WorldWideScience

Sample records for c-induced genotoxic damage

  1. Effect of recombinant human erythropoietin on mitomycin C-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rat kidney and heart tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rjiba-Touati, K; Ayed-Boussema, I; Guedri, Y; Achour, A; Bacha, H; Abid-Essefi, S

    2016-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is an antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the prolonged use of the drug may result in a serious heart and kidney injuries. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has recently been shown to exert an important cytoprotective effect in experimental brain injury and ischemic acute renal failure. The aim of the present work is to investigate the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of rhEPO against MMC-induced oxidative damage and genotoxicity. Our results showed that MMC induced oxidative stress and DNA damage. rhEPO administration in any treatment conditions decreased oxidative damage induced by MMC. It reduced malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels. rhEPO ameliorated reduced glutathione plus oxidized glutathione modulation and the increased catalase activity after MMC treatment. Furthermore, rhEPO restored DNA damage caused by MMC. We concluded that rhEPO administration especially in pretreatment condition protected rats against MMC-induced heart and renal oxidative stress and genotoxicity. PMID:25733728

  2. DNA damage in caged Gammarus fossarum amphipods: A tool for freshwater genotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacaze, Emilie [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Devaux, Alain [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Mons, Raphael [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Bony, Sylvie [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Garric, Jeanne [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Geffard, Alain [EA 2069 URVVC-SE, Laboratoire d' Eco-Toxicologie, UFR Sciences, Moulin de la Housse, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Geffard, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.geffard@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this study was to propose a tool for freshwater environmental genotoxicity assessment using Gammarus fossarum, a high ecologically relevant species. In a first part, gammarids were caged upstream and downstream wastewater treatment plant effluent output. The sensitivity of genotoxic responses of haemocytes, oocytes and spermatozoa was compared using the Comet assay. Spermatozoa appeared to be the most sensitive, suitable and relevant cell type for genotoxicity risk assessment. In a second part, a watershed-scale study was conducted over 2 years to evaluate the applicability of our caging procedure. The genotoxic impact of a contamination was followed, taking into account seasonal variability. DNA damage in spermatozoa exhibited low basal level and low variability in control upstream sites, providing a reliable discrimination of polluted sites. Finally, DNA damage in caged G. fossarum has been proved to be a sensitive and reproducible tool for freshwater genotoxicity assessment. - Highlights: > Two different contamination contexts: WWTP effluents and polymetallic contamination. > DNA damage in caged Gammarus fossarum is a sensitive tool for freshwater quality assessment. > Spermatozoa is the most relevant cell type for biomonitoring freshwater genotoxicity. > Combining biomarker responses with analytical chemistry provides rich ecotoxicological information. - We propose an approach to assess freshwater genotoxicity in the field based on caged Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea, amphipoda).

  3. Genotoxic damage in polychaetes: a study of species and cell-type sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ceri; Galloway, Tamara

    2008-06-30

    The marine environment is becoming increasingly contaminated by environmental pollutants with the potential to damage DNA, with marine sediments acting as a sink for many of these contaminants. Understanding genotoxic responses in sediment-dwelling marine organisms, such as polychaetes, is therefore of increasing importance. This study is an exploration of species-specific and cell-specific differences in cell sensitivities to DNA-damaging agents in polychaete worms, aimed at increasing fundamental knowledge of their responses to genotoxic damage. The sensitivities of coelomocytes from three polychaetes species of high ecological relevance, i.e. the lugworm Arenicola marina, the harbour ragworm Nereis diversicolor and the king ragworm Nereis virens to genotoxic damage are compared, and differences in sensitivities of their different coelomic cell types determined by use of the comet assay. A. marina was found to be the most sensitive to genotoxic damage induced by the direct-acting mutagen methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and showed dose-dependent responses to MMS and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo(a)pyrene. Significant differences in sensitivity were also measured for the different types of coelomocyte. Eleocytes were more sensitive to induction of DNA damage than amoebocytes in both N. virens and N. diversicolor. Spermatozoa from A. marina showed significant DNA damage following in vitro exposure to MMS, but were less sensitive to DNA damage than coelomocytes. This investigation has clearly demonstrated that different cell types within the same species and different species within the polychaetes show significantly different responses to genotoxic insult. These findings are discussed in terms of the relationship between cell function and sensitivity and their implications for the use of polychaetes in environmental genotoxicity studies. PMID:18579434

  4. Genotoxic damage in pathology anatomy laboratory workers exposed to formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a chemical traditionally used in pathology and anatomy laboratories as a tissue preservative. Several epidemiological studies of occupational exposure to FA have indicated an increased risk of nasopharyngeal cancers in industrial workers, embalmers and pathology anatomists. There is also a clear evidence of nasal squamous cell carcinomas from inhalation studies in the rat. The postulated mode of action for nasal tumours in rats was considered biologically plausible and considered likely to be relevant to humans. Based on the available data IARC, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, has recently classified FA as a human carcinogen. Although the in vitro genotoxic as well as the in vivo carcinogenic potentials of FA are well documented in mammalian cells and in rodents, evidence for genotoxic effects and carcinogenic properties in humans is insufficient and conflicting thus remains to be more documented. To evaluate the genetic effects of long-term occupational exposure to FA a group of 30 Pathological Anatomy laboratory workers was tested for a variety of biological endpoints, cytogenetic tests (micronuclei, MN; sister chromatid exchange, SCE) and comet assay. The level of exposure to FA was evaluated near the breathing zone of workers, time weighted average of exposure was calculated for each subject. The association between the biomarkers and polymorphic genes of xenobiotic metabolising and DNA repair enzymes was also assessed. The mean level of exposure was 0.44 ± 0.08 ppm (0.04-1.58 ppm). MN frequency was significantly higher (p = 0.003) in the exposed subjects (5.47 ± 0.76) when compared with controls (3.27 ± 0.69). SCE mean value was significantly higher (p < 0.05) among the exposed group (6.13 ± 0.29) compared with control group (4.49 ± 0.16). Comet assay data showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) of TL in FA-exposed workers (60.00 ± 2.31) with respect to the control group (41.85 ± 1.97). A positive correlation was

  5. Detection of primary DNA damage: applicability to biomonitoring of genotoxic occupational exposure and in clinical therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Oesch, F; Hengstler, J.G.; Arand, M; Fuchs, J.

    1995-01-01

    The biological effect of putative genotoxic chemicals in the work place environment was monitored in peripheral mononuclear blood cells of exposed workers. DNA strand breaks, alkali-labile sites of DNA and DNA cross-links were measured using the alkaline filter elution method. A dose dependent increase in DNA damage was found in sterilization workers exposed to ethylene oxide and metal workers with exposure towards N-nitrosodiethanolamine. Two subpopulations with different response to the ext...

  6. Anti-genotoxic ability of α-tocopherol and Anthocyanin to counteract fish DNA damage induced by musk xylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Lucia; Mottola, Filomena; Santonastaso, Marianna; Saputo, Valentina; Cusano, Elena; Costagliola, Domenico; Suero, Teresa; Pacifico, Severina; Stingo, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    Many compounds released into the environment are able to interact with genetic material. The main purpose of genetic toxicology is to investigate the adverse effects of genotoxic molecules such as reduced fitness, changes in gene frequencies and their impact on genetic diversity in populations following genotoxic exposure. However, the ecological effects of many genotoxic compounds remain poorly understood. The aim of this research was to evaluate the genotoxic activity of an artificial musk (musk xylene, MX) and the potential anti-genotoxicity against this chemical compound of two antioxidant substances (α-tocopherol and an anthocyanins enriched extract). The studies were performed both in vivo and in vitro, using the teleost Danio rerio and the DLEC (Dicentrarchus labrax embryonic cells) cell line. We carried out the exposure to these substances at different times. DNA and cell damage and their possible repair were detected by various experimental approaches: DNA strand breaks (Comet Assay), degree of apoptosis (Diffusion Assay) and molecular alterations at the genomic level (RAPD-PCR technique). Data were collected and analyzed for statistical significance using the Student's t test. The results of this study showed that MX exhibited a genotoxic activity even after short exposure times. The anti-genotoxicity experiments evidenced that both α-tocopherol and Anthocyanin were able to contrast the genotoxic effects induced by MX, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26407710

  7. Association of HSP70 and genotoxic damage in lymphocytes of workers exposed to coke-oven emission

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Chengfeng; Chen, Sheng; Li, Jizhao; Hai, Tao; Lu, Qiaofa; Sun, Enling; Wang, Ruibo; Tanguay, Robert M.; Wu, Tangchun

    2002-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) have been reported to protect cells, tissues, and organisms against damage from a wide variety of stressful stimuli. Whether they protect against deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in individuals exposed to environmental stresses and chemical carcinogens is unknown. In the study, we investigated the association between Hsp70 levels (the most abundant mammalian Hsp) and genotoxic damage in lymphocytes of workers exposed to coke-oven emission using Western dot blot an...

  8. Importance of UVA photoprotection as shown by genotoxic related endpoints: DNA damage and p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to demonstrate the importance of photoprotection in the UVA range (320-400 nm), an in vitro approach where sun formulations are spread on a quartz slide, and placed over human keratinocytes in culture is proposed as a convenient test for photoprotection assessment at the DNA level. Using the comet assay, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage or drug-induced DNA breaks were assessed. Accumulation of p53 protein was also studied as a marker for UV-induced genotoxic stress. Such a method was used to compare two formulations with different photostability. Spectroradiometry showed that a photounstable formulation lost its effectiveness in UVA screening when pre-irradiated by simulated sunlight (UVB + UVA). As a consequence, it was also shown that this formulation was not as protective as the photostable one at the genomic level. These data demonstrate that the loss of absorbing efficiency within UVA wavelengths due to photounstability may have detrimental consequences leading to impairments implicated in genotoxic events

  9. Importance of UVA photoprotection as shown by genotoxic related endpoints: DNA damage and p53 status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrot, Laurent [L' Oreal Research, Life Sciences Research, Phototoxicology Unit, Genotoxicity Group 1, av. E. Schueller, 93600 Aulnay-Sous-Bois (France)]. E-mail: lmarrot@rd.loreal.com; Belaidi, Jean-Philippe [L' Oreal Research, Life Sciences Research, Phototoxicology Unit, Genotoxicity Group 1, av. E. Schueller, 93600 Aulnay-Sous-Bois (France); Meunier, Jean-Roch [L' Oreal Research, Life Sciences Research, Phototoxicology Unit, Genotoxicity Group 1, av. E. Schueller, 93600 Aulnay-Sous-Bois (France)

    2005-04-01

    In order to demonstrate the importance of photoprotection in the UVA range (320-400 nm), an in vitro approach where sun formulations are spread on a quartz slide, and placed over human keratinocytes in culture is proposed as a convenient test for photoprotection assessment at the DNA level. Using the comet assay, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage or drug-induced DNA breaks were assessed. Accumulation of p53 protein was also studied as a marker for UV-induced genotoxic stress. Such a method was used to compare two formulations with different photostability. Spectroradiometry showed that a photounstable formulation lost its effectiveness in UVA screening when pre-irradiated by simulated sunlight (UVB + UVA). As a consequence, it was also shown that this formulation was not as protective as the photostable one at the genomic level. These data demonstrate that the loss of absorbing efficiency within UVA wavelengths due to photounstability may have detrimental consequences leading to impairments implicated in genotoxic events.

  10. Comparison of Genotoxic Damage in Monolayer Cell and Three-Dimensional Tissue-Like Cell Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behravesh, E.; Emami, K.; Wu, H.; Gonda, S.

    Risk assessment for the biological effects of high-energy charged particles, ranging from protons to iron nuclei, encountered in space is essential for the success of long-term space exploration. While prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell models, developed in our lab and others, have advanced our understanding of many aspects of genotoxicity, there is a need for in vitro models to assess the risk to humans from space radiation insults that are representative of the cellular interactions present in tissues and capable of quantifying genotoxic damage. Toward this overall goal, the objective of this study is to examine the effect of the localized microenvironment of cells, either cultured as 2-dimensional monolayers (2D) or 3-dimensional aggregates (3D), on the rate and type of genotoxic damage, and to examine those effects after the normal cell repair processes. Rodent transgenic cell lines containing 50-70 copies of a transgene were utilized to provide the enhanced sensitivity required to enable the identification and quantification of the types of mutational events incurred from exposure to iron charged particles which makes up a significant portion of Space radiation. Although the LacI target of this system is ~1000 bps, each copy of the entire construct is over 45 kbps. The utilization of this system allows for the quantification of mutational frequency and type for the LacI target as well as assessment of DNA damage for the entire 45 kbp construct. The samples were exposed to high-LET iron charged particles at Brookhaven National Laboratory's AGS/NSRL facilities for a total dose of 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy and recovered after 0, 1, and 7 days of tissue culture post-irradiation. The mutational frequency was found to be greater for the 3D samples when compared to the 2D samples at all doses. In addition, there was increased mutational frequency with 7 days culture post irradiation when compared to samples analyzed immediately after exposure. DNA sequencing of

  11. Electrochemiluminescent Arrays for Cytochrome P450-Activated Genotoxicity Screening. DNA Damage from Benzo[a]pyrene Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvastkovs, Eli G.; So, Minjeong; Krishnan, Sadagopan; Bajrami, Besnik; Tarun, Maricar; Jansson, Ingela; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2007-01-01

    Arrays suitable for genotoxicity screening are reported that generate metabolites from cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) in thin-film spots. Array spots containing DNA, various human cyt P450s, and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) generating metallopolymer [Ru(bpy)2PVP10]2+ were exposed to H2O2 to activate the enzymes. ECL from all spots was visualized simultaneously using a CCD camera. Using benzo[a]pyrene as a test substrate, enzyme activity for producing DNA damage in the arrays was found in the order CYP1B1 > CYP1A2 > CYP1A1 > CYP2E1 > myoglobin, the same as the order of their metabolic activity. Thus, these arrays estimate the relative propensity of different enzymes to produce genotoxic metabolites. This is the first demonstration of ECL arrays for high-throughput in vitro genotoxicity screening. PMID:17261025

  12. Procyanidins from grape seeds protect against phorbol ester-induced oxidative cellular and genotoxic damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin LU; Wan-zhou ZHAO; Zai CHANG; Wen-xing CHEN; Lin LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inhibitory effects of Vitis vinifera procyanidins (PAs) on carcinogen-induced oxidative stress.METHODS: The single cell gel electrophoresis technique (comet assay) was employed to detect DNA damage induced by the carcinogen phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The release of hydrogen peroxidase from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) was assayed by the horseradish peroxidase-mediated oxidation of phenol red. The microplate assay was used to detect the presence of oxidative products by means of 2',7'-dichlorofiuorescindiacetate (DCFH-DA). The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of liver mitochondria was assayed, based on the ability of SOD to inhibit the generation of superoxidate anions by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. The malondialdehyde (MDA) level was determined by the thiobarbimric acid (TBA) assay. RESULTS: DNA of NIH3T3 cells was significantly damaged after addition of PMA. The length of the comet tail was observed ,while in normal cells the comet tail could not be observed. PAs showed significant protective effects on carcinogen PMA-induced DNA damage. Through assessment of DCFH-DA oxidation, PAs were shown to inhibit the PMA-induced release of hydrogen peroxide by PMNs, and to inhibit respiratory burst activity in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Ex vivo study showed that serum from rats administered with PAs displayed similar effects in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, PAs suppressed liver mitochondrial lipid peroxidation induced by PMA. PAs protected the activity of SOD and decreased the level of MDA in liver mitochondria damaged by PMA. CONCLUSION: Dietary PAs from grape seeds protect against carcinogen-induced oxidative cellular and genotoxic damage.

  13. DNA-damaging potency and genotoxicity of aflatoxin M1 in somatic cells in vivo of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, T; Ogawa, H I; Ryo, H; Fujikawa, K

    1995-05-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a metabolic hydroxylation product of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), and the parent compound were comparatively assayed for DNA-damaging potency and genotoxicity in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster using, respectively, the mei-9a mei-41D5 DNA repair test and the mwh/flr3 wing spot test. In the repair test, larval stock, consisting of meiotic recombination-deficient double mutant mei-9a mei-41D5 males and repair-proficient females, was exposed to the test agents, and the preferential killing of the mutant larvae was taken as evidence of the DNA-damaging effect. In this test, AFM1 was registered as a DNA-damaging agent with an activity approximately 3-fold lower than that of AFB1. In the wing spot test, where larval flies, trans-heterozygous for the somatic cell markers mwh and flr3, were treated and the wings were inspected at adulthood for spots manifesting the phenotypes of the markers, AFM1 exerted a genotoxic effect compatible to that of AFB1. Based on these results and other data, we predict that AFM1 may be genotoxic in mammalian in-vivo systems as well. PMID:7666765

  14. ZnO nanoparticle tracking from uptake to genotoxic damage in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condello, Maria; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Barone, Flavia; Condello, Giancarlo; Degan, Paolo; Meschini, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are widely used both in the industry and in biomedical applications for their chemical and physical nanomaterial properties. It is therefore essential to go in depth into the cytotoxicity mechanisms and interactions between nanomaterials and cells. The aim of this work was to evaluate the dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles and their uptake, from a few minutes after treatments up to 24h. ZnO nanoparticles routes of entry into the human colon carcinoma cells (LoVo) were followed at different times by a thorough ultrastructural investigation and semiquantitative analysis. The intracellular release of Zn(2+) ions by Zinquin fluorescent dye, and phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) expression were evaluated. The genotoxic potential of ZnO nanoparticles was also investigated by determining the levels of 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). The experimental data show that ZnO nanoparticles entered LoVo cells by either passive diffusion or endocytosis or both, depending on the agglomeration state of the nanomaterial. ZnO nanoparticles coming into contact with acid pH of lysosomes altered organelles structure, resulting in the release of Zn(2+) ions. The simultaneous presence of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn(2+) ions in the LoVo cells determined the formation of reactive oxygen species at the mitochondrial and nuclear level, inducing severe DNA damage. PMID:27317967

  15. Development of human cell biosensor system for genotoxicity detection based on DNA damage-induced gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human exposure to genotoxic agents in the environment and everyday life represents a serious health threat. Fast and reliable assessment of genotoxicity of chemicals is of main importance in the fields of new chemicals and drug development as well as in environmental monitoring. The tumor suppressor gene p21, the major downstream target gene of activated p53 which is responsible for cell cycle arrest following DNA damage, has been shown to be specifically up-regulated by genotoxic carcinogens. The aim of our study was to develop a human cell-based biosensor system for simple and fast detection of genotoxic agents. Metabolically active HepG2 human hepatoma cells were transfected with plasmid encoding Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) under the control of the p21 promoter (p21HepG2GFP). DNA damage was induced by genotoxic agents with known mechanisms of action. The increase in fluorescence intensity, due to p21 mediated EGFP expression, was measured with a fluorescence microplate reader. The viability of treated cells was determined by the colorimetric MTS assay. The directly acting alkylating agent methylmethane sulphonate (MMS) showed significant increase in EGFP production after 48 h at 20 μg/mL. The indirectly acting carcinogen benzo(a)pyren (BaP) and the cross-linking agent cisplatin (CisPt) induced a dose- dependent increase in EGFP fluorescence, which was already significant at concentrations 0.13 μg/mL and 0.41 μg/mL, respectively. Vinblastine (VLB), a spindle poison that does not induce direct DNA damage, induced only a small increase in EGFP fluorescence intensity after 24 h at the lowest concentration (0.1 μg/mL), while exposure to higher concentrations was associated with significantly reduced cell viability. The results of our study demonstrated that this novel assay based on the stably transformed cell line p21HepG2GFP can be used as a fast and simple biosensor system for detection of genetic damage caused by chemical agents

  16. The role of intracellular redox imbalance in nanomaterial induced cellular damage and genotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Chauché, Caroline; Brown, David M;

    2015-01-01

    (ROS) production, neutralizing ROS (scavengers), enzymatic nucleotide pool sanitation, and DNA repair. This review discusses the importance of the maintenance of the redox balance in this context before examining studies that have investigated engineered NM induced redox imbalance and genotoxicity...

  17. Genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cadmium compounds: impact on oxidative DNA damage and nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtle, Tanja; Ebert, Franziska; Thuy, Christina; Richter, Constanze; Mullenders, Leon H F; Hartwig, Andrea

    2010-02-15

    Water-soluble and particulate cadmium compounds are carcinogenic to humans. While direct interactions with DNA are unlikely to account for carcinogenicity, induction of oxidative DNA damage and interference with DNA repair processes might be more relevant underlying modes of action (recently summarized, for example, in Joseph , P. (2009) Tox. Appl. Pharmacol. 238 , 271 - 279). The present study aimed to compare genotoxic effects of particulate CdO and soluble CdCl(2) in cultured human cells (A549, VH10hTert). Both cadmium compounds increased the baseline level of oxidative DNA damage. Even more pronounced, both cadmium compounds inhibited the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of BPDE-induced bulky DNA adducts and UVC-induced photolesions in a dose-dependent manner at noncytotoxic concentrations. Thereby, the uptake of cadmium in the nuclei strongly correlated with the repair inhibition of bulky DNA adducts, indicating that independent of the cadmium compound applied Cd(2+) is the common species responsible for the observed repair inhibition. Regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms in human cells, CdCl(2) (as shown before by Meplan, C., Mann, K. and Hainaut, P. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274 , 31663 - 31670 ) and CdO altered the conformation of the zinc binding domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In further studies applying only CdCl(2), cadmium decreased the total nuclear protein level of XPC, which is believed to be the principle initiator of global genome NER. This led to diminished association of XPC to sites of local UVC damage, resulting in decreased recruitment of further NER proteins. Additionally, CdCl(2) strongly disturbed the disassembly of XPC and XPA. In summary, our data indicate a general nucleotide excision repair inhibition by cadmium compounds, which is most likely caused by a diminished assembly and disassembly of the NER machinery. These data reveal new insights into the mechanisms involved in cadmium carcinogenesis and provide further

  18. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Guo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation, but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner.

  19. Effects of chronic exposure to benzalkonium chloride in Oncorhynchus mykiss: cholinergic neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, peroxidative damage and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, S C; Nunes, B; Rodrigues, S; Nunes, R; Fernandes, J; Correia, A T

    2016-07-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) is one of the most used conservatives in pharmaceutical preparations. However, its use is limited to a small set of external use formulations, due to its high toxicity. Benzalkonium chloride effects are related to the potential exertion of deleterious effects, mediated via oxidative stress and through interaction with membrane enzymes, leading to cellular damage. To address the ecotoxicity of this specific compound rainbow trouts were chronically exposed to BAC at environmental relevant concentrations (ranging from 0.100 to 1.050mg/L), and the biological response of cholinergic neurotoxicity, modulation of the antioxidant defense, phase II metabolism, lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity was studied. The obtained results showed a dual pattern of antioxidant response, with significant alterations in catalase activity (starting at 0.180mg/L), and lipid peroxidation, for intermediate (0.180 and 0.324mg/L) concentrations. No significant alterations occurred for glutathione-S-transferases activity. An unexpected increased of the acetylcholinesterase activity was also recorded for the individuals exposed to higher concentrations of BAC (starting at 0.180mg/L). Furthermore, exposure to BAC resulted in the establishment of genotoxic alterations, observable (for the specific case of the comet assay results) for all tested BAC concentrations. However, and considering that the oxidative response was not devisable, other mechanisms may be involved in the genotoxic effects reported here. PMID:27280532

  20. Histopathological, oxidative damage, biochemical, and genotoxicity alterations in hepatic rats exposed to deltamethrin: modulatory effects of garlic (Allium sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncir, Marwa; Ben Salah, Ghada; Kamoun, Hassen; Makni Ayadi, Fatma; Khabir, Abdelmajid; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Saoudi, Mongi

    2016-06-01

    Deltamethrin is a pesticide widely used as a synthetic pyrethroid. The aim of this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of deltamethrin to induce oxidative stress and changes in biochemical parameters, hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity in female rats following a short-term (30 days) oral exposure and attenuation of these effects by Allium sativum extract. Indeed, Allium sativum is known to be a good antioxidant food resource which helps destroy free radical particles. Our results showed that deltamethrin treatment caused an increase in liver enzyme activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); and hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. However, it induced a decrease in activities of hepatic catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (p < 0.01). Allium sativum extract normalized significantly (p < 0.01) the mentioned parameters in deltamethrin-treated rats. For genotoxic evaluation, deltamethrin treatment showed a significant increase in frequencies of micronucleus in bone-marrow cells. Micronucleus formation is an indicator of chromosomal damage which has been increasingly used to detect the genotoxic potential of environmental pests. The present study showed that Allium sativum diminished the adverse effects induced by this synthetic pyrethroid insecticide. PMID:26974685

  1. Electrochemiluminescent Arrays for Cytochrome P450-Activated Genotoxicity Screening. DNA Damage from Benzo[a]pyrene Metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Hvastkovs, Eli G.; So, Minjeong; Krishnan, Sadagopan; Bajrami, Besnik; Tarun, Maricar; Jansson, Ingela; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2007-01-01

    Arrays suitable for genotoxicity screening are reported that generate metabolites from cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) in thin-film spots. Array spots containing DNA, various human cyt P450s, and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) generating metallopolymer [Ru(bpy)2PVP10]2+ were exposed to H2O2 to activate the enzymes. ECL from all spots was visualized simultaneously using a CCD camera. Using benzo[a]pyrene as a test substrate, enzyme activity for producing DNA damage in the arrays was found in th...

  2. Estimation of genotoxic damage in irradiated patients (l8fdg) in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to determine the genotoxic (mutagenic) by the MN assay, the radiation dose administered to the patient undergoing medical radiological examinations, with special emphasis on cancer patients referred to our unit for studies of PET-CT with 2 - (18F)-Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18FDG).

  3. Evaluation of genotoxic risk and oxidative DNA damage in mammalian cells exposed to mycotoxins, patulin and citrinin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites with very diversified toxic effects in humans and animals. In the present study, patulin (PAT) and citrinin (CTN), two prevalent mycotoxins, were evaluated for their genotoxic effects and oxidative damage to mammalian cells, including Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1), human peripheral blood lymphocytes, and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). PAT, but not CTN, caused a significant dose-dependent increase in sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency in both CHO-K1 and human lymphocytes. PAT also elevated the levels of DNA gap and break in treated CHO-K1. In the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay, exposure of HEK293 to concentrations above 15 μM of PAT induced DNA strand breaks; the tail moment values also greatly increased after posttreatment with formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg). This suggests that in human cells PAT is a potent clastogen with the ability to cause oxidative damage to DNA. However, no significant change in the tail moment values in CTN-treated cultures was found, suggesting that CTN is not genotoxic to HEK293. Incubation of HEK293 with CTN increased the mRNA level of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), but not that of human 8-hydroxyguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1). PAT treatment did not modulate the expression of either HSP70 or hOGG1 mRNA

  4. Comparison of Genotoxic Damage in Monolayer Cell Cultures and Three-Dimensional Tissue-Like Cell Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behravesh, E.; Emami, K.; Wu, H.; Gonda, S.

    2004-01-01

    Assessing the biological risks associated with exposure to the high-energy charged particles encountered in space is essential for the success of long-term space exploration. Although prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell models developed in our laboratory and others have advanced our understanding of many aspects of genotoxicity, in vitro models are needed to assess the risk to humans from space radiation insults. Such models must be representative of the cellular interactions present in tissues and capable of quantifying I genotoxic damage. Toward this overall goal, the objectives of this study were to examine the effect of the localized microenvironment of cells, cultured as either 2-dimensional (2D) monolayers or 3-dimensional (3D) aggregates, on the rate and type of genotoxic damage resulting from exposure to iron charged particles, a significant portion of space radiation. We used rodent transgenic cell lines containing 50-70 copies of a LacI transgene to provide the enhanced sensitivity required to quantify mutational frequency and type in the 1,100-bp LacI target as well as assessment of DNA,damage to the entire 45-kbp construct. Cultured cells were exposed to high-enerir on charged particles at Brookhaven National Laboratory s Alternating Gradient Synchrotron facility for a total dose of 0, 0.1, 0.25,0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 Gy and allowed to recover for 0, 1, or 7 days, after which mutational type and frequency were evaluated. The mutational frequency was found to be higher in 3D samples than in 2D samples at all radiation doses. Mutational frequency also was higher at 7 days after irradiation than immediately after exposure. DNA sequencing of the mutant targets revealed that deletional mutations contributed an increasingly high percentage (up to 27%) of all mutations in cells as the dose was increased from 0.5 to 2 Gy. Several mutants also showed large and complex deletions in multiple locations within the Lac1 target. However, no differences in mutational type were

  5. The alkaline comet assay used in evaluation of genotoxic damage of drinking water disinfection by-products (bromoform and chloroform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messaouda Khallef

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The alkaline comet assay (pH 12.3 is a useful method for monitoring genotoxic effects of environmental pollutants in the root nuclei of Allium cepa and various plants; it allows the detection of single- and double-strand breaks, incomplete excision-repair sites and cross-links. It has been introduced to detect even small changes in DNA structure. It is a technically simple, highly sensitive, fast and economic test which detects in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity (DNA integrity and packing mode in any cell types examined, and requires just a few cells for its execution (Liman et al., 2011; Yıldız et al., 2009. Chloroform and bromoform are the most important trihalomethanes found in drinking water. Different concentrations of bromoform (25, 50, 75and 100µg/ml and chloroform (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water was used as a negative control and methyl methansulfonate (MMS-10 µg/ml as positive control. All obtained data were subjected to statistical analyses by using SPSS 15.0 for Windows software. For comparison purposes, Duncan multiple range tests using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA were employed and p<0.05 was accepted as the test of significance. Comet assay results showed that DNA damage was significant at p <0.05 for the different concentrations of chloroform and bromoform compared to the negative control which has a damage rate equal to 3.5 ± 0.7 and the positive control which has damage rate equal to 13.5 ± 2.12. The exposure of root tip cells to these disinfection by-products increases DNA damage. All concentrations examined in this study of bromoform and chloroform cause significant harm, which could be due to DNA damage induced by oxidative stress. The measurement of DNA damage in the nuclei of higher plant tissues is a new area of study with SCGE. This assay could be incorporated into in situ monitoring of atmosphere, water and soil: the comet assay allows a fast detection without

  6. The genotoxic effects of mobile phone waves on induction of chromosomal damages in embryos of Balb/C mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Baharara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, the widespread use of microwave producing instruments specially mobile phones; result in growing concern regarding the possible effects associated with these waves on human health. In the present study investigated the genotoxic effects of mobile phone radiation in adult mice (Balb/C and their embryos. Methods: In this experimental research pregnant mice were irradiated with mobile phone for 4 days during gestational period from 14th to 18th days of gestation for 6h/day from 9AM until 15PM. At the end of treatment period, euthanized the dams on day 18.5. Then embryos in 18.5th day of gestation were extracted. At first the morphology of embryos was studied, then documented their weight and CR length. For assessment of possible genetic damages in erythrocytes the blood was taken from their hearts and smear was prepared. Spleen tissue was prepared for histological studies. Smear was prepared from peripheral blood and bone marrow of mice and stained with May Grunowald and Gimsa. data were analyzed using t-test & ANOVA. Results: In experimental group, mobile phone radiation decreased embryos weight (P=0.04 but no change was observed in CR length. Megakaryocytes and red blood cells of spleen were significantly increased (P=0.002 and P<0.05, respectively. However, lymphocytes.numbers and micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood erythrocytes in experimental embryos and pregnant mice did not change. Interestingly, micronucleus frequency in polychromatic erythrocytes of bone marrow of pregnant mice was significantly increased (P <0.001.Conclusion: Mobile phone radiation (940 MHZ had genotoxic effects and increased micronucleus formation in polychromatic erythrocytes of bone marrow in pregnant mice.

  7. Genotoxic damage induced by isopropanol in germinal and somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Ana María; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2011-12-24

    Isopropanol (isopropyl alcohol, 2-propanol, IPA) is a volatile solvent widely used in domestic or industrial environments and reported as innocuous in various test systems. The aim of this work was to search for in vivo genotoxic effects of IPA in Drosophila melanogaster, studying its ability to induce nondisjunction (ND) in females, sex linked recessive lethals (SLRL) in males, and somatic mutation and/or recombination (SMART) in larvae. Treatments were acute (60min) and were administered via inhalation. IPA had low toxicity in adult flies (75% IPA mortality index, MI=12.7% (females) and 2.6% (males)) and larvae (MI=14.3%, 75% IPA). Female fertility was severely affected during the first 24h (brood I, BI) after treatment, but, afterwards, control values were recovered. IPA induced a 50-fold increase of ND (%) in 24h old females, and a six-fold rise in 4-5 d old BI offspring. Nondisjunction frequencies (%) in the offspring of broods II to V (24h in each case) were similar to control values. IPA doses of 25% and 50% (v/v), tested in 24h old females, showed a significant dose-dependent increase of ND(%)in BI only, with control values in subsequent broods. Flies gave normal offspring when kept in regular media for 24h before mating. The eye spot test (SMART) showed a significant increase at 50% IPA (pDNA directly, but perturbations of the nuclear membrane may be responsible for induction of ND. PMID:22001194

  8. Curcumin prevents perfluorooctane sulfonate-induced genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage in rat peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, Dilek; Çelik, Ayla

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a man-made fluorosurfactant and global pollutant. PFOS a persistent and bioaccumulative compound, and it is widely distributed in humans and wildlife. Therefore, it was added to Annex B of the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants in May 2009. Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound abundant in the rhizome of the perennial herb turmeric. It is commonly used as a dietary spice and coloring agent in cooking and anecdotally as an herb in traditional Asian medicine. In this study, male rats were treated with three different PFOS doses (0.6, 1.25, and 2.5 mg/kg) and one dose of curcumin, from Curcuma longa (80 mg/kg), and combined three doses of PFOS with 80 mg/kg dose of curcumin by gavage for 30 d at 48 h intervals. Here, we investigated the DNA damage via single-cell gel electrophoresis/comet assay and micronucleus test in rat peripheral blood in vivo. It is found that all doses of PFOS increased micronucleus frequency (p < 0.05) and strongly induced DNA damage in peripheral blood in two different parameters; the damaged cell percent and genetically damage index, and curcumin prevented the formation of DNA damage induced by PFOS. Results showed that curcumin inhibited DNA damage including GDI at certain levels at statistical manner, 30.07%, 54.41%, and 36.99% for 0.6 mg/kg, 1.25 mg/kg, and 2.5 mg/kg. PMID:25950456

  9. Genotoxic damage in mine workers exposed to diesel exhaust, and the effects of glutathione transferase genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Gaskell, M; Martin, E A;

    2005-01-01

    . Poole, R.P. Bos, Exposure to dust and particle-associated 1-nitropyrene of drivers of diesel-powered equipment in underground mining, Ann. Occp. Hyg. 47 (2003) 379-388]. Analysis of DNA damage by the Comet assay on frozen blood samples was performed on the total study group and showed significantly...... minor, unidentified adducts that had similar chromatographic properties to 1-NP adducts, and smoking did not have any effect on adduct levels. No significant effects of the genotypes of GSTM1, GSTP1 and GSTT1 on DNA-adducts and on DNA damage as measured by the Comet assay were found in the total study...

  10. Internal distribution of uranium and associated genotoxic damages in the chronically exposed bivalve Corbicula fluminea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.simon@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat, 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Adam, Christelle; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat, 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    Uranium (U) internal distribution and involved effects in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been studied after direct chronic exposure (90 d, 10 {mu}g.L-1). U distribution was assessed at the subcellular level (Metal Rich Granules -MRG-, pellets and cytosol fractions) in two main organs of the bivalve (gills and visceral mass). Micro-localisation was investigated by TEM-EDX analysis in the gills epithelium. DNA damage in gill and hemolymph samples was measured by the Comet assay. The 90-d exposure period led to a significant increase of U concentration in gills over time (x5) and a large U quantity in subcellular granules in gills. Finally, a significant increase (x2) in DNA damage was noted in exposed gills and haemocytes. This study shows that the accumulation levels and consequently the potential toxicity cannot be successfully predicted only on the basis of concentration in water or in tissues and subcellular fractions after chronic exposure. - Highlights: > Relevant information concerning the chronic impact of uranium on biota is scarce. > We study its biological speciation to explain bioavailability, accumulation, toxicity. > 80% of U accumulated was measured in the pellet fraction (organelles + granules/MRG). > Chronic exposure to U induced genetic damage in gill and haemolymph cells of the bivalve.

  11. Role of p53 gene in apoptotic repair of genotoxic tissue damage in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Fumio; Kakihara, Hiroyo; Kunugita, Naoki; Ootsuyama, Akira; Norimura, Toshiyuki [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    When DNA is damaged by exposure to a small amount of radiation, it is repaired efficiently by innate mechanisms. However, if cellular damage is more extensive, DNA repair cannot be adequately completed. To clarify the role of the p53 gene in apoptotic tissue repair, the incidence of in-vivo radiation-induced somatic mutation was evaluated by measuring the T cell receptor (TCR) gene expression in p53(+/+) and p53(-/-) mice. After {gamma}-irradiation with 3 Gy,the TCR mutation frequency (MF) was higher in p53(+/+) mice than in the controls. However, when the mice were exposed to 3 Gy at a low dose rate, the TCR MF did not increase in the p53(+/+) mice, whereas it increased and remained elevated in p53(-/-) mice, which are unable to induce apoptosis. In p53(+/+) mice, the TCR MF peaked 9 days after {gamma}-irradiation with 3 Gy at a high dose rate, and then gradually decreased with a half-life of about 13 days. However, in p53(-/-) mice, the peak level of the TCR MF did not decline significantly with time. Hence, complete repair of mutagenic damage in irradiated tissues requires the integration of DNA repair and p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair. (author)

  12. Role of p53 gene in apoptotic repair of genotoxic tissue damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When DNA is damaged by exposure to a small amount of radiation, it is repaired efficiently by innate mechanisms. However, if cellular damage is more extensive, DNA repair cannot be adequately completed. To clarify the role of the p53 gene in apoptotic tissue repair, the incidence of in-vivo radiation-induced somatic mutation was evaluated by measuring the T cell receptor (TCR) gene expression in p53(+/+) and p53(-/-) mice. After γ-irradiation with 3 Gy,the TCR mutation frequency (MF) was higher in p53(+/+) mice than in the controls. However, when the mice were exposed to 3 Gy at a low dose rate, the TCR MF did not increase in the p53(+/+) mice, whereas it increased and remained elevated in p53(-/-) mice, which are unable to induce apoptosis. In p53(+/+) mice, the TCR MF peaked 9 days after γ-irradiation with 3 Gy at a high dose rate, and then gradually decreased with a half-life of about 13 days. However, in p53(-/-) mice, the peak level of the TCR MF did not decline significantly with time. Hence, complete repair of mutagenic damage in irradiated tissues requires the integration of DNA repair and p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair. (author)

  13. Genotoxic damage in mine workers exposed to diesel exhaust, and the effects of glutathione transferase genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, L E; Gaskell, M; Martin, E A; Poole, J; Scheepers, P T J; Jensen, A; Autrup, H; Farmer, P B

    2005-06-01

    This study was performed in an Estonian shale-oil mine with the purpose to develop and apply a number of biomarkers for occupational diesel-exhaust exposure monitoring. Increased breathing-zone exposures to exhaust from operators of diesel-powered trucks in the mine was confirmed in the environmental monitoring part of the study, showing a 7.5-fold higher exposure to particle-associated 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) in 50 underground workers compared with 42 surface workers [P.T.J. Scheepers, D. Coggon, L.E. Knudsen, R. Anzion, H. Autrup, S. Bogovski, R.P. Bos, D. Dahmann, P. Farmer, E.A. Martin, V. Micka, V. Muzyka, H.-G. Neumann, J. Poole, A. Schmidt-Ott, F. Seiler, J. Volf, I. Zwirner-Baier, Biomarkers for occupational diesel exhaust exposure monitoring (BIOMODEM)-a study in underground mining, Toxicol. Lett. 134 (2002) 305-317; P.T.J. Scheepers, V. Micka, V. Muzyka, R. Anzion, D. Dahmann, J. Poole, R.P. Bos, Exposure to dust and particle-associated 1-nitropyrene of drivers of diesel-powered equipment in underground mining, Ann. Occp. Hyg. 47 (2003) 379-388]. Analysis of DNA damage by the Comet assay on frozen blood samples was performed on the total study group and showed significantly higher levels (p=0.003) in underground workers (smokers) driving diesel-powered excavation machines (median 155 on a scale from 0 to 400, among 47 persons), compared with surface workers who smoked (median of 90, among 46 persons). The level of DNA damage in underground smokers was significantly higher (p=0.04) than in non-smokers. Samples from 2 of the 3 sampling weeks had significantly lower DNA damage compared with the third week, probably due to timely processing and freezing. These samples also showed significant differences (p<0.001) between underground workers (median 145, among 41 persons) and surface workers (median 60, among 30 persons). An HPLC method was developed for the analysis of (32)P-postlabelled 1-NP-DNA-adducts, and was applied to a sub-sample of 20 workers. No

  14. Genotoxic Evaluation of Mikania laevigata Extract on DNA Damage Caused by Acute Coal Dust Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, T.P.; Heuser, V.D.; Tavares, P.; Leffa, D.D.; da Silva, G.A.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.R.T.; Pinho, R.A.; Streck, E.L.; Andrade,V.M. [University of Extremo Catarinense, Criciuma, SC (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    We report data on the possible antigenotoxic activity of Mikania laevigata extract (MLE) after acute intratracheal instillation of coal dust using the comet assay in peripheral blood, bone marrow, and liver cells and the micronucleus test in peripheral blood of Wistar rats. The animals were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution (groups 1 and 2) or MLE (100 mg/kg) (groups 3 and 4). On day 15, the animals were anesthetized with ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (20 mg/kg), and gross mineral coal dust (3 mg/0.3 mL saline) (groups 2 and 4) or saline solution (0.3 mL) (groups 1 and 3) was administered directly in the lung by intratracheal administration. Fifteen days after coal dust or saline instillation, the animals were sacrificed, and the femur, liver, and peripheral blood were removed. The results showed a general increase in the DNA damage values at 8 hours for all treatment groups, probably related to surgical procedures that had stressed the animals. Also, liver cells from rats treated with coal dust, pretreated or not with MLE, showed statistically higher comet assay values compared to the control group at 14 days after exposure. These results could be expected because the liver metabolizes a variety of organic compounds to more polar by-products. On the other hand, the micronucleus assay results did not show significant differences among groups. Therefore, our data do not support the antimutagenic activity of M. laevigata as a modulator of DNA damage after acute coal dust instillation.

  15. Investigation on sodium valproate induced germ cell damage, oxidative stress and genotoxicity in male Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sabbir; Ahmad, Tauseef; Parekh, Chintan Vishnubhai; Trivedi, Priyanka Pushkarbhai; Kushwaha, Sapana; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2011-12-01

    Sodium valproate (VPA) is the most widely used antiepileptic drug for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar psychiatric disorders and migraine. However, long-term VPA treatment has several adverse effects on the reproductive system. The present study was aimed to investigate the possible germ cell toxicity of VPA in mice. Animals were treated with VPA intraperitoneally for 10 and 28 days at the doses of 500 mg/kg-d and 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg-d, respectively, and were sacrificed 24h after the last dose. The germ cell toxicity of VPA was assessed using oxidative stress parameters, sperm count, sperm head morphology, sperm comet assay, 8-oxo-dG expression and histology. VPA treatment significantly decreased the sperm count, testes and epididymis weight and significantly increased the sperm head abnormality, sperm DNA damage, oxidative stress and 8-oxo-dG expression in the testes of mice. The present study illustrates that VPA induced germ cell toxicity in mice. PMID:22001255

  16. Biomarkers of environmental genotoxicity: comparison of genetic damage induced in Trad-SH cells and human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents some of the results of genotoxicity of the environmental agents studied in somatic cells of Tradescantia and show similarity between responses of the Tradescantia stamen hair cells (Trad-SH) and human blood cells to the physical and chemical mutagens. In the studies in vitro chromosome aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were applied to evaluate genotoxicity of pesticides. For comparison of genotoxic effectiveness of agrochemicals with other chemicals, there are also presented results of the genotoxicity of well-known mutagens (EMS, X-rays). The results confirm that in the environment a chemical pollution might cause higher genetic risk than radiation. Trad-SH assay was applied for in situ monitoring of the ambient air mutagenicity caused by benzene and petroleum associated compounds. The studies showed that gene mutation frequencies were slightly dependent on the distance from the petroleum work center. Results of measures of the cell cycle factor have shown also that the chemical pollutants in the air played also an important role in physiological cellular processes. The similarity of the Trad-SH and human blood cells responses to the physical and chemical mutagens showed that the gene mutations in Tradescantia present a simple and sensitive model, which can be very useful in biological monitoring

  17. In Vivo Effects of Vanadium Pentoxide and Antioxidants (Ascorbic Acid and Alpha-Tocopherol) on Apoptotic, Cytotoxic, and Genotoxic Damage in Peripheral Blood of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, María del Carmen; Hernández-Cortés, Lourdes Montserrat; Altamirano-Lozano, Mario Agustín

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), ascorbic acid (AA), and alpha-tocopherol (α-TOH) on apoptotic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic activity. Groups of five Hsd:ICR mice were treated with the following: (a) vehicle, distilled water; (b) vehicle, corn oil; (c) AA, 100 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip); (d) α-TOH, 20 mg/kg by gavage; (e) V2O5, 40 mg/kg by ip injection; (f) AA + V2O5; and (g) α-TOH + V2O5. Genotoxic damage was evaluated by examining micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) obtained from the caudal vein at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after treatments. Induction of apoptosis and cell viability were assessed at 48 h after treatment in nucleated cells of peripheral blood. Treatment with AA alone reduced basal MN-PCE, while V2O5 treatment marginally increased MN-PCE at all times after injection. Antioxidants treatments prior to V2O5 administration decreased MN-PCE compared to the V2O5 group, with the most significant effect in the AA + V2O5 group. The apoptotic cells increased with all treatments, suggesting that this process may contribute to the elimination of the cells with V2O5-induced DNA damage (MN-PCE). The necrotic cells only increased in the V2O5 group. Therefore, antioxidants such as AA and α-TOH can be used effectively to protect or reduce the genotoxic effects induced by vanadium compounds like V2O5. PMID:27413422

  18. Long-term exposure of A549 cells to titanium dioxide nanoparticles induces DNA damage and sensitizes cells towards genotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Lucie; Tarantini, Adeline; Beal, David; Biola-Clier, Mathilde; Bobyk, Laure; Sorieul, Sephanie; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Marie-Desvergne, Caroline; Lynch, Iseult; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Carriere, Marie

    2016-09-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are one of the most produced NPs in the world. Their toxicity has been studied for a decade using acute exposure scenarios, i.e. high exposure concentrations and short exposure times. In the present study, we evaluated their genotoxic impact using long-term and low concentration exposure conditions. A549 alveolar epithelial cells were continuously exposed to 1-50 μg/mL TiO2-NPs, 86% anatase/14% rutile, 24 ± 6 nm average primary diameter, for up to two months. Their cytotoxicity, oxidative potential and intracellular accumulation were evaluated using MTT assay and reactive oxygen species measurement, transmission electron microscopy observation, micro-particle-induced X-ray emission and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Genotoxic impact was assessed using alkaline and Fpg-modified comet assay, immunostaining of 53BP1 foci and the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay. Finally, we evaluated the impact of a subsequent exposure of these cells to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. We demonstrate that long-term exposure to TiO2-NPs does not affect cell viability but causes DNA damage, particularly oxidative damage to DNA and increased 53BP1 foci counts, correlated with increased intracellular accumulation of NPs. In addition, exposure over 2 months causes cellular responses suggestive of adaptation, characterized by decreased proliferation rate and stabilization of TiO2-NP intracellular accumulation, as well as sensitization to MMS. Taken together, these data underline the genotoxic impact and sensitization effect of long-term exposure of lung alveolar epithelial cells to low levels of TiO2-NPs. PMID:26785166

  19. The genotoxic effects of mobile phone waves on induction of chromosomal damages in embryos of Balb/C mice

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Baharara; Farhang Hadad; Mohammad-Ali Shariatzade; Mariam Amirahmadi

    2010-01-01

    Background: In recent years, the widespread use of microwave producing instruments specially mobile phones; result in growing concern regarding the possible effects associated with these waves on human health. In the present study investigated the genotoxic effects of mobile phone radiation in adult mice (Balb/C) and their embryos. Methods: In this experimental research pregnant mice were irradiated with mobile phone for 4 days during gestational period from 14th to 18th days of gestation for...

  20. Frequency of chromosome damage in synanthropic house mice as in index of genotoxic effects of environmental contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental contamination of the human habitat by a large number of chemical compounds with genotoxic activity increases genetic risk for the populations of large cities, industrial zones, and many agricultural regions. Moreover, the level of genetic danger for the population at large not involved in work with genotoxicants remains practically unknown since the detection of direct genotoxic environment effect on the human population is complicated by a number of circumstances (complexities related to selecting an adequate control as a result of migration and ethnic heterogeneity of the human population, high cost mass studies, etc.). It is clear that to evaluate the genotoxic potential of the environment, we need to use indicator organisms that are as close to man as possible in genome organization, physiological features, and reactions to mutagenic factors. Such organisms are, first of all, mammals, and among them, house mice should be given special attention; they live side by side with man, and mutagens enter their tissues along the same pathways as in human tissues. Although the direct extrapolation of degree of genetic danger from mouse to human is difficult, with synanthropoic mice, we can estimate the total mutagenic effect of the environment in various regions and population centers and compare this with estimates obtained from regions with a known degree of genetic risk (for example, for the Chernobyl zone)

  1. Evaluation of the Genotoxic Potential against H2O2-Radical-Mediated DNA Damage and Acute Oral Toxicity of Standardized Extract of Polyalthia longifolia Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanion L. Jothy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants have been used in medicoculturally diverse countries around the world, where it is a part of a time-honoured tradition that is respected even today. Polyalthia longifolia leaf extract has been previously reported as an efficient antioxidant in vitro. Hence, the genotoxic effects of P. longifolia leaf were investigated by using plasmid relation, comet, and Allium cepa assay. In the presence of  ∙OH radicals, the DNA in supercoil was start nicked into open circular form, which is the product of the single-stranded cleavage of supercoil DNA and quantified as fragmented separate bands on agarose gel in plasmid relation assay. In the plasmid relation and comet assay, the P. longifolia leaf extract exhibited strong inhibitory effects against H2O2-mediated DNA damage. A dose-dependent increase of chromosome aberrations was also observed in the Allium cepa assay. The abnormalities scored were stickiness, c-mitosis, bridges, and vagrant chromosomes. Micronucleated cells were also observed at the interphase. The results of Allium cepa assay confirmed that the methanol extracts of P. longifolia exerted no significant genotoxic or mitodepressive effects at 100 μg/mL. Thus, this study demonstrated that P. longifolia leaf extract has a beneficial effect against oxidative DNA damage. This experiment is the first report for the protective effect of P. longifolia on DNA damage-induced by hydroxyl radicals. Additionally in acute oral toxicity study, female rats were treated at 5000 mg/kg body weight of P. longifolia leaf extract and observed for signs of toxicity for 14 days. P. longifolia leaf extract did not produce any treatment-related toxic effects in rats.

  2. Anti-genotoxic effect of naringin against bleomycin-induced genomic damage in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Dilek; Teksoy, Ozgun; Bilaloglu, Rahmi; Çinkilic, Nilufer

    2016-01-01

    Naringin is a flavonoid found in grapefruit and other citrus fruits that shows antioxidant activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-genotoxic and protective effects of naringin on the chemotherapeutic/radiomimetic agent bleomycin (BLM) in human blood lymphocyte cultures in vitro using micronucleus test and chromosomal aberrations (CA) assay. We tested the three doses of naringin (1, 2, 3 µg/mL) and a single dose of BLM (20 µg/mL). BLM significantly increased the total CAs and micronucleus frequency at a concentration of 20 µg/mL. Naringin did not show any toxicity in doses of 1, 2, and 3 µg/mL. Combined treatments of BLM and naringin (2 and 3 µg/mL) significantly reduced micronucleus formation. Naringin dose-dependently decreased the total chromosome aberrations frequency induced by BLM. These results indicate that naringin could prevent BLM (20 µg/mL)-induced genotoxicity. PMID:25941869

  3. Genotoxic Damage in vivo, Susceptibility to UVC and X-Rays, and Repair Efficiency in vitro Lymphocytes from Referent and Occupational Exposed to Mercury Vapours Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For years mercury has been considered to be dangerous for human health. It was shown in vitro studies that mercury ions produce various types of DNA damage: single strand breaks as well as alkali labile lesions. The aim of this study was to compare levels of the DNA damage and cytogenetic damage induced in vivo, DNA's susceptibility to radiation, as well as repair capabilities of DNA damage induced in vitro by UV-exposure or X-rays, in lymphocytes from unexposed donors and from persons occupationally exposed to mercury vapours. In order to estimate cytogenetic damage, the analysis of sister chromatid exchange frequency (SCE) was used, while to detect DNA damage alkaline version of the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was applied. To analyse in vitro susceptibility of cells to genotoxic factors such as UV-C or X-rays, lymphocytes were exposed to 6 J/m2 of UV or irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays. After exposure the cells were incubated for 2 hours with or without the presence of phytohemagglutinin (agent stimulating cell divisions). In the present study, results do not show any statistically significant differences between the examined groups, either in the levels of DNA damage of untreated lymphocytes or in the sister chromatid exchanges. Neither the levels of DNA damage detected in lymphocytes after UV exposure and 2 h incubation, without or in the presence of a cell- division stimulating agent, nor the repair efficiencies of the DNA damage induced by UV exposure, differed significantly between the unexposed group and that occupationally exposed to mercury vapours. Statistically significant higher levels of DNA damage measured in X-ray-irradiated lymphocytes, without incubation and after 2 hours of incubation, with or without the presence of phytohemagglutinin, were observed in the group exposed to mercury vapours. So, donors exposed to mercury vapours have shown a statistically lower repair efficiency of X-ray-induced DNA damage both in non- stimulated

  4. Dermal exposure to the herbicide-paraquat results in genotoxic and cytotoxic damage to germ cells in the male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, U J A; Narayana, K; Zain, A; Raju, S; Nizam, H M; Noriah, O

    2006-02-01

    The effects of exposure to low doses of paraquat, a herbicide, via the dermal route were studied on the spermatozoa of Sprague-Dawley rats. Paraquat (1, 1'-dimethyl-4, 4'-bipyridinium dichloride) was administered once a day for five days, at intervals of 24 h at 0, 6, 15 and 30 mg/kg, and the rats were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 28, and 42 after the last exposure. The sperm suspensions were obtained by mincing the caudae epididymes and ductus deferens for the purpose of performing a sperm morphology test, sperm count and analysis of sperm mortality and sperm motility, as per the standard procedures. The sperm count was decreased (p < 0.05) only on days 7 and 14 but sperm abnormalities increased on all days (p < 0.05). Sperm mortality increased at higher dose-levels (p < 0.05) except on day 42, and motility was affected by 30 mg/kg only on day 42. In conclusion, paraquat is a genotoxic and cytotoxic agent to germ cells in the male rat. PMID:16783728

  5. The Anti-Genotoxic Effect of Taurine on Aluminum Sulphate-Induced DNA Damage in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Türkez, Hasan; Geyikoğlu, Fatime

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum sulphate Al2(SO4)3 is commonly used as a coagulant in the purification of drinking water in many regions of the world. Aluminum (Al) is also involved in several pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. However, Al is suspected to cause serious disorders such as Alzheimer's by oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, taurine (TA) is an amino acid found in mammalian tissues and it has been suggested to play a role in the defense against cellular damage. The objective of this study was to ...

  6. Inhibition of fried meat-induced rectal DNA damage and altered systemic genotoxicity in humans by crucifera, chlorophyllin, and yogurt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary exposures implicated as reducing or causing risk for colorectal cancer may reduce or cause DNA damage in colon tissue; however, no one has assessed this hypothesis directly in humans. Thus, we enrolled 16 healthy volunteers in a 4-week controlled feeding study where 8 sub...

  7. Inhibition of fried meat-induced colorectal DNA damage and altered systemic genotoxicity in humans by crucifera, chlorophyllin, and yogurt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Shaughnessy

    Full Text Available Dietary exposures implicated as reducing or causing risk for colorectal cancer may reduce or cause DNA damage in colon tissue; however, no one has assessed this hypothesis directly in humans. Thus, we enrolled 16 healthy volunteers in a 4-week controlled feeding study where 8 subjects were randomly assigned to dietary regimens containing meat cooked at either low (100°C or high temperature (250°C, each for 2 weeks in a crossover design. The other 8 subjects were randomly assigned to dietary regimens containing the high-temperature meat diet alone or in combination with 3 putative mutagen inhibitors: cruciferous vegetables, yogurt, and chlorophyllin tablets, also in a crossover design. Subjects were nonsmokers, at least 18 years old, and not currently taking prescription drugs or antibiotics. We used the Salmonella assay to analyze the meat, urine, and feces for mutagenicity, and the comet assay to analyze rectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes for DNA damage. Low-temperature meat had undetectable levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs and was not mutagenic, whereas high-temperature meat had high HCA levels and was highly mutagenic. The high-temperature meat diet increased the mutagenicity of hydrolyzed urine and feces compared to the low-temperature meat diet. The mutagenicity of hydrolyzed urine was increased nearly twofold by the inhibitor diet, indicating that the inhibitors enhanced conjugation. Inhibitors decreased significantly the mutagenicity of un-hydrolyzed and hydrolyzed feces. The diets did not alter the levels of DNA damage in non-target white blood cells, but the inhibitor diet decreased nearly twofold the DNA damage in target colorectal cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that dietary factors can reduce DNA damage in the target tissue of fried-meat associated carcinogenesis.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00340743.

  8. Genotoxic and cytotoxic damage by the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical [166Dy]Dy/166Ho-EDTMP as in vivo generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients with leukemias and multiple myeloma, the cure can be obtained to inclination of a bone marrow transplant (m.o.), for that which one is used a combination of external radiotherapy and chemotherapy with the consequent toxicity to healthy organs. The complex [166Dy]Dy/166Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate ([166Dy]Dy/166Ho-EDTMP) it forms a generator system in vivo stable with bony selective likeness in mice therefore, this it could work as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical for bone marrow ablation. The objective of this original work was to determine the genotoxic and cytotoxic damage produced by the [166Dy]Dy/166Ho-EDTMP like a generator system in vivo by means of the reticulocytes reduction (RET) and micronucleus elevation in reticulocytes (RET-MN) in peripheral blood and to evaluate its myeloablative potential for histopathologic studies. It was irradiated 166Dy2O3 enriched and it was add in form 166DyCI3 to the EDTMP in a softening media of phosphates (pH 8), the optimal molar relationship 166Dy: EDTMP was 1.7:1 and the radiochemical purity was evaluated by ITLC. The Dy:EDTMP complexes, non radioactive, its were prepared in the same way with non irradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice was injected intraperitoneally with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control mice were injected with the non radioactive complex and with sodium chloride 0.9% respectively. Before injecting each one of the solutions it was take a basal sample of peripheral blood of the mouse tail and each 48 h post-injection during 12 d. The animals were sacrificed to obtain the organs of interest and to determine the radioactivity in each one. The femur was used for the histopathologic studies. The quantification of the frequency of RET and RET-MN was carried out by flow cytometry of the sanguine samples and the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B for the dosimetry calculations was used. The radiochemical purity was 99% and in average the specific activity was of 1

  9. Genotoxicity of Tri- and Hexavalent Chromium Compounds In Vivo and Their Modes of Action on DNA Damage In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Zhijia Fang; Min Zhao; Hong Zhen; Lifeng Chen; Ping Shi; Zhiwei Huang

    2014-01-01

    Chromium occurs mostly in tri- and hexavalent states in the environment. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are extensively used in diverse industries, and trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] salts are used as micronutrients and dietary supplements. In the present work, we report that they both induce genetic mutations in yeast cells. They both also cause DNA damage in both yeast and Jurkat cells and the effect of Cr(III) is greater than that of Cr(VI). We further show that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ca...

  10. Genotoxicity assessment in Eisenia andrei coelomocytes: a study of the induction of DNA damage and micronuclei in earthworms exposed to B[a]P- and TCDD-spiked soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzini, Susanna; Boeri, Marta; Dagnino, Alessandro; Oliveri, Laura; Bolognesi, Claudia; Viarengo, Aldo

    2012-07-01

    Earthworms are useful indicators of soil quality and are widely used as model organisms in terrestrial ecotoxicology. The assessment of genotoxic effects caused by environmental pollutants is of great concern because of their relevance in carcinogenesis. In this work, the earthworm Eisenia andrei was exposed for 10 and 28 days to artificial standard soil contaminated with environmentally relevant concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) (0.1, 10, 50ppm) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD) (1×10(-5), 1×10(-4), 2×10(-3)ppm). Micronucleus (MNi) induction was evaluated in earthworm coelomocytes after DNA staining with the fluorescent dye DAPI. In the same cells, the DNA damage was assessed by means of the alkaline comet assay. Induction of MNi in coelomocytes, identified according to standard criteria, was demonstrated. B[a]P exposure for 10 and 28 days induced a significant increase in MNi frequency. In TCDD-treated earthworms, a significant effect on chromosomal damage was observed at all the concentrations used; surprisingly, greater effects were induced in animals exposed to the lowest concentration (1×10(-5)ppm). The data of the comet assay revealed a significant increase in the level of DNA damage in coelomocytes of earthworms exposed for 10 and 28 days to the different concentrations of B[a]P and TCDD. The results show that the comet and MN assays were able to reveal genotoxic effects in earthworms exposed even to the lowest concentrations of both chemicals tested here. The combined application in E. andrei of the comet assay and the micronucleus test, which reflect different biological mechanisms, may be suggested to identify genotoxic effects induced in these invertebrates by environmental contaminants in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:22459015

  11. Monitoring of genotoxic effects in lymphocytes of people exposed to pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential genotoxic risk of occupational exposure to pesticides. The DNA damage and the repair capacities of lymphocytes, in four groups of the people of various countries were assessed by the use of single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) also known as the Comet assay. The results from the analysis performed in the Spanish group are presented in this paper. Statistical analysis of the results shows a slightly higher level of the DNA damage in the untreated lymphocytes of donors from the group exposed to pesticides; however, only for donors below 30 years old are these differences significant (p<0.05). Although, comparison of the efficiency of the UV-C induced dimmers excision process did not indicate differences between exposed and referent groups, though lymphocytes for donors exposed to pesticides have shown a statistically lower repair rate (p<0.01) than lymphocytes from the unexposed group. (author)

  12. Is the Comet Assay a Sensitive Procedure for Detecting Genotoxicity?

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Yu F.; Satomi Kawaguchi; Takanori Nakamura; Gisho Honda; Ayumi Yamamoto

    2010-01-01

    Although the Comet assay, a procedure for quantitating DNA damage in mammalian cells, is considered sensitive, it has never been ascertained that its sensitivity is higher than the sensitivity of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells. To determine whether the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to those of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells, we compared the results of Comet assay with those of micronucleus test (MN test). WTK1 hum...

  13. Genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs, <100 nm are increasingly being used in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to the unique properties derived from their small sizes. However, their large surface-area to mass ratio and high redox potential may negatively impact human health and the environment. TiO2-NPs can cause inflammation, pulmonary damage, fibrosis, and lung tumors and they are possibly carcinogenic to humans. Because cancer is a disease involving mutation, there are a large number of studies on the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs. In this article, we review the results that have been reported in the literature, with a focus on data generated from the standard genotoxicity assays. The data include genotoxicity results from the Ames test, in vitro and in vivo Comet assay, in vitro and in vivo micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchange assay, mammalian cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene assay, the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay, and the mouse phosphatidylinositol glycan, class A gene assay. Inconsistent results have been found in these assays, with both positive and negative responses being reported. The in vitro systems for assessing the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs have generated a greater number of positive results than the in vivo systems, and tests for DNA and chromosome damage have produced more positive results than the assays measuring gene mutation. Nearly all tests for measuring the mutagenicity of TiO2-NPs were negative. The current data indicate that the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs is mediated mainly through the generation of oxidative stress in cells.

  14. Detección del daño genotóxico agudo y crónico en una población Detection of acute and chronic genotoxic damage in an occupationally-exposed population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Andrea Giraldo Solano

    2003-03-01

    dysfunctions. This research evaluated, in laboratory personnel at the Universidad Nacional, Medellín, Colombia, the effect of exposition to potentially genotoxic agents, by means of sister chromatids interchange tests (SCI and electrophoresis in single cells gel (comet assay. Standardization of methodological tools to quantify the damage produced by exposition to potentially genotoxic agents was achieved, in order to implement them in occupational health monitoring programs. Evaluation was carried out in two populations, exposed and control, using paired samples. Age, sex and habits were used as criterions for pairing. Comet assay showed punctual damage in the exposed population, while SCI test did not reveal chronic damage. On the other hand, neither habits nor sex showed relation with SCI index, but age did. The usefulness of the comet assay to measure the effect of punctual expositions, and that of SCI as an excellent test to quantify the effect of chronic expositions, makes them indispensable as part of the battery used in genotoxic monitoring studies. As part of the benefits of this research, infrastructure was adapted and some personnel was qualified to carry out occupational health genotoxic monitoring, with the aim of extending this service to the University community and to the private and public sectors.

