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Sample records for c-delta mediates nitric

  1. Protein kinase C delta localizes to secretory lysosomes in CD8+ CTL and directly mediates TCR signals leading to granule exocytosis-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jennifer S Y; Haydar, Tarik F; Radoja, Sasa

    2008-10-01

    Lytic granule exocytosis is the major effector function used by CD8(+) CTL in response to intracellular pathogens and tumors. Despite recent progress in the field, two important aspects of this cytotoxic mechanism remain poorly understood. First, TCR-signaling pathway(s) that selectively induces granule exocytosis in CTL has not been defined to date. Second, it is unclear how Ag receptor-induced signals are converted into mobilization of lytic granules. We recently demonstrated that protein kinase C delta (PKC delta) selectively regulates TCR-induced lytic granule polarization in mouse CD8(+) CTL. To better understand how PKC delta facilitates granule movement, here we studied dynamics of intracellular localization of PKC delta in living CD8(+) CTL. Strikingly, we found that PKC delta localizes to the secretory lysosomes and polarizes toward immunological synapse during the process of target cell killing. Also, biochemical and structure-function studies demonstrated that upon TCR ligation, PKC delta becomes rapidly phosphorylated on the activation loop and regulates granule exocytosis in a kinase-dependent manner. Altogether, our current studies provide new insights concerning the regulation of TCR-induced lytic granule exocytosis by revealing novel intracellular localization of PKC delta, providing the first example of colocalization of a kinase with secretory lysosomes in CD8(+) CTL and demonstrating that PKC delta directly transduces TCR signals leading to polarized granule secretion.

  2. Nitric oxide rescues thalidomide mediated teratogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamwala, Jamila H.; Veeriah, Vimal; Priya, M. Krishna; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; T, Pradeep; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative drug given to pregnant women, unfortunately caused limb deformities in thousands of babies. Recently the drug was revived because of its therapeutic potential; however the search is still ongoing for an antidote against thalidomide induced limb deformities. In the current study we found that nitric oxide (NO) rescues thalidomide affected chick (Gallus gallus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study confirms that NO reduced the number of thalidomide mediated limb deformities by 94% and 80% in chick and zebrafish embryos respectively. NO prevents limb deformities by promoting angiogenesis, reducing oxidative stress and inactivating caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. We conclude that NO secures angiogenesis in the thalidomide treated embryos to protect them from deformities. PMID:22997553

  3. Protein kinase C delta-mediated cytoskeleton remodeling is involved in aloe-emodin-induced photokilling of human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Te; You, Bang-Jau; Yang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Chi-Yu; Bau, Da-Tian; Lee, Hong-Zin

    2012-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy is becoming a widely accepted form of cancer treatment using a photosensitizing agent and light. Our previous study has demonstrated that photoactivated aloe-emodin induced anoikis and changes in cell morphology, which were in part mediated through its effect on cytoskeleton in lung carcinoma H460 cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of these photoactivated aloe-emodin-induced changes remain unknown. The present study demonstrated that the expression of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) was triggered by aloe-emodin and irradiation in H460 cells. Furthermore, the photoactivated aloe-emodin-induced cell death and translocation of PKCδ from the cytosol to the nucleus was found to be significantly inhibited by rottlerin, a PKCδ-selective inhibitor. Western blot analysis demonstrated that rottlerin also reversed the decrease in protein expression of cytoskeleton-related proteins, such as rat sarcoma (RAS), ras homolog gene family member A (RHO), p38, heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), α-actinin and tubulin, induced by photoactivated aloe-emodin. Our findings suggest that the regulation of cytoskeleton-related proteins mediated by PKCδ may be the mechanisms for the protective effects of rottlerin against the photoactivated aloe-emodin induced H460 cell death.

  4. Nitric Oxide: A Physiologic Mediator of Penile Erection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Arthur L.; Lowenstein, Charles J.; Bredt, David S.; Chang, Thomas S. K.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1992-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a cytotoxic agent of macrophages, a messenger molecule of neurons, and a vasodilator produced by endothelial cells. NO synthase, the synthetic enzyme for NO, was localized to rat penile neurons innervating the corpora cavernosa and to neuronal plexuses in the adventitial layer of penile arteries. Small doses of NO synthase inhibitors abolished electrophysiologically induced penile erections. These results establish NO as a physiologic mediator of erectile function.

  5. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Posttranslational Modifications: Impacts at the Synapse

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    Sophie A. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an important gasotransmitter molecule that is involved in numerous physiological processes throughout the nervous system. In addition to its involvement in physiological plasticity processes (long-term potentiation, LTP; long-term depression, LTD which can include NMDAR-mediated calcium-dependent activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, new insights into physiological and pathological consequences of nitrergic signalling have recently emerged. In addition to the canonical cGMP-mediated signalling, NO is also implicated in numerous pathways involving posttranslational modifications. In this review we discuss the multiple effects of S-nitrosylation and 3-nitrotyrosination on proteins with potential modulation of function but limit the analyses to signalling involved in synaptic transmission and vesicular release. Here, crucial proteins which mediate synaptic transmission can undergo posttranslational modifications with either pre- or postsynaptic origin. During normal brain function, both pathways serve as important cellular signalling cascades that modulate a diverse array of physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity, transcriptional activity, and neuronal survival. In contrast, evidence suggests that aging and disease can induce nitrosative stress via excessive NO production. Consequently, uncontrolled S-nitrosylation/3-nitrotyrosination can occur and represent pathological features that contribute to the onset and progression of various neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s.

  6. Exercise promotes collateral artery growth mediated by monocytic nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Stephan H; Millenaar, Dominic N; Werner, Christian; Schuh, Lisa; Degen, Achim; Bettink, Stephanie I; Lipp, Peter; van Rooijen, Nico; Meyer, Tim; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis) is an important adaptive response to hampered arterial perfusion. It is unknown whether preventive physical exercise before limb ischemia can improve arteriogenesis and modulate mononuclear cell function. This study aimed at investigating the effects of endurance exercise before arterial occlusion on MNC function and collateral artery growth. After 3 weeks of voluntary treadmill exercise, ligation of the right femoral artery was performed in mice. Hindlimb perfusion immediately after surgery did not differ from sedentary mice. However, previous exercise improved perfusion restoration ≤7 days after femoral artery ligation, also when exercise was stopped at ligation. This was accompanied by an accumulation of peri-collateral macrophages and increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in hindlimb collateral and in MNC of blood and spleen. Systemic monocyte and macrophage depletion by liposomal clodronate but not splenectomy attenuated exercise-induced perfusion restoration, collateral artery growth, peri-collateral macrophage accumulation, and upregulation of iNOS. iNOS-deficient mice did not show exercise-induced perfusion restoration. Transplantation of bone marrow-derived MNC from iNOS-deficient mice into wild-type animals inhibited exercise-induced collateral artery growth. In contrast to sedentary controls, thrice weekly aerobic exercise training for 6 months in humans increased peripheral blood MNC iNOS expression. Circulating mononuclear cell-derived inducible nitric oxide is an important mediator of exercise-induced collateral artery growth. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Is flow-mediated dilation nitric oxide mediated?: A meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Dawson, E.A.; Groenewoud, H.M.; Jones, H.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a noninvasive index of endothelial function and vascular health in humans. Studies examining the role of nitric oxide (NO) are not conclusive. In this article, we quantified the contribution of NO in FMD of conduit arteries and explored the effect of the protocol (ie,

  8. Nitric oxide mediates insect cellular immunity via phospholipase A2 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    After infection or invasion is recognized, biochemical mediators act in signaling insect immune functions. These include biogenic amines, insect cytokines, eicosanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Treating insects or isolated hemocyte populations with different mediators often leads to similar results. Se...

  9. Nitrate tolerance impairs nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jørn Bech; Boesgaard, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized......Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized...

  10. Alternatively spliced neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Champion, Hunter C.; Crone, Julie K.; Palese, Michael A.; Huang, Paul L.; Sawa, Akira; Luo, Xiaojiang; Musicki, Biljana; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2006-01-01

    A key role for nitric oxide (NO) in penile erection is well established, but the relative roles of the neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) versus endothelial forms of NOS are not clear. nNOS- and endothelial NOS-deficient mice maintain erectile function and reproductive capacity, questioning the importance of NO. Alternatively, residual NO produced by shorter transcripts in the nNOS−/− animals might suffice for normal physiologic function. We show that the β splice variant of nNOS elicits normal erection despite a decrease in stimulus-response characteristics and a 5-fold increased sensitivity to the NOS inhibitor, l-NAME. Residual nNOSβ generates only 10% of the normal NO level in vitro but produces citrulline and diaphorase staining reflecting in vivo NOS activity in pelvic ganglion nerves that is comparable to WT animals. Thus, alternatively spliced forms of nNOS are major mediators of penile erection and so may be targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:16488973

  11. Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system

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    Balazs, G. Bryan; Chiba, Zoher; Lewis, Patricia R.; Nelson, Norvell; Steward, G. Anthony

    1999-01-01

    An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO.sub.2. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement.

  12. Transnitrosylation: A Factor in Nitric Oxide-Mediated Penile Erection

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    Goetz, Tabitha; La Favor, Justin D.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nitric oxide (NO) signaling can be mediated not only through classical cGMP, but also through S-nitrosylation. The impact of S-nitrosylation on erectile function and in NO regulation and oxidative stress in the penis, however, remains poorly understood. Aims To characterize the role of GSNOR, a major regulator of S-nitrosylation homeostasis, on erection physiology and on eNOS function and oxidative/nitrosative stress in the penis. Materials and Methods Adult GSNOR-deficient and WT mice were used. Erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Total NO in penile homogenates was measured by Griess reaction. Protein S-nitrosylation, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation on Ser-1177 (positive regulatory site), eNOS uncoupling, and markers of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [4-HNE], malondialdehyde, and nitrotyrosine) in the penis were measured by Western blot. Main outcome measures Erectile function, eNOS function and oxidative stress in the penis of GSNOR-deficient mice. Results Erectile function was intact in GSNOR-deficient mice. Total S-nitrosylated proteins were increased (p<0.05) in the GSNOR−/− compared to WT mouse penis. While eNOS phosphorylation on Ser-1177 did not differ between the GSNOR−/− and WT mouse penis at baseline, electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve increased (p<0.05) P-eNOS in the WT mouse penis, but failed to increase P-eNOS in the GSNOR−/− mouse penis. Total NO production was decreased (p<0.05), while eNOS uncoupling, 4-HNE, malondialdehyde, and nitrotyrosine were increased (p<0.05) in the GSNOR-deficient mouse penis compared to that of WT mice. Conclusion Transnitrosylation mechanisms play an important role in regulating NO bioactivity in the penis. Deficiency of GSNOR leads to eNOS dysfunction and increased oxidative damage, suggesting that homeostatic eNOS function in the penis is governed by transnitrosylation. PMID:27114194

  13. Redundant role of protein kinase C delta and epsilon during mouse embryonic development.

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    Sergio Carracedo

    Full Text Available Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon are mediators of important cellular events, such as cell proliferation, migration or apoptosis. The formation of blood vessels, i.e., vasculo- and angiogenesis, is a process where these isoforms have also been shown to participate. However, mice deficient in either Protein Kinase C delta or epsilon are viable and therefore their individual contribution to the formation of the vasculature appeared so far dispensable. In this study, we show that double null mutation of Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon causes embryonic lethality at approximately E9.5. At this stage, whole mount staining of the endothelial marker CD31 in double null embryos revealed defective blood vessel formation. Moreover, culture of double deficient mouse allantois showed impaired endothelial cell organization, and analyses of double deficient embryo sections showed dilated vessels, decreased endothelial-specific adherent junctions, and decreased contact of endothelial cells with mural cells. Protein kinase C delta and epsilon also appeared essential for vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation, since α-smooth muscle actin, a classical marker for vascular smooth muscle cells, was almost undetectable in double deficient embryonic aorta at E9.5. Subsequent qPCR analyses showed decreased VE-cadherin, Vegfr2, Cd31, Cdh2, Ets1, and Fli-1, among other angiogenesis related transcripts in double deficient embryos. Taken together, these data suggest for the first time an in vivo redundant role between members of the novel Protein Kinase C subfamily that allows for mutual compensation during mouse embryonic development, with vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as an obvious common function of these two Protein Kinase Cs. Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon might therefore be useful targets for inhibiting vasculo- and/or angiogenesis.

  14. Nitric oxide: a pro-inflammatory mediator in lung disease?

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    Eiserich Jason P

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract are commonly associated with elevated production of nitric oxide (NO• and increased indices of NO• -dependent oxidative stress. Although NO• is known to have anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, various lines of evidence support the contribution of NO• to lung injury in several disease models. On the basis of biochemical evidence, it is often presumed that such NO• -dependent oxidations are due to the formation of the oxidant peroxynitrite, although alternative mechanisms involving the phagocyte-derived heme proteins myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase might be operative during conditions of inflammation. Because of the overwhelming literature on NO• generation and activities in the respiratory tract, it would be beyond the scope of this commentary to review this area comprehensively. Instead, it focuses on recent evidence and concepts of the presumed contribution of NO• to inflammatory diseases of the lung.

  15. Nitric oxide inhibits calpain-mediated proteolysis of talin in skeletal muscle cells

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    Koh, T. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside prevented many of the effects of calcium ionophore on C(2)C(12) muscle cells, including preventing talin proteolysis and release into the cytosol and reducing loss of vinculin, cell detachment, and loss of cellular protein. These results indicate that nitric oxide inhibition of calpain protected the cells from ionophore-induced proteolysis. Calpain inhibitor I and a cell-permeable calpastatin peptide also protected the cells from proteolysis, confirming that ionophore-induced proteolysis was primarily calpain mediated. The activity of m-calpain in a casein zymogram was inhibited by sodium nitroprusside, and this inhibition was reversed by dithiothreitol. Previous incubation with the active site-targeted calpain inhibitor I prevented most of the sodium nitroprusside-induced inhibition of m-calpain activity. These data suggest that nitric oxide inhibited m-calpain activity via S-nitrosylation of the active site cysteine. The results of this study indicate that nitric oxide produced endogenously by skeletal muscle and other cell types has the potential to inhibit m-calpain activity and cytoskeletal proteolysis.

  16. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    OpenAIRE

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Lagoda, Gwen F.; Musicki, Biljana; Rameau, Gerald A.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) initiates penile erection, but has not been thought to participate in the sustained erection required for normal sexual performance. We now show that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of nNOS mediates erectile physiology, including sustained erection. nNOS is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at serine(S)1412. Electrical stimulation of the penile innervation increases S1412 phosphorylation that is blocked by PKA inhib...

  17. Nitric oxide mediates abnormal responsiveness of thyroid arteries in methimazole-treated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega Serrano, Joaquín; Vila Salinas, José María; Mauricio Aviñó, María Dolores; Segarra Irles, Gloria Vicenta; Medina Bessó, Pascual; Martínez León, Juan Bautista; Lluch, Salvador

    2005-01-01

    Objective: We studied the intervention of nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin (PGI2) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in mediating responses to acetylcholine in thyroid arteries from euthyroid (E) and methimazole-treated (MT) patients. Design and methods: Branches of the superior thyroid artery were obtained from 19 E patients and 17 MT patients (euthyroid at the time of surgery) undergoing total thyroidectomy or hemithyroidectomy. Artery rings were suspended in organ baths f...

  18. Alopecia in a viable phospholipase C delta 1 and phospholipase C delta 3 double mutant.

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    Fabian Runkel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inositol 1,4,5trisphosphate (IP(3 and diacylglycerol (DAG are important intracellular signalling molecules in various tissues. They are generated by the phospholipase C family of enzymes, of which phospholipase C delta (PLCD forms one class. Studies with functional inactivation of Plcd isozyme encoding genes in mice have revealed that loss of both Plcd1 and Plcd3 causes early embryonic death. Inactivation of Plcd1 alone causes loss of hair (alopecia, whereas inactivation of Plcd3 alone has no apparent phenotypic effect. To investigate a possible synergy of Plcd1 and Plcd3 in postnatal mice, novel mutations of these genes compatible with life after birth need to be found. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterise a novel mouse mutant with a spontaneously arisen mutation in Plcd3 (Plcd3(mNab that resulted from the insertion of an intracisternal A particle (IAP into intron 2 of the Plcd3 gene. This mutation leads to the predominant expression of a truncated PLCD3 protein lacking the N-terminal PH domain. C3H mice that carry one or two mutant Plcd3(mNab alleles are phenotypically normal. However, the presence of one Plcd3(mNab allele exacerbates the alopecia caused by the loss of functional Plcd1 in Del(9olt1Pas mutant mice with respect to the number of hair follicles affected and the body region involved. Mice double homozygous for both the Del(9olt1Pas and the Plcd3(mNab mutations survive for several weeks and exhibit total alopecia associated with fragile hair shafts showing altered expression of some structural genes and shortened phases of proliferation in hair follicle matrix cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Plcd3(mNab mutation is a novel hypomorphic mutation of Plcd3. Our investigations suggest that Plcd1 and Plcd3 have synergistic effects on the murine hair follicle in specific regions of the body surface.

  19. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

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    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-11-26

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction.

  20. Akt-dependent phosphorylation of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    OpenAIRE

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A.; Crone, Julie K.; Becker, Robyn E.; Moriarity, John L.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2002-01-01

    In the penis, nitric oxide (NO) can be formed by both neuronal NO synthase and endothelial NOS (eNOS). eNOS is activated by viscous drag/shear stress in blood vessels to produce NO continuously, a process mediated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3kinase)/Akt pathway. Here we show that PI3-kinase/Akt physiologically mediates erection. Both electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve and direct intracavernosal injection of the vasorelaxant drug papaverine cause rapid increases in phos...

  1. Nitric oxide as a mediator of gastrointestinal mucosal injury?—Say it ain't so

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    Paul Kubes

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide has been suggested as a contributor to tissue injury in various experimental models of gastrointestinal inflammation. However, there is overwhelming evidence that nitric oxide is one of the most important mediators of mucosal defence, influencing such factors as mucus secretion, mucosal blood flow, ulcer repair and the activity of a variety of mucosal immunocytes. Nitric oxide has the capacity to down-regulate inflammatory responses in the gastrointestinal tract, to scavenge various free radical species and to protect the mucosa from injury induced by topical irritants. Moreover, questions can be raised regarding the evidence purported to support a role for nitric oxide in producing tissue injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting a role for nitric oxide in protecting the gastrointestinal tract from injury.

  2. Nitrated type III collagen as a biological marker of nitric oxide-mediated synovial tissue metabolism in osteoarthritis

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    Richardot, P; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Toh, L

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Nitric oxide (NO) is a major mediator of joint tissue inflammation and damage in osteoarthritis (OA) and mediates the nitration of tyrosine (Y*) residues in proteins. We investigated the nitration of type III collagen, a major constituent of synovial membrane, in knee OA. METHODS: A p...... investigation of oxidative-related alterations of synovial tissue metabolism in OA....

  3. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Lagoda, Gwen F.; Musicki, Biljana; Rameau, Gerald A.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) initiates penile erection, but has not been thought to participate in the sustained erection required for normal sexual performance. We now show that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of nNOS mediates erectile physiology, including sustained erection. nNOS is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at serine(S)1412. Electrical stimulation of the penile innervation increases S1412 phosphorylation that is blocked by PKA inhibitors but not by PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitors. Stimulation of cAMP formation by forskolin also activates nNOS phosphorylation. Sustained penile erection elicited by either intracavernous forskolin injection, or augmented by forskolin during cavernous nerve electrical stimulation, is prevented by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME or in nNOS-deleted mice. Thus, nNOS mediates both initiation and maintenance of penile erection, implying unique approaches for treating erectile dysfunction. PMID:23012472

  4. Nitric Oxide Mediates Bleomycin-Induced Angiogenesis and Pulmonary Fibrosis via Regulation of VEGF

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    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V.; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A.; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M.; Wright, Clayton A.; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogenic mediator VEGF using anti-VEGF antibody CBO-P11 significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Bleomycin-induced nitric oxide (NO) was observed to be the key upstream regulator of VEGF via the PI3k/Akt pathway. VEGF regulated other important angiogenic proteins including PAI-1 and IL-8 in response to bleomycin exposure. Inhibition of NO and VEGF activity significantly mitigated bleomycin-induced angiogenic and fibrogenic responses. NO and VEGF are key mediators of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and could serve as important targets against this debilitating disease. Overall, our data suggests an important role for angiogenic mediators in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25919965

  5. Inflammasome-derived IL-1β production induces nitric oxide-mediated resistance to Leishmania.

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    Lima-Junior, Djalma S; Costa, Diego L; Carregaro, Vanessa; Cunha, Larissa D; Silva, Alexandre L N; Mineo, Tiago W P; Gutierrez, Fredy R S; Bellio, Maria; Bortoluci, Karina R; Flavell, Richard A; Bozza, Marcelo T; Silva, João S; Zamboni, Dario S

    2013-07-01

    Parasites of the Leishmania genus are the causative agents of leishmaniasis in humans, a disease that affects more than 12 million people worldwide. These parasites replicate intracellularly in macrophages, and the primary mechanisms underlying host resistance involve the production of nitric oxide (NO). In this study we show that the Nlrp3 inflammasome is activated in response to Leishmania infection and is important for the restriction of parasite replication both in macrophages and in vivo as demonstrated through the infection of inflammasome-deficient mice with Leishmania amazonensis, Leishmania braziliensis and Leishmania infantum chagasi. Inflammasome-driven interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production facilitated host resistance to infection, as signaling through IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) and MyD88 was necessary and sufficient to trigger inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)-mediated production of NO. In this manuscript we identify a major signaling platform for host resistance to Leishmania spp. infection and describe the molecular mechanisms underlying Leishmania-induced NO production.

  6. The human coronary vasodilatory response to acute mental stress is mediated by neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sitara G; Melikian, Narbeh; Shabeeh, Husain; Cabaco, Ana R; Martin, Katherine; Khan, Faisal; O'Gallagher, Kevin; Chowienczyk, Philip J; Shah, Ajay M

    2017-09-01

    Mental stress-induced ischemia approximately doubles the risk of cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease, yet the mechanisms underlying changes in coronary blood flow in response to mental stress are poorly characterized. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) regulates basal coronary blood flow in healthy humans and mediates mental stress-induced vasodilation in the forearm. However, its possible role in mental stress-induced increases in coronary blood flow is unknown. We studied 11 patients (6 men and 5 women, mean age: 58 ± 14 yr) undergoing elective diagnostic cardiac catheterization and assessed the vasodilator response to mental stress elicited by the Stroop color-word test. Intracoronary substance P (20 pmol/min) and isosorbide dinitrate (1 mg) were used to assess endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation, respectively. Coronary blood flow was estimated using intracoronary Doppler recordings and quantitative coronary angiography to measure coronary artery diameter. Mental stress increased coronary flow by 34 ± 7.0% over the preceding baseline during saline infusion (P nitric oxide synthase in the human coronary circulation.Listen to this article's corresponding podcast at http://ajpheart.podbean.com/e/nnos-and-coronary-flow-during-mental-stress/. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Inactivation of [Fe-S] metalloproteins mediates nitric oxide-dependent killing of Burkholderia mallei.

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    Jessica Jones-Carson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Much remains to be known about the mechanisms by which O(2-dependent host defenses mediate broad antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show herein that reactive nitrogen species (RNS generated by inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase (iNOS account for the anti-Burkholderia mallei activity of IFNgamma-primed macrophages. Inducible NOS-mediated intracellular killing may represent direct bactericidal activity, because B. mallei showed an exquisite sensitivity to NO generated chemically. Exposure of B. mallei to sublethal concentrations of NO upregulated transcription of [Fe-S] cluster repair genes, while damaging the enzymatic activity of the [Fe-S] protein aconitase. To test whether [Fe-S] clusters are critical targets for RNS-dependent killing of B. mallei, a mutation was constructed in the NO-induced, [Fe-S] cluster repair regulator iscR. Not only was the iscR mutant hypersusceptible to iNOS-mediated killing, but its aconitase pool was readily oxidized by NO donors as compared to wild-type controls. Although killed by authentic H(2O(2, which also oxidizes [Fe-S] clusters, B. mallei appear to be resilient to NADPH oxidase-mediated cytotoxicity. The poor respiratory burst elicited by this bacterium likely explains why the NADPH oxidase is nonessential to the killing of B. mallei while it is still confined within phagosomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these findings have revealed a disparate role for NADPH oxidase and iNOS in the innate macrophage response against the strict aerobe B. mallei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first instance in which disruption of [Fe-S] clusters is demonstrated as cause of the bactericidal activity of NO congeners.

  8. Eph-B4 mediates vein graft adaptation by regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo; Collins, Michael J; Foster, Trenton R; Bai, Hualong; Hashimoto, Takuya; Santana, Jeans M; Shu, Chang; Dardik, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Vein graft adaptation is characterized by loss of expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor Eph-B4, the embryonic determinant of venous identity, without increased expression of its ligand ephrin-B2, the embryonic determinant of arterial identity. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important mediator of vessel remodeling. We hypothesized that the mechanism of action of Eph-B4 during vein graft adaptation might be through regulation of downstream eNOS activity. Mouse lung endothelial cells were stimulated with ephrin-B2/Fc, without and with preclustering, without and with the eNOS inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride or the Eph-B4 inhibitor NVP-BHG712, and assessed by Western blot and immunofluorescence for eNOS and Eph-B4 phosphorylation. Nitric oxide (NO) production was assessed using an NO-specific chemiluminescence analyzer. Cell migration was assessed using a Transwell assay. Human and mouse vein graft specimens were examined for eNOS activity by Western blot, and vessel remodeling was assessed in vein grafts in wild-type or eNOS knockout mice. Ephrin-B2/Fc stimulated both Eph-B4 and eNOS phosphorylation in a bimodal temporal distribution (n = 4; P < .05), with preclustered ephrin-B2/Fc causing prolonged peak Eph-B4 and eNOS phosphorylation as well as altered subcellular localization (n = 4; P < .05). Ephrin-B2/Fc increased NO release (n = 3; P < .01) as well as increased endothelial cell migration (n = 6; P < .05) in an eNOS-dependent fashion. Both human and mouse vein grafts showed increased eNOS phosphorylation compared with normal veins (n = 3; P < .05). Vein grafts from eNOS knockout mice showed less dilation and less wall thickening compared with wild-type vein grafts (n = 7; P < .05). eNOS is a mediator of vein graft adaptation to the arterial environment. Eph-B4 stimulates eNOS phosphorylation in vitro and may mediate vein graft adaptation by regulation of eNOS activity in vivo. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Stress response to cadmium and manganese in Paracentrotus lividus developing embryos is mediated by nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata [Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental Biology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Naples (Italy); Romano, Giovanna [Laboratory of Functional and Evolutionary Ecology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Naples (Italy); Palumbo, Anna, E-mail: anna.palumbo@szn.it [Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental Biology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Naples (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • NO is produced in sea urchin embryos in response to cadmium and manganese. • Cadmium and manganese affect the expression of specific genes. • NO levels regulate directly or indirectly the expression of some metal-induced genes. • NO is proposed as a sensor of different stress agents in sea urchin embryos. - Abstract: Increasing concentrations of contaminants, often resulting from anthropogenic activities, have been reported to occur in the marine environment and affect marine organisms. Among these, the metal ions cadmium and manganese have been shown to induce developmental delay and abnormalities, mainly reflecting skeleton elongation perturbation, in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, an established model for toxicological studies. Here, we provide evidence that the physiological messenger nitric oxide (NO), formed by L-arginine oxidation by NO synthase (NOS), mediates the stress response induced by cadmium and manganese in sea urchins. When NO levels were lowered by inhibiting NOS, the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. Quantitative expression of a panel of 19 genes involved in stress response, skeletogenesis, detoxification and multidrug efflux processes was followed at different developmental stages and under different conditions: metals alone, metals in the presence of NOS inhibitor, NO donor and NOS inhibitor alone. These data allowed the identification of different classes of genes whose metal-induced transcriptional expression was directly or indirectly mediated by NO. These results open new perspectives on the role of NO as a sensor of different stress agents in sea urchin developing embryos.

  10. Akt-dependent phosphorylation of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A.; Crone, Julie K.; Becker, Robyn E.; Moriarity, John L.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2002-01-01

    In the penis, nitric oxide (NO) can be formed by both neuronal NO synthase and endothelial NOS (eNOS). eNOS is activated by viscous drag/shear stress in blood vessels to produce NO continuously, a process mediated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3kinase)/Akt pathway. Here we show that PI3-kinase/Akt physiologically mediates erection. Both electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve and direct intracavernosal injection of the vasorelaxant drug papaverine cause rapid increases in phosphorylated (activated) Akt and eNOS. Phosphorylation is diminished by wortmannin and LY294002, inhibitors of PI3-kinase, the upstream activator of Akt. The two drugs also reduce erection. Penile erection elicited by papaverine is reduced profoundly in mice with targeted deletion of eNOS. Our findings support a model in which rapid, brief activation of neuronal NOS initiates the erectile process, whereas PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent phosphorylation and activation of eNOS leads to sustained NO production and maximal erection. PMID:11904450

  11. Neither nitrite nor nitric oxide mediate toxic effects of nitroglycerin on mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungel, Peter; Haindl, Susanne; Behling, Tricia; Mayer, Bernd; Redl, Heinz; Kozlov, Andrey V

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that the major effect of nitroglycerin (NG) is realized through the release of nitric oxide (NO) catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2). In addition, it has been shown that NG inhibits mitochondrial respiration. The aim of this study was to clarify whether NG-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration is mediated by NO. In rat liver mitochondria, NG inhibited complex-I-dependent respiration and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, preferentially at complex I. Both effects were insensitive to chloral hydrate, an ALDH2 inhibitor. Nitrite, an NG intermediate, had no influence on either mitochondrial respiration or the production of ROS. NO inhibited preferentially complex I but did not elevate ROS production. Hemoglobin, an NO scavenger, and blue light had contrary effects on mitochondria inhibited by NO or NG. In summary, our data suggest that although NG induces vasodilatation via NO release, it causes mitochondrial dysfunction via an NO-independent pathway. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The nitric oxide production in the moss Physcomitrella patens is mediated by nitrate reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigoberto Medina-Andrés

    Full Text Available During the last 20 years multiple roles of the nitric oxide gas (•NO have been uncovered in plant growth, development and many physiological processes. In seed plants the enzymatic synthesis of •NO is mediated by a nitric oxide synthase (NOS-like activity performed by a still unknown enzyme(s and nitrate reductase (NR. In green algae the •NO production has been linked only to NR activity, although a NOS gene was reported for Ostreococcus tauri and O. lucimarinus, no other Viridiplantae species has such gene. As there is no information about •NO synthesis neither for non-vascular plants nor for non-seed vascular plants, the interesting question regarding the evolution of the enzymatic •NO production systems during land plant natural history remains open. To address this issue the endogenous •NO production by protonema was demonstrated using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR. The •NO signal was almost eliminated in plants treated with sodium tungstate, which also reduced the NR activity, demonstrating that in P. patens NR activity is the main source for •NO production. The analysis with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM confirmed endogenous NO production and showed that •NO signal is accumulated in the cytoplasm of protonema cells. The results presented here show for the first time the •NO production in a non-vascular plant and demonstrate that the NR-dependent enzymatic synthesis of •NO is common for embryophytes and green algae.

  13. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  14. A nitric oxide-like factor mediates nonadrenergic-noncholinergic neurogenic relaxation of penile corpus cavernosum smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, N; Azadzoi, K M; Goldstein, I; Saenz de Tejada, I

    1991-01-01

    This study was initiated to characterize nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) inhibitory neurotransmission in penile corpus cavernosum. Using organ baths, isometric tension measurements were made in strips of human and rabbit corpus cavernosum. In examining endothelium-mediated responses, cumulative additions of exogenous acetylcholine elicited dose-dependent relaxations which were significantly reduced or completely inhibited in tissues treated with NG-monomethyl L-arginine (L-NMMA; an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis), oxyhemoglobin (a nitric oxide scavenger), or methylene blue (a guanylate cyclase blocker). Tissues exposed to hypoxic conditions (PO2 = 5-10 mmHg) also did not respond to exogenous acetylcholine. Mechanical removal of the endothelium in human corporal strips or in situ treatment of rabbit corpora with detergent blocked the relaxation to acetylcholine. Transmural electrical stimulation of corporal tissue strips denuded of functional endothelium, in the presence of adrenergic blockade with bretylium and muscarinic receptor blockade with atropine, caused frequency-dependent relaxation. This neurogenic relaxation was reduced or prevented by L-NMMA, oxyhemoglobin, methylene blue, and hypoxia. The effects of L-NMMA were reversed by L-arginine and the effects of hypoxia were readily reversed by normoxic conditions. Authentic, exogenous nitric oxide relaxed corporal strips which were contracted with adrenergic agonists and this effect was significantly inhibited by oxyhemoglobin. It is concluded that (a) endothelium-mediated responses of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle are mediated by a diffusible nitric oxide-like substance; (b) NANC neurogenic inhibitory responses do not require functional endothelium, and (c) nitric oxide, or a closely related substance, may act as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in penile corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. Images PMID:1647413

  15. Dissection of a Hypoxia-induced, Nitric Oxide–mediated Signaling Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkers, Pascale F.

    2009-01-01

    Befitting oxygen's key role in life's processes, hypoxia engages multiple signaling systems that evoke pervasive adaptations. Using surrogate genetics in a powerful biological model, we dissect a poorly understood hypoxia-sensing and signal transduction system. Hypoxia triggers NO-dependent accumulation of cyclic GMP and translocation of cytoplasmic GFP-Relish (an NFκB/Rel transcription factor) to the nucleus in Drosophila S2 cells. An enzyme capable of eliminating NO interrupted signaling specifically when it was targeted to the mitochondria, arguing for a mitochondrial NO signal. Long pretreatment with an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), L-NAME, blocked signaling. However, addition shortly before hypoxia was without effect, suggesting that signaling is supported by the prior action of NOS and is independent of NOS action during hypoxia. We implicated the glutathione adduct, GSNO, as a signaling mediator by showing that overexpression of the cytoplasmic enzyme catalyzing its destruction, GSNOR, blocks signaling, whereas knockdown of this activity caused reporter translocation in the absence of hypoxia. In downstream steps, cGMP accumulated, and calcium-dependent signaling was subsequently activated via cGMP-dependent channels. These findings reveal the use of unconventional steps in an NO pathway involved in sensing hypoxia and initiating signaling. PMID:19625446

  16. Dissection of a hypoxia-induced, nitric oxide-mediated signaling cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkers, Pascale F; O'Farrell, Patrick H

    2009-09-01

    Befitting oxygen's key role in life's processes, hypoxia engages multiple signaling systems that evoke pervasive adaptations. Using surrogate genetics in a powerful biological model, we dissect a poorly understood hypoxia-sensing and signal transduction system. Hypoxia triggers NO-dependent accumulation of cyclic GMP and translocation of cytoplasmic GFP-Relish (an NFkappaB/Rel transcription factor) to the nucleus in Drosophila S2 cells. An enzyme capable of eliminating NO interrupted signaling specifically when it was targeted to the mitochondria, arguing for a mitochondrial NO signal. Long pretreatment with an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), L-NAME, blocked signaling. However, addition shortly before hypoxia was without effect, suggesting that signaling is supported by the prior action of NOS and is independent of NOS action during hypoxia. We implicated the glutathione adduct, GSNO, as a signaling mediator by showing that overexpression of the cytoplasmic enzyme catalyzing its destruction, GSNOR, blocks signaling, whereas knockdown of this activity caused reporter translocation in the absence of hypoxia. In downstream steps, cGMP accumulated, and calcium-dependent signaling was subsequently activated via cGMP-dependent channels. These findings reveal the use of unconventional steps in an NO pathway involved in sensing hypoxia and initiating signaling.

  17. Nitric oxide agents impair insulin-mediated signal transduction in rat skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragoobirsingh Dalip

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence demonstrates that exogenously administered nitric oxide (NO can induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. We have investigated the modulatory effects of two NO donors, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine (SNAP and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO on the early events in insulin signaling in rat skeletal myocytes. Results Skeletal muscle cells from 6–8 week old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with SNAP or GSNO (25 ng/ml in the presence or absence of glucose (25 mM and insulin (100 nM. Cellular insulin receptor-β levels and tyrosine phosphorylation in IRS-1 were significantly reduced, while serine phosphorylation in IRS-1 was significantly increased in these cells, when compared to the insulin-stimulated control. Reversal to near normal levels was achieved using the NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO. Conclusion These data suggest that NO is a potent modulator of insulin-mediated signal transduction and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Nitric oxide mediates cytokinin functions in cell proliferation and meristem maintenance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qi; Wang, Yu-Ting; Tian, Hua; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2013-07-01

    Cytokinin and nitric oxide (NO) have been characterized as signaling molecules to trigger cell division in tissue culture. Here, we show that the hypocotyl and root explants of Arabidopsis NO-deficient mutant nos1/noa1 exhibit severe defects in callus induction and shoot regeneration in response to cytokinin. Accordingly, depletion of NO caused by a NO scavenger leads to a severe inhibitory effect on callus induction. Moreover, cytokinin-induced NO production is impaired in nos1/noa1 in which cytokinin-triggered activation of cell cycle gene CYCD3;1 is inhibited, indicating that NO may act downstream of cytokinin in the control of cell proliferation through CYCD3;1. This hypothesis is further confirmed by the genetic evidence that constitutive expression of CYCD3;1 complements the defects of nos1/noa1 mutant in meristematic activity in shoot, root, and floral tissues as well as in cytokinin-induced callus initiation and shoot regeneration. Furthermore, we show that NO deficiency caused by loss of NOS1/NOA1 impairs cellular development such as the duration of the mitotic phase and timing of the transition to endocycles in nos1/noa1 mutant leaves, which can be reverted by constitutive expression of CYCD3;1. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NO mediates transcriptional activation of CYCD3;1 in regulating the mitotic cycles in response to cytokinins.

  19. Nitric-oxide-mediated cell death is triggered by chitosan in Fusarium eumartii spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrile, María Cecilia; Mansilla, Andrea Yamila; Albertengo, Liliana; Rodríguez, María Susana; Casalongué, Claudia Anahí

    2015-05-01

    The genus Fusarium comprises a heterogeneous group of fungi important for agriculture. Fusarium solani f. sp. eumartii (F. eumartii), historically considered to be a fungal pathogen of potato, has also been associated with tomato disease. Currently, chitosan and its derivatives have been receiving more attention as environmentally friendly antimicrobial compounds in sustainable practices. The aim of the present work was to characterize downstream events associated with the mode of action of chitosan, including nitrosative reactive species, in order to identify new biomarkers of its cytotoxic action. Data indicated that chitosan-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production might lead to conidial death, concomitant with the strong reduction in fungal pathogenicity in tomato plants. Following chitosan applications, a notably dose-dependent reduction in conidial viability was demonstrated in F. eumartii. Thereafter, the infectivity of chitosan-treated spores was tested by a bioassay using tomato seedlings. All these data highlight NO valuable properties as a quantitative and qualitative biomarker of cytotoxic action of chitosan in conidial cells. In addition, these findings place the chitosan assayed here as a fungicide with a high potential of application in sustainable horticultural practices. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Passive leg movement and nitric oxide-mediated vascular function: the impact of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinity, Joel D; Groot, H Jonathan; Layec, Gwenael; Rossman, Matthew J; Ives, Stephen J; Morgan, David E; Gmelch, Ben S; Bledsoe, Amber; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-03-15

    In young healthy men, passive leg movement (PLM) elicits a robust nitric oxide (NO)-dependent increase in leg blood flow (LBF), thus providing a novel approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function. While the magnitude of the LBF response to PLM is markedly reduced with age, the role of NO in this attenuated response in the elderly is unknown. Therefore, this study sought to determine the contribution of NO in the PLM-induced LBF with age. Fourteen male subjects (7 young, 24 ± 1 yr; and 7 old, 75 ± 3 yr) underwent PLM with and without NO synthase (NOS) inhibition achieved by intra-arterial infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). LBF was determined second-by-second by Doppler ultrasound, and central hemodynamics were measured by finger photoplethysmography. NOS inhibition blunted the PLM-induced peak increase in LBF in the young (control: 668 ± 106; 431 ± 95 Δml/min; P = 0.03) but had no effect in the old (control: 266 ± 98; 251 ± 92 Δml/min; P = 0.59). Likewise, the magnitude of the reduction in the overall (i.e., area under the curve) PLM-induced LBF response to NOS inhibition was less in the old (LBF: -31 ± 18 ml) than the young (LBF: -129 ± 21 ml; P PLM-induced LBF in the elderly is primarily due to a reduced contribution to vasodilation from NO and therefore support the use of PLM as a novel approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function across the lifespan.

  1. Flow-mediated dilation and cardiovascular event prediction: does nitric oxide matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel J; Jones, Helen; Thijssen, Dick; Cable, N T; Atkinson, Greg

    2011-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an early atherosclerotic event that precedes clinical symptoms and may also render established plaque vulnerable to rupture. Noninvasive assessment of endothelial function is commonly undertaken using the flow-mediated dilation (FMD) technique. Some studies indicate that FMD possesses independent prognostic value to predict future cardiovascular events that may exceed that associated with traditional risk factor assessment. It has been assumed that this association is related to the proposal that FMD provides an index of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) function. Interestingly, placement of the occlusion cuff during the FMD procedure alters the shear stress stimulus and NO dependency of the resulting dilation: cuff placement distal to the imaged artery leads to a largely NO-mediated response, whereas proximal cuff placement leads to dilation which is less NO dependent. We used this physiological observation and the knowledge that prognostic studies have used both approaches to examine whether the prognostic capacity of FMD is related to its role as a putative index of NO function. In a meta-analysis of 14 studies (>8300 subjects), we found that FMD derived using a proximal cuff was at least as predictive as that derived using distal cuff placement, despite the latter being more NO dependent. This suggests that, whilst FMD is strongly predictive of future cardiovascular events, this may not solely be related to its assumed NO dependency. Although this finding should be confirmed with more and larger studies, we suggest that any direct measure of vascular (endothelial) function may provide independent prognostic information in humans.

  2. Exercise prevents age-related decline in nitric-oxide-mediated vasodilator function in cutaneous microvessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Mark A; Green, Daniel J; Cable, N Timothy

    2008-07-15

    Ageing is associated with impaired endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) function in human microvessels. We investigated the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise training on physiological and pharmacological NO-mediated microvascular responses in older subjects. NO-mediated vasodilatation was examined in young, older sedentary and older fit subjects who had two microdialysis fibres embedded into the skin on the ventral aspect of the forearm and laser Doppler probes placed over these sites. Both sites were then heated to 42 degrees C, with Ringer solution infused in one probe and N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) through the second. In another study, three doses of ACh were infused in the presence or absence of L-NAME in similar subjects. The older sedentary subjects then undertook exercise training, with repeat studies at 12 and 24 weeks. The NO component of the heat-induced rise in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was diminished in the older sedentary subjects after 30 min of prolonged heating at 42 degrees C (26.9 +/- 3.9%CVC(max)), compared to older fit (46.2 +/- 7.0%CVC(max), P < 0.05) and young subjects (41.2 +/- 5.2%CVC(max), P < 0.05), whereas exercise training in the older sedentary group enhanced NO-vasodilator function in response to incremental heating (P < 0.05). Similarly, the NO contribution to ACh responses was impaired in the older sedentary versus older fit subjects (low dose 3.2 +/- 1.3 versus 6.6 +/- 1.3%CVC(max); mid dose 11.4 +/- 2.4 versus 21.6 +/- 4.5%CVC(max); high dose 35.2 +/- 6.0 versus 52.6 +/- 7.9%CVC(max), P < 0.05) and training reversed this (12 weeks: 13.7 +/- 3.6, 28.9 +/- 5.3, 56.1 +/- 3.9%CVC(max), P < 0.05). These findings indicate that maintaining a high level of fitness, or undertaking exercise training, prevents age-related decline in indices of physiological and pharmacological microvascular NO-mediated vasodilator function. Since higher levels of NO confer anti-atherogenic benefit, this study has

  3. Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on sympathetically-mediated tachycardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis directly alters the tachycardia produced by sympathetically-derived norepinephrine. The NO synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 50 micromol/kg, i.v.), produced a marked rise in mean arterial blood pressure. This pressor response was associated with a fall in heart rate which involved the withdrawal of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity. The NO-donor, sodium nitroprusside (5 microg/kg, i.v.), produced a pronounced fall in mean arterial blood pressure but only a minor increase in heart rate. The beta-adrenoceptor agonist, isoproterenol (0.5 micromol/kg, i.v.), and the membrane-permeable cAMP analogue, 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (10 micromol/kg, i.v.), produced falls in mean arterial blood pressure and pronounced increases in heart rate. The indirectly acting sympathomimetic agent, tyramine (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.), produced a pressor response and a tachycardia. The effects of sodium nitroprusside, tyramine, isoproterenol and 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP on mean arterial blood pressure were not markedly affected by L-NAME. However, the tachycardia produced by these agents was considerably exaggerated in the presence of this NO synthesis inhibitor. These findings suggest that L-NAME potentiates the tachycardia produced by sympathetically-derived norepinephrine. The increased responsiveness to norepinephrine may involve (i) a rapid up-regulation of cardiac beta1-adrenoceptors and cAMP signaling in cardiac pacemaker cells due to the loss of the inhibitory influence of cardiac NO, and (ii) the up-regulation of beta1-adrenoceptor-mediated signal transduction processes in response to the L-NAME-induced withdrawal of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity.

