both the Nyegga area and at the Vestnesa Ridge points at thermogenic contributions in the sediment interstitials and pore water. The two hydrate bearing margins show large differences in hydrocarbon content and microbial activity in the pockmarks investigated. The gravity cores from the penetrated pockmark at Vestnesa showed low hydrocarbon content and thus suggest ceased or periodic venting. The fluid flow escape features at Nyegga show large variety of flux rates based on ROV monitoring and headspace analysis of the sediment and pore water. The

  7. Critical pressure and multiphase flow in Blake Ridge gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, P.B.; Liu, Xiuying; Winters, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    We use core porosity, consolidation experiments, pressure core sampler data, and capillary pressure measurements to predict water pressures that are 70% of the lithostatic stress, and gas pressures that equal the lithostatic stress beneath the methane hydrate layer at Ocean Drilling Program Site 997, Blake Ridge, offshore North Carolina. A 29-m-thick interconnected free-gas column is trapped beneath the low-permeability hydrate layer. We propose that lithostatic gas pressure is dilating fractures and gas is migrating through the methane hydrate layer. Overpressured gas and water within methane hydrate reservoirs limit the amount of free gas trapped and may rapidly export methane to the seafloor.

  8. Hydrate control for WAG injection in the Ekofisk field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lekvam, Knut; Surguchev, Leonid M.; Ekrann, Steinar; Svartaas, Thor Martin; Kelland, Malcolm; Nilsson, Svante; Oevsthus, Jorun; Gjoevikli, Nils B.

    1997-12-31

    The report relates to a hydrate formation project for the Ekofisk field on the Norwegian continental shelf. To remove the possible hydrate formation problems during WAG (Water Alternating Gas) treatment, the following project was conducted to estimate roughly the distance from the injection well that hydrate formation can be prevented by whatever treatment is most appropriate. The first aim was to test experimentally whether selected kinetic hydrate inhibitors could be used, and in which concentrations and quantities. In addition evaluations were done to calculate the required volume of the inhibitor solutions that have to be injected to prevent mixing of uninhibited water and gas. 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  10. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: A new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.J.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Yang, M.Z.

    2006-01-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition. ?? 2006 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  11. Phase Transition of Methane Gas Hydrate and Response of Marine Gas Hydrate Systems to Environmental Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.

    2003-12-01

    Gas hydrates, which contain mostly methane as the gas component in marine sediment, are stable under relatively high pressure and low temperature conditions such as those found along continental margins and permafrost regions. Its stability is mostly controlled by in-situ pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid. Environmentally introduced changes in pressure and temperature can affect the stability of gas hydrate in marine sediment. While certain changes may enhance the process of gas hydrate formation, we are much more interested in the resultant dissociation processes, which may contribute to sub-marine slope instability, seafloor sediment failure, formation of mud volcanoes and pock marks, potential vulnerability of engineering structures, and the risk to drilling and production. We have been developing models to quantify phase transition processes of marine gas hydrates and to investigate the response of marine gas hydrate systems to environmental changes. Methane gas hydrate system is considered as a three-component (water, methane, salt) four-phase (liquid, gas, hydrate, halite) system. Pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid constrain the stability of gas hydrate and affect phase transition processes via their effects on methane solubility and fluid density and enthalpy. Compared to the great quantity of studies on its stability in the literature, in-depth research on phase transition of gas hydrate is surprisingly much less. A method, which employs pressure, enthalpy, salinity and methane content as independent variables, is developed to calculate phase transition processes of the three-component four-phase system. Temperature, an intensive thermodynamic parameter, is found not sufficient in describing phase transition of gas hydrate. The extensive thermodynamic parameter enthalpy, on the other hand, is found to be sufficient both in calculation of the phase transition processes and in modeling marine gas hydrate systems. Processes

  12. Authigenic gypsum found in gas hydrate-associated sediments from Hydrate Ridge, the eastern North Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiasheng; Erwin Suess; Dirk Rickert

    2004-01-01

    Characteristic gypsum micro-sphere and granular mass were discovered by binocular microscope in the gas hydrate-associated sediments at cores SO143-221 and SO143/TVG40-2A respectively on Hydrate Ridge of Cascadia margin, the eastern North Pacific. XRD patterns and EPA analyses show both micro-sphere and granular mass of the crystals have the typical peaks and the typical main chemical compositions of gypsum, although their weight percents are slightly less than the others in the non-gas hydrate-associated marine regions. SEM pictures show that the gypsum crystals have clear crystal boundaries, planes, edges and cleavages of gypsum in form either of single crystal or of twin crystals. In view of the fact that there are meanwhile gas hydrate-associated authigenic carbonates and SO42(-rich pore water in the same sediment cores, it could be inferred reasonably that the gypsums formed also authigenically in the gas hydrate-associated environment too, most probably at the interface between the downward advecting sulfate-rich seawater and the below gas hydrate, which spilled calcium during its formation on Hydrate Ridge. The two distinct forms of crystal intergrowth, which are the granular mass of series single gypsum crystals at core SO143/TVG40-2A and the microsphere of gypsum crystals accompanied with detrital components at core SO143-221 respectively, indicate that they precipitated most likely in different interstitial water dynamic environments. So, the distinct authigenic gypsums found in gas hydrate-associated sediments on Hydrate Ridge could also be believed as one of the parameters which could be used to indicate the presence of gas hydrate in an unknown marine sediment cores.

  13. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf;

    2014-01-01

    as the rhabdophane structure is preserved. The bound hydrate water is accommodated in the rhabdophane structure and is stable at temperatures of up to 650 oC. The thermal stability of the hydrate water and the phosphate structure are of significance for the proton conductivity. The LaPO4·0.6H2O and NdPO4•0.5H2O......Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure...... to the monazite structure upon dehydration. The thermal stability of the hydrate is studied and found to contain water of two types, physically adsorbed and structurally bound hydrate water. The adsorbed water is correlated to the specific surface area and can be reversibly recovered when dehydrated as long...

  14. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  15. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  16. Hydration properties of lanthanoid(III) carbonate complexes in liquid water determined by polarizable molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Fausto; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Vercouter, Thomas; Beuchat, César; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Spezia, Riccardo

    2014-02-28

    In this work we have studied the structure and dynamics of complexes formed by three and four carbonates and a central lanthanoid(III) ion in liquid water by means of polarizable molecular dynamics simulations. With this aim we have developed a force field employing an extrapolation procedure that was previously developed for lanthanoid(III) aqua ions and then we have validated it against DFT-based data. In this way we were able to shed light on properties of the whole series, finding some similarities and differences across the series, and to help in interpreting experiments on those systems. We found that the bi-dentate tri-carbonate complexes are the most stable for all the atoms, but a variation of the number of water molecules in the first ion shell, and the associated exchange dynamics, is observed from lighter to heavier elements. On the other hand, for four-carbonate systems only one water molecule is observed in the first shell, with 10-20% probability, for La(III) and Ce(III), while for the rest of the series it seems impossible for a water molecule to enter the first ion shell in the presence of such an excess of carbonate ligands. Finally, the good performance of our extrapolation procedure, based on ionic radii, makes us confident in extending such approaches to study the structure and dynamics of other systems in solution containing Ln(III) and An(III) ions. This parametrization method results particularly useful since it does not need expensive quantum chemistry calculations for all the atoms in the series.

  17. Micromechanical cohesion force measurements to determine cyclopentane hydrate interfacial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Joshi, Sanjeev E; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2012-06-15

    Hydrate aggregation and deposition are critical factors in determining where and when hydrates may plug a deepwater flowline. We present the first direct measurement of structure II (cyclopentane) hydrate cohesive forces in the water, liquid hydrocarbon and gas bulk phases. For fully annealed hydrate particles, gas phase cohesive forces were approximately twice that obtained in a liquid hydrocarbon phase, and approximately six times that obtained in the water phase. Direct measurements show that hydrate cohesion force in a water-continuous bulk may be only the product of solid-solid cohesion. When excess water was present on the hydrate surface, gas phase cohesive forces increased by a factor of three, suggesting the importance of the liquid or quasi-liquid layer (QLL) in determining cohesive force. Hydrate-steel adhesion force measurements show that, when the steel surface is coated with hydrophobic wax, forces decrease up to 96%. As the micromechanical force technique is uniquely capable of measuring hydrate-surface forces with variable contact time, the present work contains significant implications for hydrate applications in flow assurance. PMID:22484169

  18. Terahertz spectroscopy of concrete for evaluating the critical hydration level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Nallappan, Kathirvel; Sasmal, Saptarshi; Pesala, Bala

    2014-03-01

    Concrete, a mixture of cement, coarse aggregate, sand and filler material (if any), is widely used in the construction industry. Cement, mainly composed of Tricalcium Silicate (C3S) and Dicalcium Silicate (C2S) reacts readily with water, a process known as hydration. The hydration process forms a solid material known as hardened cement paste which is mainly composed of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H), Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. To quantify the critical hydration level, an accurate and fast technique is highly desired. However, in conventional XRD technique, the peaks of the constituents of anhydrated and hydrated cement cannot be resolved properly, where as Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy has low penetration depth and hence cannot be used to determine the hydration level of thicker concrete samples easily. Further, MIR spectroscopy cannot be used to effectively track the formation of Calcium Hydroxide, a key by-product during the hydration process. This paper describes a promising approach to quantify the hydration dynamics of cement using Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. This technique has been employed to track the time dependent reaction mechanism of the key constituents of cement that react with water and form the products in the hydrated cement, viz., C-S-H, Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. This study helps in providing an improved understanding on the hydration kinetics of cement and also to optimise the physio-mechanical characteristics of concrete.

  19. Effect of Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K.E.; Park, J.M.; Kim, C.U.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Research Inst. of Chemical Technology, Jang-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrates are formed from water and natural gas molecules at particular temperatures and pressures that become ice-like inclusion compounds. Gas hydrates offer several benefits such as energy resource potential and high storage capacity of natural gas in the form of hydrates. However, the application of natural gas hydrates has been deterred by its low formation rate and low conversion ratio of water into hydrate resulting in low actual storage capacity. This paper presented an experimental study to determine the effect of adding a novel Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation. The experimental study was described with reference to the properties of prepared diols and properties of prepared disulfonates. Gemini surfactant is the family of surfactant molecules possessing more than one hydrophobic tail and hydrophilic head group. They generally have better surface-active properties than conventional surfactants of equal chain length. The paper presented the results of the study in terms of the reactions of diols with propane sultone; storage capacity of hydrate formed with and without surfactant; and methane hydrate formation with and without disulfonate. It was concluded that the methane hydrate formation was accelerated by the addition of novel anionic Gemini-type surfactants and that hydrate formation was influenced by the surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. For a given concentration, the surfactant with the highest chain length demonstrated the highest formation rate and storage capacity. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  20. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  1. Octa-coordination and the hydrated Ba2+(aq) ion

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I; Rempe, Susan B

    2014-01-01

    The hydration structure of Ba^{2+} ion is important for understanding blocking mechanisms in potassium ion channels. Here, we combine statistical mechanical theory, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, and electronic structure methods to calculate the hydration free energy and local hydration structure of Ba^{2+}(aq). The predicted hydration free energy (-302.9$\\pm$0.7 kcal/mol) matches the experimental value (-302.56 kcal/mol) when the fully occupied and exclusive inner solvation shell is treated. In the local environment defined by the inner and first shell of hydrating waters, Ba^{2+} is directly coordinated by eight (8) waters. Octa-coordination resembles the structure of Ba^{2+} and K^+ bound in potassium ion channels, but differs from the local hydration structure of K^+(aq) determined earlier.

  2. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  4. Rapid and highly selective removal of lead from water using graphene oxide-hydrated manganese oxide nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shunli; He, Feng; Wu, Jiayu; Wan, Wubo; Gu, Yawei; Gao, Bin

    2016-08-15

    To overcome the limits of graphene oxide (GO) as a novel sorbent for heavy metal removal (e.g., low sorption selectivity and difficulty in solid-liquid separation), a nanocomposite (HMO@GO) with excellent settling ability (oxide (HMO) (10.8±4.1nm) on GO. As a graphene-based adsorbent, HMO@GO exhibited fast sorption kinetics (500mgg(-1)) in the presence of high-level competing Ca(II). Cyclic sorption batches showed that 1kg HMO@GO can treat at least 22m(3) Pb(II)-laden synthetic industrial drainage (5mgL(-1) Pb(II)) and 40m(3) drinking water (0.5mgL(-1) Pb(II)) to their corresponding limits (0.1mgL(-1) for wastewater and 10μgL(-1) for drinking water) enforced in China. Additionally, the exhausted HMO@GO can be effectively regenerated using 0.3 M HCl for repeated uses. The eminent performance of HMO@GO was attributed to its specific structure, that is, the abundant oxygen-containing groups on GO mediated the growth of highly dispersed HMO that preferably sequestrated Pb(II) through specific interaction, and the host GO offered the preconcentration of Pb(II) for enhanced sequestration through the Donnan membrane effect. PMID:27107233

  5. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures: The σ of CH4 Hydrate + Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stern, Laura A. [U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Constable, Steven [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Weitemeyer, Karen A. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom), Univ. of Southampton Waterfront Campus, Southampton (United Kingdom); Smith, Megan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, Jeffery J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. We built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. We report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. Finally, these results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  6. Nuclear Well Log Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchwell, A.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing gas hydrate in a reservoir typically involves a full suite of geophysical well logs. The most common method involves using resistivity measurements to quantify the decrease in electrically conductive water when replaced with gas hydrate. Compressional velocity measurements are also used because the gas hydrate significantly strengthens the moduli of the sediment. At many gas hydrate sites, nuclear well logs, which include the photoelectric effect, formation sigma, carbon/oxygen ratio and neutron porosity, are also collected but often not used. In fact, the nuclear response of a gas hydrate reservoir is not known. In this research we will focus on the nuclear log response in gas hydrate reservoirs at the Mallik Field at the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nuclear logs may add increased robustness to the investigation into the properties of gas hydrates and some types of logs may offer an opportunity to distinguish between gas hydrate and permafrost. For example, a true formation sigma log measures the thermal neutron capture cross section of a formation and pore constituents; it is especially sensitive to hydrogen and chlorine in the pore space. Chlorine has a high absorption potential, and is used to determine the amount of saline water within pore spaces. Gas hydrate offers a difference in elemental composition compared to water-saturated intervals. Thus, in permafrost areas, the carbon/oxygen ratio may vary between gas hydrate and permafrost, due to the increase of carbon in gas hydrate accumulations. At the Mallik site, we observe a hydrate-bearing sand (1085-1107 m) above a water-bearing sand (1107-1140 m), which was confirmed through core samples and mud gas analysis. We observe a decrease in the photoelectric absorption of ~0.5 barnes/e-, as well as an increase in the formation sigma readings of ~5 capture units in the water-bearing sand as

  7. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...