  15. Cell-Based Genotoxicity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifferscheid, Georg; Buchinger, Sebastian

    Genotoxicity test systems that are based on bacteria display an important role in the detection and assessment of DNA damaging chemicals. They belong to the basic line of test systems due to their easy realization, rapidness, broad applicability, high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Since the development of the Salmonella microsomal mutagenicity assay by Ames and coworkers in the early 1970s, significant development in bacterial genotoxicity assays was achieved and is still a subject matter of research. The basic principle of the mutagenicity assay is a reversion of a growth inhibited bacterial strain, e.g., due to auxotrophy, back to a fast growing phenotype (regain of prototrophy). Deeper knowledge of the ­mutation events allows a mechanistic understanding of the induced DNA-damage by the utilization of base specific tester strains. Collections of such specific tester strains were extended by genetic engineering. Beside the reversion assays, test systems utilizing the bacterial SOS-response were invented. These methods are based on the fusion of various SOS-responsive promoters with a broad variety of reporter genes facilitating numerous methods of signal detection. A very important aspect of genotoxicity testing is the bioactivation of ­xenobiotics to DNA-damaging compounds. Most widely used is the extracellular metabolic activation by making use of rodent liver homogenates. Again, genetic engineering allows the construction of highly sophisticated bacterial tester strains with significantly enhanced sensitivity due to overexpression of enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. This provides mechanistic insights into the toxification and detoxification pathways of xenobiotics and helps explaining the chemical nature of hazardous substances in unknown mixtures. In summary, beginning with "natural" tester strains the rational design of bacteria led to highly specific and sensitive tools for a rapid, reliable and cost effective ­genotoxicity

  16. Assessment of isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside from Acacia salicina: protective effects toward oxidation damage and genotoxicity induced by aflatoxin B1 and nifuroxazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Ines; Limem, Ilef; Skandrani, Ines; Nefatti, Aicha; Ghedira, Kamel; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Genevieve; Leila, Chekir-Ghedira

    2010-08-01

    Antioxidant activity of isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside, isolated from the leaves of Acacia salicina, was determined by the ability of this compound to inhibit xanthine oxidase activity and to scavenge the free radical 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS(.-)) diammonium salt. Antigenotoxic activity was assessed using the SOS chromotest assay. This compound has the ability to scavenge the ABTS(.+) radical by a hydrogen donating mechanism. We also envisaged the study of the antioxidant effect of this compound by the enzymatic xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XOD) assay. Results indicated that isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside was a potent inhibitor of xanthine oxidase and superoxide anion scavengers. Moreover, this compound induced an inhibitory activity against nifuroxazide and aflatoxine B1 (AFB1) induced genotoxicity. Taken together, these observations provide evidence that isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside isolated from the leaves of A. salicina is able to protect cells against the consequences of oxidative stress. PMID:20809543

  17. The genotoxicities of N-nitrosamines in Drosophila melanogaster in vivo: the correlation of mutagenicity in the wing spot test with the DNA damages detected by the DNA-repair test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, T; Shiotani, T; Fujikawa, K; Hayatsu, H

    1991-04-01

    The genotoxicities of a series of N-nitrosamines were assayed in the wing spot test and a new short-term test of Drosophila melanogaster. In the spot test, larval flies trans-heterozygous for the somatic cell markers mwh and flr3 were fed the test reagents and the wing hairs in adults were inspected for clones expressing the phenotypes of the markers. In the other test, larval stock consisting of meiotic recombination-deficient (Rec-) double mutant mei-9a and mei-41D5 males and repair-proficient Rec+ females were grown on feed containing the reagents and the DNA damages were detected with the preferential killing of the Rec- larvae as an endpoint. The carcinogenic nitrosamines tested, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine (NDBA), N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR), N-nitro-sopiperidine (NPIP) and N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), all showed clearly positive activities in both tests. The activities in the wing spot test were ranked in a sequence of NDMA much greater than NMOR greater than NPIP greater than NDEA greater than NPYR greater than NDBA. A similar ranking was obtained in the repair assay. The genotoxicity of N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA), carcinogenicity studies of which are inconclusive, was marginal in the spot test. The non-carcinogenic N-nitrosoproline (NPRO) and the non-mutagenic N-nitrosothioproline (NTPRO) were negative in the spot test. NDPhA and NPRO were negative in the repair test as well. The DNA-repair test is thus a convenient technique for estimating the mutagenicity of compounds because of its simplicity compared with the wing spot test. These Drosophila tests may be useful in predicting carcinogenic potentials of compounds. PMID:1901957

  18. A predictive toxicogenomics signature to classify genotoxic versus non-genotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity testing is a critical component of chemical assessment. The use of integrated approaches in genetic toxicology, including the incorporation of gene expression data to determine the DNA damage response pathways involved in response, is becoming more common. In companion papers previously published in Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, Li et al. (2015 [6] developed a dose optimization protocol that was based on evaluating expression changes in several well-characterized stress-response genes using quantitative real-time PCR in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells in culture. This optimization approach was applied to the analysis of TK6 cells exposed to one of 14 genotoxic or 14 non-genotoxic agents, with sampling 4 h post-exposure. Microarray-based transcriptomic analyses were then used to develop a classifier for genotoxicity using the nearest shrunken centroids method. A panel of 65 genes was identified that could accurately classify toxicants as genotoxic or non-genotoxic. In Buick et al. (2015 [1], the utility of the biomarker for chemicals that require metabolic activation was evaluated. In this study, TK6 cells were exposed to increasing doses of four chemicals (two genotoxic that require metabolic activation and two non-genotoxic chemicals in the presence of rat liver S9 to demonstrate that S9 does not impair the ability to classify genotoxicity using this genomic biomarker in TK6cells.

  19. Insights into genotoxic effects of electromagnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Focke, Frauke

    2008-01-01

    The increasing use of appliances, which generate electromagnetic fields (EMFs), has provoked public concern about their safety. Scientific research into possible health effects however produced conflicting results. One of the open questions is whether or not EMF exposure has genotoxic effects. Therefore, the main objective of my thesis was to investigate DNA damage formation and repair, cell cycle progression, apoptosis and DNA damage signalling in cultured human cells under EM...

  20. Genotoxic sensitivity of the developing hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udroiu, Ion; Sgura, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Genotoxic sensitivity seems to vary during ontogenetic development. Animal studies have shown that the spontaneous mutation rate is higher during pregnancy and infancy than in adulthood. Human and animal studies have found higher levels of DNA damage and mutations induced by mutagens in fetuses/newborns than in adults. This greater susceptibility could be due to reduced DNA repair capacity. In fact, several studies indicated that some DNA repair pathways seem to be deficient during ontogenesis. This has been demonstrated also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. Genotoxicity in the hematopoietic system has been widely studied for several reasons: it is easy to assess, deals with populations cycling also in the adults and may be relevant for leukemogenesis. Reviewing the literature concerning the application of the micronucleus test (a validated assay to assess genotoxicity) in fetus/newborns and adults, we found that the former show almost always higher values than the latter, both in animals treated with genotoxic substances and in those untreated. Therefore, we draw the conclusion that the genotoxic sensitivity of the hematopoietic system is more pronounced during fetal life and decreases during ontogenic development. PMID:27036061

  1. Modulation of Tinospora rumphii and Zinc Salt on DNA Damage in Quinoline-Induced Genotoxicity and Hepatotoxicity in Male Albino Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Roger Salvacion Tan; Bajo, Lydia M.

    2014-01-01

    Tinospora rumphii (T. rumphii) is a folkloric medicinal plant that is widely distributed in Asia and Africa. It has been widely used by locals to treat many diseases including jaundice, which is a manifestation of liver damage. We investigated the action of T. rumphii crude extract together with zinc sulphate, a known tumor modulator, on hepatic injuries induced by intraperitoneal (i.p) injections of quinoline on albino mice. The hepatotoxic effect was assessed by bilirubin concentration in t...

  2. Genotoxic Klebsiella pneumoniae in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chyi Lai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colibactin is a nonribosomal peptide-polyketide synthesized by multi-enzyme complexes encoded by the pks gene cluster. Colibactin-producing Escherichia coli have been demonstrated to induce host DNA damage and promote colorectal cancer (CRC development. In Taiwan, the occurrence of pyogenic liver abscess (PLA has been suggested to correlate with an increasing risk of CRC, and Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant PLA pathogen in Taiwan. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At the asn tRNA loci of the newly sequenced K. pneumoniae 1084 genome, we identified a 208-kb genomic island, KPHPI208, of which a module identical to the E. coli pks colibactin gene cluster was recognized. KPHPI208 consists of eight modules, including the colibactin module and the modules predicted to be involved in integration, conjugation, yersiniabactin production, microcin production, and unknown functions. Transient infection of BALB/c normal liver cells with K. pneumoniae 1084 increased the phosphorylation of histone H2AX, indicating the induction of host DNA damage. Colibactin was required for the genotoxicity of K. pneumoniae 1084, as it was diminished by deletion of clbA gene and restored to the wild type level by trans-complementation with a clbA coding plasmid. Besides, BALB/c mice infected with K. pneumoniae 1084 exhibited enhanced DNA damage in the liver parenchymal cells when compared to the isogenic clbA deletion mutant. By PCR detection, the prevalence of pks-positive K. pneumoniae in Taiwan is 25.6%, which is higher than that reported in Europe (3.5%, and is significantly correlated with K1 type, which predominantly accounted for PLA in Taiwan. CONCLUSIONS: Our knowledge regarding how bacteria contribute to carcinogenesis has just begun. The identification of genotoxic K. pneumoniae and its genetic components will facilitate future studies to elucidate the molecular basis underlying the link between K. pneumoniae, PLA, and CRC.

  3. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase is required for genotoxic stress relief in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Ulm, Roman; Revenkova, Ekaterina; Di Sansebastiano, Gian-Pietro; Bechtold, Nicole; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2001-01-01

    Genotoxic stress activates complex cellular responses allowing for the repair of DNA damage and proper cell recovery. Although plants are exposed constantly to increasing solar UV irradiation, the signaling cascades activated by genotoxic environments are largely unknown. We have identified an Arabidopsis mutant (mkp1) hypersensitive to genotoxic stress treatments (UV-C and methyl methanesulphonate) due to disruption of a gene that encodes an Arabidopsis homolog of mitogen-activated protein k...

  4. Genotoxicity of streptonigrin: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzán, A D; Bianchi, M S

    2001-03-01

    Streptonigrin (SN, CAS no. 3930-19-6) is an aminoquinone antitumor antibiotic isolated from cultures of Streptomyces flocculus. This compound is a member of a group of antitumor agents which possess the aminoquinone moiety and that includes also mitomycin C, porfiromycin, actinomycin, rifamycin and geldanamycin. Because of the potential use of SN in clinical chemotherapy, the study of its genotoxicity has considerable practical significance.SN inhibits the synthesis of DNA and RNA, causes DNA strand breaks after reduction with NADH, induces unscheduled DNA synthesis and DNA adducts and inhibits topoisomerase II. At the chromosome level, this antibiotic causes chromosome damage and increases the frequency of sister-chromatid exchanges.SN cleaves DNA in cell-free systems by a mechanism that involves complexing with metal ions and autoxidation of the quinone moiety to semiquinone in the presence of NADH with production of oxygen-derived reactive species. Recent evidence strongly suggests that the clastogenic action of this compound is partially mediated by free radicals. The present review aims at summarizing past and current knowledge concerning the genotoxic effects of SN. PMID:11223403

  5. "Aspartame: A review of genotoxicity data".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, David; Gatehouse, David

    2015-10-01

    Aspartame is a methyl ester of a dipeptide of aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It is 200× sweeter than sucrose and is approved for use in food products in more than 90 countries around the world. Aspartame has been evaluated for genotoxic effects in microbial, cell culture and animal models, and has been subjected to a number of carcinogenicity studies. The in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity data available on aspartame are considered sufficient for a thorough evaluation. There is no evidence of induction of gene mutations in a series of bacterial mutation tests. There is some evidence of induction of chromosomal damage in vitro, but this may be an indirect consequence of cytotoxicity. The weight of evidence from in vivo bone marrow micronucleus, chromosomal aberration and Comet assays is that aspartame is not genotoxic in somatic cells in vivo. The results of germ cell assays are difficult to evaluate considering limited data available and deviations from standard protocols. The available data therefore support the conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) that aspartame is non-genotoxic. PMID:26321723

  6. Is nitrous oxide a genotoxic carcinogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Michael R; Hammond, Timothy G

    2015-07-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) has been widely used as a dental and surgical anaesthetic for over 150 years. However, results from a recent study suggested that increased DNA damage was seen in lymphocytes from surgical patients and this led to its continued clinical use to be questioned. The data can be challenged on technical grounds and must be considered with other studies in order to assess any possible risk. There are other studies indicating that N2O has weak genotoxicity in man, but these are confused by exposure of the populations to other anaesthetic gases including isoflurane and sevoflurane, both of which have also been reported to increase DNA damage. It should be noted that the suggested genotoxic mechanisms are all indirect, including folate deficiency, oxidative stress and homocysteine toxicity. Further, results from in vitro studies indicate that N2O has no direct DNA reactivity as negative results were obtained in a bacterial mutation (Ames) test and an assay for mutation at the hprt locus in Chinese hamster lung cells. Although not performed to definitive study designs, no evidence of carcinogenicity was seen in two long-term tests in mice and another in rats. Although there is some evidence that N2O is weakly genotoxic in humans, this appears to be similar to that reported for isoflurane and sevoflurane and all the postulated mechanisms have clear thresholds with no evidence of direct DNA reactivity. Because any potential genotoxic mechanism would have a threshold, it seems reasonable to conclude that neither occasional high exposure to patients as an anaesthetic nor low-level exposure to staff within published recommended exposure limits presents any significant carcinogenic risk. PMID:25852088

  7. Evaluation of protective effect of amifostine on dacarbazine induced genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etebari, M; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A; Lame, V

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer therapy with alkylating agents has been used for many years. Dacarbazine (DTIC) as an alkylating agent is used alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. In order to inhibit the formation of secondary cancers resulting from chemotherapy with DTIC, preventional strategies is necessary. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genoprotective effect of amifostine on the genotoxic effects of DTIC in cell culture condition. To determine the optimum genotoxic concentration of DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with various DTIC concentrations including 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml for 2 h and the genotoxic effects were evaluated by the comet assay. The result of this part of the study showed that incubation of HepG2 cells with DTIC at 5 μg/ml was sufficient to produce genotoxic effect. In order to determine the protective effects of amifostine on genotoxicity induced by DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with different concentrations of amifostine (2, 3 and 5 mg/ml) for 1 h which was followed by incubation with DTIC at 5 μg/ml for 2 h. One hour incubation of cells with different concentrations of amifostine before incubation with DITC indicated that at least 5 mg/ml concentration of amifostine can prevent genotoxic effects induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells under described condition. In conclusion amifostine could prevent DNA damage induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells. PMID:26430459

  8. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc−/−p53+/− mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  9. Estimation of genotoxic damage in irradiated patients (l8fdg) in positron emission tomography; Estimacion del dano genotoxico en pacientes irradiados con (18fdg) en tomografia por emision de positrones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz Banos, M.; Villena Garcia, C.; Moreno Capdevila, C.; Navarro Fernandez, J. L.; Alcaraz Saura, M.; Achel, D. G.; Clver Valderas, M. A.; Olivares Rueda, A.; Olmos Ortiz, E.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the genotoxic (mutagenic) by the MN assay, the radiation dose administered to the patient undergoing medical radiological examinations, with special emphasis on cancer patients referred to our unit for studies of PET-CT with 2 - (18F)-Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18FDG).

  10. 4-Aminoantipyrine reduces toxic and genotoxic effects of doxorubicin, cisplatin, and cyclophosphamide in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berno, Claudia Rodrigues; Rós, Barbara de Toledo; da Silveira, Ingridhy Ostaciana Maia Freitas; Coelho, Henrique Rodrigues; Antoniolli, Andréia Conceição Milan Brochado; Beatriz, Adilson; de Lima, Dênis Pires; Monreal, Antônio Carlos Duenhas; Sousa, Fabricio Garmus; da Silva Gomes, Roberto; Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano

    2016-07-01

    The analgesic drug dipyrone is used to treat side effects (including pain and fever) of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Dipyrone is metabolized to 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA), a PGE2-dependent blocker and inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX). We evaluated the genotoxic, mutagenic, apoptotic, and immunomodulatory activities of 4-AA in vivo and the effects of its combination with the antineoplastic drugs doxorubicin, cisplatin, and cyclophosphamide. 4-AA did not cause genotoxic/mutagenic damage, splenic phagocytosis, or leukocyte alterations. However, when combined with the antineoplastic agents, 4-AA decreased their genotoxic, mutagenic, apoptotic, and phagocytic effects. These results suggest that 4-AA might interfere with DNA damage-mediated chemotherapy. PMID:27402479

  11. Signs of deferasirox genotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ila, Hasan Basri; Topaktas, Mehmet; Arslan, Mehmet; BÜYÜKLEYLA, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload is a major health problem for patients who have to have continuous blood transfusions. It brings some metabolic problems together. Various iron chelating agents are being used for treatment of hemochromatosis which arises from excess iron accumulation. This study was conducted with the aim of determining whether deferasirox used as an iron chelator in patients with hemochromatosis has genotoxic effects. Commercial form of deferasirox, Exjade was used as test material. Test mater...

  12. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of butyl cyclohexyl phthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Çinel; Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Karabay Yavaşoğlu, N Ülkü

    2016-03-01

    Butyl cyclohexyl phthalate (BCP) is frequently used in personal care products, medical and household applications. The aim of this study is therefore to evaluate possible cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of BCP using in vitro and in vivo assays. The in vitro cytotoxic effect of BCP was investigated on mouse fibroblastic cell line (L929 cells) by MTT assay. The result showed that BCP inhibits cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 value = 0.29 µg/mL). For genotoxicity assessment, tested concentrations of BCP demonstrated mutagenic activity in the presence of S9 mix with the Salmonella strain TA100 in the Ames test. Results showed that BCP is a secondary mutagenic substance even in low concentrations. The data obtained from 28-days repeated toxicity tests on mice revealed that BCP caused abnormalities of chromosome number, in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, DNA damage, particularly DNA strand breaks, was assessed by Comet assay. The test result shows that BCP seemed to have genotoxic potential at a high level of exposure. PMID:25501535

  13. Genotoxicity assessment in patients with thalassemia minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sweedan, Suleimman A; Khabour, Omar; Isam, Ruba

    2012-05-15

    Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder that affects both genders and results in reduced synthesis of hemoglobin, and thus causing anemia. Previous studies have shown that the severe form of this disease, thalassemia major, is associated with genotoxicity. This includes increases in the level of sister chromatid exchange (SCEs), chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and micronuclei. In this study, we assessed genotoxicity in the lymphocytes of thalassemia minor subjects using sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberration (CA) assays. In addition, we investigated the level of oxidative DNA damage by measuring 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) biomarker in urine samples. Eighteen thalassemia minor subjects and eighteen matched normal healthy controls were volunteered in the study. In addition, seven thalassemia major patients were recruited as positive controls. The results showed increases in the frequency of SCEs (P0.05). Both SECs and CAs in thalassemia major patients were significantly higher compared to other groups (P0.05). In conclusion, our results showed that thalassemia minor is associated with genotoxicity to blood lymphocytes as indicated by SCEs assay. PMID:22414564

  14. Metabolism, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity of comfrey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Nan; Guo, Lei; Fu, Peter P; Fuscoe, James C; Luan, Yang; Chen, Tao

    2010-10-01

    Comfrey has been consumed by humans as a vegetable and a tea and used as an herbal medicine for more than 2000 years. Comfrey, however, produces hepatotoxicity in livestock and humans and carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Comfrey contains as many as 14 pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA), including 7-acetylintermedine, 7-acetyllycopsamine, echimidine, intermedine, lasiocarpine, lycopsamine, myoscorpine, symlandine, symphytine, and symviridine. The mechanisms underlying comfrey-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are still not fully understood. The available evidence suggests that the active metabolites of PA in comfrey interact with DNA in liver endothelial cells and hepatocytes, resulting in DNA damage, mutation induction, and cancer development. Genotoxicities attributed to comfrey and riddelliine (a representative genotoxic PA and a proven rodent mutagen and carcinogen) are discussed in this review. Both of these compounds induced similar profiles of 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adducts and similar mutation spectra. Further, the two agents share common mechanisms of drug metabolism and carcinogenesis. Overall, comfrey is mutagenic in liver, and PA contained in comfrey appear to be responsible for comfrey-induced toxicity and tumor induction. PMID:21170807

  15. Comparative Study of Genotoxicity in Different Tobacco Related Habits using Micronucleus Assay in Exfoliated Buccal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep; Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Jose, Maji; Saxena, Kartikay; K, Deepa; Prabhu, Vishnudas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral cancer is one of the most debilitating diseases afflicting mankind. Consumption of tobacco in various forms constitutes one of the most important etiological factors in initiation of oral cancer. When the focus of today’s research is to determine early genotoxic changes in human cells, micronucleus (MN) assay provides a simple, yet reliable indicator of genotoxic damage.

  16. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Acacia aroma Leaf Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Mattana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia aroma, native plant from San Luis, Argentina, is commonly used as antiseptic and for healing of wounds. The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of hot aqueous extract (HAE and ethanolic extract (EE of A. aroma. The cytotoxic activity was assayed by neutral red uptake assay on Vero cell. Cell treatment with a range from 100 to 5000 μg/mL of HAE and EE showed that 500 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL were the maximum noncytotoxic concentrations, respectively. The CC50 was 658 μg/mL for EE and 1020 μg/mL for HAE. The genotoxicity was tested by the single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay. The results obtained in the evaluation of DNA cellular damage exposed to varied concentrations of the HAE showed no significant genotoxic effect at range of 1–20 mg/mL. The EE at 20 mg/mL showed moderate genotoxic effect related to the increase of the DNA percentage contained in tail of the comet; DNA was classified in category 2. At concentrations below 5 mg/mL, the results of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Acacia aroma guarantee the safety at cell and genomic level. However further studies are needed for longer periods including animal models to confirm the findings.

  17. Evaluation of genotoxicity of combined soil pollution by cadmium and imidacloprid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN; Aijun; ZHU; Yongguan; TONG; Yiping

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the important pollutants of soil and the genotoxicity of Cd-contaminated soil was studied in combination with imidacloprid. The single cell gel electrophoresis or comet assay was used to quantify DNA strand breaks as a measure of DNA damage induced by Cd and imidacloprid contamination in soil. The soil was artificially contaminated by Cd 2 h at 25℃ and were used in the comet assay. DNA damage was measured as the values of percentage of nuclei with tails, tail length, tail DNA, tail moment (TM), and Olive tail moment (OTM). DNA damages of root tips of Vicia faba increased after Cd treatment and there were dose-related increases in DNA damage measured as these parameters. However, the addition of imidacloprid further increased the DNA damage. These data confirmed the genotoxic effect of Cd to plants, and that the combined pollution with imidacloprid can enhance the genotoxicity of Cd.

  18. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shi-Wei [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chun-Ying [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yen-Ting [Department of Medical Research and Education, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kao, Jun-Kai [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Husan-Wen [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuan-Hsun [Department of Surgical Oncology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nutrition Therapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shu-Mei [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Ju [Department of Dermatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jau-Ling [Department of Bioscience Technology, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Shieh, Jeng-Jer, E-mail: shiehjj@vghtc.gov.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Education and Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  19. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status

  20. Genotoxic potential of nonsteroidal hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topalović Dijana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormones are cellular products involved in the regulation of a large number of processes in living systems, and which by their actions affect the growth, function and metabolism of cells. Considering that hormones are compounds normally present in the organism, it is important to determine if they can, under certain circumstances, lead to genetic changes in the hereditary material. Numerous experimental studies in vitro and in vivo in different systems, from bacteria to mammals, dealt with the mutagenic and genotoxic effects of hormones. This work presents an overview of the research on genotoxic effects of non­steroidal hormones, although possible changes of genetic material under their influence have not still been known enough, and moreover, investigations on their genotoxic influence have given conflicting results. The study results show that mechanisms of genotoxic effect of nonsteroidal hormones are manifested through the increase of oxidative stress by arising reactive oxygen species. A common mechanism of ROS occurence in thyroid hormones and catecholamines is through metabolic oxidation of their phenolic groups. Manifestation of insulin genotoxic effect is based on production of ROS by activation of NADPH isophorms, while testing oxytocin showed absence of genotoxic effect. Considering that the investigations on genotoxicity of nonsteroidal hormones demonstrated both positive and negative results, the explanation of this discordance involve limitations of test systems themselves, different cell types or biological species used in the experiments, different level of reactivity in vitro and in vivo, as well as possible variations in a tissue-specific expression. Integrated, the provided data contribute to better understanding of genotoxic effect of nonsteroidal hormones and point out to the role and mode of action of these hormones in the process of occurring of effects caused by oxidative stress. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  1. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, N.; Yang, M.K.; Bi, S.X. [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin, 300387 (China); Chen, L., E-mail: chenlis@tjpu.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin, 300387 (China); Zhu, Z.Y.; Gao, Y.T.; Du, Z. [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Artificial Cell, Tianjin Third Central Hospital, Tianjin, 300170 (China)

    2013-08-01

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell–cell and cell–matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro. - Highlights: • Different cells behaviors on microstructure surfaces were discussed in this paper. • The expression of cell protein of Vinculin was studied in this research. • Cellular micronuclei test was applied to evaluate cells' genotoxicity. • Cell genotoxicity was first studied in the research field of topological surfaces.

  2. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell–cell and cell–matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro. - Highlights: • Different cells behaviors on microstructure surfaces were discussed in this paper. • The expression of cell protein of Vinculin was studied in this research. • Cellular micronuclei test was applied to evaluate cells' genotoxicity. • Cell genotoxicity was first studied in the research field of topological surfaces

  3. Genotoxicity of diuron and glyphosate in oyster spermatozoa and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcha, F; Spagnol, C; Rouxel, J

    2012-01-15

    We investigated the effects of genotoxicant exposure in gametes and embryos to find a possible link between genotoxicity and reproduction/developmental impairment, and explore the impact of chemical genotoxicity on population dynamics. Our study focused on the genotoxic effects of two herbicides on oyster gametes and embryos: glyphosate (both as an active substance and in the Roundup formulation) and diuron. France is Europe's leading consumer of agrochemical substances and as such, contamination of France's coastal waters by pesticides is a major concern. Glyphosate and diuron are among the most frequently detected herbicides in oyster production areas; as oyster is a specie with external reproduction, its gametes and embryos are in direct contact with the surrounding waters and are hence particularly exposed to these potentially dangerous substances. In the course of this study, differences in genotoxic and embryotoxic responses were observed in the various experiments, possibly due to differences in pollutant sensitivity between the tested genitor lots. Glyphosate and Roundup had no effect on oyster development at the concentrations tested, whereas diuron significantly affected embryo-larval development from the lowest tested concentration of 0.05 μg L⁻¹, i.e. an environmentally realistic concentration. Diuron may therefore have a significant impact on oyster recruitment rates in the natural environment. Our spermiotoxicity study revealed none of the tested herbicides to be cytotoxic for oyster spermatozoa. However, the alkaline comet assay showed diuron to have a significant genotoxic effect on oyster spermatozoa at concentrations of 0.05 μg L⁻¹ upwards. Conversely, no effects due to diuron exposure were observed on sperm mitochondrial function or acrosomal membrane integrity. Although our initial results showed no negative effect on sperm function, the possible impact on fertilization rate and the consequences of the transmission of damaged DNA for

  4. The in vivo genotoxicity of cisplatin, isoflurane and halothane evaluated by alkaline comet assay in Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozovic, Gordana; Orsolic, Nada; Knezevic, Fabijan; Horvat Knezevic, Anica; Benkovic, Vesna; Sakic, Katarina; Borojevic, Nikola; Dikic, Domagoj

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of repeated exposure to isoflurane or halothane and compare it with the genotoxicity of repeated exposure to cisplatin. We also determined the genotoxicity of combined treatment with inhalation anaesthetics and cisplatin on peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL), brain, liver and kidney cells of mice. The mice were divided into six groups as follows: control, cisplatin, isoflurane, cisplatin-isoflurane, halothane and cisplatin-halothane, and were exposed respectively for three consecutive days. The mice were treated with cisplatin or exposed to inhalation anaesthetic; the combined groups were exposed to inhalation anaesthetic after treatment with cisplatin. The alkaline comet assay was performed. All drugs had a strong genotoxicity (Pdamage on the PBL and kidney cells, in contrast to halothane, which had stronger genotoxicity on brain and liver cells. The combination of cisplatin and isoflurane induced lower genotoxicity on PBL than isoflurane alone (Pbrain cells, but in the combined treatment with cisplatin, the effect decreased to the level of cisplatin alone. Halothane also induced the strongest DNA damage of the liver cells, while the combination with cisplatin increased its genotoxicity even more. The genotoxicity of cisplatin and isoflurane on kidney cells were nearly at the same level, but halothane caused a significantly lower effect. The combinations of inhalation anaesthetics with cisplatin had stronger effects on kidney cells than inhalation anaesthetics alone. The observed drugs and their combinations induced strong genotoxicity on all of the mentioned cells. PMID:21509577

  5. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium

  6. Genotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Mei, Nan; Fu, Peter P

    2010-04-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are common constituents of many plant species around the world. PA-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock and wildlife. They can inflict harm to humans through contaminated food sources, herbal medicines and dietary supplements. Half of the identified PAs are genotoxic and many of them are tumorigenic. The mutagenicity of PAs has been extensively studied in different biological systems. Upon metabolic activation, PAs produce DNA adducts, DNA cross-linking, DNA breaks, sister chromatid exchange, micronuclei, chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations and chromosome mutations in vivo and in vitro. PAs induced mutations in the cII gene of rat liver and in the p53 and K-ras genes of mouse liver tumors. It has been suggested that all PAs produce a set of (+/-)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine-derived DNA adducts and similar types of gene mutations. The signature types of mutations are G : C --> T : A transversion and tandem base substitutions. Overall, PAs are mutagenic in vivo and in vitro and their mutagenicity appears to be responsible for the carcinogenesis of PAs. PMID:20112250

  7. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Mukherjee, A. [University of Calcutta, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Botany

    2009-03-15

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals - sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significantconcentration-dependent increases in DNA damage in whole blood cells, lymphocytes, and in Nicotiana plants. The comet parameters show increases in tail DNA percentage (%), tail length (mu m), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

  8. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc{sup −/−}p53{sup +/−} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Joost P.M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Speksnijder, Ewoud N. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kuiper, Raoul V. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Dutch Molecular Pathology Center, Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Salvatori, Daniela C.F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Schaap, Mirjam M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Maas, Saskia [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Robinson, Joke; Verhoef, Aart; Benthem, Jan van; Luijten, Mirjam [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Steeg, Harry van, E-mail: Harry.van.Steeg@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  9. INVESTIGATION ON THE ANTI-GENOTOXIC EFFECT OF OCIMUM SANCTUM IN FLUORIDE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambam Srilatha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the anti-genotoxic effect of Ocimum sanctum on fluoride induced genotoxicity and its impact on oxidative stress. Exposure to fluoride can mainly occur through drinking water when the levels far exceed the permissible limit. Fluorosis is a serious problem the world over resulting in damage to DNA. Micronuclei assessment from bone marrow and peripheral blood was used in the present study to assess the damage to DNA. Sodium fluoride in a single dose (30 mg/kg, i.p. was used to induce micronuclei in albino mice. Treatment with the aqueous extract of Ocimum sanctum was initiated in the single dose study (100, 400 & 800 mg/kg and as a time course for 1 day, 3 days and 7 days (100 mg/kg. 24 h after injecting sodium fluoride, the animals were sacrificed and micronuclei were determined from smears prepared from bone marrow and peripheral blood. The antioxidant impact of the extract was determined using ferric ion reducing capacity of plasma and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances as a measure of lipid peroxidation. All doses were capable of preventing the formation of micronuclei but 100 mg/kg of the aqueous extract was most efficacious as a single dose and in the time course study. The beneficial effect of Ocimum sanctum is possibly due to the synergistic action of constituents like polyphenols, triterpenoids, and flavonoids.

  10. Genetic Evidence for Genotoxic Effect of Entecavir, an Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Nucleotide Analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Wu, Xiaohua; He, Fang; Liu, Ying; Hu, Xiaoqing; Takeda, Shunichi; Qing, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside analogues (NAs) have been the most frequently used treatment option for chronic hepatitis B patients. However, they may have genotoxic potentials due to their interference with nucleic acid metabolism. Entecavir, a deoxyguanosine analog, is one of the most widely used oral antiviral NAs against hepatitis B virus. It has reported that entecavir gave positive responses in both genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. However the genotoxic mechanism of entecavir remains elusive. To evaluate the genotoxic mechanisms, we analyzed the effect of entecavir on a panel of chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic mutant cell line deficient in DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways. Our results showed that Parp1-/- mutant cells defective in single-strand break (SSB) repair were the most sensitive to entecavir. Brca1-/-, Ubc13-/- and translesion-DNA-synthesis deficient cells including Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- were hypersensitive to entecavir. XPA-/- mutant deficient in nucleotide excision repair was also slightly sensitive to entecavir. γ-H2AX foci forming assay confirmed the existence of DNA damage by entecavir in Parp1-/-, Rad18-/- and Brca1-/- mutants. Karyotype assay further showed entecavir-induced chromosomal aberrations, especially the chromosome gaps in Parp1-/-, Brca1-/-, Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- cells when compared with wild-type cells. These genetic comprehensive studies clearly identified the genotoxic potentials of entecavir and suggested that SSB and postreplication repair pathways may suppress entecavir-induced genotoxicity. PMID:26800464

  11. Rapid screening of potential human bladder carcinogens: genotoxicity in meiosis repair deficient Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, L M; Reichert, D F; Lamm, D L

    1989-11-01

    To find a quick screen of potential bladder carcinogens, a genotoxicity test in Drosophila melanogaster stocks containing DNA repair mutations was evaluated. Meiosis repair deficient male Drosophila melanogaster mei-9, mei-41, and the double mutant mei-9-41 were allowed to mate with attached -x females on media containing the test agent. Genotoxic agents produce DNA damage which accumulates and can be lethal in mei males, whereas the attached -x females are able to repair the damage and survive. Thus, the sex ratio of the progeny is a measure of genotoxicity which can be correlated with mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. In this study, tea, coffee, and saccharin were not genotoxic (p greater than 0.3). Dose dependent toxicity was observed in bracken fern (p less than 0.001). The known mutagen and bladder carcinogen, cyclophosphamide, was highly genotoxic (p less than .001). Drosophila genotoxicity not only permits rapid screening of mutagens, but may also have advantages over other systems in the screening of potential bladder carcinogens. PMID:2509735

  12. Genetic Evidence for Genotoxic Effect of Entecavir, an Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Nucleotide Analog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    Full Text Available Nucleoside analogues (NAs have been the most frequently used treatment option for chronic hepatitis B patients. However, they may have genotoxic potentials due to their interference with nucleic acid metabolism. Entecavir, a deoxyguanosine analog, is one of the most widely used oral antiviral NAs against hepatitis B virus. It has reported that entecavir gave positive responses in both genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. However the genotoxic mechanism of entecavir remains elusive. To evaluate the genotoxic mechanisms, we analyzed the effect of entecavir on a panel of chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic mutant cell line deficient in DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways. Our results showed that Parp1-/- mutant cells defective in single-strand break (SSB repair were the most sensitive to entecavir. Brca1-/-, Ubc13-/- and translesion-DNA-synthesis deficient cells including Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- were hypersensitive to entecavir. XPA-/- mutant deficient in nucleotide excision repair was also slightly sensitive to entecavir. γ-H2AX foci forming assay confirmed the existence of DNA damage by entecavir in Parp1-/-, Rad18-/- and Brca1-/- mutants. Karyotype assay further showed entecavir-induced chromosomal aberrations, especially the chromosome gaps in Parp1-/-, Brca1-/-, Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- cells when compared with wild-type cells. These genetic comprehensive studies clearly identified the genotoxic potentials of entecavir and suggested that SSB and postreplication repair pathways may suppress entecavir-induced genotoxicity.

  13. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of Euphorbia hirta in MCF-7 cell line model using comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwan Yuet Ping; Ibrahim Darah; Yeng Chen; Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity activity of Euphorbia hirta (E. hirta) in MCF-7 cell line model using comet assay. Methods: The cytotoxicity of E. hirta extract was investigated by employing brine shrimp lethality assay and the genotoxicity of E. hirta was assessed by using Comet assay. Results: Both toxicity tests exhibited significant toxicity result. In the comet assay, the E. hirta extract exhibited genotoxicity effects against MCF-7 DNA in a time-dependent manner by increasing mean percentage of DNA damage. The extract of E. hirta showed significant toxicity against brine shrimp with an LC50 value of 620.382 μg/mL (24 h). Comparison with positive control potassium dichromate signifies that cytotoxicity exhibited by the methanol extract might have moderate activity. Conclusion:The present work confirmed the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of E. hirta. However, the observed toxicity of E. hirta extracts needs to be confirmed in additional studies.

  14. Alkaline comet assay for genotoxic effect detection in neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus (Pisces, Curimatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoniello, M F; Gigena, F; Poletta, G; Loteste, A; Kleinsorge, E; Campana, M; Scagnetti, J; Parma, M J

    2009-08-01

    Toxicants on fish may induce genetic alterations that can be used as genotoxic markers. We evaluated DNA damage using alkaline comet assay applied on erythrocytes after in vivo exposure of Prochilodus lineatus to different concentrations of Cypermethrin (0.300, 0.150, 0.075 and 0.000 microg/L) as a probable chemical mutagen. The results revealed a significantly higher level of DNA damage at all concentrations of Cypermethrin tested compared to control and background level (p < 0.05). We have standardized the technique for one of the most common native fish species that will be useful for biomonitoring genotoxicity in polluted waters of the region. PMID:19466374

  15. Glycidamide genotoxicity modulated by Caspases genes polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, João Pereira; Silva, Susana N; Rueff, José; Pingarilho, Marta

    2016-08-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is amongst acknowledged carcinogenic dietary factors. Its DNA-reactive metabolite is glycidamide (GA). The present study intended to correlate the role of key polymorphic genes of apoptosis (CASP7, CASP8, CASP9, CASP10, LTA and TNFRSF1B) with biomarkers of effect of DNA damage, namely the sister chromatid exchange assay (SCE) and the comet assay in whole blood cells exposed to GA. The aim was to assess as a proof of concept the role that pro-apoptotic effector proteins might have in the yields of genotoxic effects when those effector proteins are coded by polymorphic genes. Whole blood from a small group of volunteers was exposed to GA to assess DNA damage and the volunteers were genotyped for polymorphic genes related to apoptosis pathways. A relation between the induction of SCE and several variants of the polymorphism CASP8 rs1035142 G>T was observed. Also, a relation between the % tail DNA and the CASP10 I522L polymorphism was found. Furthermore, associations between % tail DNA and several SNP-SNP interactions of CASP8 and CASP10 were found. A possible correlation between DNA damage and the genetic susceptibility, bestowed by polymorphic genes in the apoptosis inducing pathways was verified. PMID:27062911

  16. Comet Assay: A Method to Evaluate Genotoxicity of Nano-Drug Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Eskandani; Somayeh Vandghanooni

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Drug delivery systems could induce cellular toxicity as side effect of nanomaterials. The mechanism of toxicity usually involves DNA damage. The comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) is a sensitive method for detecting strand damages in the DNA of a cell with applications in genotoxicity testing and molecular epidemiology as well as fundamental research in DNA damage and repair. Methods: In the current study, we reviewed recent drug delivery researches related to...

  17. Arsenic Is A Genotoxic Carcinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen; however, there is controversy over whether or not it should be considered a genotoxic carcinogen. Many possible modes of action have been proposed on how arsenic induces cancer, including inhibiting DNA repair, altering methylation patter...

  18. Assessment of Genotoxicity of Ionizing radiation using Tradescantia-Comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last two decades, several new methodologies for the detection of DNA damage have been developed. The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, also called the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was first introduced by Ostling and Johanson as a microelectrophoretic technique for the direct visualization of DNA damage in individual cells. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Although the genotoxic effects detected by Tradescantia tests cannot be associated with mutagenesis or even carcinogenesis in humans, these bioassays are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay

  19. Recent perspectives on the relations between faecal mutagenicity, genotoxicity and diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGratz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is an essential component of the genesis of colonic cancer. Gut microbial products and food components are thought to be principally responsible for the damage that initiates disease progression. Modified Ames tests and Comet assays have been developed for measuring mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Their relevance to oncogenesis remains to be confirmed, as does the relative importance of different mutagenic and genotoxic compounds present in faecal water and the bacteria involved in their metabolism. Dietary intervention studies provide clues to the likely risks of oncogenesis. High-protein diets lead to increases in N-nitroso compounds in faecal water and greater DNA damage as measured by the Comet assay, for example. Other dietary interventions, such as non-digestible carbohydrates and probiotics, may lead to lower faecal genotoxicity. In order to make recommendations to the general public, we must develop a better understanding of how genotoxic compounds are formed in the colon, how accurate the Ames and Comet assays are, and how diet affects genotoxicity.

  20. Current investigations into the genotoxicity of zinc oxide and silica nanoparticles in mammalian models in vitro and in vivo: carcinogenic/genotoxic potential, relevant mechanisms and biomarkers, artifacts, and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon JY

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jee Young Kwon,1,* Preeyaporn Koedrith,2,* Young Rok Seo1 1Department of Life Science, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Dongguk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Phuttamonthon District, NakhonPathom, Thailand *These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first authors Abstract: Engineered nanoparticles (NPs are widely used in many sectors, such as food, medicine, military, and sport, but their unique characteristics may cause deleterious health effects. Close attention is being paid to metal NP genotoxicity; however, NP genotoxic/carcinogenic effects and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this review, we address some metal and metal oxide NPs of interest and current genotoxicity tests in vitro and in vivo. Metal NPs can cause DNA damage such as chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage, and mutations. We also discuss several parameters that may affect genotoxic response, including physicochemical properties, widely used assays/end point tests, and experimental conditions. Although potential biomarkers of nanogenotoxicity or carcinogenicity are suggested, inconsistent findings in the literature render results inconclusive due to a variety of factors. Advantages and limitations related to different methods for investigating genotoxicity are described, and future directions and recommendations for better understanding genotoxic potential are addressed. Keywords: carcinogenicity, exposure assessment, genotoxicity, nanoparticles, risk evaluation

  1. Genotoxicity of indium tin oxide by comet test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Hakkı Ciğerci

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Indium tin oxide (ITO is used for liquid crystal display (LCDs, electrochromic displays, flat panel displays, field emission displays, touch or laptop computer screens, cell phones, energy conserving architectural windows, defogging aircraft and automobile windows, heat-reflecting coatings to increase light bulb efficiency, gas sensors, antistatic window coatings, wear resistant layers on glass, nanowires and nanorods because of its unique properties of high electrical conductivity, transparency and mechanical resistance.Genotoxic effects of ITO were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of ITO at 5 different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm for 4 h. A significant increase in DNA damage was a observed at all concentrations of ITO by Comet assay. These result indicate that ITO exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  2. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; Souza, Tatiana da Silva

    2016-02-01

    Sewage treatment yields sludge, which is often used as a soil amendment in agriculture and crop production. Although the sludge contains elevated concentrations of macro and micronutrients, high levels of inorganic and organic compounds with genotoxic and mutagenic properties are present in sludge. Application of sludge in agriculture is a pathway for direct contact of crops to toxic chemicals. The objective of this study was to compile information related to the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge in different plant species. In addition, data are presented on toxicological effects in animals fed with plants grown in soils supplemented with sewage sludge. Despite the benefits of using sewage sludge as organic fertilizer, the data showcased in this review suggest that this residue can induce genetic damage in plants. This review alerts potential risks to health outcomes after the intake of food cultivated in sewage sludge-amended soils. PMID:26643763

  3. The Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Hexavalent Chromium in Steller Sea Lion Lung Fibroblasts Compared to Human Lung Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, John Pierce; Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie L.; LaCerte, Carolyne; Shaffiey, Fariba; Aboueissa, AbouEl-Makarim

    2010-01-01

    In this study we directly compared soluble and particulate chromate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human (Homo sapiens) and sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) lung fibroblasts. Our results show that hexavalent chromium induces increased cell death and chromosome damage in both human and sea lion cells with increasing intracellular chromium ion levels. The data further indicate that both sodium chromate and lead chromate are less cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea lion cells than human cells, based o...

  4. El té verde en la quimioprevención in vivo del daño genotóxico inducido por metales cancerígenos (cromo [VI] Green tea and its role on chemoprevention in vivo of genotoxic damage induced by carcinogenic metals (Chromium [VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. García-Rodríguez

    2012-08-01

    las 72 horas, del 20 y 35% a las 48 horas y del 18 y 31% a las 24 horas con los tratamientos intragástricos y ad libitum respectivamente, en comparación con el grupo tratado solo con el trióxido de cromo. Por lo que, el té verde redujo el daño genotóxico inducido por el trióxido de cromo, y la mayor protección se presentó a las 72 horas. Conclusiones: Nuestros hallazgos muestran un efecto protector del té verde contra el daño al material genético inducido por compuestos metálicos como los del Cr [VI], sugiriendo que sus componentes antioxidantes son los que tienen un efecto quimiopreventivo sobre el EOx generado por el Cr [VI] durante su reducción a Cr [III]. El hecho de que la mayor disminución de la frecuencia de MN se observe a las 72 horas y con el tratamiento ad libitum, sugiere que el efecto protector depende de la biodisponibilidad, farmacodinámica y farmacocinética del principio activo del té verde, por lo que la administración del té verde durante tiempos más prolongados antes de la exposición con compuestos de Cr [VI] podría tener un efecto preventivo más consistente.Background: Consumption of green tea, by its antioxidant properties, has been associated with beneficial health effects, because antioxidant may play a role in the risk and pathogenesis of several chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular disease and cancer. On the other hand, it has been reported that metal compounds such as chromium [VI] are carcinogenic and can induce genotoxic damage through the Oxidative Stress. Therefore, it is possible that green tea has a protective effect against the genotoxic damage induced by this compounds. Objective: To evaluate the effect of oral administration of green tea over the genotoxic damage induced by Cr [VI] by quantification of micronucleus (MN in polychromatic erythrocytes (EPC. Materials and methods: We use mice of CD-1 strain that were randomly divided into the following groups: (i control, (ii treatment with green tea, (iii

  5. Genotoxic pressure of vineyard pesticides in fish: field and mesocosm surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bony, S; Gillet, C; Bouchez, A; Margoum, C; Devaux, A

    2008-09-17

    The present study deals with the genotoxicity assessment of vineyard pesticides in fish exposed in the field or in mesocosm conditions. Primary DNA damage was quantified as strand breaks using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay (Comet assay) applied to fish erythrocytes. In a first experiment, a significant genotoxic effect was observed following an upstream-downstream gradient in early life stages of brown trout (Salmo trutta fario) exposed in the Morcille River contaminated by a mixture of vineyard pesticides during three consecutive years. The pronounced response in terms of DNA damage reported in the present study could argue for a high sensitivity of fish early life stage and/or a high level of exposure to genotoxic compounds in the Morcille River. This stresses the interest in using trout larvae incubated in sediment bed to assess genotoxic compounds in the field. In a second experiment, adult European topminnow (Phoxinus phoxinus) were exposed in water running through artificial channels to a mixture of diuron and azoxystrobin, two of the main pesticides detected in the Morcille watershed. As compared with the unexposed channel, a 3-5-fold increase in the DNA damage was observed in fish exposed to chronic environmental pesticide concentrations (1-2 microg L(-1) for diuron and 0.5-1 microg L(-1) for axoxystrobin). A single 6h pulse of pesticide (14 microg L(-1) of diuron and 7 microg L(-1) of azoxystrobin) was applied to simulate transiently elevated chemical concentrations in the river following storm conditions. It did not increase genotoxicity. After a 1-month recovery period, DNA damage in exposed fish erythrocytes recovered to unexposed level, suggesting possible involvement of both repair mechanisms and cellular turnover in this transient response. This work highlights that vineyard treatment by pesticides and in particular diuron and azoxystrobin can represent a genotoxic threat to fish from contaminated watershed rivers. PMID:18703238

  6. Genotoxicity test of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety tests of radiation irradiated foods started as early as from 1967 in Japan and genotoxicity tests in the Hatano Res. Inst., from 1977. The latter is unique in the world and is reviewed in this paper. Tests included those for the initial injury of DNA, mutagenicity, chromosomal aberration and transformation with use of bacteria, cultured mammalian cells and animals (for chromosomal aberration, micronucleus formation and dominant lethality). Foods tested hitherto were onion, rice, wheat and flour, Vienna sausage, fish sausage (kamaboko), mandarian orange, potato, black pepper and red capsicum, of which extract or powder was subjected to the test. Irradiation doses and its purposes were 0.15-6 kGy γ-ray (60Co) or electron beam by the accelerator (only for the orange), and suppression of germination, pesticide action or sterilization, respectively. Genotoxicity of all foods under tested conditions is shown negative. (N.I.)

  7. Genotoxicity evaluation of drinking water sources in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using the comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yulin; CHEN Haigang; LI Zhaoli; SUN Liwei; QU Mengmeng; LI Mei; KONG Zhiming

    2008-01-01

    The potential harm of organic pollutants in drinking water to human health is widely focused on in the world; more and more pollutants with genotoxic substances are released into the aquatic environment. Water source samples were collected from 7 different localities of Nanjing City. The potential genotoxicity of organic extracts from drinking water sources were investigated by means of the comet assay in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results showed that all the organic extracts from all the water source samples could induce DNA damages of human peripheral blood lymphocytes at different levels. A significant difference (P < 0.01) was observed when compared with the solvent control. The DNA damage increased with the increase of the dosage of the original water source. Significant differences of DNA damage were observed in different drinking water sources, as shown by the multiple comparisons analysis at the dosage of 100×; the degree of DNA damage treated by Hushu waterworks (at town level) was the most serious, the arbitrary units (AU) was 141.62±6.96, however, that of Shangyuanmen waterworks (at city level) was only 109.64±2.97. The analysis also revealed that the genotoxicity of town's water sources was higher than that of the city. The results demonstrated that the comet assay can be successfully applied to the genotoxicity monitoring programs of drinking water sources.

  8. Genotoxic and cytotoxic damage by the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP as in vivo generator system; Dano genotoxico y citotoxico por el radiofarmaco terpeutico [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP como sistema de generador in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza L, M.; Piedras R, J. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran. Vasco. de Quiroga 15, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G.; Morales R, P. [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E. [Hospital Santaelena, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez O, O. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In patients with leukemias and multiple myeloma, the cure can be obtained to inclination of a bone marrow transplant (m.o.), for that which one is used a combination of external radiotherapy and chemotherapy with the consequent toxicity to healthy organs. The complex [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate ([{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP) it forms a generator system in vivo stable with bony selective likeness in mice therefore, this it could work as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical for bone marrow ablation. The objective of this original work was to determine the genotoxic and cytotoxic damage produced by the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP like a generator system in vivo by means of the reticulocytes reduction (RET) and micronucleus elevation in reticulocytes (RET-MN) in peripheral blood and to evaluate its myeloablative potential for histopathologic studies. It was irradiated {sup 166}Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} enriched and it was add in form {sup 166}DyCI{sub 3} to the EDTMP in a softening media of phosphates (pH 8), the optimal molar relationship {sup 166}Dy: EDTMP was 1.7:1 and the radiochemical purity was evaluated by ITLC. The Dy:EDTMP complexes, non radioactive, its were prepared in the same way with non irradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice was injected intraperitoneally with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control mice were injected with the non radioactive complex and with sodium chloride 0.9% respectively. Before injecting each one of the solutions it was take a basal sample of peripheral blood of the mouse tail and each 48 h post-injection during 12 d. The animals were sacrificed to obtain the organs of interest and to determine the radioactivity in each one. The femur was used for the histopathologic studies. The quantification of the frequency of RET and RET-MN was carried out by flow cytometry of the sanguine samples and the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B for the dosimetry calculations was used. The

  9. Genotoxic and apoptotic effects of Goeckerman therapy for psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borska, L.; Andrys, C.; Krejsek, J.; Hamakova, K.; Kremlacek, J.; Palicka, V.; Ranna, D.; Fiala, Z. [Charles University Prague, Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Medicine

    2010-03-15

    Goeckerman therapy (GT) for psoriasis is based on cutaneous application of crude coal tar (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)) and exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). PAH and UVR are mutagenic, carcinogenic and immunotoxic agents that promote apoptosis. We evaluated dermal absorption of PAH as well as the genotoxic and apoptotic effects of GT in 20 patients with psoriasis, by determining numbers of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral lymphocytes, and levels of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), p53 protein and soluble FasL (sFasL) in urine and/or blood, before and after GT. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score was used to evaluate clinical efficacy of GT. Compared with pre-treatment levels, there was a significant increase in urine 1-OHP, indicating a high degree of dermal absorption of PAH (P <0.01). We also found a significant increase in the number of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P <0.001), suggesting that GT is genotoxic; significantly increased p53 protein in plasma (P <0.05), an indicator of cell response to DNA damage; and significantly increased sFasL in serum (P <0.01), an indicator of apoptosis. The PASI score was significantly decreased after GT (P <0.001), confirming clinical benefit of this treatment. Our results demonstrate high dermal absorption of PAH during GT and provide evidence that GT promotes genotoxicity and apoptosis.

  10. Genotoxicity of dichlorvos in strains of Drosophila melanogaster defective in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Manish; Sharma, A; Shukla, A K; Kumar, R; Dwivedi, U N; Kar Chowdhuri, D

    2014-05-15

    Dichlorvos (DDVP), an organophosphate pesticide, is reported to be genotoxic at high concentrations. However, the roles of DNA damage repair pathways in DDVP genotoxicity are not well characterized. To test whether pre- and post-replication pathways are involved, we measured changes in DNA migration (Comet assay) in the midgut cells of Drosophila melanogaster Oregon R+ larvae and in some mutants of pre- (mei-9, mus201, and mus207) and post- (mei-41 and mus209)replication DNA repair pathways. Insects were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of DDVP (up to 15ng/ml) for 48h. After insect exposure to 0.15ng/ml DDVP, we observed greater DNA damage in pre-replication repair mutants; effects on Oregon R+ and post-replication repair mutants were insignificant. In contrast, significant DNA damage was observed in the post-replication repair mutants after their exposure to 1.5 and 15ng/ml DDVP. The pre-replication repair mutant mus207 showed maximum sensitivity to DDVP, suggestive of alkylation damage to DNA. We also examined mutants (SOD- and urate-null) that are sensitive to oxidative stress and the results indicate that significant oxidative DNA damage occurs in DDVP-exposed mutants. This study suggests involvement of both pre- and post-replication repair pathways against DDVP-induced DNA damage in Drosophila, with oxidative DNA damage leading to genotoxicity. PMID:24614193

  11. Investigation of the genotoxicity of substances migrating from polycarbonate replacement baby bottles to identify chemicals of high concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Birgit; Simon, Coraline; Van Bossuyt, Melissa; Onghena, Matthias; Vandermarken, Tara; Van Langenhove, Kersten; Demaegdt, Heidi; Van Hoeck, Els; Van Loco, Joris; Vandermeiren, Karin; Covaci, Adrian; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Elskens, Marc; Verschaeve, Luc

    2016-03-01

    Due to the worldwide concern that bisphenol A might act as an endocrine disruptor, alternative materials for polycarbonate (PC) have been introduced on the European market. However, PC-replacement products might also release substances of which the toxicological profile - including their genotoxic effects - has not yet been characterized. Because a thorough characterization of the genotoxic profile of all these substances is impossible in the short term, a strategy was developed in order to prioritize those substances for which additional data are urgently needed. The strategy consisted of a decision tree using hazard information related to genotoxicity. The relevant information was obtained from the database of the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), in silico prediction tools (ToxTree and Derek Nexus(TM)) and the in vitro Vitotox(®) test for detecting DNA damage. By applying the decision tree, substances could be classified into different groups, each characterized by a different probability to induce genotoxic effects. Although none of the investigated substances could be unequivocally identified as genotoxic, the presence of genotoxic effects could neither be excluded for any of them. Consequently, all substances require more data to investigate the genotoxic potential. However, the type and the urge for these data differs among the substances. PMID:26802677

  12. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierscionek, Barbara K.; Li, Yuebin; Yasseen, Akeel A.; Colhoun, Liza M.; Schachar, Ronald A.; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-01

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO2) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 µg ml-1 of CeO2 nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  13. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO2) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 μg ml-1 of CeO2 nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  14. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierscionek, Barbara K; Yasseen, Akeel A [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Li, Yuebin; Schachar, Ronald A; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Colhoun, Liza M, E-mail: b.pierscionek@ulster.ac.uk, E-mail: weichen@uta.edu [Centre for Vision and Vascular Sciences, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, BT12 6BA (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-22

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 {mu}g ml{sup -1} of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  15. Anti-Genotoxic Potential of Bilirubin In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner, Marlies; Antl, Nadja; Rittmannsberger, Barbara;

    2013-01-01

    The bile pigment bilirubin is a known antioxidant and is associated with protection from cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) when present in too strong concentrations. Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) might also possess anti-genotoxic potential by preventing oxidative damage to DNA. Moderately...... (age- and sex-matched) were allocated into Gilbert syndrome (UCB ≥17.1 μmol/L; n = 38) or control groups (UCB < 17.1 μmol/L; n = 38). In addition, 40 Gunn rats were used to support the results of the human trial. Single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay measuring standard conditions (strand breaks...

  16. Genotoxic thresholds, DNA repair, and susceptibility in human populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been long assumed that DNA damage is induced in a linear manner with respect to the dose of a direct acting genotoxin. Thus, it is implied that direct acting genotoxic agents induce DNA damage at even the lowest of concentrations and that no 'safe' dose range exists. The linear (non-threshold) paradigm has led to the one-hit model being developed. This 'one hit' scenario can be interpreted such that a single DNA damaging event in a cell has the capability to induce a single point mutation in that cell which could (if positioned in a key growth controlling gene) lead to increased proliferation, leading ultimately to the formation of a tumour. There are many groups (including our own) who, for a decade or more, have argued, that low dose exposures to direct acting genotoxins may be tolerated by cells through homeostatic mechanisms such as DNA repair. This argument stems from the existence of evolutionary adaptive mechanisms that allow organisms to adapt to low levels of exogenous sources of genotoxins. We have been particularly interested in the genotoxic effects of known mutagens at low dose exposures in human cells and have identified for the first time, in vitro genotoxic thresholds for several mutagenic alkylating agents (Doak et al., 2007). Our working hypothesis is that DNA repair is primarily responsible for these thresholded effects at low doses by removing low levels of DNA damage but becoming saturated at higher doses. We are currently assessing the roles of base excision repair (BER) and methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) for roles in the identified thresholds (Doak et al., 2008). This research area is currently important as it assesses whether 'safe' exposure levels to mutagenic chemicals can exist and allows risk assessment using appropriate safety factors to define such exposure levels. Given human variation, the mechanistic basis for genotoxic thresholds (e.g. DNA repair) has to be well defined in order that susceptible individuals are

  17. Genotoxicity and Mutagenicity of Suspended Particulate Matter of River Water and Waste Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Reifferscheid

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended particulate matter of samples of river water and waste water treatment plants was tested for genotoxicity and mutagenicity using the standardized umu assay and two versions of the Ames microsuspension assay. The study tries to determine the entire DNA-damaging potential of the water samples and the distribution of DNA-damaging substances among the liquid phase and solid phase. Responsiveness and sensitivity of the bioassays are compared.

  18. Genotoxicity and Mutagenicity of Suspended Particulate Matter of River Water and Waste Water Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Georg Reifferscheid; Oepen, Britta v.

    2002-01-01

    Suspended particulate matter of samples of river water and waste water treatment plants was tested for genotoxicity and mutagenicity using the standardized umu assay and two versions of the Ames microsuspension assay. The study tries to determine the entire DNA-damaging potential of the water samples and the distribution of DNA-damaging substances among the liquid phase and solid phase. Responsiveness and sensitivity of the bioassays are compared.

  19. Sam68/KHDRBS1 is critical for colon tumorigenesis by regulating genotoxic stress-induced NF-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kai; Sun, Xin; Wier, Eric M; Hodgson, Andrea; Liu, Yue; Sears, Cynthia L; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated transcription is an important mediator for cellular responses to DNA damage. Genotoxic agents trigger a 'nuclear-to-cytoplasmic' NF-κB activation signaling pathway; however, the early nuclear signaling cascade linking DNA damage and NF-κB activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Src-associated-substrate-during-mitosis-of-68kDa/KH domain containing, RNA binding, signal transduction associated 1 (Sam68/KHDRBS1) is a key NF-κB regulator in genotoxic stress-initiated signaling pathway. Sam68 deficiency abolishes DNA damage-stimulated polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) production and the PAR-dependent NF-κB transactivation of anti-apoptotic genes. Sam68 deleted cells are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA damaging agents. Upregulated Sam68 coincides with elevated PAR production and NF-κB-mediated anti-apoptotic transcription in human and mouse colon cancer. Knockdown of Sam68 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and genetic deletion of Sam68 dampens colon tumor burden in mice. Together our data reveal a novel function of Sam68 in the genotoxic stress-initiated nuclear signaling, which is crucial for colon tumorigenesis. PMID:27458801

  20. Xylo-oligosaccharides and inulin affect genotoxicity and bacterial populations differently in a human colonic simulator challenged with soy protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, C. T.; Petersen, Anne; Licht, Tine Rask;

    2013-01-01

    High dietary intakes of some protein sources, including soy protein, can increase colonic DNA damage in animals, whereas some carbohydrates attenuate this. We investigated whether inulin and xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) could be protective against DNA strand breaks by adding them to a human colonic...... simulator consisting of a proximal vessel (PV) (pH 5.5) and a distal vessel (DV) (pH 6.8) inoculated with human faeces and media containing soy protein. Genotoxicity of the liquid phase and microbial population changes in the vessels were measured. Soy protein (3%) was fermented with 1% low amylose...... cornstarch for 10 day followed by soy protein with 1% XOS or 1% inulin for 10 day. Inulin did not alter genotoxicity but XOS significantly reduced PV genotoxicity and increased DV genotoxicity. Inulin and XOS significantly increased butyrate concentration in the DV but not PV. Numbers of the key butyrate...

  1. Mutagenic and genotoxic activity of particulate matter MP2,5, in Pamplona, North Santander, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Montañez, Mónica Liseth

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the mutagenic and genotoxic activities of particulate material (MP2,5 collected in Pamplona, Norte de Santander, Colombia.Materials and methods: MP2,5 was monitored by means of a Partisol 2025 sequential air sampler with Plus Palmflex quartz filters. The latter were subjected to two extraction procedures: Soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane-acetone; and ultrasonic extraction using dichloromethane, acetone and dichloromethane/ acetone mix. The mutagenic and genotoxic activities were determined for each extract.Results: This is the first study conducted in Colombia that reports the mutagenic and genotoxic activities associated with particulate matter (MP2,5 taken from vehicular emissions in Pamplona, Norte de Santander. The mutagenic assay determined by the Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 showed a high direct mutagenic activity in the analyzed extracts. On the other hand, the genotoxic activity, determined by means of the comet assay, was high too.Conclusion: Particulate material (MP2,5 present in air samples in Pamplona (northeastern Colombia is a risk factor for the exposed population because it can directly induce mutations and also cause genotoxic damage.

  2. In vitro and in vivo genotoxic effects of straight versus tangled multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Julia; Siivola, Kirsi M; Nymark, Penny; Lindberg, Hanna; Suhonen, Satu; Järventaus, Hilkka; Koivisto, Antti J; Moreno, Carlos; Vanhala, Esa; Wolff, Henrik; Kling, Kirsten I; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Savolainen, Kai; Norppa, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Some multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) induce mesothelioma in rodents, straight MWCNTs showing a more pronounced effect than tangled MWCNTs. As primary and secondary genotoxicity may play a role in MWCNT carcinogenesis, we used a battery of assays for DNA damage and micronuclei to compare the genotoxicity of straight (MWCNT-S) and tangled MWCNTs (MWCNT-T) in vitro (primary genotoxicity) and in vivo (primary or secondary genotoxicity). C57Bl/6 mice showed a dose-dependent increase in DNA strand breaks, as measured by the comet assay, in lung cells 24 h after a single pharyngeal aspiration of MWCNT-S (1-200 μg/mouse). An increase was also observed for DNA strand breaks in lung and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells and for micronucleated alveolar type II cells in mice exposed to aerosolized MWCNT-S (8.2-10.8 mg/m(3)) for 4 d, 4 h/d. No systemic genotoxic effects, assessed by the γ-H2AX assay in blood mononuclear leukocytes or by micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs) in bone marrow or blood, were observed for MWCNT-S by either exposure technique. MWCNT-T showed a dose-related decrease in DNA damage in BAL and lung cells of mice after a single pharyngeal aspiration (1-200 μg/mouse) and in MNPCEs after inhalation exposure (17.5 mg/m(3)). In vitro in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, MWCNT-S induced DNA strand breaks at low doses (5 and 10 μg/cm(2)), while MWCNT-T increased strand breakage only at 200 μg/cm(2). Neither of the MWCNTs was able to induce micronuclei in vitro. Our findings suggest that both primary and secondary mechanisms may be involved in the genotoxicity of straight MWCNTs. PMID:26674712

  3. Dose-Response Assessment of Four Genotoxic Chemicals in a Combined Mouse and Rat Micronucleus and Comet Assay Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Recio, Leslie; Hobbs, Cheryl; Caspary, William; Witt, Kristine L.

    2010-01-01

    The in vivo micronucleus (MN) assay has proven to be an effective measure of genotoxicity potential. However, sampling a single tissue (bone marrow) for a single indicator of genetic damage using the MN assay provides a limited genotoxicity profile. The in vivo alkaline (pH>13) Comet assay, which detects a broad spectrum of DNA damage, can be applied to a variety of rodent tissues following administration of test agents. To determine if the Comet assay is a useful supplement to the in vivo MN...

  4. Genotoxic effect of Phenanthrene on Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera: Chironomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele dos Santos Morais

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon, remains adsorbed to sedimentary particles in aquatic environments. It affects mainly benthic organisms, and is considered potentially genotoxic. In ecotoxicology, species of Chironomus Meigen, 1803 are widely known as bioindicators of the effects of chemicals on aquatic organisms. This study investigates the effects of phenanthrene on the size of the head capsule of Chironomus sancticaroli Strixino & Strixino, 1981 larvae after chronic (eight days exposure, and DNA damage after acute (96 hours and chronic exposure (eight days, under laboratory conditions. DNA damage, evaluated using the alkaline comet assay, detected effects for both exposure periods, indicating that phenanthrene is toxic for C. sancticaroli. For the acute exposure, we analyzed five concentrations of phenanthrene, between 0.16 mg.l-1 and 1.60 mg.l-1, detecting significant differences (Kruskall-Wallis test with p < 0.05 in the degree of DNA damage in all groups. These effects were not dose-dependent. For the chronic exposure, two concentrations (0.16 mg.l-1, 0.83 mg.l-1 were analyzed, and DNA damage was observed in both. Again, the effects were not dose-dependent. This indicates that phenanthrene is genotoxic to larvae of C. sancticaroli even at low concentrations. The size of the head capsule was evaluated after chronic exposure to concentrations of 0.16 mg.l-1 and 0.83 mg.l-1. Significant differences (ANOVA test with p < 0.05 were detected in the two concentrations, and a reduction in the size of the larval head capsule was observed. This suggests that phenanthrene causes delay in larval development. These results indicate that phenanthrene affects the development of and causes DNA damage in C. sancticaroli larvae. Therefore, we suggest that C. sancticaroli can be used as a biological indicator for environmental contamination with phenanthrene.