  4. Nitric oxide blunts the endothelin-mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction in exercising swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houweling, Birgit; Merkus, Daphne; Dekker, Marjolein MD; Duncker, Dirk J

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that vasodilators and vasoconstrictors that are produced by the vascular endothelium, including nitric oxide (NO), prostanoids and endothelin (ET), contribute to the regulation of systemic and pulmonary vascular tone in swine, in particular during treadmill exercise. Since NO and prostanoids can modulate the release of ET, and vice versa, we investigated the integrated endothelial control of pulmonary vascular resistance in exercising swine. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that increased NO and prostanoid production during exercise limits the vasoconstrictor influence of ET, so that loss of these vasodilators results in exaggerated ET-mediated vasoconstriction during exercise. Fifteen instrumented swine were exercised on a treadmill at 0–5 km h−1 before and during ETA/ETB receptor blockade (tezosentan, 3 mg kg−1i.v.) in the presence and absence of inhibition of NO synthase (Nω-nitro-l-arginine, 20 mg kg−1i.v.) and/or cyclo-oxygenase (indometacin, 10 mg kg−1i.v.). In the systemic circulation, ET receptor blockade decreased vascular resistance at rest, which waned with increasing exercise intensity. Prior inhibition of either NO or prostanoid production augmented the vasodilator effect of ET receptor blockade, and these effects were additive. In contrast, in the pulmonary bed, ET receptor blockade had no effect under resting conditions, but decreased pulmonary vascular resistance during exercise. Prior inhibition of NO synthase enhanced the pulmonary vasodilator effect of ET receptor blockade, particularly during exercise, whereas inhibition of prostanoids had no effect, even after prior NO synthase inhibition. In conclusion, endogenous endothelin limits pulmonary vasodilatation in response to treadmill exercise. This vasoconstrictor influence is blunted by NO but not by prostanoids. PMID:16081484

  5. Nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation increases blood flow during the early stages of stress fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Ryan E; Shoghi, Kooresh I; Silva, Matthew J

    2014-02-15

    Despite the strong connection between angiogenesis and osteogenesis in skeletal repair conditions such as fracture and distraction osteogenesis, little is known about the vascular requirements for bone formation after repetitive mechanical loading. Here, established protocols of damaging (stress fracture) and nondamaging (physiological) forelimb loading in the adult rat were used to stimulate either woven or lamellar bone formation, respectively. Positron emission tomography was used to evaluate blood flow and fluoride kinetics at the site of bone formation. In the group that received damaging mechanical loading leading to woven bone formation (WBF), (15)O water (blood) flow rate was significantly increased on day 0 and remained elevated 14 days after loading, whereas (18)F fluoride uptake peaked 7 days after loading. In the group that received nondamaging mechanical loading leading to lamellar bone formation (LBF), (15)O water and (18)F fluoride flow rates in loaded limbs were not significantly different from nonloaded limbs at any time point. The early increase in blood flow rate after WBF loading was associated with local vasodilation. In addition, Nos2 expression in mast cells was increased in WBF-, but not LBF-, loaded limbs. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester was used to suppress NO generation, resulting in significant decreases in early blood flow rate and bone formation after WBF loading. These results demonstrate that NO-mediated vasodilation is a key feature of the normal response to stress fracture and precedes woven bone formation. Therefore, patients with impaired vascular function may heal stress fractures more slowly than expected.

  6. Inhibition of protein kinase C delta attenuates allergic airway inflammation through suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/HIF-1 alpha/VEGF pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ho Choi

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is supposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic airway disease. VEGF expression is regulated by a variety of stimuli such as nitric oxide, growth factors, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α. Recently, inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been shown to alleviate cardinal asthmatic features, including airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and increased vascular permeability in asthma models. Based on these observations, we have investigated whether mTOR is associated with HIF-1α-mediated VEGF expression in allergic asthma. In studies with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, we have elucidated the stimulatory role of a mTOR-HIF-1α-VEGF axis in allergic response. Next, the mechanisms by which mTOR is activated to modulate this response have been evaluated. mTOR is known to be regulated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt or protein kinase C-delta (PKC δ in various cell types. Consistent with these, our results have revealed that suppression of PKC δ by rottlerin leads to the inhibition of PI3K/Akt activity and the subsequent blockade of a mTOR-HIF-1α-VEGF module, thereby attenuating typical asthmatic attack in a murine model. Thus, the present data indicate that PKC δ is necessary for the modulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling cascade, resulting in a tight regulation of HIF-1α activity and VEGF expression. In conclusion, PKC δ may represent a valuable target for innovative therapeutic treatment of allergic airway disease.

  7. Interaction of connexin43 and protein kinase C-delta during FGF2 signaling

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    Stains Joseph P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently demonstrated that modulation of the gap junction protein, connexin43, can affect the response of osteoblasts to fibroblast growth factor 2 in a protein kinase C-delta-dependent manner. Others have shown that the C-terminal tail of connexin43 serves as a docking platform for signaling complexes. It is unknown whether protein kinase C-delta can physically interact with connexin43. Results In the present study, we investigate by immunofluorescent co-detection and biochemical examination the interaction between Cx43 and protein kinase C-delta. We establish that protein kinase C-delta physically interacts with connexin43 during fibroblast growth factor 2 signaling, and that protein kinase C delta preferentially co-precipitates phosphorylated connexin43. Further, we show by pull down assay that protein kinase C-delta associates with the C-terminal tail of connexin43. Conclusions Connexin43 can serve as a direct docking platform for the recruitment of protein kinase C-delta in order to affect fibroblast growth factor 2 signaling in osteoblasts. These data expand the list of signal molecules that assemble on the connexin43 C-terminal tail and provide a critical context to understand how gap junctions modify signal transduction cascades in order to impact cell function.

  8. S-nitrosylation mediates nitric oxide -auxin crosstalk in auxin signaling and polar auxin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitric oxide (NO) and auxin phytohormone cross talk has been implicated in plant development and growth. Addition and removal of NO moieties to cysteine residues of proteins, is termed S-nitrosylation and de-nitrosylation, respectively and functions as an on/off switch of protein activity. This dyna...

  9. Nitric oxide blunts the endothelin-mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction in exercising swine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Houweling (Birgit); D. Merkus (Daphne); M.M. Dekker (Marjolein); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe have previously shown that vasodilators and vasoconstrictors that are produced by the vascular endothelium, including nitric oxide (NO), prostanoids and endothelin (ET), contribute to the regulation of systemic and pulmonary vascular tone in swine, in particular during treadmill

  10. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B.; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G., E-mail: bipin@amrita.edu

    2016-08-15

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2′ ,7′ -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. - Highlights: • Ecdysterone significantly enhances cell migration in a dose dependent manner. • Ecdysterone augments cell spreading during the initial phase of cell migration through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. • Ecdysterone enhances cell proliferation in a nitric oxide dependent manner. • Ecdysterone enhances nitric oxide production via activation of EGFR

  11. Nitric oxide-mediated changes in vascular reactivity in pregnancy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Z. M.; Beilin, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. To examine the mechanisms which may account for pregnancy-induced vasodilatation in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), we have investigated the changes in vascular reactivity and the effects of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) inhibition in the in situ blood-perfused, mesenteric resistance vessels of 18-20 day pregnant SHR. The effects of NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) were compared in pregnant and nonpregnant SHR and gestation matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. 2. Intra-arteria...

  12. Different sources of nitric oxide mediate neurovascular coupling in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen De Labra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the link between neuronal responses and metabolic signals is fundamental to our knowledge of brain function and it is a milestone in our efforts to interpret data from modern non invasive optical techniques such as fMRI, which are based on the close coupling between metabolic demand of active neurons and local changes in blood flow. The challenge is to unravel the link. Here we show, using spectrophotometry to record oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb and metahemoglobin (MetHb (surrogate markers of cerebral flow and nitric oxide levels respectively together with extracellular neuronal recordings in vivo and applying a multiple polynomial regression model, that the markers are able to predict up about 80% of variability in neuronal response. Furthermore, we show that the coupling between blood flow and neuronal activity is heavily influenced by nitric oxide (NO. While neuronal responses show the typical saturating response, blood flow shows a linear behaviour during contrast-response curves, with nitric oxide from different sources acting differently for low and high intensity.

  13. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Blocks Nitric Oxide-Mediated Alcohol-Stimulated Cilia Beating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Wyatt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The airway epithelium is exposed to alcohol during drinking through direct exhalation of volatized ethanol from the bronchial circulation. Alcohol exposure leads to a rapid increase in the cilia beat frequency (CBF of bronchial epithelial cells followed by a chronic desensitization of cilia stimulatory responses. This effect is governed in part by the nitric oxide regulation of cyclic guanosine and adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinases (PKG and PKA and is not fully understood. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, is implicated in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary disorders. We hypothesized that the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by ADMA blocks alcohol-stimulated increases in CBF. To test this hypothesis, ciliated primary bovine bronchial epithelial cells (BBEC were preincubated with ADMA (100 µM and stimulated with 100 mM ethanol. CBF was measured and PKA assayed. By 1 hr, ethanol activated PKA, resulting in elevated CBF. Both alcohol-induced PKA activation and CBF were inhibited in the presence of ADMA. ADMA alone had no effect on PKA activity or CBF. Using a mouse model overexpressing the ADMA-degrading enzyme, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH, we examined PKA and CBF in precision-cut mouse lung slices. Alcohol-stimulated increases in lung slice PKA and CBF were temporally enhanced in the DDAH mice versus control mice.

  14. Nitric oxide mediates the anticonvulsant effects of thalidomide on pentylenetetrazole-induced clonic seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandemehr, Borna; Rahimian, Reza; Gooshe, Maziar; Bahremand, Arash; Gholizadeh, Ramtin; Berijani, Sina; Ahmadi-Dastgerdi, Mohammad; Aminizade, Mehdi; Sarreshte-Dari, Ali; Dianati, Vahid; Amanlou, Massoud; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-05-01

    Thalidomide is an old glutamic acid derivative which was initially used as a sedative medication but withdrawn from the market due to the high incidence of teratogenicity. Recently, it has reemerged because of its potential for counteracting number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Other than the antiemetic and hypnotic aspects, thalidomide exerts some anticonvulsant properties in experimental settings. However, the underlying mechanisms of thalidomide actions are not fully realized yet. Some investigations revealed that thalidomide could elicit immunomodulatory or neuromodulatory properties by affecting different targets, including cytokines (such as TNF α), neurotransmitters, and nitric oxide (NO). In this regard, we used a model of clonic seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in male NMRI mice to investigate whether the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide is affected through modulation of the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway or not. Injection of a single effective dose of thalidomide (10 mg/kg, i.p. or higher) significantly increased the seizure threshold (Pthalidomide. On the other hand, NOS inhibitors [l-NAME and 7-NI] augmented the anticonvulsant effect of a subeffective dose of thalidomide (1 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) at relatively low doses. Meanwhile, several doses of aminoguanidine [an inducible NOS inhibitor] (20, 50 and 100 mg/kg) failed to alter the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide significantly. In summary, our findings demonstrated that the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway can be involved in the anticonvulsant properties of thalidomide, and the role of constitutive nNOS is prominent in the reported neuroprotective feature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide mediate plasticity of neuronal calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2000-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are important participants in signal transduction that could provide the cellular basis for activity-dependent regulation of neuronal excitability. In young rat cortical brain slices and undifferentiated PC12 cells, paired application of depolarization/agonist stimulation and oxidation induces long-lasting potentiation of subsequent Ca2+ signaling that is reversed by hypoxia. This potentiation critically depends on NO production and involves cellular ROS utilization. The ability to develop the Ca2+ signal potentiation is regulated by the developmental stage of nerve tissue, decreasing markedly in adult rat cortical neurons and differentiated PC12 cells.

  16. ANALYSIS OF IMMEDIATE EX VIVO RELEASE OF NITRIC OXIDE FROM HUMAN COLONIC MUCOSA IN GASTROINTESTINALLY MEDIATED ALLERGY, INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE AND CONTROLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raithel, M.; Hagel, A. F.; Zopf, Y.; Bijlsma, P. B.; de Rossi, T. M.; Gabriel, S.; Weidenhiller, M.; Kressel, J.; Hahn, E. G.; Konturek, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a local mediator in inflammation and allergy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether live incubated colorectal mucosal tissue shows a direct NO response ex vivo to nonspecific and specific immunological stimuli and whether there are disease-specific differences between

  17. The endogenous nitric oxide mediates selenium-induced phytotoxicity by promoting ROS generation in Brassica rapa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chen

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is suggested as an emerging pollutant in agricultural environment because of the increasing anthropogenic release of Se, which in turn results in phytotoxicity. The most common consequence of Se-induced toxicity in plants is oxidative injury, but how Se induces reactive oxygen species (ROS burst remains unclear. In this work, histofluorescent staining was applied to monitor the dynamics of ROS and nitric oxide (NO in the root of Brassica rapa under Se(IV stress. Se(IV-induced faster accumulation of NO than ROS. Both NO and ROS accumulation were positively correlated with Se(IV-induced inhibition of root growth. The NO accumulation was nitrate reductase (NR- and nitric oxide synthase (NOS-dependent while ROS accumulation was NADPH oxidase-dependent. The removal of NO by NR inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, and NO scavenger could alleviate Se(IV-induced expression of Br_Rbohs coding for NADPH oxidase and the following ROS accumulation in roots, which further resulted in the amelioration of Se(IV-induced oxidative injury and growth inhibition. Thus, we proposed that the endogenous NO played a toxic role in B. rapa under Se(IV stress by triggering ROS burst. Such findings can be used to evaluate the toxic effects of Se contamination on crop plants.

  18. Nitric oxide-mediated cutaneous microvascular function is impaired in polycystic ovary sydrome but can be improved by exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprung, V S; Cuthbertson, D J; Pugh, C J A; Daousi, C; Atkinson, G; Aziz, N F; Kemp, G J; Green, D J; Cable, N T; Jones, H

    2013-03-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with cardiovascular disease. The contribution of the nitric oxide (NO) dilator system to cutaneous endothelial dysfunction is currently unknown in PCOS. Our aim was to examine whether women with PCOS demonstrate impaired cutaneous microvascular NO function and whether exercise training can ameliorate any impairment. Eleven women with PCOS (age, 29 ± 7 years; body mass index, 34 ± 6 kg m(-2)) were compared with six healthy obese control women (age, 29 ± 7 years; body mass index, 34 ± 5 kg m(-2)). Six women with PCOS (30 ± 7 years; 31 ± 6 kg m(-2)) then completed 16 weeks of exercise training. Laser Doppler flowmetry, combined with intradermal microdialysis of l-N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine, a nitric oxide antagonist, in response to incremental local heating of the forearm was assessed in women with PCOS and control women, and again in women with PCOS following exercise training. Cardiorespiratory fitness, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, hormone and lipid profiles were also assessed. Differences between women with PCOS and control women and changes with exercise were analysed using Student's unpaired t tests. Differences in the contribution of NO to cutaneous blood flow [expressed as a percentage of maximal cutaneous vasodilatation (CVCmax)] were analysed using general linear models. At 42°C heating, cutaneous NO-mediated vasodilatation was attenuated by 17.5%CVCmax (95% confidence interval, 33.3, 1.7; P = 0.03) in women with PCOS vs. control women. Exercise training improved cardiorespiratory fitness by 5.0 ml kg(-1) min(-1) (95% confidence interval, 0.9, 9.2; P = 0.03) and NO-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation at 42°C heating by 19.6% CVCmax (95% confidence interval, 4.3, 34.9; P = 0.02). Cutaneous microvascular NO function is impaired in women with PCOS compared with obese matched control women but can be improved with exercise training.

  19. Resveratrol induces acute endothelium-dependent renal vasodilation mediated through nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordish, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is suggested to have beneficial cardiovascular and renoprotective effects. Resveratrol increases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. We hypothesized resveratrol acts as an acute renal vasodilator, mediated through increased NO production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In anesthetized rats, we found 5.0 mg/kg body weight (bw) of resveratrol increased renal blood flow (RBF) by 8% [from 6.98 ± 0.42 to 7.54 ± 0.17 ml·min−1·gram of kidney weight−1 (gkw); n = 8; P resveratrol before and after 10 mg/kg bw of the NOS inhibitor N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). l-NAME reduced the increase in RBF to resveratrol by 54% (from 0.59 ± 0.05 to 0.27 ± 0.06 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 10; P resveratrol before and after 1 mg/kg bw tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic. Resveratrol increased RBF 7.6% (from 5.91 ± 0.32 to 6.36 ± 0.12 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 7; P resveratrol-induced increase in RBF (from 0.45 ± 0.12 to 0.10 ± 0.05 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 7; P Resveratrol-induced vasodilation remained unaffected. We conclude intravenous resveratrol acts as an acute renal vasodilator, partially mediated by increased NO production/NO bioavailability and superoxide scavenging but not by inducing vasodilatory cyclooxygenase products. PMID:24431202

  20. Taurine chloramine, a product of activated neutrophils, inhibits in vitro the generation of nitric oxide and other macrophage inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, J; Grabowska, A; Bereta, J; Stelmaszynska, T

    1995-12-01

    Taurine (Tau) is an exceptionally abundant free amino acid in the cytosol of inflammatory cells and especially in neutrophils. Taurine protects cells from self-destruction during processes that generate oxidants. The major function of Tau in leukocytes is to trap chlorinated oxidants (HOCl). Taurine reacts with HOCl to produce the long-lived compound taurine chloramine (TauCl). Previously, we have shown that other products of the neutrophil chlorinating system are able to modify functions of macrophages. In this study, we investigated in vitro the influence of TauCl on the generation of inflammatory mediators by activated macrophages. We have found that TauCl inhibited the generation of nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6, but TauCl slightly enhanced the release of IL-1 alpha. The formation of nitrites by interferon-gamma-activated macrophages was inhibited by TauCl in a dose-dependent manner. Taurine chloramine also reduced the level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in macrophages, in a similar concentration-dependent manner. Although our experiments do not exclude a direct effect of TauCl on enzymatic activity of iNOS, the inhibition of iNOS expression seems to be the major mechanism responsible for suppression of NO formation. Finally, we discuss the biological role of TauCl in vivo. We suggest that at the site of inflammation TauCl works as a specific signaling molecule of activated neutrophils that coordinates the generation of inflammatory mediators in macrophages.

  1. The phytoestrogen equol increases nitric oxide availability by inhibiting superoxide production: an antioxidant mechanism for cell-mediated LDL modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Juliana; Wang, Jian; Morazzoni, Paolo; Hodis, Howard N; Sevanian, Alex

    2003-05-15

    Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) is reported to lower the incidence of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. ERT also lowers the levels of oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Because modified LDL can mediate the development of atherosclerosis by inflammatory processes, ERT may exert its LDL protective effect through enhanced antioxidant activity in vascular tissues. Plant sources of estrogenic compounds have been used as alternatives for ERT because they avoid a number of negative health effects produced by estrogen. In this study, the antioxidant properties of the soy isoflavone metabolite, equol (an estrogenic metabolite of daidzein) were studied. Equol has a greater antioxidant activity than the parent isoflavone compounds genistein and daidzein, found in high concentration in soy. Equol inhibits LDL oxidation in vitro and LDL oxidative modification by J774 monocyte/macrophages to LDL(-), an electronegative modified LDL found in human plasma. An antioxidant effect of equol was found to be mediated by inhibition of superoxide radical (O(2)(-*)) production and manifested through enhanced levels of free nitric oxide (NO) that prevents LDL modification. Thus, when NO levels were increased by donor agents, generators, or compounds that facilitate nitric oxide synthase activity, LDL(-) formation by J774 cells was strongly inhibited. Conversely, inhibition of NO production enhanced LDL(-) formation, and the combination of reduced NO and increased O(2)(-*) production yielded maximum LDL(-) formation. Pretreatment of cells with equol inhibited production of O(2)(-*) by J774 cells apparently via the inactivation of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase complex. Decreased O(2)(-*) production resulted in increased free NO levels (but not total NO production) indicating that decreased reactions between O(2)(-*) and NO are an outcome of equol's antioxidant activity in cell culture.

  2. Nitric oxide mediates metabolic coupling of omentum-derived adipose stroma to ovarian and endometrial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimian Rizi, Bahar; Caneba, Christine; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Nabiyar, Ahmad W; Liu, Xinran; Chen, Kevin; Klopp, Ann; Nagrath, Deepak

    2015-01-15

    Omental adipose stromal cells (O-ASC) are a multipotent population of mesenchymal stem cells contained in the omentum tissue that promote endometrial and ovarian tumor proliferation, migration, and drug resistance. The mechanistic underpinnings of O-ASCs' role in tumor progression and growth are unclear. Here, we propose a novel nitric oxide (NO)-mediated metabolic coupling between O-ASCs and gynecologic cancer cells in which O-ASCs support NO homeostasis in malignant cells. NO is synthesized endogenously by the conversion of l-arginine into citrulline through nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Through arginine depletion in the media using l-arginase and NOS inhibition in cancer cells using N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), we demonstrate that patient-derived O-ASCs increase NO levels in ovarian and endometrial cancer cells and promote proliferation in these cells. O-ASCs and cancer cell cocultures revealed that cancer cells use O-ASC-secreted arginine and in turn secrete citrulline in the microenvironment. Interestingly, citrulline increased adipogenesis potential of the O-ASCs. Furthermore, we found that O-ASCs increased NO synthesis in cancer cells, leading to decrease in mitochondrial respiration in these cells. Our findings suggest that O-ASCs upregulate glycolysis and reduce oxidative stress in cancer cells by increasing NO levels through paracrine metabolite secretion. Significantly, we found that O-ASC-mediated chemoresistance in cancer cells can be deregulated by altering NO homeostasis. A combined approach of targeting secreted arginine through l-arginase, along with targeting microenvironment-secreted factors using l-NAME, may be a viable therapeutic approach for targeting ovarian and endometrial cancers. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Safflor yellow B reduces hypoxia-mediated vasoconstriction by regulating endothelial micro ribonucleic acid/nitric oxide synthase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoyun; Yang, Ying; Li, Miao; Liu, Xin; Wang, Qiaoyun; Xin, Wenyu; Sun, Hongliu; Zheng, Qingyin

    2017-11-07

    Hypoxia-induced generation of vasoconstrictors reduces cerebral blood flow (CBF) while nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) and microRNAs (miRNA) in endothelial cells (ECs) suppress vasoconstriction. Safflor yellow B (SYB), a natural plant compound, previously attenuated angiotensin II-mediated injury of ECs and maintained endothelial function. This study investigated the putative involvement of NOS and miRNAs in SYB-mediated resistance to hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction. In vivo , chronic hypoxia was induced in rats, and SYB was administered intravenously. In vitro , rat primary aortic ECs were cultured under oxygen and glucose deprivation. After treatment with anti-microR-199a, as well as the NOS inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, SYB, or both, cell viability, NO and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) levels, NOS expression, and miRNA levels were evaluated. SYB significantly alleviated hypoxia-mediated vasoconstriction and increased CBF endothelium-dependently. SYB upregulated miR-199a, increased EC viability, decreased endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels, inhibited protein kinase C (PKC) activity, and suppressed hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression. Furthermore, the SYB-mediated reduction of inducible NOS reduced ONOO- levels. In addition, SYB downregulated miR-138 and, thereby, enhanced S100A1 and endothelial NOS activity. Hypoxia-mediated regulation of miR-138 and miR-199a inhibited endothelial NOS expression and activation, which triggered ET-1 release and vasoconstriction. Therefore, SYB treatment reduced hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction through miR-199a/endothelial NOS signaling.

  4. Novel approaches to improving endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Ulf; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Rosalia; Dalsgaard, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, which is defined by decreased endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, is associated with an increased number of cardiovascular events. Nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability is reduced by altered endothelial signal transduction or increased formation of radical oxygen species...... reacting with NO. Endothelial dysfunction is therapeutically reversible and physical exercise, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor antagonists improve flow-evoked endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with hypertension and diabetes. We have...... investigated three different approaches, with the aim of correcting endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular disease. Thus, (1) we evaluated the effect of a cell permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, on endothelial dysfunction in small arteries exposed to high pressure, (2) investigated...

  5. Nitric oxide: a downstream mediator of calcium toxicity in the ischemic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, K; Wagner, J; Boccone, L

    1994-01-17

    Loss of cellular calcium homeostasis or the production of nitric oxide (NO) have been cited as possible mechanisms that may contribute to neuronal degeneration during ischemia. We therefore examined whether cellular calcium blockade, using the agent HA1077, was protective during anoxia in hippocampal neuronal cell cultures, and whether the in vitro effects of this drug were linked to the NO pathway. Administration of the agent during anoxia was neuroprotective in neuronal cell culture. In contrast, HA1077 did not protect hippocampal neurons during NO exposure. In addition, inhibition of NO synthesis in conjunction with HA1077 application during anoxia did not significantly increase survival beyond the maximum protection afforded by HA1077 alone. These results suggest that calcium may be an initial messenger in the ischemic cascade, but that subsequent neuronal degeneration is dependent upon the NO pathway.

  6. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L.; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W.; Bukiya, Anna N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from “energy drinks”) continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40–70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS−/−) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  7. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  8. Involvement of inositol biosynthesis and nitric oxide in the mediation of UV-B induced oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro I Lytvyn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of NO-signaling in ultraviolet B (UV-B induced oxidative stress in plants is an open question. Inositol biosynthesis contributes to numerous cellular functions, including the regulation of plants tolerance to stress. This work reveals the involvement of inositol-3-phosphate synthase 1 (IPS1, a key enzyme for biosynthesis of myo-inositol and its derivatives, in the response to NO-dependent oxidative stress in Arabidopsis. Homozygous mutants deficient for IPS1 (atips1 and wild-type plants were transformed with a reduction-oxidation-sensitive green fluorescent protein 2 (grx1-rogfp2 and used for the dynamic measurement of UV-B-induced and SNP (sodium nitroprusside-mediated oxidative stresses by confocal microscopy. atips1 mutants displayed greater tissue-specific resistance to the action of UV-B than the wild type. SNP can act both as an oxidant or repairer depending on the applied concentration, but mutant plants were more tolerant than the wild type to nitrosative effects of high concentration of SNP. Additionally, pretreatment with low concentrations of SNP (10, 100 μM before UV-B irradiation resulted in a tissue-specific protective effect that was enhanced in atips1. We conclude that the interplay between nitric oxide and inositol signaling can be involved in the mediation of UV-B-initiated oxidative stress in the plant cell.

  9. Enhanced nitric oxide-mediated chemoreceptor inhibition and altered cyclic GMP signaling in rat carotid body following chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L; Chen, J; Liu, X; Dinger, B; Fidone, S

    2007-12-01

    Multiple studies have shown that chronic hypoxia (CH) elicits a time-dependent upregulation of carotid body chemoreceptor sensitivity in mammals. In the present study, we demonstrate that enhanced excitation is accompanied by a parallel increase of nitric oxide (NO)-dependent inhibition, which acts via a CH-induced modification of the normal mechanism in O(2)-sensitive type I cells. The NO synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), elicits a progressively larger increase in carotid sinus nerve (CSN) chemoreceptor activity following incremental increases in CH exposure lasting 1-16 days. The inhibitory effect of the NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), on CSN activity is enhanced following CH. However, the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by SNAP, assessed via production of cGMP, is impaired, along with decreased expression of sGC mRNA transcript. Inhibition of hypoxia-evoked Ca(2+) responses by SNAP is mediated via a cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG)-dependent mechanism in normal type I cells that is sensitive to the PKG inhibitor KT-5823, but following CH, inhibitory responses are minimally sensitive to PKG inhibition. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that CH hampers cGMP-mediated inhibition of type I cells in favor of an alternative mechanism.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of an inorganic gold and silica nanoparticle mediated drug delivery system for nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Amitava; Singla, Sumit K; Shah, Vijay H [Gastroenterology Research Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Patra, Chitta Ranjan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Guturu, Praveen [Department of Internal Medicine, UTMB, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Frost, Megan C, E-mail: patra.chittaranjan@mayo.edu, E-mail: patra.chitta@gmail.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2010-07-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in inhibiting the development of hepatic fibrosis and its ensuing complication of portal hypertension by inhibiting human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. Here we have developed a gold nanoparticle and silica nanoparticle mediated drug delivery system containing NO donors, which could be used for potential therapeutic application in chronic liver disease. The gold nanoconjugates were characterized using several physico-chemical techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Silica nanoconjugates were synthesized and characterized as reported previously. NO released from gold and silica nanoconjugates was quantified under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4 at 37 deg. C) for a substantial period of time. HSC proliferation and the vascular tube formation ability, manifestations of their activation, were significantly attenuated by the NO released from these nanoconjugates. This study indicates that gold and silica nanoparticle mediated drug delivery systems for introducing NO could be used as a strategy for the treatment of hepatic fibrosis or chronic liver diseases, by limiting HSC activation.

  11. Gaseous Mediators Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in the Mechanism of Gastrointestinal Integrity, Protection and Ulcer Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Magierowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and hydrogen sulfide (H2S are known as biological messengers; they play an important role in human organism and contribute to many physiological and pathophysiological processes. NO is produced from l-arginine by constitutive NO synthase (NOS and inducible NOS enzymatic pathways. This gaseous mediator inhibits platelet aggregation, leukocyte adhesion and contributes to the vessel homeostasis. NO is known as a vasodilatory molecule involved in control of the gastric blood flow (GBF and the maintenance of gastric mucosal barrier integrity in either healthy gastric mucosa or that damaged by strong irritants. Biosynthesis of H2S in mammals depends upon two enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase. This gaseous mediator, similarly to NO and carbon monoxide, is involved in neuromodulation, vascular contractility and anti-inflammatory activities. For decades, H2S has been known to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase and reduce cell energy production. Nowadays it is generally considered to act through vascular smooth muscle ATP-dependent K+ channels, interacting with intracellular transcription factors and promote sulfhydration of protein cysteine moieties within the cell, but the mechanism of potential gastroprotective and ulcer healing properties of H2S has not been fully explained. The aim of this review is to compare current results of the studies concerning the role of H2S and NO in gastric mucosa protection and outline areas that may pose new opportunities for further development of novel therapeutic targets.

  12. Nitric Oxide Mediates 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Leaves of Elymus nutans Griseb. Exposed to Chilling Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juanjuan; Chu, Xitong; Sun, Yongfang; Miao, Yanjun; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) are both extremely important signalling molecules employed by plants to control many aspects of physiology. In the present study, the role of NO in ALA-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of two sources of Elymus nutans Griseb. (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD) was investigated. Chilling stress enhanced electrolyte leakage, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide radical in two E. nutans, which were substantially alleviated by exogenous ALA and NO application. Pretreatment with NO scavenger PTIO or NOS inhibitor L-NNA alone and in combination with ALA induced enhancements in electrolyte leakage and the accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and superoxide radical in leaves of DX and ZD exposed to chilling stress, indicating that the inhibition of NO biosynthesis reduced the chilling resistance of E. nutans and the ALA-enhanced chilling resistance. Further analyses showed that ALA and NO enhanced antioxidant defense and activated plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and decreased the accumulation of ROS induced by chilling stress. A pronounced increase in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and NO release by exogenous ALA treatment was found in chilling-resistant DX plants exposed to chilling stress, while only a little increase was observed in chilling-sensitive ZD. Furthermore, inhibition of NO accumulation by PTIO or L-NNA blocked the protective effect of exogenous ALA, while both exogenous NO treatment and inhibition of endogenous NO accumulation did not induce ALA production. These results suggested that NO might be a downstream signal mediating ALA-induced chilling resistance in E. nutans.

  13. iNOS-Derived Nitric Oxide Induces Integrin-Linked Kinase Endocytic Lysosome-Mediated Degradation in the Vascular Endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reventun, Paula; Alique, Matilde; Cuadrado, Irene; Márquez, Susana; Toro, Rocío; Zaragoza, Carlos; Saura, Marta

    2017-07-01

    ILK (integrin-linked kinase) plays a key role in controlling vasomotor tone and is decreased in atherosclerosis. The objective of this study is to test whether nitric oxide (NO) regulates ILK in vascular remodeling. We found a striking correlation between increased levels of inducible nitric oxide and decreased ILK levels in human atherosclerosis and in a mouse model of vascular remodeling (carotid artery ligation) comparing with iNOS (inducible NO synthase) knockout mice. iNOS induction produced the same result in mouse aortic endothelial cells, and these effects were mimicked by an NO donor in a time-dependent manner. We found that NO decreased ILK protein stability by promoting the dissociation of the complex ILK/Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90)/eNOS (endothelial NO synthase), leading to eNOS uncoupling. NO also destabilized ILK signaling platform and lead to decreased levels of paxillin and α-parvin. ILK phosphorylation of its downstream target GSK3-β (glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta) was decreased by NO. Mechanistically, NO increased ILK ubiquitination mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP (C terminus of HSC70-interacting protein), but ILK ubiquitination was not followed by proteasome degradation. Alternatively, NO drove ILK to degradation through the endocytic-lysosomal pathway. ILK colocalized with the lysosome marker LAMP-1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1) in endothelial cells, and inhibition of lysosome activity with chloroquine reversed the effect of NO. Likewise, ILK colocalized with the early endosome marker EEA1 (early endosome antigen 1). ILK endocytosis proceeded via dynamin because a specific inhibitor of dynamin (Dyngo 4a) was able to reverse ILK endocytosis and its lysosome degradation. Endocytosis regulates ILK signaling in vascular remodeling where there is an overload of inducible NO, and thus its inhibition may represent a novel target to fight atherosclerotic disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. The mechanism of the nitric oxide-mediated enhancement of tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced DNA single strand breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Clementi, Emilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine (Cf) enhances the DNA cleavage induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH) in U937 cells via a mechanism involving Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of DNA-damaging species (Guidarelli et al., 1997b). Nitric oxide (NO) is not involved in this process since U937 cells do not express the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS).Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 10 μM), or S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM), however, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH. The DNA lesions generated by tB-OOH alone, or combined with SNAP, were repaired with superimposable kinetics and were insensitive to anti-oxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers but suppressed by iron chelators.SNAP or GSNO did not cause mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation but their enhancing effects on the tB-OOH-induced DNA strand scission were prevented by ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the calcium uniporter of mitochondria. Furthermore, the enhancing effects of both SNAP and GSNO were identical to and not additive with those promoted by the Ca2+-mobilizing agents Cf or ATP.The SNAP- or GSNO-mediated enhancement of the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage was abolished by the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and myxothiazol and was not apparent in respiration-deficient cells.It is concluded that, in cells which do not express the enzyme cNOS, exogenous NO enhances the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks induced by tB-OOH via a mechanism involving inhibition of complex III. PMID:9846647

  15. Nitric Oxide Mediates 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Leaves of Elymus nutans Griseb. Exposed to Chilling Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Fu

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA are both extremely important signalling molecules employed by plants to control many aspects of physiology. In the present study, the role of NO in ALA-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of two sources of Elymus nutans Griseb. (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD was investigated. Chilling stress enhanced electrolyte leakage, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and superoxide radical in two E. nutans, which were substantially alleviated by exogenous ALA and NO application. Pretreatment with NO scavenger PTIO or NOS inhibitor L-NNA alone and in combination with ALA induced enhancements in electrolyte leakage and the accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and superoxide radical in leaves of DX and ZD exposed to chilling stress, indicating that the inhibition of NO biosynthesis reduced the chilling resistance of E. nutans and the ALA-enhanced chilling resistance. Further analyses showed that ALA and NO enhanced antioxidant defense and activated plasma membrane (PM H+-ATPase and decreased the accumulation of ROS induced by chilling stress. A pronounced increase in nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity and NO release by exogenous ALA treatment was found in chilling-resistant DX plants exposed to chilling stress, while only a little increase was observed in chilling-sensitive ZD. Furthermore, inhibition of NO accumulation by PTIO or L-NNA blocked the protective effect of exogenous ALA, while both exogenous NO treatment and inhibition of endogenous NO accumulation did not induce ALA production. These results suggested that NO might be a downstream signal mediating ALA-induced chilling resistance in E. nutans.

  16. Nitric oxide and zinc-mediated protein assemblies involved in mu opioid receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Garzón, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics in controlling the perception of intense pain, although their continuous use decreases their potency due to the development of tolerance. The glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system is currently considered to be the most relevant functional antagonist of morphine analgesia. In the postsynapse of different brain regions the C terminus of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) associates with NR1 subunits of NMDARs, as well as with a series of signaling proteins, such as neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO), protein kinase C (PKC), calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). NO is implicated in redox signaling and PKC falls under the regulation of zinc metabolism, suggesting that these signaling elements might participate in the regulation of MOR activity by the NMDAR. In this review, we discuss the influence of redox signaling in the mechanisms whose plasticity triggers opioid tolerance. Thus, the MOR C terminus assembles a series of signaling proteins around the homodimeric histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1). The NMDAR NR1 subunit and the regulator of G protein signaling RGSZ2 bind HINT1 in a zinc-independent manner, with RGSZ2 associating with nNOS and regulating MOR-induced production of NO. This NO acts on the RGSZ2 zinc finger, providing the zinc ions that are required for PKC/Raf-1 cysteine-rich domains to simultaneously bind to the histidines present in the HINT1 homodimer. The MOR-induced activation of phospholipase β (PLCβ) regulates PKC, which increases the reactive oxygen species (ROS) by acting on NOX/NADPH, consolidating the long-term PKC activation required to regulate the Raf-1/MAPK cascade and enhancing NMDAR function. Thus, RGSZ2 serves as a Redox Zinc Switch that converts NO signals into Zinc signals, thereby modulating Redox Sensor Proteins like PKCγ and Raf-1. Accordingly, redox-dependent and

  17. Up-regulation of erythropoietin receptor by nitric oxide mediates hypoxia preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Li; Asavaritkrai, Pundit; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2010-11-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo), known to stimulate erythroid progenitor cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation, has been shown to be neuroprotective against brain ischemia in animal models. Both Epo and Epo receptor (EpoR) are expressed in the brain and are up-regulated by hypoxia. Brain Epo signaling can stimulate neural cell survival and prevent neuron apoptosis. Neurons from EpoR null mice exhibit marked increased sensitivity to hypoxia. In endothelial cells, Epo has been shown to stimulate nitric oxide (NO) production, particularly at low pO(2). We found here that the EpoR expression on neural cells and Epo's neuroprotective effect were regulated by NO. Hypoxia increased NO production as well as EpoR expression, and inhibition of NOS activity reduced the proportion of EpoR-expressing neurons induced at low pO(2). Conversely, addition of NO donor to cultures grown under normoxia induced EpoR. Similarly, NO donor increased EpoR promoter activity in a reporter gene assay, suggesting that NO regulates EpoR at the transcription level. Preincubation of neurons with NO results in induction of EpoR, which gives rise to protection against hypoxia even in the absence of exogenous Epo, although at high concentration NO is toxic. These data provide evidence of a role for NO in Epo activity in brain and suggest links between NO production, EpoR expression, and Epo signaling in neuroprotection.

  18. Antioxidant Systems are Regulated by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-translational Modifications (NO-PTMs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Valderrama, Raquel; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Padilla, María N.; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biological messenger that orchestrates a plethora of plant functions, mainly through post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as S-nitrosylation or tyrosine nitration. In plants, hundreds of proteins have been identified as potential targets of these NO-PTMs under physiological and stress conditions indicating the relevance of NO in plant-signaling mechanisms. Among these NO protein targets, there are different antioxidant enzymes involved in the control of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as H2O2, which is also a signal molecule. This highlights the close relationship between ROS/NO signaling pathways. The major plant antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutases (SODs) peroxiredoxins (Prx) and all the enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione (Asa-GSH) cycle, have been shown to be modulated to different degrees by NO-PTMs. This mini-review will update the recent knowledge concerning the interaction of NO with these antioxidant enzymes, with a special focus on the components of the Asa-GSH cycle and their physiological relevance. PMID:26909095

  19. Nitric Oxide Sensing in Plants Is Mediated by Proteolytic Control of Group VII ERF Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daniel J.; Md Isa, Nurulhikma; Movahedi, Mahsa; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Mendiondo, Guillermina M.; Berckhan, Sophie; Marín-de la Rosa, Nora; Vicente Conde, Jorge; Sousa Correia, Cristina; Pearce, Simon P.; Bassel, George W.; Hamali, Bulut; Talloji, Prabhavathi; Tomé, Daniel F.A.; Coego, Alberto; Beynon, Jim; Alabadí, David; Bachmair, Andreas; León, José; Gray, Julie E.; Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling compound in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In plants, NO regulates critical developmental transitions and stress responses. Here, we identify a mechanism for NO sensing that coordinates responses throughout development based on targeted degradation of plant-specific transcriptional regulators, the group VII ethylene response factors (ERFs). We show that the N-end rule pathway of targeted proteolysis targets these proteins for destruction in the presence of NO, and we establish them as critical regulators of diverse NO-regulated processes, including seed germination, stomatal closure, and hypocotyl elongation. Furthermore, we define the molecular mechanism for NO control of germination and crosstalk with abscisic acid (ABA) signaling through ERF-regulated expression of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5). Our work demonstrates how NO sensing is integrated across multiple physiological processes by direct modulation of transcription factor stability and identifies group VII ERFs as central hubs for the perception of gaseous signals in plants. PMID:24462115

  20. Exogenous Melatonin Improves Plant Iron Deficiency Tolerance via Increased Accumulation of Polyamine-Mediated Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has recently been demonstrated to play important roles in the regulation of plant growth, development, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, the possible involvement of melatonin in Fe deficiency responses and the underlying mechanisms remained elusive in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, Fe deficiency quickly induced melatonin synthesis in Arabidopsis plants. Exogenous melatonin significantly increased the soluble Fe content of shoots and roots, and decreased the levels of root cell wall Fe bound to pectin and hemicellulose, thus alleviating Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis. Intriguingly, melatonin treatments induced a significant increase of nitric oxide (NO accumulation in roots of Fe-deficient plants, but not in those of polyamine-deficient (adc2-1 and d-arginine-treated plants. Moreover, the melatonin-alleviated leaf chlorosis was blocked in the polyamine- and NO-deficient (nia1nia2noa1 and c-PTIO-treated plants, and the melatonin-induced Fe remobilization was largely inhibited. In addition, the expression of some Fe acquisition-related genes, including FIT1, FRO2, and IRT1 were significantly up-regulated by melatonin treatments, whereas the enhanced expression of these genes was obviously suppressed in the polyamine- and NO-deficient plants. Collectively, our results provide evidence to support the view that melatonin can increase the tolerance of plants to Fe deficiency in a process dependent on the polyamine-induced NO production under Fe-deficient conditions.

  1. Nitric Oxide Mediates Bleomycin-Induced Angiogenesis and Pulmonary Fibrosis via Regulation of VEGF

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V.; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A.; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M.; Wright, Clayton A.; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogen...

  2. Nitric oxide mediates lung injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Shang Jyh; Peng, Tai-Chu; Lee, Ru Ping; Hsu, Kang; Chen, Chao-Fuh; Hung, Yu-Kuen; Wang, David; Chen, Hsing I

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to play a role in lung injury (LI) induced by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). However, controversy exists as to the potential beneficial or detrimental effect of NO. In the present study, an in situ, perfused rat lung model was used to study the possible role of NO in the LI induced by I/R. The filtration coefficient (Kfc), lung weight gain (LWG), protein concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage (PCBAL), and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) were measured to evaluate the degree of pulmonary hypertension and LI. I/R resulted in increased Kfc, LWG, and PCBAL. These changes were exacerbated by inhalation of NO (20-30 ppm) or 4 mM L-arginine, an NO precursor. The permeability increase and LI caused by I/R could be blocked by exposure to 5 mM N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; a nonspecific NO synthase inhibitor), and this protective effect of L-NAME was reversed with NO inhalation. Inhaled NO prevented the increase in PAP caused by I/R, while L-arginine had no such effect. L-NAME tended to diminish the I/R-induced elevation in PAP, but the suppression was not statistically significant when compared to the values in the I/R group. These results indicate that I/R increases Kfc and promotes alveolar edema by stimulating endogenous NO synthesis. Exogenous NO, either generated from L-arginine or delivered into the airway, is apparently also injurious to the lung following I/R. Copyright 2003 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species mediate metabolic changes in barley seed embryo during germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenguo eMa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The levels of nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS, ATP/ADP ratios, reduction levels of ascorbate and glutathione, expression of the genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism of NO and activities of the enzymes involved in fermentation and in metabolism of NO and ROS were studied in the embryos of germinating seeds of two barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cultivars differing in dormancy level. The level of NO production continuously increased after imbibition while the level of nitrosylated SH-groups in proteins increased. This corresponded to the decrease of free SH-groups in proteins. At early stage of germination (0-48 h postimbibition the genes encoding class 1 phytoglobin (the protein scavenging NO and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (scavenging S-nitrosoglutathione were markedly expressed. More dormant cultivar exhibited lower ATP/ADP and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate ratios and lower lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase activities, while the production of NO and nitrosylation of proteins was higher as compared to the non-dormant cultivar. The obtained data indicate that at the onset of germination NO is actively generated causing nitrosylation of SH-groups and a switch from respiration to fermentation. After radicle protrusion the metabolism changes in a more reducing type as recorded by ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione and ascorbate. The turnover of NO by the scavenging systems (phytoglobin, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase and interaction with ROS might contribute to the maintenance of redox and energy balance of germinating seeds and lead to alleviation of dormancy.

  4. Active site topologies and cofactor-mediated conformational changes of nitric-oxide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, N C; Rodriguez-Crespo, I; Nishida, C R; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1997-03-07

    The active site topologies of neuronal (nNOS), endothelial (eNOS), and inducible (iNOS) nitric-oxide synthases heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli have been examined using three aryldiazene (Ar-N=NH) probes. The topological information derives from (a) the rate and extent of aryl-iron complex formation in the presence and absence of tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B), Ca2+-dependent calmodulin (CaM), and L-arginine, and (b) the N-phenylprotoporphyrin IX regioisomer ratios obtained upon migration of the phenyl of the phenyl-iron complex to the heme nitrogen atoms. The N-phenylprotoporphyrin ratios indicate that the three NOS isoforms have related active site topologies with unencumbered space above all four pyrrole rings but particularly above pyrrole ring D. H4B binds directly above the heme pyrrole ring D or causes a conformational change that constricts that region, because H4B markedly decreases phenyl migration to pyrrole ring D. Small CaM-dependent changes in the nNOS N-phenylporphyrin isomer pattern are consistent with a conformational link between the CaM and heme sites in this protein. The ceiling height directly above the heme iron atom differs among the isoforms and is lower than in the P450 enzymes because only nNOS and iNOS react with 2-naphthyldiazene, and none of the isoforms reacts with p-biphenyldiazene. L-Arg blocks access to the heme iron atom in all three NOS isoforms and nearly suppresses the phenyldiazene reaction. The data indicate that topological differences, including differences in the size of the active site, are superimposed on the structural similarities among the NOS active sites.