  8. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Soumpasis, D.M. [Max Planck Inst. for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  9. Formation of hydrate plug within rectangular natural gas passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, K.; Song, M.H.; Ahn, J.H.; Yoo, K.S. [Dong Guk Univ., Joong-ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Oil and gas reservoirs in off-shore shallow areas are being depleted. At the same time, the industry is expanding its production sites into deeper waters resulting in higher pressure and lower temperature and more isolated locations. In response, connecting pipelines have been extended, but because of these pressure, temperature and distance changes in pipelines, a more favorable condition for hydrate formation is created, making the problem of flow assurance more critical for safe and economic operations at deep off-shore oil and gas production sites. Another challenge in flow assurance lies in hydrate formation and potential blockage due to hydrate plugs in gas pipelines, where no free water phase is present. This paper presented an experimental study that examined the formation and the growth of hydrates from a gas mixture of methane and propane with different moisture concentrations. The hydrates were formed in a rectangular passage cooled to temperatures below equilibrium hydrate formation temperature. The paper described the experimental procedure and apparatus that was designed and fabricated for the study. A schematic layout of the hydrate formation and plug test experimental apparatus was illustrated. The paper also described the results of two sets of experiments that were conducted. It was concluded that with enough moisture content, hydrates formed without a fresh water phase under equilibrium conditions. It was also concluded that the results of the study could be used in verifying numerical models developed to predict hydrate plugging of natural gas pipelines. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Ethylene Separation via Hydrate Formation in W/O Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An hybrid absorption-hydration method was adopted to recover C2H4 from C2H4/CH4 binary gas mixtures and the hydrate formation conditions of C2H4/CH4 mixtures was studied experimentally in diesel in water (w/o emulsions. Span 20 at a concentration of 1.0 wt% in the aqueous phase was added to form water in diesel emulsions before hydrate formation and then hydrate in diesel slurry was separated after hydrate formation. The influences of initial gas-liquid volume ratio (53–142, pressure (3.4–5.4 MPa, temperature (274.15–278.15 K, water cuts (10–30 vol%, and the mole fraction of C2H4 in feed gas (13.19–80.44 mol% upon the C2H4 separation efficiency were systematically investigated. The experimental results show that ethylene can be enriched in hydrate slurry phase with high separation factor (S and recovery ratio (R. Most hydrate formation finished in 20 min, after that, the hydrate formation rate became very slow. The conclusion is useful for determining the suitable operation conditions when adopting an absorption-hydration method to separate C2H4/CH4.

  11. A STUDY OF THE HEAT OF HYDRATION OF SULFONIC ACID RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XURongnan; JIJunyan; 等

    1992-01-01

    The heat of hydration of dry sulfonic acid resin in different comcentrations of sulfuric acid has been determined. The heat of hydration of the resin in H2O is 143.4J/g(resin). The greater the concentration of sulfuric acid,the less the heat will be released.The hydrate formed from three sulfonic acid groups and one water molecule is the most stable one of all the hydrates of sulfonic acid resin and water.

  12. Constraining the origin of the Messinian gypsum deposits using coupled measurement of δ^{18}O$/δD in gypsum hydration water and salinity of fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicholas P.; Gázquez, Fernando; McKenzie, Judith A.; Chapman, Hazel J.; Hodell, David A.

    2016-04-01

    We used oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of gypsum hydration water (GHW) coupled with salinity deduced from ice melting temperatures of primary fluid inclusions in the same samples (in tandem with 87Sr/86Sr, δ34S and other isotopic measurements) to determine the composition of the mother fluids that formed the gypsum deposits of the Messinian Salinity Crisis from shallow and intermediate-depth basins. Using this method, we constrain the origin of the Messinian Primary Lower Gypsum (PLG) of the Sorbas basin (Betic foreland) and both the Upper Gypsum (UG) and the Lower Gypsum of the Sicilian basin. We then compare these results to measurements made on UG recovered from the deep Ionian and Balearic basins drilled during DSDP Leg 42A. The evolution of GHW δ18O/δD vs. salinity is controlled by mixing processes between fresh and seawater, coupled with the degree of evaporation. Evaporation and subsequent precipitation of gypsum from fluids dominated by freshwater will result in a depressed 87Sr/86Sr values and different trajectory in δ18O/δD vs. salinity space compared to fluids dominated by seawater. The slopes of these regression equations help to define the end-members from which the fluid originated. For example, salinity estimates from PLG cycle 6 in the Sorbas basin range from 18 to 51ppt, and after correction for fractionation factors, estimated δ18O and δD values of the mother water are low (-2.6 salinity) are within error of the average isotope composition of the modern precipitation and groundwater in this region of SE Spain. This indicates there was a significant contribution of meteoric water during gypsum deposition, while 87Sr/86Sr (0.708942 salinities of fluid inclusions are higher averaging ˜100ppt. In contrast to cycle 6, the intercepts of the regression equations of cycle 2 display more positive δ18O/δD values. While the estimated range in δ18O and δD of the mother water and salinities fall below those expected from the evaporation of seawater

  13. Calculating the thermodynamic characteristics of hydrophobic hydration of chromium(III) and cobalt(III) tris-acetylacetonates in water and regularities of their solvation in aqueous alcoholic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologdin, N. V.; Fabinskii, P. V.; Fedorov, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    Based on the scaled-particle theory, the Gibbs energy of the formation of cavities in the structure of water and some alcohols are calculated for the processes of dissolution of cobalt(III) and chromium(III) tris-acetylacetonates. The contribution from the hydrophobic hydration of the tris-acetylacetonate molecules in water is calculated. The location of the inversion area is clarified for a number of aqueous alcoholic solvents, and the effect the solvent's macrophysical parameters have on the patterns of tris-acetylacetonate solvation is analyzed.

  14. Effects of salinity on methane gas hydrate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using an approximately analytical formation,we extend the steady state model of the pure methane hydrate system to include the salinity based on the dynamic model of the methane hydrate system.The top and bottom boundaries of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) and the actual methane hydrate zone (MHZ),and the top of free gas occurrence are determined by using numerical methods and the new steady state model developed in this paper.Numerical results show that the MHZ thickness becomes thinner with increasing the salinity,and the stability is lowered and the base of the MHSZ is shifted toward the seafloor in the presence of salts.As a result,the thickness of actual hydrate occurrence becomes thinner compared with that of the pure water case.On the other hand,since lower solubility reduces the amount of gas needed to form methane hydrate,the existence of salts in seawater can actually promote methane gas hydrate formation in the hydrate stability zone.Numerical modeling also demonstrates that for the salt-water case the presence of methane within the field of methane hydrate stability is not sufficient to ensure the occurrence of gas hydrate,which can only form when the methane concentration dissolved in solution with salts exceeds the local methane solubility in salt water and if the methane flux exceeds a critical value corresponding to the rate of diffusive methane transport.In order to maintain gas hydrate or to form methane gas hydrate in marine sediments,a persistent supplied methane probably from biogenic or thermogenic processes,is required to overcome losses due to diffusion and advection.

  15. Hydrate pingoes at Nyegga: some characteristic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrate pingoes were observed on the seafloor during two different remotely operated vehicle (ROV)-dives, conducted by Statoil at complex-pockmark G11, at Nyegga, off Mid-Norway. Confirmation that these structures actually represent hydrate ice-cored sediment mounds (pingoes), was done by other investigators (Ivanov et al., 2006). Because it is expected that hydrate pingoes represent relatively dynamic seafloor topographic structures and that their shape and size most probably will change over relatively short time, it is important to know how to recognise them visually. Hovland and Svensen (2006) highlighted five different characteristic aspects that define hydrate pingoes on the sea floor: 1) They are dome- or disc-shaped features, which may attain any size from ~0.5 m in height and upwards. Inside pockmark G11, they were up to 1 m high. 2) They are circular or oval in plan view and may attain lateral sizes on the seafloor ranging upwards from ~0.5 m. Inside G11 they had lengths of several metres and widths of up to 4 m. 3) They have dense communities of organisms growing on their surfaces. At G11, they were overgrown with small pogonophoran tube-worms. 4) They have patches of white or grey bacterial mats growing on their surface, indicating advection (seepage) of reduced pore-waters. 5) They have small pits and patches of fluidized sediments on their surface, indicating pit corrosion of the sub-surface gas hydrate. Because gas hydrates often form in high-porosity, near-surface sediments, where water is readily available, it is thought that they will build up at locations where gases are actively migrating upwards from depth. However, gas hydrates are not stable in the presence of ambient seawater, as seawater is deficient in guest molecule gases (normally methane). Therefore, they tend to build up below surface above conduits for gas flow from depth. But, the near-surface hydrate ice-lenses will continually be corroded by seawater circulating into the sediments

  16. Coupled THCM Modeling of Gas Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, M. J.; Gai, X., Sr.; Shastri, A.; Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline clathrate compounds made of water and a low molecular gas, like methane. Gas hydrates are generally present in oil-producing areas and in permafrost regions. Methane hydrate deposits can lead to large-scale submarine slope failures, blowouts, platform foundation failures, and borehole instability. Gas hydrates constitute also an attractive source of energy as they are estimated to contain very large reserves of methane. Hydrate formation, dissociation and methane production from hydrate bearing sediments are coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) processes that involve, amongst other, exothermic formation and endothermic dissociation of hydrate and ice phases, mixed fluid flow and large changes in fluid pressure. A comprehensive THM formulation is briefly presented here. Momentum balance, mass balance and energy balance equations take into consideration the interaction among all phases (i.e. solid, liquid, gas, hydrates and ice) and mechanical equilibrium. Constitutive equations describe the intrinsic THM behavior of the sediment. Simulation results conducted for hydrate bearing sediments subjected to boundary conditions highlight the complex interaction among THM processes in hydrate bearing sediments.

  17. Hydration process in Portland cement blended with activated coal gangue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-ping LIU; Pei-ming WANG; Min-ju DING

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the hydration of a blend of Portland cement and activated coal gangue in order to determine the relationship between the degree of hydration and compressive strength development.The hydration process was investigated by various means:isothermal calorimetry,thermal analysis,non-cvaporable water measurement,and X-ray diffraction analysis.The results show that the activated coal gangue is a pozzolanic material that contributes to the hydration of the cement blend.The pozzolanic reaction occurs over a period of between 7 and 90 d,consuming portlandite and forming both crystal hydrates and ill-crystallized calcium silicate hydrates.These hydrates are similar to those found in pure Portland cement.The results show that if activated coal gangue is substituted for cement at up to 30% (w/w),it does not significantly affect the final compressive strength of the blend.A long-term compressive strength improvement can in fact be achieved by using activated coal gangue as a supplementary cementing material.The relationship between compressive strength and degree of hydration for both pure Portland cement and blended cement can be described with the same equation.However,the parameters are different since blended cement produces fewer calcium silicate hydrates than pure Portland cement at the same degree of hydration.

  18. Hydration behaviour of polyhydroxylated fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Zavala, J G [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de Los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon S/N, 47460 Jalisco (Mexico); Barajas-Barraza, R E [Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, Periferico Sur, Manuel Gomez MorIn No 8585, 45604 Jalisco (Mexico); Padilla-Osuna, I; Guirado-Lopez, R A, E-mail: jgrz@culagos.udg.mx, E-mail: ebarajas@iteso.mx, E-mail: ismael@ifisica.uaslp.mx, E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2011-10-28

    We have performed semi-empirical as well as density functional theory calculations in order to analyse the hydration properties of both bare C{sub 60} and highly hydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes. In all of our calculations, a total of 42 and 98 water molecules are always surrounding our here-considered carbon nanostructures. We found different wetting properties as a function of the chemical composition and structure of the OH-molecular over-layer covering the fullerene surface. In the case of bare C{sub 60}, water adsorption reveals that the H{sub 2}O species are not uniformly arranged around the carbon network but rather forms water droplets of different sizes, clearly revealing the hydrophobic nature of the C{sub 60} structure. In contrast, in the polyhydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes, the degree of wetting is strongly influenced by the precise location of the hydroxyl groups. We found that different adsorbed configurations for the OH-molecular coating can lead to the formation of partially hydrated or completely covered C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} compounds, a result that could be used to synthesize fullerene materials with different degrees of wettability. By comparing the relative stability of our hydroxylated structures in both bare and hydrated conditions we obtain that the energy ordering of the C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomers can change in the presence of water. The radial distribution function of our hydrated fullerenes reveals that water near these kinds of surfaces is densely packed. In fact, by counting the number of H{sub 2}O molecules which are adsorbed, by means of hydrogen bonds, to the surface of our more stable C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomer, we found that it varies in the range of 5-10, in good agreement with experiments. Finally, by comparing the calculated optical absorption spectra of various C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} structures in the presence and absence of water molecules, we note that only slight variations in the position and

  19. Micelle Structure and Hydrophobic Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joshua A; Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2015-08-26

    Despite the ubiquity and utility of micelles self-assembled from aqueous surfactants, longstanding questions remain regarding their surface structure and interior hydration. Here we combine Raman spectroscopy with multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) to probe the hydrophobic hydration of surfactants with various aliphatic chain lengths, and either anionic (carboxylate) or cationic (trimethylammonium) head groups, both below and above the critical micelle concentration. Our results reveal significant penetration of water into micelle interiors, well beyond the first few carbons adjacent to the headgroup. Moreover, the vibrational C-D frequency shifts of solubilized deuterated n-hexane confirm that it resides in a dry, oil-like environment (while the localization of solubilized benzene is sensitive to headgroup charge). Our findings imply that the hydrophobic core of a micelle is surrounded by a highly corrugated surface containing hydrated non-polar cavities whose depth increases with increasing surfactant chain length, thus bearing a greater resemblance to soluble proteins than previously recognized. PMID:26222042

  20. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  1. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  2. Microstructural characteristics of natural gas hydrates hosted in various sand sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Song, Yongchen

    2015-09-21

    Natural gas hydrates have aroused worldwide interest due to their energy potential and possible impact on climate. The occurrence of natural gas hydrates hosted in the pores of sediments governs the seismic exploration, resource assessment, stability of deposits, and gas production from natural gas hydrate reserves. In order to investigate the microstructure of natural gas hydrates occurring in pores, natural gas hydrate-bearing sediments were visualized using microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT). Various types of sands with different grain sizes and wettability were used to study the effect of porous materials on the occurrence of natural gas hydrates. Spatial distributions of methane gas, natural gas hydrates, water, and sands were directly identified. This work indicates that natural gas hydrates tend to reside mainly within pore spaces and do not come in contact with adjacent sands. Such an occurring model of natural gas hydrates is termed the floating model. Furthermore, natural gas hydrates were observed to nucleate at gas-water interfaces as lens-shaped clusters. Smaller sand grain sizes contribute to higher hydrate saturation. The wetting behavior of various sands had little effect on the occurrence of natural gas hydrates within pores. Additionally, geometric properties of the sediments were collected through CT image reconstructions. These findings will be instructive for understanding the microstructure of natural gas hydrates within major global reserves and for future resource utilization of natural gas hydrates. PMID:26277891

  3. Component analysis of the protein hydration entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2012-05-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation entropy in water, which allows us to understand global change in the solvation entropy in terms of local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. This method can be implemented via a combined approach based on molecular dynamics simulation and integral-equation theory of liquids. An illustrative application is made to 42-residue amyloid-beta protein in water. We demonstrate how this method enables one to elucidate the molecular origin for the hydration entropy change upon conformational transitions of protein.

  4. Enzyme hydration, activity and flexibility : A neutron scattering approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkal-Siebert, V [University of Heidelberg; Finney, J.L. [University College, London; Daniel, R. M. [University of Waikato, New Zealand; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Recent measurements have demonstrated enzyme activity at hydrations as low as 3%. The question of whether the hydration-induced enzyme flexibility is important for activity is addressed by performing picosecond dynamic neutron scattering experiments on pig liver esterase powders at various temperatures as well as solutions. At all temperatures and hydrations investigated here, significant quasielastic scattering intensity is found in the protein, indicating the presence of anharmonic, diffusive motion. As the hydration increases a temperature-dependent dynamical transition appears and strengthens involving additional diffusive motion. At low temperature, increasing hydration resulted in lower flexibility of the enzyme. At higher temperatures, systems containing sufficient number of water molecules interacting with the protein exhibit increased flexibility. The implication of these results is that, although the additional hydration-induced diffusive motion and flexibility at high temperatures in the enzyme detected here may be related to increased activity, they are not required for the enzyme to function.

  5. STUDY FOR NATURAL GAS HYDRATE CONVERSED FROM ICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shengjie; SHEN Jiandong; HAO Miaoli; LIU Furong

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are crystalline clathrate compounds composed of water and gases of small molecular diameters that can be used for storage and transport of natural gas as a novel method. In the paper a series of experiments of aspects and kinetics for hydrate formed from natural gas and ice were carried out on the industrial small scale production apparatus. The experimental results show that formation conditions of hydrate conversed from ice are independent of induction time, and bigger degrees of supersaturation and supercooling improved the driving force and advanced the hydrate formation.Superpressure is also favorable for ice particle conversion to hydrate. In addition, it was found there have an optimal reaction time during hydrate formation.