  5. Genotoxicity monitoring of freshwater environments using caged carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobucar, Göran I V; Stambuk, Anamaria; Pavlica, Mirjana; Sertić Perić, Mirela; Kutuzović Hackenberger, Branimir; Hylland, Ketil

    2010-01-01

    The present study deals with genotoxicity assessment of freshwaters using caged carp (Cyprinus carpio). Carps were transplanted from a fish-farm to three differently polluted sites in eastern Croatia. Two polluted sites were situated in the river Drava, downstream from the cities of Belisće and Osijek, while the reference site was in the Nature Park Kopacki rit, a preserved wetland area with limited anthropogenic influence. Exposure lasted for 3 weeks and was repeated for 3 years (2002-2004). DNA damage was assessed in erythrocytes of the exposed animals by the Comet assay and micronucleus test (MNT). In order to evaluate possible differences in stress responses to polluted water in situ and in aquaria a laboratory exposure was performed with water from the studied location in the second year of the study. Carp from the sites with high anthropogenic influence (Belisće and Osijek) had higher average DNA damage as expressed in both the MNT and Comet assay. Of the two, the Comet assay appeared to be more sensitive following both caging and aquaria exposures. The results from this study suggest that 3 weeks caging exposure of C. carpio may be a useful strategy to monitor for genotoxic agents in freshwater ecosystems. PMID:19626438

  6. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates. PMID:27231936

  7. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Verónica Prego-Faraldo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Okadaic acid (OA and dinophysistoxins (DTXs are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs. Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1 comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates.

  8. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates. PMID:27231936

  9. Human Genotoxic Study Carried Out Two Years after Oil Exposure during the Clean-up Activities Using Two Different Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Biern

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Micronuclei, comet and chromosome alterations assays are the most widely used biomarkers for determining the genotoxic damage in a population exposed to genotoxic chemicals. While chromosome alterations are an excellent biomarker to detect short- and long-term genotoxic effects, the comet assay only measures early biological effects, and furthermore it is unknown whether nuclear abnormalies, such as those measured in the micronucleus test, remain detectable long-term after an acute exposure. In our previous study, an increase in structural chromosome alterations in fishermen involved in the clean-up of the Prestige oil spill, two years after acute exposure, was detected. The aim of this study is to investigate whether, in lymphocytes from peripheral blood, the nuclear abnormalies (micronucleus, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds have a similar sensitivity to the chromosome damage analysis for genotoxic detection two years after oil exposure in the same non-smoker individuals and in the same peripheral blood extraction. No significant differences in nuclear abnormalies frequencies between exposed and non-exposed individuals were found (p > 0.05. However, chromosome damage, in the same individuals, was higher in exposed vs. non-exposed individuals, especially for chromosome lesions (p < 0.05. These findings, despite the small sample size, suggest that nuclear abnormalities are probably less-successful biomarkers than are chromosome alterations to evaluate genotoxic effects two or more years after an exposure to oil. Due to the great advantage of micronucleus automatic determination, which allows for a rapid study of hundreds of individuals exposed to genotoxic chemical exposure, further studies are needed to confirm whether this assay is or is not useful in long-term genotoxic studies after the toxic agent is no longer present.

  10. Initial hazard screening for genotoxicity of photo-transformation products of ciprofloxacin by applying a combination of experimental and in-silico testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolaram, Anju Priya; Haddad, Tarek; Leder, Christoph; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic found within μg/L concentration range in the aquatic environment. It is a known contributor of umuC induction in hospital wastewater samples. CIP can undergo photolysis to result in many transformation products (TPs) of mostly unknown toxicity. The aims of this study were to determine the genotoxicity of the UV mixtures and to understand the possible genotoxic role of the stable TPs. As such, CIP and its UV-irradiated mixtures were investigated in a battery of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in vitro assays. The combination index (CI) analysis of residual CIP in the irradiated mixtures was performed for the umu assay. Further, Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) predicted selected genotoxicity endpoints of the identified TPs. CIP achieved primary elimination after 128 min of irradiation but was not completely mineralized. Nine photo-TPs were identified. The irradiated mixtures were neither mutagenic in the Ames test nor genotoxic in the in vitro micronucleus (MN) test. Like CIP, the irradiated mixtures were umuC inducing. The CI analysis revealed that the irradiated mixtures and the corresponding CIP concentration in the mixtures shared similar umuC potentials. QSAR predictions suggested that the TPs may be capable of inducing chromosome aberration, MN in vivo, bacterial mutation and mammalian mutation. However, the experimental testing for a few genotoxic endpoints did not show significant genotoxic activity for the TPs present as a component of the whole mixture analysis and therefore, further genotoxic endpoints may need to be investigated to fully confirm this. PMID:26748250

  11. Cytostatic and genotoxic effect of temephos in human lymphocytes and HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez-Trinidad, A B; Herrera-Moreno, J F; Vázquez-Estrada, G; Verdín-Betancourt, F A; Sordo, M; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Medina-Díaz, I M; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Salazar, A M; Rojas-García, A E

    2015-06-01

    Temephos is an organophosphorus pesticide that is used in control campaigns against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. In spite of the widespread use of temephos, few studies have examined its genotoxic potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic effects of temephos in human lymphocytes and hepatoma cells (HepG2). The cytotoxicity was evaluated with simultaneous staining (FDA/EtBr). The cytostatic and genotoxic effects were evaluated using comet assays and the micronucleus technique. We found that temephos was not cytotoxic in either lymphocytes or HepG2 cells. Regarding the cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes, temephos (10 μM) caused a significant decrease in the percentage of binucleated cells and in the nuclear division index as well as an increase in the apoptotic cell frequency, which was not the case for HepG2 cells. The comet assay showed that temephos increased the DNA damage levels in human lymphocytes, but it did not increase the MN frequency. In contrast, in HepG2 cells, temephos increased the tail length, tail moment and MN frequency in HepG2 cells compared to control cells. In conclusion, temephos causes stable DNA damage in HepG2 cells but not in human lymphocytes. These findings suggest the importance of temephos biotransformation in its genotoxic effect. PMID:25746384

  12. Genotoxicity detected in wild mice living in a highly polluted wetland area in south western Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field study was carried out in the south of the Iberian Peninsula in an industrial area in the neighbourhood of Huelva city, SW Spain, and in a natural area (Donana National Park) for comparison, to estimate the genetic risk induced by environmental pollution in wild mice. Genotoxic effects in a sentinel organism, the Algerian mice (Mus spretus) free living in the industrial area were compared with animals of the same species living in the natural protected area. The single cell gel electrophoresis, or Comet assay, was performed as a genotoxicity test in peripheral blood of mice. Our results clearly show that mice free living in the contaminated area bear a high burden of genetic damage as compared with control individuals. The results suggest that the assessing of genotoxicity levels by the Comet assay in wild mice can be used as a valuable test in pollution monitoring and environmental conservation. - We have found an increased genotoxic damage in wild mice in a highly polluted area from industry, mining and agriculture in SW Spain, as assessed by the Comet assay

  13. Assessing the genotoxicity of urban air pollutants using two in situ plant bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarini, M.; Fatigoni, C.; Dominici, L.; Maestri, S. [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy); Ederli, L.; Pasqualini, S. [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, I-06121 (Italy); Monarca, S. [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy); Moretti, M., E-mail: massimo.moretti@unipg.i [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Genotoxicity of urban air has been analysed almost exclusively in airborne particulates. We monitored the genotoxic effects of airborne pollutants in the urban air of Perugia (Central Italy). Two plant bioindicators with different genetic endpoints were used: micronuclei in meiotic pollen mother cells using Tradescantia-micronucleus bioassay (Trad-MCN) and DNA damage in nuclei of Nicotiana tabacum leaves using comet assay (Nicotiana-comet). Buds of Tradescantia clone no. 4430 and young N. tabacum cv. Xanthi plants were exposed for 24 h at three sites with different pollution levels. One control site (indoor control) was also used. The two bioassays showed different sensitivities toward urban pollutants: Trad-MCN assay was the most sensitive, but DNA damage in N. tabacum showed a better correlation with the pollutant concentrations. In situ biomonitoring of airborne genotoxins using higher plants combined with chemical analysis is thus recommended for characterizing genotoxicity of urban air. - Plant bioassays used to explore in situ the correlation between air pollution and genotoxicity.

  14. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of intravitreal adalimumab administration in rabbit retinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álcio Coutinho de Paula

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of intravitreal adalimumab treatment in an animal experimental model using cytological and molecular techniques. Methods: Eighteen rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: control, adalimumab treatment, and placebo. Cytotoxicity on retinal cells was evaluated using flow cytometry assays to determine the level of apoptosis and necrosis. Genotoxicity was evaluated by comet assays to assess DNA damage, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to evaluate expression of apoptosis-inducing caspases (8 and 3. Results: No cytotoxicity or genotoxicity was observed in any of the two treatment groups (adalimumab and placebo following intravitreal administration compared with the control group. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that more than 90% of the cells were viable, and only a low proportion of retinal cells presented apoptotic (~10% or necrotic (<1% activity across all groups. Molecular damage was also low with a maximum of 6.4% DNA degradation observed in the comet assays. In addition, no increase in gene expression of apoptosis-inducing caspases was observed on retinal cells by qPCR in both the adalimumab and placebo groups compared with the control group. Conclusion: The use of adalimumab resulted in no detectable cytotoxicity or genotoxicity on retinal cells for up to 60 days upon administration. These results therefore indicate that adalimumab may be a safe option for intravitreal application to treat ocular inflammatory diseases in which TNF-α is involved.

  15. Using DNA damage to monitor water environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    DNA damage of aquatic organisms living in polluted environments can be used as a biomarker of the genotoxicity of toxic agents to organisms. This technique has been playing an important role in ecotoxicological study and environmental risk assessment. In this article, main types of DNA damage caused by pollutants in water environments were reviewed; methods of detecting DNA damage were also documented for water environmental monitoring.

  16. A pre-validation trial - testing genotoxicity of several chemicals using standard, medium- and high-throughput comet formats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Bjerve Gutzkow

    2015-06-01

    Results obtained with the three systems (standard, medium- and high-throughput were essentially the same. The 96-minigel format was analysed with the fully automated scoring system IMSTAR and comparable results were achieved with the semi-automated scoring system from Perceptives. The known genotoxic chemicals MNU, B(aP, 4-NQO and cyclophosphamide showed little consistent sign of genotoxicity at concentrations causing limited cytotoxicity. D-mannitol and Triton X-100 were, as expected, non-genotoxic (though Triton X-100, at high concentrations, caused DNA breaks as an apparent secondary effect of cytotoxicity. Etoposide and bleomycin gave significant increase in DNA strand break at borderline cytotoxic concentrations. The limitation of the assay to detect damaged bases by known genotoxins may be overcome by incorporating a DNA repair enzyme, such as formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG, to convert damaged bases into breaks as shown by Azqueta A et al., Mutagenesis vol. 28 no. 3 pp. 271–277, 2013 .

  17. Decisions to regulate genotoxic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decisions to regulate genotoxic substances involve trade-offs between various incomparable factors such as risks to human health and other environmental risks, public perceptions, costs and uncertainties. Two different approaches towards these trade-offs are discussed. In one approach, all relevant factors are defined and trade-offs are considered using a general and very elaborate analysis. Cost-benefit analysis is an exponent of this approach. An illustration is given for the regulation of transboundary releases of radioactive materials. The other approach considers what is politically feasible for the time being and seeks a decision with much room for later corrections. Incrementalism is a philosophy in this vein. It is illustrated by reference to the regulation of transboundary air pollution. Weaknesses and strengths of the two approaches are discussed. (author)

  18. UVA/UVB-induced genotoxicity and lesion repair in Colossoma macropomum and Arapaima gigas Amazonian fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Aline Aparecida; da Silva, Juliana; Nunes, Emilene A; Ianistcki, Martus; Guecheva, Temenouga N; de Oliveira, Alzira Miranda; de Oliveira, Christiane Patrícia Feitosa; Val, Adalberto Luis; Henriques, João A P

    2010-05-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is known to cause adverse effects to aquatic species and aquatic environments. The fish Colossoma macropomum (tambaqui) and Arapaima gigas (pirarucu) live in the Amazon basin, near the Equator, and thus receive high intensity of ultraviolet radiation. Deforestation further aggravates the situation by reducing shade at ground level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of UVA and UVB radiation on erythrocytes of tambaqui and pirarucu fish using Micronuclei test and Comet assay. Our study showed that UV radiation caused DNA damage in both species as detected by Comet assay. In addition, there were differences in response to genotoxicity between both species, which are possibly related to their evolutionary history. Tambaqui fish exposed to ultraviolet radiation for different periods presented clear dose-response in DNA damage profile. Significant damage repair was observed 24h after cessation of ultraviolet radiation exposure. At the test conditions used, no significant increase in micronucleated cells was observed in tambaqui and pirarucu fish. Tambaqui proved to be more sensitive to ultraviolet radiation than Pirarucu, as detected by Comet assay, showing statistically higher baseline DNA damage. The present results demonstrated that alkaline Comet assay was very sensitive for detecting the UV-induced genotoxicity during the short exposure period in our study. In addition, the present study also suggests that tambaqui and pirarucu fish are useful sentinel organisms, as their UV sensitivity allows them to be effective monitors of biological hazards in the Amazon region. PMID:20338776

  19. Benzene-induced genotoxicity in mice in vivo detected by the alkaline comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuo, J; Loft, S; Thomsen, M S;

    1996-01-01

    The myelotoxic and genotoxic effects of benzene have been related to oxidative DNA damage after metabolism by CYP2E1. Single cell gel electrophoresis (alkaline comet assay) detects DNA damage and may thus be a convenient method for the study of benzene genotoxicity. Benzene exposure to NMRI mice as...... a single oral gavage at 40, 200 or 450 mg/kg resulted in dose-related DNA damage indicated by an increased comet tail length of peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow nucleated cells sampled 6 h after exposure. After a dose of 40 mg/kg, there was a 1.6-fold increase of 'tail length' in bone...... types (p < 0.01). By comparing our data with those from genotoxicity studies on benzene using other methods, we conclude that the 'alkaline comet assay' is a sensitive method to detect DNA damage induced by benzene. We also infer that CYP2E1 contributes, at least partly, to the formation of the 'comet...

  20. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of cadmium in different marine trophic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlaki, Maria D; Araújo, Mário J; Cardoso, Diogo N; Silva, Ana Rita R; Cruz, Andreia; Mendo, Sónia; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Calado, Ricardo; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium ecotoxicity and genotoxicity was assessed in three representative species of different trophic levels of marine ecosystems - the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa, the decapod shrimp, Palaemon varians and the pleuronectiform fish Solea senegalensis. Ecotoxicity endpoints assessed in this study were adult survival, hatching success and larval development ratio (LDR) for A. tonsa, survival of the first larval stage (zoea I) and post-larvae of P. varians, egg and larvae survival, as well as the presence of malformations in the larval stage of S. senegalensis. In vivo genotoxicity was assessed on adult A. tonsa, the larval and postlarval stage of P. varians and newly hatched larvae of S. senegalensis using the comet assay. Results showed that the highest sensitivity to cadmium is displayed by A. tonsa, with the most sensitive endpoint being the LDR of nauplii to copepodites. Sole eggs displayed the highest tolerance to cadmium compared to the other endpoints evaluated for all tested species. Recorded cadmium toxicity was (by increasing order): S. senegalensis eggs < P. varians post-larvae < P. varians zoea I < S. senegalensis larvae < A. tonsa eggs < A. tonsa LDR. DNA damage to all species exposed to cadmium increased with increasing concentrations. Overall, understanding cadmium chemical speciation is paramount to reliably evaluate the effects of this metal in marine ecosystems. Cadmium is genotoxic to all three species tested and therefore may differentially impact individuals and populations of marine taxa. As A. tonsa was the most sensitive species and occupies a lower trophic level, it is likely that cadmium contamination may trigger bottom-up cascading effects in marine trophic interactions. PMID:27203468

  1. In vivo genotoxicity of nitramines, transformation products of amine-based carbon capture technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Coutris

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In times where we need to reduce our CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, it is important to get a clearer picture of the environmental impacts associated with potential mitigation technologies. Chemical absorption with amines is emerging as the most advanced mitigation technology for post-combustion capture of CO2 from fossil fuel power stations. Although the amine solvent used in this technology is recycled during the capture process, degradation products are formed and released into the environment. Among these degradation products, the aliphatic nitramine compounds dimethylnitramine and ethanolnitramine have been identified, whose environmental impact was unknown. In addition to conducting survival, growth and reproduction tests in a range of marine species, we looked into the in vivo genotoxic potential of these two compounds to experimentally exposed fish (Coutris et al. 2015. DNA damage was analyzed in blood samples collected from the caudal vein of juvenile turbot Scophthalmus maximus after 28 day exposure to nitramines, using the 12 mini-gels version of the comet assay, with and without digestion with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. Although whole organism bioassays indicated that nitramine toxicity through necrosis was low, the genotoxicity assessment revealed contrasting results, with ethanolnitramine found to be more genotoxic than dimethylnitramine by three orders of magnitude. At the lowest ethanolnitramine concentration (1 mg/L, 84 % DNA damage was observed, whereas 100 mg/L dimethylnitramine was required to cause 37 % DNA damage. The mechanisms of genotoxicity were also shown to differ between the two compounds, with oxidation of the DNA bases responsible for over 90 % of the genotoxicity of dimethylnitramine, whereas DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites were responsible for over 90 % of the genotoxicity of ethanolnitramine. Fish exposed to > 3 mg/L ethanolnitramine had virtually no DNA left in their red blood cells. The

  2. Genotoxicity studies in semiconductor industry. 1. In vitro mutagenicity and genotoxicity studies of waste samples resulting from plasma etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, R.; Huettner, E.M.; Merten, H.; Raabe, F. (Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany))

    1993-07-01

    Solid waste samples taken from the etching reactor, the turbo pump, and the waste air system of a plasma etching technology line in semiconductor production were studied as to their genotoxic properties in a bacterial repair test, in the Ames/Salmonella microsome assay, in the SOS chromotest, in primary mouse hepatocytes, and in Chinese hamster V79 cell cultures. All three waste samples were found to be active by inducing of unscheduled DNA-synthesis in mouse hepatocytes in vitro. In the bacterial rec-type repair test with Proteus mirabilis, waste samples taken from the turbo pump and the vacuum pipe system were not genotoxic. The waste sample taken from the chlorine-mediated plasma reactor was clearly positive in the bacterial repair assay and in the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli. Mutagenic activity was demonstrated for all samples in the presence and absence of S9 mix made from mouse liver homogenate. Again, highest mutagenic activity was recorded for the waste sample taken from the plasma reactor, while samples collected from the turbo pump and from the waste air system before dilution and liberation of the air were less mutagenic. For all samples chromosomal damage in V79 cells was not detected, indicating absence of clastogenic activity in vitro. Altogether, these results indicate generation of genotoxic and mutagenic products as a consequence of chlorine-mediated plasma etching in the microelectronics industry and the presence of genotoxins even in places distant from the plasma reactor. Occupational exposure can be expected both from the precipitated wastes and from chemicals reaching the environment with the air stream.

  3. SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEX DAMAGE AS A MEASURE OF GENOTOXICITY AT MEIOSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synaptonemal complex aberrations can provide a sensitive measure of chemical-specific alterations to meiotic chromosomes. Mitomycin C, cyclophosphamide, amsacrine, ellipticine, colchicine, vinblastine sulfate, and cis-platin exposures in mice have been shown to cause various patt...

  4. Genotoxicity biomarkers for monitoring occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda M. Rodríguez-Montero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology (INOR is the leading institution for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of cancer in Cuba. The main methods used in cancer treatment are surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The last one involves the handling of hazardous substances, such as cytostatics, which implies a health risk to persons occupationally exposed to it. There are two sites where a considerable among of cytostatic is handled (Ambulatory Chemotherapy Room (ACR and the Central Unit of Cytostatic Mixture Preparation (CUCM. Genotoxicity biomarkers of exposure and effects have been widely used to detect occupational environment hazards. Aims: To evaluate genotoxicity biomarkers indicative of exposure and effects to cytostatics. Methods: In this study were tested samples taken from the surfaces of biological safety cabinets located in the Central Unit of Cytostatic Mixture using SOS – Chromotest. We also evaluated samples of oral mucosa exfoliated cells from exposed and control subjects, by micronucleus test. Results: All subjects were exposed and subjects who administered the mixes in the institution had an increased of DNA damage in comparison with the pharmaceutical staff that prepared it and wear the primary protection barriers properly. Conclusions: These results underline the efficiency of genotoxicological biomarkers in detecting the exposure levels and the deleterious effect of cytostatics on occupationally exposed personal.

  5. Genotoxic effects of bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles by comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reecep Liman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth oxide is one of the important transition metal oxides and it has been intensively studied due to their peculiar characteristics (semiconductor band gap, high refractive index, high dielectric permittivity, high oxygen conductivity, resistivity, photoconductivity and photoluminescence etc.. Therefore, it is used such as microelectronics, sensor technology, optical coatings, transparent ceramic glass manufacturing, nanoenergetic gas generator, biosensor for DNA hybridization, potential immobilizing platforms for glucose oxidase and polyphenol oxidase, fuel cells, a additive in paints, an astringent in a variety of medical creams and topical ointments, and for the determination of heavy metal ions in drinking water, mineral water and urine. In addition this, Bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles (BONPs are favorable for the biomolecules adsorption than regular sized particles because of their greater advantages and novel characteristics (much higher specific surface, greater surface free energy, and good electrochemical stability etc.. Genotoxic effects of BONPs were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of BONPs at 5 different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm for 4 h. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of BONPs except 12.5 ppm by Comet assay. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS for Windows; Duncan’s multiple range test was performed. These result indicate that BONPs exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  6. Comparative Genotoxicity of Cadmium and Lead in Earthworm Coelomocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ptumporn Muangphra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine genotoxicity to coelomocytes, Pheretima peguana earthworms were exposed in filter paper studies to cadmium (Cd and lead (Pb for 48 h, at concentrations less than the LC10—Cd: 0.09, 0.19, 0.38, 0.75, and 1.50 μg cm−2; Pb: 1.65, 3.29, 6.58, 13.16, and 26.32 μg cm−2. For Cd at 0.75 μg cm−2, in the micronucleus test (detects chromosomal aberrations, significant increases (<.05 in micronuclei and binucleate cells were observed, and in the comet assay (detects DNA single-strand breaks, tail DNA% was significantly increased. Lead was less toxic with minimal effects on DNA, but the binucleates were significantly increased by Pb at 3.29 μg cm−2. This study shows that Cd is more acutely toxic and sublethally genotoxic than Pb to P. peguana. Cadmium caused chromosomal aberrations and DNA single-strand breaks at 45% of the LC10 concentration. Lead, in contrast, did not induce DNA damage but caused cytokinesis defects.

  7. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform). PMID:16219440

  8. DNA damage and autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  9. The comet assay in testing the potential genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Azqueta

    2015-06-01

    validation. The comet assay has not been yet proposed as an appropriate test to check the genotoxic potential of NMs, though at a research level it is the most used in vitro assay and the second most used in vivo assay. Moreover, the combination of the comet assay with enzymes that convert altered bases to breaks allows the identification of DNA damage induced by secondary mechanisms (e.g. oxidative stress induced by inflammation, which is very relevant in the case of NMs. Possible problems with the use of the comet assay have been suggested: NMs have been detected in close association with comets, and might interact with the DNA; or NMs might inhibit the action of enzymes. However, control experiments have not confirmed that these interactions are significant.

  10. Genotoxic Effects of PFOA and Fluoranthene on Blue Mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    OpenAIRE

    Haukenes, Kjersti

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and fluoranthene are organic pollutants with a widespread environmental occurrence. They are both present in the environment, and are known to concentrate and bioaccumulate in organisms, PFOA in general, fluoranthene in non-vertebrates. There are several studies showing toxic effects in marine organisms exposed to PFOA or fluoranthene. However, there is a lack of studies addressing the genotoxic effects of these contaminants. In this study, DNA damage and alterat...

  11. Effect of Green Tea Extract in Reducing Genotoxic Injuries of Cell Phone Microwaves on Bone Marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Zahedifar; Javad Baharara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Green tea (Camellia sinensis) extract is rich source of natural antioxidants specially catechin that is quickly absorbed into the body and it has cancer protective, anti microbial and anti inflammation effects. In this study has been studied role of green tea extract against genotoxic damage induced by cell phone microwaves on bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of adult male Balb/C mouse.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 40 mouse were divided into five groups, ...

  12. Genotoxic differences by sex in nasal epithelium and blood leukocytes in subjects residing in a highly polluted area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe differences by sex in genotoxic damage found in a population of medical students exposed to a highly oxidative atmosphere, compared with a control group, measured by the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay and histological changes in nasal epithelium smears. Cells were obtained from the nasal epithelium and blood leukocytes. Higher DNA damage in nasal cells and leukocytes was found in males compared to females and control subjects. The percentage of squamous metaplastic changes in the nasal epithelium was also higher in males compared with females and controls. The commutation of normal nasal epithelium by squamous cells might modify its protective function in the nose, increasing the risk of damage to the lower respiratory tract. Although, as medical students, males and females were exposed to the same environment and activity patterns, male genotoxicity damage was higher in control and exposed subjects. More research should be done in order to identify direct or indirect sexual hormone intervention

  13. Evaluation of genotoxicity in workers exposed to benzene and atmospheric pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göethel, Gabriela; Brucker, Natália; Moro, Angela M; Charão, Mariele F; Fracasso, Rafael; Barth, Anelise; Bubols, Guilherme; Durgante, Juliano; Nascimento, Sabrina; Baierle, Marília; Saldiva, Paulo H; Garcia, Solange C

    2014-08-01

    Gas station attendants and taxi drivers are occupationally exposed to xenobiotics which may be harmful to their health. Atmospheric pollutants and benzene can lead to DNA damage. Genotoxicity and mutagenicity assays can be used to evaluate the effects of these pollutants. We have evaluated genotoxicity and mutagenicity in workers occupationally exposed to xenobiotics, by application of the 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), comet, and micronucleus (MN) assays. Biomarkers of benzene and carbon monoxyde exposure were also measured: urinary t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA) and carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) in whole blood, respectively. The study groups comprised 43 gas station attendants (GSA), 34 taxi drivers (TD), and 22 persons without known occupational exposures (NE). Levels of t,t-MA in the GSA group were significantly elevated compared to the NE group (p0.05). DNA damage index (DI) and 8-OHdG levels were significantly higher for both the GSA and TD groups, compared to the NE group (p<0.001), but MN frequencies were not elevated. Spearman correlation analysis showed that the frequency of MN was positively correlated with 8-OHdG. A positive correlation between DNA DI levels and 8-OHdG was also observed. In conclusion, our results indicated that low levels of occupational exposure to benzene and atmospheric pollutants may be linked to genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage. PMID:25344165

  14. An update on direct genotoxicity as a molecular mechanism of ochratoxin a carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Manderville, Richard A

    2012-02-20

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a naturally occurring chlorophenolic fungal toxin that contaminates a wide range of food products and poses a cancer threat to humans. The mechanism of action (MOA) for OTA renal carcinogenicity is a controversial issue. In 2005, direct genotoxicity (covalent DNA adduct formation) was proposed as a MOA for OTA-mediated carcinogenicity [ Manderville , R. A. ( 2005 ) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 18 , 1091 - 1097 ]. At that time, inconsistent results had been published on OTA genotoxicity/mutagenicity, and conclusive evidence for OTA-mediated DNA adduction had been lacking. In this update, published data from the past 6-7 years are presented that provide new hypotheses for the MOA of OTA-mediated carcinogenicity. While direct genotoxicity remains a controversial issue for OTA, new findings from the Umemura and Nohmi laboratories provide definitive results for the mutagenicity of OTA in the target tissue (outer medulla) of male rat kidney that rules out oxidative DNA damage. These findings, coupled with our own efforts that provide new structural evidence for DNA adduction by OTA, has strengthened the argument for involvement of direct genotoxicity in OTA-mediated renal carcinogenesis. This MOA should be taken into consideration for OTA human risk assessment. PMID:22054007

  15. Chemical composition and genotoxicity assessment of sanitary landfill leachate from Rovinj, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajski, Goran; Oreščanin, Višnja; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2012-04-01

    Chemical analysis and an in vitro approach were performed to assess elemental composition and genotoxic effects of the samples of landfill leachate taken from Lokva Vidotto sanitary landfill the official landfill for Rovinj town, Croatia. Two samples of landfill leachate were collected and analyzed in order to evaluate macro, micro and trace elements by atomic absorption spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and colorimetry. Genotoxicity of sanitary landfill leachate was evaluated in human lymphocytes by the use of the micronucleus test and comet assay. Samples were characterized with relatively low concentrations of heavy metals while organic component level exceeded upper permissible limit up to 39 times. Observed genotoxic effects should be connected with high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen, which exceeded permissible limit up to 180 times. Leachate samples of both sanitary landfills increased the frequency of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. Increase of DNA damage in human lymphocytes was also detected by virtue of measuring comet assay parameters. All parameters showed statistically significant difference compared to negative control. Increased micronucleus and comet assay parameters indicate that both samples of sanitary landfill leachate are genotoxic and could pose environmental and human health risk if discharged to an aquatic environment. PMID:22177983

  16. Biodetection of potential genotoxic pollutants entering the human food chain through ashes used in livestock diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vicente, Laura; Herraez, Elisa; Briz, Oscar; Nogales, Rogelio; Molina-Alcaide, Eduarda; Marin, Jose J G

    2016-08-15

    Ash derived from energy generation is used as a source of minerals in livestock feeds. The microbial biosensor recApr-Luc2 was built to detect genotoxic hazard in recycled ash. Escherichia coli SOS gene (recA, lexA, dinI and umuC) expression in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage led to the selection of the recA promoter. The biosensor required functional RecA expression to respond to genotoxic heavy metals (Cr>Cd≈Pb), and polluted ash induced a strong recApr-Luc2 response. In human liver and intestinal cells, heavy metals induced acute toxicity (Cr>Cd>Pb) at concentrations sufficient to activate recApr-Luc2. Cytostatic effects, including genotoxicity, were cell- and metal-dependent, apart from Cr. In agreement with the recApr-Luc2 bioassay, Cr had the strongest effect in all cells. In conclusion, recApr-Luc2 could be useful for evaluating the genotoxic risk of pollutants present in ash that might be concentrated in animal products and, thus, entering the human food chain. PMID:27006217

  17. Investigation of genotoxic potential of various sizes Fe2O3 nanoparticles with comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Hakkı Ciğerci

    2015-06-01

    In this study, genotoxic potential of <50 nm and <100 nm Fe2O3 nanoparticles were investigated by using Comet Assay. Allium cepa root meristems were exposed with five doses (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 mM of <50 nm for 4 hour and three doses (2.5, 5 (EC50, 10 mM for <100 nm of Fe2O3 nanoparticle for 24 and 96 h. Methyl methanesulfonate -MMS (10 ppm was used as a positive control. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS by Windows, 18.0. It was determined that different doses of <50 nm Fe2O3 nanoparticle have no genotoxic effect of DNA. Different doses of <100 nm Fe2O3 have no genotoxic but only 10 mM dose have genotoxic effect on DNA. When compared <50 nm with <100 nm of Fe2O3 nanoparticle; <50 nm have more effects than <100 nm of Fe2O3 on DNA damage.

  18. The potential for new methods to assess human reproductive genotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immediate prospects are not good for practical methods for measuring the human heritable mutation rate. The methods discussed here range from speculative to impractical, and at best are sensitive enough only for large numbers of subjects. Given the rapid development of DNA methods and the current status of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, there is some hope that the intermediate prospects may be better. In contrast, the prospects for useful cellular-based male germinal methods seem more promising and immediate. Effective specific locus methods for sperm are already conceivable and may be practical in a few years. Obviously such methods will not predict heritable effects definitively, but they will provide direct information on reproductive genotoxicity and should contribute significantly to many current medical and environmental situations where genetic damage is suspected. 22 refs

  19. In vivo Comet assay on isolated kidney cells to distinguish genotoxic carcinogens from epigenetic carcinogens or cytotoxic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesslany, Fabrice; Zennouche, Nadia; Simar-Meintières, Sophie; Talahari, Ismaïl; Nkili-Mboui, Esther-Nadège; Marzin, Daniel

    2007-06-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the ability of the alkaline in vivo Comet assay (pH>13) to distinguish genotoxic carcinogens from epigenetic carcinogens when performed on freshly isolated kidney cells and to determine the possible interference of cytotoxicity by assessing DNA damage induced by renal genotoxic, epigenetic or toxic compounds after enzymatic isolation of kidney cells from OFA Sprague-Dawley male rats. The ability of the Comet assay to distinguish (1) genotoxicity versus cytotoxicity and (2) genotoxic versus non-genotoxic (epigenetic) carcinogens, was thus investigated by studying five known genotoxic renal carcinogens acting through diverse mechanisms of action, i.e. streptozotocin, aristolochic acids, 2-nitroanisole, potassium bromate and cisplatin, two rodent renal epigenetic carcinogens: d-limonene and ciclosporine and two nephrotoxic compounds: streptomycin and indomethacin. Animals were treated once with the test compound by the appropriate route of administration and genotoxic effects were measured at the two sampling times of 3-6 and 22-26h after treatment. Regarding the tissue processing, the limited background level of DNA migration observed in the negative control groups throughout all experiments demonstrated that the enzymatic isolation method implemented in the current study is appropriate. On the other hand, streptozotocin, 20mg/kg, used as positive reference control concurrently to each assay, caused a clear increase in the mean Olive Tail Moment median value, which allows validating the current methodology. Under these experimental conditions, the in vivo rodent Comet assay demonstrated good sensitivity and good specificity: all the five renal genotoxic carcinogens were clearly detected in at least one expression period either directly or indirectly, as in the case of cisplatin: for this cross-linking agent, the significant decrease in DNA migration observed under standard electrophoresis conditions was clearly amplified

  20. Mechanisms of 5-azacytidine (5AzC)-induced toxicity in the rat foetal brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Katayama, Kei-Ichi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Doi, Kunio

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms of 5-azacytidine (5AzC)-induced toxicity in the rat foetal brain were investigated. 5AzC (10 mg/kg) was injected into pregnant rats on day 13 of gestation and the protein and mRNA expressions of p53 and its transcriptional target genes, p21, bax, cyclin G1, fas, and gadd45, were examined in the foetal brain. The number of p53-positive cells peaked at 9 h after treatment (HAT) and those of apoptotic cells and p21-positive cells peaked at 12 HAT. The expressions of p21, bax, cyclin G1, and fas mRNAs were significantly elevated from 9 to 12 HAT. From the experiments using 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU), as compared with controls, the migration of neuroepithelial cells significantly delayed and BrdU-positive signals were observed in many apoptotic cells from 9 to 24 HAT in the 5AzC-group. In addition, the number of S phase cells significantly decreased at 12 HAT. The present results indicate that 5AzC induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest probably at G1 phase in the rat foetal brain and they might be mediated by p53 in response to DNA damage. PMID:12383193

  1. Neurobehavioral and genotoxic parameters of antipsychotic agent aripiprazole in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaqueline Nascimento PICADA; Viviane Minuzzo PONTES; Patrícia PEREIRA; Bruna de Jesus Neto DOS SANTOS; Franciele CELSO; Jéssica Dias MONTEIRO; Kelly Morais DA ROSA; Leandro Rosa CAMACHO; Luciana Rodrigues VIEIRA; Taís Madelon FREITAS; Tatiana Grasiela DASILVA

    2011-01-01

    Aim:Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic agent to treat schizophrenia,which acts through dopamine D2 partial agonism,serotonin 5-HT1A partial agonism and 5-HT2A antagonism.This study was designed to evaluate the neurobehavioral effects and genotoxic/mutagenic activities of the agent,as well as its effects on lipoperoxidation.Methods:Open field and inhibitory avoidance tasks were used.Thirty min before performing the behavioral tasks,adult male CF-1 mice were administered aripiprazole (1,3 or 10 mg/kg,ip) once for the acute treatment,or the same doses for 5 d for the subchronic treatment.Genotoxic effects were assessed using comet assay in the blood and brain tissues.Mutagenic effects were evaluated using bone marrow micronucleus test.Lipoperoxidation was assessed with thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS).Results:Acute and subchronic treatments significantly decreased the number of crossing and rearing in the open field task.Acute treatment significantly increased the step-down latency for both the short- and long-term memory in the inhibitory avoidance task.Subchronic treatments with aripiprazole (3 and 10 mg/kg) caused significant DNA strain-break damage in peripheral blood but not in the brain.Mutagenic effect was not detected in the acute and subchronic treatments.Nor TBARS levels in the liver were affected.Conclusion:Aripiprazole improved memory,but could impair motor activities in mice.The drug increased DNA damage in blood,but did not show mutagenic effects,suggesting that it might affect long-term genomic stability.

  2. Evaluation of genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of hydroalcoholic extracts of Zuccagnia punctata Cav.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Iris Catiana; Villarini, Milena; Moretti, Massimo; Dominici, Luca; Isla, María Inés

    2008-01-17

    Zuccagnia punctata Cav. (Fabaceae), a widely used plant species in Argentine folk medicine, has been shown to have a broad spectrum of antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and cytoprotective activities. In this study, the hydroalcoholic extract of Zuccagnia punctata and 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone isolated from it were investigated for genotoxicity/antigenotoxicity in the in vitro comet assay test on human hepatoma HepG2 cells. No acute toxicity of the extract could be determined. HepG2 cells were treated with three different concentrations (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 microg/mL) or 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone (0.01, 0.10 and 1.00 microg/mL). To explore the potential mechanisms of action, two approaches were followed: co-treatment with 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxyde (4-NQO), a direct genotoxic compound, and a pre-treatment protocol with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), an indirect genotoxic compound. The natural products neither affected cell viability nor induced DNA damage in the concentration range tested. Zuccagnia punctata tinctures were able to diminish the DNA damage induced in HepG2 cells by 4-NQO and B[a]P in 31% and 10%, respectively at 10 microg/mL. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone was highly effective in decreasing B[a]P-induced DNA damage at a statistically significant level, with an almost clear dose-response relationship. The inhibition values were 28.2-43.9% for the tested concentrations of 0.01-1 microg/mL, respectively. The results clearly indicate that the phytoextract from Zuccagnia punctata, under the experimental conditions tested, is not genotoxic and that 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone contributes to a high degree to the antigenotoxic effects of Zuccagnia punctata tincture. PMID:18023546

  3. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of vigabatrin, a γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase inhibitor, in Wistar rats submitted to rotarod task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, V R; Sousa, K; Pires, T R; Papke, Dkm; Vieira, C G; de Souza, L P; Leal, M B; Schunck, Rva; Picada, J N; Pereira, P

    2016-09-01

    Vigabatrin (VGB) is an antiepileptic drug thatincreases brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels through irreversible inhibition of GABA transaminase. The aim of this study was to evaluate neurotoxicological effects of VGB measuring motor activity and genotoxic and mutagenic effects after a single and repeated administration. Male Wistar rats received saline, VGB 50, 100, or 250 mg/kg by gavage for acute and subchronic (14 days) treatments and evaluated in the rotarod task. Genotoxicity was evaluated using the alkaline version of the comet assay in samples of blood, liver, hippocampus, and brain cortex after both treatments. Mutagenicity was evaluated using the micronucleus test in bone marrow of the same animals that received subchronic treatment. The groups treated with VGB showed similar performance in rotarod compared with the saline group. Regarding the acute treatment, it was observed that only higher VGB doses induced DNA damage in blood and hippocampus. After the subchronic treatment, VGB did not show genotoxic or mutagenic effects. In brief, VGB did not impair motor activities in rats after acute and subchronic treatments. It showed a repairable genotoxic potential in the central nervous system since genotoxicity was observed in the acute treatment group. PMID:26500220

  4. Genotoxic and immunotoxic potential effects of selected psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceuticals towards aquatic invertebrates is still poorly understood and sometimes controversial. This study aims to document the in vitro genotoxicity and immunotoxicity of psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on Mytilus edulis. Mussel hemocytes were exposed to fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and erythromycin, at concentrations ranging from μg/L to mg/L. Paroxetine at 1.5 μg/L led to DNA damage while the same concentration of venlafaxine caused immunomodulation. Fluoxetine exposure resulted in genotoxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. In the case of antibiotics, trimethoprim was genotoxic at 200 μg/L and immunotoxic at 20 mg/L whereas erythromycin elicited same detrimental effects at higher concentrations. DNA metabolism seems to be a highly sensitive target for psychotropic drugs and antibiotics. Furthermore, these compounds affect the immune system of bivalves, with varying intensity. This attests the relevance of these endpoints to assess the toxic mode of action of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. - Highlights: • Psychotropic drugs and antibiotics affect the immune system of Mytilus edulis. • Genotoxic and immunotoxic endpoints were relevant to assess pharmaceuticals toxicity. • DNA metabolism is a highly sensitive target for pharmaceuticals. • Fluoxetine and paroxetine were the most toxic compounds on mussel hemocytes. - Psychotropic drugs and antibiotics have the potential to cause immune toxicity and genotoxicity on Mytilus edulis hemocytes

  5. Integrated analysis of the ecotoxicological and genotoxic effects of the antimicrobial peptide melittin on Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melittin is a major constituent of the bee venom of Apis mellifera with a broad spectrum of activities. Melittin therapeutical potential is subject to its toxicity and the assessment of ecotoxicity and genotoxicity is of particular interest for therapeutic use. Here we analyzed the biological effects of melittin on two aquatic species, which are representative of two different levels of the aquatic trophic chain: the invertebrate Daphnia magna and the unicellular microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The attention was focused on the determination of: i) ecotoxicity; ii) genotoxicity; iii) antigenotoxicity. Our main finding is that melittin is detrimental to D. magna reproduction and its sub-lethal concentrations create an accumulation dependent on exposition times and a negative effect on DNA. We also observed that melittin significantly delayed time to first eggs. Moreover, results showed that melittin exerted its toxic and genotoxic effects in both species, being a bit more aggressive towards P. subcapitata. - Highlights: • We examine ecotoxicity to study how AMPs affect the environment. • We examine genotoxicity in order to analyze the damages to the DNA. • We examine the antigenotoxicity in order to verify DNA repair ability of the cells. • Possible therapeutical applications of AMPs depend on assessment of ecotoxicity. - Melittin exerts its dose dependent toxic and genotoxic effects on both indicators; no toxicity is found at concentrations that may typically reach the environment

  6. Genotoxicity assessment of intravenously injected titanium dioxide nanoparticles in gpt delta transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Miura, Nobuhiko; Hojo, Rieko; Yanagiba, Yukie; Suda, Megumi; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Miyagawa, Muneyuki; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are increasingly manufactured in large amounts for use in industrial applications such as cosmetics, pigments, foods, and as photo-catalysts. Many in vitro studies have examined the genotoxicity of TiO2 nanomaterials; some of these studies suggest that TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are genotoxic. Several in vivo studies have also been reported recently, but the results are inconsistent. In this study, we investigated, using several genotoxicity endpoints, the effects of dispersed TiO2 suspensions following multiple intravenous injections in mice. Male gpt Delta C57BL/6J mice were administered TiO2 NPs at doses of 2, 10 or 50mg/kg body weight per week for 4 consecutive weeks. Genotoxic effects were then analyzed by the Pig-a gene mutation assay and the micronucleus assay on peripheral blood, and by the alkaline comet, gpt mutation, and Spi(-) mutation assays on the liver. We also assessed the localization of TiO2 NPs in the liver, by transmission electron microscopy. Administration of TiO2 NPs did not significantly increase any of the following endpoints: frequency of Pig-a mutants (erythrocytes); frequency of micronuclei (reticulocytes); level of DNA damage (liver); frequencies of gpt and Spi(-) mutants (liver). Most TiO2 NPs in the liver were found in the sinuses and inside Kupffer cells, although some were occasionally observed in liver parenchymal cells. These results indicate that TiO2 NPs do not have genotoxic effects on mouse liver or bone marrow. PMID:27169374

  7. Deoxynivalenol induces cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in animal primary cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta; Banerjee, Subham; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Borthakur, Sashin Kumar; Veer, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium graminearum, is widely found as a contaminant of food. DON is responsible for a wide range of toxic activities, including gastro-intestinal, lymphoid, bone-marrow and cardiotoxicity. But, the complete explorations of toxicity in terms of hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity as well have not been documented well. Again, the mechanisms through which DON damages the DNA and promotes cellular toxicity are not well established. Considering the above fact, this research article is focused on the effects of DON-induced toxicities on experimental animal model as well as its effects on cellular level via various toxicological investigations. DON treatment showed cytotoxicity and DNA damage. Further, flow cytometric analysis of hepatocytes showed cellular apoptosis, suggesting that DON-induced hepatotoxicity is, may be partly, mediated by apoptosis. Moreover, significant differences were found in each haematology and clinical chemistry value, either (p > 0.05). No abnormality of any organ was found during histopathological examination. Hence, it can be concluded that DON induces oxidative DNA damage and increases the formation of centromere positive micronuclei due to aneugenic activity. PMID:25578892

  8. Raman characterization of damaged layers of 4H-SiC induced by scratching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Shin-ichi; Mitani, Takeshi; Tomobe, Masaru; Kato, Tomohisa; Okumura, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Recent development of device fabrication of SiC is awaiting detailed study of the machining of the surfaces. We scratched 4H-SiC surfaces with a sliding microindenter made of a SiC chip, and characterized machining affected layers by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results of the Raman measurement of the scratching grooves revealed that there were residual stress, defects, and stacking faults. Furthermore, with heavy scratching load, we found clusters of amorphous SiC, Si, amorphous carbon, and graphite in the scratching grooves. Analysis of the Raman spectra showed that SiC amorphization occurs first and surface graphitization (carbonization) is subsequently generated through the phase transformation of SiC. We expect that the Raman characterization of machined surfaces provides information on the machining mechanism for compound semiconductors.

  9. Genotoxic effect of ethacrynic acid and impact of antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, William M.; Hoffman, Jared D.; Loo, George, E-mail: g_loo@uncg.edu

    2015-07-01

    It is known that ethacrynic acid (EA) decreases the intracellular levels of glutathione. Whether the anticipated oxidative stress affects the structural integrity of DNA is unknown. Therefore, DNA damage was assessed in EA-treated HCT116 cells, and the impact of several antioxidants was also determined. EA caused both concentration-dependent and time-dependent DNA damage that eventually resulted in cell death. Unexpectedly, the DNA damage caused by EA was intensified by either ascorbic acid or trolox. In contrast, EA-induced DNA damage was reduced by N-acetylcysteine and by the iron chelator, deferoxamine. In elucidating the DNA damage, it was determined that EA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine but not by ascorbic acid and trolox. Also, EA decreased glutathione levels, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine. But, ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine neither inhibited nor enhanced the capacity of EA to decrease glutathione. Interestingly, the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoxime, lowered glutathione to a similar degree as EA, but no noticeable DNA damage was found. Nevertheless, buthionine sulfoxime potentiated the glutathione-lowering effect of EA and intensified the DNA damage caused by EA. Additionally, in examining redox-sensitive stress gene expression, it was found that EA increased HO-1, GADD153, and p21mRNA expression, in association with increased nuclear localization of Nrf-2 and p53 proteins. In contrast to ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine, N-acetylcysteine suppressed the EA-induced upregulation of GADD153, although not of HO-1. Overall, it is concluded that EA has genotoxic properties that can be amplified by certain antioxidants. - Highlights: • Ethacrynic acid (EA) caused cellular DNA damage. • EA-induced DNA damage was potentiated by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA increased ROS production, not inhibited by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA

  10. Investigating the embryo/larval toxic and genotoxic effects of {gamma} irradiation on zebrafish eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, O., E-mail: olivier.simon@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Massarin, S. [Laboratoire de Modelisation Environnementale, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 159, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Coppin, F. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Hinton, T.G. [Service d' Etude du Comportement des Radionucleides dans les Ecosystemes, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 159, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gilbin, R. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    Eggs/larval of freshwater fish (Danio rerio) were exposed to low dose rates of external gamma radiation (from 1 to 1000 mGy d{sup -1}) over a 20-day period, with the objective of testing the appropriateness of the 10 mGy d{sup -1} guideline suggested by the IAEA. The present study examines different endpoints, mortality and hatching time and success of embryos as well as the genotoxicity of {gamma}-irradiations (after 48 h). The 20-day embryo-larval bioassay showed an enhanced larval resistance to starvation after chronic exposure to {gamma} irradiation (from low 1 mGy d{sup -1} to high dose rate 1000 mGy d{sup -1}) and an acceleration in hatching time. Gamma irradiation led to increased genotoxic damage Ito zebrafish egg (40-50% DNA in tail in Comet assay) from the lowest dose rate (1 mGy d{sup -1}). Possible mechanisms of {gamma} radiotoxicity and implications for radioprotection are discussed. - Highlights: > Relevant information on the {gamma} radiation impact on early life stage biota is scarce. > The eggs of zebrafish Danio rerio were selected as biological model. > We test the appropriateness of the 10 mGy d{sup -1} guideline (IAEA). > We observed effects measured at individual levels (starvation, hatching time). > Chronic gamma irradiation led to increased genotoxic damage to zebrafish egg. > {gamma} radiotoxicity mechanisms and implications for radioprotection are discussed.

  11. Protective role of Lactobacillus plantarum A7 against irinotecan-induced genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Sepahi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Irinotecan is a botanical derivative and an anti-cancer drug with cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. The present study evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus plantarum A7 on the genotoxic activity of irinotecan in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 by comet assay. Materials and Methods: HepG2 were incubated with irinotecan (100 µM, heat-killed cells (0.025 µg/ml + irinotecan (100 µM, and cell-free supernatants (0.5 and 1 µg/ml of L. plantarum A7 + irinotecan (100 µM. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS was used as negative control. Results: Irinotecan was shown to induce DNA damage in HepG2 cells. The results showed that heat-killed cells (0.025 µg/ml and cell-free supernatants (0.5 and 1 µg/ml of L. plantarum significantly reduce irinotecan- induced DNA damage. Conclusion: Our results indicate that L. plantarum A7 can decrease the genotoxic effects of irinotecan in HepG2 cells, in vitro. This finding may be supportive for the optimization of therapeutic efficacy in irinotecan treatment.

  12. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles: An in vitro biosafety study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonmez Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of nanotechnology and the wide use of iron oxide nanoparticles, it has become necessary to assess the potential adverse biological effects of magnetite. This study investigated the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative damage of different concentrations of magnetite (0 to 1000 mg/L in human whole blood cultures. After supplementation of magnetite, the blood samples were incubated for 72 h. Cell viability was assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release assays. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total oxidant status (TOS were determined to evaluate the dose-dependent effects of magnetite on the oxidant/antioxidant balance and to evaluate the potential oxidative injury due to increased oxidative stress. Genotoxicity was estimated by by the sister chromatid exchange (SCE, micronuclei (MN and chromosome aberration (CA assays and determination of 8-oxo-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG levels. The results of MTT and LDH assays showed that the higher concentrations of magnetite (100, 150, 300, 500 and 1000 mg/L decreased cell viability. Concentrations of magnetite higher than 10 mg/L increased TOS levels and decreased TAC levels in human blood cells. Increasing concentrations of magnetite caused significant increases in MN, SCE and CA rates and 8-OH-dG levels. The obtained results showed that magnetite exerted dose-dependent effects on oxidative damage, genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in human blood cells.

  13. Genotoxic Effects of PAH Containing Sludge Extracts in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective Many studies have been conducted in order to evaluate the genotoxicity of chemicals and waste materials, which utilized in vivo test protocols. The use of animals for routine toxicity testing is now questioned by a growing segment of society[1]. Methods Keeping the above fact in mind, we have conducted in the present study the genotoxicity evaluation of oily sludge samples generated from a petroleum refinery and petrochemical industry and ETP sludge from petroleum refinery using DNA damage, chromosomal aberration, p53 protein induction and apoptosis in short term in vitro mammalian Chinese Hamster Ovary cell cultures. Results It is evident from the results that the oily sludge compounds derived from petroleum refinery and petrochemical industry could cause DNA damage, chromosomal aberration, p53 protein accumulation and apoptotic cell death on exposure to oily sludge extracts in the presence of metabolic activation system (S-9 mix), however, ETP sludge extract could not cause significant genotoxicity in comparison to oily sludge extract and negative control. Conclusion The effect may be attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in the samples as evidenced from GC-MS.

  14. Genotoxic potential of BM-21, an aqueous-ethanolic extract from Thalassia testudinum marine plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadira Ansoar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: BM-21 is a hydro-ethanolic extract obtained from the leaves of Thalassia testudinum marine plant, which is rich in polyphenols, and it has demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective and neuroprotective properties. Aims: To investigate the genotoxicity potential of BM-21. Methods: Salmonella typhimurium Hist. – strains were used in the pointmutation test and Escherichia coli cells were used in SOS response test. DNA primary damage was tested in hepatocytes of mice treated with oral dose of the extract (2000 mg/kg. Bone marrow micronucleus assay was used in mice to detect clastogenic damage while serum from the same animals was used to determine MDA levels in order to find out the influence of BM-21 on lipid peroxidation. Positive and negative controls were included in all experimental series. Results: BM-21 did not increase the frequency of reverse mutations in the Ames test, and it did not induce primary damage in E. coli. Comet assay showed that 2 000 mg/kg of BM-21 induced single strand breaks or alkali-labile sites in the hepatocytes from the treated mice. However, no increase in the micronucleus frequency was observed in mice polychromatic erythrocytes and significantly reduced MDA levels were detected. Conclusions: BM-21 was neither mutagenic nor induces DNA damage to prokaryotic cells. Although, it increased DNA strand breaks in vivo, this one was not translated into clastogenic damage to the whole organism. Results suggested that BM-21 was not mutagenic or genotoxic under our experimental conditions.

  15. Application of the TGx-28.65 transcriptomic biomarker to classify genotoxic and non-genotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells in the presence of rat liver S9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauk, Carole L; Buick, Julie K; Williams, Andrew; Swartz, Carol D; Recio, Leslie; Li, Heng-Hong; Fornace, Albert J; Thomson, Errol M; Aubrecht, Jiri

    2016-05-01

    In vitro transcriptional signatures that predict toxicities can facilitate chemical screening. We previously developed a transcriptomic biomarker (known as TGx-28.65) for classifying agents as genotoxic (DNA damaging) and non-genotoxic in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Because TK6 cells do not express cytochrome P450s, we confirmed accurate classification by the biomarker in cells co-exposed to 1% 5,6 benzoflavone/phenobarbital-induced rat liver S9 for metabolic activation. However, chemicals may require different types of S9 for activation. Here we investigated the response of TK6 cells to higher percentages of Aroclor-, benzoflavone/phenobarbital-, or ethanol-induced rat liver S9 to expand TGx-28.65 biomarker applicability. Transcriptional profiles were derived 3 to 4 hr following a 4 hr co-exposure of TK6 cells to test chemicals and S9. Preliminary studies established that 10% Aroclor- and 5% ethanol-induced S9 alone did not induce the TGx-28.65 biomarker genes. Seven genotoxic and two non-genotoxic chemicals (and concurrent solvent and positive controls) were then tested with one of the S9s (selected based on cell survival and micronucleus induction). Relative survival and micronucleus frequency was assessed by flow cytometry in cells 20 hr post-exposure. Genotoxic/non-genotoxic chemicals were accurately classified using the different S9s. One technical replicate of cells co-treated with dexamethasone and 10% Aroclor-induced S9 was falsely classified as genotoxic, suggesting caution in using high S9 concentrations. Even low concentrations of genotoxic chemicals (those not causing cytotoxicity) were correctly classified, demonstrating that TGx-28.65 is a sensitive biomarker of genotoxicity. A meta-analysis of datasets from 13 chemicals supports that different S9s can be used in TK6 cells, without impairing classification using the TGx-28.65 biomarker. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:243-260, 2016. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Environmental and

  16. Assessment in vitro of cytogenetic and genotoxic effects of propolis on human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro, A; Soriano, J M; Barquinero, J F; Almonacid, M; Montoro, A; Verdú, G; Sahuquillo, V; Villaescusa, J I; Sebastià, N

    2012-02-01

    We evaluated the genetic damage by ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) induced to human lymphocytes which were exposed to increasing concentrations (0-2000μgml(-1)). The results indicated that EEP reduced significantly the mitotic index (MI) and proliferation index (PI) when high concentrations of EEP were used. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) rates indicated that EEP could have genotoxic effects at high concentrations. Exposure of the cells to the amount of ethanol used as solvent did not alter either the MI and cell proliferation kinetics (CPK), or the rate of SCE. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage the cells with CAs and in the frequency of SCE at the highest concentrations, (b) a decrease in MI and in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in negative controls. In conclusion, it can be assumed that high concentrations of EEP have a cyto and genotoxic effect, in vitro, for human peripheral lymphocytes. PMID:22041523

  17. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial membrane potential constituted the most sensitive parameter assayed. • Several genotoxicity methods were applied for first time in ecotoxicological studies. • Oxidative DNA base damage (8-OHdG) was induced by paraquat exposure. • Cells with DNA strand breakage and subG1-nuclei increased in treated cultures. • Typical apoptosis hallmarks were observed in microalgal cells exposed to paraquat. - Abstract: Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of

  18. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.rioboo@udc.es

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial membrane potential constituted the most sensitive parameter assayed. • Several genotoxicity methods were applied for first time in ecotoxicological studies. • Oxidative DNA base damage (8-OHdG) was induced by paraquat exposure. • Cells with DNA strand breakage and subG1-nuclei increased in treated cultures. • Typical apoptosis hallmarks were observed in microalgal cells exposed to paraquat. - Abstract: Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of

  19. Evaluation of the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of phytotherapic and homeopathic solutions of Euphorbia tirucalli Lineu (Aveloz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Holandino

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Euphorbia tirucalli Lineu, commonly known as Aveloz, is a very common plant found in tropical regions [1]. The ingestion or contact with its latex causes symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea, pallor, skin irritation, hepatotoxicity as well as carcinogenesis [2]. Moreover, the Aveloz latex is also responsible for a few important activities against some infectious and neoplastic diseases. Aveloz latex phytochemical composition may vary according to seasonal aspects and geographic location [3], and it is used either orally or topically in traditional medicine. Popularly known as an antitumoral agent (breast, prostate, lung, kidney, it is used not only in Brazil, but in several other countries. According to the literature, the latex could have a dual behaviour, activating or inhibiting tumoral events [3-6]. However, there are few reports discussing these mechanisms. Besides, the mutagenic and genotoxic potentials of phytochemical and homeopathic Aveloz have not yet been described. Several experimental methods have been used to evaluate the mutagenic and genotoxic effects, such as Inductest, the Ames test and the chromotest. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of Aveloz latex and Aveloz phytotherapic and homeopathic solutions. Methodology: In this study, Aveloz 5 and 30cH are prepared according to Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia [7], from Aveloz latex collected in the Center for Natural Products Research (NPPN at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro [8]. The Aveloz phytochemical solution was prepared following the doses used in folk medicine: 2 drops diluted in 250ml of water and 2 drops diluted in 25 ml of water. All test solutions were submitted to the following methodologies: (a Inductest: assesses the ability of physical or chemical agents to promote lysogenic induction as a response to DNA damage in lysogenic bacteria; (b The Ames test: uses indicator strains of Salmonella

  20. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of prozac (fluoxetine) without and with addition of vitamins A and C by means of the comet assay in culture of CHO-K1 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Noélle Giacomini Lemos; Mário Sérgio Mantovani; Veronica Elisa Pimenta Vicentini

    2005-01-01

    The fluoxetine, commercially named Prozac, is efficient against depression and anxiety, with lower risk of collateral effects. However, the possible genotoxic effects are still unknown. The use of vitamins as protectors against damages on cells and DNA has been evaluated, mainly for vitamins A and C. Furthermore, the associative effect of vitamins with several medicines demands studies. The evaluations of genotoxic effect of Prozac and vitamins A and C protective effect were carried out in cu...

  1. GENOTOXICITY OF SHALLOW WATERS NEAR THE BRAZILIAN ANTARCTIC STATION "COMANDANTE FERRAZ" (EACF, ADMIRALTY BAY, KING GEORGE ISLAND, ANTARCTICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur José da Silva Rocha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Series of biomonitoring surveys were undertaken weekly in February 2012 to investigate the genotoxicity of the shallow waters around the Brazilian Antarctic Station "Comandante Ferraz" (EACF. The comet assay was applied to assess the damage to the DNA of hemocytes of the crustacean amphipods Gondogeneia antarctica collected from shallow waters near the Fuel Tanks (FT and Sewage Treatment Outflow (STO of the research station, and compare it to the DNA damage of animals from Punta Plaza (PPL and Yellow Point (YP, natural sites far from the EACF defined as experimental controls. The damage to the DNA of hemocytes of G. antarctica was not significantly different between sites in the biomonitoring surveys I and II. In survey III, the damage to the DNA of animals captured in shallow waters near the Fuel Tanks (FT and Sewage Treatment Outflow (STO was significantly higher than that of the control site of Punta Plaza (PPL. In biomonitoring survey IV, a significant difference was detected only between the FT and PPL sites. Results demonstrated that the shallow waters in front of the station may be genotoxic and that the comet assay and hemocytes of G. antarctica are useful tools for assessing genotoxicity in biomonitoring studies of Antarctic marine coastal habitats.

  2. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods. PMID:26942684

  3. Genotoxicity in earthworm after combined treatment of ionising radiation and mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to investigate the acute genotoxic effects of mercury and radiation on earthworms (Eisenia fetida). The levels of DNA damage and the repair kinetics in the coelomocytes of E. fetida treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and ionising radiation (gamma rays) were analysed by means of the comet assay. For detection of DNA damage and repair, E. fetida was exposed to HgCl2 (0-160 mg kg-1) and irradiated with gamma rays (0-50 Gy) in vivo. The increase in DNA damage depended on the concentration of mercury or dose of radiation. The results showed that the more the oxidative stress induced by mercury and radiation the longer the repair time that was required. When a combination of HgCl2 and gamma rays was applied, the cell damage was much higher than those treated with HgCl2 or radiation alone, which indicated that the genotoxic effects were increased after the combined treatment of mercury and radiation. (authors)

  4. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-02-01

    Following one of the world's largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. PMID:26907305

  5. Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals. Recently, the importance of ionizing radiation and chemicals has been recognized since radio- and chemical therapy is directly related to the control of various diseases such as cancer. Radiation and the chemicals can cause biological damages while they have great applicability. It is of necessity to analyze rapidly, easily and accurately the biological effects, especially DNA damage due to those factors. Recently SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis assay, alias comet assay) has been developed for the efficient evaluation of DNA damage. In this report, the comprehensive review will be given on the rationale, the technical applications and the advantages and shortcomings of SCGE assay. This method can be directly applied to study on toxicity, cancer, and aging in terms of the evaluation of DNA damages due to radiation and chemicals on human cellular level. It is also suggested that comet assay be used for testing genotoxicity of suspected substances, detecting irradiated foods, screening radioprotective candidates, and studying DNA repair process in various biological systems

  6. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hee Cho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Following one of the world’s largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM, a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL, the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes.

  7. Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu

    2007-10-15

    Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals. Recently, the importance of ionizing radiation and chemicals has been recognized since radio- and chemical therapy is directly related to the control of various diseases such as cancer. Radiation and the chemicals can cause biological damages while they have great applicability. It is of necessity to analyze rapidly, easily and accurately the biological effects, especially DNA damage due to those factors. Recently SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis assay, alias comet assay) has been developed for the efficient evaluation of DNA damage. In this report, the comprehensive review will be given on the rationale, the technical applications and the advantages and shortcomings of SCGE assay. This method can be directly applied to study on toxicity, cancer, and aging in terms of the evaluation of DNA damages due to radiation and chemicals on human cellular level. It is also suggested that comet assay be used for testing genotoxicity of suspected substances, detecting irradiated foods, screening radioprotective candidates, and studying DNA repair process in various biological systems.

  8. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Regina Pereira Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.; Group 3 and G4- liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF. Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group.

  9. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-07-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3(rd) week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P(+) AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  10. The yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase Slt2 is involved in the cellular response to genotoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soriano-Carot María

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maintenance of genomic integrity is essential for cell viability. Complex signalling pathways (DNA integrity checkpoints mediate the response to genotoxic stresses. Identifying new functions involved in the cellular response to DNA-damage is crucial. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SLT2 gene encodes a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascade whose main function is the maintenance of the cell wall integrity. However, different observations suggest that SLT2 may also have a role related to DNA metabolism. Results This work consisted in a comprehensive study to connect the Slt2 protein to genome integrity maintenance in response to genotoxic stresses. The slt2 mutant strain was hypersensitive to a variety of genotoxic treatments, including incubation with hydroxyurea (HU, methylmetanosulfonate (MMS, phleomycin or UV irradiation. Furthermore, Slt2 was activated by all these treatments, which suggests that Slt2 plays a central role in the cellular response to genotoxic stresses. Activation of Slt2 was not dependent on the DNA integrity checkpoint. For MMS and UV, Slt2 activation required progression through the cell cycle. In contrast, HU also activated Slt2 in nocodazol-arrested cells, which suggests that Slt2 may respond to dNTP pools alterations. However, neither the protein level of the distinct ribonucleotide reductase subunits nor the dNTP pools were affected in a slt2 mutant strain. An analysis of the checkpoint function revealed that Slt2 was not required for either cell cycle arrest or the activation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase in response to DNA damage. However, slt2 mutant cells showed an elongated bud and partially impaired Swe1 degradation after replicative stress, indicating that Slt2 could contribute, in parallel with Rad53, to bud morphogenesis control after genotoxic stresses. Conclusions Slt2 is activated by several genotoxic treatments and is required to properly cope with DNA damage. Slt

  11. Genotoxic assessment in different exposure groups working with antineoplastic agents

    OpenAIRE

    Ladeira, Carina; Viegas, Susana; Pádua, Mário; Carolino, Elisabete; Gomes, Manuel C.; Brito, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Antioneoplastic drugs are widely used in treatment of cancer, and several studies suggest acute and long-term effects associated to antineoplastic drug exposures, namely associating workplace exposure with health effects. Cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay is one promising short-term genotoxicity assays for human risk assessment and their combination is recommended to monitor populations chronically exposed to genotoxic agents. The aim of this investigation is the genotoxicity asse...

  12. Genotoxicity of diuron and glyphosate in oyster spermatozoa and embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Akcha, Farida; Spagnol, Charlene; Rouxel, Julien

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of genotoxicant exposure in gametes and embryos to find a possible link between genotoxicity and reproduction/developmental impairment, and explore the impact of chemical genotoxicity on population dynamics. Our study focused on the genotoxic effects of two herbicides on oyster gametes and embryos: glyphosate (both as an active substance and in the Roundup formulation) and diuron. France is Europe's leading consumer of agrochemical substances and as such, contamina...