  5. Redox and Nitric Oxide-Mediated Regulation of Sensory Neuron Ion Channel Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) can intimately control neuronal excitability and synaptic strength by regulating the function of many ion channels. In peripheral sensory neurons, such regulation contributes towards the control of somatosensory processing; therefore, understanding the mechanisms of such regulation is necessary for the development of new therapeutic strategies and for the treatment of sensory dysfunctions, such as chronic pain. Recent Advances: Tremendous progress in deciphering nitric oxide (NO) and ROS signaling in the nervous system has been made in recent decades. This includes the recognition of these molecules as important second messengers and the elucidation of their metabolic pathways and cellular targets. Mounting evidence suggests that these targets include many ion channels which can be directly or indirectly modulated by ROS and NO. However, the mechanisms specific to sensory neurons are still poorly understood. This review will therefore summarize recent findings that highlight the complex nature of the signaling pathways involved in redox/NO regulation of sensory neuron ion channels and excitability; references to redox mechanisms described in other neuron types will be made where necessary. Critical Issues: The complexity and interplay within the redox, NO, and other gasotransmitter modulation of protein function are still largely unresolved. Issues of specificity and intracellular localization of these signaling cascades will also be addressed. Future Directions: Since our understanding of ROS and RNS signaling in sensory neurons is limited, there is a multitude of future directions; one of the most important issues for further study is the establishment of the exact roles that these signaling pathways play in pain processing and the translation of this understanding into new therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 486–504. PMID:24735331

  6. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Modulation of Central Network Dynamics during Olfactory Perception.

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    Satoshi Watanabe

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO modulates the dynamics of central olfactory networks and has been implicated in olfactory processing including learning. Land mollusks have a specialized olfactory lobe in the brain called the procerebral (PC lobe. The PC lobe produces ongoing local field potential (LFP oscillation, which is modulated by olfactory stimulation. We hypothesized that NO should be released in the PC lobe in response to olfactory stimulation, and to prove this, we applied an NO electrode to the PC lobe of the land slug Limax in an isolated tentacle-brain preparation. Olfactory stimulation applied to the olfactory epithelium transiently increased the NO concentration in the PC lobe, and this was blocked by the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME at 3.7 mM. L-NAME at this concentration did not block the ongoing LFP oscillation, but did block the frequency increase during olfactory stimulation. Olfactory stimulation also enhanced spatial synchronicity of activity, and this response was also blocked by L-NAME. Single electrical stimulation of the superior tentacle nerve (STN mimicked the effects of olfactory stimulation on LFP frequency and synchronicity, and both of these effects were blocked by L-NAME. L-NAME did not block synaptic transmission from the STN to the nonbursting (NB-type PC lobe neurons, which presumably produce NO in an activity-dependent manner. Previous behavioral experiments have revealed impairment of olfactory discrimination after L-NAME injection. The recording conditions in the present work likely reproduce the in vivo brain state in those behavioral experiments. We speculate that the dynamical effects of NO released during olfactory perception underlie precise odor representation and memory formation in the brain, presumably through regulation of NB neuron activity.

  7. Nitric oxide mediates brassinosteroid-induced flavonoid biosynthesis in Camellia sinensis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Lan; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Li, Zhi-Xin; Wei, Ji-Peng; Shen, Chen; Yan, Peng; Zhang, Li-Ping; Han, Wen-Yan

    2017-07-01

    Flavonoids are one of the key secondary metabolites determining the quality of tea. Although exogenous brassinosteroid (BR), a steroidal plant hormone, can stimulate polyphenol biosynthesis in tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.), the relevance of endogenous BR in flavonoid accumulation and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we show that BR enhances flavonoid concentration in tea leaves by inducing an increase in the endogenous concentration of nitric oxide (NO). Notably, exogenous BR increased levels of flavonoids as well as NO in a concentration dependent manner, while suppression of BR levels by an inhibitor of BR biosynthesis, brassinazole (BRz), decreased the concentrations of both flavonoids and NO in tea leaves. Interestingly, combined treatment of BR and BRz reversed the inhibitory effect of BRz alone on the concentrations of flavonoids and NO. Likewise, exogenous NO also increased flavonoids and NO levels dose-dependently. When the NO level in tea leaves was suppressed by using a NO scavenger, 2,4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), flavonoid concentration dramatically decreased. Although individual application of 0.1μM BR increased the concentrations of flavonoids and NO, combined treatment with exogenous NO scavenger, cPTIO, reversed the effect of BR on flavonoid concentration. Furthermore, BR or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) promoted but cPTIO inhibited the transcription and activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) in leaves, while combined treatment of BR with SNP or cPTIO had no additive effect. The results of this study suggest that an optimal level of endogenous NO is essential for BR-induced promotion of flavonoid biosynthesis in tea leaves. In conclusion, this study unveiled a crucial mechanism of BR-induced flavonoid biosynthesis, which might have potential implication in improving the quality of tea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after {alpha}-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chen Shaopeng [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-02-03

    Low-dose {alpha}-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose {alpha}-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-{beta}1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  9. Apoptosis of bladder transitional cell carcinoma T24 cells induced by adenovirus-mediated inducible nitric oxide synthase gene transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jing; Zeng, Qing; Jiang, Xian-Zheng; He, Le-Ye; Wang, Jin-Rong; Yao, Kun; Wang, Chang-Hui

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effects of adenovirus-mediated inducible nitric oxide synthase gene transfection on bladder transitional cell carcinoma T24 cells, and to provide novel insights and approaches to clinical therapies against bladder transitional cell carcinoma. Firstly, construct recombinant adenovirus vector pAd-iNOS of iNOS, followed by transfection of pAd-iNOS into HECK293 packaging cells. Thirdly, harvest recombinant adenovirus rAd-iNOS after amplification and purification procedures. Finally, transfect the recombinant adenovirus rAd-iNOS into human bladder carcinoma T24 cells and examine the effect of rAd-iNOS transfection on apoptosis of T24 and possible mechanism. As shown by this study, the recombinant adenovirus rAd-iNOS was constructed successfully. The virus titer was 5.8×10(8) PFU/mL and recombinant was verified by PCR analysis. Transfection of adenovirus rAd-iNOS into T24 cells could induce secretion of high NO concentration, P53 protein expression up-regulation, as well as promotion of T24 cell apoptosis. The transfection of human bladder carcinoma T24 cells from recombinant adenovirus rAd-iNOS was confirmed to induce intracellular iNOS over-expression, high production of NO, up-regulation of intracellular P53 expression and promotion of cell apoptosis.

  10. Vasodilatador effect mediated by nitric oxide of the Zea mays L (Andean purple corn) hydroalcoholic extract in aortic rings of rat

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Loaiza, Oscar; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional San Agustín, Arequipa, Perú. Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Agustinos, Arequipa, Perú. Estudiante de medicina.; Paz-Aliaga, Azael; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional San Agustín, Arequipa, Perú. Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo Científico, Universidad Nacional San Agustín, Arequipa, Perú. Biólogo, PhD en Fisiología y Biofísica.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the vasodilator response of the hydroalcoholic extract of Zea mays L. (Andean purple corn) and to determine if this response is mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Material and methods: We obtained an extract by maceration for eight days of Andean purple corn cobs in 70% ethanol and subsequent concentration of the product. Thoracic aortic rings were evaluated in an isolated organ chamber, bathed with Krebs-Hensleit solution (KH), and vasomotor activity was recorded with ...

  11. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Regulation of GLUT by T3 and Follicle-Stimulating Hormone in Rat Granulosa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Ding, Yu; Liu, Juan; Heng, Dai; Xu, Kaili; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Cheng

    2017-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are important for normal reproductive function. Although 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) enhances follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced preantral follicle growth and granulosa cells development in vitro, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating ovarian development via glucose. In this study, we investigated whether and how T3 combines with FSH to regulate glucose transporter protein (GLUT) expression and glucose uptake in granulosa cells. In this study, we present evidence that T3 and FSH cotreatment significantly increased GLUT-1/GLUT-4 expression, and translocation in cells, as well as glucose uptake. These changes were accompanied by upregulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS)3 expression, total NOS and NOS3 activity, and NO content in granulosa cells. Furthermore, we found that activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway is required for the regulation of GLUT expression, translocation, and glucose uptake by hormones. We also found that l-arginine upregulated GLUT-1/GLUT-4 expression and translocation, which were related to increased glucose uptake; however, these responses were significantly blocked by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methylester. In addition, inhibiting NO production attenuated T3- and FSH-induced GLUT expression, translocation, and glucose uptake in granulosa cells. Our data demonstrate that T3 and FSH cotreatment potentiates cellular glucose uptake via GLUT upregulation and translocation, which are mediated through the activation of the mTOR/PI3K/Akt pathway. Meanwhile, NOS3/NO are also involved in this regulatory system. These findings suggest that GLUT is a mediator of T3- and FSH-induced follicular development. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  12. Agglutinin-mediated phagocytosis-associated generation of superoxide anion and nitric oxide by the hemocytes of the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Thiagarajan; Arumugam, Munusamy; Mullainadhan, Periasamy

    2008-03-01

    Hemocyte mediated phagocytosis is one of the vital components of innate defence mechanisms in crustaceans and this phagocytic process is aided by serum agglutinins. However, literature on agglutinin mediated opsono-phagocytosis is unclear in the case of Macrobrachium rosenbergii hemocytes. Further, very few studies in the case of superoxide anion generation and none with regard to nitric oxide generation during phagocytosis exist among crustaceans. We investigated the occurrence of agglutinins in the serum and the role of serum agglutinins in mediating phagocytosis by the hemocytes. We show that the prawn serum possesses agglutinins that function as opsonins during phagocytosis of HB RBC by the hemocytes. Hemagglutination-inhibition assays revealed the specificity of serum agglutinins for N-acetylated hexoses, namely GalNAc, GlcNAc and ManNAc, with a higher affinity for ManNAc. In addition, ManNAc was able to inhibit the phagocytic response (by about 60%) of the hemocytes against serum pretreated HB RBC, wherein the serum was previously treated with ManNAc. We next investigated the ability of the hemocytes to generate superoxide anion and nitric oxide during HB RBC phagocytosis and results show generation of both these free radicals. In addition, there was an enhancement in generation (75% increase) of these free radicals during agglutinin mediated opsonophagocytosis, when compared to buffer treated targets and interestingly this enhanced generation was inhibited by ManNAc (27% for superoxide anion and 36% for nitric oxide), an inhibitory sugar for phagocytosis. Inhibition of phagocytosis induced superoxide anion generation by DPI (53%), sodium azide (56%) and tropolone (61%), reveals the possible involvement of NADPH-oxidases, peroxidases and probably phenoloxidases, respectively, in the generation of superoxide anion. Similarly, decrease in nitric oxide generation in the presence of l-NIO (47%) during phagocytosis lends support to the role of nitric oxide

  13. Nitro-fatty acids in plant signaling: New key mediators of nitric oxide metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capilla Mata-Pérez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in animal systems have shown that NO can interact with fatty acids to generate nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs. They are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species and unsaturated fatty acids, and are considered novel mediators of cell signaling based mainly on a proven anti-inflammatory response. Although these signaling mediators have been described widely in animal systems, NO2-FAs have scarcely been studied in plants. Preliminary data have revealed the endogenous presence of free and protein-adducted NO2-FAs in extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO, which appear to be contributing to the cardiovascular benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet. Importantly, new findings have displayed the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant's development. Furthermore, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant-defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing the chaperone network and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Thus, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions, highlighting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the plant-protection mechanism. Finally, the potential of NO2-Ln as a NO donor has recently been described both in vitro and in vivo. Jointly, this ability gives NO2-Ln the potential to act as a signaling molecule by the direct release of NO, due to its capacity to induce different changes mediated by NO or NO-related molecules such as nitration and S-nitrosylation, or by the electrophilic capacity of these molecules through a nitroalkylation mechanism. Here, we describe the current state of the art regarding the advances performed in the field of NO2-FAs in plants and their

  14. Endothelial cell-derived nitric oxide enhances aerobic glycolysis in astrocytes via HIF-1α-mediated target gene activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Britta; Mesters, Jeroen R; Pellerin, Luc; Jöhren, Olaf

    2012-07-11

    Astrocytes exhibit a prominent glycolytic activity, but whether such a metabolic profile is influenced by intercellular communication is unknown. Treatment of primary cultures of mouse cortical astrocytes with the nitric oxide (NO) donor DetaNONOate induced a time-dependent enhancement in the expression of genes encoding various glycolytic enzymes as well as transporters for glucose and lactate. Such an effect was shown to be dependent on the hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1α, which is stabilized and translocated to the nucleus to exert its transcriptional regulation. NO action was dependent on both the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MEK signaling pathways and required the activation of COX, but was independent of the soluble guanylate cyclase pathway. Furthermore, as a consequence of NO treatment, an enhanced lactate production and release by astrocytes was evidenced, which was prevented by downregulating HIF-1α. Several brain cell types represent possible sources of NO. It was found that endothelial cells, which express the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) isoform, constitutively produced the largest amount of NO in culture. When astrocytes were cocultured with primary cultures of brain vascular endothelial cells, stabilization of HIF-1α and an enhancement in glucose transporter-1, hexokinase-2, and monocarboxylate transporter-4 expression as well as increased lactate production was found in astrocytes. This effect was inhibited by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME and was not seen when astrocytes were cocultured with primary cultures of cortical neurons. Our findings suggest that endothelial cell-derived NO participates to the maintenance of a high glycolytic activity in astrocytes mediated by astrocytic HIF-1α activation.

  15. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 is vital for (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate mediated activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bei-Chia; Wei, Jeng; Su, Kuo-Hui; Chiang, An-Na; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Chen, Hsiang-Ying; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2015-04-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin of green tea, has beneficial effects on physiological functions of endothelial cells (ECs), yet the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), a ligand-gated nonselective calcium channel, in EGCG-mediated endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) activation and angiogenesis. In ECs, treatment with EGCG time-dependently increased the intracellular level of Ca(2+) . Removal of extracellular calcium (Ca(2+) ) by EGTA or EDTA or inhibition of TRPV1 by capsazepine or SB366791 abrogated EGCG-increased intracellular Ca(2+) level in ECs or TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. Additionally, EGCG increased the phsophorylation of eNOS at Ser635 and Ser1179, Akt at Ser473, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) at Thr286 and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) at Thr172, all abolished by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. EGCG-induced NO production was diminished by pretreatment with LY294002 (an Akt inhibitor), KN62 (a CaMKII inhibitor), and compound C (an AMPK inhibitor). Moreover, blocking TRPV1 activation prevented EGCG-induced EC proliferation, migration, and tube formation, as well as angiogenesis in Matrigel plugs in mice. EGCG may trigger activation of TRPV1-Ca(2+) signaling, which leads to phosphorylation of Akt, AMPK, and CaMKII; eNOS activation; NO production; and, ultimately, angiogenesis in ECs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Dietary rose hip exerts antiatherosclerotic effects and increases nitric oxide-mediated dilation in ApoE-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalera, Michele; Axling, Ulrika; Rippe, Catarina; Swärd, Karl; Holm, Cecilia

    2017-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which atheromatous plaques develop inside arteries, leading to reduced or obstructed blood flow that in turn may cause stroke and heart attack. Rose hip is the fruit of plants of the genus Rosa, belonging to the Rosaceae family, and it is rich in antioxidants with high amounts of ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds. Several studies have shown that fruits, seeds and roots of these plants exert antidiabetic, antiobesity and cholesterol-lowering effects in rodents as well as humans. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which rose hip lowers plasma cholesterol and to evaluate its effects on atherosclerotic plaque formation. ApoE-null mice were fed either an HFD (CTR) or HFD with rose hip supplementation (RH) for 24 weeks. At the end of the study, we found that blood pressure and atherosclerotic plaques, together with oxidized LDL, total cholesterol and fibrinogen levels were markedly reduced in the RH group. Fecal cholesterol content, liver expression of Ldlr and selected reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) genes such as Abca1, Abcg1 and Scarb1 were significantly increased upon RH feeding. In the aorta, the scavenger receptor Cd36 and the proinflammatory Il1β genes were markedly down-regulated compared to the CTR mice. Finally, we found that RH increased nitric oxide-mediated dilation of the caudal artery. Taken together, these results suggest that rose hip is a suitable dietary supplement for preventing atherosclerotic plaques formation by modulating systemic blood pressure and the expression of RCT and inflammatory genes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lethal Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guérin infection in nitric oxide synthase 2-deficient mice: cell-mediated immunity requires nitric oxide synthase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, I; Guler, R; Vesin, D; Olleros, M L; Vassalli, P; Chvatchko, Y; Jacobs, M; Ryffel, B

    2000-09-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) infection was investigated using nitric oxide synthase 2 (nos2)-deficient mice, because NO plays a pivotal protective role in M. tuberculosis infection. We demonstrate that nos2-deficient mice were unable to eliminate BCG and succumbed within 8 to 12 weeks to BCG infection (10(6) CFU) with cachexia and pneumonia, whereas all infected wild-type mice survived. The greatest mycobacterial loads were observed in lung and spleen. Nos2-deficient mice developed large granulomas consisting of macrophages and activated T cells and caseous necrotic lesions in spleen. The macrophages in granulomas from nos2-deficient mice had reduced acid phosphatase activities, suggesting that NO is required for macrophage activation. The absence of NOS2 affected the cytokine production of the Th1 type of immune response, except IL-18. Serum amounts of IL-12p40 were increased and IFN-gamma was decreased compared with wild-type mice. The lack of NOS2 resulted in an overproduction of TNF, observed throughout the infection period. Additionally, TNFR1 and TNFR2 shedding was altered compared with wild-type mice. Up-regulation of TNF may be compensatory for the lack of NOS2. The late neutralization of TNF by soluble TNF receptors resulted in heightened disease severity and accelerated death in nos2-deficient mice but had no effect in wild-type mice. In conclusion, the inability of nos2-deficient mice to kill M. bovis BCG resulted in an accumulation of mycobacteria with a dramatic activation of the immune system and overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which resulted in death.

  18. Enteric Glia Mediate Neuron Death in Colitis Through Purinergic Pathways That Require Connexin-43 and Nitric OxideSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isola A.M. Brown

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The concept of enteric glia as regulators of intestinal homeostasis is slowly gaining acceptance as a central concept in neurogastroenterology. Yet how glia contribute to intestinal disease is still poorly understood. Purines generated during inflammation drive enteric neuron death by activating neuronal P2X7 purine receptors (P2X7R; triggering adenosine triphosphate (ATP release via neuronal pannexin-1 channels that subsequently recruits intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i in surrounding enteric glia. We tested the hypothesis that the activation of enteric glia contributes to neuron death during inflammation. Methods: We studied neuroinflammation in vivo using the 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of colitis and in situ using whole-mount preparations of human and mouse intestine. Transgenic mice with a targeted deletion of glial connexin-43 (Cx43 [GFAP::CreERT2+/−/Cx43f/f] were used to specifically disrupt glial signaling pathways. Mice deficient in inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase (iNOS−/− were used to study NO production. Protein expression and oxidative stress were measured using immunohistochemistry and in situ Ca2+ and NO imaging were used to monitor glial [Ca2+]i and [NO]i. Results: Purinergic activation of enteric glia drove [Ca2+]i responses and enteric neuron death through a Cx43-dependent mechanism. Neurotoxic Cx43 activity, driven by NO production from glial iNOS, was required for neuron death. Glial Cx43 opening liberated ATP and Cx43-dependent ATP release was potentiated by NO. Conclusions: Our results show that the activation of glial cells in the context of neuroinflammation kills enteric neurons. Mediators of inflammation that include ATP and NO activate neurotoxic pathways that converge on glial Cx43 hemichannels. The glial response to inflammatory mediators might contribute to the development of motility disorders. Keywords: Enteric Nervous System, Hemichannels

  19. Ethylene mediates brassinosteroid-induced stomatal closure via Gα protein-activated hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide production in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chenyu; Qi, Cheng; Ren, Hongyan; Huang, Aixia; Hei, Shumei; She, Xiaoping

    2015-04-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential for plant growth and development; however, whether and how they promote stomatal closure is not fully clear. In this study, we report that 24-epibrassinolide (EBR), a bioactive BR, induces stomatal closure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by triggering a signal transduction pathway including ethylene synthesis, the activation of Gα protein, and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) production. EBR initiated a marked rise in ethylene, H(2)O(2) and NO levels, necessary for stomatal closure in the wild type. These effects were abolished in mutant bri1-301, and EBR failed to close the stomata of gpa1 mutants. Next, we found that both ethylene and Gα mediate the inductive effects of EBR on H(2)O(2) and NO production. EBR-triggered H(2)O(2) and NO accumulation were canceled in the etr1 and gpa1 mutants, but were strengthened in the eto1-1 mutant and the cGα line (constitutively overexpressing the G protein α-subunit AtGPA1). Exogenously applied H(2)O(2) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) rescued the defects of etr1-3 and gpa1 or etr1 and gpa1 mutants in EBR-induced stomatal closure, whereas the stomata of eto1-1/AtrbohF and cGα/AtrbohF or eto1-1/nia1-2 and cGα/nia1-2 constructs had an analogous response to H(2)O(2) or SNP as those of AtrbohF or Nia1-2 mutants. Moreover, we provided evidence that Gα plays an important role in the responses of guard cells to ethylene. Gα activator CTX largely restored the lesion of the etr1-3 mutant, but ethylene precursor ACC failed to rescue the defects of gpa1 mutants in EBR-induced stomatal closure. Lastly, we demonstrated that Gα-activated H(2)O(2) production is required for NO synthesis. EBR failed to induce NO synthesis in mutant AtrbohF, but it led to H(2)O(2) production in mutant Nia1-2. Exogenously applied SNP rescued the defect of AtrbohF in EBR-induced stomatal closure, but H(2)O(2) did not reverse the lesion of EBR-induced stomatal closure in Nia1-2. Together, our

  20. Increased sensitivity of African American triple negative breast cancer cells to nitric oxide-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis; Thames, Easter; Kim, Jinna; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Singh, Rajan; Pervin, Shehla

    2016-07-29

    Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease where many distinct subtypes are found. Younger African American (AA) women often present themselves with aggressive form of breast cancer with unique biology which is very difficult to treat. Better understanding the biology of AA breast tumors could lead to development of effective treatment strategies. Our previous studies indicate that AA but not Caucasian (CA) triple negative (TN) breast cancer cells were sensitive to nitrosative stress-induced cell death. In this study, we elucidate possible mechanisms that contribute to nitric oxide (NO)-induced apoptosis in AA TN breast cancer cells. Breast cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of long-acting NO donor, DETA-NONOate and cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion assay. Apoptosis was determined by TUNEL and caspase 3 activity as well as changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. Caspase 3 and Bax cleavage, levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Mn SOD was assessed by immunoblot analysis. Inhibition of Bax cleavage by Calpain inhibitor, and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as SOD activity was measured in NO-induced apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo effect of NO treatment on mammary cancer stem cells (MCSCs) was assessed. NO induced mitocondria-mediated apoptosis in all AA but not in CA TN breast cancer cells. We found significant TUNEL-positive cells, cleavage of Bax and caspase-3 activation as well as depolarization mitochondrial membrane potential only in AA TN breast cancer cells exposed to NO. Inhibition of Bax cleavage and quenching of ROS partially inhibited NO-induced apoptosis in AA TN cells. Increase in ROS coincided with reduction in SOD activity in AA TN breast cancer cells. Furthermore, NO treatment of AA TN breast cancer cells dramatically reduced aldehyde dehydrogenase1 (ALDH1) expressing MCSCs and xenograft formation but not in breast cancer cells from CA origin. Ethnic differences in breast

  1. Effect of angiotensin II and its receptor antagonists on human corpus cavernous contractility and oxidative stress: modulation of nitric oxide mediated relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertemi, Hani; Mumtaz, Faiz H; Howie, Alexander J; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Thompson, Cecil S

    2011-06-01

    To our knowledge the interaction between angiotensin II and nitric oxide in the control of human corpus cavernous function has not been assessed previously. We determined the presence and role of angiotensin II and its receptors in human penile function. Corpus cavernous tissue was obtained from 35 patients undergoing gender reassignment surgery. Immunohistochemical analysis was done to determine angiotensin II peptide tissue distribution. Organ bath studies were done to determine the angiotensin II/nitric oxide interaction on corpus cavernous smooth muscle function. The role of oxidative stress in the angiotensin II response was also examined using the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Angiotensin II was distributed in arteriolar endothelium, endothelium lining sinusoids and smooth muscle cells, and caused dose dependent contraction of human corpus cavernous smooth muscle strips that was inhibited by the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist losartan. Relaxation of corpus cavernous smooth muscle induced by the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside or electrical field stimulation was potentiated by losartan. Apocynin decreased angiotensin II induced corpus cavernous contraction. Angiotensin II and nitric oxide interact to modulate human cavernous function since losartan potentiated sodium nitroprusside and electrical field stimulation mediated corpus cavernous smooth muscle relaxation. The angiotensin II response involves the production of superoxide and the development of oxidative stress. These findings support the role of angiotensin II in the regulation of human penile smooth muscle tone and suggest that angiotensin type 1 receptor inhibition may be a therapeutic approach to erectile dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Different capacities of carp leukocytes to encounter nitric oxide-mediated stress: a role for the intracellular reduced glutathione pool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeij, J.P.J.; Muiswinkel, van W.B.; Meent, van de M.; Amaral, C.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2003-01-01

    Carp head kidney (HK) phagocytes can be stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to produce nitric oxide (NO). High production of NO can suppress the carp immune system. Carp peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) are highly susceptible but HK phagocytes are relatively resistant to the immunosuppressive

  3. The specific type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram differentially regulates the proinflammatory mediators TNF-alpha and nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greten, T F; Eigler, A; Sinha, B; Moeller, J; Endres, S

    We compared the effect of the specific type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram on intracellular cAMP concentration, nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) formation in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. We found a dose-dependent increase of nitrite accumulation in

  4. Carbamylated low-density lipoprotein attenuates glucose uptake via a nitric oxide-mediated pathway in rat L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye-Jung; Lee, Kyoung Jae; Hwang, Eun Ah; Mun, Kyo-Cheol; Ha, Eunyoung

    2015-07-01

    Carbamylation is a cyanate-mediated posttranslational modification. We previously reported that carbamylated low-density lipoprotein (cLDL) increases reactive oxygen species and apoptosis via a lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor mediated pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. A recent study reported an association between cLDL and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In the current study, the effects of cLDL on glucose transport were explored in skeletal muscle cells. The effect of cLDL on glucose uptake, glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation, and signaling pathway were examined in cultured rat L6 muscle cells using 2-deoxyglucose uptake, immunofluorescence staining and western blot analysis. The quantity of nitric oxide (NO) was evaluated by the Griess reaction. The effect of native LDL (nLDL) from patients with chronic renal failure (CRF-nLDL) on glucose uptake was also determined. It was observed that cLDL significantly attenuated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the membrane, which was mediated via the increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO production. Tyrosine nitration of the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS‑1) was increased. It was demonstrated that CRF-nLDL markedly reduced glucose uptake compared with nLDL from healthy subjects. Collectively, these findings indicate that cLDL, alone, attenuates glucose uptake via NO-mediated tyrosine nitration of IRS‑1 in L6 rat muscle cells and suggests the possibility that cLDL is involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  5. Toxic effects of methoxychlor on the episodic prolactin secretory pattern: Possible mediated effects of nitric oxide production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Pilar

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This work addresses the issue of whether methoxychlor (MTX exposure may modify the ultradian secretion of prolactin through changes in the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO induced by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Associated changes in dopamine (DA content in the anterior (AH, mediobasal (MBH and posterior hypothalamus (PH and median eminence (ME were evaluated. Methods Two groups of animals (MTX and MTX+L-NAME treated received subcutaneous (sc injections of MTX at a dose of 25 mg/kg/day for one month. The other two groups of animals (control and L-NAME treated received sc vehicle injections (0.5 mL/day of sesame oil, during the same period of time to be used as controls. Forty hours before the day of the experiment, animals were anaesthetized with intrapritoneal injections of 2.5% tribromoethanol in saline and atrial cannulas were implanted through the external jugular vein. Plasma was continuously extracted in Hamilton syringes coupled to a peristaltic bomb in tubes containing phosphate-gelatine buffer (to increase viscosity. The plasma was obtained by decantation and kept every 7 minutes for the measurement of plasma prolactin levels through a specific radioimmnunoassay and DA concentration by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results Prolactin release in animals from all experimental groups analyzed was episodic. Mean plasma prolactin levels during the bleeding period, and the absolute pulse amplitude were increased after MTX or Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME administration. However MTX and L-NAME did not modify any other parameter studied with the exception of relative pulse amplitude in MTX treated rats. L-NAME administration to rats treated with the pesticide reduced mean plasma prolactin levels and the absolute amplitude of prolactin peaks. Peak duration, frequency and relative amplitude of prolactin peaks were not changed in the group of rats treated

  6. 15-epi-lipoxin A4-mediated induction of nitric oxide explains how aspirin inhibits acute inflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Paul-Clark, M. J.; Van Cao, T.; Moradi-Bidhendi, N.; Cooper, D.; Gilroy, D. W.

    2004-01-01

    The established model for the mechanism of action of aspirin is the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. However, this has never fully explained aspirin's repertoire of antiinflammatory properties. We found in acute pleuritis that aspirin, but not salicylate, indomethacin, or piroxicam, increased plasma nitric oxide (NO), which correlated with a reduction in inflammation. Inhibiting aspirin-elicited NO pharmacologically in this model nullified the antiinflammatory effects of aspirin. Moreov...

  7. Nitrous-acid-mediated synthesis of iron-nitrosyl-porphyrin: pH-dependent release of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2012-11-01

    Two iron-nitrosyl-porphyrins, nitrosyl[meso-tetrakis(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylporphyrin]iron(II) acetic acid solvate (3) and nitrosyl[meso-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenylporphyrin]iron(II) CH(2)Cl(2) solvate (4), were synthesized in quantitative yield by using a modified procedure with nitrous acid, followed by oxygen-atom abstraction by triphenylphosphine under an argon atmosphere. These nitrosyl porphyrins are in the {FeNO}(7) class. Under an argon atmosphere, these compounds are relatively stable over a broad range of pH values (4-8) but, under aerobic conditions, they release nitric oxide faster at high pH values than that at low pH values. The generated nitric-oxide-free iron(III)-porphyrin can be re-nitrosylated by using nitrous acid and triphenylphosphine. The rapid release of NO from these Fe(II) complexes at high pH values seems to be similar to that in nitrophorin, a nitric-oxide-transport protein, which formally possesses Fe(III). However, because the release of NO occurs from ferrous-nitrosyl-porphyrin under aerobic conditions, these compounds are more closely related to nitrobindin, a recently discovered heme protein. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Nitric oxide mediates aortic disease in mice deficient in the metalloprotease Adamts1 and in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller, Jorge; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Ruiz, E Josue; Villahoz, Silvia; Renard, Marjolijn; Canelas, Lizet I; Briones, Ana M; Alberca, Rut; Lozano-Vidal, Noelia; Hurlé, María A; Milewicz, Dianna; Evangelista, Arturo; Salaices, Mercedes; Nistal, J Francisco; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; De Backer, Julie; Campanero, Miguel R; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Heritable thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), including Marfan syndrome (MFS), currently lack a cure, and causative mutations have been identified for only a fraction of affected families. Here we identify the metalloproteinase ADAMTS1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) as therapeutic targets in individuals with TAAD. We show that Adamts1 is a major mediator of vascular homeostasis, given that genetic haploinsufficiency of Adamts1 in mice causes TAAD similar to MFS. Aortic nitric oxide and Nos2 levels were higher in Adamts1-deficient mice and in a mouse model of MFS (hereafter referred to as MFS mice), and Nos2 inactivation protected both types of mice from aortic pathology. Pharmacological inhibition of Nos2 rapidly reversed aortic dilation and medial degeneration in young Adamts1-deficient mice and in young or old MFS mice. Patients with MFS showed elevated NOS2 and decreased ADAMTS1 protein levels in the aorta. These findings uncover a possible causative role for the ADAMTS1-NOS2 axis in human TAAD and warrant evaluation of NOS2 inhibitors for therapy.

  9. The neuroprotective effect of acute moderate alcohol consumption on caspase-3 mediated neuroapoptosis in traumatic brain injury: the role of lysosomal cathepsin L and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbak, Gungor; Kartkaya, Kazım; Ozcelik, Eda; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Kabay, Sibel Canbaz; Arslan, Gul; Durmaz, Ramazan

    2013-01-10

    Our aim in this study was to investigate the effect of moderate acute alcohol administration on cysteine protease mediated neuronal apoptosis and nitric oxide production in the traumatic brain injury. A total of 29 adult Sprague-Dawley male rats weighing 250-300 g were used. The rats were allocated into four groups. The first group was the control (sham-operated) group in which only a craniotomy was performed, the others were alcohol, trauma and trauma+alcohol groups. Caspase-3 enzyme activity in the trauma group increased significantly in comparison with the control group. The alcohol given group showed a decreased caspase-3 enzyme activity compared to the trauma group. The level of caspase-3 enzyme activity in the alcohol+trauma group decreased in comparison to the trauma group. SF/FEL ratio of cathepsin-L enzyme activity in the trauma group was significantly higher than in the control group. Our results indicate that moderate alcohol consumption may have protective effects on apoptotic cell death after traumatic brain injury. Protective effects of moderate ethanol consumption might be related to inhibition of lysosomal protease release and nitric oxide production. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. GLP-2-mediated up-regulation of intestinal blood flow and glucose uptake is nitric oxide-dependent in TPN-fed piglets 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Xinfu; Stoll, Barbara; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2003-01-01

    %) in TPN-fed piglets. GLP-2 also increased intestinal constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and endothelial NOS protein abundance. GLP-2 acutely increased PDV glucose uptake (+90%) and net lactate production (+79%). Co-infusion of GLP-2 plus L-NAME did not increase either PDV blood flow rate...... or glucose uptake. GLP-2 increased PDV indispensable amino acid uptake by 220% and protein synthesis by 125%, but did not decrease protein breakdown or phenylalanine oxidation. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that in TPN-fed neonatal pigs, GLP-2 acutely stimulates intestinal blood flow and glucose utilization......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Our aim was to determine whether the intestinotrophic effects of GLP-2 are mediated by acute up-regulation of intestinal substrate utilization in TPN-fed piglets. METHODS: Twenty-four 12-day-old pigs, fitted with a portal flow probe and carotid, jugular and portal catheters, were...

  11. L-arginine stimulates CAT-1-mediated arginine uptake and regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase for the growth of chick intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chao; Zhang, Xiaoyun; He, Qiang; Li, Junming; Lu, Jianjun; Zou, Xiaoting

    2015-01-01

    L-arginine (L-Arg) uptake is mediated by members of cationic amino acid transporter (CAT) family and may coincide with the induction of nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The present study was conducted to investigate the extracellular concentrations of L-Arg regulating the CAT-1, CAT-4 and inducible NOS (iNOS) in chick intestinal epithelial cells. The cells were cultured for 4 days in Arg-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium containing 10, 100, 200, 400, or 600 μM L-Arg. Cell viability, nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, uptake and metabolism of L-[3H]-Arg as well as expression of CAT-1, CAT-4, and iNOS were determined. Our results showed that L-Arg enhances cell growth with a maximal response at 10-400 μM. Addition of 100, 200, or 400 μM L-Arg increased the L-[3H]-Arg uptake, which was associated with greater conversion of L-[3H]-citrulline and NO production in comparison with 10 μM L-Arg group. Increasing extracellular concentrations of L-Arg from 10 to 400 μM dose dependently increased the levels of CAT-1 mRNA and protein, while no effect on CAT-4 mRNA abundance was found. Furthermore, supplementation of 100, 200, or 400 μM L-Arg upregulated the expression of iNOS mRNA, and the relative protein levels for iNOS in 200 and 400 μM L-Arg groups were higher than those in 10 and 100 μM L-Arg groups. Collectively, we conclude that the CAT-1 isoform plays a role in L-Arg uptake, and L-Arg-mediated elevation of NO via iNOS promotes the growth of chick intestinal epithelial cells.

  12. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca(2+) mobilization and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser(1179)) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. This study suggests that FIR radiation increases NO production via increasing CaMKII-mediated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation but TRPV channels may not be involved in this pathway. Our results may provide the molecular mechanism by which FIR radiation improves endothelial function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Du-Hyong [Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Mi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Duk-Hee [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Inho, E-mail: inhojo@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  14. Duplication of phospholipase C-delta gene family in fish genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moo-Sang; Seo, Jung Soo; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Na Young; Je, Ju Eun; Sung, Ji Hea; Lee, Hyung Ho; Chung, Joon Ki

    2008-11-01

    Fishes possess more genes than other vertebrates, possibly because of a genome duplication event during the evolution of the teleost (ray-finned) fish lineage. To further explore this idea, we cloned five genes encoding phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-delta (PLC-delta), designated respectively PoPLC-deltas, from olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), and we performed phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparison to compare our putative gene products (PoPLC-deltas) with the sequences of known human PLC isoforms. The deduced amino acid sequences shared high sequence identity with human PLC-delta1, -delta3, and -delta4 isozymes and exhibited similar primary structures. In phylogenetic analysis of PoPLC-deltas with PLC-deltas of five teleost fishes (zebrafish, stickleback, medaka, Tetraodon, and Takifugu), three tetrapods (human, chicken, and frog), and two tunicates (sea squirt and pacific sea squirt), whose putative sequences of PLC-delta are available in Ensembl genome browser, the result also indicated that the two paralogous genes corresponding to each PLC-delta isoform originated from fish-specific genome duplication prior to the divergence of teleost fish. Our analyses suggest that an ancestral PLC-delta gene underwent three rounds of genome duplication during the evolution of vertebrates, leading to the six genes of three PLC-delta isoforms in teleost fish.

  15. [Nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Complex rearrangements within the human J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus and aberrant recombination between J alpha segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baer, R.; Boehm, T.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; Rabbitts, T. H.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined DNA rearrangements within a 120 kb cloned region of the human T cell receptor J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus. Three types of pattern emerge from an analysis of T cell lines and clones. Firstly, cells with two rearrangements within J delta-C delta; secondly, cells with one

  17. Effect of biliary cirrhosis on nonadrenergic noncholinergic-mediated relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum: Role of nitric oxide pathway and endocannabinoid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehpour A.R.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Relaxation of the corpus cavernosum plays a major role in penile erection. Nitric oxide (NO is known to be the most important factor mediating relaxation of corpus cavernosum, which is mainly derived from nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC nerves. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of biliary cirrhosis on nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC-mediated relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum as well as the possible relevant roles of endocannabinoid and nitric oxide systems.Methods: Corporal strips from sham-operated and biliary cirrhotic rats were mounted under tension in a standard oxygenated organ bath with guanethidine sulfate (5 µM and atropine (1 µM to induce adrenergic and cholinergic blockade. The strips were precontracted with phenylephrine hydrochloride (7.5 µM and electrical field stimulation was applied at different frequencies (2, 5, 10, 15 Hz to obtain NANC-mediated relaxation. In separate precontracted strips of the sham and cirrhotic groups, the concentration-dependent relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside (10 nM-1mM, as an NO donor, were assessed.  Results: The NANC-mediated relaxation was significantly enhanced in cirrhotic animals (P<0.01. Anandamide potentiated the relaxations in both groups (P<0.05. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (10 µM and the vanilloid receptor antagonist capsazepine (10 µM each significantly prevented the enhanced relaxations in cirrhotic rats (P<0.01. The CB2 receptor antagonist AM630 had no effect on relaxations in the cirrhotic group. In a concentration-dependent manner, L-NAME (30-1000 nM inhibited relaxations in both the sham and cirrhotic groups, although cirrhotic groups were more resistant to the inhibitory effects of L-NAME. The degree of relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside (10 nM-1 mM was similar in the two groups.Conclusions: Biliary cirrhosis enhances the neurogenic relaxation in rat corpus cavernosum probably via the NO pathway and

  18. Subthreshold nitric oxide synthase inhibition improves synergistic effects of subthreshold MMP-2/MLCK-mediated cardiomyocyte protection from hypoxic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bil-Lula, Iwona; Lin, Han-Bin; Biały, Dariusz; Wawrzyńska, Magdalena; Diebel, Lucas; Sawicka, Jolanta; Woźniak, Mieczyslaw; Sawicki, Grzegorz

    2016-06-01

    Injury of myocardium during ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a complex and multifactorial process involving uncontrolled protein phosphorylation, nitration/nitrosylation by increased production of nitric oxide and accelerated contractile protein degradation by matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). It has been shown that simultaneous inhibition of MMP-2 with doxycycline (Doxy) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) with ML-7 at subthreshold concentrations protects the heart from contractile dysfunction triggered by I/R in a synergistic manner. In this study, we showed that additional co-administration of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (1400W or L-NAME) in subthreshold concentrations improves this synergistic protection in the model of hypoxia-reoxygenation (H-R)-induced contractile dysfunction of cardiomyocytes. Isolated cardiomyocytes were subjected to 3 min. of hypoxia and 20 min. of reoxygenation in the presence or absence of the inhibitor cocktails. Contractility of cardiomyocytes was expressed as myocyte peak shortening. Inhibition of MMP-2 by Doxy (25-100 μM), MLCK by ML-7 (0.5-5 μM) and NOS by L-NAME (25-100 μM) or 1400W (25-100 μM) protected myocyte contractility after H-R in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of these activities resulted in full recovery of cardiomyocyte contractility after H-R at the level of highest single-drug concentration. The combination of subthreshold concentrations of NOS, MMP-2 and MLCK inhibitors fully protected cardiomyocyte contractility and MLC1 from degradation by MMP-2. The observed protection with addition of L-NAME or 1400W was better than previously reported combination of ML-7 and Doxy. The results of this study suggest that addition of NOS inhibitor to the mixture of inhibitors is better strategy for protecting cardiomyocyte contractility. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Caveolin-1-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase in human colon carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMANUELA FELLEY-BOSCO

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species are now widely recognized as important players contributing both to cell homeostasis and the development of disease. In this respect nitric oxide (NO is no exception. The discussion here will center on regulation of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS for two reasons. First, only iNOS produces micromolar NO concentrations, amounts that are high by comparison with the picomolar to nanomolar concentrations resulting from Ca2+-controlled NO production by endothelial eNOS or neuronal nNOS. Second, iNOS is not constitutively expressed in cells and regulation of this isoenzyme, in contrast to endothelial eNOS or neuronal nNOS, is widely considered to occur at the transcriptional level only. In particular, we were interested in the possibility that caveolin-1, a protein that functions as a tumor suppressor in colon carcinoma cells (Bender et al., 2002; this issue, might regulate iNOS activity. Our results provide evidence for the existence of a post-transcriptional mechanism controlling iNOS protein levels that involves caveolin-1-dependent sequestration of iNOS within a detergent-insoluble compartment. Interestingly, despite the high degree of conservation of the caveolin-1 scaffolding domain binding motif within all NOS enzymes, the interaction detected between caveolin-1 and iNOS in vitro is crucially dependent on presence of a caveolin-1 sequence element immediately adjacent to the scaffolding domain. A model is presented summarizing the salient aspects of these results. These observations are important in the context of tumor biology, since down-regulation of caveolin-1 is predicted to promote uncontrolled iNOS activity, genotoxic damage and thereby facilitate tumor development in humans

  20. Danggui Buxue Tang, Chinese Herbal Decoction Containing Astragali Radix and Angelicae Sinensis Radix, Induces Production of Nitric Oxide in Endothelial Cells: Signaling Mediated by Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Amy G W; Lau, K M; Zhang, Laura M L; Lin, H Q; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2016-03-01

    Danggui Buxue Tang, an ancient Chinese herbal decoction containing Astragali Radix and Angelicae Sinensis Radix at the weight ratio of 5:1, is used to mitigate menopausal syndromes in women. The pharmacological properties of Danggui Buxue Tang have been illustrated in bone development, blood enhancement, and immune stimulation. Here, we extended the possible pharmacological role of Danggui Buxue Tang in cardiovascular function. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells, the application of Danggui Buxue Tang induced the release of nitric oxide and the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Akt kinase in time- and dose-dependent manners. The robust activation of nitric oxide signaling, however, required the boiling of Astragali Radix and Angelicae Sinensis Radix together, i.e., as Danggui Buxue Tang instead of other herbal extracts. The Danggui Buxue Tang-induced phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Akt kinase in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were fully blocked by treatment with an endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME), a PI3K/Akt inhibitor (LY294002), and a Ca(2+) chelator (BAPTA-AM). In parallel, the blockage of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Akt activation subsequently fully abolished the Danggui Buxue Tang-induced nitric oxide production. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Coronary vasomotor responses to isometric handgrip exercise are primarily mediated by nitric oxide: a noninvasive MRI test of coronary endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Allison G; Iantorno, Micaela; Soleimanifard, Sahar; Steinberg, Angela; Schär, Michael; Gerstenblith, Gary; Stuber, Matthias; Weiss, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    Endothelial cell release of nitric oxide (NO) is a defining characteristic of nondiseased arteries, and abnormal endothelial NO release is both a marker of early atherosclerosis and a predictor of its progression and future events. Healthy coronaries respond to endothelial-dependent stressors with vasodilatation and increased coronary blood flow (CBF), but those with endothelial dysfunction respond with paradoxical vasoconstriction and reduced CBF. Recently, coronary MRI and isometric handgrip exercise (IHE) were reported to noninvasively quantify coronary endothelial function (CEF). However, it is not known whether the coronary response to IHE is actually mediated by NO and/or whether it is reproducible over weeks. To determine the contribution of NO, we studied the coronary response to IHE before and during infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA, 0.3 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), a NO-synthase inhibitor, in healthy volunteers. For reproducibility, we performed two MRI-IHE studies ~8 wk apart in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Changes from rest to IHE in coronary cross-sectional area (%CSA) and diastolic CBF (%CBF) were quantified. l-NMMA completely blocked normal coronary vasodilation during IHE [%CSA, 12.9 ± 2.5 (mean ± SE, placebo) vs. -0.3 ± 1.6% (l-NMMA); P exam of NO-mediated CEF promises to be useful for studying CAD pathogenesis in low-risk populations and for evaluating translational strategies designed to alter CAD in patients.