  6. Pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shicai; LIU Changling; YE Yuguang; LIU Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the pore capillary pressure and hydrate saturation in sedi-ments, a new method was proposed. First, the phase equilibria of methane hydrate in fine-grained silica sands were measured. As to the equilibrium data, the pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate were calculated. The results showed that the phase equilibria of methane hydrates in fine-grained silica sands changed due to the depressed activity of pore water caused by the surface group and negatively charged characteristic of silica particles as well as the capillary pressure in small pores together. The capil-lary pressure increased with the increase of methane hydrate saturation due to the decrease of the available pore space. However, the capillary-saturation relationship could not yet be described quantitatively because of the stochastic habit of hydrate growth.

  7. Comparative analysis of growth characteristics of hydrate formation on the surface of suspended water droplet and bubble%悬垂水滴与悬浮气泡表面气体水合物形成特性对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆引哲; 刘道平; 杨亮

    2015-01-01

    Based on a set of high-pressure visual experiment device used for the natural gas hydrates crystallization and growth on the surface of suspended water droplet and suspended bubble,the influence of factors such as pressure,temperature,water quality on the crystallization and growth are analyzed and discussed respectively.Comparative analysis of the experimental phenomena about the characteristics of hydrate formation on the surface of suspended water droplet and bubble was discussed.Temperature and pressure are the important factors of hydrate crystallization and growth.The decrease of temperature or the increase of pressure will also improve the growth of hydrate.This paper also provides experimental support for the development of spray and bubbling method to improve the hydrate formation.%基于悬垂水滴和悬浮气泡表面形成气体水合物的可视化耐高压实验装置,分析探讨了反应压力、温度、水质等因素对水滴和气泡表面气体水合物成核和生长规律的影响。对已有的关于研究单个静止悬垂水滴和悬浮气泡表面气体水合物生长特性的实验现象及结果进行了对比分析,得出结论:温度和压力是影响表面水合物结晶与生长的重要因素;温度的降低或压力的升高均使水合反应速度加快。研究为发展喷雾法和鼓泡法这两种强化制备水合物的方式提供了有效的实验支撑。

  8. Effect of under-inhibition with methanol and ethylene glycol on the hydrate control process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousif, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrate control can be achieved by chemical injection. Currently, methanol and ethylene glycol are the most widely used inhibitors in offshore hydrate control operations. To achieve effective hydrate inhibition, a sufficient amount of inhibitor must be injected to shift the thermodynamic equilibrium condition for hydrate formation outside the pipeline operating pressure and temperature. Recently published field experiments showed that hydrate blockages form more readily in under-inhibited systems than in systems completely without inhibitor. A laboratory study is conducted to determine the effect of low concentration (1--5wt%) methanol and ethylene glycol on the hydrate formation process. The results show that, although these chemicals are effective hydrate inhibitors when added in sufficient quantities, they actually enhance the rate of hydrate formation when added at low concentrations to the water. Furthermore, the presence of these chemicals seems to affect the size of the forming hydrate particles.

  9. Hydration index--a better parameter for explaining small molecule hydration in inhibition of ice recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Ferreira, Sandra S; Czechura, Pawel; Chaytor, Jennifer L; Ben, Robert N

    2008-12-24

    Several simple mono- and disaccharides have been assessed for their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Two carbohydrates were found to be effective recrystallization inhibitors. D-galactose (1) was the best monosaccharide and D-melibiose (5) was the most active disaccharide. The ability of each carbohydrate to inhibit ice growth was correlated to its respective hydration number reported in the literature. A hydration number reflects the number of tightly bound water molecules to the carbohydrate and is a function of carbohydrate stereochemistry. It was discovered that using the absolute hydration number of a carbohydrate does not allow one to accurately predict its ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Consequently, we have defined a hydration index in which the hydration number is divided by the molar volume of the carbohydrate. This new parameter not only takes into account the number of water molecules tightly bound to a carbohydrate but also the size or volume of a particular solute and ultimately the concentration of hydrated water molecules. The hydration index of both mono- and disaccharides correlates well with experimentally measured RI activity. C-Linked derivatives of the monosaccharides appear to have RI activity comparable to that of their O-linked saccharides but a more thorough investigation is required. The relationship between carbohydrate concentration and RI activity was shown to be noncolligative and a 0.022 M solution of D-galactose (1) and C-linked galactose derivative (10) inhibited recrystallization as well as a 3% DMSO solution. The carbohydrates examined in this study did not possess any thermal hysteresis activity (selective depression of freezing point relative to melting point) or dynamic ice shaping. As such, we propose that they are inhibiting recrystallization at the interface between bulk water and the quasi liquid layer (a semiordered interface between ice and bulk water) by disrupting the preordering of water.

  10. Withdrawing Nutrition, Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Module eleven of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version discusses the general aspects of withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining therapies, and presents a specific application to artificial nutrition and hydration.

  11. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  12. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    In this work the nucleation kinetics of propane gas hydrate has been investigated experimentally using a stirred batch reactor. The experiments have been performed isothermally recording the pressure as a function of time. Experiments were conducted at different stirring rates, but in the same...... supersaturation region. The experiments showed that the gas dissolution rate rather than the induction time of propane hydrate is influenced by a change in agitation. This was especially valid at high stirring rates when the water surface was severely disturbed.Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP...... the presence of additives. In most cases reasonable agreement between the data and the model could be obtained. The results revealed that especially the effective surface energy between propane hydrate and water is likely to change when the stirring rate varies from very high to low. The prolongation...

  13. Reflective terahertz (THz) imaging: system calibration using hydration phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Neha; Garritano, James; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Tewari, Priyamvada; Sung, Shijun; Maccabi, Ashkan; Nowroozi, Bryan; Babakhanian, Meghedi; Sanghvi, Sajan; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) hydration sensing continues to gain traction in the medical imaging community due to its unparalleled sensitivity to tissue water content. Rapid and accurate detection of fluid shifts following induction of thermal skin burns as well as remote corneal hydration sensing have been previously demonstrated in vivo using reflective, pulsed THz imaging. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of this technology were recently confirmed in a parallel 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging study, in which burn areas are associated with increases in local mobile water content. Successful clinical translation of THz sensing, however, still requires quantitative assessments of system performance measurements, specifically hydration concentration sensitivity, with tissue substitutes. This research aims to calibrate the sensitivity of a novel, reflective THz system to tissue water content through the use of hydration phantoms for quantitative comparisons of THz hydration imagery.Gelatin phantoms were identified as an appropriate tissue-mimicking model for reflective THz applications, and gel composition, comprising mixtures of water and protein, was varied between 83% to 95% hydration, a physiologically relevant range. A comparison of four series of gelatin phantom studies demonstrated a positive linear relationship between THz reflectivity and water concentration, with statistically significant hydration sensitivities (p < .01) ranging between 0.0209 - 0.038% (reflectivity: %hydration). The THz-phantom interaction is simulated with a three-layer model using the Transfer Matrix Method with agreement in hydration trends. Having demonstrated the ability to accurately and noninvasively measure water content in tissue equivalent targets with high sensitivity, reflective THz imaging is explored as a potential tool for early detection and intervention of corneal pathologies.

  14. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  15. 藻蓝蛋白-光动力疗法治疗小鼠HeLa细胞瘤的免疫和凋亡机制研究%Treatment of Hela Tumor in mice with C-phycocyanin Mediated Photodynamic Therapy and Its Immune Mechanism Underlying Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冰; 褚现明; 高美华

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨藻蓝蛋白介导的光动力疗法治疗小鼠HeLa细胞瘤的免疫和凋亡机制.方法 将HeLa细胞接种于小鼠肋缘皮下脾区构建荷瘤小鼠模型.实验分成3组:对照组、激光照射组、光动力治疗组(PDT组).PDT组:肿瘤局部皮下注射藻蓝蛋白液0.25 ml(约2 g)2 h后以He-Ne激光照射.实验第7 d测瘤块重量,取胸腺、脾脏检测NK细胞活性和T细胞增殖活性.取瘤块制成石蜡包埋切片,采用原位核酸杂交技术、免疫组织化学技术检测肿瘤细胞内CD44、P53、NFκB、Fas基因的表达.结果 与对照组相比,激光照射组NK细胞和免疫T细胞的增殖活性有所增强,肿瘤细胞内抗凋亡基因(Fas)表达量显著增多,而瘤块的重量、肿瘤形成率和抗凋亡基因(P53、NFκB、CD44)明显减少.以上各项指标PDT组与激光组比较,差异亦具有显著或非常显著意义(P>0.05或P<0.01).结论 藻蓝蛋白介导的光动力疗法通过增强机体的免疫力同时启动HeLa细胞内的凋亡信号转导通路诱导细胞凋亡,从而达到杀死肿瘤的目的.%Objective To study the treatment of Hela tumor in mice with C-phycocyanin (C-PC) mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) and its mechanism. Methods HeLa lines were injected into spleen area of mice to establish mice tumor models which then were divided into control group, He-Ne laser radiation group and PDT group. 7 days later, tumor weight, activities of NK cells, proliferation activities of immunocytes were determined. Tumor tissue was cut into sections and the expressions of apoptosis-related genes such as CD44, P53, NfκB and Fas in HeLa cells in vivo were determined by in situ hybridization assays and immunohistochemistry. Results Compared with control group, immunocyte proliferation ability and pro-apoptotic gene expression in He-Ne radiation group were slighthly higher, while the tumor weight and forming rate, anti-apoptotic genes quantities were comparatively lower. When the mice

  16. Effect of localized water uptake on backfill hydration and water movement in a backfilled tunnel: half-scale tests at Aespoe Bentonite Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River (Canada); Jonsson, E. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hansen, J. [Posiva Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland); Hedin, M. [Aangpannefoereningen, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramqvist, G. [Eltekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden)

    2011-04-15

    The report describes the outcome of the work within the project 'SU508.20 Impact of water inflow in deposition tunnels'. Project decision SKB doc 1178871 Version 3.0. Two activity plans have been used for the field work: AP TD SU50820-09-019 and AP TD SU 50820-09-071. SKB and Posiva have been examining those processes that may have particularly strong effects on the evolution of a newly backfilled deposition tunnel in a KBS-3V repository. These assessments have involved the conduct of increasingly large and complex laboratory tests and simulations of a backfilled tunnel section. In this series of four tests, the effect of water inflow into a backfilled tunnel section via an intersecting fracture feature was evaluated. The tests included the monitoring of mock-ups where water entered via the simulated fractures as well as evaluation of what the effect of isolated tunnel sections caused by localized water inflow would have on subsequent evolution of these isolated sections. It was found that even a slowly seeping fracture can have a substantial effect on the backfill evolution as it will cause development of a gasket-like feature that effectively cuts of air and water movement from inner to outer regions of the backfilled tunnel. Water entering via these fractures will ultimately move out of the tunnel via a single discrete flow path, in a manner similar to what was observed in previous 1/2-scale and smaller simulations. If the low-rate of water inflow from fracture is the only source of water inflow to the tunnel this will result in hydraulic behaviour similar to that observed for a single inflow point in previous tests. The presence of a fracture feature will however result in a larger proportion of water uptake by the process of suction than might occur in a point inflow situation and hence a more uniform water distribution will be present in the pellet fill. This also results in a greater tendency for water to be absorbed into the adjacent block fill

  17. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  18. Molecular modeling of the dissociation of methane hydrate in contact with a silica surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Englezos, Peter; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2012-03-15

    We use constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissociation of the fully occupied structure I methane hydrate in a confined geometry between two hydroxylated silica surfaces between 36 and 41 Å apart, at initial temperatures of 283, 293, and 303 K. Simulations of the two-phase hydrate/water system are performed in the presence of silica, with and without a 3 Å thick buffering water layer between the hydrate phase and silica surfaces. Faster decomposition is observed in the presence of silica, where the hydrate phase is prone to decomposition from four surfaces, as compared to only two sides in the case of the hydrate/water simulations. The existence of the water layer between the hydrate phase and the silica surface stabilizes the hydrate phase relative to the case where the hydrate is in direct contact with silica. Hydrates bound between the silica surfaces dissociate layer-by-layer in a shrinking core manner with a curved decomposition front which extends over a 5-8 Å thickness. Labeling water molecules shows that there is exchange of water molecules between the surrounding liquid and intact cages in the methane hydrate phase. In all cases, decomposition of the methane hydrate phase led to the formation of methane nanobubbles in the liquid water phase.

  19. A three-dimensional study on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate in porous sediment by depressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A method to synthesize typical hydrate-bearing samples is proposed. ► Hydrate dissociation in three-dimensional cell occurs throughout the hydrate zone. ► The sharp interface is hardly found during hydrate depressurization dissociation. ► Hydrate dissociation rates at different locations are not uniform. ► Thermal buffering and heat transfer influence on gas production rate of hydrate. - Abstract: A middle-scale reactor equipped with 16 thermocouples was used to investigate the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate in sediment in three dimensions. A method was proposed to form hydrate homogeneously distributed in sediment, i.e., using frozen sand instead of wet sand with pore water. With the formed hydrate sample, hydrate dissociation experiment by depressurization was carried out at a constant pressure of 1.0 MPa. It was found that gas hydrate dissociation occurs throughout the hydrate zone, which controlled by both mass transfer and heat transfer throughout the stages. The sharp-interface is hardly found during the hydrate dissociation. The thermal buffering was observed at the temperature of (271.5–272.2) K during the hydrate dissociation process. The ice arisen from hydrate dissociation slows the hydrate dissociation rate below the ice point, which will affect gas production rate. It may be more reasonable that the depressurization method is used in the initial stage and the thermal stimulation method is used in the later stage in the process of gas recovery from hydrate reservoir.