  13. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of cytostatic pharmaceuticals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zounková, R.; Odráška, P.; Doležalová, L.; Hilscherová, Klára; Maršálek, Blahoslav; Bláha, Luděk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 10 (2007), s. 2208-2214. ISSN 0730-7268 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) 2B06171; ECODIS(XE) 518043-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : cytostatic pharmaceuticals * genotoxicity * antineoplastics Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.309, year: 2007

  14. Mechanisms of genotoxic effects of hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Đelić Ninoslav J.

    2002-01-01

    A concept that compounds commonly present in biological systems lack genotoxic and mutagenic activities is generally in use, hence a low number of endogenous substances have ever been tested to mutagenicity. Epidemiological and experimental analyses indicated, however, that sexual steroids could contribute to initiation and/or continuation of malign diseases. Detailed studies using methods of biochemistry, molecular biology, cytogenetics and other branches, showed that not only epigenetic mec...

  15. Reducing the Genotoxic Potential of Retroviral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezani, Ali; Hawley, Teresa S.; Hawley, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    The recent development of leukemia in gene therapy patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease due to retroviral vector insertional mutagenesis has prompted reassessment of the genotoxic potential of integrating vector systems. In this chapter, various strategies are described to reduce the associated risks of retroviral genomic integration. These include deletion of strong transcriptional enhancer-promoter elements in the retroviral long terminal repeats, flanking the ret...

  16. Mechanisms of genotoxic effects of hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đelić Ninoslav J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept that compounds commonly present in biological systems lack genotoxic and mutagenic activities is generally in use, hence a low number of endogenous substances have ever been tested to mutagenicity. Epidemiological and experimental analyses indicated, however, that sexual steroids could contribute to initiation and/or continuation of malign diseases. Detailed studies using methods of biochemistry, molecular biology, cytogenetics and other branches, showed that not only epigenetic mechanisms, such as a stimulation of cell proliferation, but also certain hormones, that can express genotoxic effects, such as covalent DNA modification, then chromosomal lesions and chromosomal aberrations, are in the background of malign transformation under activities of hormones. In the case of oestrogens, it was shown that excessive hormonal stimulation led to a metabolic conversion of these hormones to reactive intermediates with formation of reactive oxygenic derivates, so that cells were virtually under conditions of oxidative stress. Individual and tissue susceptibility to occurrence of deterioration of DNA and other cell components generally results from the differences in efficiency of enzymic and non-enzymic mechanisms of resistance against oxidative stress. Besides, steroid thyeroid hormones and catecholamine (dopamine, noradrenaline/norepinephrine and adrenaline can express genotoxic effects in some test-systems. It is interesting that all above mentioned hormones have a phenolic group. Data on possible genotoxic effects of peptide and protein hormones are very scarce, but based on the available literature it is considered that this group of hormones probably lacks mutagenic activities. The possibility that hormones, as endogenous substances, express mutagenic activities results from the fact that DNA is, regardless of chemical and metabolic stability susceptible, to a certain extent, to changeability compatible with the processes of the

  17. Residual-QSAR. Implications for genotoxic carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Putz Mihai V

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Both main types of carcinogenesis, genotoxic and epigenetic, were examined in the context of non-congenericity and similarity, respectively, for the structure of ligand molecules, emphasizing the role of quantitative structure-activity relationship ((Q)SAR) studies in accordance with OECD (Organization for Economic and Cooperation Development) regulations. The main purpose of this report involves electrophilic theory and the need for meaningful physicochemical parameters...

  18. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R.; Feitosa, L. O.; Ballottin, D.; Marcato, P. D.; Tasic, L.; Durán, N.

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (- 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  19. Bioavailability of genotoxic mixtures in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordelon, N.; Washburn, K.; He, L.Y.; Donnelly, K.C. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health

    1996-12-31

    Contaminated media at Superfund sites typically consist of complex mixtures of organic and inorganic chemicals which are difficult to characterize, both analytically and toxicologically. The current EPA approach to risk assessment uses solvent extraction to remove chemicals from the soil as a basis for estimating risk to the human population. However, contaminants that can be recovered with a solvent extract may not represent the mixture of chemicals that are available for human exposure. A procedure using an aqueous extraction was investigated to provide a more realistic estimate of what chemicals are bioavailable. A study was conducted with two soil types: creosote-contaminated sandy soil and coal tar-contaminated clay soil spiked with benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Samples were extracted with hexane:acetone and water titrated to pH2 and pH7. HPLC analysis demonstrated up to 35% and 29% recovery of contaminants using the aqueous extracts. The estimated cancer risk for the aqueous extract was one order of magnitude less than that for solvent extracts. Analysis using the Salmonella/microsome assay demonstrated that solvent extracts were genotoxic (133 revertants/mg) with metabolic activation while aqueous extracts of clay soil were not genotoxic. Sandy soil showed genotoxicity both with and without metabolic activation. These results suggest that solvent extraction techniques may overestimate the concentration of contaminants that are available for human exposure and, hence, the risk associated with the presence of the contaminants in soil.

  20. Genotoxic effects of copper sulfate in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgieva S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the genotoxic effects of oral application of CuSO4 in rabbits by the chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. Ten male New Zealand rabbits (5 months old, weighing 3.5-4.0 kg were allocated into two groups. The first group received CuSO4 (5H2O in drinking water for 6 consecutive days. The second group was used as a control. On the 7th day, blood samples were taken from the ear marginal vein and the SCE and CA tests in peripheral lymphocytes were used as genotoxicity and mutagenicity endpoints, respectively. Results showed a significant increase in the frequencies of the aberrant cells (7.4±0.24, P<0.001 and CA (chromatid fragments 3.2±0.37, chromosome fragments 4.2±0.37, P<0.001, and total aberrations (7.4±0.24, P<0.001 after the treatment with CuSO4 when compared with the control group. The level of SCE per cell in the CuSO4-treated rabbits (9.66±0.062 was significantly higher than in rabbits from the control group. These findings show that copper exhibits a genotoxic and mutagenic potential in rabbits.

  1. From nanotechnology to nanogenotoxicology: genotoxic effect of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zülal Atlı Şekeroğlu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a multi-disciplinary technology that processes the materials that can be measured with nanometer-level and combines many research field or discipline. Nanomaterials (NMs are widely used in the fields of science, technology, communication, electronics, industry, pharmacy, medicine, environment, consumer products and military. Until recently little has been known about whether or not nanomaterials have the toxic or hazardous effects on human health and the environment. However, several studies have indicated that exposure to some nanomaterials, e.g. nanoparticles, can cause some adverse effects in humans and animals. Over the last years the number of publications focusing on nanotoxicology has gained momentum, but, there is still a gap about the genotoxicity of nanomaterials.Metal nanoparticles and their alloys with excellent mechanical properties are the materials which can be easily adapted to the mechanical conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Cobalt-chromium alloys are widely used in orthopedic applications as joint prosthesis and bone regeneration material, fillings and dental implants in jaw surgery, and in cardiovascular surgery, especially stent applications. Studies about cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of metal nanoparticles on human indicate that some metal nanoparticles have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and they may be hazardous for humans. However, a few studies have been reported concerning the genotoxic effects of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles. The data from these studies indicate that cobalt-chromium nanoparticles have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. It has been stated that the wear debris from implants cause DNA and chromosome damage in patients with cobalt-chromium replacements. It was also found that the risk of urinary cancers such as bladder, ureter, kidney and prostate in patients after hip replacement than among the wider population.Because there are very little biocompatibility and toxicity tests on

  2. Overestimation of nanoparticles-induced DNA damage determined by the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Daniela; Anselmi-Tamburini, Umberto; Tredici, Ilenia Giuseppina; Ricci, Vittorio; Sommi, Patrizia

    2016-09-01

    The increasing use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in a wide range of commercial products raises concern about the possible risks that NPs pose to human health. Many aspects of the interaction between living cells and NPs are still unclear, and a reliable assessment of NP genotoxicity would be important. One of the most common tests used for genotoxicity is the comet assay, a sensitive method measuring DNA damage in individual cells. The assay was originally developed for soluble molecules, but it is also used in the assessment of genotoxicity of NPs. However, concerns have been raised recently about the reliability of this test in the case of NPs, but no conclusive results have been presented. Using nuclei isolated from human epithelial cells incubated with NPs, we obtained clear evidence of overestimation of NP genotoxicity by the comet assay in the case of CeO2, TiO2, SiO2, and polystyrene NPs. Removal of the NPs in the cytoplasm was effective in eliminating this genotoxicity overestimation (ex post damage) and determining the actual damage produced by the NPs during incubation with the cells (ex ante damage). This method could improve significantly the determination of NP genotoxicity in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26812144

  3. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-Nps) in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Priscila; Balbinot, Fernanda; Martins de Oliveira, Hugo; Elibio Fagundes, Gabriela [PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular (Brazil); Venancio, Mireli; Vieira Ronconi, Joao Vitor; Merlini, Aline [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais (Brazil); Streck, Emilio L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Unidade Academica de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Fisiopatologia Experimental (Brazil); Marques da Silva, Paula [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais (Brazil); Moraes de Andrade, Vanessa, E-mail: vmoraesdeandrade@yahoo.com.br [PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are the most prominent nanoproducts. Due to their antimicrobial activity, they have been incorporated in different materials, such as catheters, clothes, electric home appliance, and many others. The genotoxicity of Ag-NPs (5-45 nm), in different concentrations and times of exposure, was evaluated by the comet assay in in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively, using human peripheral blood and Swiss mice. The results showed the genotoxic effect of Ag-NPs in vitro, in all the doses tested in the initial hour of exposure, possibly through the reactive oxygen species generation. Nevertheless, the values for this damage decrease with time, indicating that the DNA may have been restored by the repair system. In the in vivo conditions, we found no genotoxicity of Ag-NPs in any hour of exposure and any dose investigated, which can be attributed to the activation of a cellular antioxidant network and the hydrophobic nature of Ag-NPs. Now, it is absolutely necessary to investigate the role of Ag-NPs in different cell lines in vivo.

  4. The cyto- and genotoxicity of organotin compounds is dependent on the cellular uptake capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organotin compounds have been widely used as stabilizers and anti-fouling agents with the result that they are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. Organotins accumulate in the food chain and potential effects on human health are disquieting. It is not known as yet whether cell surface adsorption or accumulation within the cell, or indeed both is a prerequisite for the toxicity of organotin compounds. In this study, the alkylated tin derivatives monomethyltin trichloride (MMT), dimethyltin dichloride (DMT), trimethyltin chloride (TMT) and tetramethyltin (TetraMT) were investigated for cyto- and genotoxic effects in CHO-9 cells in relation to the cellular uptake. To identify genotoxic effects, induction of micronuclei (MN), chromosome aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were analyzed and the nuclear division index (NDI) was calculated. The cellular uptake was assessed using ICP-MS analysis. The toxicity of the tin compounds was also evaluated after forced uptake by electroporation. Our results show that uptake of the organotin compounds was generally low but dose-dependent. Only weak genotoxic effects were observed after exposure of cells to DMT and TMT. MMT and TetraMT were negative in the test systems. After forced uptake by electroporation MMT, DMT and TMT induced significant DNA damage at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The results presented here indicate a considerable toxicological potential of some organotin species but demonstrate clearly that the toxicity is modulated by the cellular uptake capability

  5. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-Nps) in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are the most prominent nanoproducts. Due to their antimicrobial activity, they have been incorporated in different materials, such as catheters, clothes, electric home appliance, and many others. The genotoxicity of Ag-NPs (5–45 nm), in different concentrations and times of exposure, was evaluated by the comet assay in in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively, using human peripheral blood and Swiss mice. The results showed the genotoxic effect of Ag-NPs in vitro, in all the doses tested in the initial hour of exposure, possibly through the reactive oxygen species generation. Nevertheless, the values for this damage decrease with time, indicating that the DNA may have been restored by the repair system. In the in vivo conditions, we found no genotoxicity of Ag-NPs in any hour of exposure and any dose investigated, which can be attributed to the activation of a cellular antioxidant network and the hydrophobic nature of Ag-NPs. Now, it is absolutely necessary to investigate the role of Ag-NPs in different cell lines in vivo.

  6. Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by repetitive administration of local anaesthetics: an experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies regarding the effects of some local anaesthetics have suggested that these agents can cause genetic damage. However, they have not been tested for genotoxicity related to repetitive administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of local anaesthetics upon repetitive administration. METHODS: 80 male Wistar rats were divided into: group A - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with lidocaine hydrochloride 2%; group B - 16 rats IP injected with mepivacaine 2%; group C - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with articaine 4%; group D - 16 rats IP injected with prilocaine 3% (6.0 mg/kg; group E - 8 rats subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide; and group F - 8 rats intraperitoneally injected with saline. Eight rats from groups A to D received a single dose of anaesthetic on Day 1 of the experiment; the remaining rats were dosed once a day for 5 days. RESULTS: The median number of micronuclei in the local anaesthetics groups exposed for 1 or 5 days ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, in the cyclophosphamide-exposed group was 10.00, and the negative control group for 1 and 5 days was 1.00 and 0.00, respectively (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: No genotoxicity effect was observed upon repetitive exposure to any of the local anaesthetics evaluated.

  7. Genotoxic effect of radio marked lymphocytes using Tc-99m complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genotoxic effect of radio marked lymphocytes was evaluated using 99m-Tc-HMPAO and 99m-Tc- gentisic acid complexes. With the results of this work it is pretended to contribute to the knowledge of genetic and structural damages that provokes the radiation in the marked lymphocytes. The d, 1-HMPAO was synthesized in laboratory with a yielding of 30 %. The radiochemical purity of the complexes was greater than 85%. Mouse lymphocytes obtained of sanguineous volumes 2 ml were used. The radio marked efficiency of cells was 19.6 ± 6.4% and 25.6 ± 5.8% for 99mTc-HMPAO and 99m Tc gentisic acid respectively. The genotoxic effect was evaluated using the technique of Unicellular Electrophoresis in Micro gel (Comet assay). The results showed that both 99m Tc complexes produce genotoxicity due to their capacity to penetrate cells, therefore the Auger and M internal conversion electrons place all their energy obtaining doses of Gray order. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Calderón-Segura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calypso (thiacloprid, Poncho (clothianidin, Gaucho (imidacloprid, and Jade (imidacloprid are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5×10-6 to 5.7×10-5 M Jade; 2.8×10-4 to 1.7×10-3 M Gaucho; 0.6×10-1 to 1.4×10-1 M Calypso; 1.2×10-1 to 9.5×10-1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18×10-3 M Jade, 2.0×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.0×10-1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30×10-3 M Jade, 3.3×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.8×10-1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides.

  9. Genotoxicity analysis of two halonitromethanes, a novel group of disinfection by-products (DBPs), in human cells treated in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halonitromethanes (HNMs) constitute an emerging class of disinfection by-products (DBPs) produced when chlorine and/or ozone are used for water treatment. The HNMs are structurally similar to halomethanes, but have a nitro-group in place of hydrogen bonded to the central carbon atom. Since little information exists on the genotoxic potential of HNMs, a study has been carried out with two HNM compounds, namely trichloronitromethane (TCNM) and bromonitromethane (BNM) by using human cells. Primary damage induction has been measured with the Comet assay, which is used to determine both the repair kinetics of the induced damage and the proportion of induced oxidative damage. In addition, the fixed DNA damage has been evaluated by using the micronucleus (MN) assay. The results obtained indicate that both compounds are genotoxic, inducing high levels of DNA breaks in the Comet assay, and that this DNA damage repairs well over time. In addition, oxidized bases constitute a high proportion of DNA-induced damage (50-75%). Contrarily, no positive effects were observed in the frequency of micronucleus, which measures both clastogenic and aneugenic effects, neither using TK6 cells nor peripheral blood lymphocytes. This lack of fixed genetic damage would minimize the potential mutagenic risk associated with HNMs exposure

  10. An integrative assessment to determine the genotoxic hazard of estuarine sediments: combining cell and whole-organism responses

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Pedro M; Pinto, Miguel; Vicente, Ana M.; Gonçalves, Cátia; Rodrigo, Ana P.; Louro, Henriqueta; MARIA H. COSTA; Caeiro, Sandra; Silva, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of the Comet assay in environmental monitoring remains challenging in face of the complexity of environmental stressors, e.g., when dealing with estuarine sediments, that hampers the drawing of cause-effect relationships. Although the in vitro Comet assay may circumvent confounding factors, its application in environmental risk assessment (ERA) still needs validation. As such, the present work aims at integrating genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage induced by sediment-bound ...

  11. In vitro gene expression data supporting a DNA non-reactive genotoxic mechanism for ochratoxin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin often found in cereals and agricultural products. There is unequivocal evidence of renal carcinogenicity of OTA in male rats, although the mechanism of action is unknown. At present, available data support an epigenetic mechanism (DNA non-reactive) resulting from oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, because a direct OTA interaction with DNA has not been demonstrated. Genotoxic mechanism (DNA-reactive vs. DNA non-reactive) may have implications on human risk assessment. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to identify biological pathways modulated by OTA in vitro in a human renal cell line (HK-2) to contribute to the elucidation of the mechanism of OTA toxicity. For that purpose, cells were exposed to 50 μM OTA during 6 and 24 h, and gene expression profiles were analyzed using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 A 2.0 Gene Chips. Under the same experimental conditions, genotoxicity was evaluated by the modified comet assay using FPG and Endo III to detect oxidative DNA damage, and intracellular ROS level by the H2DCF assay. After 6 h, with slight cytotoxicity (83% survival), genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain were up-regulated; and after 24 h, with a more pronounced cytotoxicity (51% survival), genes implicated in oxidative stress response were also up-regulated. Increase in intracellular ROS level and oxidative DNA damage was evident at both exposure times being more pronounced with high cytotoxicity. On the contrary, up-regulation of genes implicated in DNA damage response, as cell cycle control or apoptosis, was not detected at any exposure time. In conclusion, these results support a DNA non-reactive mechanism of OTA genotoxicity

  12. In vitro gene expression data supporting a DNA non-reactive genotoxic mechanism for ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbillaga, Leire; Azqueta, Amaia; van Delft, Joost H M; López de Cerain, Adela

    2007-04-15

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin often found in cereals and agricultural products. There is unequivocal evidence of renal carcinogenicity of OTA in male rats, although the mechanism of action is unknown. At present, available data support an epigenetic mechanism (DNA non-reactive) resulting from oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, because a direct OTA interaction with DNA has not been demonstrated. Genotoxic mechanism (DNA-reactive vs. DNA non-reactive) may have implications on human risk assessment. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to identify biological pathways modulated by OTA in vitro in a human renal cell line (HK-2) to contribute to the elucidation of the mechanism of OTA toxicity. For that purpose, cells were exposed to 50 microM OTA during 6 and 24 h, and gene expression profiles were analyzed using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 A 2.0 Gene Chips. Under the same experimental conditions, genotoxicity was evaluated by the modified comet assay using FPG and Endo III to detect oxidative DNA damage, and intracellular ROS level by the H(2)DCF assay. After 6 h, with slight cytotoxicity (83% survival), genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain were up-regulated; and after 24 h, with a more pronounced cytotoxicity (51% survival), genes implicated in oxidative stress response were also up-regulated. Increase in intracellular ROS level and oxidative DNA damage was evident at both exposure times being more pronounced with high cytotoxicity. On the contrary, up-regulation of genes implicated in DNA damage response, as cell cycle control or apoptosis, was not detected at any exposure time. In conclusion, these results support a DNA non-reactive mechanism of OTA genotoxicity. PMID:17316727

  13. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm2 lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm2 lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health

  14. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S., E-mail: sandra.wise@maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Xie, Hong, E-mail: hongxie@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Fukuda, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomofukuda009@gmail.com [Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tohoku University, Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Second Research Building, Rm 112, 1-1 Amamiyamachi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Douglas Thompson, W., E-mail: dougt@usm.maine.edu [Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health.

  15. Genotoxicity biomarkers for airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) in an area under petrochemical influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Andréia Torres; Lemos, Clarice Torres de; Flores, Andressa Negreiros; Pantoja, Eduarda Ozório; Rocha, Jocelita Aparecida Vaz; Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2016-09-01

    The effects of fine inhalable particles (PM2.5) were evaluated in an area under the influence of a petrochemical industry, investigating the sensitivity of different genotoxicity biomarkers. Organic extracts were obtained from PM2.5 samples at two sites, positioned in the first and second preferential wind direction in the area. The extracts were evaluated with Salmonella/microsome assay, microsuspension method, strains TA98, YG1021 and YG1024. The mammalian metabolization fraction (S9) was used to evaluate metabolite mutagenicity. The Comet Assay (CA) and Micronuclei Test were used in a Chinese hamster lung cell line (V79). All extracts showed mutagenicity in Salmonella, and nitrogenated compounds were strongly present. Genotoxicity were found in CA in almost all extracts and the micronuclei induction at the Site in the first (Autumn 1, Winter 1), and in the second (Spring 2) wind direction. V79 showed cytotoxicity in all samples. The three biomarkers were concordant in characterization Site NO with worse quality, compatible with the greater pollutants dispersion in the first wind direction. All PM2.5 concentrations were lower than those recommended by air quality standards but genotoxic effects were detected in all samples, corroborating that these standards are inadequate as quality indicators. The Salmonella/microsome assay proved sensitive to PM2.5 mutagenicity, with an outstanding influence of nitroarenes and aromatic amines. Analyses using CA and the micronucleus test broadened the levels of response that involve different damage induction mechanisms. Results show that the complex PM2.5 composition can provoke various genotoxic effects and the use of different bioassays is essential to understand its effects. PMID:27343868

  16. Genotoxicity assessments of alluvial soil irrigated with wastewater from a pesticide manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Reshma; Krakat, Niclas

    2015-10-01

    In this study, organochlorine pesticides (OCP) and heavy metals were analyzed from wastewater- and groundwater- irrigated soils (control samples) by gas chromatography (GC) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS), respectively. Gas chromatographic analysis revealed the presence of high concentration of pesticides in soil irrigated with wastewater (WWS). These concentrations were far above the maximum residue permissible limits indicating that alluvial soils have high binding capacity of OCP. AAS analyses revealed higher concentration of heavy metals in WWS as compared to groundwater (GWS). Also, the DNA repair (SOS)-defective Escherichia coli K-12 mutant assay and the bacteriophage lambda system were employed to estimate the genotoxicity of soils. Therefore, soil samples were extracted by hexane, acetonitrile, methanol, chloroform, and acetone. Both bioassays revealed that hexane-extracted soils from WWS were most genotoxic. A maximum survival of 15.2% and decline of colony-forming units (CFUs) was observed in polA mutants of DNA repair-defective E. coli K-12 strains when hexane was used as solvent. However, the damage of polA (-) mutants triggered by acetonitrile, methanol, chloroform, and acetone extracts was 80.0, 69.8, 65.0, and 60.7%, respectively. These results were also confirmed by the bacteriophage λ test system as hexane extracts of WWS exhibited a maximum decline of plaque-forming units for lexA mutants of E. coli K-12 pointing to an elevated genotoxic potential. The lowest survival was observed for lexA (12%) treated with hexane extracts while the percentage of survival was 25, 49.2, 55, and 78% with acetonitrile, methanol, chloroform, and acetone, respectively, after 6 h of treatment. Thus, our results suggest that agricultural soils irrigated with wastewater from pesticide industries have a notably high genotoxic potential. PMID:26394621

  17. Genotoxic evaluation of infusions of Urera baccifera leaves and roots in Allium cepa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Gindri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: The aqueous extracts of Urera baccifera Wedd. leaves and roots are used to inflammatory and infectious diseases in Brazilian folk medicine. Oxalic acid, a substance co-related with toxicity and stinging, was already quantified in this plant. Aims: To evaluate the action of leaves and roots infusions (1, 30, 75 g/L and the oxalic acid standard on mitosis as indicative of presumably antimitotic and genotoxic actions, using the Allium cepa test. Methods: Oxalic acid was quantified in the roots and leaves infusions by High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD, with the mobile phase of 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 2.5: acetonitrile at 95:5 (v/v. To the genotoxicity test, onion bulbs were used. After the rootlets germination, each bulb was submitted for 24 h of the individual treatments. Were analyzed 1000 cells per bulb, in a total of 5000 cells per treatment. Results: Results showed that all concentrations of roots infusions induced chromosomes abnormalities, except for the highest, that caused a substantial inhibition in the mitosis, precluding to be observed abnormalities. In the leaves infusions, only the two higher concentrations caused the highest values of damage in the cellular cycle. The oxalic acid also caused abnormalities in the mitosis, and may be considered responsible by part of the genotoxic action of U. baccifera. Conclusions: Oxalic acid can be responsible by part of the chromosomal abnormalities caused by U. baccifera, although, there must have more metabolites that evoke the same effect promoting the genotoxic effect of this nettle.

  18. Antiproliferative, genotoxic and oxidant activities of cyclosativene in rat neuron and neuroblastoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toğar Başak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosativene (CSV is a tetracyclic sesquiterpene found in the essential oils of Centaurea cineraria (Asteraceae and Abies magnifica A. Murray (Pinaceae plants. To the best of our knowledge, its cytotoxic, genotoxic and oxidant effects have never been studied on any cell lines. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the in vitro antiproliferative and/or cytotoxic properties, antioxidant/oxidant activity and genotoxic damage potential of CSV in healthy neurons and N2a neuroblastoma (N2a-NB cell cultures. After treatment with 10-400 μg/ml of CSV for 24 h, cell proliferation was measured by the MTT (3,(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The antioxidant activity was assessed by the total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total oxidative stress (TOS assays. To evaluate the level of DNA damage, single cell gel alkaline electrophoresis (SCGE was used. The MTT assay showed that the application of CSV significantly reduced cell viability in both cell types. CSV treatments at higher doses led to decreases of TAC levels and increases of TOS levels in neuron and N2a-NB cells. The mean values of the total scores of cells showing DNA damage were not found to be significantly different from the control values in both cells. In conclusion, this study suggests that CSV has weak anticancer potential.

  19. Evaluation of genotoxicity of combined soil pollution by cadmium and phenanthrene on earthworm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jiang; ZHAO Zuo-yuan; LU Yi-tong

    2006-01-01

    The DNA-damaging effects of the combined pollution of heavy metal and organic contamination on earthworms were evaluated by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay. Earthworms Eisenia andrei were exposed to single or combined test compounds in different doses of cadmium (Cd) 5, 10, 50 mg/kg and phenanthrene (Phe) 0.5, 2.5, 12.5 mg/kg with a treatment of 14 d.In SCGE assay, isolated coelomcytes and electrophoresis were employed to determine DNA damage degree after a 14-d treatment by test compounds. The results showed that there was a significant statistical difference between earthworms treated with Cd combined Phe with them treated alone with Cd or Phe. The Olive tail moment (OTM) of SCGE assay using earthworm coelomcytes appears to be a sensitive biomarker for evaluating exposure to genotoxic compounds. These tests also revealed that the interaction between Cd and Phe to DNA damaging effects was negative, and was strongly dependent on the concentration of pollution. This study corresponds to exploratory phase in order to reveal interaction effects of heavy metal and organic contamination on earthworms and then to set up more in-depth analysis to increase progressively the understanding of the genotoxicity mechanisms involved.

  20. Micronuclei as biomarkers of genotoxicity of gamma radiation in aquatic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B.; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (GERAR/DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia; Silva, Ronaldo C. da [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica; Amancio, Francisco F. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia

    2011-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is a genotoxic agent, inducing gene mutations and cellular death. Several efforts have been defendants in the development of techniques for measurement of radiation damage in biological systems. Among these techniques, micronuclei test has been showing as a great bio marker of DNA damage, being used in environmental monitoring to detect genotoxic agents in the environment. Additionally, organisms as Biomphalaria glabrata, freshwater molluscs, presents itself as an excellent model to assess damage caused by physical and chemical agents, due their biological and environmental characteristics. The snails were divided into groups of 5 individuals exposed to doses of 0 (control), 25, 35, 45 and 55 Gy of {sup 60}Co. After 48 hours of irradiation, the hemo lymph was collected and prepared the slides, which were stained with Giemsa and analyzed the cellular changes in haemocytes Statistical analysis was accomplished through chi-square test, ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0,05). The results indicated that B. glabrata showed to be sensitive to gamma radiation. The snails irradiated with 35 Gy showed a decrease of haemocytes, while that of 55 Gy increased. Cellular and morphological changes were observed at doses of 35, 45 and 55 Gy and the dose of 55 Gy, the most radiotoxic. (author)

  1. Micronuclei as biomarkers of genotoxicity of gamma radiation in aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is a genotoxic agent, inducing gene mutations and cellular death. Several efforts have been defendants in the development of techniques for measurement of radiation damage in biological systems. Among these techniques, micronuclei test has been showing as a great bio marker of DNA damage, being used in environmental monitoring to detect genotoxic agents in the environment. Additionally, organisms as Biomphalaria glabrata, freshwater molluscs, presents itself as an excellent model to assess damage caused by physical and chemical agents, due their biological and environmental characteristics. The snails were divided into groups of 5 individuals exposed to doses of 0 (control), 25, 35, 45 and 55 Gy of 60Co. After 48 hours of irradiation, the hemo lymph was collected and prepared the slides, which were stained with Giemsa and analyzed the cellular changes in haemocytes Statistical analysis was accomplished through chi-square test, ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0,05). The results indicated that B. glabrata showed to be sensitive to gamma radiation. The snails irradiated with 35 Gy showed a decrease of haemocytes, while that of 55 Gy increased. Cellular and morphological changes were observed at doses of 35, 45 and 55 Gy and the dose of 55 Gy, the most radiotoxic. (author)

  2. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of the herbicide dicamba using in vivo and in vitro test systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genotoxic effects of the herbicide dicamba have been studied by measuring (1) the unwinding rate of liver DNA from intraperitoneally treated rats (fluorimetric assay); (2) DNA repair as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) induced in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL); and (3) sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in HPBL. Results show that dicamba is capable of inducing DNA damage since it significantly increases the unwinding rate of rat liver DNA in vivo and also induces UDS in HPBL in vitro in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation (S-9 mix). Furthermore, dicamba causes a very slight increase in SCE frequency in HPBL in vitro

  3. Comet assay to assess the genotoxicity of Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.) husks with statistical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriccione, Milena; Ciniglia, Claudia

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm the utility of the Comet assay as a genotoxicity screening test for evaluating the impact of walnut husk aqueous extract. Phytotoxicity assays using diluted and undiluted walnut husk aqueous extracts were performed on young roots of Raphanus sativus (radish), and the Comet assay was used to evaluate DNA integrity in isolated radish radicle nuclei. The results reveal a dose-dependent accumulation of DNA damage in radish radicles treated with walnut husks water extract and that the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test combined with Johnson SB distribution was the best approach for describing Comet assay data. PMID:22526990

  4. Genotoxicity of Thermopsis turcica on Allium cepa L. roots revealed by alkaline comet and random amplified polymorphic DNA assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Cenkci, Süleyman; Kargıoğlu, Mustafa; Konuk, Muhsin

    2016-08-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate genotoxic potential of Thermopsis turcica aqueous extracts on the roots of onion bulb (Allium cepa L.) by comet assay and random amplified polymorphic DNA technique. The Allium root growth inhibition test indicated that the EC50 and 2×EC50 values were 8 and 16 mg/ml concentrations of T. turcica aqueous extracts, respectively. The negative control (distilled water), positive control (methyl methane sulfonate, 10 mg/l) and 8 and 16 mg/ml concentrations of T. turcica extracts were introduced to the roots of onion bulbs for 24 and 96 h. The root growth, DNA damage in root cells and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles of root tissue were used as endpoints of the genotoxicity. The comet assay clearly indicated that dose-dependent single strand DNA breaks in the root nuclei of onions were determined for the treatment concentrations of T. turcica extracts. In comparison to RAPD profile of negative control group, RAPD polymorphisms became evident as disappearance and/or appearance of RAPD bands in treated roots. The diagnostic and phenetic numerical analyses of RAPD profiles obviously indicated dose-dependent genotoxicity induced by Thermopsis extracts. In conclusion, the results clearly indicated that water extract of T. turcica has genotoxic potential on the roots of onion bulbs as shown by comet assay and RAPD technique. PMID:25550040

  5. Embryotoxic and genotoxic effects of heavy metals and pesticides on early life stages of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Impact of pesticides and heavy metals on early life stage of Pacific oyster. ► Toxicity investigated using embryolarvae and comet assays. ► Relationship between embryotoxicity and genotoxicty. ► Genotoxic and embryotoxic effects at enviromnental pollutant concentrations. - Abstract: This study evaluated embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of two dissolved metals copper and cadmium (Cu and Cd) and two pesticides (metolachlor and irgarol) occurring in Arcachon Bay (SW France) in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae and investigated the relationship between those two endpoints. Embryotoxicity was measured by calculating the percentage of abnormal D-shaped larvae and genotoxicity was evaluated with DNA strand breaks using the comet assay. After 24 h exposure, significant increases of the percentage of abnormal D-larvae and the DNA strand breaks were observed from 0.1 μg L−1 for Cu, 10 μg L−1 for Cd and 0.01 μg L−1 for both irgarol and metolachlor in comparison with the controls. A strong positive relationship between embryotoxicity and genotoxicity was recorded for Cu, Cd and metolachlor. The current study suggests that copper, irgarol and metolachlor can induce larval abnormalities and DNA damage in a population of exposed oysters at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  6. Effect of the nano-bio interface on the genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and associated cellular responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Raju Yashaswi

    Several toxicological studies have shown that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), one of the most widely produced engineered nanoparticles, can induce genotoxicity; however, potential adverse health effects associated with their physicochemical properties are not fully understood. Proteins in a biological medium can adsorb to the surface of the nanoparticle resulting in the formation of a protein corona that can alter the physicochemical properties of the particle. Furthermore, the protein corona may impact the interaction between nanoparticles and cells, referred to as the nano-bio interface, effecting the uptake, distribution, and toxicity of the particles. Despite the potential influence of the composition of the biological medium on the physicochemical properties and genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the majority of studies have not examined systematically the influence of medium composition on protein corona, genotoxicity, and cellular responses. In this dissertation we tested the overall hypothesis that titanium dioxide nanoparticles in medium that produces the smallest agglomerates would be taken up into cells and induce genotoxicity, and that exposure would initiate the signaling of key mediators of a DNA damage and inflammation response. Three major findings were shown in this study: 1) Protein corona formation on the surface of nano-TiO2 can impact the nano-bio interface and change cellular interaction. 2) Smaller agglomerates of nano-TiO2 are taken up more by cells without inducing cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing induced DNA damage to be processed into micronuclei in BEAS-2B cells. 3) Nano-TiO 2 in medium that facilitates increased cellular interaction induces the upregulation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response (similar to ionizing radiation) and NF-kappaB inflammation pathways. Taken together, our research provides a systematic examination of the physicochemical properties, genotoxicity, and cellular responses induced by

  7. Human biological monitoring of occupational genotoxic exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Sorsa, M

    1993-01-01

    Human biological monitoring is a valuable tool for exposure assessment in groups of persons occupationally exposed to genotoxic agents. If the monitoring activity covers genetic material the term genetic monitoring is used. The methods used for genetic monitoring are either substance specific, e.......g. the quantitation of identified DNA-adducts or substance unspecific as is the measurement of DNA-repair. The sample material used for analysis must be well characterized and subject to uniform processing for comparison of the results. Confounding factors of smoking, age and sex must be well controlled...

  8. In vivo studies on genotoxicity of a soil fumigant, dazomet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, M; Bolognesi, C; Munnia, A; Landini, E; Parodi, S

    1998-01-01

    Dazomet is a soil fumigant effective against germinating weed seeds, nematodes, soil fungi, and soil insects. Dazomet is primarily used for preplanting control in tobacco and forest nursery crops and is now marketed for a wider range of open field and greenhouse crops (e.g., vegetables, fruits, ornamental plants, lawns, and turfs). Swiss CD1 male and female mice were intraperitoneally treated with dazomet in order to evaluate its potential genotoxicity. DNA damage activity, namely, DNA single-strand breaks, DNA adducts, and increased micronuclei frequency due to treatment with the soil fumigant was observed in the experimental animals. Dose-dependent DNA adduct formation was detected in the liver, kidneys, and lungs of mice. DNA adduct levels in these three organs were 6.0 +/- 0.4 (SD), 4.8 +/- 0.1 (SD), and 2.2 +/- 0.4 (SD) adducts/10(8) nucleotides, respectively, at the highest dose of the soil fumigant tested (90 mg/kg). No adduct formation was observed in control mice. A significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks was detected in the liver and kidneys of mice treated with 100 mg/kg of dazomet (P dazomet (P < 0.05). PMID:9776181

  9. Tracing the tracks of genotoxicity by trivalent and hexavalent chromium in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Manish; Sharma, Anurag; Negi, M P S; Dwivedi, U N; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2011-05-18

    Mutagen sensitive strains (mus) in Drosophila are known for their hypersensitivity to mutagens and environmental carcinogens. Accordingly, these mutants were grouped in pre- and post-replication repair pathways. However, studying mutants belonging to one particular repair pathway may not be adequate for examining chemical-induced genotoxicity when other repair pathways may neutralize its effect. To test whether both pre-and post-replication pathways are involved and effect of Cr(III)- and Cr(VI)-induced genotoxicity in absence or presence of others, we used double mutant approach in D. melanogaster. We observed DNA damage as evident by changes in Comet assay DNA migration in cells of larvae of Oregon R(+) and single mutants of pre- (mei-9, mus201 and mus210) and post- (mei-41, mus209 and mus309) replication repair pathways and also in double mutants of different combinations (pre-pre, pre-post and post-post replication repair) exposed to increasing concentrations of Cr(VI) (0.0, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 μg/ml) for 48 h. The damage was greater in pre-replication repair mutants after exposure to 5.0 μg/ml Cr(VI), while effects on Oregon R(+) and post replication repair mutants were insignificant. Post-replication repair mutants revealed significant DNA damage after exposure to 20.0 μg/ml Cr(VI). Further, double mutants generated in the above repair categories were examined for DNA damage following Cr(VI) exposure and a comparison of damage was studied between single and double mutants. Combinations of double mutants generated in the pre-pre replication repair pathways showed an indifferent interaction between the two mutants after Cr(VI) exposure while a synergistic interaction was evident in exposed post-post replication repair double mutants. Cr(III) (20.0 μg/ml) exposure to these strains did not induce any significant DNA damage in their cells. The study suggests that both pre- and post-replication pathways are affected in Drosophila by Cr(VI) leading to

  10. Genotoxicity of synthetic amorphous silica nanoparticles in rats following short-term exposure. Part 1: Oral route

    OpenAIRE

    Tarantini, Adeline; Huet, Sylvie; Jarry, Gérard; Martine, Poul; Tavares, Ana; Vital, Nádia; Louro, Henriqueta; Silva, Maria João; Fessard, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) in its nanosized form is now used in food applications although the potential risks for human health have not been evaluated. In this study, genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage of two pyrogenic (NM-202 and 203) and two precipitated (NM-200 and -201) nanosized SAS were investigated in vivo in rats following oral exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg b.w./day for three days by gavage. DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA damag...

  11. Genotoxicity of nano/microparticles in in vitro micronuclei, in vivo comet and mutation assay systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukumori Nobutaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, manufactured nano/microparticles such as fullerenes (C60, carbon black (CB and ceramic fiber are being widely used because of their desirable properties in industrial, medical and cosmetic fields. However, there are few data on these particles in mammalian mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. To examine genotoxic effects by C60, CB and kaolin, an in vitro micronuclei (MN test was conducted with human lung cancer cell line, A549 cells. In addition, DNA damage and mutations were analyzed by in vivo assay systems using male C57BL/6J or gpt delta transgenic mice which were intratracheally instilled with single or multiple doses of 0.2 mg per animal of particles. Results In in vitro genotoxic analysis, increased MN frequencies were observed in A549 cells treated with C60, CB and kaolin in a dose-dependent manner. These three nano/microparticles also induced DNA damage in the lungs of C57BL/6J mice measured by comet assay. Moreover, single or multiple instillations of C60 and kaolin, increased either or both of gpt and Spi- mutant frequencies in the lungs of gpt delta transgenic mice. Mutation spectra analysis showed transversions were predominant, and more than 60% of the base substitutions occurred at G:C base pairs in the gpt genes. The G:C to C:G transversion was commonly increased by these particle instillations. Conclusion Manufactured nano/microparticles, CB, C60 and kaolin, were shown to be genotoxic in in vitro and in vivo assay systems.

  12. Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Ceria Nanoparticles on Different Cell Lines in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Santucci

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their radical scavenging and UV-filtering properties, ceria nanoparticles (CeO2-NPs are currently used for various applications, including as catalysts in diesel particulate filters. Because of their ability to filter UV light, CeO2-NPs have garnered significant interest in the medical field and, consequently, are poised for use in various applications. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of short-term (24 h and long-term (10 days CeO2-NP exposure to A549, CaCo2 and HepG2 cell lines. Cytotoxicity assays tested CeO2-NPs over a concentration range of 0.5 μg/mL to 5000 μg/mL, whereas genotoxicity assays tested CeO2-NPs over a concentration range of 0.5 μg/mL to 5000 μg/mL. In vitro assays showed almost no short-term exposure toxicity on any of the tested cell lines. Conversely, long-term CeO2-NP exposure proved toxic for all tested cell lines. NP genotoxicity was detectable even at 24-h exposure. HepG2 was the most sensitive cell line overall; however, the A549 line was most sensitive to the lowest concentration tested. Moreover, the results confirmed the ceria nanoparticles’ capacity to protect cells when they are exposed to well-known oxidants such as H2O2. A Comet assay was performed in the presence of both H2O2 and CeO2-NPs. When hydrogen peroxide was maintained at 25 μM, NPs at 0.5 μg/mL, 50 μg/mL, and 500 μg/mL protected the cells from oxidative damage. Thus, the NPs prevented H2O2-induced genotoxic damage.

  13. Mechanistic evaluation of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract-induced genotoxicity in L5178Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haixia; Guo, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Suhui; Dial, Stacey L; Guo, Lei; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2014-06-01

    Ginkgo biloba has been used for many thousand years as a traditional herbal remedy and its extract has been consumed for many decades as a dietary supplement. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract is a complex mixture with many constituents, including flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones. The National Toxicology Program 2-year cancer bioassay found that G. biloba leaf extract targets the liver, thyroid gland, and nose of rodents; however, the mechanism of G. biloba leaf extract-associated carcinogenicity remains unclear. In the current study, the in vitro genotoxicity of G. biloba leaf extract and its eight constituents was evaluated using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and Comet assay. The underlying mechanisms of G. biloba leaf extract-associated genotoxicity were explored. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the mutant frequency and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Western blot analysis confirmed that G. biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol activated the DNA damage signaling pathway with increased expression of γ-H2AX and phosphorylated Chk2 and Chk1. In addition, G. biloba leaf extract produced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in L5178Y cells. Loss of heterozygosity analysis of mutants indicated that G. biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol treatments resulted in extensive chromosomal damage. These results indicate that G. biloba leaf extract and its two constituents, quercetin and kaempferol, are mutagenic to the mouse L5178Y cells and induce DSBs. Quercetin and kaempferol likely are major contributors to G. biloba leaf extract-induced genotoxicity. PMID:24595819

  14. Identification of specific mRNA signatures as fingerprints for carcinogenesis in mice induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossler, Nadine; Matheis, Katja A; Ostenfeldt, Nina; Bach Toft, Dorthe; Dhalluin, Stéphane; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno

    2015-02-01

    Long-term rodent carcinogenicity studies for evaluation of chemicals and pharmaceuticals concerning their carcinogenic potential to humans are currently receiving critical revision. Additional data from mechanistic studies can support cancer risk assessment by clarifying the underlying mode of action. In the course of the IMI MARCAR project, a European consortium of EFPIA partners and academics, which aims to identify biomarkers for nongenotoxic carcinogenesis, a toxicogenomic mouse liver database was generated. CD-1 mice were orally treated for 3 and 14 days with 3 known genotoxic hepatocarcinogens: C.I. Direct Black 38, Dimethylnitrosamine and 4,4'-Methylenedianiline; 3 nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens: 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Phenobarbital sodium and Piperonyl butoxide; 4 nonhepatocarcinogens: Cefuroxime sodium, Nifedipine, Prazosin hydrochloride and Propranolol hydrochloride; and 3 compounds that show ambiguous results in genotoxicity testing: Cyproterone acetate, Thioacetamide and Wy-14643. By liver mRNA expression analysis using individual animal data, we identified 64 specific biomarker candidates for genotoxic carcinogens and 69 for nongenotoxic carcinogens for male mice at day 15. The majority of genotoxic carcinogen biomarker candidates possess functions in DNA damage response (eg, apoptosis, cell cycle progression, DNA repair). Most of the identified nongenotoxic carcinogen biomarker candidates are involved in regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. The derived biomarker lists were characterized with respect to their dependency on study duration and gender and were successfully used to characterize carcinogens with ambiguous genotoxicity test results, such as Wy-14643. The identified biomarker candidates improve the mechanistic understanding of drug-induced effects on the mouse liver that result in hepatocellular adenomas and/or carcinomas in 2-year mouse carcinogenicity studies. PMID:25410580

  15. Residual-QSAR. Implications for genotoxic carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putz Mihai V

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Both main types of carcinogenesis, genotoxic and epigenetic, were examined in the context of non-congenericity and similarity, respectively, for the structure of ligand molecules, emphasizing the role of quantitative structure-activity relationship ((QSAR studies in accordance with OECD (Organization for Economic and Cooperation Development regulations. The main purpose of this report involves electrophilic theory and the need for meaningful physicochemical parameters to describe genotoxicity by a general mechanism. Residual-QSAR Method The double or looping multiple linear correlation was examined by comparing the direct and residual structural information against the observed activity. A self-consistent equation of observed-computed activity was assumed to give maximum correlation efficiency for those situations in which the direct correlations gave non-significant statistical information. Alternatively, it was also suited to describe slow and apparently non-noticeable cancer phenomenology, with special application to non-congeneric molecules involved in genotoxic carcinogenesis. Application and Discussions The QSAR principles were systematically applied to a given pool of molecules with genotoxic activity in rats to elucidate their carcinogenic mechanisms. Once defined, the endpoint associated with ligand-DNA interaction was used to select variables that retained the main Hansch physicochemical parameters of hydrophobicity, polarizability and stericity, computed by the custom PM3 semiempirical quantum method. The trial and test sets of working molecules were established by implementing the normal Gaussian principle of activities that applies when the applicability domain is not restrained to the congeneric compounds, as in the present study. The application of the residual, self-consistent QSAR method and the factor (or average method yielded results characterized by extremely high and low correlations, respectively

  16. A study assessing the genotoxicity in rats after chronic oral exposure to a low dose of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential genotoxicity induced by chronic oral exposure to depleted uranium (DU). Weanling Wistar rats (F0), 50/sex/group, were exposed to DU in food at doses of 0, 4, or 40 mg kg-1 day-1 for four months. They were subsequently mated, resulting in the birth of F1 rats. Fifty F1 weanlings/sex/group were exposed for four months to the same dose levels as their parents. After four months, the uranium content in the tissues, the potential damage to the genetic material, and pathomorphological changes of the testicles were observed in both F0 and F1 rats. The genotoxicity of DU was evaluated by the following methods: sperm abnormality assessment, the bone-marrow micronucleus test, and the comet assay. Uranium content in F1 rats was significantly higher than that in F0 rats in both the kidney and ovary (p1 with F0 rats, significant differences were detected for most of the indicators, with F1 rats always exhibiting more damage (p1 rats. Genotoxicity may be induced in rats after chronic oral exposure to a low dose of DU. (author)

  17. Genotoxicity evaluation of kaurenoic acid, a bioactive diterpenoid present in Copaiba oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, B C; Costa-Lotufo, L V; Moraes, M O; Burbano, R R; Silveira, E R; Cunha, K M A; Rao, V S N; Moura, D J; Rosa, R M; Henriques, J A P; Pessoa, C

    2006-03-01

    Copaiba oil extracted from the Amazon traditional medicinal plant Copaifera langsdorffii is rich in kaurenoic acid (ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid), a diterpene that has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory, hypotensive, and diuretic effects in vivo and antimicrobial, smooth muscle relaxant and cytotoxic actions in vitro. This study evaluated its potential genotoxicity against Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells in vitro, using the Comet and the micronucleus assays. Kaurenoic acid was tested at concentrations of 2.5, 5,10, 30 and 60 microg/mL. The positive control was the methylmethanesulfonate (MMS). The duration of the treatment of V79 cells with these agents was 3h. The results showed that unlike MMS, kaurenoic acid (2.5, 5, and 10 microg/mL) failed to induce significantly elevated cell DNA damage or the micronucleus frequencies in the studied tests. However, exposure of V79 cells to higher concentrations of kaurenoic acid (30 and 60 microg/mL) caused significant increases in cell damage index and frequency. The data obtained provide support to the view that the diterpene kaurenoic acid induces genotoxicity. PMID:16182426

  18. Evaluation of cold shock-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in the house fly Musca domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Mishra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low temperature affects the survival, growth and development of invertebrates, especially insects, based on the severity of cold and the duration of exposure. Although the effects of cold shock or direct chilling were previously analysed in terms of development patterns and defects, morphological changes, cold hardiness, cryopreservation and diapause in insects, very little information is available regarding the effects of cold shock at the chromosomal level. Material and Methods: Late third instar larvae of the house fly Musca domestica were exposed to low temperatures (10, 4, 0 and -5°C for different durations, in order to assess genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in the present study. The chromosomal aberration assay and micronucleus test were used as genotoxic end points. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by the mitotic index and the extent of tissue damage was observed using the Trypan blue staining method. Results: A significant (P<0.05, P<0.01 and P<0.001 increase in chromosome aberrations and micronucleus frequency was observed in all of the exposed groups compared to the control. The mitotic index showed a dose-dependent increase; however, it was lower in comparison to the control. The developmental patterns in exposed larvae exhibited an increase in larval mortality and a delay in adult emergence. Extensive tissue damage was observed at -5°C by Trypan blue staining. Conclusions: The present work suggests that cold shock induces chromosome aberrations and cytotoxicity and affects the developmental pattern in house fly, M. domestica.

  19. What the Erythrocytic Nuclear Alteration Frequencies Could Tell Us about Genotoxicity and Macrophage Iron Storage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Juliana M. M.; Ribeiro, Heder J.; Procópio, Marcela S.; Alvarenga, Betânia M.; Castro, Antônio C. S.; Dutra, Walderez O.; da Silva, José B. B.; Corrêa Junior, José D.

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytic nuclear alterations have been considered as an indicative of organism’s exposure to genotoxic agents. Due to their close relationship among their frequencies and DNA damages, they are considered excellent markers of exposure in eukaryotes. However, poor data has been found in literature concerning their genesis, differential occurrence and their life span. In this study, we use markers of cell viability; genotoxicity and cellular turn over in order to shed light to these events. Tilapia and their blood were exposed to cadmium in acute exposure and in vitro assays. They were analyzed using flow cytometry for oxidative stress and membrane disruption, optical microscopy for erythrocytic nuclear alteration, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for cadmium content in aquaria water, blood and cytochemical and analytical electron microscopy techniques for the hemocateretic aspects. The results showed a close relationship among the total nuclear alterations and cadmium content in the total blood and melanomacrophage centres area, mismatching reactive oxygen species and membrane damages. Moreover, nuclear alterations frequencies (vacuolated, condensed and blebbed) showed to be associated to cadmium exposure whereas others (lobed and bud) were associated to depuration period. Decrease on nuclear alterations frequencies was also associated with hemosiderin increase inside spleen and head kidney macrophages mainly during depurative processes. These data disclosure in temporal fashion the main processes that drive the nuclear alterations frequencies and their relationship with some cellular and systemic biomarkers. PMID:26619141

  20. Protective effects of acerola juice on genotoxicity induced by iron in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Nunes Horta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metal ions such as iron can induce DNA damage by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress. Vitamin C is one of the most widely consumed antioxidants worldwide, present in many fruits and vegetables, especially inMalpighia glabra L., popularly known as acerola, native to Brazil. Acerola is considered a functional fruit due to its high antioxidant properties and phenolic contents, and therefore is consumed to prevent diseases or as adjuvant in treatment strategies. Here, the influence of ripe and unripe acerola juices on iron genotoxicity was analyzed in vivo using the comet assay and micronucleus test. The comet assay results showed that acerola juice exerted no genotoxic or antigenotoxic activity. Neither ripe nor unripe acerola juices were mutagenic to animals treated with juices, in micronucleus test. However, when compared to iron group, the pre-treatment with acerola juices exerted antimutagenic activity, decreasing significantly micronucleus mean values in bone marrow. Stage of ripeness did not influence the interaction of acerola compounds with DNA, and both ripe and unripe acerola juices exerted protective effect over DNA damage generated by iron.

  1. Protective effects of acerola juice on genotoxicity induced by iron in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Roberta Nunes; Kahl, Vivian Francilia Silva; Sarmento, Merielen da Silva; Nunes, Marisa Fernanda Silva; Porto, Carem Rejane Maglione; Andrade, Vanessa Moraes de; Ferraz, Alexandre de Barros Falcão; Silva, Juliana Da

    2016-03-01

    Metal ions such as iron can induce DNA damage by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Vitamin C is one of the most widely consumed antioxidants worldwide, present in many fruits and vegetables, especially inMalpighia glabra L., popularly known as acerola, native to Brazil. Acerola is considered a functional fruit due to its high antioxidant properties and phenolic contents, and therefore is consumed to prevent diseases or as adjuvant in treatment strategies. Here, the influence of ripe and unripe acerola juices on iron genotoxicity was analyzed in vivo using the comet assay and micronucleus test. The comet assay results showed that acerola juice exerted no genotoxic or antigenotoxic activity. Neither ripe nor unripe acerola juices were mutagenic to animals treated with juices, in micronucleus test. However, when compared to iron group, the pre-treatment with acerola juices exerted antimutagenic activity, decreasing significantly micronucleus mean values in bone marrow. Stage of ripeness did not influence the interaction of acerola compounds with DNA, and both ripe and unripe acerola juices exerted protective effect over DNA damage generated by iron. PMID:27007905

  2. Epidermal stem cells response to radiative genotoxic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human skin is the first organ exposed to various environmental stresses, which requires the development by skin stem cells of specific mechanisms to protect themselves and to ensure tissue homeostasis. As stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of epidermis during individual lifetime, the preservation of genomic integrity in these cells is essential. My PhD aimed at exploring the mechanisms set up by epidermal stem cells in order to protect themselves from two genotoxic stresses, ionizing radiation (Gamma Rays) and ultraviolet radiation (UVB). To begin my PhD, I have taken part of the demonstration of protective mechanisms used by keratinocyte stem cells after ionizing radiation. It has been shown that these cells are able to rapidly repair most types of radiation-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this repair is activated by the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In order to know if this protective mechanism is also operating in cutaneous carcinoma stem cells, we investigated the response to gamma Rays of carcinoma stem cells isolated from a human carcinoma cell line. As in normal keratinocyte stem cells, we demonstrated that cancer stem cells could rapidly repair radio-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factor 2 also mediates this repair, notably thanks to its nuclear isoforms. The second project of my PhD was to study human epidermal stem cells and progenitors responses to UVB radiation. Once cytometry and irradiation conditions were set up, the toxicity of UVB radiation has been evaluate in the primary cell model. We then characterized UVB photons effects on cell viability, proliferation and repair of DNA damage. This study allowed us to bring out that responses of stem cells and their progeny to UVB are different, notably at the level of part of their repair activity of DNA damage. Moreover, progenitors and stem cells transcriptomic responses after UVB irradiation have been study in order to analyze the global

  3. Linking hematological, biochemical, genotoxic, and behavioral responses to crude oil in the Amazon fish Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier, 1816).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhann, Daiani; de Azevedo Brust, Sandra Maristher; Domingos, Fabíola Xochilt Valdez; Val, Adalberto Luis

    2013-08-01

    Despite safety protocols, crude oil extraction and transportation in the Amazon basin has a potential for inadvertent oil spills, which can impact aquatic organisms in local rivers. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of crude oil on juvenile Amazonian fish tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, at various biological levels. Furthermore, the effect of crude oil on response to alarm substance, an important communication system in fish, was reported for the first time. Fish exposed to crude oil showed a 90 % decrease in their response to alarm substance and a 60 % decrease in swimming activity relative to control fish. Basic hematology was not affected, although an increase of 200 % of DNA damage and an increase of GST activity were observed in animals exposed to crude oil. Inverse correlations were found between genotoxicity end points and behavioral parameters, suggesting that genotoxic end points can also reflect behavioral changes. PMID:23539120

  4. Effect ofBuchanania lanzan Spreng. bark extract on cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ritesh Jain; Sanmati Kumar Jain

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To elucidate the effect of ethanolic extract ofBuchanania lanzan Spreng. (B. lanan) bark against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.Methods:The prevalence of micronuclei in bone marrow, the extent of lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and the status of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver of mice were used as intermediate biomarkers for chemoprotection. Lipid peroxidation and associated compromised antioxidant defenses in cyclophosphamide treated mice were observed in the liver.Results: Pre-treatment withB. lanzan250, 500 and1 000mg/ kg,p.o., daily for7 days significantly reduced the chromosomal damage and lipid peroxidation with concomitant changes in antioxidants and detoxification systems.Conclusions: These results point out the presence of chemopreventive phytoconstituents in the crude extract offering protection against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

  5. Genotoxic effects of the herbicide Roundup Transorb and its active ingredient glyphosate on the fish Prochilodus lineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Natália Cestari; Sofia, Silvia Helena; Martinez, Claudia B R

    2014-01-01

    Roundup Transorb (RT) is a glyphosate-based herbicide and despite its wide use around the world there are few studies comparing the effects of the active ingredient with the formulated product. In this context the purpose of this study was to compare the genotoxicity of the active ingredient glyphosate with the formulated product RT in order to clarify whether the active ingredient and the surfactant of the RT formula may exert toxic effects on the DNA molecule in juveniles of fish Prochilodus lineatus. Erythrocytes and gill cells of fish exposed to glyphosate and to RT showed DNA damage scores significantly higher than control animals. These results revealed that both glyphosate itself and RT were genotoxic to gill cells and erythrocytes of P. lineatus, suggesting that their use should be carefully monitored considering their potential impact on tropical aquatic biota. PMID:24448465

  6. Application of the micronucleus test and comet assay in Trachemys callirostris erythrocytes as a model for in situ genotoxic monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Lina M; Bock, Brian C; Orozco, Luz Yaneth; Palacio, Jaime A

    2016-05-01

    Trachemys callirostris is a turtle species endemic to northern South America. In northern Colombia it occurs in the middle and lower Magdalena River drainage and its principal tributaries (lower Cauca and San Jorge rivers) and in other minor drainages such as the lower Sinú River. In recent years, industrial, agricultural, and mining activities have altered natural habitats in Colombia where this species occurs, and many of the pollutants released there are known to induce genetic alterations in wildlife species. The micronucleus test and comet assay are two of the most widely used methods to characterize DNA damage induced by physical and chemical agents in wildlife species, but have not been employed previously for genotoxic evaluations in T. callirostris. The goal of this study was to optimize these genotoxic biomarkers for T. callirostris erythrocytes in order to establish levels of DNA damage in this species and thereby evaluate its potential as a sentinel species for monitoring genotoxic effects in freshwater environments in northern Colombia. Both genotoxic techniques were applied on peripheral blood erythrocytes from 20 captive-reared T. callirostris individuals as a negative control, as well as from samples obtained from 49 individuals collected in Magangué (Magdalena River drainage) and 24 individuals collected in Lorica (Sinú River drainage) in northern Colombia. Negative control individuals exhibited a baseline frequency of micronuclei of 0.78±0.58 and baseline values for comet tail length and tail moment of 3.34±0.24µm and 10.70±5.5, respectively. In contrast, samples from both field sites exhibited significantly greater evidence of genotoxic effects for both tests. The mean MN frequencies in the samples from Magangué and Lorica were 8.04±7.08 and 12.19±12.94, respectively. The mean tail length for samples from Magangué and Lorica were 5.78±3.18 and 15.46±7.39, respectively. Finally, the mean tail moment for samples from Magangué and

  7. Genotoxic responses of juvenile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) exposed to florfenicol and oxytetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, R G; Christofoletti, C A; Correia, J E; Ansoar, Y; Olinda, R A; Tornisielo, V L

    2015-08-01

    Florfenicol (FLC) and oxytetracycline (OTC) are the two most commonly used antibiotics for bacterial treatment in fish farming in Brazil, and because of their intensive use, the potential harmful effects on aquatic organisms are of great concern. This study evaluated the effects of environmental concentrations of FLC and OTC on the genetic material of juvenile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) erythrocytes by using the comet assay and the occurrence of micronuclei (MN) and other erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENAs) after exposure to 96hour. The comet assay showed that fish erythrocytes exhibited significantly higher DNA damage after exposure to environmental concentrations of FLC and OTC. Although MN was not observed, ENAs were significantly higher after exposure to FLC, indicating that ENAs are a better biomarker for FLC than MN. The results showed that environmental concentrations of FLC and OTC were genotoxic to erythrocytes of O. niloticus; however, future studies on DNA damage recovery are needed. PMID:25898970

  8. Assessment of status of three water bodies in Serbia based on tissue metal and metalloid concentration (ICP-OES) and genotoxicity (comet assay).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunjog, Karolina; Kolarević, Stoimir; Kračun-Kolarević, Margareta; Višnjić-Jeftić, Željka; Skorić, Stefan; Gačić, Zoran; Lenhardt, Mirjana; Vasić, Nebojša; Vuković-Gačić, Branka

    2016-06-01

    Metals and metalloids are natural components of the biosphere, which are not produced per se by human beings, but whose form and distribution can be affected by human activities. Like all substances, they are a contaminant if present in excess compared to background levels and/or in a form that would not normally occur in the environment. Samples of liver, gills, gonads and muscle from European chub, Squalius cephalus, were analyzed for Al, As, B, Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Mo, Sr and Zn using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) to highlight the importance of tissue selection in monitoring research. The comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was selected as an in vivo genotoxicity assay, a rapid and sensitive method for measuring genotoxic effects in blood, liver and gills of the European chub. Microscopic images of comets were scored using Comet IV Computer Software (Perceptive Instruments, UK). The objective of our study was to investigate two reservoirs, Zlatar and Garasi, and one river, Pestan by: (i) determining and comparing metal and metalloid concentrations in sediment, water and tissues of European chub: liver, gills, muscle and gonads (ii) comparing these findings with genotoxicity of water expressed through DNA damage of fish tissues. A clear link between the level of metals in water, sediment and tissues and between metal and genotoxicity levels at examined sites was not found. This suggests that other xenobiotics (possibly the organic compounds), contribute to DNA damage. PMID:27016612

  9. Genotoxicity of di-butyl-phthalate and di-iso-butyl-phthalate in human lymphocytes and mucosal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, N H; Wallner, B C; Kastenbauer, E R; Weissacher, H; Harréus, U A

    2001-01-01

    The genotoxicity of phthalates, widely used plasticizers, has been shown previously for di-butyl-phthalate (DBP) and di-iso-butyl-phthalate (DBP) in human mucosal cells of the upper aerodigestive tract in a previous study using the Comet assay. Furthermore, higher genotoxic sensitivities of patients with squamous cell carcinomas of either the larynx or the oropharynx compared to non-tumor patients were described. Other authors have demonstrated DNA damage by a different phthalate in human lymphocytes. It was the aim of the present study to determine whether there is a correlation between the genotoxic sensitivities to DBP and its isomer DiBP in either mucosal cells or lymphocytes. The single-cell microgel electrophoresis assay (Comet assay) was applied to detect DNA strand breaks in human epithelial cells of the upper aerodigestive tract (n=132 specimens). Human mucosa was harvested from the oropharynx in non-tumor patients and patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx. Laryngeal mucosa of patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas was harvested as well. Peripheral lymphocytes (n=49 specimens) were separated from peripheral blood. Xenobiotics investigated were DBP, DiBP, and N'methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) as positive control, respectively. For statistical analysis, the SPSS correlation analysis according to Pearson and the Wilcoxon test were performed. Genotoxicity was found for DBP and DiBP in epithelial cells and lymphocytes (Pintermediate correlation (r=0.570). Correlation in lymphocytes was the same (r=0.570). Phthalates have been investigated as a potential health hazard for a variety of reasons, including possible xenoestrogenic impact, peroxisome proliferation, and membrane destabilization. The present investigation suggests a correlated DNA-damaging impact of DBP and DiBP in human mucosal cells and in lymphocytes, respectively. PMID:11301413

  10. Comparison of the expression profiles induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of recently developed gene expression techniques using microarrays in toxicological studies (toxicogenomics) facilitate the interpretation of a toxic compound's mode of action and may also allow the prediction of selected toxic effects based on gene expression changes. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated whether carcinogens at doses known to induce liver tumors in the 2-year rat bioassay deregulate characteristic sets of genes in a short term in vivo study and whether these deregulated genes represent defined biological pathways. Male Wistar rats were dosed with the four nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens methapyrilene (MPy, 60 mg/kg/day), diethylstilbestrol (DES, 10 mg/kg/day), Wy-14643 (Wy, 60 mg/kg/day), and piperonylbutoxide (PBO, 1200 mg/kg/day). After 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, the livers were taken for histopathological evaluation and for analysis of the gene expression profiles on Affymetrix RGU34A arrays. The expression profile of the four nongenotoxic carcinogens were compared to the profiles of the four genotoxic carcinogens 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and aflatoxin B1 (AB1) from a similar study reported previously. By using statistical and clustering tools characteristically deregulated genes were extracted and functionally classified. Distinct cellular pathways were affected by the nongenotoxic carcinogens compared to the genotoxic carcinogens which at least partly correlated with the two-stage model of carcinogenesis. Characteristic to genotoxic carcinogens were a DNA damage response and the activation of proliferative and survival signaling. Nongenotoxic carcinogens showed responses to oxidative DNA or protein damage, as well as cell cycle progression and signs of regeneration. Many of the gene alterations found with the nongenotoxic carcinogens imply compound-specific mechanisms. Although neither a single gene nor a single pathway will be sufficient to

  11. Genotoxicity Testing on the International Space Station: Preparatory Work on the Experiment TRIPLE-LUX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojicic, N.; Walrafen, D.; Rabbow, E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Rettberg, P.; Weisshaar, M. P.; Horneck, G.