  2. The Antinociceptive Effects of JWH-015 in Chronic Inflammatory Pain Are Produced by Nitric Oxide-cGMP-PKG-KATP Pathway Activation Mediated by Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete, Roger; Hervera, Arnau; Leánez, Sergi; Martín-Campos, Jesús M.; Pol, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Background Cannabinoid 2 receptor (CB2R) agonists attenuate inflammatory pain but the precise mechanism implicated in these effects is not completely elucidated. We investigated if the peripheral nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG)-ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels signaling pathway triggered by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) and modulated by opioids, participates in the local antinociceptive effects produced by a CB2R agonist (JWH-015) during chronic inflammatory pain. Methodology/Principal Findings In wild type (WT) and NOS1 knockout (NOS1-KO) mice, at 10 days after the subplantar administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), we evaluated the antiallodynic (von Frey filaments) and antihyperalgesic (plantar test) effects produced by the subplantar administration of JWH-015 and the reversion of their effects by the local co-administration with CB2R (AM630), peripheral opioid receptor (naloxone methiodide, NX-ME) or CB1R (AM251) antagonists. Expression of CB2R and NOS1 as well as the antinociceptive effects produced by a high dose of JWH-015 combined with different doses of selective L-guanylate cyclase (ODQ) or PKG (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPs) inhibitors or a KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide), were also assessed. Results show that the local administration of JWH-015 dose-dependently inhibited the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by CFA which effects were completely reversed by the local co-administration of AM630 or NX-ME, but not AM251. Inflammatory pain increased the paw expression of CB2R and the dorsal root ganglia transcription of NOS1. Moreover, the antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 were absent in NOS1-KO mice and diminished by their co-administration with ODQ, Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPs or glibenclamide. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that the peripheral antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 during chronic inflammatory pain are mainly produced by the local activation of the nitric oxide-cGMP-PKG-KATP signaling pathway, triggered

  3. The antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 in chronic inflammatory pain are produced by nitric oxide-cGMP-PKG-KATP pathway activation mediated by opioids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Negrete

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cannabinoid 2 receptor (CB2R agonists attenuate inflammatory pain but the precise mechanism implicated in these effects is not completely elucidated. We investigated if the peripheral nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG-ATP-sensitive K(+ (KATP channels signaling pathway triggered by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1 and modulated by opioids, participates in the local antinociceptive effects produced by a CB2R agonist (JWH-015 during chronic inflammatory pain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In wild type (WT and NOS1 knockout (NOS1-KO mice, at 10 days after the subplantar administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, we evaluated the antiallodynic (von Frey filaments and antihyperalgesic (plantar test effects produced by the subplantar administration of JWH-015 and the reversion of their effects by the local co-administration with CB2R (AM630, peripheral opioid receptor (naloxone methiodide, NX-ME or CB1R (AM251 antagonists. Expression of CB2R and NOS1 as well as the antinociceptive effects produced by a high dose of JWH-015 combined with different doses of selective L-guanylate cyclase (ODQ or PKG (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPs inhibitors or a KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide, were also assessed. Results show that the local administration of JWH-015 dose-dependently inhibited the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by CFA which effects were completely reversed by the local co-administration of AM630 or NX-ME, but not AM251. Inflammatory pain increased the paw expression of CB2R and the dorsal root ganglia transcription of NOS1. Moreover, the antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 were absent in NOS1-KO mice and diminished by their co-administration with ODQ, Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPs or glibenclamide. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that the peripheral antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 during chronic inflammatory pain are mainly produced by the local activation of the nitric oxide-cGMP-PKG-KATP signaling pathway

  4. Nicotine-induced norepinephrine release in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and amygdala is mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and nitric oxide in the nucleus tractus solitarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rongjie; Chen, Hao; Sharp, Burt M

    2007-02-01

    The noradrenergic projections from brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) to hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and amygdala (AMYG) are involved in nicotine-related stress responses and drug craving. Previous studies demonstrated that i.v. nicotine-induced norepinephrine (NE) release in the PVN and AMYG depends on nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the brainstem. However, the direct site and mechanism of nicotine's action in brainstem are unknown. The present study determined the roles of NTS ionotropic glutamate receptors and nitric oxide (NO) in the effects of both local and systemic nicotine on NE release in PVN and AMYG. In male rats, an intra-NTS microinjection of nicotine (1.2 microg free base) or i.v. nicotine infusion (0.065 or 0.09 mg/kg) significantly increased NE levels in PVN and AMYG microdialysates. Prior microinjection of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (0.75 or 1.5 microg), but not an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonist, dose dependently nearly abolished both PVN and AMYG NE responses to nicotine administered into NTS or systemically. NO involvement was assessed with intra-NTS microinjections of the nonselective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (10-30 nmol), or the NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (0.1-0.2 nmol); both agents dose dependently inhibited i.v. nicotine-induced NE release. These results indicate that nicotine-induced NE release in PVN and AMYG is mediated entirely through the local effects of nicotine on NTS glutamate afferents and NMDA receptors that, in part, stimulate NO production, resulting in activation of noradrenergic neurons. Therefore, nicotine acts indirectly on noradrenergic NTS neurons to elicit NE release in forebrain structures.

  5. Superoxide and Nitric Oxide Involvement in Enhancing of N-methyl-D-aspartate Receptor-Mediated Central Sensitization in the Chronic Post-ischemia Pain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Tae Ha; Jung, Kyung Young; Ha, Mi Jin; Lim, Dong Gun; Hong, Jung Gil

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in persistent pain, including neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Since the data suggest that ROS are involved in central sensitization, the present study examines the levels of activated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the dorsal horn after an exogenous supply of three antioxidants in rats with chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP). This serves as an animal model of complex regional pain syndrome type-I induced by hindpaw ischemia/reperfusion injury. Methods The application of tight-fitting O-rings for a period of three hours produced CPIP in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Allopurinol 4 mg/kg, allopurinol 40 mg/kg, superoxide dismutase (SOD) 4,000 U/kg, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) 10 mg/kg and SOD 4,000 U/kg plus L-NAME 10 mg/kg were administered intraperitoneally just after O-ring application and on the first and second days after reperfusion. Mechanical allodynia was measured, and activation of the NMDA receptor subunit 1 (pNR1) of the lumbar spinal cord (L4-L6) was analyzed by the Western blot three days after reperfusion. Results Allopurinol reduced mechanical allodynia and attenuated the enhancement of spinal pNR1 expression in CPIP rats. SOD and L-NAME also blocked spinal pNR1 in accordance with the reduced mechanical allodynia in rats with CPIP. Conclusions The present data suggest the contribution of superoxide, produced via xanthine oxidase, and the participation of superoxide and nitric oxide as a precursor of peroxynitrite in NMDA mediated central sensitization. Finally, the findings support a therapeutic potential for the manipulation of superoxide and nitric oxide in ischemia/reperfusion related pain conditions. PMID:20552066

  6. Nitric oxide mediates the insulin sensitizing effects of β-sitosterol in high fat diet-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radika, M K; Viswanathan, P; Anuradha, C V

    2013-08-01

    β-Sitosterol has been shown to have antidiabetic and antioxidant effects in animal models. The objective of the study is to investigate the effects of β-sitosterol on insulin sensitivity, oxidative and nitrosative stress and lipid abnormalities in liver of high fat-fed rat model of insulin resistance (IR) and to assess whether nitric oxide (NO) is involved in its action. Adult male albino Wistar rats of body weight 150-180g were fed either control diet (CON) or high fat diet (HFD). Each dietary group was divided into two and treated or untreated with β-sitosterol (10mg/kgb.w.(-1)day(-1)) for 4weeks. Inhibition of total nitric oxide synthase (NOS) by administration of nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and inducible NOS (iNOS) by aminoguanidine (AG) in HFD and HFD+ β-sitosterol groups were accomplished to identify the role of NO. After 28days, assays were performed in plasma and liver. HFD-fed rats showed hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, IR, oxidative damage, nitrosative stress, lipid accumulation and elevated serum aminotransferases. Increased expression of iNOS and decreased expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS) were observed in them. Hepatic fat accumulation was further confirmed by histology. The biochemical and histological abnormalities associated with HFD feeding were significantly reduced by β-sitosterol administration. Administration of L-NAME to HFD-fed rats caused decrease in insulin sensitivity and increase in oxidative stress. Co-administration of L-NAME for the last seven days to β-sitosterol-treated HFD rats abolished the glucose lowering effect of β-sitosterol, but the ability to decrease oxidative stress remained unaltered. On the other hand, administration of AG resulted in improved glucose homeostasis and antioxidant levels but decreased oxidative stress and enhanced antioxidant potential in both HFD and HFD+ β-sitosterol treated groups. Thus, β-sitosterol promotes insulin sensitivity in rats fed HFD possibly by improving NO levels

  7. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  8. Evidence for sodium azide as an artifact mediating the modulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase by C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Nuria; Azcutia, Verónica; Matesanz, Nuria; Cercas, Elena; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Peiró, Concepción

    2005-03-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase protein identified as a cardiovascular risk marker. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have investigated the possible direct effects of CRP on the vasculature, using mainly commercial CRP. In the present work, a potential role for CRP as a modulator of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induction was explored. Cultured human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HASMC) were stimulated for 18 hours with 10 ng/mL interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), resulting in a marked increase of iNOS levels and NO production, as determined by Western blotting and nitrite measurement, respectively. Commercial CRP (1 to 100 microg/mL) concentration-dependently inhibited the effects elicited by IL-1beta. Unexpectedly, similar results were observed when the commercial CRP solution was replaced by the corresponding vehicle medium containing growing concentrations of sodium azide. The inhibitory effects of commercial CRP or vehicle medium were lost on sodium azide removal by dialysis. In conclusion, sodium azide from the commercial CRP solution, but not CRP itself, mainly accounts for the inhibitory effect on IL-1beta-evoked iNOS induction and NO release. Care should be taken before attributing any biologic role to commercial CRP containing sodium azide.

  9. Chitosan-induced immunity in Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze against blister blight disease is mediated by nitric-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Swarnendu; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Panda, Koustubh; Acharya, Krishnendu

    2017-06-01

    Blister blight disease, caused by an obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen, Exobasidium vexans Massee is posing a serious threat for tea cultivation in Asia. As the use of chemical pesticides on tea leaves substantially increases the toxic risks of tea consumption, serious attempts are being made to control such pathogens by boosting the intrinsic natural defense responses against invading pathogens in tea plants. In this study, the nature and durability of resistance offered by chitosan and the possible mechanism of chitosan-induced defense induction in Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze plants against blister blight disease were investigated. Foliar application of 0.01% chitosan solution at 15 days interval not only reduced the blister blight incidence for two seasons, but also maintained the induced expressions of different defense related enzymes and total phenol content compared to the control. Defense responses induced by chitosan were found to be down regulated under nitric oxide (NO) deficient conditions in vivo, indicating that the observed chitosan-induced resistance is probably activated via NO signaling. Such role of NO in host defense response was further established by application of the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), which produced similar defense responses accomplished through chitosan treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that increased production of NO in chitosan-treated tea plants may play a critical role in triggering the innate defense responses effective against plant pathogens, including that causing the blister blight disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system.

  11. Blunted flow-mediated responses and diminished nitric oxide synthase expression in lymphatic thoracic ducts of a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawieja, Scott D; Gasheva, Olga; Zawieja, David C; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2016-02-01

    Shear-dependent inhibition of lymphatic thoracic duct (TD) contractility is principally mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Endothelial dysfunction and poor NO bioavailability are hallmarks of vasculature dysfunction in states of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). We tested the hypothesis that flow-dependent regulation of lymphatic contractility is impaired under conditions of MetSyn. We utilized a 7-wk high-fructose-fed male Sprague-Dawley rat model of MetSyn and determined the stretch- and flow-dependent contractile responses in an isobaric ex vivo TD preparation. TD diameters were tracked and contractile parameters were determined in response to different transmural pressures, imposed flow, exogenous NO stimulation by S-nitro-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), and inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) by l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging molecule 4-hydroxy-tempo (tempol). Expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in TD was determined using Western blot. Approximately 25% of the normal flow-mediated inhibition of contraction frequency was lost in TDs isolated from MetSyn rats despite a comparable SNAP response. Inhibition of NOS with l-NAME abolished the differences in the shear-dependent contraction frequency regulation between control and MetSyn TDs, whereas tempol did not restore the flow responses in MetSyn TDs. We found a significant reduction in eNOS expression in MetSyn TDs suggesting that diminished NO production is partially responsible for impaired flow response. Thus our data provide the first evidence that MetSyn conditions diminish eNOS expression in TD endothelium, thereby affecting the flow-mediated changes in TD lymphatic function. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Aciculatin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-mediated inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression via suppressing NF-κB and JNK/p38 MAPK activation pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chien-Chih

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Natural products have played a significant role in drug discovery and development. Inflammatory mediators such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 have been suggested to connect with various inflammatory diseases. In this study, we explored the anti-inflammatory potential of aciculatin (8-((2R,4S,5S,6R-tetrahydro-4,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-2H-pyran-2-yl-5-hydroxy-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl-7-methoxy-4H-chromen-4-one, one of main components of Chrysopogon aciculatis, by examining its effects on the expression and activity of iNOS and COX-2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated macrophages. Methods We used nitrate and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 assays to examine inhibitory effect of aciculatin on nitric oxide (NO and PGE2 levels in LPS-activated mouse RAW264.7 macrophages and further investigated the mechanisms of aciculatin suppressed LPS-mediated iNOS/COX-2 expression by western blot, RT-PCR, reporter gene assay and confocal microscope analysis. Results Aciculatin remarkably decreased the LPS (1 μg/mL-induced mRNA and protein expression of iNOS and COX-2 as well as their downstream products, NO and PGE2 respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner (1-10 μM. Such inhibition was found, via immunoblot analyses, reporter gene assays, and confocal microscope observations that aciculatin not only acts through significant suppression of LPS-induced NF-κB activation, an effect highly correlated with its inhibitory effect on LPS-induced IκB kinase (IKK activation, IκB degradation, NF-κB phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and binding of NF-κB to the κB motif of the iNOS and COX-2 promoters, but also suppressed phosphorylation of JNK/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that aciculatin exerts potent anti-inflammatory activity through its dual inhibitory effects on iNOS and COX-2 by regulating NF-κB and JNK/p38 MAPK pathways.

  13. Nitric oxide, afferent sensory nerves, and antioxidative enzymes in the mechanism of protection mediated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium(II) dimer and sodium hydrosulfide against aspirin-induced gastric damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierowski, Marcin; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Wojcik, Dagmara; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    Aspirin exerts side effects within the gastrointestinal tract. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon monoxide (CO) have been implicated in gastroprotection but the mechanism of beneficial action of these gaseous mediators against aspirin-induced damage has not been fully studied. We determined the involvement of afferent sensory neurons, calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP), lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide (NO) biosynthesis in gastroprotection of H2S-releasing NaHS and CO-releasing tricarbonyldichlororuthenium(II) dimer (CORM-2) against aspirin-induced injury. Wistar rats with or without capsaicin-induced denervation of sensory neurons were pretreated with vehicle, CORM-2 (5 mg/kg intragastrically), or NaHS (5 mg/kg intragastrically) with or without capsazepine (5 mg/kg intragastrically) or N G-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally). The areas of aspirin-induced lesions and gastric blood flow (GBF) were assessed by planimetry and laser flowmetry respectively. Gastric mucosal messenger RNA and/or protein expression of CGRP, heme oxygenase 1, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, interleukin-1β, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1), and superoxide dismutase was determined by real-time PCR or Western blot. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) content was determined by colorimetric assay. Aspirin caused gastric lesions, decreased GBF, and raised MDA content, but pretreatment with NaHS and CORM-2 reduced these effects. Capsaicin-induced denervation or co-treatment with capsazepine reversed the gastroprotective and vasodilatory effects of NaHS but not those of CORM-2. L-NNA reversed NaHS-induced gastroprotection and partly reduced CORM-2-induced gastroprotection. NaHS and CORM-2 decreased MDA and 4-HNE content, restoring GPx-1 protein expression. We conclude that H2S- but not CO-mediated gastroprotection against aspirin-induced injury involves afferent sensory nerves and partly NO activity. NaHS and CORM-2 prevented

  14. A nitric oxide-like factor mediates nonadrenergic-noncholinergic neurogenic relaxation of penile corpus cavernosum smooth muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, N.; Azadzoi, K M; Goldstein, I; Saenz de Tejada, I.

    1991-01-01

    This study was initiated to characterize nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) inhibitory neurotransmission in penile corpus cavernosum. Using organ baths, isometric tension measurements were made in strips of human and rabbit corpus cavernosum. In examining endothelium-mediated responses, cumulative additions of exogenous acetylcholine elicited dose-dependent relaxations which were significantly reduced or completely inhibited in tissues treated with NG-monomethyl L-arginine (L-NMMA; an inhibi...

  15. Evidence that nitric oxide may mediate the ovarian steroid-induced luteinizing hormone surge: involvement of excitatory amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, J J; Sahu, A; Kalra, P S; Kalra, S P

    1993-12-01

    The involvement of excitatory N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the hypothalamic control of pituitary LH secretion is well recognized. Recent evidence shows that nitric oxide (NO), a free radical gas, may act as neurotransmitter in the brain, and its efflux is stimulated by activation of NMDA receptors. Studies were undertaken to determine whether NO is involved in the hypothalamic release of LHRH and in the LH surge induced by progesterone (P) in estrogen-primed ovariectomized rats. Rats were ovariectomized and 2 weeks later received estradiol benzoate (30 micrograms sc) at 1000 h. Two days later, P was injected at 1000 h to potentiate the estradiol benzoate-induced LH surge in the afternoon. Serial blood samples were collected at hourly intervals from 1400-1800 h via an intraatrial cannula implanted the day before P injection. Additionally, at various times before onset of the LH surge at 1400 h, the rats were injected sc with one of three inhibitors of NO synthase, the enzyme that generates NO. Control, saline-injected rats showed unambiguous LH surges in the afternoon. However, either a single injection at 1000 h of NG-methyl-L-arginine (20 mg/kg) or three injections at 1000, 1200, and 1400 h of either Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (NAME, 40 mg/kg) or Nw-nitro-L-arginine (60 mg/kg) to inhibit NO efflux markedly suppressed the P-induced LH surge in the afternoon. To ascertain whether suppression of LH surge was due to blockade of hypothalamic LHRH release, a series of in vitro studies were performed in steroid-primed rats. First we examined the effects of sodium nitroprusside (NPS), a compound that spontaneously generates and releases NO. NPS increased basal and KCl-induced LHRH release in vitro from the medial basal hypothalamus-preoptic area and median eminence fragments. No direct effect of NO at the pituitary level was seen, since NPS did not alter basal or LHRH-induced LH in vitro release from hemipituitaries. In addition, we tested the effects of

  16. GLP-2-mediated up-regulation of intestinal blood flow and glucose uptake is nitric oxide-dependent in TPN-fed piglets 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Xinfu; Stoll, Barbara; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Our aim was to determine whether the intestinotrophic effects of GLP-2 are mediated by acute up-regulation of intestinal substrate utilization in TPN-fed piglets. METHODS: Twenty-four 12-day-old pigs, fitted with a portal flow probe and carotid, jugular and portal catheters, were...... fed by TPN for 7 days. On day 8, a group of pigs (n = 8) was infused intravenously with saline (control) for 4 hours and then with GLP-2 (500 pmol x kg(-1) x hour(-1), GLP-2) for 4 hours. (2)H-glucose and (13)C-phenylalanine were infused to estimate their kinetics and protein turnover. Another group......%) in TPN-fed piglets. GLP-2 also increased intestinal constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and endothelial NOS protein abundance. GLP-2 acutely increased PDV glucose uptake (+90%) and net lactate production (+79%). Co-infusion of GLP-2 plus L-NAME did not increase either PDV blood flow rate...

  17. Impairment by hypoxia or hypoxia/reoxygenation of nitric oxide-mediated relaxation in isolated monkey coronary artery: the role of intracellular superoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, Masashi; Yamamizu, Kohei; Geddawy, Ayman; Shimosato, Takashi; Imamura, Takeshi; Ayajiki, Kazuhide; Okamura, Tomio

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hypoxia or hypoxia/reoxygenation on vascular smooth muscle function, mechanical response of monkey coronary artery without endothelium was studied under normoxia, hypoxia, and hypoxia/reoxygenation. Hypoxia or hypoxia/reoxygenation impaired the relaxation by nitroglycerin or isosorbide dinitrate but not that by 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate or isoproterenol. Tempol restored the impaired relaxation by nitroglycerin or isosorbide dinitrate, but superoxide dismutase had no effect. Apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, improved the nitroglycerin-induced relaxation under hypoxia, but not under reoxygenation. Under combined treatment of apocynin with oxypurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor), rotenone (mitochondria electron transport inhibitor), or both, hypoxic impairment of vasorelaxation was restored more effectively. Similarly, impairment of the nitroglycerin-induced vasorelaxation under hypoxia/reoxygenation was restored by combined treatment with three inhibitors, apocynin, oxypurinol, and rotenone. Increase in superoxide production under hypoxia tended to be inhibited by apocynin and that under hypoxia/reoxygenation was abolished by combined treatment with three inhibitors. These findings suggest that increased intracellular superoxide production under hypoxia or hypoxia/reoxygenation attenuates vasodilation mediated with a nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase, but not adenylyl cyclase, signaling pathway. The main source of superoxide production under hypoxia seems to be different from that under reoxygenation: superoxide is produced by NADPH oxidase during hypoxia, whereas it is produced by xanthine oxidase, mitochondria, or both during reoxygenation.[Supplementary Figure: available only at http://dx.doi.org/10.1254/jphs.11031FP].

  18. Neuroprotective effect of allicin against traumatic brain injury via Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway-mediated anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Qi, Jun; Feng, Feng; Wang, Mao-de; Bao, Gang; Wang, Tuo; Xiang, Mu; Xie, Wan-Fu

    2014-03-01

    Allicin, one of the main biologically active compounds derived from garlic, has been shown to exert various anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities in in vitro and in vivo studies. Here, we sought to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of allicin against traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. We found that allicin treatment (10 and 50mg/kg, not 1mg/kg) significantly reduced brain edema and motor functional deficits, as well as apoptotic neuronal cell death in injured cortex. These protective effects could be observed even if the administration was delayed to 4h after injury. Moreover, allicin treatment decreased the expression levels of MDA and protein carbonyl, preserved the endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities, and suppressed the expression of inflammatory cytokines. The results of Western blot analysis showed that allicin increased the phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Blocking Akt/eNOS pathway activation by specific inhibitor LY294002 (10μL, 10mmol/L) or L-NIO (0.5mg/kg) partly reversed the protective effects of allicin and its anti-inflammatory activities. The allicin induced anti-oxidative activity was partly prevented by LY294002, but not L-NIO. In summary, our data strongly suggested that allicin treatment at an appropriate dose can exert protective effect against TBI through Akt/eNOS pathway-mediated anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The bystander cell-killing effect mediated by nitric oxide in normal human fibroblasts varies with irradiation dose but not with radiation quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yuichiro; Funayama, Tomoo; Mutou-Yoshihara, Yasuko; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the dependence of the bystander cell-killing effect on radiation dose and quality, and to elucidate related molecular mechanisms. Normal human fibroblast WI-38 cells were irradiated with 0.125 - 2 Gy of γ-rays or carbon ions and were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells. Survival rates of bystander cells were investigated using the colony formation assays, and nitrite concentrations in the medium were measured using the modified Saltzman method. Survival rates of bystander cells decreased with doses of γ-rays and carbon ions of ≤ 0.5 Gy. Treatment of the specific nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenger prevented reductions in survival rates of bystander cells. Moreover, nitrite concentrations increased with doses of less than 0.25 Gy (γ-rays) and 1 Gy (carbon ions). The dose responses of increased nitrite concentrations as well as survival reduction were similar between γ-rays and carbon ions. In addition, negative relationships were observed between survival rates and nitrite concentrations. The bystander cell-killing effect mediated by NO radicals in normal human fibroblasts depends on irradiation doses of up to 0.5 Gy, but not on radiation quality. NO radical production appears to be an important determinant of γ-ray- and carbon-ion-induced bystander effects.

  20. Atorvastatin restores arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction in rats: Modulation of nitric oxide signaling and inflammatory mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesavan, Manickam; Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Kannan, Kandasamy; Suresh, Subramaniyam; Gupta, Priyanka; Vijayakaran, Karunakaran; Sankar, Palanisamy; Kurade, Nitin Pandurang; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath, E-mail: snsarkar1911@rediffmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated whether atorvastatin, an extensively prescribed statin for reducing the risks of cardiovascular diseases, can reduce the risk of arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation in rats and whether the modulation could be linked to improvement in vascular NO signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91{sup st} day, blood was collected for measuring serum C-reactive protein. Thoracic aorta was isolated for assessing reactivity to phenylephrine, sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine; evaluating eNOS and iNOS mRNA expression and measuring NO production, while abdominal aorta was used for ELISA of cytokines, chemokine and vascular cell adhesion molecules. Histopathology was done in aortic arches. Arsenic did not alter phenylephrine-elicited contraction. Atorvastatin inhibited E{sub max} of phenylephrine, but it augmented the contractile response in aortic rings from arsenic-exposed animals. Sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation was not altered with any treatment. However, arsenic reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and affected aortic eNOS at the levels of mRNA expression, protein concentration, phosphorylation and NO production. Further, it increased aortic iNOS mRNA expression, iNOS-derived NO synthesis, production of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, VCAM, sICAM) and serum C-reactive protein and aortic vasculopathic lesions. Atorvastatin attenuated these arsenic-mediated functional, biochemical and structural alterations. Results show that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation by restoring endothelial function with improvement in NO signaling and attenuating production of pro-inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules. - Highlights: • We evaluated if atorvastatin reduce arsenic

  1. TRPV4 activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase resists nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by blocking CYP2E1-mediated redox toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Ratanesh K; Das, Suvarthi; Dattaroy, Diptadip; Chandrashekaran, Varun; Alhasson, Firas; Michelotti, Gregory; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Diehl, Anna Mae; Bell, P Darwin; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    NAFLD is a clinically progressive disease with steatosis, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and fibrosis being the stages where clinical intervention becomes necessary. Lack of early biomarkers and absence of a FDA approved drug obstructs efforts for effective treatment. NAFLD progression is strongly linked to a balance between liver injury, tissue regeneration and the functioning of endogenous defense mechanisms. The failure of the defense pathways to resist the tissue damage arising from redox stress, one of the "multiple hits" in disease progression, give rise to heightened inflammation and occasional fibrosis. We introduce an endogenous defense mechanism in the liver that is mediated by TRPV4, a transient receptor potential calcium-permeable ion channel that responds to the cytotoxic liver environment and negatively regulates CYP2E1, a cytochrome p450 enzyme. Using Trpv4-/- mice and cultured primary cells, we show that TRPV4 is activated both by damage associated molecular pattern HMGB1 and collagen in diseased Kupffer cells that in turn activate the endothelial NOS (NOS3) to release nitric oxide (NO). The diffusible NO acts in a paracrine fashion in neighboring hepatocytes to deactivate the redox toxicity induced by CYP2E1. We also find that CYP2E1-mediated TRPV4 repression in late stages causes an unrestricted progression of disease. Thus, TRPV4 functions as a sensor of cell stress in the diseased fatty liver and constitutes an endogenous defense molecule, a novel concept with potential for therapeutic approaches against NAFLD, perhaps also against hepatic drug toxicity in general. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. NCX 4040, a nitric oxide-donating aspirin derivative, inhibits Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of proinflammatory mediators in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Choe, So-Hui; Hyeon, Jin-Yi; Park, Hae Ryoun; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2015-12-05

    In this study, the effects and underlying mechanisms of NCX 4040, a nitric oxide (NO)-donating aspirin derivative, on the production of proinflammatory mediators were examined using murine macrophages exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen implicated in the etiology of periodontal disease. NCX 4040 significantly reduced P. intermedia LPS-induced production of inducible NO synthase (iNOS)-derived NO, IL-1β and IL-6 as well as their mRNA expression in RAW264.7 cells. Notably, NCX 4040 was much more effective than the parental compound aspirin in reducing LPS-induced production of inflammatory mediators. NCX 4040 induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in cells treated with P. intermedia LPS, and the suppressive effect of NCX 4040 on LPS-induced NO production was significantly reversed by SnPP, a competitive HO-1 inhibitor. NCX 4040 did not influence LPS-induced phosphorylation of JNK and p38. IκB-α degradation as well as nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activities of NF-κB p65 and p50 subunits induced by P. intermedia LPS were significantly reduced by NCX 4040. Besides, LPS-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 was significantly down-regulated by NCX 4040. Further, NCX 4040 elevated the SOCS1 mRNA in cells stimulated with LPS. This study indicates that NCX 4040 inhibits P. intermedia LPS-induced production of NO, IL-1β and IL-6 in murine macrophages through anti-inflammatory HO-1 induction and suppression of NF-κB, STAT1 and STAT3 activation, which is associated with the activation of SOCS1 signaling. NCX 4040 could potentially be a promising tool in the treatment of periodontal disease, although further studies are required to verify this. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure signals may modulate ChBF, we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler flowmetry to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40-80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (i.e. vasodilation and choroidal blood velocity (presumed orbital vessel dilation. Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure. We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA, thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the blood pressure-dependent regulation of ChBF.

  4. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Regulation of Gamma Interferon-Induced Bacteriostasis: Inhibition and Degradation of Human Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucke, Christian; MacKenzie, Colin R.; Adjogble, Koku D. Z.; Takikawa, Osamu; Däubener, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Tryptophan depletion resulting from indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity within the kynurenine pathway is one of the most prominent gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-inducible antimicrobial effector mechanisms in human cells. On the other hand, nitric oxide (NO) produced by the inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS) serves a more immunoregulatory role in human cells and thereby interacts with tryptophan depletion in a number of ways. We investigated the effects of NO on IDO gene transcription, protein synthesis, and enzyme activity as well as on IDO-mediated bacteriostasis in the human epithelial cell line RT4. IFN-γ-stimulated RT4 cells were able to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in an IDO-mediated fashion, and this bacteriostatic effect was abolished by endogenously produced NO. These findings were supported by experiments which showed that IDO activity in extracts of IFN-γ-stimulated cells is inhibited by the chemical NO donors diethylenetriamine diazeniumdiolate, S-nitroso-l-cysteine, and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine. Furthermore, we found that both endogenous and exogenous NO strongly reduced the level of IDO protein content in RT4 cells. This effect was not due to a decrease in IDO gene transcription or mRNA stability. By using inhibitors of proteasomal proteolytic activity, we showed that NO production led to an accelerated degradation of IDO protein in the proteasome. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that demonstrates that the IDO is degraded by the proteasome and that NO has an effect on IDO protein stability. PMID:15102781

  5. Nitric oxide involvement in the effect of acute lithium administration on the nonadrenergic noncholinergic-mediated relaxation of rat gastric fundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mehdi; Karimollah, Ali Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2007-01-01

    Lithium has largely met its initial promise as the first drug to be discovered in the modern era of psychopharmacology. However, the mechanism for its action remains an enigma. The aim of the present study was to verify the effect of acute lithium administration on the nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC)-mediated relaxation of rat isolated gastric fundus and to evaluate the role of nitric oxide pathway in this manner. The isolated rat gastric fundus strips were precontracted with 0.5 microM serotonin and electrical field stimulation (EFS) was applied at 5 Hz frequency to obtain NANC-mediated relaxation in the presence or absence of lithium (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 mM). Also, effects of combining lithium (0.1 mM) with the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME (0.03 microM) or the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (1 microM) on relaxant responses to EFS was investigated. Moreover, effects of combining lithium (1 mM) with 0.1 mM L-arginine (a precursor of NO) on neurogenic relaxation were assessed. Also, the effect of lithium (1 mM) on relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 1 nM-0.1 mM) and glyceryltrinitrate (GTN; 0.1-10 microM) was investigated. The NANC-mediated relaxation was significantly (Plithium in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Combination of lithium (0.1 mM) with L-NAME (0.03 microM), which separately had partial inhibitory effect on relaxations, significantly (Plithium (0.1 and 1 mM). Although L-arginine at 0.1 mM had no effect on relaxation to EFS, it prevented the inhibition by lithium (1 mM) of relaxant responses to EFS. Also, SNP and GTN produced concentration-dependent relaxation in precontracted rat gastric fundus which was not altered by lithium incubation (1 mM). Our experiments indicated that lithium likely by interfering with L-arginine/NO pathway in nitrergic nerve can result in impairment of NANC-mediated relaxation of rat gastric fundus.

  6. Involvement of nitric oxide-mediated alternative pathway in tolerance of wheat to drought stress by optimizing photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huahua; Huang, Junjun; Li, Yan; Li, Changan; Hou, Junjie; Liang, Weihong

    2016-10-01

    NO-mediated alternative pathway plays an important role in protecting wheat seedlings against drought stress through dissipating excessive reducing equivalents generated by photosynthesis. Alternative pathway (AP) has been proven to be involved in responses to various stresses. However, the mechanisms of AP in defense response to drought stress are still lacking. The aims of this work are to investigate the role of AP in drought tolerance and how AP is induced under drought stress using two wheat cultivars with different drought tolerance. Our results showed that Longchun22 cultivar is more tolerant to drought than 98SN146 cultivar. Seedlings exposed to drought led to a significant increase in AP, and it increased more in Longchun22. Furthermore, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, qP) decreased significantly in drought-treated seedlings, especially in 98SN146, indicating that photoinhibition occurred under drought stress. Pretreatment with SHAM, the malate-oxaloacetate shuttle activity and photosynthetic efficiency were further inhibited in drought-treated seedlings, resulting in more serious oxidative damage as indicated by higher levels of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, NO modulated AP under drought stress by increasing AOX1a expression and pyruvate content. Taken together, these results indicate that NO-mediated AP is involved in optimizing photosynthesis under drought stress by avoiding the over-reduction of photosynthetic electron transport chain, thus reducing reactive oxygen species production and oxidative damage in wheat leaves.

  7. Nitric oxide pathway-mediated relaxant effect of aqueous sesame leaves extract (Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn.) in the guinea-pig isolated aorta smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konan, André B; Datté, Jacques Y; Yapo, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    diclofenac and tetra-ethyl-ammonium (TEA) pretreatment of GPAPs induced a suppression of the relaxation caused by ESera, and produced a very significant rightward shifts of the CRC (16-fold) for diclofenac and increase the Emax. In contract, the relaxation caused by ACh was not significantly affected by diclofenac or by TEA. Conclusion Thus, the present results indicate clearly that the nitric oxide largely contribute to the relaxation effect of Esera and of ACh in GPAPs. In addition, their contractile effects are also mediated by cyclooxygenase activation, and probably the K+ channels involvement, that confirm the use of various preparations of Esera for the treatments of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:18505582

  8. Translocation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase to the plasma membrane by ATP is mediated by P2X and P2Y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Takayuki

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The translocation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS from the cytosol to the membrane is functionally coupled to the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors at synapses. Whereas there is abundant evidence indicating that ATP and nitric oxide are involved in nociceptive transmission, whether nNOS is activated by ATP remains unknown. We recently established a fluorescence imaging system for examining nNOS translocation in PC12 cells expressing a yellow fluorescence protein-tagged nNOS N-terminal mutant, nNOSNT-YFP, and examined the effect of ATP on nNOS translocation using the system. Results The translocation of nNOS was induced by ATP in the presence of NMDA and forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator. The purinergic P2X receptor agonist 2-MeSATP and the P2Y agonist UTP significantly enhanced nNOS translocation; and simultaneous stimulation with 2-MeSATP and UTP exhibited the same concentration-response curve for the translocation as obtained with ATP. ATP, 2-MeSATP, and UTP increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i in PC12 cells. Conversely, whereas the P2X receptor antagonist PPADS and the P2Y antagonist reactive blue-2 partially inhibited increases in the translocation of nNOS and [Ca2+]i by ATP, the non-selective P2 receptor antagonist suramin completely blocked them. In addition, the increase in the nNOS translocation by ATP was blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists and inhibitors of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, and Src kinase. Consistent with the expression of P2X and P2Y receptors in the spinal cord, ATP and UTP increased the [Ca2+]i in primary cultured spinal neurons. ATP potentiated and prolonged the [Ca2+]i increase produced by NMDA in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Furthermore, the selective P2X3/P2X2/3 antagonist A-317491 inhibited nNOS activation assessed by NO formation in spinal slices prepared from neuropathic pain model mice. Conclusion ATP is involved in n

  9. Nitric oxide pathway-mediated relaxant effect of aqueous sesame leaves extract (Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn.) in the guinea-pig isolated aorta smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konan, André B; Datté, Jacques Y; Yapo, Paul A

    2008-05-27

    -ethyl-ammonium (TEA) pretreatment of GPAPs induced a suppression of the relaxation caused by ESera, and produced a very significant rightward shifts of the CRC (16-fold) for diclofenac and increase the Emax. In contract, the relaxation caused by ACh was not significantly affected by diclofenac or by TEA. Thus, the present results indicate clearly that the nitric oxide largely contribute to the relaxation effect of Esera and of ACh in GPAPs. In addition, their contractile effects are also mediated by cyclooxygenase activation, and probably the K+ channels involvement, that confirm the use of various preparations of Esera for the treatments of cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Effect of nitric oxide scavengers, carboxy-PTIO on endotoxin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research evidence shows that sepsis-associated vascular relaxation is mediated by nitric oxide. Nitric oxide formation is stimulated by endotoxin, cytokines such as Tumor necrosis factor, and Interleukines. The stimulation is due to the activation of an inducible nitric oxide synthase, which transforms an amino acid ...

  11. Impaired Pulmonary Arterial Vasoconstriction and Nitric Oxide-Mediated Relaxation Underlie Severe Pulmonary Hypertension in Sugen-Hypoxia Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Helen; Hudalla, Hannes; Michael, Zoe; Filatava, Evgenia; Li, Jun; Zhu, Minglin; Possomato-Vieira, Jose; Dias-Junior, Carlos; Kourembanas, Stella; Khalil, Raouf A

    2017-12-06

    Pulmonary vasoreactivity could determine the responsiveness to vasodilators and in turn the prognosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). We hypothesized that pulmonary vasoreactivity is impaired, and examined the underlying mechanisms, in the sugen-hypoxia rat model of severe PH. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with sugen (20 mg/kg sc) and exposed to hypoxia (9% O2) for 3 weeks followed by 4 weeks in normoxia (Su/Hx), or treated with sugen alone (Su) or hypoxia alone (Hx) or neither (Nx). After hemodynamic measurements, the heart was assessed for right ventricular hypertrophy (Fulton's Index), the pulmonary artery, aorta and mesenteric arteries were isolated for vascular function studies, and contractile markers were measured in pulmonary artery using quantitative PCR. Other rats were used for morphometric analysis of pulmonary vascular remodeling. Right ventricular systolic pressure and Fulton's Index were higher in Su/Hx vs Su, Hx and Nx rats. Pulmonary vascular remodeling was more prominent in Su/Hx vs Nx rats. In pulmonary artery rings, contraction to high KCl (96 mM) was less in Su/Hx vs Nx and Su, and phenylephrine-induced contraction was reduced in Su/Hx vs Nx, Hx and Su. Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation was less in Su/Hx vs Nx and Hx, suggesting reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. ACh relaxation was inhibited by NOS and guanylate cyclase blockade in all groups, suggesting a role of the NO-cGMP pathway. Nitrate/nitrite production in response to ACh was less in Su/Hx vs Nx, supporting reduced endothelial NO production. Sodium nitroprusside (10-8 M) caused less relaxation in Su/Hx vs Nx, Hx and Su, suggesting decreased responsiveness of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) to vasodilators. Neither contraction nor relaxation differed in the aorta or mesenteric arteries of all groups. PCR analysis showed decreased expression of contractile markers in pulmonary artery of Su/Hx vs Nx. The reduced responsiveness to vasoconstrictors and NO-mediated

  12. In Premature Newborns Intraventricular Hemorrhage Causes Cerebral Vasospasm and Associated Neurodisability via Heme-Induced Inflammasome-Mediated Interleukin-1 Production and Nitric Oxide Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eisenhut

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIntraventricular hemorrhage (IVH occurs in 60–70% of neonates weighing 500–750 g and 10–20% of those weighing 1,000–1,500 g. All forms of IVH have been associated with neurocognitive deficits. Both subarachnoid and IVHs have been associated with delayed vasospasm leading to neurological deficits. Pathways linking hemoglobin release from blood clots to vasospasm include heme-induced activation of inflammasomes releasing interleukin-1 (IL-1 that can cause calcium dependent and independent vasospasm. Free hemoglobin is a potent scavenger of nitric oxide (NO. Depletion of NO, a potent endogenous vasodilator, has been associated with features of vasospasm.HypothesisIn premature newborns, IVH causes cerebral vasospasm and associated neurodisability via heme-induced increased inflammasome-mediated IL-1 production and NO depletion.Confirmation of hypothesis and implicationsThis hypothesis could be confirmed in the IVH animal model with visualization of any associated vasospasm by angiography and in newborns with IVH by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and correlation with cerebrospinal fluid IL-1 and NO metabolite levels. Confirmation of the role of heme in activation of inflammasomes causing IL-1 production and NO binding could be achieved by measuring the effect of heme scavenging interventions on IL-1 levels and levels of NO metabolites. In addition to removal of the accumulated blood of an IVH by drainage, irrigation, and fibrinolytic therapy intrathecal application of vasodilators and heme scavenging agents like haptoglobin and haemopexin and systemic treatment with inhibitors of inflammasomes like telmisartan could be used to prevent and treat cerebral vasospasm, and thus reduce the risk of associated brain injury in premature neonates.

  13. Role of Nitric oxide in regulation of H2O2 mediating tolerance of plants to abiotic stress: A synergistic signaling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taqi Ahmed Khan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between abiotic stress, nitric oxide (NO and Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is a challenging one. It is now clear that H2O2 and NO function as signaling molecules in plants. A wide range of abiotic stresses results in H2O2 generation, from a variety of sources and it has many essential roles in plant metabolism but at the same time, accumulation related to virtually any environmental stress is potentially damaging. NO is gaining increasing attention as a regulator of diverse pathophysiological processes in plant science, mainly due to its properties (free radicals, small size, no charge, short-lived, and highly diffusible across biological membranes and multifunctional roles in plant growth, development and regulation of remarkably broad myriad of plant cellular mechanisms. Various abiotic stresses can induce NO synthesis, but its origin and mode of action in plants have not yet been completely resolved. Recent studies on NO production have tended to high light the questions that still remain unanswered rather than telling us more about NO metabolism. But regarding NO-H2O2 signaling and functions, new findings have given an impression of the intricacy of NO-H2O2 related signaling networks against abiotic stresses. Cellular responses to NO-H2O2 are complex, with considerable cross-talk between responses to several abiotic stresses. In last few years, the role of NO in H2O2 mediating tolerance in plants to abiotic stress has established much consideration.

  14. Nitric oxide attenuates overexpression of Giα proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells from SHR: Role of ROS and ROS-mediated signaling.

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    Oli Sarkar

    Full Text Available Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR exhibit decreased levels of nitric oxide (NO that may be responsible for the overexpression of Giα proteins that has been shown as a contributing factor for the pathogenesis of hypertension in SHR. The present study was undertaken to investigate if increasing the intracellular levels of NO by NO donor S-Nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP could attenuate the enhanced expression of Giα proteins in VSMC from SHR and explore the underlying mechanisms responsible for this response. The expression of Giα proteins and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, growth factor receptors and c-Src was determined by Western blotting using specific antibodies. Treatment of VSMC from SHR with SNAP for 24 hrs decreased the enhanced expression of Giα-2 and Giα-3 proteins and hyperproliferation that was not reversed by 1H (1, 2, 4 oxadiazole (4, 3-a quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, however, PD98059, a MEK inhibitor restored the SNAP-induced decreased expression of Giα proteins towards control levels. In addition, the increased production of superoxide anion, NAD(PH oxidase activity, overexpression of AT1 receptor, Nox4, p22phox and p47phox proteins, enhanced levels of TBARS and protein carbonyl, increased phosphorylation of PDGF-R, EGF-R, c-Src and ERK1/2 in VSMC from SHR were all decreased to control levels by SNAP treatment. These results suggest that NO decreased the enhanced expression of Giα-2/3 proteins and hyperproliferation of VSMC from SHR by cGMP-independent mechanism and involves ROS and ROS-mediated transactivation of EGF-R/PDGF-R and MAP kinase signaling pathways.

  15. Protein kinase A-dependent Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation Mediates the Enhancement of Baroreflex Response by Adrenomedullin in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii of Rats

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    Ho I-Chun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenomedullin (ADM exerts its biological functions through the receptor-mediated enzymatic mechanisms that involve protein kinase A (PKA, or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. We previously demonstrated that the receptor-mediated cAMP/PKA pathway involves in ADM-enhanced baroreceptor reflex (BRR response. It remains unclear whether ADM may enhance BRR response via activation of nNOS-dependent mechanism in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS. Methods Intravenous injection of phenylephrine was administered to evoke the BRR before and at 10, 30, and 60 min after microinjection of the test agents into NTS of Sprague-Dawley rats. Western blotting analysis was used to measure the level and phosphorylation of proteins that involved in BRR-enhancing effects of ADM (0.2 pmol in NTS. The colocalization of PKA and nNOS was examined by immunohistochemical staining and observed with a laser confocal microscope. Results We found that ADM-induced enhancement of BRR response was blunted by microinjection of NPLA or Rp-8-Br-cGMP, a selective inhibitor of nNOS or protein kinase G (PKG respectively, into NTS. Western blot analysis further revealed that ADM induced an increase in the protein level of PKG-I which could be attenuated by co-microinjection with the ADM receptor antagonist ADM22-52 or NPLA. Moreover, we observed an increase in phosphorylation at Ser1416 of nNOS at 10, 30, and 60 min after intra-NTS administration of ADM. As such, nNOS/PKG signaling may also account for the enhancing effect of ADM on BRR response. Interestingly, biochemical evidence further showed that ADM-induced increase of nNOS phosphorylation was prevented by co-microinjection with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, a PKA inhibitor. The possibility of PKA-dependent nNOS activation was substantiated by immunohistochemical demonstration of co-localization of PKA and nNOS in putative NTS neurons. Conclusions The novel finding of this study is that the signal transduction cascade that

  16. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is responsible for nitric oxide release from murine pituicytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, T H; Rivier, C; Lee, S

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated whether pituicytes were able to produce and release nitric oxide (NO), and which type of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) would be responsible for this phenomenon. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 1 micro g/ml was used as inflammatory mediator. Because pituicytes are known to secrete...