  20. Are seafloor pockmarks on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand, linked to CO2 hydrates? Gas hydrate stability considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Rose, P. S.; Coffin, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Vast areas of the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand are covered by seafloor pockmarks. Pockmark occurrence appears to be bathymetrically controlled with a band of smaller pockmarks covering areas between 500 and 700 m and large seafloor depressions beneath 800 m water depth. The current depth of the top of methane gas hydrate stability in the ocean is about 500 m and thus, we had proposed that pockmark formation may be linked to methane gas hydrate dissociation during sealevel lowering. However, while seismic profiles show strong indications of fluid flow, geochemical analyses of piston cores do not show any evidence for current or past methane flux. The discovery of Dawsonite, indicative of significant CO2 flux, in a recent petroleum exploration well, together with other circumstantial evidence, has led us to propose that instead of methane hydrate, CO2 hydrate may be linked to pockmark formation. We here present results from CO2 hydrate stability calculations. Assuming water temperature profiles remain unchanged, we predict the upper limit of pockmark occurrence to coincide with the top of CO2 gas hydrate stability during glacial-stage sealevel lowstands. CO2 hydrates may therefore have dissociated during sealevel lowering leading to gas escape and pockmark formation. In contrast to our previous model linking methane hydrate dissociation to pockmark formation, gas hydrates would dissociate beneath a shallow base of CO2 hydrate stability, rather than on the seafloor following upward "grazing" of the top of methane hydrate stability. Intriguingly, at the water depths of the larger seafloor depressions, the base of gas hydrate stability delineates the phase boundary between CO2 hydrates and super-saturated CO2. We caution that because of the high solubility of CO2, dissociation from hydrate to free gas or super-saturated CO2 would imply high concentrations of CO2 and speculate that pockmark formation may be linked to CO2 hydrate dissolution rather than dissociation

  1. Bis(allyl)ruthenium(IV) complexes containing water-soluble phosphane ligands: synthesis, structure, and application as catalysts in the selective hydration of organonitriles into amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadierno, Victorio; Díez, Josefina; Francos, Javier; Gimeno, José

    2010-08-23

    The novel mononuclear ruthenium(IV) complexes [RuCl(2)(eta(3):eta(3)-C(10)H(16))(L)] [L=(meta-sulfonatophenyl)diphenylphosphane sodium salt (TPPMS) (2a), 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphatricyclo[3.3.1.1(3, 7)]decane (PTA) (2b), 1-benzyl-3,5-diaza-1-azonia-7-phosphatricyclo[3.3.1.1(3, 7)]decane chloride (PTA-Bn) (2c), 3,7-diacetyl-1,3,7-triaza-5-phosphabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (DAPTA) (2d), and 2,4,10-trimethyl-1,2,4,5,7,10-hexaaza-3-phosphatricyclo[3.3.1.1(3, 7)]decane (THPA) (2e)] have been synthesized by treatment of the dimeric precursor [{RuCl(mu-Cl)(eta(3):eta(3)-C(10)H(16))}(2)] (C(10)H(16)=2,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1,8-diyl) (1) with two equivalents of the corresponding water-soluble phosphane. Reaction of 1 with one equivalent of the cage-type diphosphane ligand 2,3,5,6,7,8-hexamethyl-2,3,5,6,7,8-hexaaza-1,4-diphosphabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (THDP) allowed also the high-yield preparation of the dinuclear derivative [{RuCl(2)(eta(3):eta(3)-C(10)H(16))}(2)(mu-THDP)] (2f). All these new complexes have been analytically and spectroscopically (IR and multinuclear NMR) characterized. In addition, the structure of 2b, 2c, 2d, and 2f was unequivocally confirmed by X-ray diffraction methods. Complexes 2a-f are active catalysts for the selective hydration of nitriles to amides in pure aqueous medium under neutral conditions. The wide scope of this catalytic transformation has been evaluated by using the most active catalysts [RuCl(2)(eta(3):eta(3)-C(10)H(16))(THPA)] (2e) and [{RuCl(2)(eta(3):eta(3)-C(10)H(16))}(2)(mu-THDP)] (2f). Advantages of using MW versus conventional thermal heating are also discussed. PMID:20586085

  2. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in a PartiallySaturated Core-Scale Sand Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.; Seol,Yongkoo; Freifeld, Barry M.; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind

    2005-11-03

    We performed a sequence of tests on a partiallywater-saturated sand sample contained in an x-ray transparent aluminumpressure vessel that is conducive to x-ray computed tomography (CT)observation. These tests were performed to gather data for estimation ofthermal properties of the sand/water/gas system and thesand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as well as data to evaluate the kineticnature of hydrate dissociation. The tests included mild thermalperturbations for the estimation of the thermal properties of thesand/water/gas system, hydrate formation, thermal perturbations withhydrate in the stability zone, hydrate dissociation through thermalstimulation, additional hydrate formation, and hydrate dissociationthrough depressurization with thermal stimulation. Density changesthroughout the sample were observed as a result of hydrate formation anddissociation, and these processes induced capillary pressure changes thataltered local water saturation.

  3. Calorimetric Determination of Enthalpy of Formation of Natural Gas Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高军; KennethN.Marsh

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of enthalpies of natural gas hydrates in typical natural gas mixture containing methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane at pressure in the vicinity of 2000 kPa (300 psi) and 6900 kPa(1000psi). The measurements were made in a multi-cell differential scanning calorimeter using modified high pressure cells. The enthalpy of water and the enthalpy of dissociation of the gas hydrate were determined from the calorimeter response during slow temperature scanning at constant pressure. The amount of gas released from the dissociation of hydrate was determined from the pumped volume of the high pressure pump. The occupation ratio (mole ratio) of the water to gas and the enthalpy of hydrate formation are subject to uncertainty of 1.5%.The results show that the enthalpy of hydrate formation and the occupation ratio are essentially independent of pressure.

  4. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  5. Methane gas hydrate effect on sediment acoustic and strength properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Pecher, I.A.

    2007-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the interaction of methane gas hydrate with host sediment, we studied: (1) the effects of gas hydrate and ice on acoustic velocity in different sediment types, (2) effect of different hydrate formation mechanisms on measured acoustic properties (3) dependence of shear strength on pore space contents, and (4) pore pressure effects during undrained shear. A wide range in acoustic p-wave velocities (Vp) were measured in coarse-grained sediment for different pore space occupants. Vp ranged from less than 1 km/s for gas-charged sediment to 1.77–1.94 km/s for water-saturated sediment, 2.91–4.00 km/s for sediment with varying degrees of hydrate saturation, and 3.88–4.33 km/s for frozen sediment. Vp measured in fine-grained sediment containing gas hydrate was substantially lower (1.97 km/s). Acoustic models based on measured Vp indicate that hydrate which formed in high gas flux environments can cement coarse-grained sediment, whereas hydrate formed from methane dissolved in the pore fluid may not. The presence of gas hydrate and other solid pore-filling material, such as ice, increased the sediment shear strength. The magnitude of that increase is related to the amount of hydrate in the pore space and cementation characteristics between the hydrate and sediment grains. We have found, that for consolidation stresses associated with the upper several hundred meters of sub-bottom depth, pore pressures decreased during shear in coarse-grained sediment containing gas hydrate, whereas pore pressure in fine-grained sediment typically increased during shear. The presence of free gas in pore spaces damped pore pressure response during shear and reduced the strengthening effect of gas hydrate in sands.

  6. Detecting gas hydrate behavior in crude oil using NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuqiang; House, Waylon; Chapman, Walter G

    2006-04-01

    Because of the associated experimental difficulties, natural gas hydrate behavior in black oil is poorly understood despite its grave importance in deep-water flow assurance. Since the hydrate cannot be visually observed in black oil, traditional methods often rely on gas pressure changes to monitor hydrate formation and dissociation. Because gases have to diffuse through the liquid phase for hydrate behavior to create pressure responses, the complication of gas mass transfer is involved and hydrate behavior is only indirectly observed. This pressure monitoring technique encounters difficulties when the oil phase is too viscous, the amount of water is too small, or the gas phase is absent. In this work we employ proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to observe directly the liquid-to-solid conversion of the water component in black oil emulsions. The technique relies on two facts. The first, well-known, is that water becomes essentially invisible to liquid state NMR as it becomes immobile, as in hydrate or ice formation. The second, our recent finding, is that in high magnetic fields of sufficient homogeneity, it is possible to distinguish water from black oil spectrally by their chemical shifts. By following changes in the area of the water peak, the process of hydrate conversion can be measured, and, at lower temperatures, the formation of ice. Taking only seconds to accomplish, this measurement is nearly direct in contrast to conventional techniques that measure the pressure changes of the whole system and assume these changes represent formation or dissociation of hydrates - rather than simply changes in solubility. This new technique clearly can provide accurate hydrate thermodynamic data in black oils. Because the technique measures the total mobile water with rapidity, extensions should prove valuable in studying the dynamics of phase transitions in emulsions. PMID:16570953

  7. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces

  8. Determination of Hydrazine Hydrate in Water with Paradime Thylaminobenzaldehyde Spectrophotometric Method%对二甲氨基苯甲醛分光光度法测定水中水合肼

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄岭; 李叙柏

    2016-01-01

    在酸性条件下,水合肼与对二甲氨基苯甲醛作用,形成黄色醌式化合物,可用分光光度法对其进行测定。文中主要介绍对二甲氨基苯甲醛分光光度法测定的回收率、相对标准偏差及检出限的复验,并对上海水源水及其出厂水水合肼进行测定。%Hydrazine hydrate can be detected using spectrophotometer,because yellow quinine compound is produced when it reacts with paradime thylaminobenzaldehyde under acidic conditions. In this paper,the recovery rate,relative standard deviation and lowest detection limit of this method were analyzed,and the hydrazine hydrate in the raw water and processed water of three water plants were determined.

  9. Coupled measurements of δ18O and δD of hydration water and salinity of fluid inclusions in gypsum from the Messinian Yesares Member, Sorbas Basin (SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicholas P.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Gázquez, Fernando; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.; Chapman, Hazel J.; Hodell, David A.

    2015-11-01

    We studied one cycle (Cycle 6) of gypsum-marl deposition from the Messinian Yesares Member in Sorbas Basin, Spain. The objective was to reconstruct the changing environment of deposition and its relation to astronomically-forced climate change. The δ18O and δD of gypsum hydration water (CaSO4 • 2H2O) and salinity of fluid inclusions were measured in the same samples to test if they record the composition of the mother fluid from which gypsum was precipitated. Water isotopes are highly correlated with fluid inclusion salinity suggesting the hydration water has not exchanged after formation. The relatively low water isotope values and fluid inclusion salinities indicate a significant influence of meteoric water, whereas δ34S, δ18OSO4 and 87Sr/86Sr support a dominant marine origin for the gypsum deposits. The discrepancy between water and elemental isotope signatures can be reconciled if meteoric water dissolved previously deposited marine sulfates supplying calcium and sulfate ions to the basin which maintained gypsum saturation. This recycling process accounts for the marine δ34S, δ18OSO4 and 87Sr/86Sr signatures, whereas the low δ18O and δD values of gypsum hydration water and fluid inclusion salinities reflect the influence of freshwater. The cyclic deposition of gypsum and marl in the Yesares Member has previously been interpreted to reflect changing climate related to Earth's precession cycle. We demonstrate that the δ18O, δD and salinity of the parent brine increased from low values at the base of the cycle to a maximum in the massive gypsum palisade, and decreased again to lower values in the supercones at the top of the cycle. This pattern, together with changes in mineralogy (calcite-dolomite-gypsum), is consistent with a precession-driven change in climate with wettest conditions (summer insolation maxima) associated with the base of the calcium carbonate marls and driest conditions (summer insolation minima) during formation of the gypsum

  10. Physicochemical and structural studies of clathrate hydrates of tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhova, Irina S; Manakov, Andrey Yu; Komarov, Vladislav Yu; Villevald, Galina V; Burdin, Alexander A; Karpova, Tamara D; Aladko, Eugeny Ya

    2013-03-01

    In this work, physicochemical and structural studies have been carried out for semiclathrate hydrates of linear (un-cross-linked) and cross-linked tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates with different degrees of cross-linking of the polymeric guest molecules (n = 0.5, 1, 2, 3%) and different degrees of substitution of proton ions of carboxylic groups in poly(acrylic acid) for TBA cations (x = 1, 0.8, 0.6). The changes in the hydrates' stability and composition depending on the outlined parameters were examined in the course of phase diagram studies of the binary systems water-tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates using differential thermal analysis method and calorimetric measurements of fusion enthalpies of the hydrates. Phase diagram studies of the binary system water-linear tetrabutylammonium polyacrylate revealed the formation of four hydrates. Based on the data of chemical analysis of hydrate crystals the compositions of all hydrates have been determined. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed a tetragonal structure, space group 4/m, and unit cell parameters are close for different hydrates and lie in the ranges a = 23.4289-23.4713 Å and c = 12.3280-12.3651 Å (150 K). The structure can be related to tetragonal structure I typical for the clathrate hydrates of tetraalkylammonium salts with monomeric anions. Powder X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed the identity of the above crystal structure to that of the hydrates with cross-linked tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates. The behavior of TBA polyacrylate hydrates under the pressure of methane was studied and quantitative assessment of the gas content in the hydrates was made using volumetric analysis method. PMID:23383955

  11. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  12. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We

  13. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-08-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media.

  14. The growth rate of gas hydrate from refrigerant R12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendoush, Abdullah Abbas; Jassim, Najim Abid [Centre of Engineering Physics, Ministry of Sciences and Technology, P.O. Box 765, Baghdad (Iraq); Joudi, Khalid A. [Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2006-07-15

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were presented dealing with three phase direct-contact heat transfer by evaporation of refrigerant drops in an immiscible liquid. Refrigerant R12 was used as the dispersed phase, while water and brine were the immiscible continuous phase. A numerical solution is presented to predict the formation rate of gas hydrates in test column. The solution provided an acceptable agreement when compared with experimental results. The gas hydrate growth rate increased with time. It increased with increasing dispersed phase flow rate. The presence of surface-active sodium chloride in water had a strong inhibiting effect on the gas hydrate formation rate. (author)

  15. EXPERIMENT ON METHANE GAS HYDRATE FORMATION%甲烷水合物储气实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑新; 樊栓狮

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 INTRODUCTION Methane gas hydrates (MGH) are solid phase crystalline inclusion compounds (also called clathrates) that consist of a host water lattice with cavities in which methane gas is caged as a guest gas.Methane gas hydrate might contain 164 volumes (at standard pressure and temperature)of methane and 0.87 volumes of water per volume hydrate.

  16. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  17. Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

    2010-07-01

    To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

  18. Methane Hydrate Distribution from Prolonged and Repeated Formation in Natural and Compacted Sand Samples: X-Ray CT Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily V. L. Rees

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

  19. Experimental study and modeling of the kinetics of refrigerant hydrate formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The kinetics of the hydrate formation of three refrigerant blends is studied. • The refrigerants include three alternative refrigerants R407C, R410A and R507C. • A kinetic model is developed. • The induction time, apparent rate constant and the rate of hydrate formation are particularly studied. • The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the hydrate nucleation rate is investigated. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to identify compatible hydrate forming-refrigerants suitable for air-conditioning systems. The main challenge in designing an air conditioning system which utilises refrigerant hydrates as a media for storage of cold energy is the rate of formation and dissociation of the refrigerant hydrates. Hence, in this experimental study the kinetics of hydrate formation of three refrigerant blends, viz. R407C, R410A and R507C have been investigated. The induction time for hydrate formation, apparent rate constant of the hydrate reaction, water to hydrate conversion during hydrate growth, storage capacity, and the rate of hydrate formation of these refrigerants at various pressures and temperatures have been obtained using a kinetic model. The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the hydrate nucleation rate was also investigated

  20. Properties of Hydrated Alkali Metals Aimed at the Ion Channel Selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Hai-Long; LIU Yu-Zhi; ZHANG Su-Hua; ZHAN Yong; ZHANG Hai-Lin

    2008-01-01

    The hydration structure properties of different alkali metal ions with eight water molecules and potassium ions with different numbers of water molecules are studied using the mixed density functional theory, B3LYP, with 6-311G basis set. The hydration structures are obtained from structure optimization and the optimum numbers of water molecules in the innermost hydration shell for the alkali metal ions are found. Some useful information about the ion channel selectivity is presented.

  1. Hydration effects of deoxyadenosine: A differential calorimetric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robert; Lee, S. A.; Griffey, R. H.; Mohan, V.

    2000-03-01

    The water of hydration is an integral part of the double helical structure of DNA. In order to understand the interactions between water and DNA, we have studied the hydration of the nucleoside deoxyadenosine as a function of relative humidity. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the enthalpy and activation energy of dehydration. These data will be contrasted with the results obtained from guanosine and deoxyguanosine.

  2. Electrical Measurement to Assess Hydration Process and the Porosity Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiaosheng; XIAO Lianzhen; LI Zongjin

    2008-01-01

    The change of electrical resistivity with time at early ages was used to investigate the hydration process and the porosity development. Porosity reduction process of cement-based materials hydration was developed by a proposed method. The porosity reduction is fast at the setting period. The results find that the pore discontinuity occurs faster at lower water/cement ratios than at higher water/cement ratios which is similar to the results of the Percolation method.