    Harmful environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to influence future manned space missions. The Radiation Biology Unit at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of recognizing DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such a bioassay is the SWITCH test, which is part of the German space experiment ``Gene, immune and cellular responses to single and combined space flight conditions'' (TRIPLE-LUX) which has been selected by NASA to be performed on the International Space Station. It will supply basic information on the genotoxic response to radiation applied in microgravity. The biological end-point under investigation will depend on the bacterial SOS response brought about by genetically modified bacteria that are transformed with the pSWITCH plasmid (constructed from the plasmids pPLS-1 and pGFPuv). This luminescent/fluorescent bioassay for rapid toxicity (genotoxicity and cytotoxicity) testing, the SWITCH test (SWITCH: {S}almonella {W}eighting of {I}nduced {T}oxicity {C}yto/GenoTox for Human {H}ealth), makes use of two sensing and reporting systems for the two biological endpoints under investigation: the SOS-Lux test and the LAC-Fluoro test. The SWICH plasmid carries the promoterless lux operon of Photobacterium leiognathi as reporter element under the control of the DNA-damage dependent SOS promoter of ColD as sensor element (for genotoxicity testing) and the sequences for a hybrid protein consisting of ß-galactosidase and GFPuv of Aequorea victoria as reporter element under the control of the (in Salmonella constitutively active) LAC promoter of Escherichia coli as sensor element (for cytotoxicity testing). The system has worked properly for terrestrial applications during the first experiments. Experiments using X-rays and UV radiation of various qualities (from UVC to UVA) have given insights into cellular mechanisms

  12. Comparison of the expression profiles induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens in rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun [Bayer Healthcare AG, Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Aprather Weg 18a, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)]. E-mail: heidrun.ellinger-ziegelbauer@bayerhealthcare.com; Stuart, Barry [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Wahle, Brad [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Bomann, Werner [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Ahr, Hans Juergen [Bayer Healthcare AG, Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Aprather Weg 18a, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2005-08-04

    Application of recently developed gene expression techniques using microarrays in toxicological studies (toxicogenomics) facilitate the interpretation of a toxic compound's mode of action and may also allow the prediction of selected toxic effects based on gene expression changes. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated whether carcinogens at doses known to induce liver tumors in the 2-year rat bioassay deregulate characteristic sets of genes in a short term in vivo study and whether these deregulated genes represent defined biological pathways. Male Wistar rats were dosed with the four nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens methapyrilene (MPy, 60 mg/kg/day), diethylstilbestrol (DES, 10 mg/kg/day), Wy-14643 (Wy, 60 mg/kg/day), and piperonylbutoxide (PBO, 1200 mg/kg/day). After 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, the livers were taken for histopathological evaluation and for analysis of the gene expression profiles on Affymetrix RG{sub U}34A arrays. The expression profile of the four nongenotoxic carcinogens were compared to the profiles of the four genotoxic carcinogens 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and aflatoxin B1 (AB1) from a similar study reported previously. By using statistical and clustering tools characteristically deregulated genes were extracted and functionally classified. Distinct cellular pathways were affected by the nongenotoxic carcinogens compared to the genotoxic carcinogens which at least partly correlated with the two-stage model of carcinogenesis. Characteristic to genotoxic carcinogens were a DNA damage response and the activation of proliferative and survival signaling. Nongenotoxic carcinogens showed responses to oxidative DNA or protein damage, as well as cell cycle progression and signs of regeneration. Many of the gene alterations found with the nongenotoxic carcinogens imply compound-specific mechanisms. Although neither a single gene nor a single pathway will be

  13. ATM and ATR:Sensing DNA damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Yang; Zheng-Ping Xu; Yun Huang; Hope E. Hamrick; Penelope J. Duerksen-Hughes; Ying-Nian Yu

    2004-01-01

    Cellular response to genotoxic stress is a very complex process, and it usually starts with the "sensing" or "detection" of the DNA damage, followed by a series of events that include signal transduction and activation of transcription factors. The activated transcription factors induce expressions of many genes which are involved in cellular functions such as DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, and cell death. There have been extensive studies from multiple disciplines exploring the mechanisms of cellular genotoxic responses, which have resulted in the identification of many cellular components involved in this process, including the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) cascade. Although the initial activation of protein kinase cascade is not fully understood,human protein kinases ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) are emerging as potential sensors of DNA damage. Current progresses in ATM/ATR research and related signaling pathways are discussed in this review, in an effort to facilitate a better understanding of genotoxic stress response.

  14. Genotoxic consequences of endogenous aldehydes on mouse haematopoietic stem cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaycoechea, Juan I; Crossan, Gerry P; Langevin, Frederic; Daly, Maria; Arends, Mark J; Patel, Ketan J

    2012-09-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) regenerate blood cells throughout the lifespan of an organism. With age, the functional quality of HSCs declines, partly owing to the accumulation of damaged DNA. However, the factors that damage DNA and the protective mechanisms that operate in these cells are poorly understood. We have recently shown that the Fanconi anaemia DNA-repair pathway counteracts the genotoxic effects of reactive aldehydes. Mice with combined inactivation of aldehyde catabolism (through Aldh2 knockout) and the Fanconi anaemia DNA-repair pathway (Fancd2 knockout) display developmental defects, a predisposition to leukaemia, and are susceptible to the toxic effects of ethanol-an exogenous source of acetaldehyde. Here we report that aged Aldh2(-/-) Fancd2(-/-) mutant mice that do not develop leukaemia spontaneously develop aplastic anaemia, with the concomitant accumulation of damaged DNA within the haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) pool. Unexpectedly, we find that only HSPCs, and not more mature blood precursors, require Aldh2 for protection against acetaldehyde toxicity. Additionally, the aldehyde-oxidizing activity of HSPCs, as measured by Aldefluor stain, is due to Aldh2 and correlates with this protection. Finally, there is more than a 600-fold reduction in the HSC pool of mice deficient in both Fanconi anaemia pathway-mediated DNA repair and acetaldehyde detoxification. Therefore, the emergence of bone marrow failure in Fanconi anaemia is probably due to aldehyde-mediated genotoxicity restricted to the HSPC pool. These findings identify a new link between endogenous reactive metabolites and DNA damage in HSCs, and define the protective mechanisms that counteract this threat. PMID:22922648

  15. Monitoring genotoxic exposure in uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent data from deep uranium mines in Czechoslovakia indicated that miners are exposed to other mutagenic factors in addition to radon daughter products. Mycotoxins were identified as a possible source of mutagens in these mines. Mycotoxins were examined in 38 samples from mines and in throat swabs taken from 116 miners and 78 controls. The following mycotoxins were identified from mines samples: aflatoxins B1 and G1, citrinin, citreoviridin, mycophenolic acid, and sterigmatocystin. Some mold strains isolated from mines and throat swabs were investigated for mutagenic activity by the SOS chromotest and Salmonella assay with strains TA100 and TA98. Mutagenicity was observed, especially with metabolic activation in citro. These data suggest that mycotoxins produced by molds in uranium mines are a new genotoxic factor im uranium miners. 17 refs., 4 tabs

  16. Evaluation of protective effect of amifostine on dacarbazine induced genotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Etebari, M.; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A.; Lame, V.

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer therapy with alkylating agents has been used for many years. Dacarbazine (DTIC) as an alkylating agent is used alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. In order to inhibit the formation of secondary cancers resulting from chemotherapy with DTIC, preventional strategies is necessary. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genoprotective effect of amifostine on the genotoxic effects of DTIC in cell culture condition. To determine the optimum genotoxic concentr...

  17. The in vivo genotoxicity studies on nivalenol and deoxynivalenol

    OpenAIRE

    Le Hégarat, Ludovic; Takakura, Natsuko; Simar, S; NESSLANY Fabrice; Fessard, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Nivalenol (NIV) and deoxynivalenol (DON) are structurally related mycotoxins produced by Fusarium fungi. These fungi typically infest cereal crops such as wheat, maize, barley, oats and rye, and NIV and DON are regularly found in cereal grains, food and feed. Recent risk assessments identified possible data gaps for both DON and NIV in particular with respect to genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. The overall objective of the project was to assess the genotoxicity of DON and NIV, including the ...

  18. DNA Damage Caused By Pesticide-contaminated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.KRISHNAMURTHI; S. SARAVANA DEVI; T. CHAKRABARTI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the DNA damaging potential and the genotoxicity of individual compounds in pesticide contaminated soil. Methods In the present study, DNA damaging potential of pesticide-contaminated soil and the genotoxicity of individual compounds present in the soil were assessed using fluorimetric analysis of DNA unwinding assay. Results The contaminated soil sample showed 79% (P<0.001) of DNA strand break, whereas technical grade of major carbaryl and α-naphthol constituents of the contaminated soil showed 64% (P<0.01) and 60% (P<0.02) damage respectively. Conclusion Our results indicate that the toxicity caused by contaminated soil is mainly due to carbaryl and α -napthol, which are the major constituents of the soil sample analyzed by GC-MS.

  19. Genotoxicity study of photolytically treated 2-chloropyridine aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2-Chloropyridine (2-CPY) has been identified as a trace organic chemical in process streams, wastewater and even drinking water. Furthermore, it appears to be formed as a secondary pollutant during the decomposition of specific insecticides. As reported in our previous work, 2-CPY was readily removed and slowly mineralised when subjected to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation at 254 nm. Moreover, 2-CPY was found to be genotoxic at 100 μg ml-1 but it was not genotoxic at or below 50 μg ml-1. In this work 2-CPY aqueous solutions were treated by means of UV irradiation at 254 nm. 2-CPY mineralisation history under different conditions is shown. 2-CPY was found to mineralise completely upon prolonged irradiation. Identified products of 2-CPY photolytic decomposition are presented. Solution genotoxicity was tested as a function of treatment time. Aqueous solution samples, taken at different photo-treatment times were tested in cultured human lymphocytes applying the cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. It was found that the solution was genotoxic even when 2-CPY had been practically removed. This shows that photo-treatment of 2-CPY produces genotoxic products. Upon prolonged irradiation solution genotoxicity values approached the control value.

  20. Non—Genotoxic Carcinogens.Approaches to Their Rish Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.A.CASTRO; M.I.DiazGomez; 等

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support the idea that most human cancers are related to chemicals present in the human environment.In turn,chemicals are believed to cause cancer via either genotoxic or non-genotoxic mechanisms.There were described in literature several simple rapid and inexpensive short term ests to reasonably predict the genotoxic nature of chemicals but in contrast,there is no reliable test or battery of tests available to predict the carcinogenicity of non-genotoxic compounds and this poses a major problem to their rish assessment.In addition,there are conflictive opinions about rish assessment needs for both classes of carcinogens.Some workers elieve that for non-genotoxic carcinogens,thresholds for exposure can be drawn while others do not.In this review,the reasons behind both of these opinions and the present hypotheses about the mechanism of action of non-genotoxic carcinogens are described and analyzed in relation to future needs.

  1. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of Fucus vesiculosus extract on cultured human lymphocytes using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleide Leite-Silva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fucales, Fucaceae was screened for its protective activity using doxorubicin-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. In this study, we assessed the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of three different concentrations (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 of F. vesiculosus aqueous extract using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays. Treatment of human lymphocyte cultures with 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 F. vesiculosus aqueous extract had no effect on the chromosome aberration frequency or on the extent of DNA damage detected by the Comet assay. The antigenotoxic effects of the extract were tested in human lymphocyte cultures treated with 15 µg mL-1 of doxorubicin, either alone or combined with the different concentrations of the extract, which was added to the cultures before, simultaneously with or after the doxorubicin. Only when lymphocytes were pre-treated with extract there was a reduction in doxorubicin-induced chromosome aberrations and DNA damage as detected by the Comet assay. These results demonstrate that F. vesiculosus aqueous extract is not genotoxic in cultured human lymphocytes and indicate that when added to lymphocyte cultures before doxorubicin it has antigenotoxic activity against doxorubicin-induced DNA damage.

  2. Genotoxicity of carbon nanofibers: are they potentially more or less dangerous than carbon nanotubes or asbestos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisin, E. R.; Murray, A.R.; Sargent, L.; Lowry, D.; Chirila, M.; Siegrist, K.J.; Schwegler-Berry, D.; Leonard, S.; Castranova, V.; Fadeel, B.; Kagan, V.E.; Shvedova, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The production of carbon nanofibers and nanotubes (CNF/CNT) and their composite products is increasing globally. CNF are generating great interest in industrial sectors such as energy production and electronics, where alternative materials may have limited performance or are produced at a much higher cost. However, despite the increasing industrial use of carbon nanofibers, information on their potential adverse health effects is limited. In the current study, we examine the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of carbon-based nanofibers (Pyrograf®-III) and compare this material with the effects of asbestos fibers (crocidolite) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The genotoxic effects in the lung fibroblast (V79) cell line were examined using two complementary assays: the comet assay and micronucleus (MN) test. In addition, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect the chromatin pan-centromeric signals within the MN indicating their origin by aneugenic (chromosomal malsegregation) or clastogenic (chromosome breakage) mechanisms. Cytotoxicity tests revealed a concentration- and time-dependent loss of V79 cell viability after exposure to all tested materials in the following sequence: asbestos>CNF>SWCNT. Additionally, cellular uptake and generation of oxygen radicals was seen in the murine RAW264.7 macrophages following exposure to CNF or asbestos but not after administration of SWCNT. DNA damage and MN induction were found after exposure to all tested materials with the strongest effect seen for CNF. Finally, we demonstrated that CNF induced predominately centromere-positive MN in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) indicating aneugenic events. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved in CNF-induced genotoxicity. PMID:21310169

  3. Genotoxicity of carbon nanofibers: Are they potentially more or less dangerous than carbon nanotubes or asbestos?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of carbon nanofibers and nanotubes (CNF/CNT) and their composite products is increasing globally. CNF are generating great interest in industrial sectors such as energy production and electronics, where alternative materials may have limited performance or are produced at a much higher cost. However, despite the increasing industrial use of carbon nanofibers, information on their potential adverse health effects is limited. In the current study, we examine the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of carbon-based nanofibers (Pyrograf (registered) -III) and compare this material with the effects of asbestos fibers (crocidolite) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The genotoxic effects in the lung fibroblast (V79) cell line were examined using two complementary assays: the comet assay and micronucleus (MN) test. In addition, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect the chromatin pan-centromeric signals within the MN indicating their origin by aneugenic (chromosomal malsegregation) or clastogenic (chromosome breakage) mechanisms. Cytotoxicity tests revealed a concentration- and time-dependent loss of V79 cell viability after exposure to all tested materials in the following sequence: asbestos > CNF > SWCNT. Additionally, cellular uptake and generation of oxygen radicals was seen in the murine RAW264.7 macrophages following exposure to CNF or asbestos but not after administration of SWCNT. DNA damage and MN induction were found after exposure to all tested materials with the strongest effect seen for CNF. Finally, we demonstrated that CNF induced predominately centromere-positive MN in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) indicating aneugenic events. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved in CNF-induced genotoxicity.

  4. Evaluation of impairment of DNA integrity in marine gastropods (Cronia contracta) as a biomarker of genotoxic contaminants in coastal water around Goa, West coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A; Gaitonde, Dipak C S; Sarkar, Amit; Vashistha, D; D'Silva, Classy; Dalal, S G

    2008-10-01

    The measurement of the impairment of DNA in marine gastropod (Cronia contracta) provides an insight into the genotoxic effects of contaminants on marine organisms along the Goa coast. The impact of genotoxic contaminants on Goan coastal environment was evaluated in terms of the loss of DNA integrity (expressed as the value of 'I') in marine snails with respect to those from the reference site (Palolem) over a period from April 2004 to May 2005 using the technique of alkaline unwinding assay. The DNA integrity in marine snails was found to be significantly damaged at Dona Paula (58%), Vasco (73.5%), and Velsao (48.5%) during the monsoon period (July-August 2004). Similar trend in the loss of DNA integrity in marine gastropods was also detected during the post-monsoon (November-December 2004) and the pre-monsoon (April-May 2005) periods. The low integrities of DNA in marine gastropods at these sites can be attributed to exposure to genotoxic contaminants especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and toxic heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Mn) prevalent in the marine environment as evident by their accumulation in the tissues of the marine snails inhabiting different sites along the Goa coast. The contaminant-induced DNA strand breaks in marine snails increased significantly at Dona Paula, Vasco, and Velsao clearly indicating the levels of contamination of the sites by genotoxic compounds in those regions. The genotoxic effects of contaminants were further substantiated by detection of the impairment (39%) of DNA integrity in marine snails in a field experiment in which the same species of marine snails (C. contracta) collected from the reference site, Palolem, were deployed at Dona Paula and caged for 25 days for exposure to ambient marine pollutants. The impairment of DNA integrity in marine gastropods along the Goa coast can thus act as a biomarker for marine pollution monitoring of genotoxic contaminants. PMID:18358533

  5. Genotoxicity Evaluation of Irrigative Wastewater from Shijiazhuang City in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuehui; Tang, Longmei; Yang, Lixue; Zhang, Xiaolin; Wang, Liqin; Yu, Fengxue; Liu, Yi; Chen, Qing; Liu, Dianwu

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the wastewater sample collected from the Dongming discharging river in Shijiazhuang city was analysed using both chemical analysis and biological assays including the Salmonella mutagenicity test, micronucleus test and single-cell gel electrophoresis. Chemical analysis of the sample was performed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The Salmonella mutagenicity test was performed on Salmonella typhimurium TA97, TA98, TA100 and TA102 strains with and without S9 mixture. The mice received the wastewater in natura through drinking water at concentrations of 25%, 50%, and 100%. One group of mice was exposed for 2 consecutive days, and the other group of mice was exposed for 15 consecutive days. To establish the levels of primary DNA damage, single-cell gel electrophoresis was performed on treated mouse liver cell. The concentrations of chromium and lead in the sample exceeded the national standard (GB20922-2007) by 0.78 and 0.43-fold, respectively. More than 30 organic compounds were detected, and some of the detected compounds were mutagens, carcinogens and environmental endocrine disrupters. A positive response for Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain was observed. Mouse exposure via drinking water containing 50% and 100% of wastewater for 15 consecutive days caused a significant increase of MN frequencies in a dose-response manner. Mouse exposure via drinking water containing 50% and 100% of wastewater for 15 consecutive days caused a significant increase of the Olive tail moments in a dose-response manner. All the results indicated that the sample from the Dongming discharging river in Shijiazhuang city exhibited genotoxicity and might pose harmful effects on the local residents. PMID:26658348

  6. Evaluation of smoking genotoxicity in Turkish young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Ayse G.; Durakbasi-Dursun, H. Gul; Demirel, Sennur; Acar, Aynur

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For the past few decades, it has been widely known in developed countries that tobacco is dangerous, but it is still insufficiently realized how big these dangers really are. AIMS: To determine and evaluate micronuclei (MN) frequencies of young smokers and nonsmokers in three different tissues (peripheric blood lymphoctes, buccal mucosa, and exfoliative urothelial cells) at the same time. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MN assay was performed on buccal mucosa, urothelial cells, and peripheric blood lymphocyte samples obtained from 15 healthy male smokers (>5 pack-years) and 15 healthy male nonsmoker controls who had not been exposed to any known genotoxic agent. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: The statistical differences between smoker and nonsmoker groups were calculated by using student t test. The differences between smoker-group tissues were compared by ANOVA. RESULTS: It was found that MN frequency (mean value ± standard deviation) in oral mucosa cells from smokers and controls were 1.20 ± 0.22% and 0.26 ± 0.10%; in urothelial exfoliative cells, 1.29 ± 0.28% and 0.12 ± 0.08%; in peripheric blood lymphocytes, 1.53 ± 0.23% and 0.38 ± 0.12%, respectively. The mean MN frequencies in buccal mucosa, urothelial exfoliative cells, and peripheric blood lymphocytes were significantly higher in smokers than in those of controls (P<0.05). All tissues were affected from smoking, but the most destructive effect was seen in urothelial cells of smokers (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that cigarette smoke is a DNA damage causitive agent on exfoliative buccal mucosa and urothelial cells and peripheric blood lymphocytes of young smokers, but it has most destructive effect on urothelial cells. PMID:21814336

  7. Genotoxicity Evaluation of Irrigative Wastewater from Shijiazhuang City in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehui Liu

    Full Text Available In the present study, the wastewater sample collected from the Dongming discharging river in Shijiazhuang city was analysed using both chemical analysis and biological assays including the Salmonella mutagenicity test, micronucleus test and single-cell gel electrophoresis. Chemical analysis of the sample was performed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The Salmonella mutagenicity test was performed on Salmonella typhimurium TA97, TA98, TA100 and TA102 strains with and without S9 mixture. The mice received the wastewater in natura through drinking water at concentrations of 25%, 50%, and 100%. One group of mice was exposed for 2 consecutive days, and the other group of mice was exposed for 15 consecutive days. To establish the levels of primary DNA damage, single-cell gel electrophoresis was performed on treated mouse liver cell. The concentrations of chromium and lead in the sample exceeded the national standard (GB20922-2007 by 0.78 and 0.43-fold, respectively. More than 30 organic compounds were detected, and some of the detected compounds were mutagens, carcinogens and environmental endocrine disrupters. A positive response for Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain was observed. Mouse exposure via drinking water containing 50% and 100% of wastewater for 15 consecutive days caused a significant increase of MN frequencies in a dose-response manner. Mouse exposure via drinking water containing 50% and 100% of wastewater for 15 consecutive days caused a significant increase of the Olive tail moments in a dose-response manner. All the results indicated that the sample from the Dongming discharging river in Shijiazhuang city exhibited genotoxicity and might pose harmful effects on the local residents.

  8. Genotoxic effect induced by a magnetic field of 200 micro tesla: experimental model in vivo; Efecto genotoxico inducido por un campo magnetico de 200 microteslas: modelo experimental in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya Navarro, I.; Alcaraz Saura, M.; Alcaraz Fernandez, M. D.; Olmos Ortiz, E.; Montalban Leon, F.; Sanchez Villalobos, J. M.; Alcaraz Banos, M.

    2011-07-01

    This study aims to determine the existence of a possible genotoxic (mutagenic) induced by continuous exposure to a magnetic field of 200 {+-} 20 {+-} Teslas and evaluate a possible protective effect of different antioxidants considered protective against chromosomal damage induced by ionizing radiation.

  9. Assessment of Cr(VI-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using high content analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad M Thompson

    Full Text Available Oral exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI] induces intestinal redox changes, villus cytotoxicity, crypt hyperplasia, and intestinal tumors in mice. To assess the effects of Cr(VI in a cell model relevant to the intestine, undifferentiated (proliferating and differentiated (confluent Caco-2 cells were treated with Cr(VI, hydrogen peroxide or rotenone for 2-24 hours. DNA damage was then assessed by nuclear staining intensity of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG and phosphorylated histone variant H2AX (γ-H2AX measured by high content analysis methods. In undifferentiated Caco-2, all three chemicals increased 8-OHdG and γ-H2AX staining at cytotoxic concentrations, whereas only 8-OHdG was elevated at non-cytotoxic concentrations at 24 hr. Differentiated Caco-2 were more resistant to cytotoxicity and DNA damage than undifferentiated cells, and there were no changes in apoptotic markers p53 or annexin-V. However, Cr(VI induced a dose-dependent translocation of the unfolded protein response transcription factor ATF6 into the nucleus. Micronucleus (MN formation was assessed in CHO-K1 and A549 cell lines. Cr(VI increased MN frequency in CHO-K1 only at highly cytotoxic concentrations. Relative to the positive control Mitomycin-C, Cr(VI only slightly increased MN frequency in A549 at mildly cytotoxic concentrations. The results demonstrate that Cr(VI genotoxicity correlates with cytotoxic concentrations, and that H2AX phosphorylation occurs at higher concentrations than oxidative DNA damage in proliferating Caco-2 cells. The findings suggest that in vitro genotoxicity of Cr(VI is primarily oxidative in nature at low concentrations. Implications for in vivo intestinal toxicity of Cr(VI will be discussed.

  10. Genotoxicity in child populations exposed to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs in the air from Tabasco, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldeco R. Gamboa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The economy of the state of Tabasco is based on oil extraction. However, this imposes major effects to the environment and communities. Examples are the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs that may be found in the soil, water and sediment of the region. Their volatility makes them available to living beings and results in genotoxic activity. The purpose of this study was to quantify the levels of PAHs in the air at several points in the state, and to analyze their relationship with possible damage to DNA on local inhabitants. Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis Assay (Comet Assay was applied to peripheral blood lymphocytes of five groups of children between six and 15 years of age. PAH samples were analyzed following US/EPA TO-13-A method. Results indicated the presence in the air of most of the 16 PAHs considered as high priority by EPA, some of which have been reported with carcinogenic activity. Differences (p<0.05 were found between PAHs concentration in the gaseous component and in the particulate component of air samples, with the greatest values for the gaseous component. Greatest PAH concentrations were detected in areas with high oil extraction activities. Children groups from high oil activity areas presented genotoxic damage labeled from moderate to high according to DNA migration from nuclei (Tail Length: 14.2 - 42.14 mm and Tail/Head: 0.97 - 2.83 mm compared with control group (12.25 and 0.63 mm, respectively. The group with greatest cell damage was located in the area with the greatest oil activity. We conclude that the presence of PAHs in the air may represent a health risk to populations that are chronically exposed to them at high oil activity regions.

  11. Extract of Lillium candidum L. Can Modulate the Genotoxicity of the Antibiotic Zeocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bryant

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Lilium candidum L. extract (LE is well known in folk medicine for the treatment of burns, ulcers, inflammations and for healing wounds. This work aims to clarify whether the genotoxic potential of the radiomimetic antibiotic zeocin (Zeo could be modulated by LE. Our results indicate that LE exerts no cytotoxic, DNA-damaging and clastogenic activity in in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Pisum sativum L. and Hordeum vulgare L. test systems over a broad concentration range. Weak but statistically significant clastogenic effects due to the induction of micronuclei and chromosome aberrations have been observed in H. vulgare L. after treatment with 200 and 300 μg/mL LE. To discriminate protective from adverse action of LE different experimental designs have been used. Our results demonstrate that the treatment with mixtures of LE and Zeo causes an increase in the level of DNA damage, micronuclei and “metaphases with chromatid aberrations” (MwA. Clear evidence has been also obtained indicating that pretreatment with LE given 4 h before the treatment with Zeo accelerates the rejoining kinetics of Zeo-induced DNA damage in P. sativum L. and C. reinhardtii, and can decrease clastogenic effect of Zeo measured as frequencies of micronuclei and MwA in H. vulgare L. Here, we show for the first time that LE can modulate the genotoxic effects of zeocin. The molecular mode of action strongly depends on the experimental design and varies from synergistic to protective effect (adaptive response–AR. Our results also revealed that LE-induced AR to zeocin involves up-regulation of DSB rejoining in C. reinhardtii and P. sativum L. cells.

  12. Uranium induces apoptosis and is genotoxic to normal rat kidney (NRK-52(E)) proximal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiebault, C.; Carriere, M.; Milgram, S.; Simon, A.; Avoscan, L.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, CNRS, UMR 9956, Lab Pierre Sue, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2007-07-01

    Uranium (U) is a heavy metal used in the nuclear industry and for military applications. U compounds are toxic. Their toxicity is mediated either by their radioactivity or their chemical properties. Mammalian kidneys and bones are the main organs affected by U toxicity. Although the most characteristic response to U exposure is renal dysfunction, little information is available on the mechanisms of its toxicity at the molecular level. This report studied the genotoxicity of U. Apoptosis induction in normal rat kidney (NRK-52(E)) proximal cells was investigated as a function of exposure time or concentrations (0-800 {mu}M). In parallel, DNA damage was evaluated by several methods. In order to distinguish between the intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis, caspases-8, -9, -10 assays were conducted and the mitochondrial membrane potential was measured. Three methods were selected for their complementarities in the detection of genetic lesions. The comet assay was used for the detection of primary lesions of DNA. {gamma}-H2AX immunostaining was achieved to detect DNA double-strand breaks. The micronucleus assay was used to detect chromosomic breaks or losses. DNA damage and apoptosis were observed in a concentration-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that U is genotoxic from 300 {mu}M and induces caspase dependent apoptosis cell death from 200 {mu}M mainly through the intrinsic pathway in NRK-52(E) cells. These results suggest that the DNA damage caused by U is reversible at low concentration (200-400 {mu}M) but becomes irreversible and leads to cell death for higher concentrations (500-800 {mu}M). (authors)

  13. The role of SOG1, a plant-specific transcriptional regulator, in the DNA damage response

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiyama, Kaoru O.; Kimura, Seisuke; Maki, Hisaji; Britt, Anne B.; Umeda, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Plants are inescapably exposed to environmental stress because of their sessile lifestyle. Such stress induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are in turn a source of genotoxic stress. ROS are also generated intrinsically during photosynthesis in the chloroplasts. Furthermore, plants are affected by the UV component of sunlight, which damages their genomes. To protect their genomic integrity from DNA damage, plants activate a DNA damage response (DDR) system that regula...

  14. Molecular and structural changes induced by essential oils treatments in Vicia faba roots detected by genotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, Elena; Boccia, Priscilla; Zanellato, Miriam; Meconi, Claudia; Donnarumma, Lucia; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Mecozzi, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increased interest in exploiting allelopathy in organic agriculture. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of essential oil mixtures in order to establish their allelopathic use in agriculture. Two mixtures of essential oils consisting respectively of tea tree oil (TTO) and clove plus rosemary (C + R) oils were tested. Phytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests on the root meristems of Vicia faba minor were performed. A phytotoxic influence was particularly relevant for C + R mixture, while genotoxicity tests revealed significant results with both C + R oil mixture and TTO. Phenotypic analysis on Vicia faba minor primary roots following C + R oil mixture treatment resulted in callose production, an early symptom attributed to lipid peroxidation. The approach described in this study, based on genotoxicity bioassays, might identify specific DNA damage induced by essential oil treatments. These tests may represent a powerful method to evaluate potential adverse effects of different mixtures of essential oils that might be useful in alternative agriculture. Future studies are focusing on the positive synergism of more complex mixtures of essential oils in order to reduce concentrations of potentially toxic components while at the same time maintaining efficacy in antimicrobial and antifungal management. PMID:26914511

  15. Genotoxicity assessment of propyl thiosulfinate oxide, an organosulfur compound from Allium extract, intended to food active packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado-García, P; Maisanaba, S; Puerto, M; Llana-Ruiz-Cabello, M; Prieto, A I; Marcos, R; Pichardo, S; Cameán, A M

    2015-12-01

    Essential oils from onion (Allium cepa L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and their main components, such as propyl thiosulfinate oxide (PTSO) are being intended for active packaging with the purpose of maintaining and extending food product quality and shelf life. The present work aims to assess for the first time the potential mutagenicity/genotoxicity of PTSO (0-50 µM) using the following battery of genotoxicity tests: (1) the bacterial reverse-mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium (Ames test, OECD 471); (2) the micronucleus test (OECD 487) (MN) and (3) the mouse lymphoma thymidine-kinase assay (OECD 476) (MLA) on L5178YTk(+/-), cells; and (4) the comet assay (with and without Endo III and FPG enzymes) on Caco-2 cells. The results revealed that PTSO was not mutagenic in the Ames test, however it was mutagenic in the MLA assay after 24 h of treatment (2.5-20 µM). The parent compound did not induce MN on mammalian cells; however, its metabolites (in the presence S9) produced positive results (from 15 µM). Data from the comet assay indicated that PTSO did not induce DNA breaks or oxidative DNA damage. Further in vivo genotoxicity tests are needed to confirm its safety before it is used as active additive in food packaging. PMID:26607106

  16. Genotoxic and immunotoxic potential effects of selected psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Emilie; Pédelucq, Julie; Fortier, Marlène; Brousseau, Pauline; Auffret, Michel; Budzinski, Hélène; Fournier, Michel

    2015-07-01

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceuticals towards aquatic invertebrates is still poorly understood and sometimes controversial. This study aims to document the in vitro genotoxicity and immunotoxicity of psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on Mytilus edulis. Mussel hemocytes were exposed to fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and erythromycin, at concentrations ranging from μg/L to mg/L. Paroxetine at 1.5 μg/L led to DNA damage while the same concentration of venlafaxine caused immunomodulation. Fluoxetine exposure resulted in genotoxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. In the case of antibiotics, trimethoprim was genotoxic at 200 μg/L and immunotoxic at 20 mg/L whereas erythromycin elicited same detrimental effects at higher concentrations. DNA metabolism seems to be a highly sensitive target for psychotropic drugs and antibiotics. Furthermore, these compounds affect the immune system of bivalves, with varying intensity. This attests the relevance of these endpoints to assess the toxic mode of action of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. PMID:25829077

  17. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  18. Genotoxicity test of propolis extract, mineral trioksida aggregat, and calcium hydroxide on fibroblast BHK-21 cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceples Dian Kartika W.P

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health industry has always used natural products as an alternative. Propolis, a natural antibiotic, is a resinous yellow brown or dark brown substance derived from honey bees (Apis mellifera. The main chemical compounds contained in propolis are flavonoids, phenolics and other various aromatic compounds. Flavonoids are well known plant compounds that have antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proprieties. Propolis is expected to be an alternative used for root canal treatment with lower toxicity compared to calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH2 . Over the last decade, a new material, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was developed, and has been used as the gold standard. All materials used in mouth should be biocompatible. The initial level of material biocompatibility evaluation involves toxicity and genotoxicity tests. Purpose: This research is aimed to conduct comparison test of genotoxicity effect of propolis extract, MTA and Ca(OH2 on fibroblast BHK-21 cell culture. Methods: This research was conducted with single-cell gel electrophoresis method. Results: The results indicate that propolis extract cannot cause DNA damage, while MTA can cause apoptosis and Ca(OH2 can cause neucrosis. Conclusion: It can be concluded that propolis extract has genotoxicity effect lower than MTA and Ca(OH2 , but MTA has lower effect on fibroblast BHK-21 cell culture.

  19. Does the crystal habit modulate the genotoxic potential of silica particles? A cytogenetic evaluation in human and murine cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, P; Nigro, M; Bernardeschi, M; Lucchesi, P; Scarcelli, V; Frenzilli, G

    2015-10-01

    Crystalline silica inhaled from occupational sources has been classified by IARC as carcinogenic to humans; in contrast, for amorphous silica, epidemiological and experimental evidence remains insufficient. The genotoxicity of crystalline silica is still debated because of the inconsistency of experimental results ("variability of silica hazard"), often related to the features of the particle surfaces. We have assessed the role of crystal habit in the genotoxicity of silica powders. Pure quartz (crystalline) and vitreous silica (amorphous), sharing the same surface features, were used in an in vitro study with human pulmonary epithelial (A549) and murine macrophage (RAW264.7) cell lines, representative of occupational and environmental exposures. Genotoxicity was evaluated by the comet and micronucleus assays, and cytotoxicity by the trypan blue method. Cells were treated with silica powders for 4 and 24h. Quartz but not vitreous silica caused cell death and DNA damage in RAW264.7 cells. A549 cells were relatively resistant to both powders. Our results support the view that crystal habit per se plays a pivotal role in modulating the biological responses to silica particles. PMID:26433261

  20. Genotoxicity of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 strain cannot be dissociated from its probiotic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olier, Maïwenn; Marcq, Ingrid; Salvador-Cartier, Christel; Secher, Thomas; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Boury, Michèle; Bacquié, Valérie; Pénary, Marie; Gaultier, Eric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Fioramonti, Jean; Oswald, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Oral administration of the probiotic bacterium Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 improves chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, but the molecular basis for this therapeutic efficacy is unknown. E. coli Nissle 1917 harbors a cluster of genes coding for the biosynthesis of hybrid nonribosomal peptide-polyketide(s). This biosynthetic pathway confers the ability for bacteria to induce DNA double strand breaks in eukaryotic cells. Here we reveal that inactivation of the clbA gene within this genomic island abrogated the ability for the strain to induce DNA damage and chromosomal abnormalities in non-transformed cultured rat intestinal epithelial cells but is required for the probiotic activity of E. coli Nissle 1917. Thus, evaluation of colitis severity induced in rodent fed with E. coli Nissle 1917 or an isogenic non-genotoxic mutant demonstrated the need for a functional biosynthetic pathway both in the amelioration of the disease and in the modulation of cytokine expression. Feeding rodents with a complemented strain for which genotoxicity was restored confirmed that this biosynthetic pathway contributes to the health benefits of the probiotic by modulating its immunomodulatory properties. Our data provide additional evidence for the benefit of this currently used probiotic in colitis but remind us that an efficient probiotic may also have side effects as any other medication. PMID:22895085

  1. Genotoxicity assessment of Copaiba oil and its fractions in Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mara Ribeiro; Darin, Joana D'Arc Castania; Hernandes, Lívia Cristina; de Souza Ramos, Mônica Freiman; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2012-07-01

    Copaiba oil-resin, extracted from the trunk of Copaifera, and traditionally used in folk medicine in the treatment of various disorders, has been shown to be an effective antiinflamatory, antitumor, antitetanus, antiseptic and anti-blenorrhagea agent. As, there are few studies evaluating its genotoxicity, this aspect of the commercial oil-resin, and its volatile and resinous fractions, were evaluated in mice by comet assay and micronucleus (MN) test. A single dose of oil resin, volatile or resin fractions (500; 1,000 or 2,000 mg/kg b.w.) was administered by gavage. The chemical compositions of Copaiba oil resin and its fractions was analyzed by gas chromatography. According to comet assaying, treatment with either one did not increase DNA damage, and as to MN testing, there was no alteration in the incidence of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. Chromatographic analysis of the oil-resin itself revealed sesquiterpenes, diterpenic carboxylic acid methyl esters and high levels of β-caryophyllene. Thus, it can be assumed that the oil resin and volatile and resinous fractions from the commercial product are not genotoxic or mutagenic. PMID:23055807

  2. Genotoxicity assessment of Copaiba oil and its fractions in Swiss mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Ribeiro Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Copaiba oil-resin, extracted from the trunk of Copaifera, and traditionally used in folk medicine in the treatment of various disorders, has been shown to be an effective antiinflamatory, antitumor, antitetanus, antiseptic and antiblenorrhagea agent. As, there are few studies evaluating its genotoxicity, this aspect of the commercial oil-resin, and its volatile and resinous fractions, were evaluated in mice by comet assay and micronucleus (MN test. A single dose of oil resin, volatile or resin fractions (500; 1,000 or 2,000 mg/kg b.w. was administered by gavage. The chemical compositions of Copaiba oil resin and its fractions was analyzed by gas chromatography. According to comet assaying, treatment with either one did not increase DNA damage, and as to MN testing, there was no alteration in the incidence of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. Chromatographic analysis of the oil-resin itself revealed sesquiterpenes, diterpenic carboxylic acid methyl esters and high levels of β-caryophyllene. Thus, it can be assumed that the oil resin and volatile and resinous fractions from the commercial product are not genotoxic or mutagenic.

  3. Benzophenone guttiferone A from Garcinia achachairu Rusby (Clusiaceae presents genotoxic effects in different cells of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Menezes Terrazas

    Full Text Available Benzophenones from natural sources and those of synthetic analogues present several reports of potent biological properties, and Guttiferone A represents a promising medicinal natural compound with analgesic and gastroprotective profiles. Considering that there are no reports that assess the genetic toxicity of Guttiferone A, the present study was undertaken to investigate the genotoxic potential of this benzophenone isolated from seeds of Garcinia achachairu in terms of DNA damage in different cells of Swiss albino mice using the comet assay, and its clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow cells in vivo by the micronucleus test. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring polychromatic (PCE and normochromatic (NCE erythrocytes ratio. Guttiferone A was administered by oral gavage at doses of 15, 30 and 60 mg/kg. The results showed that Guttiferone A produced genotoxic effects in leukocytes, liver, bone marrow, brain and testicle cells and clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow erythrocytes of mice. The PCE/NCE ratio indicated no cytotoxicity. Since guttiferone A is harmful to the genetic material we suggest caution in its use by humans.

  4. Genotoxic and Nongenotoxic Effects of Glycidyl Methacrylate on Human Lung Fibroblast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE-JUN YIN; FU-DE FANG; JIAN-NING XU; CHANG-QI ZOU; FENG-SHENG HE

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the genotoxic and nongenotoxic effects of short-term exposure to glycidyl mathacrylate (GMA) on human lung fibroblast cells (2BS cells) in vitro. Methods DNA strand breakage was determined by single cell gel electrophoresis, and DNA ladder formation assay and flow cytometric analysis were carried out to detect apoptic responses of cells to GMA exposure.The HPRT gene mutation assay was used to evaluate the mutagenicity, and the effect of GMA on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in the exposed cells was examined with the scrape loading/dye transfer technique. The ability of GMA to transform 2BS cells was also tested by an in vitro cell transformation assay. Results Exposure to GMA resulted in a dose-dependent increase in DNA strand breaks but not apoptic responses. GMA was also shown to significantly induce HPRT gene mutations and morphological transformation in 2BS cells in vitro. In contrast, GMA produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of GJIC. Conclusions GMA elicits both genotoxic and nongenotoxic effects on 2BS cells in vitro. The induction of DNA damage and gene mutations and inhibition of GJIC by GMA may casually contribute to GMA-induced cell transformation.

  5. Textile effluent induced genotoxic effects and oxidative stress in Clarias gariepinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoola, S O; Bassey, B O; Alimba, C G; Ajani, E K

    2012-09-01

    Human and ecological disorder experienced in industrial settlements as a result of improper disposal of chemicals such as textile effluent calls for careful surveillance on the state of the environment. This study investigated the toxicity of textile effluent discharge using biochemical and cytogenetic responses to ascertain the acute and sub lethal effects on Clarias gariepinus. The 96 h LC50 of C. gariepinus exposed to the textile effluent was 8.203 ml L(-1). Fourteen day exposures to 1, 2, 4 and 6 ml L(-1) doses were conducted and several toxicological endpoints were evaluated. Sub lethal genotoxicity and biochemical study was also carried out for fourteen days. The genotoxicity studies utilized micronucleus test while the biochemical studies quantified serum anti-oxidant status Total Protein (TP), Catalase (CAT), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Malondialdehyde (MDA) of the exposed fish. Toxicity factor indicates that the 96 h LC50 was significantly more toxic than the 24 h LC50 (p effluent at the tested concentrations induced micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities in the peripheral blood of exposed fish. Micronucleus, notch and binucleated cell formation were significant (p 0.05). The results obtained from this study showed that textile effluent increase cytogenetic damage and altered anti-oxidant status in C. gariepinus. Chemicals in the effluent can be bioaccumulated and biomagnified in the aquatic organism hence affecting man. PMID:24163963

  6. GFP tracking transcriptional activity endogenous p53: vector construction and application in genotoxicity detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Wei-sen; LUO Chen; XIE Wei-bing; CHEN Han-yuan

    2001-01-01

    To establish a sensitive.and specific system for genotoxicity detection in vivo. Methods: Endogenous p53 tracer vector p53RE was constructed by using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter to trace p53 transcriptional activity under the control of base SV40 early promoter. The tracer cells 3T3-REG were established by transfecting NIH3T3 cells with tracer vector and treated with ultraviolet, H202 and adriamycin to induce DNA damage and the subsequent endogenous p53 expression. The GFP expression and its green fluorescence in the tracer cells were observed and measured with fluorescent microscope and FACS. Results: The GFP expression increased rapidly after various treatment and reached the maximum 1 h later, and decreased gradually afterwards. FACS analysis showed that GFP expression in 3T3-REG tracer cells was consistent with the concentration of H202, while that in 3T3-SVG cells, which were transfected with control vector pSV-GFP, hardly increased in response to the treatment. Conclusion: GFP tracing p53 transcriptional activity is a sensitive and specific method for genotoxicity detection.

  7. Nandrolone androgenic hormone presents genotoxic effects in different cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Carolina Almeida; Gonçalves, Álvaro Luiz Martini; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero; Maistro, Edson Luis

    2012-10-01

    Nandrolone is an androgenic-anabolic steroid (AAS) with diverse medical applications but taken indiscriminately by some to rapidly increase muscle mass. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and clastogenic potential of nandrolone (deca-durabolin®) in vivo in different cells of mice, using the comet assay and micronucleus test, respectively. The animals received subcutaneous injection of the three doses of the steroid (1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg kg⁻¹ body weight). Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring 200 consecutive total polychromatic (PCE) and normochromatic (NCE) erythrocytes (PCE-NCE ratio). The results showed a significant dose-related increase in the frequency of DNA damage in leukocytes, liver, bone marrow, brain and testicle cells at the three tested doses and a significant increase of the micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes at all tested doses. Under our experimental conditions, the nandrolone steroid hormone showed genotoxic and clastogenic effects when administered subcutaneously to mice. PMID:21717486

  8. Isothiocyanate from the Tunisian radish (Raphanus sativus) prevents genotoxicity of Zearalenone in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah-Abbès, Jalila; Abbès, Samir; Ouanes, Zouhour; Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A; Bacha, Hassen; Oueslati, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a naturally occurring contaminant of animal feed that has been implicated in several mycotoxicoses in farm livestock. Recently some information has become available indicating that ZEN caused cancer or at least increased its prevalence, although the mechanism of action is unknown. Many papers mentioned that exposure to ZEN results in genotoxicity and DNA damage. Therefore, we investigated the chemo-preventive role of 4-(methylthio)-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC) extracted from Tunisian Raphanus sativus (radish) on the cytogenetic effect of ZEN in Balb/c mice and in in vitro cultures of mouse lymphocytes isolated from mouse spleen. We determined chromosome aberrations and micronuclei as well as the mitotic index and DNA fragmentation following ZEN treatment alone or in combination with MTBITC. This report is the first to provide evidence of a statistically significant decrease of structural chromosome aberrations and micronuclei associated with an augmentation of the mitotic index and prevention of DNA fragmentation in all mice treated with ZEN-MTBITC and in mouse lymphocyte cultures. The MTBITC alone was safe and succeeded in reducing the toxicity of ZEN by counteracting its deleterious effect, thus protecting against the genotoxicity and clastogenicity from ZEN. PMID:19501672

  9. General stress, detoxification pathways, neurotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluated in Ruditapes philippinarum exposed to human pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Martínez, Gabriela V; DelValls, T Angel; Martín-Díaz, M Laura

    2016-02-01

    A battery of biomarkers was evaluated on Ruditapes philippinarum exposed during 14 days to caffeine, ibuprofen, carbamazepine and novobiocin (0.1, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 50µgL(-1)). The battery included general stress (lysosomal membrane stability - LMS) analysed in the hemolymph, and biochemical biomarkers analysed in digestive gland tissues including: biomarkers of phase I (etoxyresorufin O-deethylase - EROD, dibenzylfluorescein dealkylase - DBF), phase II (gluthathione-S-transferase - GST), oxidative stress (gluthathione reductase - GR, gluthathione peroxidase - GPX, lipid peroxidation - LPO), neurotoxicity (acetylcholinesterase activity - AChE), and genotoxicity (DNA damage). Pharmaceuticals tested induced the sublethal responses (even at the environmental range 0.1µgL(-1)). At this low concentration; caffeine, ibuprofen and carbamazepine decreased the LMS significantly compared with controls (p<0.05). The four compounds induced significantly the detoxification metabolism and oxidative stress (p<0.05). Neurotoxicity was noticed in clams exposed to caffeine and carbamazepine (p<0.05). Ibuprofen, carbamazepine and novobiocin produced genotoxic effects (p<0.05). Results from this research validate the use of biomarkers when assessing the effects of pharmaceuticals within a marine environmental risk assessment framework, using as a laboratory bioassay model the species R. philippinarum. PMID:26436477

  10. In vitro cytogenetic and genotoxic effects of curcumin on human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastià, Natividad; Soriano, Jose M; Barquinero, Joan F; Villaescusa, Juan I; Almonacid, Miguel; Cervera, José; Such, Esperanza; Silla, María A; Montoro, Alegría

    2012-09-01

    Curcumin has shown a wide range of properties such as anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. Many of these effects, mainly the anti-carcinogenic effect, could be linked to its anti-oxidant effects. Nevertheless, some studies suggest that this natural compound possesses both pro- and anti-oxidative effects and that curcumin could be a genotoxic agent for some cell lines. We evaluated the genetic damage induced by curcumin to human lymphocytes exposed to increasing concentrations (0-50 μg/ml) of curcumin. Biomarkers such as chromosome aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) were analyzed. In addition to the cytogenetic analysis, the effect of curcumin in the cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) by the proliferation index (PI) was also analyzed. The results indicated that high concentrations of curcumin induced CAs, mainly acentric fragments. SCEs rate was not statistically different from the control group in any curcumin treated cell group. The PI of cells treated with 2 and 5 μg/ml of curcumin were statistically significant from the control group and finally, the MI showed a tendency to increase in all the concentrations of curcumin tested. In conclusion, it can be assumed that the higher concentrations of curcumin evaluated have a cyto and genotoxic effect, in vitro, for human peripheral lymphocytes. PMID:22713711

  11. Evaluation of genotoxic variations in plant model systems in a case of metal stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackova, Darinka Gjorgieva; Kadifkova-Panovska, Tatjana; Andonovska, Katerina Bačeva; Stafilov, Trajče

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of long term, high metal exposition (cadmium, lead, copper, nickel and zinc) on DNA damage in four plant model systems [Taraxacum officinale (Asteraceae), Matricaria recutita L. (Asteraceae), Robinia pseudoacacia L. (Fabaceae), and Urtica dioica (Urticaceae)]. DNA stability was investigated by a Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Agarose-gel electrophoresis revealed total of 37 bands with different molecular weights ranging from 1250 to 5000 bp. It generated distinctive polymorphism value of 72.97% (27 bands) total in four plant species investigated. The dendrogram constructed using NTSYSpc programme showed that there is grouping in separate clusters of the same plant model collected from two different areas (metal-exposed and control samples). The study concluded that the long term metal-exposing periods had genotoxic stress on macromolecules of plant model systems investigated and biomarkers used should be augmented for reliable estimates of genotoxicity after exposure of plants to metal stressors. PMID:26853058

  12. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of permethrin in mice: micronuclei analysis in peripheral blood erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Gislaine Cristina; de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa; Araujo, Andrea Mendez; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Mathias, Maria Izabel Camargo

    2012-12-01

    Pyrethroids such as permethrin are synthetic compounds widely used in the agriculture of many countries to combat plagues and in domestic products, such as acaricides. Not so long ago these chemicals were characterized as non-toxic for non-target organisms; however, recent studies have showed that these compounds could present toxic potential for many organisms. In this sense, this study presents genotoxic and mutagenic potential of permethrin administered intraperitoneally in mice under artificial conditions by the use of micronucleus assay in the peripheral blood of these animals. The mice were divided into five groups: group I = negative control (distilled water), group II = positive control (cyclophosphamide), group III = 30% of permethrin LD(50) (96 mg/kg), group IV = 50% of permethrin LD(50) (160 mg/kg), and group V = 80% of permethrin LD(50) (256 mg/kg). The peripheral blood was collected 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment. Results showed that all the tested permethrin dosages presented genotoxic and mutagenic effects 24 h after treatment, which would contradict the classification of this chemical product as moderately toxic, i.e., unable to cause damages to the cell DNA. PMID:22965619

  13. Assessing of genotoxicity of 16 centralized source-waters in China by means of the SOS/umu assay and the micronucleus test: initial identification of the potential genotoxicants by use of a GC/MS method and the QSAR Toolbox 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan; Weiwei, Jiang; Na, Li; Mei, Ma; Donghong, Wang; Zijian, Wang; Kaifeng, Rao

    2014-03-15

    Only few studies were conducted to assess genotoxicity of centralized source waters in China and almost none of them dealt with the causal relationship between the genotoxic effect and genotoxicants. In this work, 16 centralized source waters in China were sampled from five river systems and genotoxicity of their organic extracts was assessed by use of the SOS/umu test for DNA-damaging effect and the miniaturized flow cytometry-based micronucleus (MN) test for chromosome-damaging effect. In addition, initial identification of potential genotoxicants for the six samples from the Yangtze River was done with a GC/MS method and the QSAR toolbox 3.0. The results demonstrate that eight samples showed both indirect and direct DNA-damaging effects, another four samples showed only indirect DNA-damaging effects, while chromosome-damaging effects were found for 14 out of the 16 samples, in which aneugenic and clastogenic modes of action were found for 4 and 10 samples, respectively. Both direct/indirect DNA-damaging effects and chromosome-damaging effects were induced by the six Yangtze River samples, and the existing different types of genotoxicant confirmed the results. Furthermore, o-phenylphenol was initially identified as the major cause for the DNA-damaging effects while PAHs, pesticides, phenol and anthraquinone were identified as ubiquitous chromosome-damaging agents among these samples. In conclusion, a combination of the SOS/umu test and the miniaturized flow cytometry-based MN test to detect both DNA-damaging and chromosome-damaging effects could be used as a comprehensive genotoxicity assessment tool for the evaluation and classification of genotoxicity of complex mixtures, and potential genotoxicants can be initially identified with additional information from chemical analysis and the QSAR toolbox. PMID:24525378

  14. Chemopreventive effect of cactus Opuntia ficus indica on oxidative stress and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mansour Hédi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic agent. In aflatoxicosis, oxidative stress is a common mechanism contributing to initiation and progression of hepatic damage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE on aflatoxin B1-induced liver damage in mice by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA level, the protein carbonyls generation and the heat shock proteins Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 expressions in liver. We also looked for an eventual protective effect against AFB1-induced genotoxicity as determined by chromosome aberrations test, SOS Chromotest and DNA fragmentation assay. We further evaluated the modulation of p53, bax and bcl2 protein expressions in liver. Methods Adult, healthy balbC (20-25 g male mice were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 250 μg/Kg.b.w AFB1. Animals treated by AFB1 and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results clearly showed that AFB1 induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers. In addition, it has a genotoxic potential and it increased the expression of pro apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of bcl2. The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with AFB1, showed (i a total reduction of AFB1 induced oxidative damage markers, (ii an anti-genotoxic effect resulting in an efficient prevention of chromosomal aberrations and DNA fragmentation compared to the group treated with AFB1 alone (iii restriction of the effect of AFB1 by differential modulation of the expression of p53 which

  15. Logical network of genotoxic stress-induced NF-kappaB signal transduction predicts putative target structures for therapeutic intervention strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Naumann, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Rainer Poltz1, Raimo Franke1,#, Katrin Schweitzer1, Steffen Klamt2, Ernst-Dieter Gilles2, Michael Naumann11Institute of Experimental Internal Medicine, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; 2Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Magdeburg, Germany; #Present address: Department of Chemical Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, GermanyAbstract: Genotoxic stress is induced by a broad range of DNA-damaging agents and could lead to a ...

  16. Revision of OECD Guidelines for Genotoxicity Testing: Current Status and Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past 30 years, assays have been developed to evaluate chemical genotoxicity. OECD Genotoxicity Test Guidelines (TG) describe assay procedures for regulatory safety testing. Since the last OECD TG revision (1997), there has been tremendous scientific and technological pro...

  17. Effect of particle size and dispersion status on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of zinc oxide in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Joanna; Catalán, Julia; Järventaus, Hilkka; Lindberg, Hanna K; Suhonen, Satu; Vippola, Minnamari; Stępnik, Maciej; Norppa, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Data available on the genotoxicity of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) are controversial. Here, we examined the effects of particle size and dispersion status on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nanosized and fine ZnO, in the presence and absence of bovine serum albumin (BSA; 0.06%) in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells. Dynamic light scattering analysis showed the most homogenous dispersions in water alone for nanosized ZnO and in water with BSA for fine ZnO. After a 48-h treatment, both types of ZnO were cytotoxic within a similar, narrow dose range (1.5-3.0μg/cm(2)) and induced micronuclei at a near toxic dose range (1.25-1.75μg/cm(2)), both with and without BSA. In the comet assay, nanosized ZnO (1.25-1.5μg/cm(2)), in the absence of BSA, caused a statistically significant increase in DNA damage after 3-h and 6-h treatments, while fine ZnO did not. Our findings may be explained by better uptake or faster intracellular dissolution of nanosized ZnO without BSA during short treatments (3-6h; the comet assay), with less differences between the two ZnO forms after longer treatments (>48h; the in vitro micronucleus test). As ZnO is genotoxic within a narrow dose range partly overlapping with cytotoxic doses, small experimental differences e.g. in the dispersion of ZnO particles may have a substantial effect on the genotoxicity of the nominal doses added to the cell culture. PMID:27402478

  18. Polyvinyl polypyrrolidone attenuates genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles synthesized via green route, tested in Lathyrus sativus L. root bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Kamal K; Achary, V Mohan M; Phaomie, Ganngam; Sahu, Hrushi K; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Panda, Brahma B

    2016-08-01

    The silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized extracellularly from silver nitrate (AgNO3) using kernel extract from ripe mango Mengifera indica L. under four different reaction conditions of the synthesis media such as the (i) absence of the reducing agent, trisodium citrate (AgNPI), (ii) presence of the reducing agent (AgNPII), (iii) presence of the cleansing agent, polyvinyl polypyrrolidone, PVPP (AgNPIII), and (iv) presence of the capping agent, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, PVP (AgNPIV). The synthesis of the AgNPs was monitored by UV-vis spectrophotometry. The AgNPs were characterised by the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Functional groups on the AgNPs were established by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The AgNPs (AgNPI, AgNPII, AgNPIII and AgNPIV) were spherical in shape with the diameters and size distribution-widths of 14.0±5.4, 19.2±6.6, 18.8±6.6 and 44.6±13.2nm, respectively. Genotoxicity of the AgNPs at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100mgL(-1) was determined by the Lathyrus sativus L. root bioassay and several endpoint assays including the generation of reactive oxygen species and cell death, lipid peroxidation, mitotic index, chromosome aberrations (CA), micronucleus formation (MN), and DNA damage as determined by the Comet assay. The dose-dependent induction of genotoxicity of the silver ion (Ag(+)) and AgNPs was in the order Ag(+)>AgNPII>AgNPI>AgNPIV>AgNPIII that corresponded with their relative potencies of induction of DNA damage and oxidative stress. Furthermore, the findings underscored the CA and MN endpoint-based genotoxicity assay which demonstrated the genotoxicity of AgNPs at concentrations (≤10mgL(-1)) lower than that (≥10mgL(-1)) tested in the Comet assay. This study demonstrated the protective action of PVPP against the genotoxicity of AgNPIII which was independent of the size of the AgNPs in the L. sativus L. root bioassay

  19. DNA topoisomerase II, genotoxicity, and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type II topoisomerases are ubiquitous enzymes that play essential roles in a number of fundamental DNA processes. They regulate DNA under- and overwinding, and resolve knots and tangles in the genetic material by passing an intact double helix through a transient double-stranded break that they generate in a separate segment of DNA. Because type II topoisomerases generate DNA strand breaks as a requisite intermediate in their catalytic cycle, they have the potential to fragment the genome every time they function. Thus, while these enzymes are essential to the survival of proliferating cells, they also have significant genotoxic effects. This latter aspect of type II topoisomerase has been exploited for the development of several classes of anticancer drugs that are widely employed for the clinical treatment of human malignancies. However, considerable evidence indicates that these enzymes also trigger specific leukemic chromosomal translocations. In light of the impact, both positive and negative, of type II topoisomerases on human cells, it is important to understand how these enzymes function and how their actions can destabilize the genome. This article discusses both aspects of human type II topoisomerases

  20. Genotoxicity of drinking water from Chao Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q.; Jiao, Q.C. [Nanjing Univ. (China). Dept. of Biological Science and Technology; Huang, X.M.; Jiang, J.P.; Cui, S.Q.; Yao, G.H.; Jiang, Z.R.; Zhao, H.K.; Wang, N.Y. [Anhui Antiepidemic Station, Hefei (China)

    1999-02-01

    Genotoxic activity appears to originate primarily from reactions of chlorine with humic substances in the source waters. Comparisons of extracts of settled versus chlorinated water have confirmed that chlorinating during water treatment produces mutagenic activity in the mutagenicity tests. Present work on XAD-2 extracts of raw, chlorinated (treated), and settled water from the Chao Lake region of China has involved a battery of mutagenicity assays for various genetic endpoints: the Salmonella test, the sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) induction in Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cells, and the micronucleus (MN) induction in the peripheral blood erythrocytes of silver carp. Extracts of raw and treated water but not the settled water are mutagenic in the Salmonella assay. On the other hand, extracts of three water samples show activity in the SCE and MN assays, especially the raw and treated water. These data show that contamination and chlorinating contribute mutagens to drinking water and suggest that the mammalian assays may be more sensitive for detecting mutagenicity in aquatic environment than the Salmonella test.

  1. Integration of genotoxicity and population genetic analyses in kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) exposed to radionuclide contamination at the Nevada Test Site, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakis, Christopher W.; Bickham, John W.; Lamb, Trip; Medica, Philip A.; Lyne, T. Barrett

    2001-01-01

    We examined effects of radionuclide exposure at two atomic blast sites on kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, USA, using genotoxicity and population genetic analyses. We assessed chromosome damage by micronucleus and flow cytometric assays and genetic variation by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analyses. The RAPD analysis showed no population structure, but mtDNA exhibited differentiation among and within populations. Genotoxicity effects were not observed when all individuals were analyzed. However, individuals with mtDNA haplotypes unique to the contaminated sites had greater chromosomal damage than contaminated-site individuals with haplotypes shared with reference sites. When interpopulation comparisons used individuals with unique haplotypes, one contaminated site had greater levels of chromosome damage than one or both of the reference sites. We hypothesize that shared-haplotype individuals are potential migrants and that unique-haplotype individuals are potential long-term residents. A parsimony approach was used to estimate the minimum number of migration events necessary to explain the haplotype distributions on a phylogenetic tree. The observed predominance of migration events into the contaminated sites supported our migration hypothesis. We conclude the atomic blast sites are ecological sinks and that immigration masks the genotoxic effects of radiation on the resident populations.

  2. Inhibition of TGFbeta1 Signaling Attenutates ATM Activity inResponse to Genotoxic Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirshner, Julia; Jobling, Michael F.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Glick, Adam B.; Lavin, Martin J.; Koslov, Sergei; Shiloh, Yosef; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2006-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage that elicits a cellular program of damage control coordinated by the kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM). Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}), which is activated by radiation, is a potent and pleiotropic mediator of physiological and pathological processes. Here we show that TGF{beta} inhibition impedes the canonical cellular DNA damage stress response. Irradiated Tgf{beta}1 null murine epithelial cells or human epithelial cells treated with a small molecule inhibitor of TGF{beta} type I receptor kinase exhibit decreased phosphorylation of Chk2, Rad17 and p53, reduced {gamma}H2AX radiation-induced foci, and increased radiosensitivity compared to TGF{beta} competent cells. We determined that loss of TGF{beta} signaling in epithelial cells truncated ATM autophosphorylation and significantly reduced its kinase activity, without affecting protein abundance. Addition of TGF{beta} restored functional ATM and downstream DNA damage responses. These data reveal a heretofore undetected critical link between the microenvironment and ATM that directs epithelial cell stress responses, cell fate and tissue integrity. Thus, TGF{beta}1, in addition to its role in homoeostatic growth control, plays a complex role in regulating responses to genotoxic stress, the failure of which would contribute to the development of cancer; conversely, inhibiting TGF{beta} may be used to advantage in cancer therapy.

  3. Genotoxic effect of gamma radiation in vivo rats as evaluated by comet assay and micronucleus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA is one of the most critical site of damage induced by UV, gamma radiation and other the environmental chemical pollutants. Genotoxic evaluation of environmental agents is generally carried out using cytogenetic markers like chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei formation. During the recent years Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis/Comet Assay, has emerged as one of the most powerful assays to detect DNA damage at molecular level in any eukaryotic cell. Present studies were undertaken to investigate the effect of gamma radiation at DNA and chromosomal level using comet assay and micronucleus test. Female Wistar rats were exposed to gamma radiation using 60Co Teletherapy machine; 0.125, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 Gy at a dose rate of 0.33 Gy/min. Blood and bone marrow samples were processed for comet assay using the standard protocol. Bone marrow cells from femur bone were also processed for micronucleus assay. Results of these studies indicated a dose dependent increase in DNA damage as indicated by increase in tail length (TL), tail moment (TM) and % DNA in tail (% DNA- T). Similarly, a dose dependent increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (mn-PCEs) was also observed. A good correlation between, DNA damage and the induction of micronucleated erythrocytes was observed. (author)

  4. genotoxicity of the pesticide dichlorvos and herbicide butachlor on rana zhenhaiensis tadpoles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    genotoxicity of dichlorvos and butachlor on erythrocytes of rana zhenhaiensis tadpoles was investigated by the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay or comet assay.tadpoles were treated for 24 h in the laboratory with different concentrations of the testing agents,2.256,4.512,6.768,9.024,11.280 mg/l for dichlorvos and 0.292,0.584,0.876,1.168,1.460 mg/l for butachlor,to use the comet assay to test for the significance of dosage responsiveness to an increase in dna damage,as measured by the mean dna tail length-to-width ratio.the concentrations of 4.512 mg/l dichlorvos and 0.876 mg/l butachlor resulted in highly significant increases in dna damage of the tadpoles.there were linear correlations between the mean dna tail length-to-width ratio and the concentrations of the two test substances.our results showed that the two commonly used agricultural chemicals caused dose dependent dna damage of amphibians,and that comet assay might be a useful tool for measuring dna damage of tadpoles exposed in the field.