  17. Nitric oxide and superoxide mediate diesel particle effects in cytokine-treated mice and murine lung epithelial cells--implications for susceptibility to traffic-related air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Nicholas D; LaGier, Adriana J; Slade, Ralph; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy H; Dye, Janice A

    2012-11-15

    Epidemiologic studies associate childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution with increased respiratory infections and asthmatic and allergic symptoms. The strongest associations between traffic exposure and negative health impacts are observed in individuals with respiratory inflammation. We hypothesized that interactions between nitric oxide (NO), increased during lung inflammatory responses, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased as a consequence of traffic exposure ─ played a key role in the increased susceptibility of these at-risk populations to traffic emissions. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) were used as surrogates for traffic particles. Murine lung epithelial (LA-4) cells and BALB/c mice were treated with a cytokine mixture (cytomix: TNFα, IL-1β, and IFNγ) to induce a generic inflammatory state. Cells were exposed to saline or DEP (25 μg/cm(2)) and examined for differential effects on redox balance and cytotoxicity. Likewise, mice undergoing nose-only inhalation exposure to air or DEP (2 mg/m(3) × 4 h/d × 2 d) were assessed for differential effects on lung inflammation, injury, antioxidant levels, and phagocyte ROS production. Cytomix treatment significantly increased LA-4 cell NO production though iNOS activation. Cytomix +  DEP-exposed cells incurred the greatest intracellular ROS production, with commensurate cytotoxicity, as these cells were unable to maintain redox balance. By contrast, saline + DEP-exposed cells were able to mount effective antioxidant responses. DEP effects were mediated by: (1) increased ROS including superoxide anion (O(2)(·-)), related to increased xanthine dehydrogenase expression and reduced cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity; and (2) increased peroxynitrite generation related to interaction of O(2)(·-) with cytokine-induced NO. Effects were partially reduced by superoxide dismutase (SOD) supplementation or by blocking iNOS induction. In mice, cytomix +  DEP-exposure resulted in

  18. Nitric oxide and superoxide mediate diesel particle effects in cytokine-treated mice and murine lung epithelial cells — implications for susceptibility to traffic-related air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies associate childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution with increased respiratory infections and asthmatic and allergic symptoms. The strongest associations between traffic exposure and negative health impacts are observed in individuals with respiratory inflammation. We hypothesized that interactions between nitric oxide (NO), increased during lung inflammatory responses, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased as a consequence of traffic exposure ─ played a key role in the increased susceptibility of these at-risk populations to traffic emissions. Methods Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) were used as surrogates for traffic particles. Murine lung epithelial (LA-4) cells and BALB/c mice were treated with a cytokine mixture (cytomix: TNFα, IL-1β, and IFNγ) to induce a generic inflammatory state. Cells were exposed to saline or DEP (25 μg/cm2) and examined for differential effects on redox balance and cytotoxicity. Likewise, mice undergoing nose-only inhalation exposure to air or DEP (2 mg/m3 × 4 h/d × 2 d) were assessed for differential effects on lung inflammation, injury, antioxidant levels, and phagocyte ROS production. Results Cytomix treatment significantly increased LA-4 cell NO production though iNOS activation. Cytomix +  DEP-exposed cells incurred the greatest intracellular ROS production, with commensurate cytotoxicity, as these cells were unable to maintain redox balance. By contrast, saline + DEP-exposed cells were able to mount effective antioxidant responses. DEP effects were mediated by: (1) increased ROS including superoxide anion (O2˙-), related to increased xanthine dehydrogenase expression and reduced cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity; and (2) increased peroxynitrite generation related to interaction of O2˙- with cytokine-induced NO. Effects were partially reduced by superoxide dismutase (SOD) supplementation or by blocking iNOS induction. In mice, cytomix +  DEP

  19. Nitric oxide and superoxide mediate diesel particle effects in cytokine-treated mice and murine lung epithelial cells — implications for susceptibility to traffic-related air pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzo Nicholas D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiologic studies associate childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution with increased respiratory infections and asthmatic and allergic symptoms. The strongest associations between traffic exposure and negative health impacts are observed in individuals with respiratory inflammation. We hypothesized that interactions between nitric oxide (NO, increased during lung inflammatory responses, and reactive oxygen species (ROS, increased as a consequence of traffic exposure ─ played a key role in the increased susceptibility of these at-risk populations to traffic emissions. Methods Diesel exhaust particles (DEP were used as surrogates for traffic particles. Murine lung epithelial (LA-4 cells and BALB/c mice were treated with a cytokine mixture (cytomix: TNFα, IL-1β, and IFNγ to induce a generic inflammatory state. Cells were exposed to saline or DEP (25 μg/cm2 and examined for differential effects on redox balance and cytotoxicity. Likewise, mice undergoing nose-only inhalation exposure to air or DEP (2 mg/m3 × 4 h/d × 2 d were assessed for differential effects on lung inflammation, injury, antioxidant levels, and phagocyte ROS production. Results Cytomix treatment significantly increased LA-4 cell NO production though iNOS activation. Cytomix + DEP-exposed cells incurred the greatest intracellular ROS production, with commensurate cytotoxicity, as these cells were unable to maintain redox balance. By contrast, saline + DEP-exposed cells were able to mount effective antioxidant responses. DEP effects were mediated by: (1 increased ROS including superoxide anion (O2˙-, related to increased xanthine dehydrogenase expression and reduced cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity; and (2 increased peroxynitrite generation related to interaction of O2˙- with cytokine-induced NO. Effects were partially reduced by superoxide dismutase (SOD supplementation or by blocking iNOS induction. In mice, cytomix

  20. Nitric oxide: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeberg, D A; Chaet, M S; Bass, R C; Arkovitz, M S; Garcia, V F

    1995-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a paracrine-acting gas enzymatically synthesized from L-arginine, is a unique biologic mediator that has been implicated in a myriad of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. It is an important regulator of vascular tone and may be the mediator of the hemodynamic changes involved in sepsis and cirrhosis. In addition, there is increasing evidence that NO is involved in coagulation, immune function, inhibitory innervation of the gastrointestinal tract, protection of gastrointestinal mucosa, and the hepatotoxicity of cirrhosis. It has already been speculated that NO may represent a point of control or intervention in a number of disease states. The purpose of this paper is to provide the surgeon with a broad overview of the scientific and clinical aspects of this important molecule.

  1. Activation of protein kinase C delta following cerebral ischemia leads to release of cytochrome C from the mitochondria via bad pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunjan R Dave

    Full Text Available The release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria following cerebral ischemia is a key event leading to cell death. The goal of the present study was to determine the mechanisms involved in post-ischemic activation of protein kinase c delta (δPKC that lead to cytochrome c release.We used a rat model of cardiac arrest as an in vivo model, and an in vitro analog, oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Cardiac arrest triggered translocation of δPKC to the mitochondrial fraction at 1 h reperfusion. In synaptosomes, the peptide inhibitor of δPKC blocked OGD-induced translocation to the mitochondria. We tested two potential pathways by which δPKC activation could lead to cytochrome c release: phosphorylation of phospholipid scramblase-3 (PLSCR3 and/or protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. Cardiac arrest increased levels of phosphorlyated PLSCR3; however, inhibition of δPKC translocation failed to affect the OGD-induced increase in PLSCR3 in synaptosomal mitochondria suggesting the post-ischemic phosphorylation of PLSCR3 is not mediated by δPKC. Inhibition of either δPKC or PP2A decreased cytochrome c release from synaptosomal mitochondria. Cardiac arrest results in the dephosphorylation of Bad and Bax, both downstream targets of PP2A promoting apoptosis. Inhibition of δPKC or PP2A prevented OGD-induced Bad, but not Bax, dephosphorylation. To complement these studies, we used proteomics to identify novel mitochondrial substrates of δPKC.We conclude that δPKC initiates cytochrome c release via phosphorylation of PP2A and subsequent dephosphorylation of Bad and identified δPKC, PP2A and additional mitochondrial proteins as potential therapeutic targets for ischemic neuroprotection.

  2. Harvesting clues from genome wide transcriptome analysis for exploring thalidomide mediated anomalies in eye development of chick embryo: Nitric oxide rectifies the thalidomide mediated anomalies by swinging back the system to normal transcriptome pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pavitra; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Kathirvel, Priyadarshan; Veeriah, Vimal; Dutta, Priya; Sankaranarayanan, Kavitha; Gupta, Ravi; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-02-01

    Thalidomide, the notorious teratogen is known to cause various developmental abnormalities, among which a range of eye deformations are very common. From the clinical point of view, it is necessary to pinpoint the mechanisms of teratogens that tune the gene expression. However, to our knowledge, the molecular basis of eye deformities under thalidomide treatmenthas not been reported so far. Present study focuses on the possible mechanism by which thalidomide affects eye development and the role of Nitric Oxide in recovering thalidomide-mediated anomalies of eye development using chick embryo and zebrafish models with transcriptome analysis. Transcriptome analysis showed that 403 genes were up-regulated and 223 genes were down-regulated significantly in thalidomide pre-treated embryos. 8% of the significantly modulated genes have been implicated in eye development including Pax6, OTX2, Dkk1 and Shh. A wide range of biological process and molecular function was affected by thalidomide exposure. Biological Processes including structural constituent of eye lens and Molecular functions such as visual perception and retinal metabolic process formed strong annotation clustersindicating the adverse effects of thalidomide on eye development and function. Here, we have discussed the whole embryo transcriptome with the expression of PAX6, SOX2, and CRYAAgenes from developing eyes. Our experimental data showing structural and functional aspects includingeye size, lens transparency and optic nerve activity and bioinformatics analyses of transcriptome suggest that NO could partially protect thalidomide treated embryos from its devastating effects on eye development and function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  3. Peroxynitrite Chemistry Derived from Nitric Oxide Reaction with a Cu(II)-OOH Species and a new Copper Mediated NO Reductive Coupling Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghee; Siegler, Maxime A.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2014-01-01

    New peroxynitrite-copper chemistry ensues via addition of nitric oxide (•NO(g)) to a CuII-hydroperoxo species. In characterizing the system, the ligand-Cu(I) complex was shown to effect •NO(g) reductive coupling, a new reaction type. Biological implications are discussed. PMID:24322625

  4. Peroxynitrite chemistry derived from nitric oxide reaction with a Cu(II)-OOH species and a copper mediated NO reductive coupling reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghee; Siegler, Maxime A; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2014-03-18

    New peroxynitrite-copper chemistry ensues via addition of nitric oxide (˙NO(g)) to a Cu(II)-hydroperoxo species. In characterizing the system, the ligand-Cu(i) complex was shown to effect a seldom observed ˙NO(g) reductive coupling reaction. Biological implications are discussed.

  5. Human urinary excretion profile after smoking and oral administration of ( sup 14 C)delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, E.; Gillespie, H.K.; Halldin, M.M. (BMC, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1990-05-01

    The urinary excretion profiles of delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) metabolites have been evaluated in two chronic and two naive marijuana users after smoking and oral administration of ({sup 14}C)delta 1-THC. Urine was collected for five days after each administration route and analyzed for total delta 1-THC metabolites by radioactivity determination, for delta 1-THC-7-oic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography, and for cross-reacting cannabinoids by the EMIT d.a.u. cannabinoid assay. The average urinary excretion half-life of {sup 14}C-labeled delta 1-THC metabolites was calculated to be 18.2 +/- 4.9 h (+/- SD). The excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings were similar to the excretion profile of {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites in the naive users. However, in the chronic users the excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings did not resemble the radioactive excretion due to the heavy influence from previous Cannabis use. Between 8-14% of the radioactive dose was recovered in the urine in both user groups after oral administration. Lower urinary recovery was obtained both in the chronic and naive users after smoking--5 and 2%, respectively.

  6. Nitric oxide supersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Thomsen, L L

    1993-01-01

    Nitroglycerin, which may be regarded as a prodrug for nitric oxide, induces a mild to moderate headache in healthy subjects. In order to study whether migraine patients are more sensitive to nitric oxide than non-migrainous subjects, four different doses of intravenous nitroglycerin were given...... previously shown a similar supersensitivity to histamine which in human cerebral arteries activates endothelial H1 receptors and causes endothelial production of nitric oxide. Migraine patients are thus supersensitive to exogenous nitric oxide from nitroglycerin as well as to endothelially produced nitric...... oxide. It is suggested that nitric oxide may be partially or completely responsible for migraine pain....

  7. Enhanced Abscisic Acid-Mediated Responses in nia1nia2noa1-2 Triple Mutant Impaired in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-Dependent Nitric Oxide Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge; León, José

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates a wide range of plant processes from development to environmental adaptation. Despite its reported regulatory functions, it remains unclear how NO is synthesized in plants. We have generated a triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant that is impaired in nitrate reductase (NIA/NR)- and Nitric Oxide-Associated1 (AtNOA1)-mediated NO biosynthetic pathways. NO content in roots of nia1nia2 and noa1-2 plants was lower than in wild-type plants and below the detection limit in nia1nia2noa1-2 plants. NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated biosynthesis of NO were thus active and responsible for most of the NO production in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The nia1nia2noa1-2 plants displayed reduced size, fertility, and seed germination potential but increased dormancy and resistance to water deficit. The increasing deficiency in NO of nia1nia2, noa1-2, and nia1nia2noa1-2 plants correlated with increased seed dormancy, hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) in seed germination and establishment, as well as dehydration resistance. In nia1nia2noa1-2 plants, enhanced drought tolerance was due to a very efficient stomata closure and inhibition of opening by ABA, thus uncoupling NO from ABA-triggered responses in NO-deficient guard cells. The NO-deficient mutants in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated pathways in combination with the triple mutant will be useful tools to functionally characterize the role of NO and the contribution of both biosynthetic pathways in regulating plant development and defense. PMID:20007448

  8. Enhanced abscisic acid-mediated responses in nia1nia2noa1-2 triple mutant impaired in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-dependent nitric oxide biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge; León, José

    2010-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates a wide range of plant processes from development to environmental adaptation. Despite its reported regulatory functions, it remains unclear how NO is synthesized in plants. We have generated a triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant that is impaired in nitrate reductase (NIA/NR)- and Nitric Oxide-Associated1 (AtNOA1)-mediated NO biosynthetic pathways. NO content in roots of nia1nia2 and noa1-2 plants was lower than in wild-type plants and below the detection limit in nia1nia2noa1-2 plants. NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated biosynthesis of NO were thus active and responsible for most of the NO production in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The nia1nia2noa1-2 plants displayed reduced size, fertility, and seed germination potential but increased dormancy and resistance to water deficit. The increasing deficiency in NO of nia1nia2, noa1-2, and nia1nia2noa1-2 plants correlated with increased seed dormancy, hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) in seed germination and establishment, as well as dehydration resistance. In nia1nia2noa1-2 plants, enhanced drought tolerance was due to a very efficient stomata closure and inhibition of opening by ABA, thus uncoupling NO from ABA-triggered responses in NO-deficient guard cells. The NO-deficient mutants in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated pathways in combination with the triple mutant will be useful tools to functionally characterize the role of NO and the contribution of both biosynthetic pathways in regulating plant development and defense.

  9. An in vitro co-culture mouse model demonstrates efficient vaccine-mediated control of Francisella tularensis SCHU S4 and identifies nitric oxide as a predictor of efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Golovlev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular bacterium and cell-mediated immunity is critical for protection, but mechanisms of protection against highly virulent variants, such as the prototypic strain F. tularensis strain SCHU S4, are poorly understood. To this end, we established a co-culture system, based on splenocytes from naïve or immunized mice and in vitro infected bone marrow-derived macrophages, that allowed assessment of mechanisms controlling infection with F. tularensis. We utilized the system to understand why the clpB gene deletion mutant, ΔclpB, of SCHU S4 shows superior efficacy as a vaccine in the mouse model as compared to the existing human vaccine, the live vaccine strain (LVS. Compared to naïve splenocytes, ΔclpB- or LVS-immune splenocytes conferred very significant control of a SCHU S4 infection and the ΔclpB-immune splenocytes were superior to the other splenocytes. Cultures with the latter splenocytes also contained higher levels of IFN-gamma and nitric oxide, and T cells expressing combinations of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-17 than did cultures with LVS-immune splenocytes. There was strong inverse correlation between bacterial replication and levels of nitrite, an end product of nitric oxide, and essentially no control was observed when BMDM from iNOS-/- mice were infected. Collectively, the mouse co-culture model identified a critical role of nitric oxide for protection against a highly virulent strain of F. tularensis.

  10. Calcium fluxes cause nuclear shrinkage and the translocation of phospholipase C-delta1 into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masashi; Taguchi, Katsutoshi; Maekawa, Shohei; Fukami, Kiyoko; Yagisawa, Hitoshi

    2010-03-26

    Phospholipase C-delta1 (PLCdelta1) is the most fundamental form of the eukaryotic PLC and thought to play important roles in the regulation of cells. We previously reported that PLCdelta1 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus, and an influx of Ca2+ triggers the nuclear import of PLCdelta1 via Ca2+-dependent interaction with importin beta1, although the physiological meaning of this is unclear. Here we have examined the distribution of PLCdelta1 using primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons. Treatment of 7DIV neurons with ionomycin or thapsigargin caused the nuclear localization of PLCdelta1 as has been observed in other cell lines. Similar results were obtained with neurons treated with glutamate, suggesting that the nuclear localization of PLCdelta1 plays some roles in excitotoxicity associated with ischemic stress. Generally, cells undergoing ischemic or hypoxic cell death show nuclear shrinkage. We confirmed that a massive influx of Ca2+ caused similar results. Furthermore, overexpression of GFP-PLCdelta1 facilitated ionomycin-induced nuclear shrinkage in embryonic fibroblasts derived from PLCdelta1 gene-knockout mice (PLCdelta1KO-MEF). By contrast, an E341A mutant that cannot bind with importin beta1 and be imported into the nucleus by ionomycin and also lacks enzymatic activity did not cause nuclear shrinkage in PLCdelta1KO-MEF. Nuclear translocation and the PLC activity of PLCdelta1, therefore, may regulate the nuclear shape by controlling the nuclear scaffold during stress-induced cell death caused by high levels of Ca2+. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Disruption of neuronal nitric oxide synthase dimerization contributes to the development of Alzheimer's disease: Involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5-mediated phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase at Ser(293).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Park, Jung-Hyun; Jo, Inho; Song, Kee-Ho; Han, Jung-Soo; Park, Seung Hwa; Han, Seol-Heui; Cho, Du-Hyong

    2016-10-01

    Although previous studies have suggested that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-derived NO has neuroprotective effects on the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether and how disruption of nNOS dimerization contributes to the development of AD. No differences in synaptic number or expression of synaptic markers, including synaptophysin and postsynaptic density 95, were found in the cortex of 5 × FAD mice, which possess 5 familial AD mutations, at 6 months of age compared with control littermates. nNOS dimerization was disrupted in the 5 × FAD cortex, accompanied by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The subcellular distribution of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) shifted more diffusely toward a cytosolic compartment, but there was no change in total expression. Furthermore, the levels of p25, a CDK5 activator, increased significantly and it colocalized with nNOS in the 5 × FAD cortex. In silico analysis revealed that a new nNOS-specific GSP (glycine-serine-proline) motif was well-conserved across species at nNOS-Ser(293), which is located ahead of the N-terminal hook. This motif was not present in the closely related isoform, endothelial NOS. Motif scan analysis also predicted that CDK5 can phosphorylate nNOS-Ser(293) with a high likelihood. An in vitro phosphorylation assay clearly showed that CDK5/p25 does indeed phosphorylate nNOS-Ser(293). Finally, nNOS-S293D mutant, a phosphomimetic form of nNOS-Ser(293), and nNOS-S293A mutant, a neutral form of nNOS-Ser(293), significantly decreased nNOS dimerization and NO production. Taken together, our results demonstrate that nNOS dimers are disrupted in the 5 × FAD cortex, and nNOS-Ser(293), a potential site of CDK5 phosphorylation, may be involved in the decrease in nNOS dimerization and NO production, and the development of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization....... From the perspective of mediatization research, the most important effect of the media stems from their embeddedness in culture and society....

  13. Minicircle DNA-mediated endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene transfer enhances angiogenic responses of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Nadeeka; Gurusinghe, Saliya; Chen, Haiying; Chen, Shuangfeng; Wang, Le-Xin; Lim, Shiang Y; Strappe, Padraig

    2016-04-01

    Non-viral-based gene modification of adult stem cells with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) may enhance production of nitric oxide and promote angiogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) derived from endothelial cells is a pleiotropic diffusible gas with positive effects on maintaining vascular tone and promoting wound healing and angiogenesis. Adult stem cells may enhance angiogenesis through expression of bioactive molecules, and their genetic modification to express eNOS may promote NO production and subsequent cellular responses. Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) were transfected with a minicircle DNA vector expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or eNOS. Transfected cells were analysed for eNOS expression and NO production and for their ability to form in vitro capillary tubules and cell migration. Transcriptional activity of angiogenesis-associated genes, CD31, VEGF-A, PDGFRα, FGF2, and FGFR2, were analysed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Minicircle vectors expressing GFP (MC-GFP) were used to transfect HEK293T cells and rBMSCs, and were compared to a larger parental vector (P-GFP). MC-GFP showed significantly higher transfection in HEK293T cells (55.51 ± 3.3 %) and in rBMSC (18.65 ± 1.05 %) compared to P-GFP in HEK293T cells (43.4 ± 4.9 %) and rBMSC (15.21 ± 0.22 %). MC-eNOS vectors showed higher transfection efficiency (21 ± 3 %) compared to P-eNOS (9 ± 1 %) and also generated higher NO levels. In vitro capillary tubule formation assays showed both MC-eNOS and P-eNOS gene-modified rBMSCs formed longer (14.66 ± 0.55 mm and 13.58 ± 0.68 mm, respectively) and a greater number of tubules (56.33 ± 3.51 and 51 ± 4, respectively) compared to controls, which was reduced with the NOS inhibitor L-NAME. In an in vitro wound healing assay, MC-eNOS transfected cells showed greater migration which was also reversed by L-NAME treatment. Finally, gene expression analysis in MC-eNOS transfected cells showed significant

  14. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung [Department of Anesthesiology, Health Sciences Center L4 Rm 081, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Rebecchi, Mario, E-mail: Mario.rebecchi@SBUmed.org [Department of Anesthesiology, Health Sciences Center L4 Rm 081, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  15. LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage CAT-2-mediated l-arginine uptake and nitric oxide biosynthesis is inhibited by omega fatty acid lipid emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; Huang, Chuanjiang; Zhao, Yunzhao; Wang, Bin; Ren, Jianan; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid (ω-3 FA) lipid emulsion has been reported to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production and alter inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages. However, the role of cellular uptake of l-arginine and iNOS transcription in ω-3 FA emulsion-induced inhibition of NO has not been explored. In addition, cationic amino acid transporter-2 (CAT-2) can regulate iNOS activity. The effect of ω-3 FA emulsion on CAT-2 expression is unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that ω-3 FA emulsion pretreatment would decrease the production of NO in LPS-stimulated macrophages and that this effect would occur through alterations in the cellular uptake of l-arginine and CAT-2 expression, in addition to iNOS expression. Confluent immortalized murine macrophages (RAW264.7cells) were incubated with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, ω-3 FA emulsion, or an isoenergetic ω-6 lipid emulsion for 4 h. The cells were washed and then stimulated with LPS (1 μg/mL) or media alone for 12 or 24 h before harvesting. Greiss reagent was used to assess NO production of plate well supernatants. Cellular uptake of l-arginine was assessed through [(3)H]-l-arginine. The expression of iNOS and CAT-2 mRNA in harvested RAW264.7 was quantified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. NO production of unstimulated RAW264.7 cells was similar in all groups. After LPS stimulation, ω-3 FA pretreatment at 12 and 24 h produced significantly less NO (P anti-inflammatory effects, ω-3 FA lipid emulsion also significantly lowers NO production and l-arginine transport through altered expression of iNOS and CAT-2 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of HYAL2 in LSS-induced glycocalyx impairment and the PKA-mediated decrease in eNOS-Ser-633 phosphorylation and nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangquan; Chen, Liang; Ye, Peng; Wang, Zhimei; Zhang, Junjie; Ye, Fei; Chen, Shaoliang

    2016-12-15

    Hyaluronan (HA) in the endothelial glycocalyx serves as a mechanotransducer for high-shear-stress-stimulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) production. Low shear stress (LSS) has been shown to contribute to endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis by impairing the barrier and mechanotransduction properties of the glycocalyx. Here we focus on the possible role of hyaluronidase 2 (HYAL2) in LSS-induced glycocalyx impairment and the resulting alterations in eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We show that LSS strongly activates HYAL2 to degrade HA in the glycocalyx. The dephosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-633 under LSS was triggered after HA degradation by hyaluronidase and prevented by repairing the glycocalyx with high-molecular weight hyaluronan. Knocking down HYAL2 in HUVECs protected against HA degradation in the glycocalyx by inhibiting the expression and activity of HYAL2 and further blocked the dephosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-633 and the decrease in NO production in response to LSS. The LSS-induced dephosphorylation of PKA was completely abrogated in HYAL2 siRNA-transfected HUVECs. The LSS-induced dephosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-633 was also reversed by the PKA activator 8-Br-cAMP. We thus suggest that LSS inhibits eNOS-Ser-633 phosphorylation and, at least partially, NO production by activating HYAL2 to degrade HA in the glycocalyx. © 2016 Kong et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Inducible nitric oxide synthase mediates DNA double strand breaks in Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-induced leukemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydoun, Hicham H; Cherian, Mathew A; Green, Patrick; Ratner, Lee

    2015-08-12

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive and fatal malignancy of CD4(+) T-lymphocytes infected by the Human T-Cell Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1). The molecular mechanisms of transformation in ATLL have not been fully elucidated. However, genomic instability and cumulative DNA damage during the long period of latency is believed to be essential for HTLV-1 induced leukemogenesis. In addition, constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway was found to be a critical determinant for transformation. Whether a connection exists between NF-κB activation and accumulation of DNA damage is not clear. We recently found that the HTLV-1 viral oncoprotein, Tax, the activator of the NF-κB pathway, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we investigated whether any of the NF-κB target genes are critical in inducing DSBs. Of note, we found that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) that catalyzes the production of nitric oxide (NO) in macrophages, neutrophils and T-cells is over expressed in HTLV-1 infected and Tax-expressing cells. Interestingly, we show that in HTLV-1 infected cells, iNOS expression is Tax-dependent and specifically requires the activation of the classical NF-κB and JAK/STAT pathways. A dramatic reduction of DSBs was observed when NO production was inhibited, indicating that Tax induces DSBs through the activation of NO synthesis. Determination of the impact of NO on HTLV-1-induced leukemogenesis opens a new area for treatment or prevention of ATLL and perhaps other cancers in which NO is produced.

  18. The Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in Perfluorooctanoic Acid-Induced Developmental Cardiotoxicity and l-Carnitine Mediated Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA is an environmental contaminant that could induce developmental cardiotoxicity in a chicken embryo, which may be alleviated by l-carnitine. To explore the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO in such changes and the potential effects of l-carnitine, fertile chicken eggs were exposed to PFOA via an air cell injection, with or without l-carnitine co-treatment. The ROS and NO levels in chicken embryo hearts were determined with electron spin resonance (ESR, and the protein levels of the nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in chicken embryo hearts were assessed with western blotting. The results of ESR indicated that PFOA exposure induced an elevation in the ROS levels in ED19 chicken embryo hearts and hatchling chicken hearts, while l-carnitine could alleviate such changes. Meanwhile, increased NO levels were observed in ED19 embryo hearts and hatchling hearts following PFOA exposure, while l-carnitine co-treatment exerted modulatory effects. Western blotting revealed that p65 translocation in ED19 embryo hearts and hatchling hearts was enhanced by PFOA, while l-carnitine co-treatment alleviated such changes. iNOS expression levels in ED19 embryo hearts followed the same pattern as NO levels, while a suppression of expression was observed in hatchling hearts exposed to PFOA. ROS/NF-κB p65 and iNOS/NO seem to be involved in the late stage (ED19 and post hatch of PFOA-induced developmental cardiotoxicity in a chicken embryo. l-carnitine could exert anti-oxidant and NO modulatory effects in the developing chicken embryo hearts, which likely contribute to its cardioprotective effects.

  19. Proteomic analysis of human bladder epithelial cells by 2D blue native SDS-PAGE reveals TCDD-induced alterations of calcium and iron homeostasis possibly mediated by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nisha; Pink, Mario; Petrat, Frank; Rettenmeier, Albert W; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2015-01-02

    A proteomic analysis of the interaction among multiprotein complexes involved in 2,3,7,8-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-mediated toxicity in urinary bladder epithelial RT4 cells was performed using two-dimensional blue native SDS-PAGE (2D BN/SDS-PAGE). To enrich the protein complexes, unexposed and TCDD-exposed cells were fractionated. BN/SDS-PAGE of the resulting fractions led to an effective separation of proteins and protein complexes of various origins, including cell membrane, mitochondria, and other intracellular compartments. Major differences between the proteome of control and exposed cells involved the alteration of many calcium-regulated proteins (calmodulin, protein S100-A2, annexin A5, annexin A10, gelsolin isoform b) and iron-regulated proteins (ferritin, heme-binding protein 2, transferrin). On the basis of these findings, the intracellular calcium concentration was determined, revealing a significant increase after 24 h of exposure to TCDD. Moreover, the concentration of the labile iron pool (LIP) was also significantly elevated in TCDD-exposed cells. This increase was strongly inhibited by the calmodulin (CaM) antagonist W-7, which pointed toward a possible interaction between iron and calcium signaling. Because nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly enhanced in TCDD-exposed cells and was also inhibited by W-7, we hypothesize that alterations in calcium and iron homeostasis upon exposure to TCDD may be linked through NO generated by CaM-activated nitric oxide synthase. In our model, we propose that NO produced upon TCDD exposure interacts with the iron centers of iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs) that modulate the alteration of ferritin and transferrin, resulting in an augmented cellular LIP and, hence, increased toxicity.

  20. Expression of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunits in amoeboid microglia mediates production of nitric oxide via NF-κB signaling pathway and oligodendrocyte cell death in hypoxic postnatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Madhuvika; Sivakumar, Viswanathan; Lu, Jia; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2011-04-01

    The present study was focused on identifying the expression of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits on activated microglia and to determine their role in the pathogenesis of periventricular white matter damage (PWMD) in neonatal rats following hypoxia. One day old wistar rats were subjected to hypoxia (5% O(2) ; 95% N(2) ) and the mRNA and protein expression of NMDAR subunits (NR1, NR2A-D, and NR3A) in the periventricular white matter (PWM) was determined at different time points (3,24 h, 3, 7, and 14 days) following hypoxic exposure. Immunoexpression of NR1 and NR2A-D was localized in amoeboid microglial cells (AMC) suggesting the presence of functional NMDARs in them. The expression of NMDAR in primary microglial cultures was ascertained by RT-PCR analysis and double immunofluorescence studies. The functionality of the microglial NMDAR in cultured microglial cells was examined by monitoring calcium movements in cells with fura-2. In primary microglial cultures, hypoxia induced the nuclear translocation of NF-κB which was suppressed by administration of MK801, an NMDAR antagonist. MK801 also down regulated the hypoxia-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) production by microglia which may be mediated by the NF-κB signaling pathway. NO produced by microglia is known to cause death of oligodendrocytes in the developing PWM. In this connection, pharmacological agents such as MK801, BAY (NF-κB inhibitor), and 1400w (iNOS inhibitor) proved to be beneficial since they reduced the hypoxia-induced iNOS expression, NO production, and a corresponding reduction in the death of oligodendrocytes following hypoxia. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. U-Bang-Haequi Tang: A Herbal Prescription that Prevents Acute Inflammation through Inhibition of NF-κB-Mediated Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hwangbo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since antiquity, medical herbs have been prescribed for both treatment and preventative purposes. Herbal formulas are used to reduce toxicity as well as increase efficacy in traditional Korean medicine. U-bang-haequi tang (UBT is a herbal prescription containing Arctii fructus and Forsythia suspensa as its main components and has treated many human diseases in traditional Korean medicine. This research investigated the effects of UBT against an acute phase of inflammation. For this, we measured induction of nitric oxide (NO and related proteins in macrophage cell line stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Further, paw swelling was measured in carrageenan-treated rats. Carrageenan significantly induced activation of inflammatory cells and increases in paw volume, whereas oral administration of 0.3 or 1 g/kg/day of UBT inhibited the acute inflammatory response. In RAW264.7 cells, UBT inhibited mRNA and protein expression levels of iNOS. UBT treatment also blocked elevation of NO production, nuclear translocation of NF-κB, phosphorylation of Iκ-Bα induced by LPS. Moreover, UBT treatment significantly blocked the phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases by LPS. In conclusion, UBT prevented both acute inflammation in rats as well as LPS-induced NO and iNOS gene expression through inhibition of NF-κB in RAW264.7 cells.

  2. Nitric Oxide Synthase-Mediated Phytoalexin Accumulation in Soybean Cotyledons in Response to the Diaporthe phaseolorum f. sp. meridionalis Elicitor1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modolo, Luzia Valentina; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Braga, Márcia Regina; Salgado, Ione

    2002-01-01

    Phytoalexin biosynthesis is part of the defense mechanism of soybean (Glycine max) plants against attack by the fungus Diaporthe phaseolorum f. sp. meridionalis (Dpm), the causal agent of stem canker disease. The treatment of soybean cotyledons with Dpm elicitor or with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, resulted in a high accumulation of phytoalexins. This response did not occur when SNP was replaced by ferricyanide, a structural analog of SNP devoid of the NO moiety. Phytoalexin accumulation induced by the fungal elicitor, but not by SNP, was prevented when cotyledons were pretreated with NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The Dpm elicitor also induced NOS activity in soybean tissues proximal to the site of inoculation. The induced NOS activity was Ca2+- and NADPH-dependent and was sensitive to the NOS inhibitors NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, aminoguanidine, and l-N6-(iminoethyl) lysine. NOS activity was not observed in SNP-elicited tissues. An antibody to brain NOS labeled a 166-kD protein in elicited and nonelicited cotyledons. Isoflavones (daidzein and genistein), pterocarpans (glyceollins), and flavones (apigenin and luteolin) were identified after exposure to the elicitor or SNP, although the accumulation of glyceollins and apigenin was limited in SNP-elicited compared with fungal-elicited cotyledons. NOS activity preceded the accumulation of these flavonoids in tissues treated with the Dpm elicitor. The accumulation of these metabolites was faster in SNP-elicited than in fungal-elicited cotyledons. We conclude that the response of soybean cotyledons to Dpm elicitor involves NO formation via a constitutive NOS-like enzyme that triggers the biosynthesis of antimicrobial flavonoids. PMID:12427995

  3. Nitric oxide increases the spontaneous firing rate of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro via a cyclic GMP-mediated PKG-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podda, Maria Vittoria; Marcocci, Maria Elena; Oggiano, Leonardo; D'Ascenzo, Marcello; Tolu, Eusebio; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Azzena, Gian Battista; Grassi, Claudio

    2004-10-01

    The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on the discharge rate of medial vestibular nucleus neurons (MVNn) were investigated in rat brainstem slices. The NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 200 microM) caused a marked enhancement (+36.7%) of MVNn spontaneous firing rate, which was prevented by the NO-scavenger, carboxy-PTIO (300 microM). The SNP effects were not modified (+37.4%) by synaptic uncoupling, suggesting that NO influences intrinsic membrane properties of MVNn rather than the synaptic input they receive. The excitatory action of SNP was virtually abolished by slice pretreatment with the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (10 microM), and it was mimicked (+33.1%) by the cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP (400 microM). Protein kinase G (PKG) and cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) were both excluded as downstream effectors of the NO/cGMP-induced excitation. However, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel blockers, L-cis-diltiazem (LCD, 100 microM) and Sp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS (100 microM), significantly reduced the firing rate increase produced by 8-Br-cGMP. Moreover, LCD alone decreased spontaneous MVNn firing (-19.7%), suggesting that putative CNG channels may contribute to the tonic control of resting MVNn discharge. 8-Br-cAMP (1 mM) also elicited excitatory effects in MVNn (+40.8%), which occluded those induced by 8-Br-cGMP, indicating that the two nucleotides share a common target. Finally, nested-polymerase chain reaction assay revealed the expression of CNG channel alpha subunit transcript in MVNn. Our data provide the first demonstration that NO/cGMP signalling modulates MVNn spontaneous firing through a mechanism that is independent of PKG or PKA and probably involves activation of CNG channels.

  4. IFN-γ Production Depends on IL-12 and IL-18 Combined Action and Mediates Host Resistance to Dengue Virus Infection in a Nitric Oxide-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisalpino, Daniel; Amaral, Flávio A.; Souza, Patrícia R. S.; Souza, Rafael S.; Ryffel, Bernhard; Vieira, Leda Q.; Silva, Tarcília A.; Atrasheuskaya, Alena; Ignatyev, George; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; Souza, Danielle G.; Teixeira, Mauro M.

    2011-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by one of four serotypes of Dengue virus (DENV-1–4). Severe dengue infection in humans is characterized by thrombocytopenia, increased vascular permeability, hemorrhage and shock. However, there is little information about host response to DENV infection. Here, mechanisms accounting for IFN-γ production and effector function during dengue disease were investigated in a murine model of DENV-2 infection. IFN-γ expression was greatly increased after infection of mice and its production was preceded by increase in IL-12 and IL-18 levels. In IFN-γ−/− mice, DENV-2-associated lethality, viral loads, thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration, and liver injury were enhanced, when compared with wild type-infected mice. IL-12p40−/− and IL-18−/− infected-mice showed decreased IFN-γ production, which was accompanied by increased disease severity, higher viral loads and enhanced lethality. Blockade of IL-18 in infected IL-12p40−/− mice resulted in complete inhibition of IFN-γ production, greater DENV-2 replication, and enhanced disease manifestation, resembling the response seen in DENV-2-infected IFN-γ−/− mice. Reduced IFN-γ production was associated with diminished Nitric Oxide-synthase 2 (NOS2) expression and NOS2−/− mice had elevated lethality, more severe disease evolution and increased viral load after DENV-2 infection. Therefore, IL-12/IL-18-induced IFN-γ production and consequent NOS2 induction are of major importance to host resistance against DENV infection. PMID:22206036

  5. Hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 interact to mediate UV-B-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in radish sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Su, Nana; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Cui, Jin; Liang, Yongchao

    2016-07-12

    The cross talk among hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) in UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation in the hypocotyls of radish sprouts was investigated. The results showed that UV-B irradiation significantly increased the anthocyanin accumulation and the expression of UVR8, and a similar trend appeared in radish sprouts subjected to cadmium, chilling and salt stresses regardless of light source. However, these responses disappeared under dark exposure. These results suggest that abiotic stress-induced anthocyanin accumulation and UVR8 expression were light-dependent. Moreover, abiotic stresses all enhanced the production of H2O2 and exogenous H2O2 addition significantly increased the anthocyanin concentration and UVR8 transcription, while these increases were severely inhibited by addition of dimethylthiourea (DMTU, a chemical trap for H2O2). It seems to suggest that H2O2 played an important role in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Furthermore, addition of 0.5 mM sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO-releasing compound) substantially induced the anthocyanin accumulation, and H2O2-induced anthocyanin accumulation and UVR8 expression were significantly suppressed by co-treatment with 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl (PTIO, a NO scavenger), which was parallel with the expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related transcription factors and structural genes. All these results demonstrate that both H2O2 and NO are involved in UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation, and there is a crosstalk between them as well as a classical UVR8 pathway.

  6. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ release via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wei

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Hollow smooth muscle organs such as the bladder undergo significant changes in wall tension associated with filling and distension, with attendant changes in muscle tone. Our previous study indicated that stretch induces Ca(2+ release occurs in the form of Ca(2+ sparks and Ca(2+ waves in urinary bladder myocytes. While, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca2+ release in smooth muscle is unknown.We examined the transduction mechanism linking cell stretch to Ca(2+ release. The probability and frequency of Ca(2+ sparks induced by stretch were closely related to the extent of cell extension and the time that the stretch was maintained. Experiments in tissues and single myocytes indicated that mechanical stretch significantly increases the production of nitric oxide (NO and the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+ sparks and contractility increases were abrogated by the NO inhibitor L-NAME and were also absent in eNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, exposure of eNOS null mice to exogenously generated NO induced Ca(2+ sparks. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ did not inhibit SICR, but this process was effectively blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitors LY494002 and wortmannin; the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were up-regulated by 204+/-28.6% and 258+/-36.8% by stretch, respectively. Moreover, stretch significantly increased the eNOS protein expression level.Taking together, these results suggest that stretch-induced Ca2+ release is NO dependent, resulting from the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

  7. Effect of chemical structure of S-nitrosothiols on nitric oxide release mediated by the copper sites of a metal organic framework based environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Edinbyrd, Kiara; Li, Tanping; Kumar, Revati

    2017-05-17

    The effect of chemical structure of different biologically compatible S-nitrosothiols on the solvation environment at catalytic copper sites in a metal organic framework (MOF) suspended in a solution of ethanol is probed using computational methods. The use of a copper based MOF as a storage vehicle and catalyst (copper sites of the MOF) in the controlled and sustained release of chemically stored nitric oxide (NO) from S-nitrosocysteine has been shown to occur both experimentally and computationally [J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 3330-3333; Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 23403]. Previous studies on a copper based MOF, namely HKUST-1, concluded that modifications in the R-group of s-nitrosothiols and/or organic linkers of MOFs led to a method capable of modulating NO release. In order to test the hypothesis that larger R-groups slow down NO release, four different RSNOs (R = cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine or glutathione) of varying size were investigated, which in turn required the use of a larger copper based MOF. Due to its desirable copper centers and more extensive framework, MOF-143, an analog of HKUST-1 was chosen to further explore both the effect of different RSNOs as well as MOF environments on NO release. Condensed phase classical molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to study the effect of the complex MOF environment as well as the chemical structure and size of the RSNO on the species on the catalytic reaction. The results indicate that in addition to the size of the RSNO species and the organic linkers within the MOF, the reaction rates can be modulated by the molecular structure of the RSNO and furthermore combining different RSNO species can also be used to tune the rate of NO release.

  8. Opening of small and intermediate calcium-activated potassium channels induces relaxation mainly mediated by nitric-oxide release in large arteries and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in small arteries from rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stankevicius, Edgaras; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Kroigaard, Christel

    2011-01-01

    current, and NO release that were blocked by apamin and TRAM-34 or charybdotoxin. These findings suggest that opening of SK(Ca) and IK(Ca) channels leads to endothelium-dependent relaxation that is mediated mainly by NO in large mesenteric arteries and by EDHF-type relaxation in small mesenteric arteries......This study was designed to investigate whether calcium-activated potassium channels of small (SK(Ca) or K(Ca)2) and intermediate (IK(Ca) or K(Ca)3.1) conductance activated by 6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime (NS309) are involved in both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium......-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-type relaxation in large and small rat mesenteric arteries. Segments of rat superior and small mesenteric arteries were mounted in myographs for functional studies. NO was recorded using NO microsensors. SK(Ca) and IK(Ca) channel currents and mRNA expression were investigated...

  9. Inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer cell migration by grape seed proanthocyanidins is mediated through the inhibition of nitric oxide, guanylate cyclase, and ERK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punathil, Thejass; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2009-03-01

    Tumor cell migration is considered as a major event in the metastatic cascade. Here we examined the effect of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) on migration capacity and signaling mechanisms using nonsmall cell human lung cancer cells. Using in vitro migration assay, we found that treatment of A549 and H1299 cells with GSPs resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of migration of these cells. The migration capacity of cells was reduced in presence of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. GSPs suppressed the elevated levels of endogenous NO/NOS in A549 and H1299 cells and blocked the migration promoting capacity of L-arginine. Treatment with guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitor 1-H-[1,2,4]oxadiaxolo[4,3-a]quinolalin-1-one (ODQ) reduced the migration of A549 cells whereas additional presence of 8-bromoguanosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP, cGMP analogue) restored the migration of these cells, suggesting a role for GC in migration of A549 cells. GSPs reduced the elevated levels of cGMP in cancer cells and also blocked the migration restoring activity of 8-Br-cGMP. The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) inhibitor, UO126, inhibited the migration of A549 cells, indicating a role for MAPKK in the migration. Additionally, UO126 and ODQ inhibited the migration restoring effects of L-arginine in L-NAME-treated cells, suggesting the involvement of cGMP and MAPK pathways in NO-mediated migration. GSPs inhibited L-arginine and 8-Br-cGMP-induced activation of ERK1/2 in A549 cells. Together, these results indicate sequential inhibition of NO/NOS, GC, and MAPK pathways by GSPs in mediating the inhibitory signals for cell migration, an essential step in invasion and metastasis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Tracking reactive intermediates by FTIR monitoring of reactions in low-temperature sublimed solids: nitric oxide disproportionation mediated by ruthenium(II) carbonyl porphyrin Ru(TPP)(CO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizyan, Arsen S; Kurtikyan, Tigran S; Martirosyan, Garik G; Ford, Peter C

    2013-05-06

    Interaction of NO ((15)NO) with amorphous layers of Ru(II) carbonyl porphyrin (Ru(TPP)(CO), TPP(2-) = meso-tetraphenylporphyrinato dianion) was monitored by FTIR spectroscopy from 80 K to room temperature. An intermediate spectrally characterized at very low temperatures (110 K) with ν(CO) at 2001 cm(-1) and ν(NO) at 1810 cm(-1) (1777 cm(-1) for (15)NO isotopomer) was readily assigned to the mixed carbonyl-nitrosyl complex Ru(TPP)(CO)(NO), which is the logical precursor to CO labilization. Remarkably, Ru(TPP)-mediated disproportionation of NO is seen even at 110 K, an indication of how facile this reaction is. By varying the quantity of supplied NO, it was also demonstrated that the key intermediate responsible for NO disproportionation is the dinitrosyl complex Ru(TPP)(NO)2, supporting the conclusion previously made from solution experiments.