  3. Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslin, Mark; Owen, Matthew; Betts, Richard; Day, Simon; Dunkley Jones, Tom; Ridgwell, Andrew

    2010-05-28

    Gas hydrates are ice-like deposits containing a mixture of water and gas; the most common gas is methane. Gas hydrates are stable under high pressures and relatively low temperatures and are found underneath the oceans and in permafrost regions. Estimates range from 500 to 10,000 giga tonnes of carbon (best current estimate 1600-2000 GtC) stored in ocean sediments and 400 GtC in Arctic permafrost. Gas hydrates may pose a serious geohazard in the near future owing to the adverse effects of global warming on the stability of gas hydrate deposits both in ocean sediments and in permafrost. It is still unknown whether future ocean warming could lead to significant methane release, as thermal penetration of marine sediments to the clathrate-gas interface could be slow enough to allow a new equilibrium to occur without any gas escaping. Even if methane gas does escape, it is still unclear how much of this could be oxidized in the overlying ocean. Models of the global inventory of hydrates and trapped methane bubbles suggest that a global 3( degrees )C warming could release between 35 and 940 GtC, which could add up to an additional 0.5( degrees )C to global warming. The destabilization of gas hydrate reserves in permafrost areas is more certain as climate models predict that high-latitude regions will be disproportionately affected by global warming with temperature increases of over 12( degrees )C predicted for much of North America and Northern Asia. Our current estimates of gas hydrate storage in the Arctic region are, however, extremely poor and non-existent for Antarctica. The shrinking of both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets in response to regional warming may also lead to destabilization of gas hydrates. As ice sheets shrink, the weight removed allows the coastal region and adjacent continental slope to rise through isostacy. This removal of hydrostatic pressure could destabilize gas hydrates, leading to massive slope failure, and may increase the risk of

  4. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasol, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  5. The Pore Structure and Hydration Performance of Sulphoaluminate MDF Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Cong-yun; YUAN Run-zhang; LONG Shi-zong

    2004-01-01

    The hydration and pore structure of sulphoaluminate MDF cement were studied by X-ray diffractometer ( XRD ), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimeter ( MIP ) etc. The ex-perimental results indicate that hydration products of the materials are entringites ( Aft ), aluminium hydroxide andCSH (Ⅰ) gel etc. Due to its very low water-cement ratio, hydration function is only confined to the surfaces of ce-ment grains, and there is a lot of sulphoaluminate cement in the hardenite which is unhydrated yet. Hydration re-action was rapidly carried under the condition of the heat-pressing. Therefore cement hydrates Aft, CSH (Ⅰ) andaluminium hydroxide gel fill in pores. The expansibility of Aft makes the porosity of MDF cement lower ( less than1 percent ) and the size of pore smaller (80 percent pore was less than 250A), and enhances its strength.

  6. Particle size and hydration medium effects on hydration properties and sugar release of wheat straw fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat straw is gaining importance as a feedstock for the production of biofuels and high value-added bioproducts. Several pretreatments recover the fermentable fraction involving the use of water or aqueous solutions. Therefore, hydration properties of wheat straw fibers play an important role in improving pretreatment performance. In this study, the water retention capacity (WRC) and swelling of wheat straw fibers were studied using water, propylene glycol (PPG) and an effluent from a H2-producing reactor as the hydration media with three particle sizes (3.35, 2.00 and 0.212 mm). The effects of swelling were analyzed by optical and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The highest WRC was reached with the effluent medium (9.84 ± 0.87 g g−1 in 4 h), followed by PPG (8.52 ± 0.18 g g−1 in 1 h) and water (8.74 ± 0.76 g g−1 in 10 h). The effluent hydration treatment had a synergic effect between the enzymes present and the water. The particle size had a significant effect on the WRC (P < 0.01), the highest values were reached with 3.35 mm fibers. The CLSM images showed that finer fibers were subjected to a shaving effect due to the grinding affecting its capacity to absorb the hydration medium. The microscopic analysis showed the increase in the width of the epidermal cells after the hydration and a more undulating cell wall likely due to the hydration of the amorphous regions in the cellulose microfibrils. The sugar release was determined, achieving the highest glucose content with the effluent hydration treatment. - Highlights: • Water retention capacity (WRC) and swelling of wheat straw fibers were studied. • The highest WRC was achieved with a biological effluent. • The enzymatic activity in the biological effluent yielded the highest sugar release. • Finer fibers showed a shaving effect that affected its capacity to absorb water. • A more undulating cell wall was visualized after the hydration

  7. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  8. Hydrate plugging or slurry flow : effect of key variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellecase, E.; Geraci, G.; Barrios, L.; Estanga, D.; Domingues, R.; Volk, M. [Tulsa Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Although oil and gas companies have proven design criteria and proper operating procedures to prevent hydrate plugs from forming, hydrates remain the primary issue in flow assurance. The costs associated with hydrate prevention affect project economics, particularly in deepwater pipelines. As such, there is an interest in developing a technology that allows hydrates to be transported as a slurry, while avoiding plugs. The feasibility of managing such hydrate flow was investigated. This study used a hydrate flow loop to investigate the effects of flow conditions on the transportability of a slurry in both steady-state and restart conditions. For most cases, uninhibited steady-state slurry flow conditions above 25 per cent water-cut were marginal, and most likely not feasible at 50 per cent water-cut or above. Liquid loading and velocity appeared to have a marginal effect on plugging tendency. However, minimum velocity may be needed to guarantee slurry transportation. Some of the important parameters and key variables that determine if a plug will form, particularly in restart conditions, include oil-water dispersion properties; oil-water phase segregation on the plugging tendency of model fluids; the location and state of the water; and the flow pattern. It was concluded that the plugging behaviour of oil systems changes with these variables, and with the oil-water chemistry. As such, specific strategies must be developed for each field. 4 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs.

  9. Kinetics Characteristics of Nitrogen Hydrates Respond to Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Liu, C.; Ye, Y.; Gong, J.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a high pressure differential scanning calorimetry (HP DSC) based on thermo-analytical technique was applied to investigate the kinetics and thermodynamics characteristics of nitrogen hydrates. Nitrogen hydrates was synthesized in the sample vessel under different pressures as temperature decreased from 293 to 233 K with a constant cooling rate of 0.2 K/min controlled by the DSC. To measure the hydrates dissociation enthalpies , the temperature was slowly raised up from 233 to 293 K at a constant rate ranging of 0.05 K/min. 1. Peak area on the heat flow curves represents the amount of heat during phase transition. In these experiments, the total water added to the sample vessel (mt) is already known. By integrating the peak areas of ice and hydrate, we know the total heats of ice (Qi) and hydrate (Qh), respectively. As the heat of ice per gram can be measured easily (336.366 J/g), the mass of ice (mi) can be obtain. Then, the dissociation heat of nitrogen hydrate per gram (Hh ) can be calculated by the equation: H(J/g)=Qh/(mt-mi) It is shown that the dissociation heats of nitrogen hydrates are a little larger than ice, but do not change a lot with different pressures. The average value of dissociation heat is 369.158 J/g. 2. During the DSC cooling stage, hydrate formed at temperature much lower than equilibrium. The biggest sub-cooling is about 291 K, while the smallest one is about 279 K. However, during these experiments, the pressure did not show obvious relationship with sub-cooling. It confirmed that even the proper conditions were achieved, formation was still a stochastic process. For one thing, due to the random distribution of dissolved gas in water, the interfacial tension and the water activity were not equal in the whole system. And if there was a free gas phase, which leads to different fugacity on water-gas interface, the stochastic behavior would be more significant in the sample vessel. 3. The energy released from hydrates formation as

  10. Study on the mechanism of C-phycocyanin mediated photodynamic therapy in curing mice with MCF-7%藻蓝蛋白介导光动力疗法在乳腺癌治疗中的机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冰; 褚现明; 高美华; 徐颖婕

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨藻蓝蛋白介导的光动力学疗法在乳腺癌治疗中的机制.方法 将MCF-7细胞接种于小鼠肋缘皮下脾区构建乳腺癌小鼠模型.小鼠分成4组:对照组、He-Ne激光照射组、藻蓝蛋白处理组、光动力学治疗组(PDT组).10 d后检测瘤块重量,NK细胞活性和T细胞增殖活性.取瘤块制成石蜡包埋切片,采用原位核酸杂交技术、免疫组织化学技术检测组织细胞内凋亡相关蛋白的表达.体外培养的MCF-7细胞也相应分成4组,通过MTT法、电镜和免疫荧光技术检测细胞增殖活性、细胞形态、细胞色素C表达量的变化.结果 与对照组相比,激光照射组各检测指标均无明显差异,而藻蓝蛋白处理组中NK细胞和T细胞的增殖活性有所增强,肿瘤组织细胞内抗凋亡蛋白(Fas)表达量明显增多,而瘤块的重量、肿瘤形成率和抗凋亡蛋白(p53、NF-κB、CD44)明显减少,如果藻蓝蛋白结合激光治疗发现各检测指标与对照组比较差异更为明显.体外试验证实藻蓝蛋白能抑制MCF-7细胞的增殖,促进细胞色素C的释放,电镜下细胞呈现典型的凋亡形态,用光动力学方法处理后效果更为明显.结论 藻蓝蛋白可以作为一种光敏剂,其介导的光动力学疗法通过增强机体的免疫力同时启动乳腺癌细胞内的凋亡信号转导通路诱导细胞凋亡,从而达到杀死肿瘤的目的.%Aim To study the mechanism of C-phycocyanin ( C-PC ) mediated photodynamic therapy ( PDT ) in curing breast cancer.Methods MCF-7 cells were injected into spleen area of mice to establish mice models with breast cancer which then were divided into four groups: control group, He-Ne laser radiation group, C-PC treatment group and PDT group.10 days later, tumor weight, activities of NK cells, proliferative activities of T cells were determined.The tumors were made to paraffin section and the expressions of apoptosis related proteins such as CD44 , P53 ,NFKB and Fas in

  11. The role of natural gas hydrates in global changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of gas hydrates which produce global changes are: structure and composition of hydrates, heat of the phase transition and of accumulation and decomposition (about 420 kJ kg-1), the change of the water specific volume (26-32%) under its transition to the hydrate state, and the electric impulse formation between the two phases during the phase transitions of systems. One volume of water contains 70-200 volumes of gas in hydrate state. Gas pressure in the crystal lattice of hydrate is hundreds, even thousands MPa. The hydrate formation zone is associated with frigid areas of Earth sedimentary rocks; on the land, near the polar regions, in the sea, at any latitude at depths >200-500 m. Methane hydrate resources make up about 104 Gt, 99% of them under the sea. The explored resources are 500 Gt. Hydrate methane is, undoubtedly, the energy potential of mankind for the next century, but the rates of the free methane outflow into the atmosphere and their influence on the global climate, ecology, geography, etc. need to be taken into account. The current amount of methane in the atmosphere is about 4.8 Gt. Thus, the average Earth surface temperature is increased by 1.3 K. The annual increase of methane in the atmosphere is 1%. Natural gas hydrates, their spreading and features may cause blowouts of free methane to the atmosphere, much greater than the current biochemical and technogenic sources. Methane may flow from the top and from the bottom of the layer as well under changing thermodynamic conditions, such as decreasing pressure, increase of the geothermal gradient, neotectonic shifts, changing of the hydrate deposits, electric potential. The free methane provides for an increase of CO2, H2O, O3 concentration. The heating effect of methane can be equal to or exceed that of CO2

  12. When proteins are completely hydrated in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugo, Oliviero

    2016-08-01

    In the crystalline state, protein surface patches that do not form crystal packing contacts are exposed to the solvent and one or more layers of hydration water molecules can be observed. It is well known that these water molecules cannot be observed at very low resolution, when the scarcity of experimental information precludes the observation of several parts of the protein molecule, like for example side-chains at the protein surface. On the contrary, more details are observable at high resolution. Here it is shown that it is necessary to reach a resolution of about 1.5-1.6Å to observe a continuous hydration layer at the protein surface. This contrasts previous estimations, which were more tolerant and according to which a resolution of 2.5Å was sufficient to describe at the atomic level the structure of the hydration layer. These results should prove useful in guiding a more rigorous selection of structural data to study protein hydration and in interpreting new crystal structures. PMID:27112977

  13. CO₂ processing and hydration of fruit and vegetable tissues by clathrate hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeya, Satoshi; Nakano, Kohei; Thammawong, Manasikan; Umeda, Hiroki; Yoneyama, Akio; Takeda, Tohoru; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Matsuo, Seiji

    2016-08-15

    CO2 hydrate can be used to preserve fresh fruits and vegetables, and its application could contribute to the processing of carbonated frozen food. We investigated water transformation in the frozen tissue of fresh grape samples upon CO2 treatment at 2-3 MPa and 3°C for up to 46 h. Frozen fresh bean, radish, eggplant and cucumber samples were also investigated for comparison. X-ray diffraction indicated that after undergoing CO2 treatment for several hours, structure I CO2 hydrate formed within the grape tissue. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging using the diffraction-enhanced imaging technique revealed the presence of CO2 hydrate within the intercellular spaces of these tissues. The carbonated produce became effervescent because of the dissociation of CO2 hydrate through the intercellular space, especially above the melting point of ice. In addition, suppressed metabolic activity resulting from CO2 hydrate formation, which inhibits water and nutrient transport through intercellular space, can be expected. PMID:27006222

  14. Silicate anion structural change in calcium silicate hydrate gel on dissolution of hydrated cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High pH conditions of aqueous solutions in a radioactive waste repository can be brought about by dissolution of cementitious materials. In order to clarify the mechanisms involved in maintaining this high pH for long time, we investigated the dissolution phenomena of OPC hydrate. In the present research, leaching tests on powdered cement hydrates were conducted by changing the ratio of mass of leaching water to mass of OPC hydrate (liquid/solid ratio) from 10 - 2,000 (wt/wt). Ordinary Portland Cement hydrate was contacted with deionized water and placed in a sealed bottle. After a predetermined period, the solid was separated from the solution. From the results of XRD analysis on the solid phase and the Ca concentration in the aqueous phase, it was confirmed that Ca(OH)2 was preferentially dissolved when the liquid/solid ratio was 10 or 100 (wt/wt), and that C-S-H gel as well as Ca(OH)2 were dissolved when the liquid/solid ratio was 500 (wt/wt) or larger. 29Si-NMR results showed that the silicate anion chain of the C-S-H gel became longer when the liquid/solid ratio was 500 (wt/wt) or greater. This indicates that leaching of OPC hydrate results in a structural change of C-S-H gel. (author)

  15. Gas hydrate saturation from acoustic impedance and resistivity logs in the shenhu area, south china sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Wu, S.; Lee, M.; Guo, Y.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.

    2011-01-01

    During the China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition -1 (GMGS-1), gas hydrate was discovered in layers ranging from 10 to 25 m above the base of gas hydrate stability zone in the Shenhu area, South China Sea. Water chemistry, electrical resistivity logs, and acoustic impedance were used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the chloride concentrations range from 0 to 43% of the pore space. The higher gas hydrate saturations were present in the depth from 152 to 177 m at site SH7 and from 190 to 225 m at site SH2, respectively. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity using Archie equation have similar trends to those from chloride concentrations. To examine the variability of gas hydrate saturations away from the wells, acoustic impedances calculated from the 3 D seismic data using constrained sparse inversion method were used. Well logs acquired at site SH7 were incorporated into the inversion by establishing a relation between the water-filled porosity, calculated using gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity logs, and the acoustic impedance, calculated from density and velocity logs. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from acoustic impedance of seismic data are ???10-23% of the pore space and are comparable to those estimated from the well logs. The uncertainties in estimated gas hydrate saturations from seismic acoustic impedances were mainly from uncertainties associated with inverted acoustic impedance, the empirical relation between the water-filled porosities and acoustic impedances, and assumed background resistivity. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. An effective medium inversion algorithm for gas hydrate quantification and its application to laboratory and borehole measurements of gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, S.; Minshull, T.A.; Priest, J.A.; Best, A.I.; Clayton, C.R.I.; Waite, W.F.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of gas hydrate in marine sediments alters their physical properties. In some circumstances, gas hydrate may cement sediment grains together and dramatically increase the seismic P- and S-wave velocities of the composite medium. Hydrate may also form a load-bearing structure within the sediment microstructure, but with different seismic wave attenuation characteristics, changing the attenuation behaviour of the composite. Here we introduce an inversion algorithm based on effective medium modelling to infer hydrate saturations from velocity and attenuation measurements on hydrate-bearing sediments. The velocity increase is modelled as extra binding developed by gas hydrate that strengthens the sediment microstructure. The attenuation increase is modelled through a difference in fluid flow properties caused by different permeabilities in the sediment and hydrate microstructures. We relate velocity and attenuation increases in hydrate-bearing sediments to their hydrate content, using an effective medium inversion algorithm based on the self-consistent approximation (SCA), differential effective medium (DEM) theory, and Biot and squirt flow mechanisms of fluid flow. The inversion algorithm is able to convert observations in compressional and shear wave velocities and attenuations to hydrate saturation in the sediment pore space. We applied our algorithm to a data set from the Mallik 2L–38 well, Mackenzie delta, Canada, and to data from laboratory measurements on gas-rich and water-saturated sand samples. Predictions using our algorithm match the borehole data and water-saturated laboratory data if the proportion of hydrate contributing to the load-bearing structure increases with hydrate saturation. The predictions match the gas-rich laboratory data if that proportion decreases with hydrate saturation. We attribute this difference to differences in hydrate formation mechanisms between the two environments.