  5. In vivo genotoxicity of furan in F344 rats at cancer bioassay doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furan, a potent rodent liver carcinogen, is found in many cooked food items and thus represents a human cancer risk. Mechanisms for furan carcinogenicity were investigated in male F344 rats using the in vivo Comet and micronucleus assays, combined with analysis of histopathological and gene expression changes. In addition, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III (EndoIII)-sensitive DNA damage was monitored as a measure of oxidative DNA damage. Rats were treated by gavage on four consecutive days with 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg bw furan, doses that were tumorigenic in 2-year cancer bioassays, and with two higher doses, 12 and 16 mg/kg. Rats were killed 3 h after the last dose, a time established as producing maximum levels of DNA damage in livers of furan-treated rats. Liver Comet assays indicated that both DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines increased in a near-linear dose-responsive fashion, with statistically significant increases detected at cancer bioassay doses. No DNA damage was detected in bone marrow, a non-target tissue for cancer, and peripheral blood micronucleus assays were negative. Histopathological evaluation of liver from furan-exposed animals produced evidence of inflammation, single-cell necrosis, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. In addition, genes related to apoptosis, cell-cycle checkpoints, and DNA-repair were expressed at a slightly lower level in the furan-treated livers. Although a mixed mode of action involving direct DNA binding cannot be ruled out, the data suggest that furan induces cancer in rat livers mainly through a secondary genotoxic mechanism involving oxidative stress, accompanied by inflammation, cell proliferation, and toxicity. -- Highlights: ► Furan is a potent rodent liver carcinogen and represents a human cancer risk. ► Furan induces DNA damage in rat liver at cancer bioassay doses. ► Furan induces oxidative stress, inflammation and cell proliferation in rat liver. ► Expression of

  6. In vivo genotoxicity of furan in F344 rats at cancer bioassay doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Wei, E-mail: Wei.Ding@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Petibone, Dayton M. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Latendresse, John R. [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Pearce, Mason G. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Muskhelishvili, Levan; White, Gene A. [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Chang, Ching-Wei [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Mittelstaedt, Roberta A.; Shaddock, Joseph G.; McDaniel, Lea P. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Doerge, Daniel R. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Morris, Suzanne M.; Bishop, Michelle E.; Manjanatha, Mugimane G.; Aidoo, Anane; Heflich, Robert H. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Furan, a potent rodent liver carcinogen, is found in many cooked food items and thus represents a human cancer risk. Mechanisms for furan carcinogenicity were investigated in male F344 rats using the in vivo Comet and micronucleus assays, combined with analysis of histopathological and gene expression changes. In addition, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III (EndoIII)-sensitive DNA damage was monitored as a measure of oxidative DNA damage. Rats were treated by gavage on four consecutive days with 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg bw furan, doses that were tumorigenic in 2-year cancer bioassays, and with two higher doses, 12 and 16 mg/kg. Rats were killed 3 h after the last dose, a time established as producing maximum levels of DNA damage in livers of furan-treated rats. Liver Comet assays indicated that both DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines increased in a near-linear dose-responsive fashion, with statistically significant increases detected at cancer bioassay doses. No DNA damage was detected in bone marrow, a non-target tissue for cancer, and peripheral blood micronucleus assays were negative. Histopathological evaluation of liver from furan-exposed animals produced evidence of inflammation, single-cell necrosis, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. In addition, genes related to apoptosis, cell-cycle checkpoints, and DNA-repair were expressed at a slightly lower level in the furan-treated livers. Although a mixed mode of action involving direct DNA binding cannot be ruled out, the data suggest that furan induces cancer in rat livers mainly through a secondary genotoxic mechanism involving oxidative stress, accompanied by inflammation, cell proliferation, and toxicity. -- Highlights: ► Furan is a potent rodent liver carcinogen and represents a human cancer risk. ► Furan induces DNA damage in rat liver at cancer bioassay doses. ► Furan induces oxidative stress, inflammation and cell proliferation in rat liver. ► Expression of

  7. Red mud a byproduct of aluminum production contains soluble vanadium that causes genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mišík, Miroslav [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Burke, Ian T. [Earth Surface Science Institute, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Reismüller, Matthias; Pichler, Clemens; Rainer, Bernhard [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Mišíková, Katarina [Department of Botany, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Mayes, William M. [Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, University of Hull, Scarborough YO11 3AZ (United Kingdom); Knasmueller, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried.knasmueller@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Red mud (RM) is a byproduct of aluminum production; worldwide between 70 and 120 million tons is produced annually. We analyzed RM which was released in the course of the Kolontar disaster in Hungary into the environment in acute and genotoxicity experiments with plants which are widely used for environmental monitoring. We detected induction of micronuclei which reflect chromosomal damage in tetrads of Tradescantia and in root cells of Allium as well as retardation of root growth with contaminated soils and leachates. Chemical analyses showed that RM contains metals, in particular high concentrations of vanadium. Follow-up experiments indicated that vanadate causes the effects in the plants. This compound causes also in humans DNA damage and positive results were obtained in carcinogenicity studies. Since it was found also in RM from other production sites our findings indicate that its release in the environment is a global problem which should be studied in more detail. Capsule abstract: Our findings indicate that the red mud causes genotoxic effect in plants probably due to the presence of vanadate which is contained at high concentrations in the residue. - Highlights: • Red mud, a by-product of aluminum production, causes DNA-damage in higher plants. • We showed that this effect is caused by vanadate a known carcinogenic genotoxin. • Vanadate is contained in high concentrations in the residue. • Release of red mud may cause adverse effects in ecosystems and affect human health.

  8. The application of the comet assay to assess the genotoxicity of environmental pollutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanikia, Soudabeh; Galea, Francesca; Nagy, Eszter; Phillips, David H; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Arlt, Volker M

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to establish a protocol for cell dissociation from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) to assess the genotoxicity of the environmental pollutant benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) using the alkaline version of the single cell electrophoresis assay (comet assay). BaP genotoxicity was assessed in C. elegans (wild-type [WT]; N2, Bristol) after 48h exposure (0-40μM). Induction of comets by BaP was concentration-dependent up to 20μM; comet% tail DNA was ∼30% at 20μM BaP and ∼10% in controls. Similarly, BaP-induced DNA damage was evaluated in C. elegans mutant strains deficient in DNA repair. In xpa-1 and apn-1 mutants BaP-induced comet formation was diminished to WT background levels suggesting that the damage formed by BaP that is detected in the comet assay is not recognised in cells deficient in nucleotide and base excision repair, respectively. In summary, our study provides a protocol to evaluate DNA damage of environmental pollutants in whole nematodes using the comet assay. PMID:27389785

  9. Red mud a byproduct of aluminum production contains soluble vanadium that causes genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red mud (RM) is a byproduct of aluminum production; worldwide between 70 and 120 million tons is produced annually. We analyzed RM which was released in the course of the Kolontar disaster in Hungary into the environment in acute and genotoxicity experiments with plants which are widely used for environmental monitoring. We detected induction of micronuclei which reflect chromosomal damage in tetrads of Tradescantia and in root cells of Allium as well as retardation of root growth with contaminated soils and leachates. Chemical analyses showed that RM contains metals, in particular high concentrations of vanadium. Follow-up experiments indicated that vanadate causes the effects in the plants. This compound causes also in humans DNA damage and positive results were obtained in carcinogenicity studies. Since it was found also in RM from other production sites our findings indicate that its release in the environment is a global problem which should be studied in more detail. Capsule abstract: Our findings indicate that the red mud causes genotoxic effect in plants probably due to the presence of vanadate which is contained at high concentrations in the residue. - Highlights: • Red mud, a by-product of aluminum production, causes DNA-damage in higher plants. • We showed that this effect is caused by vanadate a known carcinogenic genotoxin. • Vanadate is contained in high concentrations in the residue. • Release of red mud may cause adverse effects in ecosystems and affect human health

  10. Studies on the genotoxicity of endosulfan in different tissues of fresh water fish Mystus vittatus using the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shilpi; Nagpure, N S; Kumar, Ravindra; Pandey, Sanjay; Srivastava, Satish K; Singh, Poonam J; Mathur, P K

    2007-11-01

    Endosulfan, a widely used organochlorine pesticide, is readily bio-accumulative in fishes and can be indirectly harmful to human populations. Limited efforts have been made to study long-term genotoxic effects of endosulfan in different tissues of fish using gentoxicity biomarkers. Therefore, the current investigation was undertaken to detect single-cell DNA strand breaks induced by endosulfan in the fresh water teleost fish Mystus vittatus using the comet assay. The LC(50) value of technical grade endosulfan was first determined for the fish species in a semistatic system, and on the basis of the LC(50) value, the sublethal and nonlethal concentrations were determined. The DNA damage was measured in gill, kidney, and erythrocytes as the percentage of DNA in comet tails of fish specimens exposed to the sublethal and nonlethal concentrations of endosulfan. In general, significant effects (p < 0.01) from both concentration and time of exposure were observed in exposed fishes. It was found that all the tissues at all concentrations exhibited the highest DNA damage on day 1, after which there was a nonlinear decline in the percentage of tail DNA. The comparison of DNA damage among the tissues at different concentrations could not show the sensitivity of particular tissue to endosulfan. The current study explored the utility of the comet assay for in vivo laboratory studies using fish species to screen the genotoxic potential of chemical agents. PMID:17713809

  11. Bioaccumulation of nickel and its biochemical and genotoxic effects on juveniles of the neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Francine F; Risso, Wagner E; Simonato, Juliana D; Martinez, Claudia B R

    2015-06-01

    Juveniles of the freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus were exposed to three concentrations of nickel (Ni): 25, 250 and 2500 µg L(-1) or water only for periods of 24 and 96 h to test for Ni bioaccumulation, its effects on antioxidant defenses and metallothioneins, and the occurrence of DNA damage. After exposure, the fish were sampled and tissue removed from the gills, liver, kidney and muscle to test for Ni accumulation and conduct biochemical (gills and liver) and genotoxic (blood cells and gills) analyses. The results showed that Ni accumulates in the organs in different proportions (kidney>liver>gills>muscle) and accumulation varied according to exposure time. Metallothionein (MT) levels increased in the liver and gills after exposure to Ni, implying that the presence of Ni in these tissues could induce MT synthesis. We also observed that Ni exposure affected antioxidant defenses, increasing lipid peroxidation in the liver of fish exposed to Ni for 96 h at the highest concentration tested. DNA damage increased in both blood cells and gills of fish exposed to all Ni concentrations, indicating the genotoxic potential of Ni on fish. We therefore concluded that Ni accumulates in various tissues and results in oxidative and DNA damage in P. lineatus, and that the maximum permitted Ni concentration set in Brazilian legislation (25 µg L(-1)) for freshwaters is not safe for this species. PMID:25744913

  12. Analysis of Delphinidin and Luteolin Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocyte Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Ezić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bioflavonoids delphinidin (2-(3,4,5-Trihydroxyphenylchromenylium-3,5,7-triol and luteolin (2-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl-5,7-dihydroxy-4-chromenone have been recognized as promising antioxidants and anticancer substances. Due to their extensive use, the goal of the research was to determine whether they have any genotoxic potential in vitro.Methods: Analysis of genotoxic potential was performed applying chromosome aberrations test in human lymphocyte culture, as this kind of research was not conducted abundantly for these two bioflavonoids. Delphinidin and luteolin were dissolved in DMSO and added to cultures in final concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 μM.Results: In human lymphocytes cultures Delphinidin induced PCDs in all treatments, potentially affecting the cell cycle and topoisomerase II activity. In concentration of 50 μM luteolin showed strong genotoxic effects and caused significant reduction of cell proliferation.Conclusion: Luteolin exhibited certain genotoxic and cytostatic potential. Delphinidin was not considered genotoxic, however its impact on mitosis, especially topoisomerase II activity, was revealed.

  13. In vivo protective activity of Styrax camporum hydroalcoholic extract against genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin and methyl methanesulfonate in the micronucleus and comet assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francielli de Oliveira, Pollyanna; Furtado, Ricardo Andrade; Acésio, Nathália Oliveira; Leandro, Luís Fernando; Montanheiro, Giovanna; de Pádua, Francisnéia Corrêa; Corrêa, Mariana Beltrame; Braguini, Caio Guedes; Pauletti, Patrícia Mendonça; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2012-12-01

    Styrax camporum Pohl is a tall shrub or a tree with small white flowers, which grows in the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais and is popularly used for the treatment of gastroduodenal diseases. Considering this last fact, the aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of S. camporum hydroalcoholic extract and its influence on genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin and methyl methanesulfonate in Swiss mice using the micronucleus and comet assays, respectively. The animals were treated by gavage with different doses of the extract (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg body weight). For antigenotoxicity assessment, different doses of the S. camporum extract were administered simultaneously with doxorubicin (micronucleus test; 15 mg/kg) and methanesulfonate (comet assay; 40 mg/kg). The results showed that the S. camporum extract itself was not genotoxic in the mouse micronucleus or comet assay. The number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes was significantly lower in animals treated with the S. camporum extract and doxorubicin when compared to animals treated only with doxorubicin. In the comet assay, the S. camporum extract, at the doses tested, significantly reduced the extent of DNA damage in liver cells induced by methanesulfonate. The putative activity of the active compounds of S. camporum extract may explain the effect of this plant on genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin and methanesulfonate. PMID:23254694

  14. Genotoxicity of Water Contaminants from the Basin of Lake Sevan, Armenia Evaluated by the Comet Assay in Gibel Carp (Carassius auratus gibelio) and Tradescantia Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Anna; Gabrielyan, Barduch; Minasyan, Seyran; Hovhannisyan, Galina; Aroutiounian, Rouben

    2016-03-01

    Combination of bioassays and chemical analysis was applied to determine the genotoxic/mutagenic contamination in four different sites of the basin of Lake Sevan in Armenia. Water genotoxicity was evaluated using the single cell gel electrophoresis technique (comet assay) in erythrocytes of gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio), Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MCN) and Tradescantia stamen hair mutation (Trad-SHM) assays. Significant inter-site differences in the levels of water genotoxicity according to fish and Trad-MCN bioassays have been revealed. Two groups of locations with lower (south-southwest of the village Shorzha and Peninsula of Lake Sevan) and higher (estuaries of Gavaraget and Dzknaget rivers) levels of water genotoxicity were distinguished. Correlation analysis support the hypothesis that the observed genetic alterations in fish and plant may be a manifestation of the effects of water contamination by nitrate ions, Si, Al, Fe, Mn and Cu. Increase of DNA damage in fish also correlated with content of total phosphorus. PMID:26739952

  15. Nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon have genotoxic effects on glioblastoma multiforme cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinzmann, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta;

    2014-01-01

    the U87 cancer cells. However, incubation with pristine graphene and reduced graphene oxide led to a significant decrease in cell viability, whereas incubation with graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond led to a smaller decrease in cell viability. The results of a comet assay...... demonstrated that pristine graphene, reduced graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond caused DNA damage and were therefore genotoxic in U87 cells, whereas graphene oxide was not. © 2014 Hinzmann et al.......The carbon-based nanomaterial family consists of nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon, which may have a number of interactions with biological systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of nanoparticles comprised evaluation of cell morphology, and assessment of cell...

  16. Disperse Red 1 (textile dye) induces cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in mouse germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Fábio Henrique; Bustos-Obregon, Eduardo; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2015-06-01

    Disperse Red 1 (DR1), which is widely used in the textile industry, is an azo dye that contributes to the toxicity and pollution of wastewater. To assess the toxic effects of DR1 on reproduction, sexually mature male mice (Mus musculus, strain CF-1) were orally (gavage) treated with single doses of the compound at 20, 100 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Testicular features and sperm parameters were evaluated 8.3, 16.6 and 24.9 days after treatments. In addition to testicular toxicity caused by the dye, the data clearly showed an increased frequency of sperm with abnormal morphology and decreased fertility. An increased amount of DNA damage was also detected in testis cells 16.6 and 24.9 days after treatments with 100 and 500 mg/kg. This study demonstrated the toxic and genotoxic effects of DR1, indicating the harmful activity of this dye on reproductive health. PMID:25883024

  17. H2 O2-induced higher order chromatin degradation: A novel mechanism of oxidative genotoxicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gregory W Konat

    2003-02-01

    The genotoxicity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is well established. The underlying mechanism involves oxidation of DNA by ROS. However, we have recently shown that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the major mediator of oxidative stress, can also cause genomic damage indirectly. Thus, H2O2 at pathologically relevant concentrations rapidly induces higher order chromatin degradation (HOCD), i.e. enzymatic excision of chromatin loops and their oligomers at matrix-attachment regions. The activation of endonuclease that catalyzes HOCD is a signalling event triggered specifically by H2O2. The activation is not mediated by an influx of calcium ions, but resting concentrations of intracellular calcium ions are required for the maintenance of the endonuclease in an active form. Although H2O2-induced HOCD can efficiently dismantle the genome leading to cell death, under sublethal oxidative stress conditions H2O2-induced HOCD may be the major source of somatic mutations.

  18. Sucrose, glucose and fructose have similar genotoxicity in the rat colon and affect the metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Baunsgaard, D.; Autrup, H.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Møller, P.; Lindecrona, R.; Wallin, H.; Poulsen, H. E.; Loft, S.; Dragsted, L. O.

    2008-01-01

    proliferation were determined in colon, and a metabonomic analysis was performed in plasma and urine. The sugars increased the mutation rates in colon and the bulky adduct levels in colon and liver to a similar extent. All sugars decrease the caecal concentration of acetic acid and propionic acid. The......% sucrose, glucose, fructose or potato starch as part of the diet. Mutation rates and bulky DNA adduct levels were determined in colon and liver. The concentration of short-chain fatty acids and pH were deter-mined in caecum, C-peptide was determined in plasma, biomarkers for oxidative damage and...... metabonomic studies indicated disturbed amino acid metabolism and decrease in plasma and urinary acetate as a common feature for all sugars and confirmed triglyceridemic effects of fructose. In conclusion, the genotoxicity may be related to the altered chemical environment in the caecum and thereby also in...

  19. Nucleo-cytoplasmic communication in apoptotic response to genotoxic and inflammatory stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean Y. J. WANG

    2005-01-01

    Genotoxic agents or inflammatory cytokines activate cellular stress responses and trigger programmed cell death.We have identified a signal transduction module, including three nuclear proteins that participate in the regulation of cell death induced by chemotherapeutic agents and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In this nuclear signaling module, retinoblastoma protein (Rb) functions as an inhibitor of apoptotic signal transduction. Inactivation of Rb by phosphorylation or caspase-dependent cleavage/degradation is required for cell death to occur. Rb inhibits the Abl tyrosine kinase. Thus,Rb inactivation is a pre-requisite for Abl activation by DNA damage or TNF. Activation of nuclear Abl and its downstream effector p73 induces mitochondriadependent cell death. The involvement of these nuclear signal transducers in TNF induced apoptosis, which does not require new gene expression, indicates that nuclear events other than transcription can contribute to extrinsic apoptotic signal transduction.

  20. In vitro genotoxic evaluation of the medicinal plant Chenopodium ambrosioides L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadano, A; Gurni, A; López, P; Ferraro, G; Carballo, M

    2002-06-01

    Chenopodium ambrosioides (Chenopodiaceae) is an anthelmintic herb used in Latin-America's folk medicine. The aim of this work is to evaluate genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plant which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1000 microg/ml), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic indexes (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed (a) a statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both preparations of Paico, (b) a decrease in MI of both preparations assayed, although no modification in the CPK values either in the infusion or in the decoction was observed. These results suggest a possible genotoxic effect of both preparations, probably due to different active principles. PMID:12020922

  1. Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity and Genetic Susceptibility to Arsenic-Related Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Bianchi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The arsenic (As exposure represents an important problem in many parts of the World. Indeed, it is estimated that over 100 million individuals are exposed to arsenic, mainly through a contamination of groundwaters. Chronic exposure to As is associated with adverse effects on human health such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, neurological diseases and the rate of morbidity and mortality in populations exposed is alarming. The purpose of this review is to summarize the genotoxic effects of As in the cells as well as to discuss the importance of signaling and repair of arsenic-induced DNA damage. The current knowledge of specific polymorphisms in candidate genes that confer susceptibility to arsenic exposure is also reviewed. We also discuss the perspectives offered by the determination of biological markers of early effect on health, incorporating genetic polymorphisms, with biomarkers for exposure to better evaluate exposure-response clinical relationships as well as to develop novel preventative strategies for arsenic- health effects.

  2. EVALUATION OF GENOTOXICITY AND CYTOTOXICITY OF TINOSPORA CORDIFOLIA (THUNB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMIT KUMAR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The communication deals with the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of commonly used medicinal plant, Tinosporacordifolia (Thunb.. Genotoxicity was studied using the Allium cepa L. root tip model using three dose concentrations(10, 20 and 30 mg/mL for 24, 48 and 72 h. T-test was performed to validate the significance of data. Datarevealed dose dependent alterations in the Mitotic Index (M.I.. The M.I. first showed a significant increase andthen reduced as the concentration of extract was raised. The extract increased the rate of growth in the A. ceparoot meristem cells. Moreover, no spindle disturbances, or micronuclei formation was observed indicating thatthe stem extract did not exhibit prominent genotoxic activity. Cytotoxicity of T. cordifolia extract was evaluatedusing RBCs. The extract showed significant dose dependent cytotoxic activity (p=2.98. Considering the aboveresults, the use of aqueous stem extract of Tinospora cordifolia can be considered safe at low dose.

  3. Evaluation of the genotoxic activity of dicamba and atrazine herbicides in several Mexican and South American varieties of sweetcorn (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso, M S; Alvarez, C M; De la Cruz, L; Escoto, M D; Sánchez, J J G

    2015-01-01

    Corn is a major crop and various herbicides are used to maximize its production, which include a dicamba-atrazine mixture. This has great advantages, but can also induce DNA damage. Genotoxic activity was assessed by comet assay following application of two concentrations of dicamba-atrazine: 1000-2000 and 2000-4000 ppm. Apical meristem leaf nuclei from 119 varieties of sweetcorn plants from Mexico and South America, and from five commercial sweetcorn hybrids were used. Each accession comprised two individuals per concentration and two controls. Significant genotoxic activity (P 0.05) except (P < 0.05) in the 2000-4000 ppm treated plants from Mexico and the 1000-2000 ppm treated plants from South America. Sweetcorn hybrids showed significant genetic damage (P < 0.01) at all concentrations compared to the negative controls. Thus, the dicamba-atrazine mixture caused genetic damage to corn plants, and it suggested that Mexican sweetcorn is more sensitive to dicamba-atrazine than the maize varieties from South America. Neither hybrid status nor the origin avoids DNA damage caused by Marvel. Thus, maize can be useful as a biomonitor of genetic damage induced by chemicals and to identify possible phenotypes based upon the amount of genetic damage induced by herbicides and selection of resistant genotypes. PMID:26681004

  4. Does uranium exposure induce oxidative stress and genotoxicity in the teleostean Danio rerio? first experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barillet, S.; Devaux, A.; Simon, O.; Buet, A.; Pradines, C. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Within the Envirhom research program, key advances have been obtained in uranium bioaccumulation and underlying mechanisms understanding in various biological models at the individual level. However, considering different scales of biological effects (from early to delayed ones, from low to high level of organization) is crucial to provide ecologically relevant indicators. Organisms counteract stress induced by pollutant exposure through a wide range of physiological responses being both dose and time dependent. Effects at higher hierarchical levels are always preceded by early changes in biological processes, from subtle biochemical disturbances to impaired physiological functions, increased susceptibility to other stresses, reduced life-span Within this global context, preliminary experiments were carried out on adult zebra fish (Danio rerio), to assess early changes after short-term uranium exposure. Among the subsequent primary subcellular damages oxidative stress and genotoxicity (characterizing both chemo-toxicity and radiotoxicity) are relevant endpoints, thus requiring the knowledge of dose-effects relationships as a first operational approach to provide useful tool in predicting possible effects of U exposure. Zebra fish has been selected due to its small size (facilitating its maintenance) and its extended use in eco-toxicological studies. Moreover, its short life-cycle will allow to carry out chronic exposure experiments (along the whole life-cycle). Four uranium concentrations (0, 20, 100 and 500{mu}g.L{sup -1}) and five sampling times (0, 0.5, 1, 5 and 10 days) were selected. Catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were measured as oxidative stress bio-markers. DNA damage level was assessed in zebra fish erythrocytes using the comet assay. Uranium bioaccumulation was concurrently studied to understand observed bio-marker responses. Further experiments, dedicated to the assessment of the impact of chronic uranium

  5. Does uranium exposure induce oxidative stress and genotoxicity in the teleostean Danio rerio? first experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the Envirhom research program, key advances have been obtained in uranium bioaccumulation and underlying mechanisms understanding in various biological models at the individual level. However, considering different scales of biological effects (from early to delayed ones, from low to high level of organization) is crucial to provide ecologically relevant indicators. Organisms counteract stress induced by pollutant exposure through a wide range of physiological responses being both dose and time dependent. Effects at higher hierarchical levels are always preceded by early changes in biological processes, from subtle biochemical disturbances to impaired physiological functions, increased susceptibility to other stresses, reduced life-span Within this global context, preliminary experiments were carried out on adult zebra fish (Danio rerio), to assess early changes after short-term uranium exposure. Among the subsequent primary subcellular damages oxidative stress and genotoxicity (characterizing both chemo-toxicity and radiotoxicity) are relevant endpoints, thus requiring the knowledge of dose-effects relationships as a first operational approach to provide useful tool in predicting possible effects of U exposure. Zebra fish has been selected due to its small size (facilitating its maintenance) and its extended use in eco-toxicological studies. Moreover, its short life-cycle will allow to carry out chronic exposure experiments (along the whole life-cycle). Four uranium concentrations (0, 20, 100 and 500μg.L-1) and five sampling times (0, 0.5, 1, 5 and 10 days) were selected. Catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were measured as oxidative stress bio-markers. DNA damage level was assessed in zebra fish erythrocytes using the comet assay. Uranium bioaccumulation was concurrently studied to understand observed bio-marker responses. Further experiments, dedicated to the assessment of the impact of chronic uranium

  6. Genetic Damage Induced by Accidental Environmental Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Pérez-Cadahía

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum is one of the main energy sources worldwide. Its transport is performed by big tankers following some established marine routes. In the last 50 years a total amount of 37 oil tankers have given rise to great spills in different parts of the world, Prestige being the last one. After the accident, a big human mobilisation took place in order to clean beaches, rocks and fauna, trying to reduce the environmental consequences of this serious catastrophe. These people were exposed to the complex mixture of compounds contained in the oil. This study aimed at determine the level of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOC, and the possible damage induced on the population involved in the different cleaning tasks by applying the genotoxicity tests sister chromatid exchanges (SCE, micronucleus (MN test, and comet assay. Four groups of individuals were included: volunteers (V, hired manual workers (MW, hired high-pressure cleaner workers (HPW and controls. The higher VOC levels were associated with V environment, followed by MW and lastly by HPW, probably due to the use of high-pressure cleaners. Oil exposure during the cleaning tasks has caused an increase in the genotoxic damage in individuals, the comet assay being the most sensitive biomarker to detect it. Sex, age and tobacco consumption have shown to influence the level of genetic damage, while the effect of using protective devices was less noticeable than expected, perhaps because the kind used was not the most adequate.

  7. Variation in genotoxic stress tolerance among frog populations exposed to UV and pollutant gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Populations of widely distributed species can be subjected to unequal selection pressures, producing differences in rates of local adaptation. We report a laboratory experiment testing tolerance variation to UV-B and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) among common frog (Rana temporaria) populations according to their natural exposure level in the field. Studied populations were naturally distributed along two gradients, i.e. UV-B radiation with altitude and level of contamination by PAHs with the distance to emitting sources (road traffic). Tadpoles from eight populations were subjected to (1) no or high level of artificial UV-B; (2) four concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) (0, 50, 250, 500 μg L-1); (3) simultaneously to UV-B and BaP. Since both stressors are genotoxic, the number of micronucleated erythrocytes (MNE) in circulating red blood cells was used as a bioindicator of tadpole sensitivity. High-altitude populations appear to be locally adapted to better resist UV-B genotoxicity, as they showed the lowest MNE numbers. Conversely, no correlation was observed between levels of PAH contamination in the field and tadpole tolerance to BaP in the laboratory, indicating the absence of local adaptation for BaP tolerance in these populations. Nevertheless, the decrease of MNE formation due to BaP exposure with altitude suggests that high-altitude populations were intrinsically more resistant to BaP genotoxicity. We propose the hypothesis of a co-tolerance between UV-B and BaP in high-altitude common frog populations: local adaptation to prevent and/or repair DNA damage induced by UV-B could also protect these highland populations against DNA damage induced by BaP. The results of this study highlight the role of local adaptation along pollutant gradients leading to tolerance variation, which implies that is it necessary to take into account the history of exposure of each population and the existence of co-tolerance that can hide toxic effects of a new

  8. Evaluation of the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of a living nosode compounded with Influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Leitao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The influenza virus has been responsible for contagious respiratory diseases with high mortality rates [1]. Some drugs have been used to treat human influenza. However, these drugs cause many common side effects and induce the appearance of resistant viral strains [2]. The impact caused by the influenza virus has motivated the development of new approaches for the prevention and control of influenza [3]. Therefore, a new homeopathic medicine was developed using, as a starting point, the infectious influenza virus [4]. This belongs to a group called living nosodes [5]. However, its mutagenic and genotoxic potentials, especially when used in low dilutions, has not yet been evaluated and it is important because this biotherapic is prepared from living microorganisms. Different methods can be used to detect mutagenic and genotoxicic effects. Aims: This study aims to evaluate the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of influenza A living nosode at different homeopathic potencies. Methodology: 1 ml of purified viral suspension was diluted in 9 ml of sterile distilled water. This sample was submitted to 100 mechanical succussions (approximately 3 Hz, using Autic® Brazilian machine, originating the first dilution, named decimal (1x. 1 ml of this solution was diluted in 9 ml of solvent and was submitted to 100 sucussions, generating biotherapic 2x. This procedure was successively repeated, according to Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, to obtain the biotherapic 30x [6]. By the same technique, water vehicle was prepared until 30x potency to be used as control. All samples were prepared in sterile and under aseptic conditions, using laminar flow cabinet, class II, and were stored in the refrigerator (8ºC. The samples 1x, 6x, 12x, 18x, 24x and 30x and water 30x (vehicle control were analysed by: the Inductest, which assesses the ability of physical or chemical agents to promote lysogenic induction as a reflection of damage

  9. Variation in genotoxic stress tolerance among frog populations exposed to UV and pollutant gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquis, Olivier [Laboratoire d' Ecologie Alpine, UMR CNRS 5553, Universite de Savoie, Technolac, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Miaud, Claude, E-mail: claude.miaud@univ-savoie.fr [Laboratoire d' Ecologie Alpine, UMR CNRS 5553, Universite de Savoie, Technolac, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Ficetola, Gentile Francesco [Laboratoire d' Ecologie Alpine, UMR CNRS 5553, Universite de Savoie, Technolac, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Department of Biology, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Bocher, Aurore [Laboratoire de Chimie Moleculaire et Environnement, Universite de Savoie, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Mouchet, Florence [Laboratoire d' Ecologie Fonctionnelle, UMR CNRS-UPS-INPT 5245, Institut National Polytechnique-ENSAT, Auzeville-Tolosane (France); Guittonneau, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Chimie Moleculaire et Environnement, Universite de Savoie, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Devaux, Alain [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, Ecole Nationale des Travaux Publics de l' Etat, INRA-EFPA, Vaulx-en-Velin (France)

    2009-11-08

    Populations of widely distributed species can be subjected to unequal selection pressures, producing differences in rates of local adaptation. We report a laboratory experiment testing tolerance variation to UV-B and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) among common frog (Rana temporaria) populations according to their natural exposure level in the field. Studied populations were naturally distributed along two gradients, i.e. UV-B radiation with altitude and level of contamination by PAHs with the distance to emitting sources (road traffic). Tadpoles from eight populations were subjected to (1) no or high level of artificial UV-B; (2) four concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) (0, 50, 250, 500 {mu}g L{sup -1}); (3) simultaneously to UV-B and BaP. Since both stressors are genotoxic, the number of micronucleated erythrocytes (MNE) in circulating red blood cells was used as a bioindicator of tadpole sensitivity. High-altitude populations appear to be locally adapted to better resist UV-B genotoxicity, as they showed the lowest MNE numbers. Conversely, no correlation was observed between levels of PAH contamination in the field and tadpole tolerance to BaP in the laboratory, indicating the absence of local adaptation for BaP tolerance in these populations. Nevertheless, the decrease of MNE formation due to BaP exposure with altitude suggests that high-altitude populations were intrinsically more resistant to BaP genotoxicity. We propose the hypothesis of a co-tolerance between UV-B and BaP in high-altitude common frog populations: local adaptation to prevent and/or repair DNA damage induced by UV-B could also protect these highland populations against DNA damage induced by BaP. The results of this study highlight the role of local adaptation along pollutant gradients leading to tolerance variation, which implies that is it necessary to take into account the history of exposure of each population and the existence of co-tolerance that can hide toxic effects of a

  10. Evaluation of the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of homeopathic Candida albicans solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Santos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida spp is naturally found in humans’ flora of skin, gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts and, in general, up to 75% of the population does not have any symptom [1]. However, oral candidiasis is very common among HIV patients and patients undergoing chemotherapy. The treatment of oral candidiasis is necessary once the disease causes discomfort and dysphagia, resulting in poor nutrition, slow recovery, and prolonged hospital stay [2,3]. Preliminary results obtained by our group with a new biotherapic prepared from Candida albicans (Candida 30x showed a great potential to reduce the candida yeast adhesion rate when the epithelial cells were pre-treated. This study is currently being developed with the evaluation of mutagenic and genotoxic potentials of several homeopathic solutions. Aims: The goal of this study was to assess the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of different homeopathic potencies of C. albicans. Methodology: One part of C. albicans yeast obtained from Brazilian patient’s blood [4] was diluted in 9 parts of sterile water. This sample was submitted to 100 mechanical succussions (approximately 3 Hz, using Autic® Brazilian machine, originating the first dilution (1x. Then, 1 ml of this solution was diluted in 9 ml of solvent, submitted to 100 succussions, obtaining 2x potency. This procedure was successively repeated to obtain 30x potency, according to Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia [5]. By the same technique, water vehicle was prepared until 30x to be used as control. All samples were prepared in sterile and aseptic conditions, using laminar flow cabinet, class II and were stored in the refrigerator (8ºC. The samples 1x, 6x, 12x, 18x, 24x and 30x of C. albicans and water 30x (vehicle control were analysed by: the Inductest, which assesses the ability of physical or chemical agents to promote lysogenic induction as a reflection of damage in DNA

  11. Epigenome Maintenance in Response to DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabin, Juliette; Fortuny, Anna; Polo, Sophie E

    2016-06-01

    Organism viability relies on the stable maintenance of specific chromatin landscapes, established during development, that shape cell functions and identities by driving distinct gene expression programs. Yet epigenome maintenance is challenged during transcription, replication, and repair of DNA damage, all of which elicit dynamic changes in chromatin organization. Here, we review recent advances that have shed light on the specialized mechanisms contributing to the restoration of epigenome structure and function after DNA damage in the mammalian cell nucleus. By drawing a parallel with epigenome maintenance during replication, we explore emerging concepts and highlight open issues in this rapidly growing field. In particular, we present our current knowledge of molecular players that support the coordinated maintenance of genome and epigenome integrity in response to DNA damage, and we highlight how nuclear organization impacts genome stability. Finally, we discuss possible functional implications of epigenome plasticity in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27259203

  12. Genotoxicity evaluation of the herbicide Garlon(®) and its active ingredient (triclopyr) in fish (Anguilla anguilla L.) using the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Sofia; Santos, Maria A; Gaivão, Isabel; Pacheco, Mário

    2015-09-01

    Triclopyr-based herbicides are broadly used worldwide for site preparation and forest vegetation management. Thus, following application, these agrochemicals can inadvertently reach the aquatic ecosystems. Garlon(®) is one of the most popular commercial denominations of this group of herbicides, considered as highly toxic to fish, even by its manufacturer. Although DNA is frequently regarded as a target of pesticide toxicity, the genotoxic potential of Garlon(®) to fish remains completely unknown. Hence, the main goal of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of Garlon(®) and its active ingredient (triclopyr), clarifying the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, the comet assay, implemented as the standard procedure, with an extra step involving DNA lesion-specific repair enzymes (formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase and endonuclease III), was used to identify DNA damage in blood cells of Anguilla anguilla L. Short-term exposures (1 and 3 days) to Garlon(®) and triclopyr were carried out, adopting environmentally realistic concentrations (67.6 and 270.5 µg L(-1) Garlon(®) and 30 and 120 µg L(-1) triclopyr). The results concerning the nonspecific DNA damage proved the risk of the herbicide Garlon(®) and its active ingredient triclopyr in both tested concentrations and exposure lengths. In addition, the higher genotoxic potential of the formulation, in comparison with the active ingredient, was demonstrated. When the additional breaks corresponding to net enzyme-sensitive sites were considered, none of the conditions revealed significant levels of oxidative damage. This identification of the genotoxic properties of triclopyr-based herbicides to fish highlights the need to develop less hazardous formulations, as well as the adoption of mitigation measures related to the application of these agrochemicals in the framework of forestry and agriculture sustainable management. PMID:24623388

  13. Genotoxicity Assessment of Erythritol by Using Short-term Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Young-Shin; Lee, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Erythritol is a sugar alcohol that is widely used as a natural sugar substitute. Thus, the safety of its usage is very important. In the present study, short-term genotoxicity assays were conducted to evaluate the potential genotoxic effects of erythritol. According to the OECD test guidelines, the maximum test dose was 5,000 μg/plate in bacterial reverse mutation tests, 5,000 μg/ml in cell-based assays, and 5,000 mg/kg for in vivo testing. An Ames test did not reveal any positive results. No...

  14. EVALUATION OF GENOTOXICITY AND CYTOTOXICITY OF TINOSPORA CORDIFOLIA (THUNB.)

    OpenAIRE

    AMIT KUMAR; SUKUMAR DANDAPAT; MANOJ KUMAR; M. P. SINHA

    2013-01-01

    The communication deals with the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of commonly used medicinal plant, Tinosporacordifolia (Thunb.). Genotoxicity was studied using the Allium cepa L. root tip model using three dose concentrations(10, 20 and 30 mg/mL) for 24, 48 and 72 h. T-test was performed to validate the significance of data. Datarevealed dose dependent alterations in the Mitotic Index (M.I.). The M.I. first showed a significant increase andthen reduced as the concentration of extract was rais...

  15. Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis in DNA Damage Detection (Comet Assay)

    OpenAIRE

    Aysen Durmaz; Nurten Dikmen; Cumhur Gunduz

    2010-01-01

    “Single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)”, also called “Comet Assay”, is a sensitive, reliable and rapid technique for quantifying and analyzing DNA damage in individual cells. The comet assay is widely used in living cells, researches and the applications on comet assay is becoming broader day by day. To date, the comet assay has been used for a variety of applications, including genotoxic and cytotoxic agent analyses, environmental toxicology, cancer research, and radiati...

  16. Cordyceps sinensis: Genotoxic Potential in Human Peripheral Blood Cells and Antigenotoxic Properties Against Hydrogen Peroxide by Comet Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljevic, Jovana D; Zivkovic, Lada P; Cabarkapa, Andrea M; Bajic, Vladan P; Djelic, Ninoslav J; Spremo-Potparevic, Biljana M

    2016-06-01

    Context • Cordyceps sinensis (C sinensis) is a well-known, traditional, Chinese medicinal mushroom, valued for its beneficial properties for human health. C sinensis has been reported to have immunomodulatory, anticancer, antiaging, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Despite potential medicinal benefits, no previously published reports are available about the genotoxicity or antigenotoxicity of C sinensis, as detected by comet assay. Objective • The objective of the study was to evaluate both the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of an extract of C sinensis (CS extract) in human peripheral blood cells. Design • The research team designed a pilot study. Setting •The study was conducted at the Center for Biological Research, University of Belgrade, in Belgrade, Serbia. Participants • Participants were 6 healthy individuals (2 males and 4 females), between the ages of 20 and 45 y, recruited on a voluntary basis, who provided heparinized, peripheral blood samples. Intervention • Four concentrations of the CS extract-125 μg/mL, 250 μg/mL, 500 μg/mL, and 1000 μg/mL-were used in the treatment of tested blood cells from the blood samples. Three independent procedures were performed: (1) a genotoxicity assessment, (2) an antigenotoxicity assessment for pretreatment of human cells with the CS extract prior to their exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (ie, an evaluation of the benefits of the CS extract as a preventive agent); and (3) posttreatment of human cells with the CS extract after their exposure to H2O2 (ie, an evaluation of the benefits of the CS extract as an interventional agent). Outcome Measures • Cells were graded by eye inspection into 5 classes, depending on the extent of DNA damage, representing: (1) class A-undamaged cells with no tail (95%).Results • The CS extract proved to be nongenotoxic because no induced DNA damage was detected at all tested concentrations. For the antigenotoxicity assessment of the pretreatment with

  17. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lans (Hannes); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired prope

  18. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of prozac (fluoxetine without and with addition of vitamins A and C by means of the comet assay in culture of CHO-K1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noélle Giacomini Lemos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The fluoxetine, commercially named Prozac, is efficient against depression and anxiety, with lower risk of collateral effects. However, the possible genotoxic effects are still unknown. The use of vitamins as protectors against damages on cells and DNA has been evaluated, mainly for vitamins A and C. Furthermore, the associative effect of vitamins with several medicines demands studies. The evaluations of genotoxic effect of Prozac and vitamins A and C protective effect were carried out in culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells, CHO-K1, by means of the comet test. The Prozac was used, in liquid formulation, diluted in 5µg, 1µg and 0.2 µg/mL of culture medium. The vitamins were used, in liquid formulation, at the concentrations of 3µg and 880,5 µg/mL of culture medium to vitamins A and C, respectively. The treatments were carried out during 1 hour. The obtained data demonstrated that only the highest concentration of Prozac (5 µg is genotoxic and both vitamins A and C reduced such genotoxicity. The data suggest a follow-up on patients who use Prozac and the possibility of vitamins A and C association in order to minimize the collateral genotoxic effects.

  19. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  20. Flooding modifies the genotoxic effects of pollution on a worm, a mussel and two fish species from the Sava River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aborgiba, Mustafa; Kostić, Jovana; Kolarević, Stoimir; Kračun-Kolarević, Margareta; Elbahi, Samia; Knežević-Vukčević, Jelena; Lenhardt, Mirjana; Paunović, Momir; Gačić, Zoran; Vuković-Gačić, Branka

    2016-01-01

    Extreme hydrological events, such as water scarcity and flooding, can modify the effect of other stressors present in aquatic environment, which could result in the significant changes in the ecosystem functioning. Presence and interaction of various stressors (genotoxic pollutants) in the environment can influence the integrity of DNA molecules in aquatic organisms which can be negatively reflected on the individual, population and community levels. Therefore, in this study we have investigated the impact of flooding, in terms of genotoxicity, on organisms belonging to different trophic levels. The study was carried out on the site situated in the lower stretch of the Sava River which faced devastating effects of severe flooding in May 2014. The flooding occurred during our field experiment and this event provided a unique opportunity to assess its influence to the environment. The in situ effects of this specific situation were monitored by measuring physical, chemical and microbiological parameters of water, and by comparing the level of DNA damage in coelomocytes and haemocytes of freshwater worms Branchiura sowerbyi, haemocytes of freshwater mussels Unio tumidus and blood cells of freshwater fish Abramis bjoerkna/Abramis sapa, by means of the comet assay. Our study indicated that the flooding had a significant impact on water quality by decreasing the amount and discharge rate of urban wastewaters but simultaneously introducing contaminants from the nearby fly ash disposal field into river by runoff, which had diverse effects on the level of DNA damage in the studied organisms. This indicates that the assessment of genotoxic pollution in situ is strongly affected by the choice of the bioindicator organism. PMID:25861862

  1. SIGNALING TO THE P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR THROUGH PATHWAYS ACTIVATED BY GENOTOXIC AND NON-GENOTOXIC STRESSES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2002-07-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is post-translational modified at {approx}18 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review the posttranslational modifications to p53 and the pathways that produce them in response to both genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses.

  2. In vivo and in vitro exposures for the evaluation of the genotoxic effects of lead on the Neotropical freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, V.; Cavalcante, D.G.S.M.; Vilela, M.B.F.A. [Laboratory of Animal Ecophysiology, Department of Physiological Sciences, Londrina State University, PB 6001, 86051-990 Londrina, PR (Brazil); Sofia, S.H. [Laboratory of Genetics and Animal Ecology, Department of General Biology, Londrina State University, PB 6001, 86051-990 Londrina, PR (Brazil); Martinez, C.B.R., E-mail: cbueno@uel.br [Laboratory of Animal Ecophysiology, Department of Physiological Sciences, Londrina State University, PB 6001, 86051-990 Londrina, PR (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    In the present study, in vivo and in vitro exposures were used to assess the genotoxicity of lead (Pb) to the freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus. The comet assay using blood, liver and gill cells, and the occurrence of micronuclei (MN) and other erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA) were used to assess the genotoxic potential of lead in vivo. Metallothionein content (MT) was measured in fish liver in order to evaluate the protection of fish against Pb toxicity. Fish erythrocytes were exposed to Pb in vitro (1, 3 and 6 h) and the number of viable cells, DNA integrity, using the comet assay, and lysosomal membrane stability, measured by the neutral red retention assay (NRRA) were analyzed. The results of the comet assay after in vivo toxicity tests (6, 24 and 96 h) showed that Pb was genotoxic for all the three tissues analyzed after 96 h exposure. A significant increase in liver MT content was observed after 6 and 24 h of Pb exposure. MN frequency did not increase after Pb exposures, but the frequency of the other ENA, such as kidney-shaped nuclei, segmented nuclei and lobed nuclei, showed a significant increase after 24 and 96 h, indicating that ENA is a better biomarker for Pb exposure than MN alone after short-term exposures. The results of the comet assay performed with erythrocytes in vitro exposed to lead confirmed its genotoxic effect and showed that DNA damage increased with increasing exposure time. Moreover, the NRRA clearly indicated that Pb induces a destabilization of the lysosomal membrane. These results demonstrate the potential genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of lead after acute exposures.

  3. Organic extracts of urban air pollution particulate matter (PM2.5)-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in human lung bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Min; Kim, Ha Ryong; Park, Yong Joo; Lee, Soo Yeun; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2011-08-16

    Traffic is a major source of particulate matter (PM), and ultrafine particulates and traffic intensity probably contribute significantly to PM-related health effects. As a strong relationship between air pollution and motor vehicle-originated pollutants has been shown to exist, air pollution genotoxicity studies of urban cities are steadily increasing. In Korea, the death rate caused by lung cancer is the most rapidly increased cancer death rate in the past 10 years. In this study, genotoxicity of PM2.5 (traffic area in Suwon City, Korea, was studied using cultured human lung bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) as a model system for the potential inhalation health effects. Organic extract of PM2.5 (CE) generated significant DNA breakage and micronucleus formation in a dose-dependent manner (1μg/cm(3)-50μg/cm(3)). In the acid-base-neutral fractionation of PM2.5, neutral samples including the aliphatic (F3), aromatic (F4) and slightly polar (F5) fractions generated significant DNA breakage and micronucleus formation. These genotoxic effects were significantly blocked by scavenging agents [superoxide dismutase (SOD), sodium selenite (SS), mannitol (M), catalase (CAT)]. In addition, in the modified Comet assay using endonucleases (FPG and ENDOIII), CE and its fractions (F3, F4, and F5) increased DNA breakage compared with control groups, indicating that CE and fractions of PM2.5 induced oxidative DNA damage. These results clearly suggest that PM2.5 collected in the Suwon traffic area has genotoxic effects and that reactive oxygen species may play a distinct role in these effects. In addition, aliphatic/chlorinated hydrocarbons, PAH/alkylderivatives, and nitro-PAH/ketones/quinones may be important causative agents of the genotoxic effects. PMID:21524716

  4. In vivo and in vitro exposures for the evaluation of the genotoxic effects of lead on the Neotropical freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, V; Cavalcante, D G S M; Viléla, M B F A; Sofia, S H; Martinez, C B R

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, in vivo and in vitro exposures were used to assess the genotoxicity of lead (Pb) to the freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus. The comet assay using blood, liver and gill cells, and the occurrence of micronuclei (MN) and other erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA) were used to assess the genotoxic potential of lead in vivo. Metallothionein content (MT) was measured in fish liver in order to evaluate the protection of fish against Pb toxicity. Fish erythrocytes were exposed to Pb in vitro (1, 3 and 6 h) and the number of viable cells, DNA integrity, using the comet assay, and lysosomal membrane stability, measured by the neutral red retention assay (NRRA) were analyzed. The results of the comet assay after in vivo toxicity tests (6, 24 and 96 h) showed that Pb was genotoxic for all the three tissues analyzed after 96 h exposure. A significant increase in liver MT content was observed after 6 and 24 h of Pb exposure. MN frequency did not increase after Pb exposures, but the frequency of the other ENA, such as kidney-shaped nuclei, segmented nuclei and lobed nuclei, showed a significant increase after 24 and 96 h, indicating that ENA is a better biomarker for Pb exposure than MN alone after short-term exposures. The results of the comet assay performed with erythrocytes in vitro exposed to lead confirmed its genotoxic effect and showed that DNA damage increased with increasing exposure time. Moreover, the NRRA clearly indicated that Pb induces a destabilization of the lysosomal membrane. These results demonstrate the potential genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of lead after acute exposures. PMID:21652016

  5. In vivo and in vitro exposures for the evaluation of the genotoxic effects of lead on the Neotropical freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, in vivo and in vitro exposures were used to assess the genotoxicity of lead (Pb) to the freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus. The comet assay using blood, liver and gill cells, and the occurrence of micronuclei (MN) and other erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA) were used to assess the genotoxic potential of lead in vivo. Metallothionein content (MT) was measured in fish liver in order to evaluate the protection of fish against Pb toxicity. Fish erythrocytes were exposed to Pb in vitro (1, 3 and 6 h) and the number of viable cells, DNA integrity, using the comet assay, and lysosomal membrane stability, measured by the neutral red retention assay (NRRA) were analyzed. The results of the comet assay after in vivo toxicity tests (6, 24 and 96 h) showed that Pb was genotoxic for all the three tissues analyzed after 96 h exposure. A significant increase in liver MT content was observed after 6 and 24 h of Pb exposure. MN frequency did not increase after Pb exposures, but the frequency of the other ENA, such as kidney-shaped nuclei, segmented nuclei and lobed nuclei, showed a significant increase after 24 and 96 h, indicating that ENA is a better biomarker for Pb exposure than MN alone after short-term exposures. The results of the comet assay performed with erythrocytes in vitro exposed to lead confirmed its genotoxic effect and showed that DNA damage increased with increasing exposure time. Moreover, the NRRA clearly indicated that Pb induces a destabilization of the lysosomal membrane. These results demonstrate the potential genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of lead after acute exposures.

  6. The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of metalaxy-M on earthworms (Eisenia fetida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Zhu, Lusheng; Han, Yingnan; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Yan

    2014-10-01

    As the main optical isomer of metalaxyl, metalaxyl-M has been widely used worldwide in recent years because of its notable effect on the prevention and control of crop diseases. Together with the toxicity and degradation of metalaxyl-M, the chemical has attracted the attention of researchers. The present study examined the toxic effects of metalaxyl-M on earthworms at 0 mg kg(-1) , 0.1 mg kg(-1) , 1 mg kg(-1) , and 3 mg kg(-1) on days 7, 14, 21 and 28 after exposure. The results showed that metalaxyl-M could cause an obvious increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) when the concentration was higher than 0.1 mg kg(-1) , which led to lipid peroxidation in earthworms. Metalaxyl-M can induce DNA damage in earthworms, and the level of DNA damage markedly increased with increasing the concentration of metalaxyl-M. Metalaxyl-M also has a serious influence on the activities of antioxidant enzymes, which results in irreversible oxidative damage in cells. The changes of these indicators all indicated that metalaxyl-M may cause cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on earthworms. PMID:25043480

  7. Genotoxicity of Air Borne Particulates Assessed by Comet and the Salmonella Mutagenicity Test in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Milaat

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Fine airborne respirable particulates less than 10 micrometer (PM10 are considered one of the top environmental public health concerns, since they contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs which are among the major carcinogenic compounds found in urban air. The objective of this study is to assess the genotoxicity of the ambient PM10 collected at 11 urban sites in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The PM10 extractable organic matter (EOM was examined for its genotoxicity by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE comet assay and the Salmonella mutagenicity (Ames test .Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to quantify 16 PAH compounds in four sites. Samples from oil refinery and heavy diesel vehicles traffic sites showed significant DNA damage causing comet in 20-44% of the cells with tail moments ranging from 0.5-2.0 compared to samples from petrol driven cars and residential area, with comet in less than 2% of the cells and tail moments of < 0.02.In the Ames test, polluted sites showed indirect mutagenic response and caused 20-56 rev/ m3, mean while residential and reference sites caused 2-15 rev /m3. The genotoxicity of the EOM in both tests directly correlated with the amount of organic particulate and the PAHs concentrations in the air samples. The PAHs concentrations ranged between 0.83 ng/m3 in industrial and heavy diesel vehicles traffic sites to 0.18 ng /m3 in the residential area. Benzo(ghipyrene was the major PAH components and at one site it represented 65.4 % of the total PAHs. Samples of the oil refinery site were more genotoxic in the SCGE assay than samples from the heavy diesel vehicles traffic site, despite the fact that both sites contain almost similar amount of PAHs. The opposite was true for the mutagenicity in the Ames test. This could be due to the nature of the EOM in both sites. These findings confirm the genotoxic potency of the PM10 organic extracts to which urban populations are exposed.

  8. Identification of early target genes of aflatoxin B1 in human hepatocytes, inter-individual variability and comparison with other genotoxic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josse, Rozenn; Dumont, Julie; Fautrel, Alain; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guillouzo, André, E-mail: andre.guillouzo@univ-rennes1.fr

    2012-01-15

    Gene expression profiling has recently emerged as a promising approach to identify early target genes and discriminate genotoxic carcinogens from non-genotoxic carcinogens and non-carcinogens. However, early gene changes induced by genotoxic compounds in human liver remain largely unknown. Primary human hepatocytes and differentiated HepaRG cells were exposed to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) that induces DNA damage following enzyme-mediated bioactivation. Gene expression profile changes induced by a 24 h exposure of these hepatocyte models to 0.05 and 0.25 μM AFB1 were analyzed by using oligonucleotide pangenomic microarrays. The main altered signaling pathway was the p53 pathway and related functions such as cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. Direct involvement of the p53 protein in response to AFB1 was verified by using siRNA directed against p53. Among the 83 well-annotated genes commonly modulated in two pools of three human hepatocyte populations and HepaRG cells, several genes were identified as altered by AFB1 for the first time. In addition, a subset of 10 AFB1-altered genes, selected upon basis of their function or tumor suppressor role, was tested in four human hepatocyte populations and in response to other chemicals. Although they exhibited large variable inter-donor fold-changes, several of these genes, particularly FHIT, BCAS3 and SMYD3, were found to be altered by various direct and other indirect genotoxic compounds and unaffected by non-genotoxic compounds. Overall, this comprehensive analysis of early gene expression changes induced by AFB1 in human hepatocytes identified a gene subset that included several genes representing potential biomarkers of genotoxic compounds. -- Highlights: ► Gene expression profile changes induced by aflatoxin B1 in human hepatocytes. ► AFB1 modulates various genes including tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes. ► Important inter-individual variations in the response to AFB1. ► Some genes also altered by other

  9. Biomonitoring of the genotoxic effects and oxidative potentials of commercial edible dung beetles (Onitis sp.), grasshopper (Caelifera sp.) and mole crickets (Gryllotalpa sp.) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Kubra; Incekara, Umit; Turkez, Hasan

    2014-09-01

    In this investigation, the genotoxic and oxidative effects of water soluble extracts of dung beetles, flying grasshopper and mole crickets have been assessed on cultured human blood cells. The extracts were added to the culture tubes at 12 different concentrations (0-2000 ppm). Micronucleus test was used to monitor the DNA and the chromosomal damage produced by aqueous extracts in vitro. In addition, to assess the oxidative effects, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were also measured. Our results indicated that these extracts did not show genotoxic effects at the tested concentrations. However, the extracts caused dose-dependent alterations in both TAC and TOS levels. Based on the findings, it was concluded that the studied insects can be consumed safely, but it is necessary to consider the cellular damages which are likely to appear depending on oxidative stress at higher concentrations. It has also been suggested that this in vitro approach for oxidative and genotoxicity assessments may be useful to evaluate the potential health risks of edible insects. PMID:24700298

  10. Genotoxicity determinations of coriander drop and extract of Coriander Sativum cultured fibroblast of rat embryo by comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay is a quick, simple and sensitive technique for measuring DNA damage in cell nucleus. It is well known that medicinal herbs play an important role in the life of human beings, thus it is essential to determine their safety as public health is concerned. In this study the genotoxicity of Coriander drop, herbal pharmaceutical product, and the extract of Coriander sativum were examined in cultured fibroblast of rat embryo using comet assay. The thirteen to fifteen days old rat embryos were lysed with tripsin and after certain steps it was centrifuged and then cultured. After three to five passages, different concentrations of each product were applied to the fibroblasts. Lysing, electrophoresis, neutralization and staining were carried out. Finally the slides were analyzed with fluorescence microscope. In the test groups the results indicated that coriander drop at different doses showed some fragmentation of DNA but this damage as a result was deemed to be not significant. However, in the case of Coriander sativum extract the results showed no mutagenic effects in comparison with the positive control group (p<0.05). In conclusion, these herbal products did not show any magnetic effect according to our test, but further genotoxicity assays are recommended. (author)

  11. Lagos lagoon sediment organic extracts and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce embryotoxic, teratogenic and genotoxic effects in Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogbanmu, Temitope O; Nagy, Eszter; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M; Otitoloju, Adebayo A; Bury, Nic R

    2016-07-01

    An expansion of anthropogenic activity around Lagos lagoon, Nigeria, has raised concerns over increasing contaminants entering the lagoon's ecosystem. The embryotoxicity, teratogenicity and genotoxicity of sediment organic extracts from four sampling zones around Lagos lagoon, Ilaje, Iddo, Atlas Cove and Apapa, as well as the dominant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) identified in water measured during the wet season (naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene and a mixture of these), were assessed with Danio rerio embryos. Embryos were exposed to varying concentrations of toxicants from 0-72 h post-fertilization (hpf). Embryotoxicity at 72 hpf showed a dose-dependent increase in mortality upon exposure to extracts from all zones, except Atlas Cove. Similarly, higher levels of teratogenic effects, such as increased oedema, and haemorrhage and developmental abnormalities resulted from exposure to extracts from Ilaje, Iddo and Apapa zones. Treatment with single PAHs revealed that significant levels of detrimental effects were obtained only for phenanthrene. The modified comet assay revealed that the oxidative damage to DNA was generally low (<12 %) overall for all sediment extracts, but was significantly elevated with Ilaje and Iddo sediment extracts when compared with solvent controls. Oxidative damage was observed with the single PAHs, phenanthrene and benzo[a]pyrene, as well as with the PAH mixture. This study highlights that Lagos lagoon sediment extracts have teratogenic, embryotoxic and genotoxic properties, which are likely due to the high molecular weight PAHs present in the extracts, some of which are known or are suspected human carcinogens. PMID:27068906

  12. Studying the genotoxicity of vincristine on human lymphocytes using comet assay, micronucleus assay and TCR gene mutation test in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of our previous investigation for workers occupationally exposed to vincristine (VCR) indicated that the genetic damage was detectable with comet assay, cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and housekeeping gene mutation tests. In order to determine the results of above investigation and to inquire further the characteristics of genotoxicity of VCR, the cytogenetic effects of VCR on human lymphocytes were assessed with comet assay, CBMN assay and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene mutation test in vitro. The lymphocytes from two healthy donors were incubated for 24 h at doses of 0.00, 0.01, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.08 μg ml-1 VCR. The results of the present experiment showed that VCR not only could induce DNA damage, increase significantly micronucleus frequencies and the apoptotic cell ratios and decrease the nuclear division index (NDI) with dose-response relationship, but also could produce nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs), a biomarker of DNA misrepair and/or telomere end-fusions and nuclear buds (NBUDs), a biomarker of elimination of amplified DNA and/or DNA repair complexes. Moreover, VCR could enhance TCR gene mutation frequency (Mf-TCR) of human lymphocytes. There was good correlation between the parameters (mean tail length, mean tail moment, micronucleus frequency, micronucleated frequency and Mf-TCR). The results of present study supported the results of our previous investigation for workers occupationally exposed to VCR, and the genotoxicity of VCR was determined at the different genetic end-points in vitro

  13. The genotoxic effects of benzo[a]pyrene and methamidophos on black porgy evaluated by comet assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rixian; Hong, Huasheng; Wang, Xinhong; Wang, Kejian; Wang, Chunguang

    2005-12-01

    In this study, two common pollutants (benzo[a]pyrene and methamidophos) in marine environment were tested by comet assay for their inducement of in vivo genotoxic effect to the blood cells of black porgy ( Acanthopagrus schlegeli). The fish was exposed to 2 μg/L of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and methamidophos, and their mixture. The assay was performed on whole blood at 2 h, 5 h, 24 h and 96 h exposure intervals. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in each treatment with the pollutants. Additive effect of BaP and methamidophos was also found in the experiment. However, the decrease ratios of DNA damage for 5 h and 96 h exposure interals compared with 2 h and 24 h exposure ones, respectively, were noticed. This phenomenon may be explained by the function of repairing process via enzyme cytochrome P450 in the animal. Evidence of the genotoxicity of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on marine fish are discussed in this paper.

  14. Genotoxicity of PM10 and extracted organics collected in an industrial, urban and rural area in Flanders, Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation in the genotoxic potency of PM10 in vitro in relation to the particle source type was investigated. Particles were collected at one urban, one rural, and one industrial site in Flanders. Genotoxicity was assessed using four different in vitro test systems exposed to PM10 in suspension and to the organic extracts of PM10. Two of these systems were bacterial assays: the Salmonella mutagenicity test and the Vitotox test. In addition, the Comet assay and Micronucleus test were performed using human blood cells. Results show that exposure to PM10 and the organic extracts from both urban and industrial areas causes significant genetic damage. The Salmonella mutagenicity test was most suitable for the screening of PM10 and the organic extracts; the Micronucleus test was most suitable only for the screening of organic extracts, and original particles were toxic for the exposed lymphocytes. Clear dose-response curves were not established in the Comet and Vitotox assay, and organic extracts were apparently toxic in the latter. The total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content of the organic extracts, as measured with GC/MS, ranged between 1 and 6 ng/m3. Results obtained in this study suggest that PM10 causes DNA damage and mutations. The use of biological tests for the screening of air samples is useful to complement air quality control by chemical measurements

  15. The genotoxic effects of benzo[a]pyrene and methamidophos on black porgy evaluated by comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this study, two common pollutants (benzo[a]pyrene and methamidophos) in marine environment were tested by comet assay for their inducement of in vivo genotoxic effect to the blood cells of black porgy (Acanthopagrus schlegeli). The fish was exposed to 2 μg/L of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and methamidophos, and their mixture. The assay was performed on whole blood at 2 h, 5 h, 24 h and 96 h exposure intervals. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in each treatment with the pollutants. Additive effect of BaP and methamidophos was also found in the experiment. However, the decrease ratios of DNA damage for 5 h and 96 h exposure interals compared with 2 h and 24 h exposure ones, respectively, were noticed. This phenomenon may be explained by the function of repairing process via enzyme cytochrome P450 in the animal. Evidence of the genotoxicity of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on marine fish are discussed in this paper.

  16. Genotoxic and histopathological biomarkers for assessing the effects of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite in Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Vélez, Paolin Rocio; Fascineli, Maria Luiza; Koppe Grisolia, Cesar; de Oliveira Lima, Emília Celma; Sousa, Marcelo Henrique; de Morais, Paulo César; Bentes de Azevedo, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic exfoliated vermiculite is a synthetic nanocomposite that quickly and efficiently absorbs organic compounds such as oil from water bodies. It was developed primarily to mitigate pollution, but the possible adverse impacts of its application have not yet been evaluated. In this context, the acute toxicity of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite was herein assessed by genotoxic and histopathological biomarkers in zebrafish (Danio rerio). DNA fragmentation was statistically significant for all groups exposed to the magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and for fish exposed to the highest concentration (200mg/L) of exfoliated vermiculite, whereas the micronucleus frequency, nuclear abnormalities and histopathological alterations were not statistically significant for the fish exposed to these materials. In the intestinal lumen, epithelial cells and goblet cells, we found the presence of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite, but no alterations or presence of the materials-test in the gills or liver were observed. Our findings suggest that the use of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite during standard ecotoxicological assays caused DNA damage in D. rerio, whose alterations may be likely to be repaired, indicating that the magnetic nanoparticles have the ability to promote genotoxic damage, such as DNA fragmentation, but not mutagenic effects. PMID:26878635

  17. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Genotoxicity hazard assessment of Caramel Colours III and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusick, D J; Jagannath, D R; Galloway, S M; Nestmann, E R

    1992-05-01

    Results from a battery of short-term tests in vitro and in vivo used to assess the genotoxicity of caramel colours are presented and discussed in relation to reports from the literature. No evidence of genotoxicity was found in the Salmonella plate incorporation test using five standard strains or in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene conversion assay using strain D4, either with or without S-9 for activation. A weak clastogenic effect for a sample of Caramel Colour III in CHO cells was abolished in the presence of S-9. Two samples of Caramel Colour IV were not clastogenic in CHO cells. Salmonella pre-incubation tests without S-9 also failed to reveal any mutagenic activity for any of the caramel colours tested. The Caramel Colour III sample that showed clastogenic activity in CHO cells in vitro did not induce micronuclei when evaluated in a mouse bone marrow assay. These results are in general agreement with reports in the literature regarding the genotoxicity of caramel colours, and support the conclusion that caramel colours do not pose a genotoxic hazard to humans. PMID:1644382

  19. Genotoxicity of Pesticide Waste Contaminated Soil and Its Leachate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. D. SIVANESAN; K. KRISHNAMURTHI; S. D. WACHASUNDER; T. CHAKRABARTI

    2004-01-01

    Improper land disposal of hazardous waste can result in leaching of hazardous constituents which may contaminate ground and surface water leading to adverse impact on human health and environment consequences. The present study utilized mammalian cell culture for the genotoxicity assessment of waste and its leachate. Methods Genotoxic potential and chemical analysis of pesticide derived tarry waste contaminated soil extract and its leachate was assessed using in vitro human lymphocyte cultures and GC-MS. Results The investigation revealed that the soil extract could cause significant to highly significant genotoxicity in the form of DNA strand break at 25 μL (P<0.01), 50 μL, 100 μL and 200 μL (P<0.001) and chromosomal aberration at 25 μL (P<0.01) and 50 μL and 100 μL (P<0.001). The leachate could cause significant DNA strand break and chromosomal aberration only at 100 μL and 200 μL (P<0.01) dose levels. Conclusion The genotoxicity observed is attributed to carbaril and tetra methyl naphthyl carbamate, the major ingredients of the extracts, as revealed by GC-MS.