  11. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M S Ribeiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of the IgSF are type I transmembrane proteins containing one or more extracellular Ig-like domains and their regulation of effector functions is mediated intracellularly by distinct stimulatory or inhibitory pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Carp SITR was found in a substracted cDNA repertoire from carp macrophages, enriched for genes up-regulated in response to the protozoan parasite Trypanoplasma borreli. Carp SITR is a type I protein with two extracellular Ig domains in a unique organisation of a N-proximal V/C2 (or I- type and a C-proximal V-type Ig domain, devoid of a transmembrane domain or any intracytoplasmic signalling motif. The carp SITR C-proximal V-type Ig domain, in particular, has a close sequence similarity and conserved structural characteristics to the mammalian CD300 molecules. By generating an anti-SITR antibody we could show that SITR protein expression was restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage. Carp SITR is abundantly expressed in macrophages and is secreted upon in vitro stimulation with the protozoan parasite T. borreli. Secretion of SITR protein during in vivo T. borreli infection suggests a role for this IgSF receptor in the host response to this protozoan parasite. Overexpression of carp SITR in mouse macrophages and knock-down of SITR protein expression in carp macrophages, using morpholino antisense technology, provided evidence for the involvement of carp SITR in the parasite-induced NO production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the structural and functional characterization of a novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in a teleost fish and propose a role for carp SITR in the NO-mediated response to a

  12. Nitric oxide (NO) counteracts cadmium induced cytotoxic processes mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Brassica juncea: cross-talk between ROS, NO and antioxidant responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kusum; Mehta, S K; Shekhawat, G S

    2013-04-01

    Research on NO in plants has achieved huge attention in recent years mainly due to its function in plant growth and development under biotic and abiotic stresses. In the present study, we investigated Cd induced NO generation and its relationship to ROS and antioxidant regulation in Brassica juncea. Cd accumulated rapidly in roots and caused oxidative stress as indicated by increased level of lipid peroxidation and H2O2 thus, inhibiting the overall plant growth. It significantly decreased the root length, leaf water content and photosynthetic pigments. A rapid induction in intracellular NO was observed at initial exposures and low concentrations of Cd. A 2.74-fold increase in intracellular NO was recorded in roots treated with 25 μM Cd than control. NO effects on Malondialdehyde (MDA) content and on antioxidant system was investigated by using sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor and a scavenger, [2-(4-carboxy-2-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylinidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide] (cPTIO). Roots pretreated with 5 mM SNP for 6 h when exposed to 25 μM Cd for 24 h reduced the level of proline, non-protein thiols, SOD, APX and CAT in comparison to only Cd treatments. However, this effect was almost blocked by 100 μM cPTIO pretreatment to roots for 1 h. This ameliorating effect of NO was specific because cPTIO completely reversed the effect in the presence of Cd. Thus, the present study report that NO strongly counteracts Cd induced ROS mediated cytotoxicity in B. juncea by controlling antioxidant metabolism as the related studies are not well reported in this species.

  13. Low Level Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Decrease Connexin36 Gap Junction Coupling in Mouse and Human Islets through Nitric Oxide-mediated Protein Kinase Cδ*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Nikki L.; Walter, Rachelle L.; Hemmati, Alireza; Westacott, Matthew J.; Benninger, Richard K. P.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the decline in islet function during the development of diabetes. Cytokines can disrupt insulin secretion and calcium dynamics; however, the mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood. Connexin36 gap junctions coordinate glucose-induced calcium oscillations and pulsatile insulin secretion across the islet. Loss of gap junction coupling disrupts these dynamics, similar to that observed during the development of diabetes. This study investigates the mechanisms by which pro-inflammatory cytokines mediate gap junction coupling. Specifically, as cytokine-induced NO can activate PKCδ, we aimed to understand the role of PKCδ in modulating cytokine-induced changes in gap junction coupling. Isolated mouse and human islets were treated with varying levels of a cytokine mixture containing TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ. Islet dysfunction was measured by insulin secretion, calcium dynamics, and gap junction coupling. Modulators of PKCδ and NO were applied to determine their respective roles in modulating gap junction coupling. High levels of cytokines caused cell death and decreased insulin secretion. Low levels of cytokine treatment disrupted calcium dynamics and decreased gap junction coupling, in the absence of disruptions to insulin secretion. Decreases in gap junction coupling were dependent on NO-regulated PKCδ, and altered membrane organization of connexin36. This study defines several mechanisms underlying the disruption to gap junction coupling under conditions associated with the development of diabetes. These mechanisms will allow for greater understanding of islet dysfunction and suggest ways to ameliorate this dysfunction during the development of diabetes. PMID:26668311

  14. Protein tyrosine nitration of aldolase in mast cells: a plausible pathway in nitric oxide-mediated regulation of mast cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Yokananth; Moon, Tae Chul; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Befus, A Dean

    2010-07-01

    NO is a short-lived free radical that plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular signaling. Mast cell (MC)-derived NO and exogenous NO regulate MC activities, including the inhibition of MC degranulation. At a molecular level, NO acts to modify protein structure and function through several mechanisms, including protein tyrosine nitration. To begin to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of NO in MCs, we investigated protein tyrosine nitration in human MC lines HMC-1 and LAD2 treated with the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione. Using two-dimensional gel Western blot analysis with an anti-nitrotyrosine Ab, together with mass spectrometry, we identified aldolase A, an enzyme of the glycolytic pathway, as a target for tyrosine nitration in MCs. The nitration of aldolase A was associated with a reduction in the maximum velocity of aldolase in HMC-1 and LAD2. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that despite these changes in the activity of a critical enzyme in glycolysis, there was no significant change in total cellular ATP content, although the AMP/ATP ratio was altered. Elevated levels of lactate and pyruvate suggested that S-nitrosoglutathione treatment enhanced glycolysis. Reduced aldolase activity was associated with increased intracellular levels of its substrate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Interestingly, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate inhibited IgE-mediated MC degranulation in LAD2 cells. Thus, for the first time we report evidence of protein tyrosine nitration in human MC lines and identify aldolase A as a prominent target. This posttranslational nitration of aldolase A may be an important pathway that regulates MC phenotype and function.

  15. NITRIC OXIDE INTERFERES WITH HYPOXIA SIGNALING DURING COLONIC INFLAMMATION

    OpenAIRE

    CARIA,Cintia Rabelo e Paiva; MOSCATO,Camila Henrique; TOMÉ,Renata Bortolin Guerra; PEDRAZZOLI Jr,José; RIBEIRO,Marcelo Lima; GAMBERO,Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Context Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Methods Colitis was induced by single (acute) or repeated (reactivated colitis) trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administ...

  16. Abscisic acid, H2O2 and nitric oxide interactions mediated cold-induced S-adenosylmethionine synthetase in Medicago sativa subsp. falcata that confers cold tolerance through up-regulating polyamine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenfei; Tan, Jiali; Zhuo, Chunliu; Wang, Congying; Xiang, Bin; Wang, Zengyu

    2014-06-01

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) is the key enzyme catalysing the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a precursor of polyamines and ethylene. To investigate the potential role of SAMS in cold tolerance, we isolated MfSAMS1 from the cold-tolerant germplasm Medicago sativa subsp. falcata and analysed the association of SAM-derived polyamines with cold tolerance. The expression of MfSAMS1 in leaves was greatly induced by cold, abscisic acid (ABA), H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). Our data revealed that ABA, H2O2 and NO interactions mediated the cold-induced MfSAMS1 expression and cold acclimation in falcata. SAM, putrescine, spermidine and spermine levels, ethylene production and polyamine oxidation were sequentially altered in response to cold, indicating that SAMS-derived SAM is preferentially used in polyamine synthesis and homeostasis during cold acclimation. Antioxidant enzyme activities were also induced in response to cold and showed correlation with polyamine oxidation. Overexpression of MfSAMS1 in tobacco resulted in elevated SAM levels, but polyamine levels and ethylene production in the transgenic plants were not significantly changed. Compared to the wild type, transgenic plants had increased levels of apoplastic H2O2, higher transcript levels of genes involved in polyamine synthesis and oxidation, and higher activities of polyamine oxidation and antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that overexpression of MfSAMS1 promoted polyamine synthesis and oxidation, which in turn improved H2 O2 -induced antioxidant protection, as a result enhanced tolerance to freezing and chilling stress in transgenic plants. This is the first report demonstrating that SAMS plays an important role in plant tolerance to cold via up-regulating polyamine oxidation. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Nitric oxide mediates root K+/Na+ balance in a mangrove plant, Kandelia obovata, by enhancing the expression of AKT1-type K+ channel and Na+/H+ antiporter under high salinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Chen

    Full Text Available It is well known that nitric oxide (NO enhances salt tolerance of glycophytes. However, the effect of NO on modulating ionic balance in halophytes is not very clear. This study focuses on the role of NO in mediating K(+/Na(+ balance in a mangrove species, Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu and Yong. We first analyzed the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor, on ion content and ion flux in the roots of K. obovata under high salinity. The results showed that 100 μM SNP significantly increased K(+ content and Na(+ efflux, but decreased Na(+ content and K(+ efflux. These effects of NO were reversed by specific NO synthesis inhibitor and scavenger, which confirmed the role of NO in retaining K(+ and reducing Na(+ in K. obovata roots. Using western-blot analysis, we found that NO increased the protein expression of plasma membrane (PM H(+-ATPase and vacuolar Na(+/H(+ antiporter, which were crucial proteins for ionic balance. To further clarify the molecular mechanism of NO-modulated K(+/Na(+ balance, partial cDNA fragments of inward-rectifying K(+ channel, PM Na(+/H(+ antiporter, PM H(+-ATPase, vacuolar Na(+/H(+ antiporter and vacuolar H(+-ATPase subunit c were isolated. Results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that NO increased the relative expression levels of these genes, while this increase was blocked by NO synthesis inhibitors and scavenger. Above results indicate that NO greatly contribute to K(+/Na(+ balance in high salinity-treated K. obovata roots, by activating AKT1-type K(+ channel and Na(+/H(+ antiporter, which are the critical components in K(+/Na(+ transport system.

  18. Role of nitric oxide in cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moochhala, S; Rajnakova, A

    1999-12-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in tumorigenesis is multifactorial. NO can participate in the complicated process of carcinogenesis by mediating DNA damage in early phases of tumorigenesis, as well as support tumor progression through the induction of angiogenesis and suppression of the immune response. This paper addresses the effects of NO on transcriptional regulation following DNA damage and cyclooxygenase expression in the multistep process of tumorigenesis.

  19. Resveratrol and Endothelial Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO derived from the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS has antihypertensive, antithrombotic, anti-atherosclerotic and antiobesogenic properties. Resveratrol is a polyphenol phytoalexin with multiple cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Part of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are mediated by eNOS. Resveratrol stimulates NO production from eNOS by a number of mechanisms, including upregulation of eNOS expression, stimulation of eNOS enzymatic activity and reversal of eNOS uncoupling. In addition, by reducing oxidative stress, resveratrol prevents oxidative NO inactivation by superoxide thereby enhancing NO bioavailability. Molecular pathways underlying these effects of resveratrol involve SIRT1, AMPK, Nrf2 and estrogen receptors.

  20. Nitric oxide-induced eosinophil apoptosis is dependent on mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT, JNK and oxidative stress: apoptosis is preceded but not mediated by early mPT-dependent JNK activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilmarinen-Salo Pinja

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eosinophils are critically involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. Nitric oxide (NO is produced in high amounts in asthmatic lungs and has an important role as a regulator of lung inflammation. NO was previously shown to induce eosinophil apoptosis mediated via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and caspases. Our aim was to clarify the cascade of events leading to NO-induced apoptosis in granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF-treated human eosinophils concentrating on the role of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species (ROS and JNK. Methods Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometric analysis of relative DNA content, by Annexin-V labelling and/or morphological analysis. Immunoblotting was used to study phospho-JNK (pJNK expression. Mitochondrial membrane potential was assessed by JC-1-staining and mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT by loading cells with calcein acetoxymethyl ester (AM and CoCl2 after which flow cytometric analysis was conducted. Statistical significance was calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA or paired t-test. Results NO-donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP induced late apoptosis in GM-CSF-treated eosinophils. SNAP-induced apoptosis was suppressed by inhibitor of mPT bongkrekic acid (BA, inhibitor of JNK SP600125 and superoxide dismutase-mimetic AEOL 10150. Treatment with SNAP led to late loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Additionally, we found that SNAP induces early partial mPT (1 h that was followed by a strong increase in pJNK levels (2 h. Both events were prevented by BA. However, these events were not related to apoptosis because SNAP-induced apoptosis was prevented as efficiently when BA was added 16 h after SNAP. In addition to the early and strong rise, pJNK levels were less prominently increased at 20–30 h. Conclusions Here we demonstrated that NO-induced eosinophil apoptosis is mediated via ROS, JNK and late mPT. Additionally

  1. Nitric oxide and chronic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Grisham

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to play an important role in modulating the inflammatory response by virtue of its ability to affect bloodflow, leukocyte function and cell viability. The objective of this study was to assess the role that NO may play in mediating the mucosal injury and inflammation in a model of chronic granulomatous colitis using two pharmacologically different inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Chronic granulomatous colitis with liver and spleen inflammation was induced in female Lewis rats via the subserosal (intramural injection of peptidoglycan/polysaccharide (PG/PS derived from group A streptococci. Chronic NOS inhibition by oral administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (15 µmol/kg/day or amino-guanidine (AG (15 µmol/ kg/day was found to attenuate the PG/PS-induced increases in macroscopic colonic inflammation scores and colonic myeloperoxidase activity. Only AG -- not L-NAME – attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in colon dry weight. Both L-NAME and AG significantly attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in spleen weight whereas neither was effective at significantly attenuating the PG/PS-induced increases in liver weight. Although both L-NAME and AG inhibited NO production in vivo, as measured by decreases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels, only AG produced significantly lower values (38±3 versus 83±8 µM, respectively, P<0.05. Finally, L-NAME, but not AG, administration significantly increased mean arterial pressure from 83 mmHg in colitic animals to 105 mmHg in the PG/PS+ L-NAME-treated animals (P<0.05. It is concluded that NO may play an important role in mediating some of the pathophysiology associated with this model of chronic granulomatous colitis.

  2. Role of nitric oxide in cerebrovascular reactivity to NMDA and hypercapnia during prenatal development in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Andrew P.; Ohata, Hiroto; Koehler, Raymond C.

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral vasodilatory responses evoked by activation of NMDA receptors and by hypercapnia are important factors in the integrated vascular response to perinatal cerebral ischemia. Cerebral vasodilation to NMDA is mediated by nitric oxide in adult and newborn animals, whereas vasodilation to hypercapnia is thought to become modulated by nitric oxide, at least in swine, after the newborn period. The developmental role of nitric oxide in the cerebral blood flow response to NMDA and hypercapnia w...

  3. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  4. Nitric oxide inhibitory activity of Strychnos spinosa (loganiaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The study was aimed at determining the anti-inflammatory activity of fractions and extracts obtained from Strychnos spinosa leaves on a mediator of inflammation nitric oxide (NO). Materials and Methods: Leaves were extracted with acetone and separated into fractions with different polarities by solventsolvent ...

  5. Inhibition of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E2 Expression by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Purpose: To determine whether the methanol extract of Polyopes affinis (MEPA) down-regulates the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. Methods: The production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was measured by the Griess reagents and ...

  6. Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (heart attack) and hypertension. Nitric oxide (NO), an inorganic molecule formed by vascular endothelial cells is now thought to be a messenger molecule that is believed to playa crucial role in various biological processes of both physiological and pathological importance. Nitric oxide is a simple heterodiatomic molecule ...

  7. Interleukin 1 beta induces diabetes and fever in normal rats by nitric oxide via induction of different nitric oxide synthases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I; Bjerre, U; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    1994-01-01

    Substantial in vitro evidence suggests that nitric oxide may be a major mediator of interleukin 1 (IL-1) induced pancreatic beta-cell inhibition and destruction in the initial events leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Using NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of both......, glucagon, corticosterone and leukocyte- and differential-counts in normal rats injected once daily for 5 days with interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) (0.8 microgram/rat = 4.0 micrograms/kg). Inhibition of both the constitutive and the inducible forms of nitric oxide synthase prevented IL-1 beta-induced fever...

  8. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as...

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Exogenous nitric oxide inhibits shedding of ADAM17 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzowska, Monika; Stalińska, Krystyna; Mezyk-Kopeć, Renata; Wawro, Karolina; Duda, Katarzyna; Das, Sudipta; Bereta, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Both ADAM17, the secretase responsible for the shedding of ectodomains of numerous membrane proteins including TNF and its receptors, as well as nitric oxide synthesized by inducible nitric oxide synthase play regulatory roles in inflammation and tumor progression. We analyzed the effect of endogenous and exogenous nitric oxide on the expression and activity of ADAM17 in murine endothelial cells and a monocyte/macrophage cell line. We found that endogenous nitric oxide influenced neither ADAM17 mRNA level nor the shedding of two ADAM17 substrates, TNF and TNFR1. Exogenous NO significantly diminished the release of TNF and TNFR1 without affecting the ADAM17 transcript level. Our data seem contrary to a previous report that showed the activation of ADAM17 by nitric oxide (Zhang et al., 2000, J Biol Chem 275: 15839-15844). We discuss potential mechanisms of NO-mediated inhibition of ectodomain shedding and possible reasons of discrepancy between our results and the previous report.

  11. Neuronal Nitric-Oxide Synthase Deficiency Impairs the Long-Term Memory of Olfactory Fear Learning and Increases Odor Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Eloisa; Heldt, Scott A.; Fletcher, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    Experience-induced changes associated with odor learning are mediated by a number of signaling molecules, including nitric oxide (NO), which is predominantly synthesized by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the brain. In the current study, we investigated the role of nNOS in the acquisition and retention of conditioned olfactory fear. Mice…

  12. Catalysis by nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marletta, M A; Hurshman, A R; Rusche, K M

    1998-10-01

    The enzyme nitric oxide synthase catalyzes the oxidation of the amino acid L-arginine to L-citrulline and nitric oxide in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Nitric oxide plays a critical role in signal transduction pathways in the cardiovascular and nervous systems and is a key component of the cytostatic/cytotoxic function of the immune system. Characterization of nitric oxide synthase substrates and cofactors has outlined the broad details of the overall reaction and suggested possibilities for chemical steps in the reaction; however, the molecular details of the reaction mechanism are still poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests a role for the reduced bound pterin in the first step of the reaction--the hydroxylation of L-arginine.

  13. Regulation and control of nitric oxide (NO) in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacevic, Zaklina; Sahni, Sumit; Lok, K.H.

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a novel storage and transport mechanism for nitric oxide (NO) mediated by glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1), protects M1-macrophage (M1-MØ) models from large quantities of endogenous NO. This system stores and transp......We recently demonstrated that a novel storage and transport mechanism for nitric oxide (NO) mediated by glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1), protects M1-macrophage (M1-MØ) models from large quantities of endogenous NO. This system stores...... be responsible for delivering cytotoxic NO as DNICs via MRP1 from M1-MØs, to tumor cell targets....

  14. Nitric oxide-induced signalling in rat lacrimal acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia Karen; Tritsaris, K.; Dissing, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological role of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating secretory processes in rat lacrimal acinar cells. In addition, we wanted to determine whether the acinar cells possess endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity by measuring NO productio...... using the fluorescent NO indicator 4,5-diaminofluorescein (DAF-2). We initiated investigations by adding NO from an external source by means of the NO-donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP). Cellular concentrations of cyclic guanosine 5'-phosphate (cGMP) ([cGMP]) were measured...... by radioimmunoassay (RIA), and we found that SNAP induced a fast increase in the [cGMP], amounting to 350% of the [cGMP] in resting cells. Moreover, addition of SNAP and elevating [cGMP] in fura-2 loaded lacrimal acinar cells, resulted in a cGMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated release of Ca2+ from intracellular...

  15. Effect of Nitric Oxide on the Growth and Development of Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Kuruthukulangarakoola, Gitto Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Besides the signaling function, nitric oxide can also serve as a source of nitrogen in plants. Fixation of nitric oxide seems to be mediated by non-symbiotic hemoglobins and thereby introducing it into the N-metabolic pathway. These new findings could be important for breeding to generate plants with improved growth. Neben der wichtigen Funktion von Stickstoffmonoxid als Signalmolekül in Pflanzen kann dieses Molekül auch als Stickstoffquelle dienen. Hierbei scheint Stickstoffmonoxid mittel...

  16. Nitric oxide-mediated vasorelaxation effects of anti-angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) peptide from Styela clava flesh tissue and its anti-hypertensive effect in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seok-Chun; Kim, Dong Geon; Han, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Young Jae; Lee, Jung-Kwon; Byun, Hee-Guk; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Park, Sun-Joo; Lee, Dae-Ho; Jeon, You-Jin

    2012-09-15

    In our previous study, an anti-angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) peptide (Ala-His-Ile-Ile-Ile, MW: 565.3Da) was isolated from Styela clava flesh tissue. In this study the fractions obtained during the isolation process and the finally purified peptide were examined to see if they had vasorelaxation effects in isolated rat aortas, and then the peptide was investigated for anti-hypertensive effect in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). The induction of vasorelaxation in the rat aortas was observed with the isolated fractions and the peptide from the enzymatic hydrolysate of S. clava flesh tissue and could be markedly blocked by pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). In human endothelial cells, NO synthesis was found to be increased and eNOS phosphorylation was upregulated when the cells were cultured with the purified peptide. Furthermore, systolic blood pressure was reduced by administration of the potent vasorelaxation peptide in SHRs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. NITRIC OXIDE INTERFERES WITH HYPOXIA SIGNALING DURING COLONIC INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Rabelo e Paiva CARIA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Methods Colitis was induced by single (acute or repeated (reactivated colitis trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administration in rats. In addition, one group of rats with reactivated colitis was also treated with Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride to block nitric oxide synthase. Colitis was assessed by macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity in the colon samples. Hypoxia was determined using the oxygen-dependent probe, pimonidazole. The expression of HIF-1α and HIF-induced factors (vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGF and apelin was assessed using Western blotting. Results The single or repeated administration of trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid to rats induced colitis which was characterized by a high macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity. Hypoxia was observed with both protocols. During acute colitis, HIF-1α expression was not increased, but VEGF and apelin were increased. HIF-1α expression was inhibited during reactivated colitis, and VEGF and apelin were not increased. Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride blockade during reactivated colitis restored HIF-1α, VEGF and apelin expression. Conclusions Nitric oxide could interfere with hypoxia signaling during reactivated colitis inflammation modifying the expression of proteins regulated by HIF-1α.

  18. Nitric oxide interferes with hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caria, Cintia Rabelo e Paiva; Moscato, Camila Henrique; Tomé, Renata Bortolin Guerra; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Gambero, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Colitis was induced by single (acute) or repeated (reactivated colitis) trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administration in rats. In addition, one group of rats with reactivated colitis was also treated with Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride to block nitric oxide synthase. Colitis was assessed by macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity in the colon samples. Hypoxia was determined using the oxygen-dependent probe, pimonidazole. The expression of HIF-1α and HIF-induced factors (vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGF and apelin) was assessed using Western blotting. The single or repeated administration of trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid to rats induced colitis which was characterized by a high macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity. Hypoxia was observed with both protocols. During acute colitis, HIF-1α expression was not increased, but VEGF and apelin were increased. HIF-1α expression was inhibited during reactivated colitis, and VEGF and apelin were not increased. Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride blockade during reactivated colitis restored HIF-1α, VEGF and apelin expression. Nitric oxide could interfere with hypoxia signaling during reactivated colitis inflammation modifying the expression of proteins regulated by HIF-1α.

  19. Nitric oxide in the rat vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, A; Blythe, W R; Zdanski, C J; Prazma, J; Pillsbury, H C

    1994-10-01

    Nitric oxide is known to function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. It is also known to be involved in the central nervous system excitatory amino acid neurotransmission cascade. Activation of excitatory amino acid receptors causes an influx of calcium, which activates nitric oxide synthase. The resulting increase in intracellular nitric oxide activates soluble guanylate cyclase, leading to a rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate are found in the vestibular system and have been postulated to function as vestibular system neurotransmitters. Although nitric oxide has been investigated as a neurotransmitter in other tissues, no published studies have examined the role of nitric oxide in the vestibular system. Neuronal NADPH-diaphorase has been characterized as a nitric oxide synthase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, producing nitric oxide during the reaction. We used a histochemical stain characterized by Hope et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci 1991;88:2811) as specific for neuronal nitric oxide synthase to localize the enzyme in the rat vestibular system. An immunocytochemical stain was used to examine rat inner ear tissue for the presence of the enzyme's end product, L-citrulline, thereby demonstrating nitric oxide synthase activity. Staining of vestibular ganglion sections showed nitric oxide synthase presence and activity in ganglion cells and nerve fibers. These results indicate the presence of active nitric oxide synthase in these tissues and suggest modulation of vestibular neurotransmission by nitric oxide.

  20. Protective role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, Ester W J A; Stegeman, Coen A; Heeringa, Peter; Henning, Robert; van Goor, Harry

    Nitric oxide is a versatile molecule, with its actions ranging from haemodynamic regulation to anti-proliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. Nitric oxide is produced by the nitric oxide synthases, endothelial NOS (eNOS), neural NOS (nNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS). Constitutively

  1. Multifaceted role of nitric oxide in an in vitro mouse neuronal injury model: transcriptomic profiling defines the temporal recruitment of death signalling cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhao Feng; Chen, Minghui Jessica; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Shui, Guanghou; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Philip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide is implicated in the pathogenesis of various neuropathologies characterized by oxidative stress. Although nitric oxide has been reported to be involved in the exacerbation of oxidative stress observed in several neuropathologies, existent data fail to provide a holistic description of how nitrergic pathobiology elicits neuronal injury. Here we provide a comprehensive description of mechanisms contributing to nitric oxide induced neuronal injury by global transcriptomic profiling. Microarray analyses were undertaken on RNA from murine primary cortical neurons treated with the nitric oxide generator DETA-NONOate (NOC-18, 0.5 mM) for 8–24 hrs. Biological pathway analysis focused upon 3672 gene probes which demonstrated at least a ±1.5-fold expression in a minimum of one out of three time-points and passed statistical analysis (one-way anova, P < 0.05). Numerous enriched processes potentially determining nitric oxide mediated neuronal injury were identified from the transcriptomic profile: cell death, developmental growth and survival, cell cycle, calcium ion homeostasis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, mitochondrial homeostasis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and GSH and nitric oxide metabolism. Our detailed time-course study of nitric oxide induced neuronal injury allowed us to provide the first time a holistic description of the temporal sequence of cellular events contributing to nitrergic injury. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in nitric oxide neuropathologies where nitric oxide mediated injury is causative. PMID:21352476

  2. Nitric oxide: considerations for the treatment of ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpolilli, Nicole A; Moskowitz, Michael A; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Some 40 years ago it was recognized by Furchgott and colleagues that the endothelium releases a vasodilator, endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). Later on, several groups identified EDRF to be a gas, nitric oxide (NO). Since then, NO was identified as one of the most versatile and unique molecules in animal and human biology. Nitric oxide mediates a plethora of physiological functions, for example, maintenance of vascular tone and inflammation. Apart from these physiological functions, NO is also involved in the pathophysiology of various disorders, specifically those in which regulation of blood flow and inflammation has a key role. The aim of the current review is to summarize the role of NO in cerebral ischemia, the most common cause of stroke. PMID:22333622

  3. Nitric oxide regulates the aggregation of stimulated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, T; Nilsson, H M; Sundqvist, T

    2000-08-02

    Neutrophil aggregation is mediated by both CD18 integrin and L-selectin. Nitric oxide attenuates the integrin-mediated adhesion of neutrophils to collagen and to endothelium and may therefore affect aggregation as well. FMLP-stimulated neutrophils exposed to l-arginine showed increased and prolonged aggregation, whereas cells pretreated with L-NAME did not differ from FMLP-stimulated controls. Nitric oxide is known to induce ADP ribosylation of G-actin, which inhibits polymerization. We detected equivalent levels of total F-actin in cells pretreated with l-arginine or L-NAME and non-pretreated controls. However, neutrophils pretreated with l-arginine and stimulated by CD18 integrin cross-linking exhibited a more limited increase in total F-actin, compared to control and L-NAME-pretreated cells. Thus at least two signaling pathways may be involved FMLP-stimulated aggregation, mediated by CD18 integrins. More specifically, it is plausible that FMLP-receptor signaling upregulates CD18 integrins and endogenous NO subsequently modulates CD18-mediated signaling to prolong aggregation, possibly through ADP-ribosylation of actin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  4. Nitric Oxide and Interlukin-6 Levels in Intellectual Disability Adults with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Eli; Beiker, Reut; Morad, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) are highly reactive mediators that have been shown to play different roles in a variety of different biological process. The role of NO and IL-6 in the neuropathogenesis of brain seizures is still questionable. In order to evaluate the role of NO and IL-6 in neurological disorders such as seizures, we…

  5. Immunobiology of Nitric Oxide and Regulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martin; Rey, Kevin; Besler, Katrina; Wang, Christine; Choy, Jonathan

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a bioactive gas that has multiple roles in innate and adaptive immune responses. In macrophages, nitric oxide is produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase upon microbial and cytokine stimulation. It is needed for host defense against pathogens and for immune regulation. This review will summarize the role of NO and iNOS in inflammatory and immune responses and will discuss the regulatory mechanisms that control inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and activity.

  6. (-)-Epicatechin-induced recovery of mitochondria from simulated diabetes: Potential role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Sánchez, Israel; Rodríguez, Alonso; Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    (-)-Epicatechin increases indicators associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in endothelial cells and myocardium. We investigated endothelial nitric oxide synthase involvement on (-)-epicatechin-induced increases in indicators associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in human coronary artery endothelial cells cultured in normal-glucose and high-glucose media, as well as to restore indicators of cardiac mitochondria from the effects of simulated diabetes. Here, we demonstrate the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase on (-)-epicatechin-induced increases in mitochondrial proteins, transcription factors and sirtuin 1 under normal-glucose conditions. In simulated diabetes endothelial nitric oxide synthase function, mitochondrial function-associated and biogenesis-associated indicators were adversely impacted by high glucose, effects that were reverted by (-)-epicatechin. As an animal model of type 2 diabetes, 2-month old C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet for 16 weeks. Fasting and fed blood glucose levels were increased and NO plasma levels decreased. High-fat-diet-fed mice myocardium revealed endothelial nitric oxide synthase dysfunction, reduced mitochondrial activity and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. The administration of 1 mg/kg (-)-epicatechin for 15 days by oral gavage shifted these endpoints towards control mice values. Results suggest that endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates (-)-epicatechin-induced increases of indicators associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in endothelial cells. (-)-Epicatechin also counteracts the negative effects that high glucose or simulated type 2 diabetes has on endothelial nitric oxide synthase function. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Nitric oxide production upregulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling by inhibiting Dickkopf-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qiang; Zhang, Xinglu; Liu, Quan; Zhang, Xianghong; Bartels, Christian E; Geller, David A

    2013-11-01

    Nitric oxide signaling plays complex roles in carcinogenesis, in part, due to incomplete mechanistic understanding. In this study, we investigated our discovery of an inverse correlation in the expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the Wnt/β-catenin regulator Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) in human cancer. In human tumors and animal models, induced nitric oxide synthesis increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling by negatively regulating DKK1 gene expression. Human iNOS (hiNOS) and DKK1 gene expression were inversely correlated in primary human colon and breast cancers, and in intestinal adenomas from Min (Apc(min/+)) mice. Nitric oxide production by various routes was sufficient to decrease constitutive DKK1 expression, increasing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colon and breast cancer cells and primary human hepatocytes, thereby activating the transcription of Wnt target genes. This effect could be reversed by RNA interference-mediated silencing of iNOS or treatment with iNOS inhibitors, which restored DKK1 expression and its inhibitory effect on Wnt signaling. Taken together, our results identify a previously unrecognized mechanism through which the nitric oxide pathway promotes cancer by unleashing Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These findings further the evidence that nitric oxide promotes human cancer and deepens insights in the complex control Wnt/β-catenin signaling during carcinogenesis.

  8. S-Adenosylmethionine modulates inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in rat liver and isolated hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majano, P L; García-Monzón, C; García-Trevijano, E R; Corrales, F J; Cámara, J; Ortiz, P; Mato, J M; Avila, M A; Moreno-Otero, R

    2001-12-01

    Hepatocellular availability of S-adenosylmethionine, the principal biological methyl donor, is compromised in situations of liver damage. S-Adenosylmethionine administration alleviates experimental liver injury and increases survival in cirrhotic patients. The mechanisms behind these beneficial effects of S-adenosylmethionine are not completely known. An inflammatory component is common to many of the pathological conditions in which S-adenosylmethionine grants protection to the liver. This notion led us to study the effect of S-adenosylmethionine administration on hepatic nitric oxide synthase-2 induction in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and proinflammatory cytokines. The effect of S-adenosylmethionine on nitric oxide synthase-2 expression was assessed in rats challenged with bacterial lipopolysaccharide and in isolated rat hepatocytes treated with proinflammatory cytokines. Interactions between S-adenosylmethionine and cytokines on nuclear factor kappa B activation and nitric oxide synthase-2 promoter transactivation were studied in isolated rat hepatocytes and HepG2 cells, respectively. S-Adenosylmethionine attenuated the induction of nitric oxide synthase-2 in the liver of lipopolysaccharide-treated rats and in cytokine-treated hepatocytes. S-Adenosylmethionine accelerated the resynthesis of inhibitor kappa B alpha, blunted the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and reduced the transactivation of nitric oxide synthase-2 promoter. Our findings indicate that the hepatoprotective actions of S-adenosylmethionine may be mediated in part through the modulation of nitric oxide production.

  9. Oxygen tension regulates the nitric oxide pathway. Physiological role in penile erection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, N; Vardi, Y; Padma-Nathan, H; Daley, J; Goldstein, I; Saenz de Tejada, I

    1993-01-01

    Relaxation of the trabecular smooth muscle of the corpus cavernosum (the erectile tissue) of the penis is mediated by nitric oxide released by the nerves and endothelium. We have investigated the physiological role of oxygen tension in the regulation of trabecular smooth muscle tone. In human subjects, measurement of intracavernosal PO2 in blood drawn from corpus cavernosum in the flaccid state was comparable to that of venous blood (25-43 mmHg). Vasodilatation of the resistance arteries and trabecular smooth muscle relaxation by intracavernosal injection of papaverine and phentolamine caused oxygen tension to rise rapidly to arterial levels (PO2 approximately 100 mmHg). Isolated human and rabbit corpus cavernosum tissue strips in organ baths, exposed to arterial-like PO2 relaxed to the endothelium-dependent dilator acetylcholine and to electrical stimulation of the autonomic dilator nerves. These nitric oxide-mediated responses were progressively inhibited as a function of decreasing PO2 to levels measured in the flaccid penis. Reverting to normoxic conditions readily restored endothelium-dependent and neurogenic relaxation. Relaxation to exogenous nitric oxide was not impaired in low PO2. In rabbit corpus cavernosum, low PO2 reduced basal levels of cGMP and prevented cGMP accumulation induced by stimulation of dilator nerves. Furthermore, low PO2 inhibited nitric oxide synthase activity in corpus cavernosum cytosol. It is concluded that physiological concentrations of oxygen modulate penile erection by regulating nitric oxide synthesis in corpus cavernosum tissue. PMID:7679408

  10. In-vivo effects of Glu298Asp endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofowora, G; Dishy, V; Xie, H G; Imamura, H; Nishimi, Y; Morales, C R; Morrow, J D; Kim, R B; Stein, C M; Wood, A J

    2001-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase catalyses the formation of the vasodilator nitric oxide, a major regulator of vascular tone. The Asp298 polymorphism of the nitric oxide synthase gene is associated with altered function and expression of the enzyme in vitro and myocardial infarction and coronary artery spasm in vivo. We examined the effect of the Glu298Asp polymorphism on: (1) local vascular responses to phenylephrine, acetylcholine, glyceryl trinitrate and prostaglandin E1 in the dorsal hand vein; (2) changes in forearm blood flow during mental stress, a measure of nitric oxide-mediated effect on resistance vessels; (3) excretion of urinary nitrite/nitrate as a measure of total body nitric oxide production; and (4) F2-isoprostane metabolite, a measure of oxidative stress, in healthy Glu298 (n = 12) and Asp298 (n = 13) homozygotes. There were no significant differences in acetylcholine dose responses (P = 0.29) in Glu298 and Asp298 homozygotes. Responses to glyceryl trinitrate, prostaglandin E1 and the alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine did not differ by genotype. Forearm blood flow was similar at rest and increased significantly (from 7.5 ml/min/100 ml to 12.2 ml/min/100 ml; P = 0.003), but similarly (P = 0.2), during mental stress in both genotypes. Asp298 homozygotes excreted significantly less nitrate/nitrite than Glu298 homozygotes (nitrate + nitrite/creatinine ratio 0.05 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.09 +/- 0.01, respectively; P < 0.005). Urinary F2-isoprostane metabolite excretion did not differ (Glu298, 2.04 +/- 0.25 ng/mg creatinine; Asp298, 1.85 +/- 0.37 ng/mg creatinine; P = 0.7). We conclude that in healthy volunteers the Glu298Asp polymorphism affects endogenous nitric oxide production without affecting nitric oxide-mediated vascular responses. This polymorphism may only have clinical significance in the presence of endothelial dysfunction.

  11. Nitric oxide and hypoxia signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey Man, H S; Tsui, Albert K Y; Marsden, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production is catalyzed by three distinct enzymes, namely, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS). The production of NO by vascular endothelium relies mainly on eNOS. Curiously, iNOS and nNOS also are relevant for vascular NO production in certain settings. By relaxing vascular smooth muscle, the classical view is that NO participates in O2 homeostasis by increasing local blood flow and O2 delivery. It is now appreciated that NO has an even more fundamental role in cellular oxygen sensing at the cellular and physiological level. A key component of cellular oxygen sensing is the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) that activates a transcriptional program to promote cellular survival under conditions of inadequate oxygen supply. Important new insights demonstrate that HIF protein is stabilized by two parallel pathways: (1) a decrease in the O2-dependent prolyl hydroxylation of HIF and (2) NO-dependent S-nitrosylation of HIF pathway components including HIF-α. The need for these two complementary pathways to HIF activation arises because decreased oxygen delivery can occur not only by decreased ambient oxygen but also by decreased blood oxygen-carrying capacity, as with anemia. In turn, NO production is tightly linked to O2 homeostasis. O2 is a key substrate for the generation of NO and impacts the enzymatic activity and expression of the enzymes that catalyze the production of NO, the nitric oxide synthases. These relationships manifest in a variety of clinical settings ranging from the unique situation of humans living in hypoxic environments at high altitudes to the common scenario of anemia and the use of therapeutics that can bind or release NO. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Liver cirrhosis and nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ergun

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Liver cirrhosis is a clinical condition which appears due to various etiologies and basically contains diffuse fibrozis and nodularity. Portal hypertension frequently accompanies this condition and constitutes the complications with negative effects concerning patients mortality and morbidity. For this reason, understanding the pathophysiologies of cirrhosis and portal hypertension is essential for the supplementation of new treatment options. In this review, the role of nitric oxide in the pathophysiologies of fibrosis, cirrhosis and portal hypertension has been discussed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(2.000: 91-131

  13. Tobacco Xenobiotics Release Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam EWN

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many xenobiotic compounds exert their actions through the release of free radicals and related oxidants 12, bringing about unwanted biological effects 3. Indeed, oxidative events may play a significant role in tobacco toxicity from cigarette smoke. Here, we demonstrate the direct in vitro release of the free radical nitric oxide (•NO from extracts and components of smokeless tobacco, including nicotine, nitrosonornicotine (NNN and 4-(methyl-N-nitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK in phosphate buffered saline and human saliva using electron spin resonance and chemiluminescence detection. Our findings suggest that tobacco xenobiotics represent as yet unrecognized sources of •NO in the body.

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Relationship between endothelial nitric oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Introduction: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the enzyme in charge of nitric oxide production, plays a crucial role in vascular biology. However, the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affecting the gene encoding for eNOS (eNOS) on coronary artery diseases remains under debate and no data were ...

  15. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joles, JA; Vos, IH; Grone, HJ; Rabelink, TJ

    The importance of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been well established. Endothelium-derived nitric oxide has been shown to be essential for vascular homeostasis and modulation of eNOS has thus become a target in prevention of cardiovascular disease. The role of the

  16. Relationship between endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the enzyme in charge of nitric oxide production, plays a crucial role in vascular biology. However, the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affecting the gene encoding for eNOS (eNOS) on coronary artery diseases remains under debate and no data were ...

  17. Cervical nitric oxide release in women postterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen-Tommiska, Mervi; Nuutila, Mika; Ylikorkala, Olavi

    2004-04-01

    Nitric oxide may be a factor in cervical ripening. We compared the nitric oxide metabolite levels in cervical fluid in women going beyond term and in women delivering spontaneously at term. We studied a total of 208 women with singleton pregnancies: 108 women who went beyond term (294 days or longer), and 100 women who went spontaneously into labor at term. Cervical fluid samples, collected well before the initiation of labor, were assessed for nitric oxide metabolites using an assay with a detection limit of 3.8 micromol/L. Women going beyond term had detectable levels of nitric oxide metabolites in their cervical fluid (60%) less often (P =.001) than women delivering at term (87%). The nitric oxide metabolite concentration in cervical fluid in women going beyond term (median 23.5 micromol/L; 95% confidence interval less than 3.8, 31.8) was 4.5 times lower (P postterm labor were included in the comparison. Both nulliparous (median less than 3.8 micromol/L) and parous (median 31.3 micromol/L) women going beyond term had lower (P postterm group, women with cervical fluid nitric oxide metabolite concentrations at or below the median failed more often (P <.001) to progress in labor and had longer (P =.02) duration of labor than those with cervical fluid nitric oxide metabolite concentrations above the median. Reduced cervical nitric oxide release may contribute to prolonged pregnancy. II-2

  18. Pu-erh Tea Reduces Nitric Oxide Levels in Rats by Inhibiting Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression through Toll-Like Receptor 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Guan; Li, Chunjie; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Hang; Sheng, Jun; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Pu-erh tea undergoes a unique fermentation process and contains theabrownins, polysaccharides and caffeine; although it is unclear about which component is associated with the down regulation of nitric oxide levels or how this process is mediated. To address this question we examined the effects of pu-erh tea on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes. Cohorts of rats were separately given four-week treatments of water as control, pu-erh tea, or the tea components: theabrownins, caffeine or polysaccharides. Five experimental groups were injected with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to induce nitric oxide (NO) production, while the corresponding five control groups were injected with saline as a negative control. The serum and liver NO concentrations were examined and the NOS expression of both mRNA and protein was measured in liver. The results showed that the rats which were fed pu-erh tea or polysaccharides had lower levels of NO which corresponded with the down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. We further demonstrate that this effect is mediated through reduction of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Thus we find that the polysaccharide components in pu-erh tea reduce NO levels in an animal model by inhibiting the iNOS expression via signaling through TLR4. PMID:22837686

  19. Role of nitric oxide in non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic inhibitory junction potentials in canine ileocolonic sphincter.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, S. M.; McKeen, E. S.; Sanders, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. Electrical field stimulation causes neurally-mediated relaxation of the ileocolonic sphincter that is due to activation of non-adrenergic and non-cholinergic (NANC) nerves. Recent studies have suggested that nitric oxide (NO) is the neurotransmitter that mediates relaxation. 2. Using intracellular recording techniques, we have tested whether NANC inhibitory junction potentials (i.j.ps) in the canine ileocolonic sphincter are also mediated by NO. 3. Electrical field stimulation elicited exc...

  20. Decreased neuronal nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA and somatostatin messenger RNA in the striatum of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, P J; Waldvogel, H J; Faull, R L; Love, D R; Emson, P C

    1996-06-01

    The cellular abundance of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and somatostatin messenger RNAs was compared in the caudate nucleus, putamen and sensorimotor cortex of Huntington's disease and control cases. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA was significantly decreased in the caudate nucleus and putamen, but not in the sensorimotor cortex in Huntington's disease; the decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA became more pronounced with the severity of the disease. Somatostatin gene expression was significantly decreased in the dorsal putamen in Huntington's disease, but was essentially unchanged in all other regions examined. The density of neurons expressing detectable levels of neuronal nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA was reduced in the striata of Huntington's disease cases with advanced pathology; the density of neurons expressing detectable levels of somatostatin messenger RNA was similar in control and Huntington's disease cases. Neuropeptide Y-, somatostatin- and NADPH-diaphorase-positive neurons were consistently present throughout the striatum across all the grades of the disease. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase and NADPH-diaphorase activity (a histochemical marker for nitric oxide synthase-containing neurons) co-localize with somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in interneurons in the human striatum and cerebral cortex. Although the neurodegeneration associated with Huntington's disease is most evident in the striatum (particularly the dorsal regions), neuronal nitric oxide synthase/neuropeptide Y/somatostatin interneurons are relatively spared. Nitric oxide released by neuronal nitric oxide synthase-containing neurons may mediate glutamate-induced excitotoxic cell death, a mechanism proposed to be instrumental in causing the neurodegeneration seen in Huntington's disease. The results described here suggest that although the population of interneurons containing somatostatin, neuropeptide Y and neuronal nitric oxide synthase do survive in

  1. Nitric oxide signaling in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J J David; Man, H S Jeffrey; Marsden, Philip A

    2012-03-01

    Endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) is classically viewed as a regulator of vasomotor tone. NO plays an important role in regulating O(2) delivery through paracrine control of vasomotor tone locally and cardiovascular and respiratory responses centrally. Very soon after the cloning and functional characterization of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), studies on the interaction between O(2) and NO made the paradoxical finding that hypoxia led to decreases in eNOS expression and function. Why would decreases in O(2) content in tissues elicit a loss of a potent endothelial-derived vasodilator? We now know that restricting our view of NO as a regulator of vasomotor tone or blood pressure limited deeper levels of mechanistic insight. Exciting new studies indicate that functional interactions between NO and O(2) exhibit profound complexity and are relevant to diseases states, especially those associated with hypoxia in tissues. NOS isoforms catalytically require O(2). Hypoxia regulates steady-state expression of the mRNA and protein abundance of the NOS enzymes. Animals genetically deficient in NOS isoforms have perturbations in their ability to adapt to changes in O(2) supply or demand. Most interestingly, the intracellular pathways for O(2) sensing that evolved to ensure an appropriate balance of O(2) delivery and utilization intersect with NO signaling networks. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilization and transcriptional activity is achieved through two parallel pathways: (1) a decrease in O(2)-dependent prolyl hydroxylation of HIF and (2) S-nitrosylation of HIF pathway components. Recent findings support a role for S-nitrosothiols as hypoxia-mimetics in certain biological and/or disease settings, such as living at high altitude, exposure to small molecules that can bind NO, or anemia.