  17. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-01-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant “onion-skin” fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2–3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched “hydration fronts” where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between ~110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at C. Our observations support fast hydration at temperatures as low as 60 °C; prolonged exposure to high temperature of 175°–225° during water addition is less likely as the glass would lose alkalies and should alter to clays within days. A compilation of low-temperature hydration diffusion coefficients suggests ~2 orders of magnitude higher rates of diffusion at 60–110 °C temperatures, compared with values expected from extrapolation of high-temperature (>400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration

  18. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. The hydration of Portland cement is retarded in the presence of both the admixtures and nanosize hydration products are formed.

  19. STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF COMPLEMENTARY HYDRATION ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SELF-REDUCING PELLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felippe de Oliveira Sousa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study has investigated how different methods and time of complementary hydration affects the cold strength of self-reducing pellets. Identical pellets had been made by the addition of pellet feed, coal, cement and lime and have been subjected to hydration by water immersion or in a moist chamber for different periods. A group of non-hydrated pellets was used as reference for evaluation the effect of hydration. The pellets were then characterized by mechanical tests of compression and tumbling strength. The results have shown an increase in the mechanical properties of pellets and have proved that the hydration by moist chamber was the most efficient method.

  20. Physical modeling of the formation of clathrate hydrates of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobyshev, A.; Aldiyarov, A.; Kurnosov, V.; Katpaeva, K.; Korshikov, E.; Sokolov, D.; Shinbayeva, A.; Timchenko, A.

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays natural gas hydrates attract special attention as a possible source of fossil fuel. According to various estimates, the reserves of hydrocarbons in hydrates exceed considerably explored reserves of natural gas. Due to the clathrate structure the unit volume of the gas hydrate can contain up to 160-180 volumes of pure gas. In recent years interest to a problem of gas hydrates has considerably increased. Such changes are connected with the progress in searches of the alternative sources of hydrocarbonic raw materials in countries that do not possess the resources of energy carriers. Thus gas hydrates are nonconventional sources of the hydrocarbonic raw materials which can be developed in the near future. At the same time, mechanisms of methane clathrate hydrates formations have not reached an advanced level, their thermophysical and mechanical properties have not been investigated profoundly. Thereby our experimental modeling of the processes of formation of methane clathrate hydrates in water cryomatrix prepared by co-condensation from the gas phase onto a cooled substrate was carried out over the range of condensation temperatures 12-60 K and pressures 10-4-10-6 Torr. In our experiments the concentration of methane in water varied in the range of 5%-90%. The thickness deposited films was 30-60 μm. The vibrational spectra of two-component thin films of CH4 + H2O condensates were measured and analyzed.

  1. Experimental Study of Gas Hydrate Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandino, O.; Ruffine, L.

    2011-12-01

    Important quantities of methane and other gases are trapped below the seafloor and in the permafrost by an ice-like solid, called gas hydrates or clathrate hydrates. The latter is formed when water is mixing with different gases at high pressures and low temperatures. Due to a their possible use as a source of energy [1] or the problematic related to flow assurance failure in pipelines [2] the understanding of their processes of formation/destabilisation of these structures becomes a goal for many laboratories research as well as industries. In this work we present an experimental study on the stochastic behaviour of hydrate formation from a bulk phase. The method used here for the experiments was to repeat several time the same hydrate formation procedure and to notice the different from one experiment to another. A variable-volume type high-pressure apparatus with two sapphire windows was used. This device, already presented by Ruffine et al.[3], allows us to perform both kinetics and phase equilibrium measurements. Three initial pressure conditions were considered here, 5.0 MPa, 7.5 MPa and 10.0 MPa. Hydrates have been formed, then allowed to dissociate by stepwise heating. The memory effect has also been investigated after complete dissociation. It turned out that, although the thermodynamics conditions of formation and/or destabilization were reproducible. An attempt to determine the influence of pressure on the nucleation induction time will be discussed. References 1. Sum, A. K.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D., Clathrate Hydrates: From Laboratory Science to Engineering Practice. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 2009, 48, 7457-7465. 2. Sloan, E. D., A changing hydrate paradigm-from apprehension to avoidance to risk management. Fluid Phase Equilibria 2005, 228, 67-74. 3. Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Charlou, J. L.; Cremière, A.; Zehnder, B. H., Experimental study of gas hydrate formation and destabilisation using a novel high-pressure apparatus. Marine

  2. Preliminary Experimental Examination Of Controls On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Bryant, S. L.; You, K.; Polito, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate change will cause warming of the oceans and land. This will affect the occurrence, behavior, and location of subseafloor and subterranean methane hydrate deposits. We suggest that in many natural systems local salinity, elevated by hydrate formation or freshened by hydrate dissociation, may control gas transport through the hydrate stability zone. We are performing experiments and modeling the experiments to explore this behavior for different warming scenarios. Initially, we are exploring hydrate association/dissociation in saline systems with constant water mass. We compare experiments run with saline (3.5 wt. %) water vs. distilled water in a sand mixture at an initial water saturation of ~0.5. We increase the pore fluid (methane) pressure to 1050 psig. We then stepwise cool the sample into the hydrate stability field (~3 degrees C), allowing methane gas to enter as hydrate forms. We measure resistivity and the mass of methane consumed. We are currently running these experiments and we predict our results from equilibrium thermodynamics. In the fresh water case, the modeled final hydrate saturation is 63% and all water is consumed. In the saline case, the modeled final hydrate saturation is 47%, the salinity is 12.4 wt. %, and final water saturation is 13%. The fresh water system is water-limited: all the water is converted to hydrate. In the saline system, pore water salinity is elevated and salt is excluded from the hydrate structure during hydrate formation until the salinity drives the system to three phase equilibrium (liquid, gas, hydrate) and no further hydrate forms. In our laboratory we can impose temperature gradients within the column, and we will use this to investigate equilibrium conditions in large samples subjected to temperature gradients and changing temperature. In these tests, we will quantify the hydrate saturation and salinity over our meter-long sample using spatially distributed temperature sensors, spatially distributed

  3. L'hydratation de la surface de Mars vue par l'imageur spectral OMEGA

    OpenAIRE

    Jouglet, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Water is currently present on Mars as ice, vapor and surface hydration. Hydration is known to be adsorbed water on minerals or prisoned in their structure. It can influence the Martian water cycle as well as enable mineral alteration or exobiology. This PhD thesis studies the global and seasonal aspects of hydration using the data from the visible and near infrared imaging spectrometer OMEGA. Our work is based on the 3 µm hydration absorption feature, which has required to develop an efficien...

  4. Infrared spectroscopy for monitoring gas hydrates in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, G.T.; Luzinova, Y.; Mizaikoff, B. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Raichlin, Y.; Katzir, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Tel-Aviv (Israel). Shool of Physics and Astronomy

    2008-07-01

    This paper introduced the first principles for monitoring gas hydrate formation and dissociation in aqueous solution by evaluating state-responsive infrared (IR) absorption features of water with fiberoptic evanescent field spectroscopy. A first order linear functional relationship was also derived according to Lambert Beer's law in order to quantify the percentage gas hydrate within the volume of water probed via the evanescent field. In addition, spectroscopic studies evaluating seafloor sediments collected from a gas hydrate site in the Gulf of Mexico revealed minimal spectral interferences from sediment matrix components. As such, evanescent field sensing strategies were established as a promising perspective for monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrates in oceanic environments. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  5. 1st principle simulations of ions in water solutions: Bond structure and chemistry in the hydration shells of highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weare, John

    2012-02-01

    Methods of direct simulation (Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics) have provided new insights into the structure and dynamics of electrolyte solutions. However, these methods are limited by the difficulty of developing reliable ion-solvent and solvent-solvent potential interactions in the highly perturbed hydration region. To model the interactions in this region methods of simulation that are based on the direct on the fly solution to the electronic Schr"odinger equation (ab-initio molecular dynamics, AIMD) are being developed. However, 1st principle methods have their own problems because the solution to the electronic structure problem is intractable unless rather uncontrolled approximations are made (e.g. density functional theory, DFT) and there is high computational cost to the solution to the Schr"odinger equation. To test the accuracy of AIMD methods we have directly simulated the XAFS spectra for a series of transition metal ions Ca^2+, Cr^3+, Mn^2+, Fe^3+, Co^2+, Ni^2+, Cu^2+, and Zn^2+. Despite DFT's well know deficiencies, the agreement between the calculated XAFS spectra and the data is almost quantitative for these test ions. This agreement supports the extension of the interpretation well beyond that of the usual XAFS analysis to include higher-order multiple scattering signals in the XAFS spectra, which provide a rigorous probe of the first shell distances and disorders. Less well resolved features of the spectra can still be analyzed and are related to 2nd shell structure. The combination of XAFS measurements and the parameter free AIMD method leads to new insights into the hydration structure of these ions. While strictly local DFT +gga provides excellent agreement with data, the addition of exact exchange seems to provide slightly better structural agreement. The computational complexity of these calculations requires the development of simulation tools that scale to high processor number on massively parallel supercomputers. Our present algorithm

  6. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-01

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall. PMID:25332072

  7. Hysteresis of methane hydrate formation/decomposition at subsea geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Gas hydrates are a major risk when transporting oil and gas in offshore subsea pipelines. Under typical conditions in these pipelines (at high pressure and low temperature) the formation of gas hydrates is favourable. The hydrates form large solid plugs that can block pipelines and can even cause them to burst. This represents a major problem for the gas mining industry, which currently goes to extreme measures to reduce the risk of hydrate formation because there is no reliable experimental data on hydrate processes. The mechanisms of gas hydrate formation, growth and inhibition are poorly understood. A clear understanding of the fundamental processes will allow development of cost effective technologies to avoid production losses in gas pipelines. We are studying the nucleation of the methane hydrates by measuring the hysteresis of hydrate formation/decomposition by neutron diffraction. When a gas hydrate is decomposed (melted) the resulting water has a 'supposed memory effect' raising the probability of rapid hydrate reformation. This rapid reformation does not occur for pure water where nucleation can be delayed by several hours (induction time) due to metastability [1]. The memory effect can only be destroyed by extreme heating of the effected area. Possible causes of this effect include residual water structure, persistent hydrate crystal lites remaining in solution and remaining dissolved gas. We will compare the kinetics of formation and the stability region of hydrate formation of 'memory' water for comparison with pure water. This information has important implications for the oil and gas industry because it should provide a better understanding of the role of multiple dissociation and reformation of gas hydrates in plug formation.

  8. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Weihua; Moridis, George; Wang, Runqiang; Xiao, Yun; Li, Jianhui

    2007-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language) is recognized as one of the mo...

  9. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus. PMID:23899752

  10. Evolution of the hydration in cements with additions

    OpenAIRE

    Bonavetti, V. L.; Rahhal, V. F.; Irassar, E. F.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the hydration mechanism of portland cement pastes with limestone, quartz and natural pozzolan (80/20 weight) was analized. The techniques used were nonevaporable water content, pozzolanic activity and X-ray diffraction. Results show that filler effect increases initially the amount of hydration products in all pastes. For limestone pastes, the dilution effect is significant at long time, for quartz and pozzolan pastes the dilution effect was lower due to the contribution of the...

  11. Notes on hydrated cement fractals investigated by SANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficker, T [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Physics Department, Technical University, Zizkova 17, CZ-602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Len, A [Budapest Neutron Centre, Konkoly Thege 29-33, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Nemec, P [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Physics Department, Technical University, Zizkova 17, CZ-602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-07-07

    Hydrated cement pastes with different water-to-cement ratios have been investigated by the small-angle scattering neutron technique. Special attention has been paid to the fractal nanostructure of the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H solid gel) and its basic building particles, i.e. nanometric globules. The inner stability of these particles has been tested and shown to be sufficiently persistent to withstand all spatial regroupings of the overall nanostructure caused by variations of w/c ratios.

  12. Monitoring hydrate formation and dissociation in sandstone and bulk with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, B A; Moradi-Araghi, A; Stevens, J C

    2003-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a very effective tool for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates because of the large intensity contrast between the images of the liquid components and the solid hydrate. Tetrahydrofuran/water hydrate was used because the two liquid components are miscible and form hydrate at ambient pressure. These properties made this feasibility study proceed much faster than using methane/water, which requires high pressure to form the hydrate. The formation and dissociation was monitored first in a THF/water-saturated Berea sandstone plug and second in the bulk. In both cases it appeared that nucleation was needed to begin the formation process, i.e., the presence of surfaces in the sandstone and shaking of the bulk solution. Dissociation appeared to be dominated by the rate of thermal energy transfer. The dissociation temperature of hydrate formed in the sandstone plug was not significantly different from the dissociation temperature in bulk.

  13. Serrano charged up for hydrates battle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flatern, R. von

    2001-07-01

    The plugging of pipelines by paraffin and hydrate formations is an obstacle still to be overcome in the transportation of gases in deep cold water. However, a new flow assurance technique is soon to be installed in Shell's Serrano and Oregano fields in the Gulf of Mexico and this is expected to eventually impact on the entire offshore industry: it is this development which is discussed. The system uses electricity to heat the pipelines.

  14. Structure and Hydration of Highly Branched, Monodisperse Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, John; Nickels, Jonathan; Stanley, Christopher; Diallo, Souleymane; Katsaras, John; Dutcher, John

    Monodisperse phytoglycogen nanoparticles are a promising, new soft colloidal nanomaterial with many applications in the personal care, food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. These applications rely on exceptional properties that emerge from the highly branched structure of phytoglycogen and its interaction with water, such as extraordinarily high water retention, and low viscosity and exceptional stability in water. The structure and hydration of the nanoparticles was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). SANS allowed us to determine the size of the nanoparticles, evaluate their radial density profile, quantify the particle-to-particle spacing, and determine their water content. The results show clearly that the nanoparticles are highly hydrated, with each nanoparticle containing 250% of its mass in water, and that aqueous dispersions approach a jamming transition at ~ 25% (w/w). QENS experiments provided an independent and consistent measure of the high level of hydration of the particles.

  15. Determination of hydration film thickness using atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Changsheng; SONG Shaoxian; GU Qingbao

    2005-01-01

    Dispersion of a solid particle in water may lead to the formation of hydration film on the particle surface, which can strongly increase the repulsive force between the particles and thus strongly affect the stability of dispersions. The hydration film thickness, which varies with the variation of property of suspension particles, is one of the most important parameters of hydration film, and is also one of the most difficult parameters that can be measured accurately. In this paper, a method, based on force-distance curve of atomic force microscopy, for determining the hydration film thickness of particles is developed. The method utilizes the difference of cantilever deflection before, between and after penetrating the hydration films between tip and sample, which reflect the difference of slope on the force-distance curve. 3 samples, mica, glass and stainless steel, were used for hydration thickness determination, and the results show that the hydration film thickness between silicon tip and mica, glass and stainless steel are 30.0(2.0, 29.0(1.0 and 32.5(2.5 nm, respectively.