  20. Genistein genotoxicity: Critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein > 5 μM as non-physiological, and thus 'high' doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of 'the dose defines the poison' applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein

  1. Genistein genotoxicity: critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Catherine B; King, Audrey A

    2007-10-01

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein >5 microM as non-physiological, and thus "high" doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of "the dose defines the poison" applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein. PMID:17688899

  2. Integrated Molecular Analysis Indicates Undetectable Change in DNA Damage in Mice after Continuous Irradiation at ~ 400-fold Natural Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Olipitz, Werner; Wiktor-Brown, Dominika; Shuga, Joe; Pang, Bo; McFaline, Jose; Lonkar, Pallavi; Thomas, Aline; Mutamba, James T; Greenberger, Joel S.; Samson, Leona D.; Dedon, Peter C; Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the event of a nuclear accident, people are exposed to elevated levels of continuous low dose-rate radiation. Nevertheless, most of the literature describes the biological effects of acute radiation. Objectives: DNA damage and mutations are well established for their carcinogenic effects. We assessed several key markers of DNA damage and DNA damage responses in mice exposed to low dose-rate radiation to reveal potential genotoxic effects associated with low dose-rate radiation....

  3. A mitotic phosphorylation feedback network connects Cdk1, Plk1, 53BP1, and Chk2 to inactivate the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vugt, Marcel A T M; Gardino, Alexandra K; Linding, Rune; Ostheimer, Gerard J; Reinhardt, H Christian; Ong, Shao-En; Tan, Chris S; Miao, Hua; Keezer, Susan M; Li, Jeijin; Pawson, Tony; Lewis, Timothy A; Carr, Steven A; Smerdon, Stephen J; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Yaffe, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage checkpoints arrest cell cycle progression to facilitate DNA repair. The ability to survive genotoxic insults depends not only on the initiation of cell cycle checkpoints but also on checkpoint maintenance. While activation of DNA damage checkpoints has been studied extensively, molecular...

  4. Evaluation of the genotoxicity/mutagenicity and antigenotoxicity/antimutagenicity induced by propolis and Baccharis dracunculifolia, by in vitro study with HTC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Matheus Mantuanelli; Matsumoto, Sílvia Tamie; Jamal, Cláudia Masrouah; Malaspina, Osmar; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2016-06-01

    The ethanolic extract of propolis, especially the Brazilian green type, is widely and mainly used for therapeutic purposes despite the lack of knowledge about its effects and its cellular mode of action. This type of propolis, derived from Baccharis dracunculifolia (alecrim-do-campo), has been extensively commercialized and the consumers use it to enhance health. This work aimed to assess the genotoxic/mutagenic and antigenotoxic/antimutagenic potentials of the ethanolic extracts of Brazilian green propolis and of B. dracunculifolia, on mammalian cells. It was not observed genotoxic and mutagenic effects by both extracts. After evaluate the exposure of the cells to each extract with a recognized mutagen, simultaneously, the results showed a significant reduction on DNA damage. The experiment carried out with a pre-incubation period was more effective than without incubation test, showing that the tested extracts were able to inactivate the mutagen before it could react with the DNA. PMID:26891814

  5. Somatic cell genotoxicity at the glycophorin A locus in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an assay for detecting variant erythrocytes that occur as a result of in vivo allele loss at the glycophorin A (GPA) locus on chromosome 4 in humans. This gene codes for an erythroid- specific cell surface glycoprotein, and with our assay we are able to detect rare variant erythrocytes that have lost expression of one of the two GPA alleles. Two distinctly different variant cell types are detected with this assay. One variant cell type (called N OE) is hemizygous. Our assay also detects homozygous variant erythrocytes that have lost expression of the GPA(M) allele and express the GPA(N) allele at twice the heterozygous level. The results of this assay are an enumeration of the frequency of N OE and NN variant cell types for each individual analyzed. These variant cell frequencies provide a measure of the amount of somatic cell genotoxicity that has occurred at the GPA locus. Such genotoxicity could be the result of (1) reactions of toxic chemicals to which the individual has been exposed, or (2) high energy radiation effects on erythroid precursor cells, or (3) errors in DNA replication or repair in these cells of the bone marrow. Thus, the GPA-based variant cell frequency can serve as a biodosimeter that indicates the amount of genotoxic exposure each individual has received. Because two very different kinds of variant cells are enumerated, different kinds of genotoxicity should be distinguishable. Results of the GPA somatic genotoxicity assay may also provide valuable information for cancer-risk estimation on each individual. 16 refs

  6. Protective Effect of Curcumin against Ionizing Radiation (IR)-induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in HepG2 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has many practical applications such as medicine, foods, agricultures, industries, and research laboratories. However, the increasing use of radiation is associated with radiation accidents threatening human health. It is well known that exposure to IR gives rise to genomic alterations, mutagenesis, and cell death. IR is absorbed directly by DNA, leading to various DNA damages (single or double-strand breaks, base damage, and DNA-DNA or DNA-protein cross-linkages) in many living organisms. Therefore, the development of effective and nontoxic radioprotective agents is of considerable interest. Curcumin (C12H20O6, structure is the major yellow component of Curcuma longa with biological activities (antioxidant, anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties). It has been widely used as food and medicine for a long time. The aim of our present study is to investigate the protective effects of curcumin against IR-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in cultured HepG2 cells

  7. Genotoxic effects of bisphenol A on somatic cells of female mice, alone and in combination with X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajowik, Aneta; Radzikowska, Joanna; Dobrzyńska, Małgorzata M

    2013-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a monomer used in the manufacture of epoxy, polycarbonate, and polystyrene resins, is a xenoestrogen present in many consumer products. We investigated the effects of 2-week exposure to BPA, either alone or in combination with X-rays, on the induction of DNA damage in somatic cells of female mice in vivo. The micronucleus and alkaline comet assays were used to evaluate genotoxicity. BPA induced DNA strand breaks in lung cells but not in bone marrow lymphocytes, liver, kidney, or spleen cells. Induction of micronuclei was observed only in polychromatic reticulocytes of peripheral blood. Levels of damage following combination exposure to ionizing radiation plus BPA depended on tissue, assay, and time. PMID:23954285

  8. Photoelectrochemical Sensors for the Rapid Detection of DNA Damage Induced by Some Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    M. Jamaluddin Ahmed; Bin-Tian Zhang; Liang-Hong Guo

    2010-01-01

    Photoelectrochemcal sensors were developed for the rapid detection of oxidative DNA damage induced by titanium dioxide and polystyrene nanoparticles. Each sensor is a multilayer film prepared on a tin oxide nanoparticle electrode using layer- by-layer self assembly and is composed of separate layer of a photoelectrochemical indicator, DNA. The organic compound and heavy metals represent genotoxic chemicals leading two major damaging mechanisms, DNA adduct formation and DNA oxidation. The DN...

  9. PARP-1 mechanism for coupling DNA damage detection to poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Langelier, Marie-France; Pascal, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) regulates gene transcription, cell death signaling, and DNA repair through production of the posttranslational modification poly(ADP-ribose). During the cellular response to genotoxic stress PARP-1 rapidly associates with DNA damage, which robustly stimulates poly(ADP-ribose) production over a low basal level of PARP-1 activity. DNA damage-dependent PARP-1 activity is central to understanding PARP-1 biological function, but structural insights into the m...

  10. AFFINITY OF LIGNIN PREPARATIONS TOWARDS GENOTOXIC COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božena Košíková

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chemicals may be modulated by other chemicals, including those prepared by organic synthesis. Consid-ering the several drawbacks of synthetic compounds vis-a-vis the human organism, the lignin biomass component was examined for this purpose. The binding affinity of lignin samples prepared by chemical and biological modification of lignin products derived from chemical wood treatment towards for N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDA was examined. The protective role of the lignin samples against carcinogenesis was tested on a well-known model carcinogen, N-methyl-N´-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG. The observed ability of a series of lignin preparations to reduce alkylation damage of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA on hamster cells in vitro could be explained by their affinity to bind N-nitrosoamines. The results indicate that lignin has potential to protect living organisms against damaging effects of different genotoxicants.

  11. Magnetite Nanoparticles Induce Genotoxicity in the Lungs of Mice via Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Totsuka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are useful for their characteristic properties and are commonly used in various fields. Nanosized-magnetite (MGT is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields, whereas their toxicological properties are not well documented. A safety assessment is thus urgently required for MGT, and genotoxicity is one of the most serious concerns. In the present study, we examined genotoxic effects of MGT using mice and revealed that DNA damage analyzed by a comet assay in the lungs of imprinting control region (ICR mice intratracheally instilled with a single dose of 0.05 or 0.2 mg/animal of MGT was approximately two- to three-fold higher than that of vehicle-control animals. Furthermore, in gpt delta transgenic mice, gpt mutant frequency (MF in the lungs of the group exposed to four consecutive doses of 0.2 mg MGT was significantly higher than in the control group. Mutation spectrum analysis showed that base substitutions were predominantly induced by MGT, among which G:C to A:T transition and G:C to T:A transversion were the most significant. To clarify the mechanism of mutation caused by MGT, we analyzed the formation of DNA adducts in the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. DNA was extracted from lungs of mice 3, 24, 72 and 168 h after intratracheal instillation of 0.2 mg/body of MGT, and digested enzymatically. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG and lipid peroxide-related DNA adducts were quantified by stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Compared with vehicle control, these DNA adduct levels were significantly increased in the MGT-treated mice. In addition to oxidative stress- and inflammation related-DNA adduct formations, inflammatory cell infiltration and focal granulomatous formations were also observed in the lungs of MGT-treated mice. Based on these findings, it is suggested that inflammatory responses are probably involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice.

  12. Impact of heterozygous mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Sensitivity to genotoxic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carriers of heterozygous mutations in BRCA1 / 2 have a high risk of developing breast cancer. The loss of the normal allele with consequent loss of function is frequently observed in tumor level. Since these genes involved in the cellular response to genetic damage, loss of function can determine differences in sensitivity to genotoxic agents. In this study investigated whether heterozygous mutations in BRCA1 / 2 modify the sensitivity to genotoxic drugs using lymphoblastic cell lines developed from individuals who carry no mutation carriers and heterozygous for BRCA1 / 2. Materials and methods. Chemo sensitivity of the cell lines was compared lymphoblastoid GM13709 (mutation in exon 11 of BRCA1 2187delA), GM14622 (level 607stop mutation in exon 11 of BRCA2) and GM 14453 (normal BRCA1 / 2) from exposure to Adriamycin (0.2-2.5 mM) and Cisplatin (0.625- 80mM) through the test of cell viability based on MTT reduction. It determined the inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) from curves regression dose-response obtained after 24 hours of drug exposure. It 5 independent experiments performed in triplicate. Results. The line GM14622 was significantly (P = 0.003) more sensitive to Adriamycin (IC50: 0.585 mM) than the Control GM14453 (IC50: 1.364 mM) online while GM13709 was similar to the control (IC50: 1.324 mM) response. Turn the line GM14622 was also significantly (P = 0.01) more sensitive cisplatin (IC50: 12.7 mM) than the line GM14453 (IC50: 28.6mm) and GM13709 had the same response as the (IC50: 28.6 mM) control. Discussion and Conclusions. Our results suggest that mutations deleterious heterozygous BRCA2 may confer increased sensitivity to drugs genotoxic, which may have implications in the management of patients carrying or BRCA2 mutations in women with sporadic breast cancer exhibit low expression of BRCA2

  13. Genotoxicity induced by Roundup® (Glyphosate) in tegu lizard (Salvator merianae) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumburg, Laura G; Siroski, Pablo A; Poletta, Gisela L; Mudry, Marta D

    2016-06-01

    Environmental contaminants produce multiple adverse consequences at individual, population and ecosystem levels. High volumes of agrochemicals applied to great variety of crops, together with agricultural expansion, generate great concerns due to the impact for the environment and large risk implicated for wildlife. The lack of data on these threats is striking. The tegu lizard (Salvator merianae) is one of the species that live in environments under contaminant effects. Several characteristics allow proposing this species as a potential sentinel organism for the monitoring of pesticides in their habitat. The present study is the first report about genotoxicity in tegu lizard neonates after embryonic exposure to Roundup® (glyphosate 66.2%). The micronucleus test (MN), nuclear abnormalities (NAs) assay and comet assay (CA) were used as biomarkers of genotoxic effects induced in erythrocytes by topical exposure of the eggs to the glyphosate commercial formulation Roundup® (RU), in laboratory controlled conditions. A total of 96 eggs were distributed in six groups exposed to RU (50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600μg/egg), one positive control (PC; 200μg cyclophosphamide/egg) and one negative control (NC; distilled water). No teratogenic effects were observed in any of the exposed or control neonates. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in all concentrations higher than 100μg/egg with respect to NC (p0.05). Our results provide new information about the undesirable effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulations RU on this lizard species that inhabits areas permanently exposed to several pesticide formulations. We consider of utmost necessity a strict regulation of the agrochemical application conditions in those environments near to places where wild populations of terrestrial and aquatic species live, in order to minimize the adverse effects on ecosystems. PMID:27155487

  14. Genotoxicity testing of peptides: Folate deprivation as a marker of exaggerated pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guérard, Melanie, E-mail: melanie.guerard@roche.com; Zeller, Andreas; Festag, Matthias; Schubert, Christine; Singer, Thomas; Müller, Lutz

    2014-09-15

    The incidence of micronucleated-cells is considered to be a marker of a genotoxic event and can be caused by direct- or indirect-DNA reactive mechanisms. In particular, small increases in the incidence of micronuclei, which are not associated with toxicity in the target tissue or any structurally altering properties of the compound, trigger the suspicion that an indirect mechanism could be at play. In a bone marrow micronucleus test of a synthetic peptide (a dual agonist of the GLP-1 and GIP receptors) that had been integrated into a regulatory 13-week repeat-dose toxicity study in the rat, small increases in the incidence of micronuclei had been observed, together with pronounced reductions in food intake and body weight gain. Because it is well established that folate plays a crucial role in maintaining genomic integrity and pronounced reductions in food intake and body weight gain were observed, folate levels were determined from plasma samples initially collected for toxicokinetic analytics. A dose-dependent decrease in plasma folate levels was evident after 4 weeks of treatment at the mid and high dose levels, persisted until the end of the treatment duration of 13-weeks and returned to baseline levels during the recovery period of 4 weeks. Based on these properties, and the fact that the compound tested (peptide) per se is not expected to reach the nucleus and cause DNA damage, the rationale is supported that the elevated incidence of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes is directly linked to the exaggerated pharmacology of the compound resulting in a decreased folate level. - Highlights: • A synthetic peptide has been evaluated for potential genotoxicity • Small increases in an integrated (13-weeks) micronucleus test were observed • Further, animals had a pronounced reductions in food intake and body weight gain • A dose-dependent decrease in plasma folate levels was evident from week 4 onwards • Elevated micronuclei-incidence due to the

  15. Genotoxic effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on human blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The possible health hazard of exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELFMFs) has became an issue of considerable public concern. Although many epidemiological studies have been done, a definite correlation between exposure to environmental ELFMFs and cancer has not been found.. According to several investigations, ELF fields cannot directly damage DNA or cause mutations (NRPB,1992; Verschaeve 1995). On the other hand few studies have addressed the possibility that ELF magnetic fields could be able to enhance the genotoxic effect of known chemical or physical mutagens (Hintenlang, 1993; Maes et al., 2000). The aim of the present study is to investigate the potential genotoxic effect of ELFMFs alone or in combination with X rays on human blood cells. Four different cytogenetic tests (chromosome aberration, cytokinesis-block micronucleus, sister chromatid exchange and comet assay) have been applied. Human blood samples were exposed to 50 Hz, 1 mT uniform magnetic field generated by a Helmholtz coil system, in incubator. Whole blood samples from three healthy donors (30-40 years) were exposed to ELF MFs for 2 h and further blood samples from other three donors were diluted in culture medium in absence of phytoemoagglutinin and then exposed for 48 h to ELF fields. A sham control consisting on a same current system, with the coils activated in anti-parallel direction was used. A positive control (1 Gy of X-rays) were also included. A potential synergistic effect between ELF and X-rays (1 Gy) exposures was also investigated. Results did not show any significant differences between 2 h ELFMFs-exposed and unexposed samples for each cytogenetic endpoints analyzed. Similarly, the combined treatments failed to indicate the presence of any synergistic effect between the ELF magnetic fields and the physical mutagen. Results from the 48 h exposure time are currently being processed. (author)

  16. Curcumin nanoparticles loaded hydrogels protects against aflatoxin B1-induced genotoxicity in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A; Salman, Asmaa S; Ibrahim, Mohamed I M; El-Kady, Ahmed A; Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H; Hassan, Nabila S; Waly, Ahmed I

    2016-08-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate the protective role of curcumin nanoparticles loaded hydrogels (Cur-NPs-Hgs) against AFB1-induced genotoxicity in rat liver. Animals were divided into 7 treatment groups and treated orally for 3 weeks as follow: the control group, the group treated with Hgs alone (0.5 ml/rat), the groups treated with low or high dose of Cur-NPs-Hgs (100 or 200 mg/kg b.w), the group treated with AFB1 (0.125 mg/kg b.w) and the groups treated with AFB1 plus the low or high dose of Cur-NPs-Hgs. Blood ant liver samples were collected for different biochemical, genetical, histological and histochemical analysis. The results revealed that the prepared Cur-NPs have nearly spherical shape with average size of 140 ± 20 nm and negative zeta potential value of 30.7 ± 2.57 mV. The in vivo results showed that treatment with AFB1 decreased the body weight accompanied biochemical, genotoxicity and histological disturbances. The combined treatment with AFB1 and Cur-Nps-Hgs at the two tested doses succeeded to induce a significant protection against AFB1. It could be concluded that Cur-NPs-Hgs is a promise candidate to protect against AFB1-induce liver damage in the high incidence area. Moreover, Hgs are excellent candidates as drug delivery system. PMID:27288928

  17. Genotoxicity of Chlorpyrifos and the Antimutagenic Role of Lettuce Leaves in Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilia Badrakhan Abdelaziz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chlorpyrifos [O O-diethyl-O-(3 5 6-trichloro-2-pyridyl-phosphorothioate] is one of the most widelyused organophosphate insecticides. Previous studies proved that chlorpyrifos, at different doses,induced genotoxicity. In Egyptian foods, the residual levels of pesticides are often higher than thosefound in developed country ones. So the aim of this research was to evaluate the genotoxicity of theinsecticide chlorpyrifos at doses equal to its maximum residue limit (MRL in the leafy vegetables, itsdouble and quadruple (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight in somatic and germ cells of male mice.In addition to that, evaluating the role of lettuce leaves as antigenotoxic in reducing the genotoxiceffects of chlorpyrifos tested doses when concurrently administrated to these animals. The studywas conducted on adult male laboratory mice at three levels: bone marrow cells as a model formitotic chromosome aberrations, spermatocytes as a model for meiotic chromosomes and spermcount and morphology. The results of the present study indicate that the treatment of male micewith chlorpyrifos by oral gavages for three months induced significant increase in the frequencies oftotal chromosomal aberrations in both somatic and germ cells in relation to control groups. Resultsof the sperm analysis showed that chlorpyrifos induced significant decrease in the sperm countwhen compared to negative control. Furthermore, it induced significant increase in head and tailsperm abnormalities, among which coiled tail was considered the most obvious sperm abnormalityinduced by chlorpyrifos. At the same time, the present study indicated that lettuce leaves feedconcurrently with three doses of chlorpyrifos could not protect cells from damage.

  18. Necdin modulates proliferative cell survival of human cells in response to radiation-induced genotoxic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The finite replicative lifespan of cells, termed cellular senescence, has been proposed as a protective mechanism against the proliferation of oncogenically damaged cells, that fuel cancer. This concept is further supported by the induction of premature senescence, a process which is activated when an oncogene is expressed in normal primary cells as well as following intense genotoxic stresses. Thus, deregulation of genes that control this process, like the tumor suppressor p53, may contribute to promoting cancer by allowing cells to bypass senescence. A better understanding of the genes that contribute to the establishment of senescence is therefore warranted. Necdin interacts with p53 and is also a p53 target gene, although the importance of Necdin in the p53 response is not clearly understood. In this study, we first investigated Necdin protein expression during replicative senescence and premature senescence induced by gamma irradiation and by the overexpression of oncogenic RasV12. Gain and loss of function experiments were used to evaluate the contribution of Necdin during the senescence process. Necdin expression declined during replicative aging of IMR90 primary human fibroblasts or following induction of premature senescence. Decrease in Necdin expression seemed to be a consequence of the establishment of senescence since the depletion of Necdin in human cells did not induce a senescence-like growth arrest nor a flat morphology or SA-β-galactosidase activity normally associated with senescence. Similarly, overexpression of Necdin did not affect the life span of IMR90 cells. However, we demonstrate that in normal human cells, Necdin expression mimicked the effect of p53 inactivation by increasing radioresistance. This result suggests that Necdin potentially attenuate p53 signaling in response to genotoxic stress in human cells and supports similar results describing an inhibitory function of Necdin over p53-dependent growth arrest in mice

  19. Hyparrhenia hirta: A potential protective agent against hematotoxicity and genotoxicity of sodium nitrate in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaziz-Ketata, Hanen; Salah, Ghada Ben; Mahjoubi, Amira; Aidi, Zied; Kallel, Choumous; Kammoun, Hassen; Fakhfakh, Faiza; Zeghal, Najiba

    2015-11-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the adverse hematotoxic and genotoxic effects of water nitrate pollution on male adult rats and the use of hyparrhenia hirta methanolic extract in alleviating these effects. Sodium nitrate (NaNO3 ) was administered to adult rats by oral gavage at a dose of 400 mg kg(-1) bw daily for 50 days, while hyparrhenia hirta methanolic extract was given by drinking water at a dose of 1.5 mg mL(-1) (200 mg kg(-1) bw). The NaNO3 -treated group showed a significant decrease in red blood cell count, hemoglobin and hematocrit and a significant increase in total white blood cell, in neutrophil and eosinophil counts. Platelet count, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration remained unchanged in treated groups compared to those of controls. Meanwhile, the results showed a marked reduction in the antioxidant enzyme activities, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, along with an elevation in the level of lipid peroxidation and a reduction in the total glutathione content, indicating the induction of oxidative stress in the erythrocytes of NaNO3 -treated group. Interestingly, NaNO3 treatment showed a significant increase in the frequencies of total chromosomal aberrations, aberrant metaphases and micronucleus in bone-marrow cells. The oxidative stress induced by nitrate treatment might be the major cause for chromosomal rearrangements as free radicals leading to DNA damage. Hyparrhenia hirta methanolic extract appeared to be effective against hematotoxic and genotoxic changes induced by nitrate, as evidenced by the improvement of the markers cited above. PMID:24740966

  20. Genotoxicity testing of peptides: Folate deprivation as a marker of exaggerated pharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of micronucleated-cells is considered to be a marker of a genotoxic event and can be caused by direct- or indirect-DNA reactive mechanisms. In particular, small increases in the incidence of micronuclei, which are not associated with toxicity in the target tissue or any structurally altering properties of the compound, trigger the suspicion that an indirect mechanism could be at play. In a bone marrow micronucleus test of a synthetic peptide (a dual agonist of the GLP-1 and GIP receptors) that had been integrated into a regulatory 13-week repeat-dose toxicity study in the rat, small increases in the incidence of micronuclei had been observed, together with pronounced reductions in food intake and body weight gain. Because it is well established that folate plays a crucial role in maintaining genomic integrity and pronounced reductions in food intake and body weight gain were observed, folate levels were determined from plasma samples initially collected for toxicokinetic analytics. A dose-dependent decrease in plasma folate levels was evident after 4 weeks of treatment at the mid and high dose levels, persisted until the end of the treatment duration of 13-weeks and returned to baseline levels during the recovery period of 4 weeks. Based on these properties, and the fact that the compound tested (peptide) per se is not expected to reach the nucleus and cause DNA damage, the rationale is supported that the elevated incidence of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes is directly linked to the exaggerated pharmacology of the compound resulting in a decreased folate level. - Highlights: • A synthetic peptide has been evaluated for potential genotoxicity • Small increases in an integrated (13-weeks) micronucleus test were observed • Further, animals had a pronounced reductions in food intake and body weight gain • A dose-dependent decrease in plasma folate levels was evident from week 4 onwards • Elevated micronuclei-incidence due to the

  1. Replication stress and oxidative damage contribute to aberrant constitutive activation of DNA damage signalling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, J; Hamerlik, P; Stockhausen, Marie;

    2010-01-01

    brain and grade II astrocytomas, despite the degree of DDR activation was higher in grade II tumors. Markers indicative of ongoing DNA replication stress (Chk1 activation, Rad17 phosphorylation, replication protein A foci and single-stranded DNA) were present in GBM cells under high- or low...... and indicate that replication stress, rather than oxidative stress, fuels the DNA damage signalling in early stages of astrocytoma development.......Malignant gliomas, the deadliest of brain neoplasms, show rampant genetic instability and resistance to genotoxic therapies, implicating potentially aberrant DNA damage response (DDR) in glioma pathogenesis and treatment failure. Here, we report on gross, aberrant constitutive activation of DNA...

  2. Genotoxicity and molecular response of silver nanoparticle (NP-based hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Liming

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since silver-nanoparticles (NPs possess an antibacterial activity, they were commonly used in medical products and devices, food storage materials, cosmetics, various health care products, and industrial products. Various silver-NP based medical devices are available for clinical uses, such as silver-NP based dressing and silver-NP based hydrogel (silver-NP-hydrogel for medical applications. Although the previous data have suggested silver-NPs induced toxicity in vivo and in vitro, there is lack information about the mechanisms of biological response and potential toxicity of silver-NP-hydrogel. Methods In this study, the genotoxicity of silver-NP-hydrogel was assayed using cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN. The molecular response was studied using DNA microarray and GO pathway analysis. Results and discussion The results of global gene expression analysis in HeLa cells showed that thousands of genes were up- or down-regulated at 48 h of silver-NP-hydrogel exposure. Further GO pathway analysis suggested that fourteen theoretical activating signaling pathways were attributed to up-regulated genes; and three signal pathways were attributed to down-regulated genes. It was discussed that the cells protect themselves against silver NP-mediated toxicity through up-regulating metallothionein genes and anti-oxidative stress genes. The changes in DNA damage, apoptosis and mitosis pathway were closely related to silver-NP-induced cytotoxicity and chromosome damage. The down-regulation of CDC14A via mitosis pathway might play a role in potential genotoxicity induced by silver-NPs. Conclusions The silver-NP-hydrogel induced micronuclei formation in cellular level and broad spectrum molecular responses in gene expression level. The results of signal pathway analysis suggested that the balances between anti-ROS response and DNA damage, chromosome instability, mitosis inhibition might play important roles in silver-NP induced toxicity

  3. Genotoxicity of 2-bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fanxue; Yan, Jian; Li, Yan [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fu, Peter P. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fossom, Linda H.; Sood, Ramesh K.; Mans, Daniel J.; Chu, Pei-I [Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Moore, Martha M. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Chen, Tao, E-mail: tao.chen@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Impurities are present in any drug substance or drug product. They can be process-related impurities that are not completely removed during purification or are formed due to the degradation of the drug substance over the product shelf-life. Unlike the drug substance, impurities generally do not have beneficial effects and may present a risk without associated benefit. Therefore, their amount should be minimized. 2-Bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone (BCP) is an impurity of bupropion, a second-generation antidepressant and a smoking cessation aid. The United States Pharmacopeia recommends an acceptable level for BCP that is not more than 0.1% of the bupropion. Because exposure to genotoxic impurities even at low levels is of significant concern, it is important to determine whether or not BCP is genotoxic. Therefore, in this study the Ames test and the in vitro micronucleus assay were conducted to evaluate the genotoxicity of BCP. BCP was mutagenic with S9 metabolic activation, increasing the mutant frequencies in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 22- and 145-fold induction over the controls in Salmonella strains TA100 and TA1535, respectively. BCP was also positive in the in vitro micronucleus assay, resulting in up to 3.3- and 5.1-fold increase of micronucleus frequency for treatments in the absence and presence of S9, respectively; and 9.9- and 7.4-fold increase of aneuploidies without and with S9, respectively. The addition of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an antioxidant, reduced the genotoxicity of BCP in both assays. Further studies showed that BCP treatment resulted in induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the TK6 cells. The results suggest that BCP is mutagenic, clastogenic, and aneugenic, and that these activities are mediated via generation of reactive metabolites. - Highlights: • 2-Bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone is an impurity of bupropion. • BCP was positive in both the Ames test and the in vitro micronucleus assay. • It induced high frequencies of

  4. Genotoxicity of 2-bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impurities are present in any drug substance or drug product. They can be process-related impurities that are not completely removed during purification or are formed due to the degradation of the drug substance over the product shelf-life. Unlike the drug substance, impurities generally do not have beneficial effects and may present a risk without associated benefit. Therefore, their amount should be minimized. 2-Bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone (BCP) is an impurity of bupropion, a second-generation antidepressant and a smoking cessation aid. The United States Pharmacopeia recommends an acceptable level for BCP that is not more than 0.1% of the bupropion. Because exposure to genotoxic impurities even at low levels is of significant concern, it is important to determine whether or not BCP is genotoxic. Therefore, in this study the Ames test and the in vitro micronucleus assay were conducted to evaluate the genotoxicity of BCP. BCP was mutagenic with S9 metabolic activation, increasing the mutant frequencies in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 22- and 145-fold induction over the controls in Salmonella strains TA100 and TA1535, respectively. BCP was also positive in the in vitro micronucleus assay, resulting in up to 3.3- and 5.1-fold increase of micronucleus frequency for treatments in the absence and presence of S9, respectively; and 9.9- and 7.4-fold increase of aneuploidies without and with S9, respectively. The addition of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an antioxidant, reduced the genotoxicity of BCP in both assays. Further studies showed that BCP treatment resulted in induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the TK6 cells. The results suggest that BCP is mutagenic, clastogenic, and aneugenic, and that these activities are mediated via generation of reactive metabolites. - Highlights: • 2-Bromo-3′-chloropropiophenone is an impurity of bupropion. • BCP was positive in both the Ames test and the in vitro micronucleus assay. • It induced high frequencies of

  5. Sulforaphane inhibits CYP1A1 activity and promotes genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China); Zhuang, Shulin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China); Zhang, Chao; Dai, Heping [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Liu, Weiping, E-mail: wliu@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Increasing environmental pollution by carcinogens such as some of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has prompted growing interest in searching for chemopreventive compounds which are readily obtainable. Sulforaphane (SFN) is isolated from cruciferous vegetables and has the potentials to reduce carcinogenesis through various pathways. In this study, we studied the effects of SFN on CYP1A1 activity and genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The results showed that SFN inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells by directly inhibiting CYP1A1 activity, probably through binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1 revealed by molecular docking. However, SFN promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells and reduced the viability of initiated yeast cells. Besides, it is surprising that SFN also failed to reduce genotoxicity induced by other genotoxic reagents which possess different mechanisms to lead to DNA damage. Currently, it is difficult to predict whether SFN has the potentials to reduce the risk of TCDD based on the conflicting observations in the study. Therefore, further studies should be urgent to reveal the function and mechanism of SFN in the stress of such POPs on human health. - Highlights: • Sulforaphane inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells. • Sulforaphane may bind to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1. • Sulforaphane promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells. • Sulforaphane may promote DNA damage by DNA strand breaks or DNA alkylation.

  6. Sun Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Sun Damage A A A The sun has a profound effect over years of exposure ... changes. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun accounts for most premature skin aging. Many skin ...

  7. In vivo genotoxicity of furan in F344 rats at cancer bioassay doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Petibone, Dayton M; Latendresse, John R; Pearce, Mason G; Muskhelishvili, Levan; White, Gene A; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Shaddock, Joseph G; McDaniel, Lea P; Doerge, Daniel R; Morris, Suzanne M; Bishop, Michelle E; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Aidoo, Anane; Heflich, Robert H

    2012-06-01

    Furan, a potent rodent liver carcinogen, is found in many cooked food items and thus represents a human cancer risk. Mechanisms for furan carcinogenicity were investigated in male F344 rats using the in vivo Comet and micronucleus assays, combined with analysis of histopathological and gene expression changes. In addition, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III (EndoIII)-sensitive DNA damage was monitored as a measure of oxidative DNA damage. Rats were treated by gavage on four consecutive days with 2, 4, and 8mg/kg bw furan, doses that were tumorigenic in 2-year cancer bioassays, and with two higher doses, 12 and 16mg/kg. Rats were killed 3h after the last dose, a time established as producing maximum levels of DNA damage in livers of furan-treated rats. Liver Comet assays indicated that both DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines increased in a near-linear dose-responsive fashion, with statistically significant increases detected at cancer bioassay doses. No DNA damage was detected in bone marrow, a non-target tissue for cancer, and peripheral blood micronucleus assays were negative. Histopathological evaluation of liver from furan-exposed animals produced evidence of inflammation, single-cell necrosis, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. In addition, genes related to apoptosis, cell-cycle checkpoints, and DNA-repair were expressed at a slightly lower level in the furan-treated livers. Although a mixed mode of action involving direct DNA binding cannot be ruled out, the data suggest that furan induces cancer in rat livers mainly through a secondary genotoxic mechanism involving oxidative stress, accompanied by inflammation, cell proliferation, and toxicity. PMID:22507866

  8. Genotoxic effects of environmental estrogen-like compounds in CHO-K1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayama, Sumiko; Nakagawa, Yoshio; Tayama, Kuniaki

    2008-01-01

    Some environmental estrogen-like compounds, such as bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-octylphenol (OP), propyl p-hydroxybenzoate (P-PHBA), and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (B-PHBA), synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), and natural estrogen, 17beta-estradiol (E2), were studied for their genotoxicity in CHO-K1 cells using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosome aberration (CA), and DNA strand break (comet) assays. Six of the chemicals, excluding E2, caused DNA migration in the comet assay and induced SCEs at one or more of the highest doses. Among the chemicals, OP produced an especially high incidence of SCEs. Structural CA was induced by five of the chemicals, excluding OP and NP, and BPA, E2, and DES also induced aneuploid cells. E2 and DES particularly increased the rate of polyploidy at high doses. The incidence of colchicine-mitosis-like (c-mitotic) figures suggesting spindle disrupting effects was also detected with five of the chemicals, excluding OP and NP, and six of the chemicals, excluding E2, caused endoreduplication (ERD), a form of nuclear polyploidization induced by block of cell cycle at G2 phase, at one or more high doses. Our present results suggest that OP and NP cause repairable DNA damage, including SCEs, and do not result in CA, while the damage caused by DES, BPA, P-PHBA, and B-PHBA results in the induction of CAs together with SCEs probably because of imperfect repair. We are unable to explain the observation that the DNA damage caused by E2 resulted in CA induction but not DNA migration or SCE induction, except for speculating that the DNA damage is different from that caused by DES and the estrogen-like chemicals. Our findings also suggest that E2, DES and BPA have aneuploidogenic properties, and that the former two of chemicals also are polyploidy-inducing agents. PMID:17913570

  9. Chromium oxide nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity and p53-dependent apoptosis in human lung alveolar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Violet Aileen; Jain, Abhishek Kumar; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-10-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2 O3 ) nanoparticles (NPs) are being increasingly used as a catalyst for aromatic compound manufacture, abrading agents and as pigments (e.g., Viridian). Owing to increased applications, it is important to study the biological effects of Cr2 O3 NPs on human health. The lung is one of the main exposure routes to nanomaterials; therefore, the present study was designed to determine the genotoxic and apoptotic effect of Cr2 O3 NPs in human lung epithelial cells (A549). The study also elucidated the molecular mechanism of its toxicity. Cr2 O3 NPs led to DNA damage, which was deduced by comet assay and cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. The damage could be mediated by the increased levels of reactive oxygen species. Further, the oxygen species led to a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in the ratio of BAX/Bcl-2 leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis induced by Cr2 O3 NPs, which ultimately leads to cell death. Hence, there is a need of regulations to be imposed in NP usage. The study provided insight into the caspase-dependent mechanistic pathway of apoptosis. PMID:26086747

  10. Genotoxicity estimation of tumor growth in organisms preliminary irradiated at low doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmarakov I. O.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine a level of nuclear DNA stability in the liver and blood lymphocytes of an organism with Guerin’s carcinoma, developing at low doses irradiation background. Methods. Single cell DNA microelectrophoresis, electrophoresis of total and fragmented DNA, spectrophotometer titration of DNA complexes with pironin G. Results. The damage of nuclear DNA in the liver and blood lymphocytes at the initial stages after preliminary irradiation at low doses (daily dose 36.12×10–4 Kl/kg has mono- directional character, mostly expressed in the blood lymphocytes by increasing of 10–50 kb, 2 kb and less DNA fragments amount. At the same time, nuclear DNA damage induced by radiation in the liver and blood lymphocytes of the organism with the developing tumor manifests itself by a high rate of destructivity at the terminal stages of Guerin’s carcinoma growth only, mostly revealed in the liver of irradiated rats with tumor. Conclusions. The observed instability of nuclear DNA in the lymphocytes and liver may reduce their adequate functioning that could promote oncogenesis in the irradiated organism, and also cause an increase of drugs genotoxicity at the efforts of malignant growth elimination

  11. Evaluation of genotoxicity in patients subjected to panoramic radiography by micronucleus assay on epithelial cells of the oral mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallak Arora

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiography is one of the most valuable diagnostic tools used in comprehensive dental care. Although there is no safe level of radiation exposure, the possible risk associated with exposure to radiation, must be elucidated. To date, a variety of assays have been proposed to assess the mutagenic potential of genotoxicants; however, these methods are typically laborious and time consuming. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of routinely used panoramic radiation exposure in exfoliated epithelial cells as measured by the formation of micronuclei and to compare the genotoxicity of X-rays on keratinized epithelial gingival cells and the nonkeratinized buccal epithelial cells.The study included 53 healthy individuals with a mean age of 25.21 ±12.67 years. Specimens of exfoliated epithelial cells were collected from patients subjected to panoramic radiography before and 10 days after radiation exposure. The cells were stained with Giemsa and evaluated for micronuclei by scoring 1000 cells per slide.In our study, the genotoxic effect of radiation exposure from panoramic radiography showed a statistically significant increase in the MN frequency in buccal epithelial cells. A significant correlation was observed between the age of the subjects and micronuclei, although no such correlation was found between gender and micronuclei count.MN test serves as a simple biomarker indicating the direct exposure to DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation, emphasizing great sensitivity even for exposure to low doses during radiation screening. Thus, panoramic dental radiography should be cautiously used only when necessary.

  12. Genotoxicity evaluation and a primary risk assessment of organic pollutants in the drinking water sources of Nanjing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi-qiang; WU Yu-lin; CHEN Yuan-gao; KONG Zhi-ming

    2006-01-01

    An increasing number of industrial, agricultural, and commercial chemicals in the aquatic environment leads to various deleterious effects on organisms, which is becoming an increasingly serious problem in China. In this study, the comet assay was conducted to investigate the genotoxicity to human body caused by organic concentrates in the drinking water sources of Nanjing City from Yangtze River of China, and health and ecology risk due to expose to these organic pollutants were evaluated with the multimedia environmental assessment system (MEAS). For all the water samples, they were collected from four different locations in the drinking water sourcr samples, es of Nanjing City. The results of the comet assay showed that all the organic concentrates from the water samples could induce different levels DNA damages on human peripheral blood lymphocytes, and a statistically significant difference (p<0.01) was observed compared with the solvent control, which demonstrated the genotoxicity was in existence.According to the ambient severity (AS) of individual compound, we had sorted out the main organic pollutants in the drinking water source of the four waterworks, and the results showed that there was some potential hazard to human body for all the source water,namely the total ambient severity (TAS) of health for each water source was more than 1. However, the TAS of ecology for each water source was less than 1, which indicated that it was safe to ecology. The results of this investigation demonstrate the application of the comet assay and the MEAS in aquatic environmental monitoring studies, and the comet assay found to be fast, sensitive, and suitable for genotoxicity monitoring programs of drinking water source.

  13. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiyong [First affiliated hospital, Zhejiang University, School of medicine, Cancer Center, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Zhang, Xiaoshan [Department of Genetics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Genetics Unit 1010, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Teng, Lisong, E-mail: lsteng@zju.edu.cn [First affiliated hospital, Zhejiang University, School of medicine, Cancer Center, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Legerski, Randy J., E-mail: rlegersk@mdanderson.org [Department of Genetics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Genetics Unit 1010, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  14. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  15. Damage Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Marie

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of Task 2.2 of the HARDER project is according to the work package description: For various structural configurations of the struck ship and using the results of Task 2.1, the probability distributions for the damage location and size will be derived. The format will be similar to the...... damage statistics and bow height statistics for vessels in the world fleet. The proposals for the p-, r-, and v-factors have been compared to factors from current regulation by examples.......The purpose of Task 2.2 of the HARDER project is according to the work package description: For various structural configurations of the struck ship and using the results of Task 2.1, the probability distributions for the damage location and size will be derived. The format will be similar to the p...... between the damage location, the damage sizes and the main particulars of the struck vessel. From the numerical simulation and the analyse of the damage statistics it is found that the current formulation from the IMO SLF 43/3/2 can be used as basis for determination of the p-, r-, and v...

  16. Biomonitoring of genotoxic risk in radar facility workers: comparison of the comet assay with micronucleus assay and chromatid breakage assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genotoxic risks of occupational exposure in a radar facility were evaluated by using alkaline comet assay, micronucleus assay and chromatid breakage assay on peripheral blood leukocytes in exposed subjects and corresponding controls. Results show that occupational exposure to microwave radiation correlates with an increase of genome damage in somatic cells. The levels of DNA damage in exposed subjects determined by using alkaline comet assay were increased compared to control and showed interindividual variations. Incidence of micronuclei was also significantly increased compared to baseline control values. After short exposure of cultured lymphocytes to bleomycin, cells of occupationally exposed subjects responded with high numbers of chromatid breaks. Although the level of chromosome damage generated by bleomycin varied greatly between individuals, in exposed subjects a significantly elevated number of chromatid breaks was observed. Our results support data reported in literature indicating that microwave radiation represents a potential DNA-damaging hazard. Alkaline comet assay is confirmed as a sensitive and highly reproducible technique for detection of primary DNA damage inflicted in somatic cells. Micronucleus assay was confirmed as reliable bio-markers of effect and chromatid breakage assay as sensitive bio-marker of individual cancer susceptibility. The results obtained also confirm the necessity to improve measures and to perform accurate health surveillance of individuals occupationally exposed to microwave radiation

  17. Genotoxic effects of 2-dodecyl cyclobutanone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports in vivo experiments with rats who received two different doses of 2-dodecyl cyclobutane administered orally. 16 hours after administration, colon cells were isolated and examined for DNA damage by means of the comet assay. No cytotoxic effects were found with the trypan blue exclusion test. When the '% tail intensity' or the 'tail moment' were used for quantitative analysis with the comet assay, it was found that similar results are obtained for the test group which received a lower dose of 2-dodecyl cyclobutane (1.12 mg/kg of body weight) and the control group which received 2% dimethyl sulfoxide. Administration of higher concentrations of the 2-dodecyl cyclobutane (14.9 mg/kg of body weight) was found to induce minor, but significant DNA damage in the test group. Further experiments will be needed in order to assess the relevance of these results for assessment of health risks due to consumption of irradiated food. (orig./CB)

  18. Metabolomic alterations in human cancer cells by vitamin C-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetaki, Megumi; Tabata, Sho; Nakasuka, Fumie; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous administration of high-dose vitamin C has recently attracted attention as a cancer therapy. High-dose vitamin C induces pro-oxidant effects and selectively kills cancer cells. However, the anticancer mechanisms of vitamin C are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed metabolic changes induced by vitamin C in MCF7 human breast adenocarcinoma and HT29 human colon cancer cells using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). The metabolomic profiles of both cell lines were dramatically altered after exposure to cytotoxic concentrations of vitamin C. Levels of upstream metabolites in the glycolysis pathway and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were increased in both cell lines following treatment with vitamin C, while adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels and adenylate energy charges were decreased concentration-dependently. Treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and reduced glutathione (GSH) significantly inhibited vitamin C-induced cytotoxicity in MCF7 cells. NAC also suppressed vitamin C-dependent metabolic changes, and NAD treatment prevented vitamin C-induced cell death. Collectively, our data suggests that vitamin C inhibited energy metabolism through NAD depletion, thereby inducing cancer cell death. PMID:26350063

  19. Genetic Evidence for Genotoxic Effect of Entecavir, an Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Nucleotide Analog

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Lei; Wu, Xiaohua; He, Fang; Liu, Ying(College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875, Beijing, China); Hu, Xiaoqing; Takeda, Shunichi; Qing, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside analogues (NAs) have been the most frequently used treatment option for chronic hepatitis B patients. However, they may have genotoxic potentials due to their interference with nucleic acid metabolism. Entecavir, a deoxyguanosine analog, is one of the most widely used oral antiviral NAs against hepatitis B virus. It has reported that entecavir gave positive responses in both genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. However the genotoxic mechanism of entecavir remains elusive. To ev...

  20. Ecotoxicological and Genotoxic Evaluation of Buenos Aires City (Argentina) Hospital Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Anahí Magdaleno; Ángela Beatriz Juárez; Valeria Dragani; Magalí Elizabeth Saenz; Marta Paz; Juan Moretton

    2014-01-01

    Hospital wastewater (HWW) constitutes a potential risk to the ecosystems and human health due to the presence of toxic and genotoxic chemical compounds. In the present work we investigated toxicity and genotoxicity of wastewaters from the public hospital of Buenos Aires (Argentina). The effluent from the sewage treatment plant (STP) serving around 10 million inhabitants was also evaluated. The study was carried out between April and September 2012. Toxicity and genotoxicity assessment was per...

  1. Genotoxic Effects of Chlorpyrifos in Freshwater Fish Cirrhinus mrigala Using Micronucleus Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Bhatnagar; Abhay Singh Yadav; Navneet Cheema

    2016-01-01

    The genotoxicity of pesticides is an issue of worldwide concern and chlorpyrifos is one of the largest selling organophosphate agrochemicals that has been widely detected in surface waters of India. The studies on long term genotoxic biomarkers are limited; therefore, present study was carried out to analyze the incidence of nuclear anomalies in the blood cells of fresh water fish Cirrhinus mrigala using micronucleus (MN) assay as a potential tool for assessment of genotoxicity. Acute toxicit...

  2. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to American alligator cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-02-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is a known human carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. We measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in American alligator cells derived from scute tissue. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to alligator cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that alligators may be used as a model for assessing the effects of environmental Cr(VI) contamination as well as for other metals of concern. PMID:26730726

  3. Assessment of genotoxic potential of Tamra Bhasma (incinerated copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Y Chaudhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The presence of metallic content in Ayurvedic drugs became an important burning issue in present days. The usefulness of Bhasmas (incinerated metals/minerals in therapeutics, their safety or toxicity is frequently being raised on different platforms. Considering this, there is a need to develop toxicity profiles of different metals/minerals. Tamra Bhasma (incinerated copper one such metallic formulation is widely used in cardiac and lipid disorders by Ayurvedic Physicians. The present study is aimed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of Tamra Bhasma. Materials and Methods: It was prepared as per classical guidelines and administered to Swiss albino mice for 14 consecutive days. Chromosomal aberration and sperm abnormality assay were studied. Results: All treated groups exhibited significant body weight gain in comparison to cyclophosphamide (CP group. Results revealed no structural deformity in above parameters in comparison to CP group. Conclusion: Reported data showed that both tested samples of Tamra Bhasma were not genotoxic and can be used safely.

  4. Acetaminophen metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity in rat primary hepatocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acetaminophen (APAP) metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity were measured in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Although 3 mM APAP caused a slight increase in cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, cellular glutathione concentration (an index of APAP metabolism) was reduced by 50%. APAP at 7 mM was significantly more toxic to these hepatocytes and had a similar but more marked effect on glutathione concentrations. In spite of its cytotoxicity, neither dose of APAP stimulated DNA repair synthesis when monitored by the rate of incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA following exposure to APAP. Thus, although APAP has been shown to be both hepato- and nephrotoxic in several in vivo and in vitro systems, the reactive toxic metabolite of APAP is not genotoxic in rat primary hepatocyte cultures

  5. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    OpenAIRE

    Carina Ladeira; Susana Viegas; Gomes, Manuel C.

    2015-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN) assay is a comprehensive system for measuring DNA damage; cytostasis and cytotoxicity-DNA damage events are scored specifically in once-divided binucleated cells. The endpoints possible to be measured are micronuclei (MN), a biomarker of chromosome breakage and/or whole chromosome loss, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB), a biomarker of DNA misrepair and/or telomere end-fusions, and nuclear buds (NBUD), a biomarker of elimination of amplified DNA and/...

  6. Genistein suppresses doxorubicin associated genotoxicity in human lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Beg, Tanveer; Siddique, Yasir H.; Ara, Gulshan; Afzal, Mohammad; Azmi, Asfar S

    2011-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a well-known DNA intercalating chemotherapy drug that is widely used for treatment of different cancers. Its clinical utility is limited due to the observed genotoxic side effects on healthy cells suggesting that newer combination and genoprotective regimens are urgently needed for the management of doxorubicin chemotherapy. Some dietary phytochemicals are well known for their protective mechanism of action and genistein from soy is recognized as an anti-oxidant with similar pr...

  7. Antioxidant, genotoxic and antigenotoxic activities of daphne gnidium leaf extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Chaabane Fadwa; Boubaker Jihed; Loussaif Amira; Neffati Aicha; Kilani-Jaziri Somaya; Ghedira Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira Leila

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Plants play a significant role in maintaining human health and improving the quality of human life. They serve humans well as valuable components of food, as well as in cosmetics, dyes, and medicines. In fact, many plant extracts prepared from plants have been shown to exert biological activity in vitro and in vivo. The present study explored antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects of Daphne gnidium leaf extracts. Methods The genotoxic potential of petroleum ether, chlorofor...

  8. Current Studies into the Genotoxic Effects of Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Teng Ng; Li, Jasmine J.; Boon-Huat Bay; Lin-Yue Lanry Yung

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created opportunities for engineers to manufacture superior and more efficient devices and products. Nanomaterials (NMs) are now widely used in consumer products as well as for research applications. However, while the lists of known toxic effects of nanomaterials and nanoparticles (NPs) continue to grow, there is still a vast gap in our knowledge about the genotoxicity of NMs. In this paper, we highlight some NMs of interest and discuss the current in vivo and in vitro stu...

  9. Evaluation of occupational genotoxic risk in a Brazilian hospital

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Many therapeutic, diagnostic and prophylactic procedures used in hospitals are of potential genetic risk. An evaluation was made of genotoxic occupational risk in 42 workers from the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, who had been occupationally exposed to lead (solder), ethylene oxide (sterilization area), antineoplastic drugs (nurses and pharmacists) or ionizing radiation. They were compared with 42 unexposed individuals. There was an increase in the frequency of binucleated ...

  10. Exposure to runoff from coal-tar-sealed pavement induces genotoxicity and impairment of DNA repair capacity in the RTL-W1 fish liver cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzler, Aude, E-mail: aude.kienzler@entpe.fr [Université de Lyon, UMR LEHNA 5023, USC INRA, ENTPE, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx-en-Velin F-69518 (France); Mahler, Barbara J., E-mail: bjmahler@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, 1505 Ferguson Lane, Austin, TX 78754 (United States); Van Metre, Peter C., E-mail: pcvanmet@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, 1505 Ferguson Lane, Austin, TX 78754 (United States); Schweigert, Nathalie [Université de Lyon, UMR LEHNA 5023, USC INRA, ENTPE, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx-en-Velin F-69518 (France); Devaux, Alain, E-mail: alain.devaux@entpe.fr [Université de Lyon, UMR LEHNA 5023, USC INRA, ENTPE, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx-en-Velin F-69518 (France); Bony, Sylvie, E-mail: bony@entpe.fr [Université de Lyon, UMR LEHNA 5023, USC INRA, ENTPE, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx-en-Velin F-69518 (France)

    2015-07-01

    Coal-tar-based (CTB) sealcoat, frequently applied to parking lots and driveways in North America, contains elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related compounds. The RTL-W1 fish liver cell line was used to investigate two endpoints (genotoxicity and DNA-repair-capacity impairment) associated with exposure to runoff from asphalt pavement with CTB sealcoat or with an asphalt-based sealcoat hypothesized to contain about 7% CTB sealcoat (AS-blend). Genotoxic potential was assessed by the Formamido pyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg)-modified comet assay for 1:10 and 1:100 dilutions of runoff samples collected from 5 h to 36 d following sealcoat application. DNA-repair capacity was assessed by the base excision repair comet assay for 1:10 dilution of samples collected 26 h and 36 d following application. Both assays were run with and without co-exposure to ultraviolet-A radiation (UVA). With co-exposure to UVA, genotoxic effects were significant for both dilutions of CTB runoff for three of four sample times, and for some samples of AS-blend runoff. Base excision repair was significantly impaired for CTB runoff both with and without UVA exposure, and for AS-blend runoff only in the absence of UVA. This study is the first to investigate the effects of exposure to the complex mixture of chemicals in coal tar on DNA repair capacity. The results indicate that co-exposure to runoff from CT-sealcoated pavement and UVA as much as a month after sealcoat application has the potential to cause genotoxicity and impair DNA repair capacity. - Highlights: • Co-exposure to runoff from coal-tar-sealcoated pavement and UVA caused DNA damage. • Significant genotoxicity occurred with a 1:100 dilution of runoff. • Runoff collected up to 36 d following coal-tar-sealcoat application was genotoxic. • Exposure to runoff from sealed pavement impaired an important DNA repair pathway. • Repair capacity was impaired with a 1:10 dilution of runoff (1:100 not

  11. Exposure to runoff from coal-tar-sealed pavement induces genotoxicity and impairment of DNA repair capacity in the RTL-W1 fish liver cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal-tar-based (CTB) sealcoat, frequently applied to parking lots and driveways in North America, contains elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related compounds. The RTL-W1 fish liver cell line was used to investigate two endpoints (genotoxicity and DNA-repair-capacity impairment) associated with exposure to runoff from asphalt pavement with CTB sealcoat or with an asphalt-based sealcoat hypothesized to contain about 7% CTB sealcoat (AS-blend). Genotoxic potential was assessed by the Formamido pyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg)-modified comet assay for 1:10 and 1:100 dilutions of runoff samples collected from 5 h to 36 d following sealcoat application. DNA-repair capacity was assessed by the base excision repair comet assay for 1:10 dilution of samples collected 26 h and 36 d following application. Both assays were run with and without co-exposure to ultraviolet-A radiation (UVA). With co-exposure to UVA, genotoxic effects were significant for both dilutions of CTB runoff for three of four sample times, and for some samples of AS-blend runoff. Base excision repair was significantly impaired for CTB runoff both with and without UVA exposure, and for AS-blend runoff only in the absence of UVA. This study is the first to investigate the effects of exposure to the complex mixture of chemicals in coal tar on DNA repair capacity. The results indicate that co-exposure to runoff from CT-sealcoated pavement and UVA as much as a month after sealcoat application has the potential to cause genotoxicity and impair DNA repair capacity. - Highlights: • Co-exposure to runoff from coal-tar-sealcoated pavement and UVA caused DNA damage. • Significant genotoxicity occurred with a 1:100 dilution of runoff. • Runoff collected up to 36 d following coal-tar-sealcoat application was genotoxic. • Exposure to runoff from sealed pavement impaired an important DNA repair pathway. • Repair capacity was impaired with a 1:10 dilution of runoff (1:100 not

  12. Gamma radiation induced genetic damage in the lymphocytes of the head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy aims to kill or damage cancer cells. Often normal cells also get inevitably damaged permanently by this leading to secondary malignancies in these patients. Present study was aimed to know the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on lymphocytes of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients exposed to various cumulative doses of gamma rays during radiotherapy. These patients were treated with cobalt 60 gamma radiation (External Beam Radiotherapy) for a period of five to six weeks with a daily fraction of 2 Gy for 5 days a week. Genotoxic effects of radiation in these patients were analysed employing chromosomal aberration test and alkaline comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis/SCGE) techniques. Peripheral blood of these patients before starting with radiotherapy (pre-therapy) served as control and blood collected later on at weekly time intervals of the therapy during the course of radiotherapy served as treated (∼ 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 Gy) samples. Data were analysed employing student's t-test. Significant DNA damage was observed at the individual level in comparison with their pre-therapy baseline data in all patients. Inter-individual variation of the genotoxic effects were analysed using one way ANOVA. Present observations revealed the radiotherapy induced DNA damage in the non-target cells indicating the genotoxic effect of radiation at the doses studied. This may recommend the need to reduce the daily radiotherapy dose further to increase the safety of non-target cells. (author)

  13. Determination of the main impurities formed after acid hydrolysis of soybean extracts and the in vitro mutagenicity and genotoxicity studies of 5-ethoxymethyl-2-furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemitz, Marina C; Picada, Jaqueline N; da Silva, Juliana; Garcia, Ana Letícia H; Papke, Débora K M; Grivicich, Ivana; Steppe, Martin; von Poser, Gilsane L; Teixeira, Helder F

    2016-09-10

    Soybean acid hydrolyzed extracts are raw-materials widely used for manufacturing of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics products due to their high content of isoflavone aglycones. In the present study, the main sugar degradation products 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF) and 5-ethoxymethyl-2-furfural (EMF) were quantitatively determined after acid hydrolysis of extracts from different soybean cultivars by a validated liquid chromatography method. The furanic compounds determined in samples cover the range of 0.16-0.21mg/mL and 0.22-0.33mg/mL for HMF and EMF, respectively. Complementarily, due to the scarce literature regarding the EMF toxicology, this study also assessed the EMF mutagenicity by the Salmonella/microsome test and genotoxicity by the comet assay. The results revealed that EMF did not show mutagenicity at the range of 50-5000μg/plate in S. typhimurium strains TA98, TA97a, TA100, TA102 and TA1535, but induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells at non-cytotoxic doses of 0.1-1.3mg/mL, mainly by oxidative stress mechanisms. Based on literature of HMF genotoxicity, and considering the EMF genotoxicity results herein shown, purification procedures to remove these impurities from extracts are recommended during healthcare products development to ensure the security of the products. PMID:27475406

  14. Assessment of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of standardized aqueous extract from leaves ofErythroxylum cuneatum in human HepG2 and WRL68 cells line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RK Wesam; AN Ghanya; HH Mizaton; M ILham; A Aishah

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the cytotoxicity and the genotoxicity of standardized aqueous of dry leaves ofErythroxylum cuneatum(E. cuneatum) in humanHepG2 andWRL68 cells. Methods:The cytotoxicity ofE. cuneatum extract was evaluated by bothMTS andLDH assays. Genotoxicity study onE. cuneatum extract was assessed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay).The protective effect ofE. cuneatum against menadione-induced cytotoxicity was also investigated.Results:Results from this study showed thatE. cuneatum extract exhibited cytotoxic activities towards the cells withIC50 value of(125±12) and(125±14) μg/mL forHepG2 andWRL68 cells respectively, after72 h incubation period as determined byMTS assay.LDH leakage was detected at(251±19) and(199.5±12.0) μg/mL forHepG2 andWRL68 respectively. Genotoxicity study results showed that treatment withE. cuneatum up to1 mg/mLdid not cause obviousDNA damage inWRL68 andHepG2 cells.Addition ofE. cunaetum did not show significant protection towards menadione inWRL68 andHepG2Cells.Conclusions:E. cuneatum standardized aqueous extract might be developed in order to establish new pharmacological possibilities for its application.

  15. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of Euterpe oleraceae Mart. (Arecaceae) fruit oil (açaí), in mammalian cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, E S; Froder, J G; Carvalho, J C T; Rosa, P C P; Perazzo, F F; Maistro, E L

    2016-07-01

    E. oleracea is a tropical plant from the Amazon region, with its fruit used for food, and traditionally, as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hypocholesterolemic, for atherosclerotic disease, and has anticancer properties. The oil of the fruit has antidiarrheic, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities, but without genotoxicity evaluation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of E. oleracea fruit oil (EOO), in rat cells. Male Wistar rats were treated with EOO by gavage at doses of 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg, for 14 days, within a 24 h interval. The DNA damage in the leukocytes, liver, bone marrow and testicular cells, was assessed by the comet assay, and the clastogenic/aneugenic effects in the bone marrow cells, by the micronucleus test. Our phytochemicals characterization of the EOO showed the presence of vanillic, palmitic, γ-linolenic, linoleic, oleic, cinnamic, caffeic, protocatechuic, ferulic, syringic acids, and flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol rutinoside as the main constituents. Both cytogenetic tests performed showed that EOO presented no significant genotoxic effects in the analyzed cells, at the three tested doses. These results indicate that, under our experimental conditions, E. oleracea fruit oil did not reveal genetic toxicity in rat cells. PMID:27125964

  16. Effects of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in Oncorhynchus mykiss liver after an acute exposure: assessment of oxidative stress, genotoxicity and histological alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Nunes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At present cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NP have numerous applications ranging from industry to the household, leading to its wide distribution namely in the aquatic environment. The hereby study aimed to assess the toxic effects of CeO2 NPs in Oncorhynchus mykiss liver following an acute exposure (96h to three different concentrations (0.25, 2.5 and 25 mg/L in terms of the genotoxicity (comet assay, oxidative stress response (Catalase CAT; Glutathione S-Transferases GSTs; Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances TBARS and histopathology. CeO2 NP exposure resulted in genotoxic damage in all exposure treatments, inhibition of CAT in the highest concentration and histopathological changes in all exposure concentrations with predominance of progressive and circulatory alterations. However TBARS and GSTs showed no significant differences comparatively to the control (unexposed group. The results suggest that CeO2 NP are able to cause genotoxicity, biochemical impairment and histological alterations in the liver of rainbow trout.

  17. In vivo genotoxicity testing of the amnesic shellfish poison (domoic acid) in piscine erythrocytes using the micronucleus test and the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxic amino acid naturally produced in the marine environment by some diatom species belonging to the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Although the neurotoxic properties of DA have been demonstrated, very little is known about in vivo genotoxicity of DA on aquatic organisms. In the present paper, an in vivo study on the genotoxic effects of domoic acid was carried out on a fish, Oreochromis niloticus, using the micronucleus test and the comet assay. The fish were exposed to three doses of domoic acid (1, 5 and 10 μg/g body weight) by intracoelomic injections. Ethyl methane sulphonate at a single dose of 5 mg/l was used as positive control. Analysis of micronuclei, nuclear abnormalities and DNA damage were carried out on peripheral erythrocytes sampled 24, 48 and 72 h post-treatment. Our results revealed significant increases in the frequencies of micronuclei, nuclear abnormalities as well as DNA strand breaks and thus demonstrated the genotoxic potential of DA on fish

  18. Genotoxicity of irinotecan and its modulation by vitamins A, C and E in human lymphocytes from healthy individuals and cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontek, R; Drozda, R; Sliwiński, M; Grzegorczyk, K

    2010-03-01

    Many patients being treated for cancer use dietary supplements, particularly antioxidants, in the hope of reducing the toxicity of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. However, clinicians should advise their patients against using antioxidant dietary supplements during chemotherapy. Irinotecan (CPT-11) is a common chemotherapeutic agent, but it causes side effects, including genotoxicity with damages the DNA of blood cells. The aim of this work was to evaluate the modulating effect of A, C and E vitamins on genotoxic activity of irinotecan (CPT-11) and to analyse the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of both patients with diagnosed colorectal carcinoma and healthy individuals in vitro. In healthy donors' cells CPT-11 did not exert a strong, genotoxic effect, both in the presence of vitamins and without them. In turn, a statistically significant increase of DNA migration in the comet tails was noted in patients' lymphocytes. The presence of vitamins A, C and E in incubation solutions acted synergistically, increasing the level of DNA lesions in cells caused by the exposure of the material on tested irinotecan concentrations. Analysis of the efficacy of DNA repair, performed after 2h of postincubation, showed the decrease of DNA percentage in comet tails in all experimental samples. PMID:19853651

  19. Genotoxic effect of radio marked lymphocytes using Tc-99m complexes; Efecto genotoxico del radiomarcado de linfocitos empleando complejos de Tc-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza L, M.; Ferro F, G.; Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The genotoxic effect of radio marked lymphocytes was evaluated using {sup 99m}-Tc-HMPAO and {sup 99m}-Tc- gentisic acid complexes. With the results of this work it is pretended to contribute to the knowledge of genetic and structural damages that provokes the radiation in the marked lymphocytes. The d, 1-HMPAO was synthesized in laboratory with a yielding of 30 %. The radiochemical purity of the complexes was greater than 85%. Mouse lymphocytes obtained of sanguineous volumes 2 ml were used. The radio marked efficiency of cells was 19.6 {+-} 6.4% and 25.6 {+-} 5.8% for {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and {sup 99m} Tc gentisic acid respectively. The genotoxic effect was evaluated using the technique of Unicellular Electrophoresis in Micro gel (Comet assay). The results showed that both {sup 99m} Tc complexes produce genotoxicity due to their capacity to penetrate cells, therefore the Auger and M internal conversion electrons place all their energy obtaining doses of Gray order. (Author)

  20. In vivo genotoxicity testing of the amnesic shellfish poison (domoic acid) in piscine erythrocytes using the micronucleus test and the comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavas, Tolga [Mersin University, Faculty of Sciences and Letters, Department of Biology, 33343 Mersin (Turkey)], E-mail: tcavas@mersin.edu.tr; Koenen, Serpil [Mersin University, Faculty of Sciences and Letters, Department of Biology, 33343 Mersin (Turkey)

    2008-11-11

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxic amino acid naturally produced in the marine environment by some diatom species belonging to the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Although the neurotoxic properties of DA have been demonstrated, very little is known about in vivo genotoxicity of DA on aquatic organisms. In the present paper, an in vivo study on the genotoxic effects of domoic acid was carried out on a fish, Oreochromis niloticus, using the micronucleus test and the comet assay. The fish were exposed to three doses of domoic acid (1, 5 and 10 {mu}g/g body weight) by intracoelomic injections. Ethyl methane sulphonate at a single dose of 5 mg/l was used as positive control. Analysis of micronuclei, nuclear abnormalities and DNA damage were carried out on peripheral erythrocytes sampled 24, 48 and 72 h post-treatment. Our results revealed significant increases in the frequencies of micronuclei, nuclear abnormalities as well as DNA strand breaks and thus demonstrated the genotoxic potential of DA on fish.

  1. Evaluation of Mango Byproduct Extracts as Antioxidant Against Pb-Acetate-Induced Oxidative Stress and Genotoxicity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makawy Aida I. El

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant and antiproliferative properties of mango by-products were investigated. This study was carried out to evaluate the protective role of mango peel or kernel defatted extracts against Pb-acetate adverse effects on oxidant/antioxidant status, liver dysfunction biomarkers, histopathological changes and genotoxicity in male mice. Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity of both extracts were evaluated. Two doses of both extracts (50 and 100 mg/kg were used to evaluate their role against the toxicity of Pb-acetate (500 ppm. Mice given mango extracts with Pb-acetate had significantly lower plasma MDA, AST and ALT and higher glutathione than mice given Pb-acetate alone. Mango extracts prevented the histopathological changes in liver induced by Pb-acetate and decreased the cytotoxicity of lead by increasing the ratio of PCE/NCE. Mango extract treatment reduced the DNA damage induced by Pb-acetate in liver as demonstrated by a reduction in micronuclei and decrease in tail length, tail DNA% and Olive tail moment. It can be concluded that mango by-product extracts have potential to protect from oxidative stress and genotoxicity of lead.