  2. Role of nitric oxide in long-term potentiation of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E

    2000-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the role of nitric oxide in long-term potentiation induced in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by high-frequency stimulation of the primary vestibular afferents. The nitric oxide scavenger [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide ] and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester were administered before and after induction of potentiation. Both drugs completely prevented long-term potentiation, whereas they did not impede the potentiation build-up, or affect the already established potentiation. These results demonstrate that the induction, but not the maintenance of vestibular long-term potentiation, depends on the synthesis and release into the extracellular medium of nitric oxide. In addition, we analysed the effect of the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside on vestibular responses. Sodium nitroprusside induced long-term potentiation, as evidenced through the field potential enhancement and unit peak latency decrease. This potentiation was impeded by D, L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, and was reduced under blockade of synaptosomal platelet-activating factor receptors by ginkgolide B and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors by (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid. When reduced, potentiation fully developed following the washout of antagonist, demonstrating an involvement of platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in its full development. Potentiation induced by sodium nitroprusside was also associated with a decrease in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio, which persisted under ginkgolide B, indicating that nitric oxide increases glutamate release independently of platelet-activating factor-mediated presynaptic events. We suggest that nitric oxide, released after the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, acts as a retrograde messenger leading to an enhancement of glutamate release to a

  3. [Higher nitric oxide levels are associated with disease activity in Egyptian rheumatoid arthritis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Adel Mahmoud; Habeeb, Reem Abdelmonem; El-Azizi, Noran Osama; Khattab, Dina Aziz; Abo-Shady, Rania Ahmed; Elkabarity, Rania Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress generated within inflammatory joints can produce autoimmune phenomena and joint destruction. Radical species with oxidative activity, including reactive nitrogen species, represent mediators of inflammation and cartilage damage. To assess serum nitric oxide as a marker of oxidative stress in Egyptian patients with rheumatoid arthritis and its relation to disease activity. 80 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were divided into 2 groups, according to the DAS-28 score: Group I: 42 patients with disease activity, and Group II: 38 patients with no disease activity. Forty age- and sex-matched individuals were included as control group (Group III). Routine laboratory investigations were done, and nitric oxide was measured using Elisa. Hand plain radiographies were done for radiological status scoring using the Sharp method. A comparison between nitric oxide in all three groups showed a highly significant difference (p < 0.001), significantly higher levels were obtained among rheumatoid arthritis patients in comparison to controls, and higher levels were obtained in patients with active disease (mean±SD 82.38±20.46) in comparison to patients without active disease (35.53±7.15). Nitric oxide in Group I showed a significant positive correlation with morning stiffness (r=0.45), arthritis (r=0.43), platelet count (r=0.46), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.83), C-reactive protein (r=0.76) and Disease Activity Score (r=0.85). Nitric oxide showed a significant positive correlation (r=0.43) with hand radiographies (Sharp score) in Group I. There are increased levels of nitric oxide in the serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Nitric oxide correlates significantly with disease activity, inflammatory markers and radiological joint status. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitric oxide in marine photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Castellano, Immacolata; Patti, Francesco Paolo; Palumbo, Anna; Buia, Maria Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide is a versatile and powerful signaling molecule in plants. However, most of our understanding stems from studies on terrestrial plants and very little is known about marine autotrophs. This review summarizes current knowledge about the source of nitric oxide synthesis in marine photosynthetic organisms and its role in various physiological processes under normal and stress conditions. The interactions of nitric oxide with other stress signals and cross talk among secondary messengers are also highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Revised reference model for nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, J. C.; Bailey, P. L.; Craig, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    A nearly global set of data on the nitric acid distribution was obtained for seven months by the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The evaluation of the accuracy, precision, and resolution of these data is described, and a description of the major features of the nitric acid distributions is presented. The zonal mean for nitric acid is distributed in a stratospheric layer that peaks near 30 mb, with the largest mixing ratios occurring in polar regions, especially in winter.

  6. Nitric oxide mediates iron‐induced ferritin accumulation in Arabidopsis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murgia, Irene; Delledonne, Massimo; Soave, Carlo

    2002-01-01

    .... During the last few years, NO has also been detected in several plant species and the increasing number of reports on its function in plants have implicated NO as an important effector of growth...

  7. Óxido nítrico: revisão Nitric oxide: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nereide Freire Cerqueira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O óxido nítrico é um mediador gasoso responsável por uma variedade de fenômenos fisiológicos. A l-arginina é a precursora da síntese do óxido nítrico, na presença de óxido nítrico-sintase. Este artigo revê as funções das óxido nítrico-sintases e como o óxido nítrico atua na permeabilidade vascular e na síndrome de isquemia e reperfusão, assim como possíveis métodos para sua mensuração.Nitric oxide is a gaseous mediator responsible for a variety of physiologic effects. The l-arginine is the precursor of the synthesis of nitric oxide in presence of nitric oxide synthase. This article reviews the functions of nitric oxide synthases, the action of nitric oxide on vascular permeability and ischemia-reperfusion injury, as well as possible methods for determination of NO.

  8. Salicylates, nitric oxide, malaria, and Reye's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, I; Whitten, R; Molyneux, M; Taylor, T

    2001-02-24

    Reye's syndrome virtually disappeared from much of the world after the use of salicylate in febrile children was successfully discouraged. This severe sepsis-like disease was thought to be caused by a hypersensitivity to salicylates in children with mild viral infections, although no mechanism consistent with this proposal was ever established. Salicylate toxicity in African children has been noted to have many clinical features in common with severe falciparum malaria, including acidosis, altered consciousness, convulsions, and hypoglycaemia. Salicylates are widely available in various formulations in many African countries, and are commonly used for initial treatment of the symptoms that malaria shares with other diseases. There is now experimental evidence that salicylate increases and prolongs the activity of key elements along the signalling pathway through which interferon gamma generates inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and we have shown that iNOS is strongly expressed in fatal malaria and other acute fevers in African children. We further propose that, in areas where salicyaltes are still used to treat the symptoms of febrile illnesses in children, this mechanism could exacerbate potentially serious infectious diseases, including falciparum malaria. In contrast, the absence of salicylate use in children in some Pacific islands could contribute to the milder outcome of falciparum malaria than is observed in Africa. Widespread expression of iNOS has also been seen in the tissues of a patient with fatal clinically defined Reye's syndrome. This finding suggests that Reye's syndrome can be mediated through salicylate enhancement of iNOS expression, the initial trigger in this instance usually being a viral infection.

  9. A nuclear magnetic resonance (1H and 13C) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (delta13C, delta2H and delta18O) study of Andalusian olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramendía, María A; Marinas, Alberto; Marinas, José M; Sánchez, Elena; Urbano, Francisco J; Guillou, Claude; Moreno Rojas, José M; Moalem, Mustafa; Rallo, Luis

    2010-05-30

    We have determined delta(13)C, delta(2)H and delta(18)O isotopic abundances in Andalusian olive oils. In addition, the fatty acid composition and the distribution of isomers at positions 1,3 and 2 of glycerol were determined by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, respectively. Isotopic results obtained for four series of oil samples extracted from olives harvested in the 2004/05 and 2005/06 seasons are discussed in terms of olive variety, ripeness, geographical origin, fatty acid composition and growing altitude. A distinction was also established between olives grown in irrigated and in dry land by studying selected samples of the previous series and others from the 2005/06, 2006/07, 2007/08 and 2008/09 seasons. The results showed that olive ripeness does not influence the abundance of any of the three isotopes studied. On the other hand, the olive variety influences the abundance of the oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, and also, less markedly, that of carbon. No clear-cut effect of height or latitude on isotope values is observed, probably because the olive variety also changes with height and latitude, thus masking such influences. The oil samples from dryland-grown olives had increased delta(13)C values relative to irrigation-grown olives. In addition, no definite relationship appears to exist between isotope distribution and fatty acid composition. Finally, oil samples from olives harvested in the 2005/06 season in Italy could be distinguished from those from Spain in terms of their isotopic values (delta(2)H mainly). Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family...

  11. Nitric oxide donors for treating preterm labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckitt, Kirsten; Thornton, Steve; O'Donovan, Oliver P; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-05-08

    A number of tocolytics have been advocated for the treatment of threatened preterm labour in order to delay birth. The rationale is that a delay in birth may be associated with improved neonatal morbidity or mortality. Nitric oxide donors, such as nitroglycerin, have been used to relax the uterus. This review addresses their efficacy, adverse effects and influence on neonatal outcome. To determine whether nitric oxide donors administered in threatened preterm labour are associated with a delay in birth, adverse effects or improved neonatal outcome. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (1 December 2013). Randomised controlled trials of nitric oxide donors administered for tocolysis. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Twelve trials, including a total of 1227 women at risk of preterm labour, contributed data to this updated review. The methodological quality of trials was mixed; trials comparing nitric oxide donors with other types of tocolytics were not blinded and this may have had an impact on findings.Three studies compared nitric oxide donors (glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)) with placebo. There was no significant evidence that nitric oxide donors prolonged pregnancy beyond 48 hours (average risk ratio (RR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74 to 1.90, two studies, 186 women), and although for most adverse effects there was no significant difference between groups, women in the active treatment group in one study were at higher risk of experiencing a headache. For infant outcomes there was no significant evidence that nitric oxide donors reduced the risk of neonatal death or serious morbidity (stillbirth RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.01 to 8.59, one study, 153 infants; neonatal death RR 0.43, 95% CI 0.06 to 2.89, two studies, 186 infants). One study, using a composite outcome, reported a reduced risk of serious adverse outcomes for infants in the GTN group which approached statistical significance (RR

  12. Nitric oxide in cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huiwen; Wang, Lei; Mollica, Molly; Re, Anthony T; Wu, Shiyong; Zuo, Li

    2014-10-10

    Cancer metastasis is the spread and growth of tumor cells from the original neoplasm to further organs. This review analyzes the role of nitric oxide (NO), a signaling molecule, in the regulation of cancer formation, progression, and metastasis. The action of NO on cancer relies on multiple factors including cell type, metastasis stage, and organs involved. Various chemotherapy drugs cause cells to release NO, which in turn induces cytotoxic death of breast, liver, and skin tumors. However, NO has also been clinically connected to a poor cancer prognosis because of its role in angiogenesis and intravasation. This supports the claim that NO can be characterized as both pro-metastatic and anti-metastatic, depending on specific factors. The inhibition of cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis pathways by NO donors has been proposed as a novel therapy to various cancers. Studies suggest that NO-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs act on cancer cells in several ways that may make them ideal for cancer therapy. This review summarizes the biological significance of NO in each step of cancer metastasis, its controversial effects for cancer progression, and its therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitric Oxide for preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Sánchez Luna

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO is a selective pulmonary vasodilator that has demonstrated its efficacy when used to treat severe hypoxemic respiratory failure associated to pulmonary hypertension in term or near term newborns since 1992. Premature newborn infants are not included in the approved indication of iNO use, but in some circumstances, when pulmonary hypertension is associated to severe respiratory failure iNO has been demonstrated as an effective therapy to improve respiratory failure. Also iNO demonstrated in animal studies its potential use to treat or prevent BPD, but clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any beneficial effect of this drug when used as routine or rescue therapy, and probably only in a selected group of preterm infants, used soon after delivery and not severely ill it could have a role if any. The neuro-protective effect found in some experimental studies and clinical reports gives a new attractive potential indication of iNO use in this population, but current data of follow-up multicenter randomized controlled trials do not support this effect. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  14. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  15. Intersection of interferon and hypoxia signal transduction pathways in nitric oxide-induced tumor apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendler, D S; Bao, C; Wang, T; Huang, E L; Ratovitski, E A; Pardoll, D A; Lowenstein, C J

    2001-05-01

    Activated macrophages play a central role in antitumor immunity. However, the stimuli that activate macrophages to kill tumor cells are not completely understood. Because the center of solid tumors can be hypoxic, we hypothesized that hypoxia may be an important signal in activating macrophages to kill tumor cells. Hypoxia stimulates IFN-primed macrophages to express the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) and to synthesize nitric oxide (NO). We show that this synergy between IFN and hypoxia is mediated by the direct interaction of the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), which are both required for the hypoxic transcription of NOS2. This interaction between HIF-1 and IRF-1 may explain the mechanism by which macrophages infiltrating into tumors are activated to express NOS2 and to produce NO, a mediator of tumor apoptosis.

  16. Investigating nitric oxide signalling involvement in the antidepressant action of ketamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina

    2012-01-01

    Stress-induced excessive glutamate transmission at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA-R’s) may underlie a primary mechanism in the physiology that leads to depression, and ketamine, an NMDA-R antagonist, has been shown to rapidly relieve depression in humans. A number of downstream mechanisms...... have been suggested to mediate the antidepressant action of ketamine, including the activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (or Akt) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). However, the mechanism(s) that are affected immediately downstream of NMDA......-R’s remain unclear. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is directly coupled to and activated by NMDA-R’s, and the uncoupling of the nNOS-NMDA-R complex prevents NMDA-R-mediated excitotoxicity. Therefore, we investigated whether the antidepressant mechanism of ketamine involves the inhibition of nitric...

  17. A possible role for nitric oxide in osteoclastogenesis associated with cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Y; Pashia, Mary E; Nishimoto, Sheri Y; Faddis, Brian T; Chole, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential role of nitric oxide in cholesteatoma-induced bone resorption, in vitro and in vivo. Cholesteatoma is a disease of inflammatory bone resorption in the middle ear leading to hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Inappropriate activation of osteoclasts causes the morbidity associated with this disease. Previous studies suggest nitric oxide may be an important mediator of osteoclast function. A murine model of cholesteatoma induced bone resorption was used to demonstrate nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene expression and the effect of a NOS inhibitor. An in vitro osteoclast culture method was used to demonstrate the effect of nitric oxide on isolated osteoclasts. Osteoclast development was assayed by counting the number of mature osteoclasts; activity was assayed by measuring the amount of resorbed bone. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction results demonstrated the temporal expression of all three NOS isoforms in vivo. NOS I demonstrated very low levels of expressions throughout the duration of the study with no change in expression in response to keratin implant. Similarly, NOS III also demonstrated low levels of expression and no change in response to keratin. NOS II was highly upregulated in response to keratin throughout the duration of the study. In vitro, pharmacological nitric oxide donors--sodium nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine--dose-dependently stimulated osteoclast resorption. Alone, interferon gamma (IFNgamma)--but not IL-1beta or TNFalpha--generated nitrite in vitro. A cytokine cocktail of IL-1beta, TNFalpha, and IFNgamma synergistically enhanced nitrite production. Nitrite production was blocked by the addition of aminoguanidine (AG), suggesting that AG-inhibited cytokine mediated nitrite production. However, in an in vivo model of cholesteatoma-induced bone resorption, the osteoclast response of AG-treated mice was not statistically different from

  18. Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Modulating Effects of Nitric Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Fang; Diers, Anne R.; Hogg, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Altered metabolic phenotype has been recognized as a hallmark of tumor cells for many years, but this aspect of the cancer phenotype has come into greater focus in recent years. NOS2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase of iNOS) has been implicated as a component in many aggressive tumor phenotypes, including melanoma, glioblastoma and breast cancer. Nitric oxide has been well established as a modulator of cellular bioenergetics pathways, in many ways similar to the alteration of cellular metabolism observed in aggressive tumors. In this review we attempt to bring these concepts together with the general hypothesis that one function of NOS2 and NO in cancer is to modulate metabolic processes to facilitate increased tumor aggression. There are many mechanisms by which NO can modulate tumor metabolism, including direct inhibition of respiration, alterations in mitochondrial mass, oxidative inhibition of bioenergetic enzymes, and the stimulation of secondary signaling pathways. Here we review metabolic alterations in the context of cancer cells and discuss the role of NO as a potential mediator of these changes. PMID:25464273

  19. Nitric oxide production and nitric oxide synthase expression in acute human renal allograft rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, EWJA; van Goor, H; Tiebosch, ATMG; Moshage, H; Tegzess, Adam; Stegeman, CA

    2000-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which are either constitutively expressed in the kidney or inducible, in resident and infiltrating cells during inflammation and allograft rejection. NO is rapidly degraded to the stable end products nitrite and nitrate, which

  20. Diminished citrulline-arginine-nitric oxide production rates are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis incidence in premature pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major gastrointestinal disease in premature infants that is associated with formula feeding and intestinal hypoxia. Low arginine availability in these infants has been linked to NEC since arginine is the sole precursor of nitric oxide (NO), a critical mediator of...

  1. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the trigeminal vascular system and other brain structures related to pain in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Ploug, Kenneth Beri; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is considered to be a key mediator in the pathophysiology of migraine but the localisation of NO synthesizing enzymes (NOS) throughout the pain pathways involved in migraine has not yet been fully investigated. We have used quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting...

  2. VDR dependent and independent effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on nitric oxide production by osteoblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, H.M.E.; van den Heuvel, E.G.H.M.; Carmeliet, G.; Schaafsma, A.; Klein-Nulend, J.; Bakker, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) strongly mediates bone mass. Mechanical stimulation also affects bone mass, partly via enhancing nitric oxide (NO) production by osteoblasts. We aimed to determine whether 1,25(OH)2D3 affects NO production by osteoblasts in the presence or absence of mechanical

  3. Expression of nitric oxide synthases and formation of nitrotyrosine and reactive oxygen species in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, G; Moshage, H; Van Dullemen, HM; De Jager-Krikken, A; Tiebosch, ATMG; Kleibeuker, JH; Jansen, PLM; Van Goor, H

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), NO in IBD can be either harmful or protective. NO can react with superoxide anions (O-2(.-)), yielding the toxic oxidizing agent peroxynitrite (ONOO-). Peroxynitrite

  4. Oxygen tension regulates the nitric oxide pathway. Physiological role in penile erection.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, N.; Vardi, Y.; Padma-Nathan, H; Daley, J; Goldstein, I; Saenz de Tejada, I.

    1993-01-01

    Relaxation of the trabecular smooth muscle of the corpus cavernosum (the erectile tissue) of the penis is mediated by nitric oxide released by the nerves and endothelium. We have investigated the physiological role of oxygen tension in the regulation of trabecular smooth muscle tone. In human subjects, measurement of intracavernosal PO2 in blood drawn from corpus cavernosum in the flaccid state was comparable to that of venous blood (25-43 mmHg). Vasodilatation of the resistance arteries and ...

  5. Indirect evaluation of corneal apoptosis in contact lens wearers by estimation of nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Bhatia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Contact lens induced trauma to the corneal epithelium results in increased release of inflammatory mediators. The keratocyte apoptosis is directly related to epithelial injury and has been correlated with increased production of nitric oxide. Potent antioxidant enzymes protect cells from oxidative damage by inactivating reactive oxygen species and thus inhibiting apoptosis. This study aims at determination of total nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in tears which will be an indirect criteria for assessing apoptosis. Materials and Methods : Nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes were estimated in tears of 25 soft contact lens wearers and compared with 25 age and sex matched controls. Results : Statistically significant increase of nitric oxide (P< 0.001, superoxide dismutase (P< 0.001 and glutathione peroxidase (P< 0.001 levels was seen in tears of contact lens wearers as compared to controls. There was also statistically significant increase in the levels of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (P< 0.05 and glutathione peroxidase (P< 0.01, with increase in the total duration of contact lens wear in years. Conclusions : Increase in the level of nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in tears of contact lens wearers suggested that contact lens wear suppresses the process of apoptosis. However, it was also postulated that the increased levels of nitric oxide balances the anti-apoptotic activities of increased levels of antioxidant enzymes by its pro-apoptotic activity leading to protective outcomes in contact lens wearers.

  6. Dispersal of human and plant pathogens biofilms via nitric oxide donors at 4 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Durie, Ian A; Henríquez, Tania; Satkute, Aiste; Matuszewska, Marta; Prado, Raphael Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide donors capable of manipulating nitric oxide-mediated signaling in bacteria could induce dispersal of biofilms. Encased in extracellular polymeric substances, human and plant pathogens within biofilms are significantly more resistant to sanitizers. This is particularly a problem in refrigerated environments where food is processed. In an exercise aimed to study the potential of nitric oxide donors as biofilm dispersal in refrigerated conditions, we compared the ability of different nitric oxide donors (SNAP, NO-aspirin and Noc-5) to dislodge biofilms formed by foodborne, human and plant pathogens treated at 4 °C. The donors SNAP and Noc-5 were efficient in dispersing biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica, pathogenic Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua. The biomasses were decreased up to 30 % when compared with the untreated controls. When the plant pathogens Pectobacterium sp. and Xanthomonas sp. were tested the dispersion was mainly limited to Pectobacterium carotovorum biofilms, decreasing up to 15 % after exposure to molsidomine. Finally, the association of selected nitric oxide donors with sanitizers (DiQuat, H2O2, peracetic acid and PhenoTek II) was effective in dispersing biofilms. The best dispersal was achieved by pre-treating P. carotovorum with molsidomine and then peracetic acid. The synergistic effect was estimated up to ~35 % in dispersal when compared with peracetic acid alone. The association of nitric oxide donors with sanitizers could provide a foundation for an improved sanitization procedure for cleaning refrigerate environments.

  7. Tetrahydrobiopterin Protects Against Hypertrophic Heart Disease Independent of Myocardial Nitric Oxide Synthase Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Toru; Sivakumaran, Vidhya; Carnicer, Ricardo; Zhu, Guangshuo; Hahn, Virginia S; Bedja, Djahida; Recalde, Alice; Duglan, Drew; Channon, Keith M; Casadei, Barbara; Kass, David A

    2016-03-21

    Nitric oxide synthase uncoupling occurs under conditions of oxidative stress modifying the enzyme's function so it generates superoxide rather than nitric oxide. Nitric oxide synthase uncoupling occurs with chronic pressure overload, and both are ameliorated by exogenous tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-a cofactor required for normal nitric oxide synthase function-supporting a pathophysiological link. Genetically augmenting BH4 synthesis in endothelial cells fails to replicate this benefit, indicating that other cell types dominate the effects of exogenous BH4 administration. We tested whether the primary cellular target of BH4 is the cardiomyocyte or whether other novel mechanisms are invoked. Mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (mGCH1) and wild-type littermates underwent transverse aortic constriction. The mGCH1 mice had markedly increased myocardial BH4 and, unlike wild type, maintained nitric oxide synthase coupling after transverse aortic constriction; however, the transverse aortic constriction-induced abnormalities in cardiac morphology and function were similar in both groups. In contrast, exogenous BH4 supplementation improved transverse aortic constricted hearts in both groups, suppressed multiple inflammatory cytokines, and attenuated infiltration of inflammatory macrophages into the heart early after transverse aortic constriction. BH4 protection against adverse remodeling in hypertrophic cardiac disease is not driven by its prevention of myocardial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, as presumed previously. Instead, benefits from exogenous BH4 are mediated by a protective effect coupled to suppression of inflammatory pathways and myocardial macrophage infiltration. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  8. Estimation of nitric oxide as an inflammatory marker in periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menaka K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is not only important in host defense and homeostasis but it is also regarded as harmful and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The presence of NO in periodontal disease may reflect the participation of an additional mediator of bone resorption responsible for disease progression. The aim of this study was to assess the level of NO in serum in chronic periodontitis, and correlate these levels with the severity of periodontal disease. Sixty subjects participated in the study and were divided into two groups. NO levels were assayed by measuring the accumulation of stable oxidative metabolite, nitrite with Griess reaction. Results showed subjects with periodontitis had significantly high nitrite in serum than healthy subjects. NO production is increased in periodontal disease, this will enable us to understand its role in disease progression and selective inhibition of NO may be of therapeutic utility in limiting the progression of periodontitis.

  9. Nitric Oxide Synthase and Cyclooxygenase Pathways: A Complex Interplay in Cellular Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The cellular reaction to external challenges is a tightly regulated process consisting of integrated processes mediated by a variety of signaling molecules, generated as a result of modulation of corresponding biosynthetic systems. Both, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) systems, consist of constitutive forms (NOS1, NOS3 and COX-1), which are mostly involved in housekeeping tasks, and inducible forms (NOS2 and COX-2), which shape the cellular response to stress and variety of bioactive agents. The complex interplay between NOS and COX pathways can be observed at least at three levels. Firstly, products of NOS and Cox systems can mediate the regulation and the expression of inducible forms (NOS2 and COX-2) in response of similar and dissimilar stimulus. Secondly, the reciprocal modulation of cyclooxygenase activity by nitric oxide and NOS activity by prostaglandins at the posttranslational level has been shown to occur. Mechanisms by which nitric oxide can modulate prostaglandin synthesis include direct S-nitrosylation of COX and inactivation of prostaglandin I synthase by peroxynitrite, product of superoxide reaction with nitric oxide. Prostaglandins, conversely, can promote an increased association of dynein light chain (DLC) (also known as protein inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase) with NOS1, thereby reducing its activity. The third level of interplay is provided by intracellular crosstalk of signaling pathways stimulated by products of NOS and COX which contributes significantly to the complexity of cellular signaling. Since modulation of COX and NOS pathways was shown to be principally involved in a variety of pathological conditions, the dissection of their complex relationship is needed for better understanding of possible therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on implications of interplay between NOS and COX for cellular function and signal integration.

  10. The Chemical Biology of Nitric Oxide. Implications in Cellular Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Douglas D.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Flores-Santana, Wilmarie; Switzer, Christopher H.; Donzellie, Sonia; Hussain, Perwez; Vecoli, Cecilia; Paolocci, Nazareno; Ambs, Stefan; Colton, Carol; Harris, Curtis; Roberts, David D.; Wink, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has earned the reputation of being a signaling mediator with many diverse and often opposing biological activities. The diversity in response to this simple diatomic molecule comes from the enormous variety of chemical reactions and biological properties associated with it. In the last few years, the importance of steady state NO concentrations have emerged as a key determinant of its biological function. Precise cellular responses are differentially regulated by specific NO concentration. We propose 5 basic distinct concentration levels of NO activity; cGMP mediated processes ([NO] 400 nM) and nitrosative stress (1 µM). In general, lower NO concentrations promote cell survival and proliferation, while higher levels favor cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence. Free radical interactions will also influence NO signaling. One of the consequences of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is to reduce NO concentrations. This antagonizes the signaling of nitric oxide and in some cases results in converting a cell cycle arrest profile to a cell survival one. The resulting reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated from these reactions can also have biological effects and increase oxidative and nitrosative stress responses. A number of factors determine the formation of NO and its concentration, such as diffusion, consumption, and substrate availability which are referred to as Kinetic Determinants for Molecular Target Interactions. These are the chemical and biochemical parameters that shape cellular responses to NO. Herein we discuss signal transduction and the chemical biology of NO in terms of the direct and indirect reactions. PMID:18439435

  11. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Nianzhen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca2+ elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca2+ elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca2+ wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca2+ signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca2+-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca2+ signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca2+, possibly through store-operated Ca2+ channels. The NO-induced Ca2+ signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca2+ change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca2+ influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca2+ release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca2+ elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca2+ wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by

  12. Nitric-oxide synthase is a mechanical signal transducer that modulates talin and vinculin expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidball, J. G.; Spencer, M. J.; Wehling, M.; Lavergne, E.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli can cause changes in muscle mass and structure which indicate that mechanisms exist for transducing mechanical stimuli into signals that influence gene expression. Myotendinous junctions show adaptations to modified muscle loading which suggest that these are transcriptionally distinct domains in muscle fibers that may experience local regulation of expression of structural proteins that are concentrated at these sites. Vinculin and talin are cytoskeletal proteins that are highly enriched at myotendinous junctions that we hypothesize to be subject to local transcriptional regulation. Our findings show that mechanical stimulation of muscle cells in vivo and in vitro causes an increase in the expression of vinculin and talin that is mediated by nitric oxide. Furthermore, nitric oxide-stimulated increases in vinculin and talin expression occur through a protein kinase G-dependent pathway and therefore differ from other mechanisms through which nitric oxide has been shown previously to modulate transcription. Analysis of vinculin mRNA distribution in mechanically stimulated muscle fibers shows that the mRNA is highly concentrated at myotendinous junctions, which supports the hypothesis that myotendinous junctions are distinct domains in which the expression of cytoskeletal proteins is modulated by mechanical stimuli through a nitric oxide and protein kinase G-dependent pathway.

  13. Antenatal insults modify newborn olfactory function by nitric oxide produced from neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander; Yu, Lei; Yang, Yirong; Khalid, Syed; Luo, Kehuan; Jiang, Rugang; Ji, Haitao; Derrick, Matthew; Kay, Leslie; Silverman, Richard B; Tan, Sidhartha

    2012-10-01

    Newborn feeding, maternal, bonding, growth and wellbeing depend upon intact odor recognition in the early postnatal period. Antenatal stress may affect postnatal odor recognition. We investigated the exact role of a neurotransmitter, nitric oxide (NO), in newborn olfactory function. We hypothesized that olfactory neuron activity depended on NO generated by neuronal NO synthase (NOS). Utilizing in vivo functional manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in a rabbit model of cerebral palsy we had shown previously that in utero hypoxia-ischemia (H-I) at E22 (70% gestation) resulted in impaired postnatal response to odorants and poor feeding. With the same antenatal insult, we manipulated NO levels in the olfactory neuron in postnatal day 1 (P1) kits by administration of intranasal NO donors or a highly selective nNOS inhibitor. Olfactory function was quantitatively measured by the response to amyl acetate stimulation by MEMRI. The relevance of nNOS to normal olfactory development was confirmed by the increase of nNOS gene expression from fetal ages to P1 in olfactory epithelium and bulbs. In control kits, nNOS inhibition decreased NO production in the olfactory system and increased MEMRI slope enhancement. In H-I kits the MEMRI slope did not increase, implicating modification of endogenous NO-mediated olfactory function by the antenatal insult. NO donors as a source of exogenous NO did not significantly change function in either group. In conclusion, olfactory epithelium nNOS in newborn rabbits probably modulates olfactory signal transduction. Antenatal H-I injury remote from delivery may affect early functional development of the olfactory system by decreasing NO-dependent signal transduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... NOS3 gene polymorphisms and clinical parameters in patients with periodontal disease. Genomic DNA was obtained from the ... Key words: Periodontal diseases, nitric oxide synthases gene, DNA, PCR. INTRODUCTION ... various diseases' pathogenesis because of its dual role. *Corresponding author.

  15. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  16. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) is involved in key steps of immune response. Genetic factors predispose individuals to periodontal disease. This study's aim was to explore the association between NOS3 gene polymorphisms and clinical parameters in patients with periodontal disease. Genomic DNA was obtained ...

  17. Nitric oxide formation from nitrite in zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a potential nitric oxide (NO) donor and may have important biological functions at low concentrations. The present study tests the hypothesis that nitrite accumulation across the gills in fish will cause a massive NO production from nitrite. Zebrafish were exposed to three different...

  18. Synthesis of nitric oxide in human osteoblasts in response to physiologic stimulation of electrotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Ayman; Kim, Paul; Cho, Michael

    2006-12-01

    Electrotherapy for bone healing, remodeling and wound healing may be mediated by modulation of nitric oxide (NO). Using NO-specific fluorophore (DAF-2), we report here that application of non-invasive, physiologic electrical stimulation induces NO synthesis in human osteoblasts, and that such NO generation is comparable to that induced by estrogen treatment. For example, application of a sinusoidal 1 Hz, 2 V/cm (peak to peak) electrical stimulation (ES) increases NO-bound DAF-2 fluorescence intensity by a 2-fold within 60 min exposure by activating nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Increase in the NO level is found to depend critically on the frequency and strength of ES. While the frequency of 1 Hz ES seems optimal, the ES strength >0.5 V/cm is required to induce significant NO increase, however. Nitric oxide synthesis in response to ES is completely prevented by blocking estrogen receptors using a competitive inhibitor, suggesting that NO generation is likely initiated by activation of estrogen receptors at the cell surface. Based on these findings, physiologic stimulation of electrotherapy appears to represent a potential non-invasive, non-genomic, and novel physical technique that could be used to regulate NO-mediated bone density and facilitate bone remodeling without adverse effects associated with hormone therapy.

  19. DOES BRACHIAL ARTERY FMD PROVIDE A BIOASSAY FOR NITRIC OXIDE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Ives, Stephen J.; McDaniel, John; Trinity, Joel D.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Supiano, Mark A.; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to better define the role of nitric oxide (NO) in brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) in young, healthy humans. Brachial artery blood velocity and diameter were determined (ultrasound Doppler) in eight volunteers (26 ± 1 yrs) before and after 5-min forearm circulatory occlusion with and without intra-arterial infusion of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor L-NMMA (0.48 mg/dl/min). Control (CON) and L-NMMA trials were performed with the occlusion cuff placed in the traditional distal position, as well as proximal to the measurement site. FMD was significantly reduced, but not abolished, by L-NMMA in the distal cuff trial (8.9 ± 1.3 to 6.0 ± 0.7%, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.02), with no effect of L-NMMA on FMD with proximal cuff placement (10.6 ± 1.2 to 12.4 ± 1.7%, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.39). When the reduction in shear stimulus following L-NMMA was taken into account, no drug difference was observed for either distal (0.26 ± 0.02 to 0.23 ± 0.03, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.40) or proximal (0.23 ± 0.08 to 0.23 ± 0.03, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.89) FMD trials. These findings challenge the assertion that NO is obligatory for brachial artery FMD, and call into question the sensitivity of this procedure for non-invasive determination of NO bioavailability in young, healthy humans. PMID:23774225

  20. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase induces ultrastructural changes in the neurohypophysis of dehydrated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagley, G H; Cobbett, P

    1997-02-07

    Neuroglial relation in the rat neurohypophysis have been shown previously to change significantly after an acute dehydration stimulus. Here, we demonstrate a significant role for nitric oxide as a mediator of this response. Adult male rats were injected (i.p.) with 1.5 M NaCl or with 1.5 M NaCl and N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. Five hours after the dehydration stimulus, animals were perfusion fixed and the ultrastructure of their neurohypophyses examined. Neurohypophyses of animals injected with L-NAME and NaCl had significantly less contact between the basal lamina and the membrane of axon terminals than those of animals injected only with NaCl. There was also a significantly larger number of axonal profiles enclosed within neurohypophysial astrocytes in L-NAME and NaCl injected animals than in animals injected only with NaCl.

  1. Therapeutic strategies to address neuronal nitric oxide synthase deficiency and the loss of nitric oxide bioavailability in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpani, Cara A; Hayes, Alan; Rybalka, Emma

    2017-05-25

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a rare and fatal neuromuscular disease in which the absence of dystrophin from the muscle membrane induces a secondary loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and the muscles capacity for endogenous nitric oxide synthesis. Since nitric oxide is a potent regulator of skeletal muscle metabolism, mass, function and regeneration, the loss of nitric oxide bioavailability is likely a key contributor to the chronic pathological wasting evident in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. As such, various therapeutic interventions to re-establish either the neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein deficit or the consequential loss of nitric oxide synthesis and bioavailability have been investigated in both animal models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and in human clinical trials. Notably, the efficacy of these interventions are varied and not always translatable from animal model to human patients, highlighting a complex interplay of factors which determine the downstream modulatory effects of nitric oxide. We review these studies herein.

  2. Estrogen increases the severity of anaphylaxis in female mice through enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hox, Valerie; Desai, Avanti; Bandara, Geethani; Gilfillan, Alasdair M; Metcalfe, Dean D; Olivera, Ana

    2015-03-01

    Clinical observations suggest that anaphylaxis is more common in adult women compared with adult men, although the mechanistic basis for this sex bias is not well understood. We sought to document sex-dependent differences in a mouse model of anaphylaxis and explore the role of female sex hormones and the mechanisms responsible. Passive systemic anaphylaxis was induced in female and male mice by using histamine, as well as IgE or IgG receptor aggregation. Anaphylaxis was assessed by monitoring body temperature, release of mast cell mediators and/or hematocrit, and lung weight as a measure of vascular permeability. A combination of ovariectomy, estrogen receptor antagonism, and estrogen administration techniques were used to establish estrogen involvement. Anaphylactic responses were more pronounced in female than male mice. The enhanced severity of anaphylaxis in female mice was eliminated after pretreatment with an estrogen receptor antagonist or ovariectomy but restored after administration of estradiol in ovariectomized mice, demonstrating that the sex-specific differences are due to the female steroid estradiol. Estrogen did not affect mast cell responsiveness or anaphylaxis onset. Instead, it increased tissue expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Blockage of NOS activity with the inhibitor L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester or genetic eNOS deficiency abolished the sex-related differences. Our study defines a contribution of estrogen through its regulation of eNOS expression and nitric oxide production to vascular hyperpermeability and intensified anaphylactic responses in female mice, providing additional mechanistic insights into risk factors and possible implications for clinical management in the further exploration of human anaphylaxis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Blastomyces dermatitidis Yeast Cells Inhibit Nitric Oxide Production by Alveolar Macrophage Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Nicole M.; Carmen, John C.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of pathogens to evade host antimicrobial mechanisms is crucial to their virulence. The dimorphic fungal pathogen Blastomyces dermatitidis can infect immunocompetent patients, producing a primary pulmonary infection that can later disseminate to other organs. B. dermatitidis possesses a remarkable ability to resist killing by alveolar macrophages. To date, no mechanism to explain this resistance has been described. Here, we focus on macrophage production of the toxic molecule nitric oxide as a potential target of subversion by B. dermatitidis yeast cells. We report that B. dermatitidis yeast cells reduce nitric oxide levels in the supernatants of activated alveolar macrophages. This reduction is not due to detoxification of nitric oxide, but rather to suppression of macrophage nitric oxide production. We show that B. dermatitidis yeast cells do not block upregulation of macrophage inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression or limit iNOS access to its arginine substrate. Instead, B. dermatitidis yeast cells appear to inhibit iNOS enzymatic activity. Further investigation into the genetic basis of this potential virulence mechanism could lead to the identification of novel antifungal drug targets. PMID:21444664

  4. Isomers of nitric acid and chlorine nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, M.P.; Francl, M.M.; Rowland, F.S.; Hehre, W.J.

    1988-09-22

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the HF/6-31G* and MP2/6-31G* levels have been performed on nitric acid and chlorine nitrate. Equilibrium geometries and electric dipole moments obtained from the MP2/6-31G* calculations are in good agreement with the respective experimental values, normal-mode (harmonic) vibrational frequencies and frequency shifts due to isotopic substitution calculated at this level support the most recent gas-phase infrared assignments for chlorine nitrate but suggest a reversal in the assignment of v/sub 5/ and v/sub 6/ for nitric acid. Calculations at the same levels of theory were also performed on peroxynitrous acid (HOONO) and chlorine peroxynitrite (ClOONO). The former is found to be 35 kcal/mol less stable than nitric acid at the MP2/6-31G* level; chlorine peroxynitrite is 30 kcal/mol higher in energy than chlorine nitrate. The possible role of these high-energy isomers in atmospheric processes is discussed.

  5. All-trans retinoic acid and a novel synthetic retinoid tamibarotene (Am80) differentially regulate CD38 expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells: possible involvement of protein kinase C-delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uruno, Akira; Noguchi, Naoya; Matsuda, Ken; Nata, Koji; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Chikamatsu, Youichiro; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Ito, Sadayoshi; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Akira

    2011-08-01

    ATRA and a synthetic RAR agonist tamibarotene (Am80) induce granulocytic differentiation of human acute leukemia HL-60 cells and have been used in antineoplastic therapy. ATRA induces CD38 antigen during HL-60 cell differentiation, which interacts with CD31 antigen on the vascular EC surface and may induce disadvantages in the therapy. We here examined the mechanisms of the ATRA-mediated CD38 induction and compared the difference between ATRA- and tamibarotene-mediated induction. Tamibarotene-induced HL-60 cell adhesion to ECs was 38% lower than ATRA, and NB4 cell adhesion to ECs by tamibarotene was equivalent to ATRA, which induced CD38 gene transcription biphasically in HL-60 cells, the early-phase induction via DR-RARE containing intron 1, and the delayed-phase induction via RARE lacking the 5'-flanking region. In contrast to ATRA, tamibarotene induced only the early-phase induction, resulting in its lower CD38 induction than ATRA. A PKCδ inhibitor, rottlerin, and siRNA-mediated PKCδ knockdown suppressed the ATRA-induced CD38 promoter activity of the 5'-flanking region, whereas a RAR antagonist, LE540, or RAR knockdown did not affect it. Cycloheximide and rottlerin suppressed the delayed-phase induction of CD38 expression by ATRA but did not affect the early-phase induction. Moreover, ATRA, but not tamibarotene, induced PKCδ expression without affecting its mRNA stability. The diminished effect of tamibarotene on CD38-mediated HL-60 cell adhesion to ECs compared with ATRA is likely a result of the lack of its delayed-phase induction of CD38 expression, which may be advantageous in antineoplastic therapy.

  6. Nitric oxide donors for the treatment of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nortcliffe, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Chapter One provides a general introduction into the biology and chemistry of nitric oxide, with particular focus on the role of nitric oxide in cardiovascular disease, cancer and hypoxia. It also details the types of organic functional groups used as nitric oxide donors, with detailed discussion of nitrate esters, furoxans and sydnonimines. Chapter Two discusses prostate cancer. It provides an overview into the development of prostate cancer, prostate cancer staging, and treatment. The ke...

  7. Nitric oxide. A novel signal transduction mechanism for transcellular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignarro, L J

    1990-11-01

    Nitric oxide first captured the interest of biologists when this inorganic molecule was found to activate cytosolic guanylate cyclase and stimulate cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP) formation in mammalian cells. Further studies led to the finding that nitric oxide causes vascular smooth muscle relaxation and inhibition of platelet aggregation by mechanisms involving cyclic GMP and that several clinically used nitrovasodilators owe their biological actions to nitric oxide. Nitric oxide possesses physicochemical and pharmacological properties that make it an ideal candidate for a short-term regulator or modulator of vascular smooth muscle tone and platelet function. Nitric oxide is synthesized by various mammalian tissues including vascular endothelium, macrophages, neutrophils, hepatic Kupffer cells, adrenal tissue, cerebellum, and other tissues. Nitric oxide is synthesized from endogenous L-arginine by a nitric oxide synthase system that possesses different cofactor requirements in different cell types. The nitric oxide formed diffuses out of its cells of origin and into nearby target cells, where it binds to the heme group of cytosolic guanylate cyclase and thereby causes enzyme activation. This interaction represents a novel and widespread signal transduction mechanism that links extracellular stimuli to the biosynthesis of cyclic GMP in nearby target cells. The small molecular size and lipophilic nature of nitric oxide enable communication with nearby cells containing cytosolic guanylate cyclase. The extent of transcellular communication is limited by the short half-life of nitric oxide, thereby ensuring a localized response. Labile nitric oxide-generating molecules such as S-nitrosothiols may be involved as precursors or effectors. Further research will provide a deeper understanding of the biology of nitric oxide and the nature of associated pathophysiological states.

  8. Intravenous beta-endorphin administration fails to alter hypothalamic blood flow in rats expressing normal or reduced nitric oxide synthase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benyo, Z.; Szabo, C; Velkel, M.H; Bohus, B.G J; Wahl, M.A; Sandor, P

    1996-01-01

    beta-Endorphin (beta-END) significantly contributes to the maintenance of hypothalamic blood flow (HBF) autoregulation during hemorrhagic hypotension in rats. Recently, several natural and synthetic opioid peptides were reported to induce nitric oxide (NO)-mediated dilation in the cerebrovascular

  9. Beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation inhibits nitric oxide generation by Mycobacterium avium infected macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomershine, C S; Lafuse, W P; Zwilling, B S

    1999-11-01

    Catecholamine regulation of nitric oxide (NO) production by IFNgamma-primed macrophages infected with Mycobacterium avium was investigated. Epinephrine treatment of IFNgamma-primed macrophages at the time of M. avium infection inhibited the anti-mycobacterial activity of the cells. The anti-mycobacterial activity of macrophages correlated with NO production. Using specific adrenergic receptor agonists, the abrogation of mycobacterial killing and decreased NO production by catecholamines was shown to be mediated via the beta2-adrenergic receptor. Elevation of intracellular cAMP levels mimicked the catecholamine-mediated inhibition of NO in both M. avium infected and LPS stimulated macrophages. Specific inhibitors of both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A prevented the beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide production. Beta2-adrenoreceptor stimulation at the time of M. avium infection of IFNgamma-primed macrophages also inhibited expression of iNOS mRNA. These observations show that catecholamine hormones can affect the outcome of macrophage-pathogen interactions and suggest that one result of sympathetic nervous system activation is the suppression of the capacity of macrophages to produce anti-microbial effector molecules.

  10. Titanium interaction with zirconium during hydrolysis in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurov, A.A.; Sinegribova, O.A.; Yagodin, G.A. (Moskovskij Khimiko-Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-05-01

    The titanium behaviour in nitric acid solutions in the presence of zirconium is studied. The fact of stabilization of titanium nitric acid solutions by zirconium is found that permits to obtain highly concentrated (> 100 g/l TiO/sub 2/) titanium nitric acid solutions with low acidity (< 1.0 mol./l HNO/sub 3/) stable for 1.5-2.0 moths. The reason of stabilization is the interaction between hydrolized compounds of zirconium and titanium. Precipitates from mixed zirconium-titanium nitric acid solutions following a long-term hold-up present mainly hydrated polymerized titanium dioxide.