  16. 钻井液侵入海洋含水合物地层的一维数值模拟研究%Invasion of water-based drilling mud into oceanic gas-hydrate-bearing sediment:One-dimensional numerical simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁伏龙; 张可霓; 吴能友; 蒋国盛; 张凌; 刘力; 余义兵

    2013-01-01

    mud invasion into oceanic gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS) by taking hydrate reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico as a case. Compared with the conventional oil/gas-bearing sediments, hydrate dissociation and reformation are the main characteristics of mud invasion in GHBS when the invasion condition is in an unstable region of gas hydrates phase diagram. The simulation results show that the density (I. E. , corresponding pressure), temperature, and salt content of drilling fluids have great effects on the process of drilling fluid invasion. When the temperature and salt content of drilling fluids are constants, the higher the density of the drilling fluid is, the greater degree of invasion and hydrate dissociation are. The increased pore pressure caused by the mud invasion, endothermic cooling with hydrate dissociation compounded by the Joule-Thompson effect and lagged effect of heat transfer in sediments, together make water and gas forming secondary hydrates. The secondary hydrate together with existing hydrate probably makes the hydrate saturation higher than original hydrate saturation. This high saturation hydrate ring could be attributed to the displacement effect of mud invasion and the permeability reduction because of secondary hydrates forming. Under the same temperature and pressure of drilling fluids, the higher the salt concentration of the drilling fluid, the faster rate and greater degree of hydrate dissociation due to the stronger thermodynamic inhibition effect and heat transfer efficiency. The occurrence of high-saturation hydrate girdle band seems to mainly depend on the temperature and salinity of drilling fluids. The dissociated free gas, the dilution of water salinity associated with hydrate dissociation and the occurrence of high saturation hydrate ring probably cause the calculated hydrate saturation based on well logging is higher than that of actual hydrate-bearing sediments. Our simulations suggest that in order to keep wellbore stability

  17. Collective dynamics of hydrated β-lactoglobulin by inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Hosokawa, Shinya; Baron, Alfred Q R; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2010-10-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of hydrated β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were performed to investigate the collective dynamics of hydration water and hydrated protein on a picosecond time scale. Samples with different hydration levels h [=mass of water (g)/mass of protein (g)] of 0 (dry), 0.5, and 1.0 were measured at ambient temperature. The observed dynamical structure factor S(Q,ω)/S(Q) was analyzed by a model composed of a Lorentzian for the central peak and a damped harmonic oscillator (DHO) for the side peak. The dispersion relation between the excitation energy in the DHO model and the momentum transfer Q was obtained for the hydrated β-lg at both hydration levels, but no DHO excitation was found for the dry β-lg. The high-frequency sound velocity was similar to that previously observed in pure water. The ratio of the high-frequency sound velocity of hydrated β-lg to the adiabatic one of hydrated lysozyme (h=0.41) was estimated as ∼1.6 for h=0.5. The value is significantly smaller than that (∼2) of pure water that has the tetrahedral network structure. The present finding thus suggests that the tetrahedral network structure of water around the β-lg is partially disrupted by the perturbation from protein surface. These results are consistent with those reported from Brillouin neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation studies of hydrated ribonuclease A. PMID:20942540

  18. Study on molecular controlled mining system of methane hydrate; Methane hydrate no bunshi seigyo mining ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyagawa, M.; Saito, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Karasawa, H.; Kiyono , F.; Nagaoki, R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Komai, T.; Haneda, H.; Takahashi, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Nada, H. [Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Basic studies are conducted for the collection of methane from the methane hydrate that exists at levels deeper than 500m in the sea. The relationship between the hydrate generation mechanism and water cluster structure is examined by use of mass spectronomy. It is found that, among the stable liquid phase clusters, the (H2O)21H{sup +} cluster is the most stable. Stable hydrate clusters are in presence in quantities, and participate in the formation of hydrate crystal nuclei. For the elucidation of the nucleus formation mechanism, a kinetic simulation is conducted of molecules in the cohesion system consisting of water and methane molecules. Water molecules that array near methane molecules at the normal pressure is disarrayed under a higher pressure for rearray into a hydrate structure. Hydrate formation and breakdown in the three-phase equilibrium state of H2O, CH4, and CO2 at a low temperature and high pressure are tested, which discloses that supercooling is required for formation, that it is possible to extract CH4 first for replacement by guest molecule CO2 since CO2 is stabler than CH4 at a lower pressure or higher temperature, and that formation is easier to take place when the grain diameter is larger at the formation point since larger grain diameters result in a higher formation temperature. 3 figs.

  19. Three types of gas hydrate reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico identified in LWD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Woong; Collett, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    High quality logging-while-drilling (LWD) well logs were acquired in seven wells drilled during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II in the spring of 2009. These data help to identify three distinct types of gas hydrate reservoirs: isotropic reservoirs in sands, vertical fractured reservoirs in shale, and horizontally layered reservoirs in silty shale. In general, most gas hydratebearing sand reservoirs exhibit isotropic elastic velocities and formation resistivities, and gas hydrate saturations estimated from the P-wave velocity agree well with those from the resistivity. However, in highly gas hydrate-saturated sands, resistivity-derived gas hydrate-saturation estimates appear to be systematically higher by about 5% over those estimated by P-wave velocity, possibly because of the uncertainty associated with the consolidation state of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Small quantities of gas hydrate were observed in vertical fractures in shale. These occurrences are characterized by high formation resistivities with P-wave velocities close to those of water-saturated sediment. Because the formation factor varies significantly with respect to the gas hydrate saturation for vertical fractures at low saturations, an isotropic analysis of formation factor highly overestimates the gas hydrate saturation. Small quantities of gas hydrate in horizontal layers in shale are characterized by moderate increase in P-wave velocities and formation resistivities and either measurement can be used to estimate gas hydrate saturations.

  20. Method for calculating the parameters of formation of hydrates from multicomponent gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaporozhets, E. P.; Shostak, N. A.

    2016-09-01

    A model of hydrate formation in multicomponent gas-liquid water or ice systems including the exo- and endothermic processes has been suggested. Based on this model, a method for calculating the molecular and energy parameters such as the hydration number, amount of moles of hydrate, amount of gas and water in it, its density and molar mass, and the energy and rate of hydrate formation was developed. A comparison of the calculated and experimental values of the parameters revealed that the difference between them varied from 0 to 5.46%.

  1. Kinetics of bread crumb hydration as related to porous microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Vincent; Monnet, Anne-Flore; Jourdren, Solenne; Panouillé, Maud; Chappard, Christine; Souchon, Isabelle

    2016-08-10

    During oral processing and throughout the digestion process, hydration mechanisms have a key influence on the functional properties of food. This is the case with bread, for which hydration may affect the kinetics of starch hydrolysis as well as taste, aroma and texture perceptions. In this context, the aim of the present study is to understand how crumb porous micro-architecture impacts hydration kinetics. Four types of French baguettes were considered, varying in structure and/or compositions. An experimental set-up was developed for the real-time measurement of water uptake in crumb samples. Mathematical models were then fitted to extract quantitative parameters of use for the description and the understanding of experimental observations. Finally, bread crumb samples were analyzed before and after hydration through X-ray micro-computed tomography for the assessment of crumb micro-architectural properties. Distinct hydration behaviors were observed for the four types of bread. Higher hydration rates and capacities were reported for industrial baguettes (highest porosity) compared to denser semi-industrial, whole wheat and traditional baguettes. However, crumb porosity alone is not sufficient to predict hydration behavior. This study made it possible to point out the importance of capillary action in crumb hydration mechanisms, with a strong role of cells with diameters of 2 mm and below. The high density of these small cells generates high interconnection probabilities that may have an impact both on crumb hydration duration and capacity. As a consequence, accounting for microstructural features resulting from bread formulation may provide useful leverages for the control of functional properties. PMID:27466974

  2. 钻井液侵入海洋含水合物地层的一维数值模拟研究%Invasion of water-based drilling mud into oceanic gas-hydrate-bearing sediment:One-dimensional numerical simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁伏龙; 张可霓; 吴能友; 蒋国盛; 张凌; 刘力; 余义兵

    2013-01-01

    mud invasion into oceanic gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS) by taking hydrate reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico as a case. Compared with the conventional oil/gas-bearing sediments, hydrate dissociation and reformation are the main characteristics of mud invasion in GHBS when the invasion condition is in an unstable region of gas hydrates phase diagram. The simulation results show that the density (I. E. , corresponding pressure), temperature, and salt content of drilling fluids have great effects on the process of drilling fluid invasion. When the temperature and salt content of drilling fluids are constants, the higher the density of the drilling fluid is, the greater degree of invasion and hydrate dissociation are. The increased pore pressure caused by the mud invasion, endothermic cooling with hydrate dissociation compounded by the Joule-Thompson effect and lagged effect of heat transfer in sediments, together make water and gas forming secondary hydrates. The secondary hydrate together with existing hydrate probably makes the hydrate saturation higher than original hydrate saturation. This high saturation hydrate ring could be attributed to the displacement effect of mud invasion and the permeability reduction because of secondary hydrates forming. Under the same temperature and pressure of drilling fluids, the higher the salt concentration of the drilling fluid, the faster rate and greater degree of hydrate dissociation due to the stronger thermodynamic inhibition effect and heat transfer efficiency. The occurrence of high-saturation hydrate girdle band seems to mainly depend on the temperature and salinity of drilling fluids. The dissociated free gas, the dilution of water salinity associated with hydrate dissociation and the occurrence of high saturation hydrate ring probably cause the calculated hydrate saturation based on well logging is higher than that of actual hydrate-bearing sediments. Our simulations suggest that in order to keep wellbore stability

  3. Atomistic modelling of the hydration of CaSO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Craig D.

    2003-08-01

    Atomistic modelling techniques, using empirical potentials, have been used to simulate a range of structures formed by the hydration of γ-CaSO 4 and described as CaSO 4· nH 2O (0commercial importance and has been subjected to much experimental study. These simulation studies demonstrate significant water-matrix interactions that influence the crystallography of the hydrated phase. The existence of two types of hydration site has been predicted, including one within the Ca 2+coordination sphere. Close correlation between water molecule bonding energy, Ca 2+-O w bond length and unit-cell volume have been established. This shows that as the number of water molecules within the unit cell increases, the bonding energy increases and the unit cell contracts. However around n=0.5, this process reaches a turning point with the incorporation of further waters resulting in reduced binding energy and an expanding unit cell.

  4. Mechanisms of deep slab hydration: numerical modeling and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenda, M.; Gerya, T.; Burlini, L.

    2009-12-01

    Water is a fundamental component of the Earth, affecting its internal structures and dynamics. Sea-water enters the subduction factory via slab hydration that occurs mainly at the trench and is subsequently released in the upper mantle wedge because of slab warming and de-hydration. In the last decades, the scientific research has focused mainly on geophysical processes related to the de-hydration of the slab. However, not much is known on how and to which extent the subducting oceanic plate get hydrated. In order to investigate hydration of the slab, we performed 2D numerical models of a spontaneously bending oceanic plate using I2ELVIS code that account for visco-elasto-plastic rheologies and where fluid flow is regulated by Darci’s law. At the outer rise, bending-related slab faulting occurs, providing a pathway for water percolation in the slab. Faults generally deep trenchward, but antithetic faults are also common. Downward deep fluid flow establishes during brittle extensional deformation at the trench outer rise producing strong variation of the tectonic pressure and causing sub-hydrostatic or even negative pressure gradients along bending related normal faults through which fluids are pumped. The results of the numerical experiment indicate that water can be transported down and stored in the bending area via serpentinization of the normal faults. Deep slab hydration has important implications for the rheological structure, seismicity and seismic anisotropy of the upper mantle because: 1) more water can be stored in the slab producing more enhanced weakening of the mantle wedge, 2) intermediate and deep intra-slab earthquakes can be triggered by slab de-hydration, 3) DHMS phases, able to bring fluids down to the transition zone and lower mantle, could form in the cold core of the slab, 4) the slab could acquire a strong anisotropic fabric responsible for the anisotropic patterns observed at subduction zones.

  5. Effect of hydrate formation-dissociation on emulsion stability using DSC and visual techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachance, J.W.; Dendy Sloan, E.; Koh, C.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrates Research

    2008-07-01

    Many flow assurance operators are now focusing on preventing hydrates from agglomerating and forming plugs within pipelines. A key factor in reducing plug formation in oil-dominated systems is the stability of emulsified water in gas hydrate formation. In this study, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies were used to show that gas hydrate formation has a destabilizing effect on water and oil emulsions, and can result in a free water phase through the coalescence and agglomeration of dissociated hydrate particles. The study focused on investigating the ability of the hydrates to stay segregated with hydrate formation. The stability of water-in-oil emulsions with hydrate formation was investigated with a range of different crude oils with varying emulsion stability levels. Thermal properties were measured at both atmospheric and pressurized conditions. Thermocouples in the calorimetric furnace were used to measure the temperature difference between reference and sample cells. Emulsion stability was measured over a 1-month time period. Results of the study showed that hydrate formation and dissociation destabilizes emulsions. However, the asphaltene fraction in crude oils resists hydrate-induced destabilization. The stability of the emulsion increased when asphaltene content increased. It was concluded that emulsion stability is a key factor in preventing agglomeration in flow lines. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  6. Clinical study on orofacial photonic hydration using phototherapy and biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Grandi, Natália D. P.; Florez, Fernando L. E.; Grecco, Clovis; Lopes, Luciana A.

    2015-06-01

    Skin hydration is important to prevent aging and dysfunction of orofacial system. Nowadays, it is known that cutaneous system is linked to muscle system, then every dentist need to treat healthy facial skin, as lips, keeping orofacial functions healthy. Thirty-two patients were treated using laser and led therapy single or associated to biomaterials (dermo-cosmetics) searching for the best protocol to promote skin hydration. Using a peace of equipment to measure electric impedance, percentage of water and oil from skin, before and after different treatments were analyzed. Statistic tests using 5% and 0.1% of significance were applied and results showed that light could improve hydration of epidermis layer of facial skin. Considering just light effect, using infrared laser followed by blue led system is more effective to hydration than just blue led system application. Considering dermo-cosmetic and light, the association between both presented the best result.

  7. Importancia del agua en la hidratación de la población española: documento FESNAD 2010 Importance of water in the hydration of the Spanish population: FESNAD 2010 document

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Iglesias Rosado

    2011-02-01

    documento se presentan todas estas consideraciones en cuanto a la hidratación, y se realizan diferentes recomendaciones al respecto.For any healthy individual, thirst is an appropriate sign to drink water, except for babies, sportsmen, and most of ill and elderly people. In these instances, it is convenient to schedule appropriate times to drink water since great demands and the physiological mechanisms that determine thirst in these situations may condition water unbalances with important consequences for health and the physical and intellectual performance. The human body has a number of mechanisms that allow keeping constant the water content by adjusting intakes and wastes. Water balance is determined by intake (consumed water, beverages, and water contained in foods and wastes (urine, stools, the skin, and expired air from the lungs. Failure of these mechanisms and subsequent impairments in water balance may produce severe disarrangements that may threaten somebody´s life. In the present document, we analyze the evidences regarding the factors conditioning water needs in the different life stages and physiological situations, as well as the consequences of water unbalance under different situations. A proper hydration may be achieved by feeding and the use of water and other liquids. Although water is the beverage by excellence and represents the ideal way of restoring the losses and get hydrated, we should be aware that, from the very beginning, we have sought other liquid sources with hydration properties. In the last decades we have increased the consumption of different beverages, with a proliferation of sugar-containing beverages. Since excessive sugar consumption has been related to obesity and other chronic conditions, it is evident that the use of these caloric beverages should be rationalized, especially in children. In this document all the considerations regarding hydration are presented and different recommendations are exposed.