  2. Antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans strains and genotoxicity assessment in human leukocyte cells of Euphorbia tirucalli L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Flávio Souza de Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last times, focus on plant research has increased all over the world. Euphorbia tirucalli L., a plant known popularly as Aveloz, and originally used in Africa, has been drawing attention for its use in the United States and Latin America, both for use as an ornamental plant and as a medicinal plant. E. tirucalli L. is a member of the family Euphorbiaceae and contains many diterpenoids and triterpenoids, in particular phorbol esters, apparently the main constituent of this plant, which are assumed to be responsible for their activities in vivo and in vitro. The in vitro antifungal activities of Euphorbia tirucalli (L. against opportunistic yeasts were studied using microbroth dilution assay. The results showed that aqueous extract and latex preparation were effective against ten clinical strains of Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro (Latex and extract MIC range of 3.2 - > 411 µg/mL. Aiming the safe use in humans, the genotoxic effects of E. tirucalli were evaluated in human leukocytes cells. Our data show that both aqueous extract and latex preparation have no genotoxic effect in human leukocytes cells in vitro. Although the results cannot be extrapolated by itself for use in vivo, they suggest a good perspective for a therapeutic application in future. In conclusion, our results show that the aqueous extract and latex preparation from E. tirucalli L. are antifungal agents effectives against several strains of C. neoformans and do not provoke DNA damage in human leukocyte cells, considering the concentrations tested.

  3. Genotoxic effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil, evaluated by Helix aspersa (Mueller, 1774)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianistcki, M. [Laboratorio de Genetica Toxicologica, Department of Biology, ULBRA, Av. Farroupilha 8001, Pr. 14/Sala 218, Bairro Sao Jose, CEP 92425-900 Canoas, RS (Brazil); Dallarosa, J. [Laboratorio de Ecologia, UFRGS (Brazil); Sauer, C.; Teixeira, C.E. [Fundacao Estadual de Protecao Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, FEPAM, RS (Brazil); Silva, J. da, E-mail: juliana.silva@ulbra.b [Laboratorio de Genetica Toxicologica, Department of Biology, ULBRA, Av. Farroupilha 8001, Pr. 14/Sala 218, Bairro Sao Jose, CEP 92425-900 Canoas, RS (Brazil)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to biomonitor metropolitan areas of Porto Alegre (Brazil) for PAHs associated with atmospheric particles and check their effects on the DNA of the land mollusk Helix aspersa. The sampling sites are located in an urban area with heavy traffic: (i) Canoas, (ii) Sapucaia do Sul, and (iii) FIERGS/Porto Alegre. The samples were collected during a continuous period of 24 hours during 15 days using Stacked Filter Units (SFU) on polycarbonate filters (two separated size fractions: PM{sub 10-2.5} and PM{sub <2.5}). The concentrations of 16 major PAHs were determined according to EPA. Comet assay on H. aspersa hemolymph cells was chosen for genotoxicity evaluation. This evaluation shows that, in general, the smaller PM-size fractions (PM{sub <2.5}) have the highest genotoxicity and contain higher concentrations of extractable organic matter. In addition, associations between chemical characteristics and PM carcinogenicity tend to be stronger for the smaller PM-size fractions. - DNA damage in H. aspersa exposed to atmospheric particulate in Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre demonstrated association with PAHs in the fine filter (PM{sub <2.5}).

  4. Genotoxic potency in Drosophila melanogaster of selected aromatic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as assayed in the DNA repair test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, K; Fort, F L; Samejima, K; Sakamoto, Y

    1993-12-01

    Drosophila melanogaster stock consisting of meiotic recombination deficient (Rec-) double mutant mei-9a mei-41D5 males and Rec+ females was exposed at the larval stage to an aromatic amine or a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. After emergence as adult flies, the males and the females were scored separately. When the treatment caused a dose-dependent reduction in the male to female ratio from the control level; the experiment was repeated with a larval stock consisting of Rec+ males and Rec+ females under comparable conditions. A preferential killing effect upon Rec- larvae was taken as evidence of DNA damaging effect of the test compound. Among 16 compounds tested, 1-AP, B(a)P, 2-AF, DAF, 4-AAF, 2-AAF, 1-AA, 2-AA, DMA, B(a)A and DMBA were registered as positive; Py and 3-MC were weakly positive; and B(e)P, Fluo and Ant were negative. The selective killing effects of the compounds in each of the pyrene, fluorene and anthracene series varied drastically as a function of structure in a way similar to that reported for the genotoxicity in Drosophila and the carcinogenicity in rodents. The Drosophila DNA repair assay will serve as a simple adjunct to the already available means for studying the genotoxic potency of aromatic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:7694108

  5. Genotoxic effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil, evaluated by Helix aspersa (Mueller, 1774)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to biomonitor metropolitan areas of Porto Alegre (Brazil) for PAHs associated with atmospheric particles and check their effects on the DNA of the land mollusk Helix aspersa. The sampling sites are located in an urban area with heavy traffic: (i) Canoas, (ii) Sapucaia do Sul, and (iii) FIERGS/Porto Alegre. The samples were collected during a continuous period of 24 hours during 15 days using Stacked Filter Units (SFU) on polycarbonate filters (two separated size fractions: PM10-2.5 and PM). The concentrations of 16 major PAHs were determined according to EPA. Comet assay on H. aspersa hemolymph cells was chosen for genotoxicity evaluation. This evaluation shows that, in general, the smaller PM-size fractions (PM) have the highest genotoxicity and contain higher concentrations of extractable organic matter. In addition, associations between chemical characteristics and PM carcinogenicity tend to be stronger for the smaller PM-size fractions. - DNA damage in H. aspersa exposed to atmospheric particulate in Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre demonstrated association with PAHs in the fine filter (PM).

  6. Effects of triclosan and triclocarban on the growth inhibition, cell viability, genotoxicity and multixenobiotic resistance responses of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Yuan, Tao; Cheng, Peng; Bai, Qifeng; Zhou, Chuanqi; Ao, Junjie; Wang, Wenhua; Zhang, Haimou

    2015-11-01

    The information about adverse effects of emerging contaminants on aquatic protozoa is very scarce. The growth inhibition effect, cell viability, genotoxicity and multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) responses of two commonly used antimicrobial agents, triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) to protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila were investigated in this study. The results revealed that TCS and TCC can inhibit the growth of T. thermophila with 24h EC50 values of 1063 and 295μgL(-1), respectively. The impairment of plasma membrane was observed after 2h exposure of TCS or TCC at the level of mg/L. Furthermore, it is noticeable that at environmentally relevant concentration (1.0μgL(-1)), both TCS and TCC can lead to statistically significant DNA damage in T. thermophila, while the inhibition of growth and change of cell viability cannot be observed. Our results firstly provide the evidence for genotoxic effects of TCS and TCC on the freshwater protozoan. Additionally, both TCS and TCC were found to inhibit the efflux transporter activities, with the inhibitory potencies of 39% and 40% (using verapamil as a model inhibitor), respectively. Particularly, TCC could significantly down-regulate the expression of MXR related gene Abcb15, which encodes the membrane efflux protein that acting as P-gp in T. thermophila. The results raise the awareness of potential aquatic ecological and human health risks from the exposure of TCS and TCC, as they might potentiate the toxic effects by chemosensitizing with co-existing toxicants. PMID:26246462

  7. Genotoxicity, potential cytotoxicity and cell uptake of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the marine fish Trachinotus carolinus (Linnaeus, 1766)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignardi, Caroline P., E-mail: carolpatvig@usp.br [Department of Biological Oceanography, Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, Praça do Oceanogáfico 191, Cidade Universitária, Butantã, São Paulo, SP 05508900 (Brazil); Hasue, Fabio M., E-mail: humbigutis@gmail.com [Department of Biological Oceanography, Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, Praça do Oceanogáfico 191, Cidade Universitária, Butantã, São Paulo, SP 05508900 (Brazil); Sartório, Priscila V., E-mail: pri.sartorio@gmail.com [Department of Biological Oceanography, Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, Praça do Oceanogáfico 191, Cidade Universitária, Butantã, São Paulo, SP 05508900 (Brazil); Cardoso, Caroline M., E-mail: camargonato@gmail.com [Department of Biological Oceanography, Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, Praça do Oceanogáfico 191, Cidade Universitária, Butantã, São Paulo, SP 05508900 (Brazil); Machado, Alex S.D., E-mail: mamiferomarinho@gmail.com [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Integrated College North of Minas Osmane Barbosa Avenue, 11111, JK, Montes Claros, MG 39404006 (Brazil); and others

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}–NP cytogenotoxicity and cell uptake in marine fish was studied. • TiO{sub 2}–NP suspension was in primary particle, agglomerated and aggregated form. • TiO{sub 2}–NP genotoxicity was time/dose dependent and may induce cell uptake. • Methodology proved to be efficient for evaluating the toxic effect of TiO{sub 2}–NP. - Abstract: Nanoparticles have physicochemical characteristics that make them useful in areas such as science, technology, medicine and in products of everyday use. Recently the manufacture and variety of these products has grown rapidly, raising concerns about their impact on human health and the environment. Adverse effects of exposure to nanoparticles have been reported for both terrestrial and aquatic organisms, but the toxic effects of the substances on marine organisms remain poorly understood. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of TiO{sub 2}–NP in the marine fish Trachinotus carolinus, through cytogenotoxic methods. The fish received two different doses of 1.5 μg and 3.0 μg–TiO{sub 2}–NP g{sup −1} by intraperitoneal injection. Blood samples were collected to analyze erythrocyte viability using the Trypan Blue exclusion test, comet assay (pH > 13), micronucleus (MN) and other erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities (ENA) 24, 48 and 72 h after injection. The possible cell uptake of TiO{sub 2}–NP in fish injected with the higher dose was investigated after 72 h using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that TiO{sub 2}–NP is genotoxic and potentially cytotoxic for this species, causing DNA damage, inducing the formation of MN and other ENA, and decreasing erythrocyte viability. TEM examination revealed that cell uptake of TiO{sub 2}–NP was mainly in the kidney, liver, gills and to a lesser degree in muscle. To the extent of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first in vivo study of genotoxicity and other effects of TiO{sub 2}–NP in a marine fish.

  8. Genotoxicity, potential cytotoxicity and cell uptake of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the marine fish Trachinotus carolinus (Linnaeus, 1766)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TiO2–NP cytogenotoxicity and cell uptake in marine fish was studied. • TiO2–NP suspension was in primary particle, agglomerated and aggregated form. • TiO2–NP genotoxicity was time/dose dependent and may induce cell uptake. • Methodology proved to be efficient for evaluating the toxic effect of TiO2–NP. - Abstract: Nanoparticles have physicochemical characteristics that make them useful in areas such as science, technology, medicine and in products of everyday use. Recently the manufacture and variety of these products has grown rapidly, raising concerns about their impact on human health and the environment. Adverse effects of exposure to nanoparticles have been reported for both terrestrial and aquatic organisms, but the toxic effects of the substances on marine organisms remain poorly understood. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of TiO2–NP in the marine fish Trachinotus carolinus, through cytogenotoxic methods. The fish received two different doses of 1.5 μg and 3.0 μg–TiO2–NP g−1 by intraperitoneal injection. Blood samples were collected to analyze erythrocyte viability using the Trypan Blue exclusion test, comet assay (pH > 13), micronucleus (MN) and other erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities (ENA) 24, 48 and 72 h after injection. The possible cell uptake of TiO2–NP in fish injected with the higher dose was investigated after 72 h using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that TiO2–NP is genotoxic and potentially cytotoxic for this species, causing DNA damage, inducing the formation of MN and other ENA, and decreasing erythrocyte viability. TEM examination revealed that cell uptake of TiO2–NP was mainly in the kidney, liver, gills and to a lesser degree in muscle. To the extent of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first in vivo study of genotoxicity and other effects of TiO2–NP in a marine fish

  9. Recommended lists of genotoxic and non-genotoxic chemicals for assessment of the performance of new or improved genotoxicity tests: a follow-up to an ECVAM workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, David; Kasper, Peter; Müller, Lutz; Corvi, Raffaella; Speit, Günter

    2008-05-31

    At a recent ECVAM workshop considering ways to reduce the frequency of irrelevant positive results in mammalian cell genotoxicity tests [D. Kirkland, S. Pfuhler, D. Tweats, M. Aardema, R. Corvi, F. Darroudi, A. Elhajouji, H.-R. Glatt, P. Hastwell, M. Hayashi, P. Kasper, S. Kirchner, A. Lynch, D. Marzin, D. Maurici, J.-R. Meunier, L. Müller, G. Nohynek, J. Parry, E. Parry, V. Thybaud, R. Tice, J. van Benthem, P. Vanparys, P. White, How to reduce false positive results when undertaking in vitro genotoxicity testing and thus avoid unnecessary followup animal tests: Report of an ECVAM Workshop, Mutat. Res. 628 (2007) 31-55], recommendations for improvements/modifications to existing tests, and suggestions for new assays were made. Following on from this, it was important to identify chemicals that could be used in the evaluation of modified or new assays. An expert panel was therefore convened and recommendations made for chemicals to fit three different sets of characteristics, namely: This paper therefore contains these three recommended lists of chemicals and describes how these should be used for any test-evaluation programme. PMID:18539078

  10. Application of the SOS/umu test and high-content in vitro micronucleus test to determine genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of nine benzothiazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan; Weiwei, Jiang; Na, Li; Mei, Ma; Kaifeng, Rao; Zijian, Wang

    2014-12-01

    Benzothiazole and benzothiazole derivatives (BTs) have been detected in various environmental matrices as well as in human beings, but little is currently available regarding their toxicities. In our study, genotoxicities of nine BTs (benzothiazole [BT], 2-chlorobenzothiazole [CBT], 2-bromobenzothiazole [BrBT], 2-fluorobenzothiazole [FBT], 2-methylbenzothiazole [MeBT], 2-mercaptobenzothiazole [MBT], 2-aminobenzothiazole [ABT], 2-hydroxy-benzothiazole [OHBT] and 2-methythiobenzothiazole [MTBT]) are comprehensively evaluated by the SOS/umu test using the bacterial Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 for DNA-damaging effect and the high content in vitro micronucleus test using two human carcinoma cells (MGC-803 and A549) for chromosome-damaging effect. The cytotoxicity of BTs on both bacteria and two human cells was also evaluated. Except for the cytotoxic effect of MBT on MGC-803 and A549, the other tested BTs showed more than 50% cytotoxicity at their highest concentrations in a dose-dependent manner, and their LC50s ranged from 19 (MBT in bacteria) to 270 mg l(-1) (CBT in A549). Activation and inactivation were observed for specific BTs after metabolism. On the other hand, no evidence of genotoxicity was obtained for BT, FBT and MBT, and DNA damage was induced by ABT, OHBT, BrBT and MTBT in MGC-803, by MeBT in A549 and by CBT in both cells. Through quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis, two structure alerts for chemical genotoxicity, including heterocyclic amine and hacceptor-path3-hacceptor are present in ABT and OHBT respectively; however, the underlying mechanisms still need further evaluation. PMID:24478133

  11. [In vitro study of genotoxic and oxidative effects induced on human pulmonary cells by exposure to PAHs extracted from airborne particulate matter collected in a coke plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, D; Ursini, C L; Pira, E; Romano, C; Ciervo, A; Maiello, R; Caglieri, A; Iavicoli, S

    2007-01-01

    Genotoxic and oxidative effect of airborne particulate matter collected in a coke plant were evaluated on lung epithelial cells (A549). We aimed to clarify the mechanism of action of complex mixtures of PAHs and to identify biomarkers of effect of lung cancer. Particulate matter was analysed by GC/MS. Genotoxic and oxidative effects induced by the exposure to the extract were evaluated by Fpg comet assay. The cells were exposed for 30 min, 2h and 4h to 0.01%, 0.02% and 0.05% of the extract. We evaluated comet percentage and analysed tail moment values of exposed and unexposed cells treated with Fpg enzyme (TMenz) and untreated (TM) that indicate respectively oxidative and direct DNA damage. We found 0.328 ng/m3 of pyrene, 0.33 ng/m3 of benzo(a)anthracene, 1.073 ng/m3 of benzo(b)fluoranthene, 0.22 ng/m3 of benzo(k)fluoranthene, 0.35 ng/m3 of benzo(a)pyrene, 0.079 ng/m3 of dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and 0.40 ng/m3 of benzo(g,h,i)perylene. A dose-dependent increase, although not significant, of TM and TMenz in the exposed cells in respect to controls was found that indicates a slight increase of both direct and oxidative damage in exposed cells. A slight increase of comet percentage was found at the highest dose. We show the high sensibility of comet assay to measure early DNA damage also at low doses suggesting the use of such test on A549 to evaluate on target organ the effects of complex mixtures of genotoxic substances. PMID:18409689

  12. 2-Dodecylcyclobutanone, a radiolytic product of palmitic acid, is genotoxic in primary human colon cells and in cells from preneoplastic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, Nadine [Department of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Friedrich Schiller University, Dornburger Strasse 25, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Weise, Anja [Institute of Human Genetics and Anthropology, Friedrich Schiller University, Kollegiengasse 10, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Claussen, Uwe [Institute of Human Genetics and Anthropology, Friedrich Schiller University, Kollegiengasse 10, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Sendt, Wolfgang [Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Clinic for Surgery, Friedrich Schiller University, Erlanger Allee 101, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Marian, Brigitte [Institute for Cancer Research, University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Glei, Michael [Department of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Friedrich Schiller University, Dornburger Strasse 25, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L. [Department of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Friedrich Schiller University, Dornburger Strasse 25, D-07743 Jena (Germany)]. E-mail: b8pobe@uni-jena.de

    2006-02-22

    The irradiation of fat results in the formation of 2-alkylcyclobutanones, a new class of food contaminants. Results of previous in vitro studies with primary human colon cells and in vivo experiments with rats fed with 2-alkylcyclobutanones indicated that these radiolytic derivatives may be genotoxic and enhance the progression of colon tumors. The underlying mechanisms of these effects, however, are not clearly understood. Therefore we performed additional investigations to elucidate the genotoxic potential of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2dDCB) that is generated from palmitic acid. In particular, we explored the relative sensitivities of human colon cells, representing different stages of tumor development and healthy colon tissues, respectively. HT29clone19A cells, LT97 adenoma cells and primary human epithelial cells were exposed to 2dDCB (150-2097 {mu}M). We determined cytotoxic effects using trypan blue exclusion. Genotoxicity, reflected as strand breaks, was assessed using the alkaline version of the comet assay and chromosomal abnormalities were investigated by 24-color fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization. 2dDCB was cytotoxic in a time- and dose-dependent manner in LT97 adenoma cells and in freshly isolated primary cells but not in the human colon tumor cell line. Associated with this was a marked induction of DNA damage by 2dDCB in LT97 adenoma cells and in freshly isolated colonocytes, whereas in the HT29clone19A cells no strand breaks were detectable. A long-term incubation of LT97 adenoma cells with lower concentrations of 2dDCB revealed cytogenetic effects. In summary, 2dDCB was clearly genotoxic in healthy human colon epithelial cells and in cells representing preneoplastic colon adenoma. These findings provide additional evidence that this compound may be regarded as a possible risk factor for processes in colon carcinogenesis related to initiation and progression.

  13. The cadmium-mercaptoacetic acid complex contributes to the genotoxicity of mercaptoacetic acid-coated CdSe-core quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weikun; Fan, Junpeng; He, Yide; Huang, Bihai; Liu, Huihui; Pang, Daiwen; Xie, Zhixiong

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have many potential clinical and biological applications because of their advantages over traditional fluorescent dyes. However, the genotoxicity potential of QDs still remains unclear. In this paper, a plasmid-based system was designed to explore the genotoxic mechanism of QDs by detecting changes in DNA configuration and biological activities. The direct chemicobiological interactions between DNA and mercaptoacetic acid-coated CdSecore QDs (MAA-QDs) were investigated. After incubation with different concentrations of MAA-QDs (0.043, 0.13, 0.4, 1.2, and 3.6 μmol/L) in the dark, the DNA conversion of the covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA to the open circular (OC) DNA was significantly enhanced (from 13.9% ± 2.2% to 59.9% ± 12.8%) while the residual transformation activity of plasmid DNA was greatly decreased (from 80.7% ± 12.8% to 13.6% ± 0.8%), which indicated that the damages to the DNA structure and biological activities induced by MAA-QDs were concentration-dependent. The electrospray ionization mass spectrometry data suggested that the observed genotoxicity might be correlated with the cadmium-mercaptoacetic acid complex (Cd-MAA) that is formed in the solution of MAA-QDs. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and transformation assay results indicated that the Cd-MAA complex might interact with DNA through the groove-binding mode and prefer binding to DNA fragments with high adenine and thymine content. Furthermore, the plasmid transformation assay could be used as an effective method to evaluate the genotoxicities of nanoparticles. PMID:22679373

  14. The cadmium–mercaptoacetic acid complex contributes to the genotoxicity of mercaptoacetic acid-coated CdSe-core quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weikun; Fan, Junpeng; He, Yide; Huang, Bihai; Liu, Huihui; Pang, Daiwen; Xie, Zhixiong

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have many potential clinical and biological applications because of their advantages over traditional fluorescent dyes. However, the genotoxicity potential of QDs still remains unclear. In this paper, a plasmid-based system was designed to explore the genotoxic mechanism of QDs by detecting changes in DNA configuration and biological activities. The direct chemicobiological interactions between DNA and mercaptoacetic acid-coated CdSecore QDs (MAA–QDs) were investigated. After incubation with different concentrations of MAA–QDs (0.043, 0.13, 0.4, 1.2, and 3.6 μmol/L) in the dark, the DNA conversion of the covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA to the open circular (OC) DNA was significantly enhanced (from 13.9% ± 2.2% to 59.9% ± 12.8%) while the residual transformation activity of plasmid DNA was greatly decreased (from 80.7% ± 12.8% to 13.6% ± 0.8%), which indicated that the damages to the DNA structure and biological activities induced by MAA–QDs were concentration-dependent. The electrospray ionization mass spectrometry data suggested that the observed genotoxicity might be correlated with the cadmium–mercaptoacetic acid complex (Cd–MAA) that is formed in the solution of MAA–QDs. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and transformation assay results indicated that the Cd–MAA complex might interact with DNA through the groove-binding mode and prefer binding to DNA fragments with high adenine and thymine content. Furthermore, the plasmid transformation assay could be used as an effective method to evaluate the genotoxicities of nanoparticles. PMID:22679373

  15. 2-Dodecylcyclobutanone, a radiolytic product of palmitic acid, is genotoxic in primary human colon cells and in cells from preneoplastic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation of fat results in the formation of 2-alkylcyclobutanones, a new class of food contaminants. Results of previous in vitro studies with primary human colon cells and in vivo experiments with rats fed with 2-alkylcyclobutanones indicated that these radiolytic derivatives may be genotoxic and enhance the progression of colon tumors. The underlying mechanisms of these effects, however, are not clearly understood. Therefore we performed additional investigations to elucidate the genotoxic potential of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2dDCB) that is generated from palmitic acid. In particular, we explored the relative sensitivities of human colon cells, representing different stages of tumor development and healthy colon tissues, respectively. HT29clone19A cells, LT97 adenoma cells and primary human epithelial cells were exposed to 2dDCB (150-2097 μM). We determined cytotoxic effects using trypan blue exclusion. Genotoxicity, reflected as strand breaks, was assessed using the alkaline version of the comet assay and chromosomal abnormalities were investigated by 24-color fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization. 2dDCB was cytotoxic in a time- and dose-dependent manner in LT97 adenoma cells and in freshly isolated primary cells but not in the human colon tumor cell line. Associated with this was a marked induction of DNA damage by 2dDCB in LT97 adenoma cells and in freshly isolated colonocytes, whereas in the HT29clone19A cells no strand breaks were detectable. A long-term incubation of LT97 adenoma cells with lower concentrations of 2dDCB revealed cytogenetic effects. In summary, 2dDCB was clearly genotoxic in healthy human colon epithelial cells and in cells representing preneoplastic colon adenoma. These findings provide additional evidence that this compound may be regarded as a possible risk factor for processes in colon carcinogenesis related to initiation and progression

  16. Relation between DNA damage measured by comet assay and OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism in antineoplastic drugs biomonitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Carina Ladeira; Susana Viegas; Mário Pádua; Elisabete Carolino; Gomes, Manuel C.; Miguel Brito

    2015-01-01

    Antineoplastic drugs are hazardous chemical agents used mostly in the treatment of patients with cancer, however health professionals that handle and administer these drugs can become exposed and develop DNA damage. Comet assay is a standard method for assessing DNA damage in human biomonitoring and, combined with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) enzyme, it specifically detects DNA oxidative damage.The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxic effects in workers occupationally e...

  17. The evaluation Genotoxic Risks in Medical Personnel Occupationally Exposed to Ultrasound: the Alkaline Comet Assay Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ultrasound devices in medical diagnosis has experienced a phenomenal growth in recent years. Therefore it has become important to check its genetic harmlessness, especially in occupationally exposed medical personnel. In the present study, the alkaline comet assay was selected as a sensitive bio marker of exposure to evaluate the levels of primary DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes of ultrasound-exposed and corresponding control subjects. Exposed and control groups comprised of 30 subjects of similar age and smoking habits. The venous blood samples were processed by standard come assay procedure; they were embedded into agarose microgel, subjected to lysis, denaturation and electrophoresis in alkaline conditions. The extent of DNA migration in leukocytes was assessed by measuring of comet tail length and tail moment. A total of 100 randomly captured comets from each slide were examined using an epifluorescent microscope connected through a black and white camera to an computerising image system. The results obtained indicate potentially geonotixic effects of daily occupational exposure to ultrasound with significant increased values of comet tail length and tail moment measured in leukocytes of the exposed subjects compared to control. Within exposed group significant inter-individual differences in DNA damage were assessed, indicating different genome sensitivity. It was also observed that smoking habits influenced the levels of primary DNA damage in some control and exposed subjects. In spite of their limitations, results of present comet assay study indicate that individuals occupationally exposed to ultrasound may experience an increased genotoxic risk and strongly emphasize the need for more research into the nature and extent of the biological consequences to medical personnel working with ultrasound. (Author) 43 refs

  18. Testing the genotoxicity of some perfumes with high diethylphthalate (DEP levels using comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Al-Saleh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The presence of phthalates in perfumes has gained recently some attention since these chemicals are added sometimes intentionally as a fixative. Our previous study tested 47 branded perfumes sold in Saudi market and found 68% of tested samples had diethylphthalate (DEP, above reported threshold limit of 1 ppm. Of these phthalates, DEP was found to have the highest mean value (1621.63 ppm. These results enticed us to test the potential genotoxicity of 7 brands in which their DEP contents were in the range of 1.06 ppm to 23649.3 ppm in human TK-6 cells using single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay. Cells were exposed to 400 µl perfume for 2 hrs, at room temperature. Tail moment was (TM used as a metric measure for DNA damage and 25 cells per sample were determined by image analysis software. Four perfumes with DEP above 40 ppm produced significant DNA damage in TK-6 cells with TM of 54.27 ± 1.04, n=500 compare to the other 3 perfumes with DEP < 2 ppm (21.94 ± 1.09, n=300, untreated cells (2.99 ± 0.17, n=250 and cells induced with ethanol (33.76 ± 1.4, n=75 or methanol (23.82 ± 1.84, n=100 which are the vehicles used in perfume's preparations. The results suggest that DEP in perfumes might be one of the ingredients that provoked DNA damage; however, further investigation is required confirming our observation.

  19. Sesamol attenuates genotoxicity in bone marrow cells of whole-body γ-irradiated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Selvan, Tamizh G; Tripathi, Akanchha M; Choudhary, Sandeep; Khan, Shahanshah; Adhikari, Jawahar S; Chaudhury, Nabo K

    2015-09-01

    Ionising radiation causes free radical-mediated damage in cellular DNA. This damage is manifested as chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei (MN) in proliferating cells. Sesamol, present in sesame seeds, has the potential to scavenge free radicals; therefore, it can reduce radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective potential of sesamol in bone marrow cells of mice and related haematopoietic system against radiation-induced genotoxicity. A comparative study with melatonin was designed for assessing the radioprotective potential of sesamol. C57BL/6 mice were administered intraperitoneally with either sesamol or melatonin (10 and 20mg/kg body weight) 30 min prior to 2-Gy whole-body irradiation (WBI) and sacrificed after 24h. Total chromosomal aberrations (TCA), MN and cell cycle analyses were performed using bone marrow cells. The comet assay was performed on bone marrow cells, splenocytes and lymphocytes. Blood was drawn to study haematological parameters. Prophylactic doses of sesamol (10 and 20mg/kg) in irradiated mice reduced TCA and micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte frequency in bone marrow cells by 57% and 50%, respectively, in comparison with radiation-only groups. Sesamol-reduced radiation-induced apoptosis and facilitated cell proliferation. In the comet assay, sesamol (20mg/kg) treatment reduced radiation-induced comets (% DNA in tail) compared with radiation only (P < 0.05). Sesamol also increased granulocyte populations in peripheral blood similar to melatonin. Overall, the radioprotective efficacy of sesamol was found to be similar to that of melatonin. Sesamol treatment also showed recovery of relative spleen weight at 24h of WBI. The results strongly suggest the radioprotective efficacy of sesamol in the haematopoietic system of mice. PMID:25863274

  20. Recent Advances in In Vivo Genotoxicity Testing: Prediction of Carcinogenic Potential Using Comet and Micronucleus Assay in Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Seung Hun; Kwon, Jee Young; Lee, Jong Kwon; Seo, Young Rok

    2013-01-01

    Genotoxic events have been known as crucial step in the initiation of cancer. To assess the risk of cancer, genotoxicity assays, including comet, micronucleus (MN), chromosomal aberration, bacterial reverse, and sister chromatid exchange assay, can be performed. Compared with in vitro genotoxicity assay, in vivo genotoxicity assay has been used to verify in vitro assay result and definitely provide biological significance for certain organs or cell types. The comet assay can detect DNA strand...

  1. Genotoxic Potential of Two Herbicides and their Active Ingredients Assessed with Comet Assay on a Fish Cell Line, Epithelioma Papillosum Cyprini (EPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Kristian; Rank, Jette; Jensen, Klara;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the epithelioma papillosum cyprini (EPC) cell line handling procedure for the comet assay to investigate the genotoxic potential of widely used pesticides. The effects of various media and handling of the EPC cell line were examined. Results indicated...... that avoiding trypsin to detach cells led to lower level of DNA damage in the negative control. Further, two commonly used herbicides (Dezormon and Optica trio) and their four active ingredients (4-chloro-o-tolyloxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propionic acid, 2...

  2. Response of native flora to inducible genotoxic damage from increased radioactivity around NPP Jaslovske Bohunice, Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not generally known that the first serious failure of nuclear power plant (NPP) technology with loss of human lives occurred in NPP Jaslovske Bohunice (Czechoslovakia) in January 1976. A year later the second accident finally broken reactor A1 with large radioactive contamination. This material was later (in 1980) washed into the nearby drainage by the heavy rain. In cleaning procedure, the contaminated soil particles contaminated the slopes of the drainage. These spots have the shape of 'blurs' about 15 cm wide with a scale of contamination from 0,067; 0,15; 2,38; 9,5; 45.5 up to 322 kBq/kg 137Cs. The research was done in cooperation with the Institute of Tumorbiology, University of Vienna, within the grant Action Austria - Slovak Republic. Details of radioactivity at the area were obtained thanks to the Research Institute of the Nuclear Energy in Trnava, Slovakia. In our ten years long-term study of contaminated soil around nuclear power plant (NPP) Jaslovske Bohunice 24 species of local flora were used to show impact of these accidents. The 19 km long banks of the Jaslovske Bohunice NPP waste water recipient has been identified as contaminated by 137Cs. In total, more than 67,000 m2 of river banks have been found as being contaminated at levels exceeding 1 Bq 137Cs/g of soil. Used phytotoxic and cytogenetic -in situ' tests were extended by analyses of pollen grains. Although the dose of some samples of radioactive soil was relatively high (322 kBq kg-1) no any significant impact on the biological level of tested wild plant species was observed. Possible explanation (such as adaptation and resistance) is discussed. (author)

  3. Genotoxic damage in mine workers exposed to diesel exhaust, and the effects of glutathione transferase genotypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knudsen, L.E.; Gaskell, M.; Martin, E.A.; Poole, J.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Jensen, A.; Autrup, H.; Farmer, P.

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed in an Estonian shale-oil mine with the purpose to develop and apply a number of biomarkers for occupational diesel-exhaust exposure monitoring. Increased breathing-zone exposures to exhaust from operators of diesel-powered trucks in the mine was confirmed in the environmenta

  4. Evaluation of genotoxic damage in wild rodents from a polluted area in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ieradi, L. A.; Zima, Jan; Allegra, F.; Kotlánová, E.; Campanella, L.; Grossi, R.; Cristaldi, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2003), s. 57-66. ISSN 0139-7893 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/97/0850; GA MŠk VS97102 Grant ostatní: Italian National Research Council(IT) 96.00084.CT04-CNR Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : rodents * environmental pollution * heavy metals Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.494, year: 2003 http://www.ivb.cz/folia/52/1/57-66.pdf

  5. Genotoxic and oxidative damage potentials in human lymphocytes after exposure to terpinolene in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Turkez, Hasan; Aydın, Elanur; Geyikoglu, Fatime; Cetin, Damla

    2014-01-01

    Terpinolene (TPO) is a monocyclic monoterpene found in the essential oils of various fir and pine species. Recent reports indicated that several monoterpenes could exhibit antioxidant effects in both human and animal experimental models. However, so far, the nature and/or biological roles of TPO have not been elucidated in human models yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic, oxidative and cytotoxic effects of TPO in cultured human blood cells (n = 5) for the first time. Hum...

  6. Inhibition of protein kinase C induces differentiation in Neuro-2a cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Miñana, M D; Felipo, V.; Grisolía, S

    1990-01-01

    1-(5-Isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7), a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C, induced neuritogenesis in Neuro-2a cells, whereas N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA 1004), which inhibits more efficiently cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, did not. The effect, noticeable after 3 hr, was maximum (13-fold increase at 500 microM H7) between 1 and 3 days and was maintained over 2 months. In controls, 90% of the cells were undifferentiated, whereas after 3 hr wit...

  7. Oxidatively damaged DNA in rats exposed by oral gavage to C60 fullerenes and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Janne K; Risom, Lotte; Jacobsen, Nicklas R;

    2009-01-01

    extent of genotoxicity, whereas corn oil per se generated more genotoxicity than the particles. Although there was increased mRNA expression of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase in the liver of C60 fullerene-treated rats, we found no significant increase in repair activity. CONCLUSIONS: Oral exposure to low...... the initiating event in the development of cancer. OBJECTIVE: In this study we investigated the effect of a single oral administration of C60 fullerenes and SWCNT. METHODS: We measured the level of oxidative damage to DNA as the premutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in the colon...

  8. Bioactivation and genotoxicity of the herbal constituents safrole, estragole and methyleugenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.

    2007-01-01

    The herbal constituents safrole, estragole, and methyleugenol, belonging to the chemical class of the alkenylbenzenes, are genotoxic and carcinogenic compounds. The genotoxicity of these alkenylbenzenes proceeds via electrophilic metabolites generated bycytochromeP450 enzym

  9. Apoptosis and clonogenic survival in three tumour cell lines exposed to gamma rays or chemical genotoxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the extent to which apoptosis is induced and clonogenicity reduced in three tumour cell lines - the human melanoma Me45 and promyelocytic leukaemia HL-60, and the rat rhabdomyosarcoma R1 - after exposure to the anticancer drugs etoposide and cis-platinum or to gamma radiation; each induces different types of DNA damage. Cells which readily underwent apoptosis did not necessarily show a correlated loss of clonogenicity; for example, Me45 cells showed the highest sensitivity to all three agents in clonogenic assays but much lower levels of apoptotic cells than R1 or HL-60 cells. These results show that the efficiency of the eradication of clonogenic cells by genotoxic agents does not solely depend on the induction of apoptotic processes, and suggest that the induction of apoptosis and suppression of clonogenicity are independent processes. (author)

  10. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of a trypanocidal drug quinapyramine sulfate loaded-sodium alginate nanoparticles in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuja, Anju; Kumar, Balvinder; Chopra, Meenu; Bajaj, Anshu; Kumar, Rajender; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sandeep; Riyesh, T; Yadav, Suresh C

    2016-07-01

    We synthesized quinapyramine sulfate loaded-sodium alginate nanoparticles (QS-NPs) to reduce undesirable toxic effects of QS against the parasite Trypanosoma evansi, a causative agent of trypanosomosis. To determine the safety of the formulated nanoparticles, biocompatibility of QS-NPs was determined using Vero, Hela cell lines and horse erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Our experiments unveiled a concentration-dependent safety/cytotoxicity (metabolic activity), genotoxicity (DNA damage, chromosomal aberrations), production of reactive oxygen species and hemolysis in QS-NPs treated cells. Annexin-V propidium iodide (PI) staining showed no massive apoptosis or necrosis. However, at very high doses (more than 300 times than the effective doses), we observed more toxicity in QS-NPs treated cells as compared to QS treated cells. QS-NPs were safe at effective trypanocidal doses and even at doses several times higher than the effective dose. PMID:27000439

  11. Genotoxic effects induced by the exposure to an environmental mixture of illicit drugs to the zebra mussel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Marco; Magni, Stefano; Castiglioni, Sara; Binelli, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Despite the growing interest on the presence of illicit drugs in freshwater ecosystems, just recently the attention has been focused on their potential toxicity towards non-target aquatic species. However, these studies largely neglected the effects induced by exposure to complex mixtures of illicit drugs, which could be different compared to those caused by single psychoactive molecules. This study was aimed at investigating the genetic damage induced by a 14-day exposure to a realistic mixture of the most common illicit drugs found in surface waters worldwide (cocaine, benzoylecgonine, amphetamine, morphine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) on the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). The mixture caused a significant increase of DNA fragmentation and triggered the apoptotic process and micronuclei formation in zebra mussel hemocytes, pointing out its potential genotoxicity towards this bivalve species. PMID:27261879

  12. Screening potential genotoxic effect of aquatic plant extracts using the mussel micronucleus test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bettina Eck-Varanka; Nora Kovts; Katalin Hubai; Gbor Paulovits; rpd Ferincz; Eszter Horvth

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To assess the genotoxic potential of selected aquatic macrophytes:Ceratophyllum demersum L. (hornwort, family Ceratophyllaceae),Typha angustifolia L. (narrowleaf cattail, family Typhaceae),Stratiotes aloides L. (water soldier, family Butomaceae), andOenanthe aquatica (L.) Poir. (water dropwort, family Umbelliferae). Methods: For genotoxicity assessment, the mussel micronucleus test was applied. Micronucleus frequency was determined from the haemolymph ofUnio pictorum L. (painter’s mussel). In parallel, total and hydrolisable tannin contents were determined. Results:All plant extracts elucidated significant mutagenic effect. Significant correlation was determined between tannin content and mutagenic capacity. Conclusions:The significant correlation between genotoxicity as expressed by micronucleus frequency and tannin content (both total and hydrolisable tannins) indicate that tannin is amongst the main compounds being responsible for the genotoxic potential. It might be suggested that genotoxic capacity of these plants elucidate a real ecological effect in the ecosystem.

  13. The Comet Assay for the Evaluation of Genotoxic Potential of Landfill Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Widziewicz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxic assessment of landfill leachate before and after biological treatment was conducted with two human cell lines (Me45 and NHDF and Daphnia magna somatic cells. The alkali version of comet assay was used to examine genotoxicity of leachate by DNA strand breaks analysis and its repair dynamics. The leachate samples were collected from Zabrze landfill, situated in the Upper Silesian Industrial District, Poland. Statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallice ANOVA rank model were observed between DNA strand breaks in cells incubated with leachate before and after treatment (P<0.001. Nonparametric Friedman ANOVA confirmed time-reliable and concentration-reliable cells response to leachate concentration. Examinations of chemical properties showed a marked decrease in leachate parameters after treatment which correlate to reduced genotoxicity towards tested cells. Obtained results demonstrate that biological cotreatment of leachate together with municipal wastewater is an efficient method for its genotoxic potential reduction; however, treated leachate still possessed genotoxic character.

  14. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of guarana (Paullinia cupana) in prokaryotic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, C A; Leal, J; Costa, S S; Leitão, A C

    1994-05-01

    Aqueous extracts of Paullinia cupana (guarana), a species that belongs to the Sapindaceae family, were analyzed for the presence of genotoxic activities in bacterial cells. The extracts of guarana were genotoxic as assessed by lysogenic induction in Escherichia coli and they were also able to induce mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium. Addition of S9 microsomal fraction, catalase, superoxide dismutase or thiourea counteracted the genotoxic activity of guarana, suggesting that oxygen reactive species play an essential role in the genotoxicity of aqueous guarana extracts. The genotoxic activity in the extracts was related to the presence of a molecular complex formed by caffeine and a flavonoid (catechin or epicatechin) in the presence of potassium. PMID:7513067

  15. Damage database

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš; Valach, Jaroslav; Křemen, P.; Abrahamčík, J.

    Prague: Institute of theoretical and applied mechanics AS CR, v.v.i, 2011 - (Drdácký, M.; Binda, L.; Hennen, I.; Kőpp, C.; Lanza, L.), s. 185-195 ISBN 978-80-86246-37-6 Grant ostatní: evropská komise(XE) CHEF-SSPI-044251 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : flood * damage * cultural heritage Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  16. DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, Sunita; Rastogi, Rajesh P.; Singh, Kanchan L.; Singh, Shailendra P; Sinha, Rajeshwar P.

    2008-01-01

    Even under the best of circumstances, DNA is constantly subjected to chemical modifications. Several types of DNA damage such as SSB (single strand break), DSB (double strand break), CPDs (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers), 6-4PPs (6-4 photoproducts) and their Dewar valence isomers have been identified that result from alkylating agents, hydrolytic deamination, free radicals and reactive oxygen species formed by various photochemical processes including UV radiation. There are a n...

  17. Aldehydes with high and low toxicities inactivate cells by damaging distinct cellular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming-Zhang; Shoulkamy, Mahmoud I; Salem, Amir M H; Oba, Shunya; Goda, Mizuki; Nakano, Toshiaki; Ide, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Aldehydes are genotoxic and cytotoxic molecules and have received considerable attention for their associations with the pathogenesis of various human diseases. In addition, exposure to anthropogenic aldehydes increases human health risks. The general mechanism of aldehyde toxicity involves adduct formation with biomolecules such as DNA and proteins. Although the genotoxic effects of aldehydes such as mutations and chromosomal aberrations are directly related to DNA damage, the role of DNA damage in the cytotoxic effects of aldehydes is poorly understood because concurrent protein damage by aldehydes has similar effects. In this study, we have analysed how saturated and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes exert cytotoxic effects through DNA and protein damage. Interestingly, DNA repair is essential for alleviating the cytotoxic effect of weakly toxic aldehydes such as saturated aldehydes but not highly toxic aldehydes such as long α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Thus, highly toxic aldehydes inactivate cells exclusively by protein damage. Our data suggest that DNA interstrand crosslinks, but not DNA-protein crosslinks and DNA double-strand breaks, are the critical cytotoxic DNA damage induced by aldehydes. Further, we show that the depletion of intracellular glutathione and the oxidation of thioredoxin 1 partially account for the DNA damage-independent cytotoxicity of aldehydes. On the basis of these findings, we have proposed a mechanistic model of aldehyde cytotoxicity mediated by DNA and protein damage. PMID:26917342

  18. Genotoxic, cytotoxic, developmental and survival effects of tritiated water in the early life stages of the marine mollusc, Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an integrated approach linking different levels of biological organisation, the genotoxic, cytotoxic, developmental and survival impact of tritiated water (HTO) were investigated in the embryo-larvae of marine mollusc Mytilus edulis. One-hour-old embryos were exposed to a range of concentrations (0.37-370 kBq ml-1) of HTO, which delivered a dose between 0.02 and 21.41 mGy over the exposure period for different end points. Detrimental effects, if any, were monitored at different levels of biological organisation (i.e. DNA, chromosomal, cellular and individual). Genotoxic effects were assessed using molecular and cytogenetic approaches which included analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosomal aberrations (Cabs). Cytotoxic effects were evaluated by determining the proliferative rate index (PRI) of the embryo-larval cells. Developmental and survival effects were also monitored every 24 h up to 72 h. Results in general indicated that HTO significantly increased cytogenetic damage, cytotoxicity, developmental abnormalities and mortality of the embryo-larvae as a function of concentration or radiation dose. The analysis of RAPD profiles also revealed qualitative effects in the HTO exposed population compared to controls. However, while the embryo-larvae showed dose or concentration dependent effects for mortality, developmental abnormalities and induction of SCEs, the dose-dependent effects were not apparent for Cabs and PRI at higher doses. The study contributes to our limited understanding of the impact of environmentally relevant radionuclides on non-human biota and emphasises the need for further investigations to elucidate potentially long term damage induced by persistent, low levels of other radionuclides on commercially and ecologically important species, in order to protect human and ecosystem health

  19. Genotoxic, cytotoxic, developmental and survival effects of tritiated water in the early life stages of the marine mollusc, Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagger, Josephine A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Devon, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Atienzar, Franck A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Devon, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Devon, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ajha@plymouth.ac.uk

    2005-09-10

    Using an integrated approach linking different levels of biological organisation, the genotoxic, cytotoxic, developmental and survival impact of tritiated water (HTO) were investigated in the embryo-larvae of marine mollusc Mytilus edulis. One-hour-old embryos were exposed to a range of concentrations (0.37-370 kBq ml{sup -1}) of HTO, which delivered a dose between 0.02 and 21.41 mGy over the exposure period for different end points. Detrimental effects, if any, were monitored at different levels of biological organisation (i.e. DNA, chromosomal, cellular and individual). Genotoxic effects were assessed using molecular and cytogenetic approaches which included analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosomal aberrations (Cabs). Cytotoxic effects were evaluated by determining the proliferative rate index (PRI) of the embryo-larval cells. Developmental and survival effects were also monitored every 24 h up to 72 h. Results in general indicated that HTO significantly increased cytogenetic damage, cytotoxicity, developmental abnormalities and mortality of the embryo-larvae as a function of concentration or radiation dose. The analysis of RAPD profiles also revealed qualitative effects in the HTO exposed population compared to controls. However, while the embryo-larvae showed dose or concentration dependent effects for mortality, developmental abnormalities and induction of SCEs, the dose-dependent effects were not apparent for Cabs and PRI at higher doses. The study contributes to our limited understanding of the impact of environmentally relevant radionuclides on non-human biota and emphasises the need for further investigations to elucidate potentially long term damage induced by persistent, low levels of other radionuclides on commercially and ecologically important species, in order to protect human and ecosystem health.

  20. The genotoxicity of UVA irradiation in Drosophila melanogaster and the synergistic action of 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, T; Tanabe, F; Hayatsu, H

    1992-08-01

    To study the genotoxicity of near-ultraviolet light (UVA) on a whole body, Drosophila melanogaster larvae were irradiated with UVA and the emerging flies were examined for the mutant wing spot formation. The genotoxicity of UVA was also assayed with the in vivo DNA-repair test using males with repair-deficiency at the mei-9 and mei-41 locus and the matching repair-proficient females. Third-instar larvae were placed in a plastic Petri dish, which was covered with soft glass, and irradiated with black light at 4-5 W/m2. This irradiation resulted in an increase in mutant wing-hair spots. After a 15 h irradiation (approximately 240 kJ/m2), the mutant clone frequencies found in the adult flies (spots/wing) were: 1.68 for the small single spots, 0.38 for the large single spots and 0.11 for the twin spots, while at zero time they were 0.68, 0.06 and 0.02 respectively. On the other hand, the UVA irradiation was negative in the in vivo DNA-repair test, indicating that the UVA-induced DNA lesion may not be subject to repair by the mei-9 and mei-41 functions. The presence of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) during the irradiation remarkably enhanced somatic mutations, and showed a strong DNA-damaging effect in the repair test. For example, a 15 h UVA irradiation with 26.7 microM 8-MOP resulted in a 14-fold increase in the number of twin spots per wing as compared with the frequency obtained on treatment with UVA alone. Treatment of the larvae with 8-MOP alone gave no mutant clones or DNA damage. A high frequency in twin spot formation was also observed in this UVA + 8-MOP treatment, indicating that extensive chromosomal recombinations took place in the somatic cells. PMID:1499094

  1. Dose-dependent genotoxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles stimulated by reactive oxygen species in human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mohammad Javed; Kumar, Sudhir; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alrokayan, Salman A; Abu-Salah, Khalid M; Ahamed, Maqusood

    2016-05-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are of great interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology because of their broad industrial and commercial applications. Therefore, toxicity of CuO NPs needs to be thoroughly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and oxidative stress induced by CuO NPs in human lung epithelial (A549) cells. CuO NPs were synthesized by solvothermal method and the size of NPs measured under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was found to be around 23 nm. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays showed that CuO NPs (5-15 µg/ml) exert cytotoxicity in A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Comet assay suggested concentration-dependent induction of DNA damage due to the exposure to CuO NPs. The comet tail moment was 27% at 15 µg/ml of CuO NPs, whereas it was 5% in control (p CuO NPs induced micronuclei (MN) in A549 cells dose dependently. The frequency of MN was 25/10(3) cells at 15 µg/ml of CuO NPs, whereas it was 2/10(3) cells for control. CuO NPs were also found to induce oxidative stress in a concentration-dependent manner, which was indicated by induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation along with glutathione depletion. Moreover, MN induction and DNA damage were significantly correlated with ROS (R(2) = 0.937 for ROS vs. olive tail moment, and R(2) = 0.944 for ROS vs. MN). Taken together, this study suggested that CuO NPs induce genotoxicity in A549 cells, which is likely to be mediated through ROS generation and oxidative stress. PMID:24311626

  2. Effects of the surfactant polyoxyethylene amine (POEA) on genotoxic, biochemical and physiological parameters of the freshwater teleost Prochilodus lineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Claudia D C; Martinez, Claudia B R

    2014-09-01

    The surfactant polyoxyethylene amine (POEA) is added to several formulations of glyphosate herbicides that are widely used in agriculture and can contaminate aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, an integrated approach examining genotoxic, biochemical and physiological parameters was employed to evaluate acute effects of POEA on the Neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus. Juvenile fish were exposed to 0.15 mg·L(-1) (POEA 1), 0.75 mg·L(-1) (POEA 2) and 1.5 mg·L(-1) (POEA 3) of POEA or only water (CTR), and after 24h exposure samples of blood and liver were taken. Compared with CTR, liver of fish exposed to POEA 2 and POEA 3 showed increased activity of 7 ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase and increased content of glutathione, whereas the activity of glutathione-S-transferase was diminished. On the other hand, fish of the group POEA 1 showed an increase in the activity of superoxide dismutase and in the occurrence of lipid peroxidation. Fish exposed to POEA 3 presented increased hepatic activity of glutathione peroxidase and reduced plasma cortisol. The exposure to POEA at all concentrations tested caused an increase in plasma lactate and a decrease in the hepatic activity of catalase, in the number of red blood cells and in hemoglobin content. The comet assay used for analyzing DNA damage in blood cells indicated the genotoxicity of the surfactant at all concentrations tested. Taken together these results show that POEA can cause effects at various levels, such as hemolysis, DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, which are directly related to an imbalance in the redox state of the fish. PMID:24955954

  3. Application of the comet assay and detection of DNA damage in haemocytes of medicinal leech affected by aluminium pollution: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an investigation of genotoxic effects in medicinal leech (Hirudo verbana) exposed to water and sediment of Lake Njivice (Krk Island, Croatia) contaminated by aluminium compounds. The levels of primary DNA damage in leech haemocytes and loss of DNA integrity caused by acute and chronic exposure to contaminated water and sediment were investigated using the alkaline comet assay. Genotoxic effects induced by acute exposure to contaminants were evaluated on leech haemocytes and blood cells of fish and mouse treated ex vivo. The effects of chronic exposure were assessed on haemocytes sampled from an animal kept under laboratory conditions on contaminated water and sediment for 180 days. The results indicate the DNA damaging potential of aluminium compounds present in an excess amount in tested samples. - The alkaline comet assay applied on Hirudo verbana haemocytes can be a useful tool in determining the potential genotoxicity of water and sediment pollutants.

  4. Application of the comet assay and detection of DNA damage in haemocytes of medicinal leech affected by aluminium pollution: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihaljevic, Zlatko, E-mail: zmihalj@biol.pmf.h [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia); Ternjej, Ivancica, E-mail: ivancica@biol.pmf.h [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia); Stankovic, Igor, E-mail: igor.stankovic@voda.h [Central Water Management Laboratory, Hrvatske vode, Ulica grada Vukovara 220, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia); Kerovec, Mladen, E-mail: mkerovec@biol.pmf.h [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia); Kopjar, Nevenka, E-mail: nkopjar@imi.h [Mutagenesis Unit, Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Ksaverska c. 2, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-05-15

    This report describes an investigation of genotoxic effects in medicinal leech (Hirudo verbana) exposed to water and sediment of Lake Njivice (Krk Island, Croatia) contaminated by aluminium compounds. The levels of primary DNA damage in leech haemocytes and loss of DNA integrity caused by acute and chronic exposure to contaminated water and sediment were investigated using the alkaline comet assay. Genotoxic effects induced by acute exposure to contaminants were evaluated on leech haemocytes and blood cells of fish and mouse treated ex vivo. The effects of chronic exposure were assessed on haemocytes sampled from an animal kept under laboratory conditions on contaminated water and sediment for 180 days. The results indicate the DNA damaging potential of aluminium compounds present in an excess amount in tested samples. - The alkaline comet assay applied on Hirudo verbana haemocytes can be a useful tool in determining the potential genotoxicity of water and sediment pollutants.

  5. Genotoxicity of uranium contamination in embryonic zebrafish cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is a metal used in the nuclear industry and for military applications. Studies on mammals have shown that uranium is genotoxic. However the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the genotoxicity of uranium are poorly known for other types of vertebrates such as fish. Since unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be key lesions in cell lethality, the activity of one of the major DSB-repair pathways, i.e. non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), has been evaluated in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to uranium. Genotoxicity of uranium in ZF4 cells was further assessed by comet and micronucleus assays. Exposure to uranium results in the production of DSBs a few hours after incubation. These breaks trigger the phosphorylation of H2AX proteins. We showed that the DNA-PK kinase activity, essential for NHEJ, is altered by the presence of uranium. The presence of uranium in cells disturbs but does not inhibit the repair rate of DSBs. Such a result suggests an impact of uranium upon the reparability of DSBs and the potential activation of alternative DSBs repair pathway leading to the propagation of possible misrepaired DSBs. In parallel, we performed a transmission electron microscopy analysis of cells exposed to uranium and were able to localize internalized uranium using an Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalyser. We observed the formation of precipitates in lysosome-like vesicles for 250 μM of uranium in the medium. The appearance of these precipitates is concomitant with the decrease of the number of DSBs per cell. This process might be a part of a defence system whose role in counteracting cytotoxicity calls for further dedicated research.

  6. Assessment of methyl methacrylate genotoxicity by the micronucleus test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarildo Mariano de Araújo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of methyl methacrylate (MMA vapor by simulating standard occupational exposure of 8 hours per day and using the micronucleus test. We used 32 adult male Wistar rats divided into three groups: A - 16 rats exposed to MMA for 8 hours a day, B - Eight rats receiving single subcutaneous doses of cyclophosphamide on the first day of the experiment (positive control, C - Eight rats receiving only water and food ad libitum (negative control. Eight rats from group A and all of the rats from groups B and C were sacrificed 24 hours after beginning the experiment (acute exposure in group A. The remaining animals in group A were sacrificed 5 days after the experiment began (repeated exposure assessment in group A, simulating occupational exposure 40 hours/week. Femoral bone marrow was collected from each rat at the time of sacrifice for use in the micronucleus test. Two slides were completed per animal and were stained with Giemsa staining. Two thousand polychromatic erythrocytes were counted per animal. The Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a multiple comparisons test (Dunn test was used for statistical analysis. The median number of micronuclei was 7.00 in the group exposed to MMA for 1 day, 2.00 in the group exposed to MMA for 5 days, 9.00 in the group exposed to cyclophosphamide (positive control and 0.756 in the negative control group (p < 0.0001. MMA was genotoxic when measured after 1 day of exposure but was not evidently genotoxic after 5 days.

  7. Genotoxicity of uranium contamination in embryonic zebrafish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Sandrine, E-mail: sandrine.pereira@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DEI, SECRE, LRE, Cadarache (France); Camilleri, Virginie; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DEI, SECRE, LRE, Cadarache (France)

    2012-03-15

    Uranium is a metal used in the nuclear industry and for military applications. Studies on mammals have shown that uranium is genotoxic. However the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the genotoxicity of uranium are poorly known for other types of vertebrates such as fish. Since unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be key lesions in cell lethality, the activity of one of the major DSB-repair pathways, i.e. non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), has been evaluated in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to uranium. Genotoxicity of uranium in ZF4 cells was further assessed by comet and micronucleus assays. Exposure to uranium results in the production of DSBs a few hours after incubation. These breaks trigger the phosphorylation of H2AX proteins. We showed that the DNA-PK kinase activity, essential for NHEJ, is altered by the presence of uranium. The presence of uranium in cells disturbs but does not inhibit the repair rate of DSBs. Such a result suggests an impact of uranium upon the reparability of DSBs and the potential activation of alternative DSBs repair pathway leading to the propagation of possible misrepaired DSBs. In parallel, we performed a transmission electron microscopy analysis of cells exposed to uranium and were able to localize internalized uranium using an Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalyser. We observed the formation of precipitates in lysosome-like vesicles for 250 {mu}M of uranium in the medium. The appearance of these precipitates is concomitant with the decrease of the number of DSBs per cell. This process might be a part of a defence system whose role in counteracting cytotoxicity calls for further dedicated research.

  8. Polyomavirus interaction with the DNA damage response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua; L.Justice; Brandy; Verhalen; Mengxi; Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that subvert cellular metabolism and pathways to mediate their own replication—normally at the expense of the host cell. Polyomaviruses are a group of small DNA viruses, which have long been studied as a model for eukaryotic DNA replication. Polyomaviruses manipulate host replication proteins, as well as proteins involved in DNA maintenance and repair, to serve as essential cofactors for productive infection. Moreover, evidence suggests that polyomavirus infection poses a unique genotoxic threat to the host cell. In response to any source of DNA damage, cells must initiate an effective DNA damage response(DDR) to maintain genomic integrity, wherein two protein kinases, ataxia telangiectasia mutated(ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related(ATR), are major regulators of DNA damage recognition and repair. Recent investigation suggests that these essential DDR proteins are required for productive polyomavirus infection. This review will focus on polyomaviruses and their interaction with ATMand ATR-mediated DNA damage responses and the effect of this interaction on host genomic stability.

  9. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Regina Pereira Silva; Luis Fernando Barbisan; Maria Lúcia Zaidan Dagli; Paulo Hilário Nascimento Saldiva

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4- liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine ...

  10. Nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon have genotoxic effects on glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzmann, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Jagiełło, Joanna; Koziński, Rafał; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Grodzik, Marta; Lipińska, Ludwika; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, Andrè

    2014-01-01

    The carbon-based nanomaterial family consists of nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon, which may have a number of interactions with biological systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of nanoparticles comprised of pristine graphene, reduced graphene oxide, graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond in a U87 cell line. The scope of the work consisted of structural analysis of the nanoparticles using transmission electron microscopy, evaluation of cell morphology, and assessment of cell viability by Trypan blue assay and level of DNA fragmentation of U87 cells after 24 hours of incubation with 50 μg/mL carbon nanoparticles. DNA fragmentation was studied using single-cell gel electrophoresis. Incubation with nanoparticles containing the allotropes of carbon did not alter the morphology of the U87 cancer cells. However, incubation with pristine graphene and reduced graphene oxide led to a significant decrease in cell viability, whereas incubation with graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond led to a smaller decrease in cell viability. The results of a comet assay demonstrated that pristine graphene, reduced graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond caused DNA damage and were therefore genotoxic in U87 cells, whereas graphene oxide was not. PMID:24876774

  11. Genotoxicity of meso-2,3-dimercapto succinic acid-coated silver sulfide quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Özkan Vardar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanotecnology products have been used in wide applications in chemistry, electronics, energy generation, and medicine. Despite significant interest in developing quantum dots (QDs for biomedical applications, many researchers are convinced that QDs will never be used for the treatment of patients because of their potential toxicity. In various in vitro cell culture studies, the cytotoxic properties of some QD have been demonstrated and they have been suggested to be toxic in humans. In this study, the cytotoxic properties of Ag2S-(Meso-2,3-Dimercapto Succinic acid nanomaterials in V79 cells (Chinese lung fibroblast cell line were determined by MTT assay. The genotoxic effects of Ag2S-(Meso-2,3-Dimercapto Succinic acid were evaluated by the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis. The cells were treated with Ag2S-(Meso-2,3-Dimercapto Succinic acid at the concentrations of 5- 2000 µg/ml. No cytotoxic effect of Ag2S-(Meso-2,3-Dimercapto Succinic acid at all concentrations studied was observed. No significant increases in DNA damage were found at the studied concentrations when compared to negative control in V79 cells. In conclusion, further in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the safety doses of Ag2S-(Meso-2,3-Dimercapto Succinic acid.

  12. Genotoxic Properties of 2-Dodecylcyclobutanone, a Compound Formed on Irradiation of Food Containing Fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When food containing fat is treated by ionizing radiation, a group of 2-alkylcyclobutanones is formed. These components contain the same number of carbon atoms as their precursor fatty acids and the alkyl group is located in ring position 2. Thus, from palmitic acid 2-dodecylcyclobutanone is derived. To date, there is no evidence that the cyclobutanones occur in unirradiated food. Therefore, these components cannot be considered inherent to food, and for questions pertaining to risk assessment of irradiated food it would be advisable to determine the genotoxic and toxic potentials of cyclobutanones. Measurements of DNA damage in cells exposed to 2-dodecylcyclobutanone, employing the single cell microgel electrophoresis technique, have been carried out. In vitro experiments using rat and human colon cells indicate that 2-dodecylcyclobutanone in the concentration range of about 0.30-1.25 mg/ml induces DNA strand breaks in the cells. Simultaneously, a concentration related cytotoxic effect is observed as was determined by trypan blue exclusion. To which extent these in vitro findings are of relevancy for the in vivo human exposure situation needs to be investigated in further studies. In vivo tests in rats are in progress

  13. ZnO nanoparticles induced inflammatory response and genotoxicity in human blood cells: A mechanistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Violet Aileen; Kumar, Ashutosh; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-11-01

    The wide application of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in cosmetics, paints, biosensors, drug delivery, food packaging and as anticancerous agents has increased the risk of human exposure to these NPs. Earlier in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated a cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of ZnO NPs. However, there is paucity of data regarding their immunomodulatory effects. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the immunotoxic potential of ZnO NPs using human monocytic cell line (THP-1) as model to understand the underlying molecular mechanism. A significant (p glutathione (GSH) levels as compared to control. The expression levels of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade proteins such as p-ERK1/2, p-p38 and p-JNK were also significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) induced. Also, at the concentration tested, NPs induced DNA damage as assessed by the Comet and micronucleus assays. Our data demonstrated that ZnO NPs induce oxidative and nitrosative stress in human monocytes, leading to increased inflammatory response via activation of redox sensitive NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathways. PMID:26146191

  14. Lycopersicon assays of chemical/radiation genotoxicity for the study of environmental mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William F; Owens, Elizabeth T

    2002-07-01

    From a literature survey, 21 chemicals are tabulated that have been evaluated in 39 assays for their clastogenic effects in Lycopersicon. Nineteen of the 21 chemicals are reported as giving a positive reaction (i.e. causing chromosome aberrations). Of these, five are reported positive with a dose response. In addition, 23 assays have been recorded for six types of radiation, all of which reacted positively. The results of 102 assays with 32 chemicals and seven types of radiation tested for the induction of gene mutations are tabulated, as well as 20 chemicals and/or radiation in combined treatments. The Lycopersicon esculentum (2n=24) assay is a very good plant bioassay for assessing chromosome damage both in mitosis and meiosis and for somatic mutations induced by chemicals and radiations. The Lycopersicon bioassay has been shown to be as sensitive and as specific an assay as other plant genotoxicity assays, such as Hordeum vulgare, Vicia faba, Crepis capillaris, Pisum sativum and Allium cepa and should be considered in further studies in assessing clastogenicity. Tests using L. esculentum can be made for a spectrum of mutant phenotypes of which many are identifiable in young seedlings. PMID:12088718

  15. Toxicopathic changes and genotoxic effects in liver of rat following exposure to diazinon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzi, Lobna; Haouas, Zohra; Salah, Imen Belhadj; Sakly, Amina; Grissa, Intissar; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; Mehdi, Meriem; Cheikh, Hassen Ben

    2016-06-01

    In general, people may come in contact with mixtures of insecticides through domestic use, consumption of contaminated food or drinks, and/or living close to treated areas. We analyzed the toxic effects of diazinon on histological structure of liver and hematological parameters in male rats. DNA-damaging potential of diazinon was also investigated using the comet assay in blood cells and the micronucleus test in bone marrow. Two groups of six male rats orally received different amounts of diazinon: 1/50 and 1/25 LD 50 for 4 weeks (5 day/week). The present study showed that diazinon caused hypertrophy of sinusoids, central vein, and portal triad, in addition to the formation of oedema, vacuoles, hemorrhage, necrosis, and lymphoid infiltration in rats' liver. A significant decrease in red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrite levels, and platelet counts was observed in the treated groups. However, the white blood cell count increased. Micronucleus test results revealed aneugenic effects of diazinon. Furthermore, we noticed an increase in comet tail length in treated groups. So, the comet assay confirmed the genotoxic potential of diazinon in vivo. On the assumption that all alterations observed in rats could be observed in human, it is necessary to raise the awareness about the health risk posed by this insecticide. PMID:26916269

  16. Genotoxic evaluation of orthodontic bonding adhesives exposed to electron beam irradiation: an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the in vitro genotoxicity of two orthodontic adhesives and to determine the type of cell death they induce on human lymphocytes after exposing to Electron Bea