  8. Measurements of methane hydrate equilibrium in systems inhibited with NaCl and methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We report phase equilibria data for hydrates with salt and methanol. ► A unique experimental procedure using the DSC is used for the measurements. ► Measured data suggest that current hydrate prediction models may need to be adjusted. - Abstract: Natural gas hydrates are ice-like inclusion compounds that form at high pressures and low temperatures in the presence of water and light hydrocarbons. Hydrate formation conditions are favorable in gas and oil pipelines, and their formation threatens gas and oil production. Thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors (THIs) are chemicals (e.g., methanol, monoethylene glycol) deployed in gas pipelines to depress the equilibrium temperature required for hydrate formation. This work presents a novel application of a stepwise differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measurement to accurately determine the methane hydrate phase boundary in the presence of THIs. The scheme is first validated on a model (ice + salt water) system, and then generalized to measure hydrate equilibrium temperatures for pure systems and 0.035 mass fraction NaCl solutions diluted to 0, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 mass fraction methanol. The hydrate equilibrium temperatures are measured at methane pressures from (7.0 to 20.0) MPa. The measured equilibrium temperatures are compared to values computed by the predictive hydrate equilibrium tool CSMGem.

  9. The simulation of nature gas production from ocean gas hydrate reservoir by depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The vast amount of hydrocarbon gas encaged in gas hydrates is regarded as a kind of future potential energy supply due to its wide deposition and cleanness. How to exploit gas hydrate with safe, effective and economical methods is being pursued. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to simulate the hydrate dissocia- tion by depressurization in hydrate-bearing porous medium. The model can be used to analyze the effects of the flow of multiphase fluids, the intrinsic kinetic process of hydrate dissociation, the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation, ice-water phase equilibrium, the variation of permeability, the convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production. The nu- merical results agreed well with the 1-D and 2-D experiments. The numerical results for 3-D hydrate reservoir show that in the first stage of depressurization gas can be produced effectively from hydrate reservoir. With the depletion of reservoir energy because of endothermic process of hydrate dissociation the gas rate decreases rapidly. Then, methods such as thermal stimulation and inhibitor injection should be considered to replace depressurization

  10. Determination of the Physical Properties of Sediments Depending on Hydrate Saturation Using a "Quick Look" Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, B.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Seyberth, K.; Heeschen, K. U.; Priegnitz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and electromagnetic measurements are promising tools for the detection and quantification of gas hydrate occurrences in nature. The seismic wave velocity depends among others on the hydrate quantity and the quality (e.g. pore filling or cementing hydrate). For a proper interpretation of seismic data the knowledge of the dependency of physical properties as a function of hydrate saturation in a certain scenario is crucial. Within the SUGAR III project we determine such dependencies for various scenarios to support models for joint inversion of seismic and EM data e.g. for the shallow gas hydrate reservoirs in the Danube Delta. Since the formation of artificial lab samples containing pore filling hydrate from methane dissolved in water is a complex and time consuming procedure, we developed an easier alternative. Ice is very similar to hydrate in some of its physical properties. Therefore it might be used as analogous pore fill in a "quick look" experiment to determine the dependency of rock physical properties on hydrate content. We used the freezing point depression of a KCl solution to generate a dependency of ice saturation on temperature. The measured seismic wave velocity in dependence on ice saturation compares very well with data measured on a glass bead sediment sample with methane hydrate formed from methane dissolved in water. We could also observe that ice, formed from a salt solution in the pore space of sediment, behaves similar to methane hydrate as a non-cementing solid pore fill.

  11. Three-phase flow of submarine gas hydrate pipe transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立; 徐海良; 杨放琼

    2015-01-01

    In the hydraulic transporting process of cutter-suction mining natural gas hydrate, when the temperature−pressure equilibrium of gas hydrate is broken, gas hydrates dissociate into gas. As a result, solid−liquid two-phase flow (hydrate and water) transforms into gas−solid−liquid three-phase flow (methane, hydrate and water) inside the pipeline. The Euler model and CFD-PBM model were used to simulate gas−solid−liquid three-phase flow. Numerical simulation results show that the gas and solid phase gradually accumulate to the center of the pipe. Flow velocity decreases from center to boundary of the pipe along the radial direction. Comparison of numerical simulation results of two models reveals that the flow state simulated by CFD-PBM model is more uniform than that simulated by Euler model, and the main behavior of the bubble is small bubbles coalescence to large one. Comparison of numerical simulation and experimental investigation shows that the values of flow velocity and gas fraction in CFD-PBM model agree with experimental data better than those in Euler model. The proposed PBM model provides a more accurate and effective way to estimate three-phase flow state of transporting gas hydrate within the submarine pipeline.

  12. High-pressure transformations in sulfuric acid hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Galilean moons of Jupiter; Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, have surfaces that are composed of very different materials to the silicates that make up our Earth. For Europa and Ganymede, two moons under intense investigation from past and future space missions, their surfaces are made up of ice and hydrates. Despite the apparent ‘simplicity’ of these materials, we still observe very complex geological formations on these moons – including subduction. This means we need to understand the transformations of candidate surface materials under a range of pressure/temperature conditions in order to accurately explain the formations on these icy surfaces. One hydrate candidate material for the surfaces of these moons are sulfuric acid hydrates, formed from radolytic sulfur (from Io) reacting with the surface ice. Sulfuric acid hydrates have already been established to have a complex phase diagram with composition. We have now used the Mito cell at the PLANET instrument to undertake the first investigation of the high-pressure behavior of the water rich sulfuric acid hydrates. Compressing at 100 K and 180 K we see that the hemitriskaidekahydrate becomes the stable water-rich hydrate and observe some interesting relaxation behaviour in this material at pressure, which could have significant consequences for the interiors of Ganymede.

  13. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  14. Numerical simulations of CO2 -assisted gas production from hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhara, P.; Anderson, B. J.; Myshakin, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experimental studies over the last decade have reviewed the feasibility of using CO2 or CO2+N2 gas mixtures to recover CH4 gas from hydrates deposits. That technique would serve the dual purpose of CO2 sequestration and production of CH4 while maintaining the geo-mechanical stability of the reservoir. In order to analyze CH4 production process by means of CO2 or CO2+N2 injection into gas hydrate reservoirs, a new simulation tool, Mix3HydrateResSim (Mix3HRS)[1], was previously developed to account for the complex thermodynamics of multi-component hydrate phase and to predict the process of CH4 substitution by CO2 (and N2) in the hydrate lattice. In this work, Mix3HRS is used to simulate the CO2 injection into a Class 2 hydrate accumulation characterized by a mobile aqueous phase underneath a hydrate bearing sediment. That type of hydrate reservoir is broadly confirmed in permafrost and along seashore. The production technique implies a two-stage approach using a two-well design, one for an injector and one for a producer. First, the CO2 is injected into the mobile aqueous phase to convert it into immobile CO2 hydrate and to initiate CH4 release from gas hydrate across the hydrate-water boundary (generally designating the onset of a hydrate stability zone). Second, CH4 hydrate decomposition is induced by the depressurization method at a producer to estimate gas production potential over 30 years. The conversion of the free water phase into the CO2 hydrate significantly reduces competitive water production in the second stage, thereby improving the methane gas production. A base case using only the depressurization stage is conducted to compare with enhanced gas production predicted by the CO2-assisted technique. The approach also offers a possibility to permanently store carbon dioxide in the underground formation to greater extent comparing to a direct injection of CO2 into gas hydrate sediment. Numerical models are based on the hydrate formations at the

  15. Predicting hydration energies for multivalent ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    errors. Our results indicate that quantum chemical calculations combined with COSMO-RS solvent treatment is a reliable method for treating multivalent ions in solution, provided one hydration shell of explicit water molecules is included for metal cations. The accuracy is not high enough to allow...... (TZVP) level. Agreement with experimental data for monovalent and divalent ions is good and shows no significant systematic errors. Predictions are noticeably better than with standard COSMO. The agreement with experimental data for trivalent and tetravalent ions is slightly worse and shows systematic...... absolute predictions of hydration energies but could be used to investigate trends for several ions, thanks to the low computational cost, in particular for ligand exchange reactions....

  16. 饱和粗砂、粉土内甲烷水合物形成与分解过程中的水分迁移规律%Water transfer rules during methane hydrate formation and dissociation inside saturated coarse sand and loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 吴青柏; 王英梅

    2011-01-01

    用可探测土壤水分变化的pF-meter探头组装了新型水合物研究设备,并对两种饱和介质内甲烷水合物形成与分解过程中的水分迁移规律进行研究,以期望能为进一步探索多孔介质内甲烷水合物形成与分解机制提供参考.通过实验发现相同条件下,不同饱和介质内生成的甲烷水合物形态存在较大差异,且形成过程中的水分迁移规律也不同;水合物分解过程表现出的水分迁移规律与水合物常规分解事实相悖,其具体原因仍需做进一步研究.%In order to understand the kinetics mechanism of methane hydrate formation and dissociation inside porous media more comprehensively, a novel research apparatus with three pFmeter sensors which could detect water changes of soil was designed and manufactured and the water transfer rules during methane hydrate formation and dissociation inside two different saturated media were studied with the novel apparatus. It was experimentally proved that under the same formation condition, there were obvious differences in methane hydrate formation configuration and water transfer rules between inside the saturated coarse sand and inside the saturated loess during the same hydrate formation processes. During hydrate dissociation processes, the water transfer rules were abnormal and inconsistent with the conventional methane dissociation facts, which needed more studies to find out the real reasons.

  17. Cement with silica fume and granulated blast-furnace slag: strength behavior and hydration

    OpenAIRE

    Bonavetti, V. L.; Castellano, C.; Donza, H.; Rahhal, V. F.; Irassar, E. F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the influence of portland cement replacement by silica fume (up to 10%) and/or granulated blast furnace slag (up to 70%) on the hydration cement (XRD, heat of hydration, non evaporable water content and calcium hydroxide content) curing under sealed conditions and their effect on the mechanical strength. The obtained results indicate that binary cements containing silica fume and ternary cements there was a significant increase of hydration rate at early age. At later a...

  18. Gas Hydrate Stability and Sampling: The Future as Related to the Phase Diagram

    OpenAIRE

    E. Dendy Sloan; Amadeu K. Sum; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2010-01-01

    The phase diagram for methane + water is explained, in relation to hydrate applications, such as in flow assurance and in nature. For natural applications, the phase diagram determines the regions for hydrate formation for two- and three-phase conditions. Impacts are presented for sample preparation and recovery. We discuss an international study for “Round Robin†hydrate sample preparation protocols and testing.

  19. Gas hydrate stability and sampling: the future as related to the phase diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, E. D.; Koh, C. A.; Sum, A. K. [Center for Hydrate Research, Chemical Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The phase diagram for methane plus water is explained, in relation to hydrate applications, such as in flow assurance and in nature. For natural applications, the phase diagram determines the regions for hydrate formation for two- and three-phase conditions. Impacts are presented for sample preparation and recovery. We discuss an international study for 'Round Robin' hydrate sample preparation protocols and testing. (authors)

  20. Acute physiological response to indoor cycling with and without hydration: case and self-control study

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ramos-Jiménez; R. P. Hernández-Torres; A. Wall-Medrano; P. V. Torres-Durán; M. A. Juárez-Oropeza; J. A. Solís Ceballos

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Oral rehydration drinks help maintain physical capacity and hydration during exercise. Objective: Evaluate, in a case and self-control study, the effectiveness of three hydration and exercise protocols on work capacity and physical and psychosomatic stress during indoor cycling (InC). Methods: 14 middle-aged eutrophic men participated in three controlled randomly and not sequentially hydration (~278 mL 6/c 15 min) and exercise (InC/90 min) protocols: No liquids, plain water, or ...

  1. Gas Hydrate Stability and Sampling: The Future as Related to the Phase Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dendy Sloan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The phase diagram for methane + water is explained, in relation to hydrate applications, such as in flow assurance and in nature. For natural applications, the phase diagram determines the regions for hydrate formation for two- and three-phase conditions. Impacts are presented for sample preparation and recovery. We discuss an international study for “Round Robin” hydrate sample preparation protocols and testing.

  2. Proton transfer from water to ketyl radical anion: Assessment of critical size of hydrated cluster and free energy barrier in solution from first principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sohag; Dasgupta, Teesta; Mallik, Bhabani S.

    2016-09-01

    We present the reactivity of an organic intermediate by studying the proton transfer process from water to ketyl radical anion using gas phase electronic structure calculations and the metadynamics method based first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. Our results indicate that during the micro solvation of anion by water molecules systematically, the presence of minimum three water molecules in the gas phase cluster is sufficient to observe the proton transfer event. The analysis of trajectories obtained from initial FPMD simulation of an aqueous solution of the anion does not show any evident of complete transfer of the proton from water. The cooperativity of water molecules and the relatively weak anion-water interaction in liquid state prohibit the full release of the proton. Using biasing potential through first principles metadynamics simulations, we report the observation of proton transfer reaction from water to ketyl radical anion with a barrier height of 16.0 kJ/mol.

  3. Micromechanical measurements of the effect of surfactants on cyclopentane hydrate shell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erika P; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the effect of surfactants on clathrate hydrate growth and morphology, especially particle shell strength and cohesion force, is critical to advancing new strategies to mitigate hydrate plug formation. In this study, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and polysorbate 80 surfactants were included during the growth of cyclopentane hydrates at several concentrations above and below the critical micelle concentration. A novel micromechanical method was applied to determine the force required to puncture the hydrate shell using a glass cantilever (with and without surfactants), with annealing times ranging from immediately after the hydrate nucleated to 90 minutes after formation. It was shown that the puncture force was decreased by the addition of both surfactants up to a maximum of 79%. Over the entire range of annealing times (0-90 minutes), the thickness of the hydrate shell was also measured. However, there was no clear change in shell thickness with the addition of surfactants. The growth rate of the hydrate shell was found to vary less than 15% with the addition of surfactants. The cohesive force between two hydrate particles was measured for each surfactant and found to be reduced by 28% to 78%. Interfacial tension measurements were also performed. Based on these results, microscopic changes to the hydrate shell morphology (due to the presence of surfactants) were proposed to cause the decrease in the force required to break the hydrate shell, since no macroscopic morphology changes were observed. Understanding the hydrate shell strength can be critical to reducing the capillary bridge interaction between hydrate particles or controlling the release of unconverted water from the interior of the hydrate particle, which can cause rapid hydrate conversion.

  4. Micromechanical measurements of the effect of surfactants on cyclopentane hydrate shell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erika P; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the effect of surfactants on clathrate hydrate growth and morphology, especially particle shell strength and cohesion force, is critical to advancing new strategies to mitigate hydrate plug formation. In this study, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and polysorbate 80 surfactants were included during the growth of cyclopentane hydrates at several concentrations above and below the critical micelle concentration. A novel micromechanical method was applied to determine the force required to puncture the hydrate shell using a glass cantilever (with and without surfactants), with annealing times ranging from immediately after the hydrate nucleated to 90 minutes after formation. It was shown that the puncture force was decreased by the addition of both surfactants up to a maximum of 79%. Over the entire range of annealing times (0-90 minutes), the thickness of the hydrate shell was also measured. However, there was no clear change in shell thickness with the addition of surfactants. The growth rate of the hydrate shell was found to vary less than 15% with the addition of surfactants. The cohesive force between two hydrate particles was measured for each surfactant and found to be reduced by 28% to 78%. Interfacial tension measurements were also performed. Based on these results, microscopic changes to the hydrate shell morphology (due to the presence of surfactants) were proposed to cause the decrease in the force required to break the hydrate shell, since no macroscopic morphology changes were observed. Understanding the hydrate shell strength can be critical to reducing the capillary bridge interaction between hydrate particles or controlling the release of unconverted water from the interior of the hydrate particle, which can cause rapid hydrate conversion. PMID:26618773

  5. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  6. Acoustical method of whole-body hydration status monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvazyan, A. P.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Calhoun, M.; Utter, A.

    2016-07-01

    An acoustical handheld hydration monitor (HM) for assessing the water balance of the human body was developed. Dehydration is a critical public health problem. Many elderly over age of 65 are particularly vulnerable as are infants and young children. Given that dehydration is both preventable and reversible, the need for an easy-to-perform method