  11. Measuring nasal nitric oxide in allergic rhinitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesic, V S; Djordjevic, V Z; Tomic-Spiric, V; Dudvarski, Z R; Soldatovic, I A; Arsovic, N A

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to compare two sampling methods for nasal nitric oxide in healthy individuals and allergic rhinitis patients, and to examine the within-subject reliability of nasal nitric oxide measurement. The study included 23 allergic rhinitis patients without concomitant asthma and 10 healthy individuals. For all participants, nitric oxide levels were measured non-invasively from the lungs through the mouth (i.e. the oral fractional exhaled nitric oxide) and the nose. Nasal nitric oxide was measured by two different methods: (1) nasal aspiration via one nostril during breath holding and (2) single-breath quiet exhalation against resistance through a tight facemask (i.e. the nasal fractional exhaled nitric oxide). Compared with healthy participants, allergic rhinitis patients had significantly higher average oral and nasal nitric oxide levels. All methods of nitric oxide measurement had excellent reliability. Nasal nitric oxide measurement is a useful and reliable clinical tool for diagnosing allergic rhinitis in patients without asthma in an out-patient setting.

  12. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  13. Nitrite: A physiological store of nitric oxide and modulator of mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruti Shiva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite, long considered a biologically inert metabolite of nitric oxide (NO oxidation, is now accepted as a physiological storage pool of NO that can be reduced to bioactive NO in hypoxic conditions to mediate a spectrum of physiological responses in blood and tissue. This graphical review will provide a broad overview of the role of nitrite in physiology, focusing on its formation and reduction to NO as well as its regulation of the mitochondrion—an emerging subcellular target for its biological actions in tissues.

  14. Treatment Of Sunitinib-Induced Hypertension In Solid Tumors By Nitric Oxid Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís A. Leon

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension (HT is one of the most common adverse effects of angiogenesis inhibitors. Hypertension observed in clinical trials appears to correlate with the potency of VEGF kinase inhibitor against VEGFR-2: agents with higher potency are associated with a higher incidence of hypertension. Although the exact mechanism by TKIs induce hypertension has not yet been completely clarified, two key hypotheses have been postulated. First, some studies have pointed to a VEGF inhibitors-induced decrease in nitric oxide synthase (NOS and nitric oxide (NO production, that can result in vasoconstriction and increased blood pressure. VEGF, mediated by PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathway, upregulates the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme leading to up-regulation of NO production. So inhibition of signaling through the VEGF pathway would lead to a decrease in NO production, resulting in an increase in vascular resistance and blood pressure. Secondly a decrease in the number of microvascular endothelial cells and subsequent depletion of normal microvessel density (rarefaction occurs upon VEGF signaling inhibition.

  15. Crosstalk between nitric oxide and hypoxia-inducible factor signaling pathways: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrickson MD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Marina D Hendrickson, Robert O Poyton Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA Abstract: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is responsible for cellular adaptations to hypoxia. While oxygen (O2 negatively regulates its stability, many other factors affect HIF-1 stability and activity, including nitric oxide (NO. NO derived from l-arginine and nitrite (NO2– could nitrosylate or nitrate HIF-1 and multiple proteins involved in HIF-1 regulation, and can allow HIF-1 to escape normoxic degradation. In turn, HIF-1 can increase NO production through multiple mechanisms, including increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression and subunit 4-2 of cytochrome c oxidase (COX4-2 expression. There is therefore a high degree of crosstalk between HIF-1 and NO signaling. As such, many cellular responses to NO are mediated by HIF-1, and vice versa. This includes, but is not limited to, angiogenesis, apoptosis, senescence, and metabolic changes. These pathways all have important functions in normal physiology and when altered can contribute or, in some cases, lead to pathogenesis. Keywords: HIF, nitric oxide, Cco/NO mitochondrial signaling, ROS/RNS, cancer

  16. The effect of dynamic mechanical compression on nitric oxide production in the meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, C; Fermor, B; Weinberg, J B; Pisetsky, D S; Misukonis, M A; Guilak, F

    2001-07-01

    The menisci play an important role in the biomechanics of the knee, and loss of meniscal function has been associated with progressive degenerative changes of the joint in rheumatoid arthritis as well as in osteoarthritis. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms that link meniscal injury or degeneration to arthritis. Meniscal fibrochondrocytes respond to environmental mediators such as growth factors and cytokines, but the influence of mechanical stress on their metabolic activity is not well understood. Nitric oxide (NO) is believed to play a role in mechanical signal transduction, and there is also significant evidence of its role in cartilage and meniscus degeneration. The goal of this study was to determine if meniscal fibrochondrocytes respond to mechanical stress by increasing NO production in vitro. Explants of lateral and medial porcine menisci were dynamically compressed in a precisely controlled manner, and NO production, nitric oxide synthase antigen expression and cell viability were measured. The relative responses of the meniscal surface and deep layers to dynamic compression were also investigated separately. Meniscal NO production was significantly (Pmedial and lateral menisci. Dynamically compressed menisci contained inducible nitric oxide synthase antigen, while uncompressed menisci did not. Significant (Pbiomechanical consequences on joint physiology and function.

  17. Auxin-induced nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins were involved in the gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weiming; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang; Cui, Dayong; Cai, Weiming

    Gravitropism is the asymmetric growth or curvature of plant organs in response to gravistimulation. There is a complex signal transduction cascade which involved in the differential growth of plants in response to changes in the gravity vector. The role of auxin in gravitropism has been demonstrated by many experiments, but little is known regarding the molecular details of such effects. In our studies before, mediation of the gravitropic bending of soybean roots and rice leaf sheath bases by nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins, are induced by auxin. The asymmetrical distribution of nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins resulted from the asymmetrical synthesis of them in bending sites. In soybean roots, inhibitions of NO and cGMP synthesis reduced differential NO and cGMP accumulation respectively, which both of these effects can lead to the reduction of gravitropic bending. Gibberellin-induced OsXET, OsEXPA4 and OsRWC3 were also found involved in the gravitropic bending. These data indicated that auxin-induced nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins were involved in the gravitropism. More experiments need to prove the more detailed mechanism of them.

  18. A nitric oxide burst precedes apoptosis in angiosperm and gymnosperm callus cells and foliar tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, M C; Magalhaes, J R; Durzan, D

    2000-06-01

    Leaves and callus of Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Taxus brevifolia were used to investigate nitric oxide-induced apoptosis in plant cells. The effect of nitric oxide (NO) was studied by using a NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a nitric oxide-synthase (NOS) inhibitor, N:(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA), and centrifugation (an apoptosis-inducing treatment in these species). NO production was visualized in cells and tissues with a specific probe, diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2 DA). DNA fragmentation was detected in situ by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) method. In both species, NO was detected diffused in the cytosol of epidermal cells and in chloroplasts of guard cells and leaf parenchyma cells. Centrifugation increased NO production, DNA fragmentation and subsequent cell death by apoptosis. SNP mimicked centrifugation results. NMMA significantly decreased NO production and apoptosis in both species. The inhibitory effect of NMMA on NO production suggests that a putative NOS is present in Kalanchoë and Taxus cells. The present results demonstrated the involvement of NO on DNA damage leading to cell death, and point to a potential role of NO as a signal molecule in these plants.

  19. Inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthases exert contrasting effects during rat intestinal recovery following fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Junta; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Machida, Naomi; Ohtake, Kazuo; Saito, Yuki; Kobayashi, Jun

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the effects of endogenous inducible (iNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase on recovery from intestinal mucosal atrophy caused by fasting-induced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation during refeeding in rats. Rats were divided into five groups, one of which was fed ad libitum, and four of which underwent 72 h of fasting, followed by refeeding for 0, 6, 24, and 48 h, respectively. iNOS and neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA and protein levels in jejunal tissues were measured, and mucosal height was histologically evaluated. Apoptotic indices, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) transcription levels, nitrite levels (as a measure of nitric oxide [NO] production),8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine formation (indicating reactive oxygen species [ROS] levels), crypt cell proliferation, and the motility indices (MI) were also estimated. Associations between mucosal height and NOS protein levels were determined using Spearman's rank correlation test. Notably, we observed significant increases in mucosal height and in neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA and protein expression as refeeding time increased. Indeed, there was a significant positive correlation between neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein level and mucosal height during the 48-h refeeding period ( r = 0.725, P fasting. Our finding suggests that refeeding likely repairs fasting-induced jejunal atrophy by suppressing iNOS expression and subsequently inhibiting NO, ROS, and IFN-γ as apoptosis mediators, and by promoting neuronal nitric oxide synthase production and inducing crypt cell proliferation via mechanical stimulation. Impact statement Besides providing new data confirming the involvement of iNOS and nNOS in intestinal mucosal atrophy caused by fasting, this study details their expression and function during recovery from this condition following refeeding. We demonstrate a significant negative correlation between iNOS and nNOS levels during refeeding, and associate this with cell proliferation

  20. Oscillatory shear alters endothelial hydraulic conductivity and nitric oxide levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillsley, Mechteld V; Tarbell, John M

    2002-05-24

    This study addresses the role of nitric oxide (NO) and downstream signaling pathways in mediating the influences of oscillatory shear stress on the hydraulic conductivity (L(p)) of bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) monolayers. Exposure of BAEC monolayers to 20 dyne/cm2 steady shear stress for 3 h induced a 3.3-fold increase in L(p). When an oscillatory shear amplitude of 10 dyne/cm2 was superimposed on a steady shear of 10 dyne/cm2 to produce a non-reversing oscillatory shear pattern (10+/-10 dyne/cm2), L(p) increased by 3.0-fold within 90 min. When the amplitude was increased to 15 dyne/cm2, resulting in a reversing oscillatory shear pattern (10+/-15 dyne/cm2), the increase in L(p) over 3 h was completely suppressed. Twenty and 10+/-10 dyne/cm2 induced 2.9- and 2.6-fold increases in NO production above non-sheared controls, respectively, whereas 10+/-15 dyne/cm2 stimulated a 14-fold increase in NO production. The inhibition of L(p) with reversing oscillatory shear may be associated with alterations in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production downstream of NO which is up-regulated by reversing oscillatory shear, but is unaffected by steady shear.

  1. Nitric oxide synthase deficiency and the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidball, James G; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The secondary loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) that occurs in dystrophic muscle is the basis of numerous, complex and interacting features of the dystrophic pathology that affect not only muscle itself, but also influence the interaction of muscle with other tissues. Many mechanisms through which nNOS deficiency contributes to misregulation of muscle development, blood flow, fatigue, inflammation and fibrosis in dystrophic muscle have been identified, suggesting that normalization in NO production could greatly attenuate diverse aspects of the pathology of muscular dystrophy through multiple regulatory pathways. However, the relative importance of the loss of nNOS from the sarcolemma versus the importance of loss of total nNOS from dystrophic muscle remains unknown. Although most current evidence indicates that nNOS localization at the sarcolemma is not required to achieve NO-mediated reductions of pathology in muscular dystrophy, the question remains open concerning whether membrane localization would provide a more efficient rescue from features of the dystrophic phenotype. PMID:25194047

  2. Nitric oxide destabilizes Pias3 and regulates sumoylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Qu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-related protein modifiers (SUMO modification is an important mechanism for posttranslational regulation of protein function. However, it is largely unknown how the sumoylation pathway is regulated. Here, we report that nitric oxide (NO causes global hyposumoylation in mammalian cells. Both SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (Pias3 were targets for S-nitrosation. S-nitrosation did not interfere with the SUMO conjugating activity of Ubc9, but promoted Pias3 degradation by facilitating its interaction with tripartite motif-containing 32 (Trim32, a ubiquitin E3 ligase. On the one hand, NO promoted Trim32-mediated Pias3 ubiquitination. On the other hand, NO enhanced the stimulatory effect of Pias3 on Trim32 autoubiquitination. The residue Cys459 of Pias3 was identified as a target site for S-nitrosation. Mutation of Cys459 abolished the stimulatory effect of NO on the Pias3-Trim32 interaction, indicating a requirement of S-nitrosation at Cys459 for positive regulation of the Pias3-Trim32 interplay. This study reveals a novel crosstalk between S-nitrosation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, which may be crucial for NO-related physiological and pathological processes.

  3. New nitric oxide donors based on ruthenium complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.N. Lunardi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO donors produce NO-related activity when applied to biological systems. Among its diverse functions, NO has been implicated in vascular smooth muscle relaxation. Despite the great importance of NO in biological systems, its pharmacological and physiological studies have been limited due to its high reactivity and short half-life. In this review we will focus on our recent investigations of nitrosyl ruthenium complexes as NO-delivery agents and their effects on vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation. The high affinity of ruthenium for NO is a marked feature of its chemistry. The main signaling pathway responsible for the vascular relaxation induced by NO involves the activation of soluble guanylyl-cyclase, with subsequent accumulation of cGMP and activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. This in turn can activate several proteins such as K+ channels as well as induce vasodilatation by a decrease in cytosolic Ca2+. Oxidative stress and associated oxidative damage are mediators of vascular damage in several cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. The increased production of the superoxide anion (O2- by the vascular wall has been observed in different animal models of hypertension. Vascular relaxation to the endogenous NO-related response or to NO released from NO deliverers is impaired in vessels from renal hypertensive (2K-1C rats. A growing amount of evidence supports the possibility that increased NO inactivation by excess O2- may account for the decreased NO bioavailability and vascular dysfunction in hypertension.

  4. Nitric Oxide Regulation of Mitochondrial Processes: Commonality in Medical Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2015-07-16

    The vital status of diverse classes of eukaryotic mitochondria is reflected by the high degree of evolutionary modification functionally linked to ongoing multifaceted organelle development. From this teleological perspective, a logistical enhancement of eukaryotic cellular energy requirements indicates a convergence of metabolic processes within the mitochondrial matrix for optimal synthesis of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate and necessitates an evolutionarily driven retrofit of the primordial endosymbiont bacterial plasma membrane into the inner mitochondrial membrane. The biochemical complexity of eukaryotic inner membrane electron transport complexes linked to temporally-defined, state-dependent, fluctuations in mitochondrial oxygen utilization is capable of generating deleterious reactive oxygen species. Within this functional context, an extensive neurochemical literature supports the role of the free radical gas nitric oxide (NO) as a key signaling molecule involved in the regulation of multiple aspects of mitochondrial respiration/oxidative phosphorylation. Importantly, the unique chemical properties of NO underlie its rapid metabolism in vivo within a mechanistic spectrum of small oxidative molecules, free and protein-bound thiol adducts, and reversible binding to ferrous heme iron centers. Recent compelling work has identified a medically relevant dual regulation pathway for mitochondrial NO expression mediated by traditionally characterized NO synthases (NOS) and by enzymatic reduction of available cellular nitrite pools by a diverse class of cytosolic and mitochondrial nitrite reductases. Accordingly, our short review presents selected medically-based discussion topics relating to multi-faceted NO regulation of mitochondrial functions in human health and disease states.

  5. Changes in the level of cytosolic calcium, nitric oxide and nitric oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Variceal bleeding due to abnormal platelet function is a well-known complication of cirrhosis. Nitric oxide-related stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis. In the present investigation, we evaluated the level of platelet aggregation and concomitant changes in the level of platelet cytosolic calcium ...

  6. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Selim Gokay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg, or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg. After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P=0.044 positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  7. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Komur, Baran; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  8. Nitric oxide: an antiparasitic molecule of invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Ana

    2006-05-01

    Since Furchgott, Ignarro and Murad won the Nobel prize in 1998 for their work on the role of nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling molecule, many reports have shown the seemingly limitless range of body functions controlled by this compound. In vertebrates, the role of NO as a defense against infection caused by viruses, bacteria, and protozoan and metazoan parasites has been known for several years. New evidence, however, shows that NO is also important in defending invertebrates against parasites. This discovery is a breakthrough in the understanding of how the invertebrate immune system works, and it has implications for the emerging field of invertebrate ecological immunology.

  9. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals.......Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia...

  10. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed...... in the oxic-anoxic transition zone. Apparently, NO is produced by ammonia oxidizers under oxic conditions and consumed by denitrification under microoxic conditions. Experimental percolation of sediment cores with aerated surface water resulted in an initial rate of NO production that was 12 times higher than...

  11. The effect of the phytoestrogen genistein on plasma nitric oxide concentrations, endothelin-1 levels and endothelium dependent vasodilation in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Morabito, Nunziata; Crisafulli, Alessandra; D'Anna, Rosario; Corrado, Francesco; Ruggeri, Pietro; Campo, Giuseppe M; Calapai, Gioacchino; Caputi, Achille P; Squadrito, Giovanni

    2002-08-01

    The phytoestrogen genistein improves endothelial dysfunction in ovariectomized rats through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether genistein alters the balance between the nitric oxide products and endothelin-1 and influences endothelium-dependent vasodilation in postmenopausal women. Sixty healthy postmenopausal women were enrolled in the study. A double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized design was employed. After a 4-week stabilization on a standard fat-reduced diet, participants to the study were randomly assigned to receive either genistein (n=30; 54 mg/day) or placebo (n=30). Flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the brachial artery, plasma nitric oxide breakdown products and endothelin-1 levels were measured at baseline and after 6 months of genistein therapy. The mean baseline level of nitrites/nitrates was 22+/-10 micromol/l and increased to 41+/-10 micromol/ml after 6 months of treatment. The mean baseline plasma endothelin-1 level was 14+/-4 pg/ml and decreased to 7+/-1 pg/ml following 6 months of treatment with genistein. The mean baseline ratio of nitric oxide to endothelin also significantly increased at the end of treatment. Flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the brachial artery was 3.9+/-0.8 mm at baseline and increased to 4.4+/-0.7 mm after 6 months of treatment. Placebo-treated women showed no changes in plasma nitrites/nitrates, endothelin-1 levels and flow-mediated vasodilation. Genistein therapy improves flow-mediated endothelium dependent vasodilation in healthy postmenopausal women. This improvement may be mediated by a direct effect of genistein on the vascular function and could be the result of an increased ratio of nitric oxide to endothelin.

  12. NO to cancer: The complex and multifaceted role of nitric oxide and the epigenetic nitric oxide donor, RRx-001☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicinski, Jan; Oronsky, Bryan; Ning, Shoucheng; Knox, Susan; Peehl, Donna; Kim, Michelle M.; Langecker, Peter; Fanger, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous mediator of vasodilation, nitric oxide (NO), has been shown to be a potent radiosensitizer. However, the underlying mode of action for its role as a radiosensitizer – while not entirely understood – is believed to arise from increased tumor blood flow, effects on cellular respiration, on cell signaling, and on the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), that can act as radiosensitizers in their own right. NO activity is surprisingly long-lived and more potent in comparison to oxygen. Reports of the effects of NO with radiation have often been contradictory leading to confusion about the true radiosensitizing nature of NO. Whether increasing or decreasing tumor blood flow, acting as radiosensitizer or radioprotector, the effects of NO have been controversial. Key to understanding the role of NO as a radiosensitizer is to recognize the importance of biological context. With a very short half-life and potent activity, the local effects of NO need to be carefully considered and understood when using NO as a radiosensitizer. The systemic effects of NO donors can cause extensive side effects, and also affect the local tumor microenvironment, both directly and indirectly. To minimize systemic effects and maximize effects on tumors, agents that deliver NO on demand selectively to tumors using hypoxia as a trigger may be of greater interest as radiosensitizers. Herein we discuss the multiple effects of NO and focus on the clinical molecule RRx-001, a hypoxia-activated NO donor currently being investigated as a radiosensitizer in the clinic. PMID:26164533

  13. The correlation between total antioxidant capacity and nitric oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Semen samples from 45 infertile men and 70 normozospermic men were examined for DNA damage, nitric oxide concentration and TAC. DNA damage was measured by comet assay and nitric oxide concentration was evaluated by Griess assay. TAC was measured in seminal plasma based on the generation of peroxyl ...

  14. Nitric oxide inhalation in infants with respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skimming, J W; Bender, K A; Hutchison, A A; Drummond, W H

    1997-02-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that nitric oxide inhalation increases systemic arterial blood oxygen tension of prematurely delivered infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Nitric oxide was administered to 23 preterm infants with a diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome. The infants were randomly assigned to receive either 5 or 20 ppm of nitric oxide and were studied between 24 and 168 hours after delivery. The treatment period for each infant lasted 15 minutes and was preceded by and followed by a 15-minute control period. We evaluated all outcome variables by using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance; p values less than 0.01 were considered significant. Nitric oxide inhalation caused significant increases in the following: arterial blood oxygen tension, directly measured arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation, and transcutaneously measured arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation. No differences between the effects of the two nitric oxide concentrations were detected, nor were residual effects detected 15 minutes after either dose of nitric oxide was discontinued. Inhalation of both 5 and 20 ppm nitric oxide causes concentration-independent increases in the blood oxygen tensions of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. We speculate that nitric oxide inhalation may be a useful adjunctive therapy for these patients.

  15. Effects of inhaled nitric oxide on oxygenation and haemodynamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    always mandatory for such procedures, it improves access to the operative field and expedites the surgery. The most is the endothelial dependent vasorelaxing factor nitric oxide. (NO). in theory inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) could increase oxygenation by selectively decreasing pulmonary resistance and increasing blood flow to ...

  16. Propolis Ameliorates Tumor Nerosis Factor-α, Nitric Oxide levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Increased nitric oxide (NO), neuronal inflammation and apoptosis have been proposed to be involved in excitotoxicity plays a part in many neurodegenerative diseases. To understand the neuro-protective effects of propolis, activities of Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and caspase-3 along with NO and tumor ...

  17. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature

  18. Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, Cycleooxygenase-2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, Cycleooxygenase-2 and Lipid Peroxidation by Methanol Extract of Pericarpium Zanthoxyli. ... Production of iNOS induced by LPS was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited by the extract, suggesting that the extract inhibits nitric oxide (NO) production by suppressing iNOS expression.

  19. Influence of nitric oxide on histamine and carbachol – induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to determine the influence of nitric oxide (NO) on the action of histamine and carbachol on acid secretion in the common African toad – Bufo regularis. Gastric acidity was determined by titration method. The acid secretion was determined when nitric oxide was absent following administration of NO synthase ...

  20. Evaluation of nitric oxide as a novel diagnostic marker for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    45%. Nitrite/Nitrate is a stable end product of nitric oxide increase in patients with HCC. Aim: It was to evaluate nitric oxide as a novel diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Eighty patients and 15 normal individuals enrolled in the study: Group (1) 15 normal individuals. Group (2) 30 patients with chronic ...

  1. Effect of nitric oxide scavengers, carboxy-PTIO on endotoxin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    values of the cardiovascular parameters considered in this study. This indicates that carboxy-PTIO is an efficient nitric oxide scavenger chemical of trapping nitric oxide immediately after its synthesis. Therefore, based on the current result, carboxy-PTIO can be used as one possible treatment agent against septic shock.

  2. Adrenoceptor-activated nitric oxide synthesis in salivary acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia; Dissing, Steen; Tritsaris, Katerina

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the cellular regulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in isolated acinar cells from rat parotid and human labial salivary glands, using the newly developed fluorescent nitric oxide (NO) indicator, DAF-2. We found that sympathetic stimulation with norepinephrine (NE) caused...

  3. [Nitric oxide participation during amoebic liver abscess development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Emiliano, Joel; Flores-Villavicencio, Lerida Liss; Segovia, Jose; Arias-Negrete, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide participates in both physiological and pathophysiological functions, and it plays an important role in the mammalian immune system in killing or inhibiting the growth of many pathogens, including parasites, viruses and bacteria. Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes amoebiasis, which is characterized by intestinal damage and amoebic liver abscess development. The development of amoebic liver abscess in hamsters is similar to that in humans, whereas mice are resistant to amoebic liver abscess development due to an increase in nitric oxide production. Unlike in mice, amoebic liver abscess development in hamsters is due to an excess in nitric oxide production or possibly to a greater susceptibility of the hamster to damage caused by nitric oxide. Therefore, it could be important to elucidate if, in humans, an excess in nitric oxide production favors amoebic liver abscess development.

  4. Nitric Oxide Modulators: An Emerging Class of Medicinal Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, S. R.; Satyanarayana, K.; Rao, M. N. A.; Pai, K. V.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide, a unique messenger in biological system, is ubiquitously present virtually in all tissues revealing its versatile nature of being involved in diverse physiological functions such as vascular tone, inhibition of platelet aggregation, cell adhesion, neurotransmission and enzyme and immune regulation. The tremendous advancements made in the past few decades in this area suggests that the nitric oxide modulation either by its exogenous release through nitric oxide donors or inhibition of its synthesis by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors in physiological milieu may provide newer clinical strategies for the treatment of some diseases. In this review, an attempt is made to document and understand the biological chemistry of different classes of nitric oxide modulators that would prove to be a fruitful area in the years to come. PMID:23798773

  5. Nitric-oxide synthase trafficking inducer is a pleiotropic regulator of endothelial cell function and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Shreeta; Ain, Rupasri

    2017-04-21

    Endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) and its bioactive product, nitric oxide (NO), mediate many endothelial cell functions, including angiogenesis and vascular permeability. For example, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenesis is inhibited upon reduction of NO bioactivity both in vitro and in vivo Moreover, genetic disruption or pharmacological inhibition of eNOS attenuates angiogenesis during tissue repair, resulting in delayed wound closure. These observations emphasize that eNOS-derived NO can promote angiogenesis. Intriguingly, eNOS activity is regulated by nitric-oxide synthase trafficking inducer (NOSTRIN), which sequesters eNOS, thereby attenuating NO production. This has prompted significant interest in NOSTRIN's function in endothelial cells. We show here that NOSTRIN affects the functional transcriptome of endothelial cells by down-regulating several genes important for invasion and angiogenesis. Interestingly, the effects of NOSTRIN on endothelial gene expression were independent of eNOS activity. NOSTRIN also affected the expression of secreted cytokines involved in inflammatory responses, and ectopic NOSTRIN overexpression functionally restricted endothelial cell proliferation, invasion, adhesion, and VEGF-induced capillary tube formation. Furthermore, NOSTRIN interacted directly with TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), leading to the suppression of NFκB activity and inhibition of AKT activation via phosphorylation. Interestingly, TNF-α-induced NFκB pathway activation was reversed by NOSTRIN. We found that the SH3 domain of NOSTRIN is involved in the NOSTRIN-TRAF6 interaction and is required for NOSTRIN-induced down-regulation of endothelial cell proteins. These results have broad biological implications, as aberrant NOSTRIN expression leading to deactivation of the NFκB pathway, in turn triggering an anti-angiogenic cascade, might inhibit tumorigenesis and cancer progression. © 2017 by The American Society for

  6. Hypobaric hypoxia induced arginase expression limits nitric oxide availability and signaling in rodent heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjulata; Padhy, Gayatri; Vats, Praveen; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj Kumar

    2014-06-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate regulation of cardiac arginase expression during hypobaric hypoxia and subsequent effect on nitric oxide availability and signaling. Rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (282mmHg for 3h) and ARG1 expression was monitored. The expression levels of eNOS and eNOS(Ser1177) were determined by Western blotting, cGMP levels were measured by ELISA and amino acid concentrations were measured by HPLC analysis. Transcription regulation of arginase was monitored by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay with anti-c-Jun antibody for AP-1 consensus binding site on ARG1 promoter. Arginase activity was inhibited by intra-venous dose of N-(ω)-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (nor-NOHA) prior to hypoxia exposure and subsequent effect on NO availability and oxidative stress were evaluated. Hypobaric hypoxia induced cardiac arginase expression by recruiting c-Jun to AP-1 binding site on ARG1 promoter. This increased expression redirected l-arginine towards arginase and resulted in limited endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, nitric oxide (NO) availability and cGMP mediated signaling. Inhibition of arginase restored the eNOS activity, promoted cardiac NO availability and ameliorated peroxynitrite formation during hypoxia. Hypoxic induced arginase under transcription control of AP-1 reciprocally regulates eNOS activity and NO availability in the heart. This also results in cardiac oxidative stress. This study provides understanding of hypoxia-mediated transcriptional regulation of arginase expression in the heart and its subsequent effect on eNOS activity, NO availability and signaling as well as cardiac oxidative stress. This information will support the use of arginase inhibitors as therapeutics for pathological hypoxia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inorganic Polyphosphate Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) Expression in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kana; Shiba, Toshikazu; Doi, Kazuya; Morita, Koji; Kubo, Takayasu; Makihara, Yusuke; Piattelli, Adriano; Akagawa, Yasumasa

    2013-01-01

    In response to infection, macrophages produce a series of inflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide (NO), to eliminate pathogens. The production of these molecules is tightly regulated via various mechanisms, as excessive responses are often detrimental to host tissues. Here, we report that inorganic polyphosphate [poly(P)], a linear polymer of orthophosphate ubiquitously found in mammalian cells, suppresses inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria, in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Poly(P) with longer chains is more potent than those with shorter chains in suppressing LPS-induced iNOS expression. In addition, poly(P) decreased LPS-induced NO release. Moreover, poly(P) suppressed iNOS mRNA expression induced by LPS stimulation, thereby indicating that poly(P) reduces LPS-induced iNOS expression by down-regulation at the mRNA level. In contrast, poly(P) did not affect the LPS-induced release of TNF, another inflammatory mediator. Poly(P) may serve as a regulatory factor of innate immunity by modulating iNOS expression in macrophages. PMID:24040305

  8. Nitric oxide in liver fibrosis: The role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2015-12-01

    The inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is expressed in hepatic cells in pathological conditions. Its induction is involved in the development of liver fibrosis, and thus iNOS could be a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes the role of iNOS in liver fibrosis, focusing on 1) iNOS biology, 2) iNOS-expressing liver cells, 3) iNOS-related therapeutic strategies, and 4) future directions.

  9. Nitric oxide and mitochondria in metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, Larisa; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Fattakhov, Nikolai; Vasilenko, Mariia; Zatolokin, Pavel; Kirienkova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders that collectively increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in the pathogeneses of MS components and is involved in different mitochondrial signaling pathways that control respiration and apoptosis. The present review summarizes the recent information regarding the interrelations of mitochondria and NO in MS. Changes in the activities of different NO synthase isoforms lead to the formation of metabolic disorders and therefore are highlighted here. Reduced endothelial NOS activity and NO bioavailability, as the main factors underlying the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in MS, are discussed in this review in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction. We also focus on potential therapeutic strategies involving NO signaling pathways that can be used to treat patients with metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The article may help researchers develop new approaches for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:25741283

  10. [Effect of nitric oxide in vestibular compensation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zi-dong; Zhang, Lian-shan

    2003-10-01

    To study the effect of nitric oxide (NO) in vestibular compensation after unilateral vestibular deafferentation. Eighteen animals were divided into two groups, 6 of group a as control, 12 of group b received gentamicin intratympanic injection in the left ear. Half of the animals were killed respectively after 5 days and 10 days. Vestibular endorgan and brainstem tissue sections were subjected to NADPH-d reactive test of NOS for histochemical examination. In group a, NOS-like reactivity in both sides of vestibular endorgan and nucli. In group b during 5 days, NOS-like reactivity in right side of vestibular endorgan and nucli, those of the left side were negative. During 10 days, NOS-like reactivity only in the right side of vestibular endorgan. Changes of NOS expression in the contralateral vestibular nucli might have played a role in vestibular compensation.

  11. The role of nitric oxide in reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCann S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays a crucial role in reproduction at every level in the organism. In the brain, it activates the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH. The axons of the LHRH neurons project to the mating centers in the brain stem and by afferent pathways evoke the lordosis reflex in female rats. In males, there is activation of NOergic terminals that release NO in the corpora cavernosa penis to induce erection by generation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. NO also activates the release of LHRH which reaches the pituitary and activates the release of gonadotropins by activating neural NO synthase (nNOS in the pituitary gland. In the gonad, NO plays an important role in inducing ovulation and in causing luteolysis, whereas in the reproductive tract, it relaxes uterine muscle via cGMP and constricts it via prostaglandins (PG.

  12. Biological nitric oxide signalling: chemistry and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Tassiele A; da Silva, Roberto S; Miranda, Katrina M; Switzer, Christopher H; Wink, David A; Fukuto, Jon M

    2013-08-01

    Biological nitrogen oxide signalling and stress is an area of extreme clinical, pharmacological, toxicological, biochemical and chemical research interest. The utility of nitric oxide and derived species as signalling agents is due to their novel and vast chemical interactions with a variety of biological targets. Herein, the chemistry associated with the interaction of the biologically relevant nitrogen oxide species with fundamental biochemical targets is discussed. Specifically, the chemical interactions of nitrogen oxides with nucleophiles (e.g. thiols), metals (e.g. hemeproteins) and paramagnetic species (e.g. dioxygen and superoxide) are addressed. Importantly, the terms associated with the mechanisms by which NO (and derived species) react with their respective biological targets have been defined by numerous past chemical studies. Thus, in order to assist researchers in referring to chemical processes associated with nitrogen oxide biology, the vernacular associated with these chemical interactions is addressed. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  14. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  15. Biological nitric oxide signalling: chemistry and terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Tassiele A; da Silva, Roberto S; Miranda, Katrina M; Switzer, Christopher H; Wink, David A; Fukuto, Jon M

    2013-01-01

    Biological nitrogen oxide signalling and stress is an area of extreme clinical, pharmacological, toxicological, biochemical and chemical research interest. The utility of nitric oxide and derived species as signalling agents is due to their novel and vast chemical interactions with a variety of biological targets. Herein, the chemistry associated with the interaction of the biologically relevant nitrogen oxide species with fundamental biochemical targets is discussed. Specifically, the chemical interactions of nitrogen oxides with nucleophiles (e.g. thiols), metals (e.g. hemeproteins) and paramagnetic species (e.g. dioxygen and superoxide) are addressed. Importantly, the terms associated with the mechanisms by which NO (and derived species) react with their respective biological targets have been defined by numerous past chemical studies. Thus, in order to assist researchers in referring to chemical processes associated with nitrogen oxide biology, the vernacular associated with these chemical interactions is addressed. PMID:23617570

  16. Interleukin-1 beta-induced nitric oxide production from isolated rat islets is modulated by D-glucose and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H U; Mauricio, D; Karlsen, Allan Ertman

    1996-01-01

    -glucose-mediated modulation of interleukin-1 beta effects on insulin release from isolated rat islets was related to modulation of nitric oxide production. Further, we wished to investigate the effects of agents increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP on interleukin-1 beta-induced nitrite production. We......Interleukin-1 beta has been proposed to cause selective beta-cell destruction via the induction of nitric oxide synthesis. The cytotoxic effect of interleukin-1 beta is modulated by the concentration of D-glucose in the medium. The aim of this study was to investigate if D...... effects on acute insulin release was found at high (28 mmol/l) concentrations of D-glucose, and blocking nitrite production by the L-arginine analog aminoguanidine, which selectively inhibits the cytokine-inducible nitric oxide synthase, did not result in protection against the inhibitory action...

  17. Trace elements and nitric oxide function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marletta, Michael A; Spiering, Michelle M

    2003-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged over the last 15 y as a mammalian metabolic intermediate that is involved in the regulation of critical physiological functions such as blood vessel homeostasis, neuronal transmission and host response to infection. NO is synthesized by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase, which converts the amino acid L-arginine to citrulline and NO. NO functions in biological systems in two very important ways. First, it has been found to be a messenger by which cells communicate with one another (signal transduction), and second, it plays a critical role in the host response to infection. In this second function, it appears that the toxic properties of NO have been harnessed by the immune system to kill or at least slow the growth of invading organisms. The nonspecific chemical reactivity with key cellular targets is responsible for this action. In signaling, NO directly activates the enzyme soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Once activated, sGC converts GTP to cGMP and pyrophosphate. The cGMP formed is responsible for the well-documented actions of NO such as blood vessel dilation. With the initial discovery of NO signaling, several important questions emerged that centered largely on the issue of how a signaling system functions when the signaling agent is chemically reactive (short lived), highly diffusible and toxic. Critical, especially in signaling, are the control of NO biosynthesis and interaction with the biological receptors at a concentration that will not harm the host. Why did Nature choose NO for the roles it has? That question engenders only speculation. How does NO work (i.e., what does NO do, and how does it do it without harm yet with specificity)? Answers to these questions can now be offered as the molecular level details emerge to form an interesting picture.

  18. Increased cortical nitric oxide release after phencyclidine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pålsson, Erik; Finnerty, Niall; Fejgin, Kim; Klamer, Daniel; Wass, Caroline; Svensson, Lennart; Lowry, John

    2009-12-01

    Phencyclidine exerts psychotomimetic effects in humans and is used as a pharmacological animal model for schizophrenia. We, and others, have demonstrated that phencyclidine induces cognitive deficits in rats that are associated with schizophrenia. These cognitive deficits can be normalized by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The development of selective microelectrochemical nitric oxide sensors may provide direct evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide in these effects. The aim of the present study was to use LIVE (long term in vivo electrochemistry) to investigate the effect of phencyclidine, alone or in combination with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, on nitric oxide levels in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. Phencyclidine (2 mg kg(-1)) produced an increase in cortical nitric oxide levels and this increase was ameliorated by L-NAME (10 mg kg(-1)). Tentatively, the results from the present study provide a biochemical rationale for the involvement of nitric oxide in the phencyclidine model of schizophrenia. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Nitric oxide in the psychobiology of mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altan Eşsizoğlu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is in a gaseous form and is widespread in the human body. It functions by acting as a secondary messenger in the modulatory activities of neuronal functions of the central nervous system. Nitric oxide is the first identified neurotransmitter of the nontraditional neurotransmitter family.Studies conducted on experimental animals demonstrate that nitric oxide has a neuromodulatory efficacy on the secretions of other neurotransmitters and that it has an effect on learning and memory functions, and on various neuronal mechanisms. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the location of nitric oxide in the central nervous system, its effect on anxiety and depression, its relationship with other neurotransmitters, and also about its role on neurotoxicity. There are clinical studies concerning the level of nitrate, a product of nitric oxide metabolism, and also experimental studies concerning its rewarding effect of alcohol and substance use, in patients with depression and schizophrenia. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate its relationship with stress, which is an important factor in the etiology of psychiatric disorders. These studies demonstrate that nitric oxide is closely related with stress physiology.Nitric oxide is a neuromodulator, which is frequently being mentioned about nowadays in psychiatry. Clinical and experimental studies play an important role in the psychobiology of psychiatric disorders.

  20. Adverse experiences with nitric acid at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, W.S.; Craig, D.K.; Vitacco, M.J.; McCormick, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric acid is used routinely at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in many processes. However, the site has experienced a number of adverse situations in handling nitric acid. These have ranged from minor injuries to personnel to significant explosions. This document compiles many of these events and includes discussions of process upsets, fires, injuries, and toxic effects of nitric acid and its decomposition products. The purpose of the publication is to apprise those using the acid that it is a potentially dangerous material and can react in many ways as demonstrated by SRS experience. 10 refs.

  1. Evidence for the participation of nitric oxide in pemphigus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.X. Siebra

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of the skin. Nitric oxide (NO is an inflammatory mediator linked to a variety of physiological and pathophysiological phenomena that include skin tumors, psoriasis, urticaria, and atopic dermatitis. Inflammatory cells present in pemphigus lesions are important sources of NO production. We investigated whether NO is involved in pemphigus. A prospective cohort study was conducted at the Dermatology Service of the Hospital Universitário Walter Cantídio of the Federal University of Ceará. All patients seen at the outpatient clinic between August 2000 and July 2001, with a clinically and histologically confirmed diagnosis of pemphigus were included. The median age was 42.5 years (range: 12-69 years with a male to female ratio of 3:2. Total serum nitrite levels, used as a marker for NO production, were determined by the Griess reaction. Skin biopsies from pemphigus and breast surgery (control patients were used for the detection of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS by immunohistochemistry. Twenty-two (22 patients with pemphigus and eight (8 controls who did not differ in demographic characteristics were included. Total serum nitrite levels were significantly higher (>7 µmol/L in pemphigus patients compared to controls (<6 µmol/L, regardless of the severity of the clinical activity of pemphigus (P < 0.0001. All pemphigus biopsies presented increased immunostaining for iNOS that was not detected in normal skin samples. These data are the first to demonstrate that pemphigus patients display increased serum NO levels that are associated with increased iNOS expression in the affected skin.

  2. Nitric oxide and salicylic acid signaling in plant defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klessig, Daniel F.; Durner, Jörg; Noad, Robert; Navarre, Duroy A.; Wendehenne, David; Kumar, Dhirendra; Zhou, Jun Ma; Shah, Jyoti; Zhang, Shuqun; Kachroo, Pradeep; Trifa, Youssef; Pontier, Dominique; Lam, Eric; Silva, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical signaling role in the activation of plant defense responses after pathogen attack. We have identified several potential components of the SA signaling pathway, including (i) the H2O2-scavenging enzymes catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, (ii) a high affinity SA-binding protein (SABP2), (iii) a SA-inducible protein kinase (SIPK), (iv) NPR1, an ankyrin repeat-containing protein that exhibits limited homology to IκBα and is required for SA signaling, and (v) members of the TGA/OBF family of bZIP transcription factors. These bZIP factors physically interact with NPR1 and bind the SA-responsive element in promoters of several defense genes, such as the pathogenesis-related 1 gene (PR-1). Recent studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) is another signal that activates defense responses after pathogen attack. NO has been shown to play a critical role in the activation of innate immune and inflammatory responses in animals. Increases in NO synthase (NOS)-like activity occurred in resistant but not susceptible tobacco after infection with tobacco mosaic virus. Here we demonstrate that this increase in activity participates in PR-1 gene induction. Two signaling molecules, cGMP and cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR), which function downstream of NO in animals, also appear to mediate plant defense gene activation (e.g., PR-1). Additionally, NO may activate PR-1 expression via an NO-dependent, cADPR-independent pathway. Several targets of NO in animals, including guanylate cyclase, aconitase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (e.g., SIPK), are also modulated by NO in plants. Thus, at least portions of NO signaling pathways appear to be shared between plants and animals. PMID:10922045

  3. Role of the nitric oxide pathway and the endocannabinoid system in neurogenic relaxation of corpus cavernosum from biliary cirrhotic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, M; Sadeghipour, H; Shafaroodi, H; Nezami, B G; Gholipour, T; Hajrasouliha, A R; Tavakoli, S; Nobakht, M; Moore, K P; Mani, A R; Dehpour, A R

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Relaxation of corpus cavernosum, which is mediated by nitric oxide (NO) released from non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmission, is critical for inducing penile erection and can be affected by many pathophysiological conditions. However, the peripheral effect of liver cirrhosis on erectile function is as yet unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of biliary cirrhosis on NANC-mediated relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum and the possible roles of endocannabinoid and nitric oxide systems in this model. Experimental approach: Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation. Controls underwent sham operation. Four weeks later, strips of corpus cavernosum were mounted in a standard organ bath and NANC-mediated relaxations were obtained by applying electrical field stimulation. Key results: The NANC-mediated relaxation was enhanced in corporal strips from cirrhotic animals. Anandamide potentiated the relaxations in both groups. Either AM251 (CB1 antagonist) or capsazepine (vanilloid VR1 antagonist), but not AM630 (CB2 antagonist), prevented the enhanced relaxations of cirrhotic strips. Either the non-selective NOS inhibitor L-NAME or the selective neuronal NOS inhibitor L-NPA inhibited relaxations in both groups, but cirrhotic groups were more resistant to the inhibitory effects of these agents. Relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (NO donor) were similar in tissues from the two groups. Conclusions and implications: Cirrhosis potentiates the neurogenic relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum probably via the NO pathway and involving cannabinoid CB1 and vanilloid VR1 receptors. PMID:17486141

  4. The correlation between total antioxidant capacity and nitric oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-08-30

    citrulline by a family of isoenzymes known as the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and involved in diverse physiological and pathophysiological processes in various organs, including the human male and female reproductive tracts ...

  5. Adhesion Development and the Expression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Svinarich

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether nitric oxide (NO, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of thrombus formation, is involved in the formation and maintenance of adhesions.

  6. Inhibition of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E 2 Expression by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E 2 Expression by Methanol Extract of Polyopes affinis in Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 Microglial Cells through Suppression of Akt-dependent NF-kB Activity and MAPK Pathway.

  7. Nitric oxide inhibits glycogen synthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, F.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Meijer, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the existence of intrahepatic regulation of glucose metabolism by Kupffer cell products. Nitric oxide (NO) is known to inhibit gluconeogenic flux through pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. However, NO may also influence glucose metabolism at

  8. NO to cancer: The complex and multifaceted role of nitric oxide and the epigenetic nitric oxide donor, RRx-001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicinski, Jan; Oronsky, Bryan; Ning, Shoucheng; Knox, Susan; Peehl, Donna; Kim, Michelle M; Langecker, Peter; Fanger, Gary

    2015-12-01

    The endogenous mediator of vasodilation, nitric oxide (NO), has been shown to be a potent radiosensitizer. However, the underlying mode of action for its role as a radiosensitizer - while not entirely understood - is believed to arise from increased tumor blood flow, effects on cellular respiration, on cell signaling, and on the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), that can act as radiosensitizers in their own right. NO activity is surprisingly long-lived and more potent in comparison to oxygen. Reports of the effects of NO with radiation have often been contradictory leading to confusion about the true radiosensitizing nature of NO. Whether increasing or decreasing tumor blood flow, acting as radiosensitizer or radioprotector, the effects of NO have been controversial. Key to understanding the role of NO as a radiosensitizer is to recognize the importance of biological context. With a very short half-life and potent activity, the local effects of NO need to be carefully considered and understood when using NO as a radiosensitizer. The systemic effects of NO donors can cause extensive side effects, and also affect the local tumor microenvironment, both directly and indirectly. To minimize systemic effects and maximize effects on tumors, agents that deliver NO on demand selectively to tumors using hypoxia as a trigger may be of greater interest as radiosensitizers. Herein we discuss the multiple effects of NO and focus on the clinical molecule RRx-001, a hypoxia-activated NO donor currently being investigated as a radiosensitizer in the clinic. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The influence of propofol on P-selectin expression and nitric oxide production in re-oxygenated human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corcoran, T B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Reperfusion injury is characterized by free radical production and endothelial inflammation. Neutrophils mediate much of the end-organ injury that occurs, requiring P-selectin-mediated neutrophil-endothelial adhesion, and this is associated with decreased endothelial nitric oxide production. Propofol has antioxidant properties in vitro which might abrogate this inflammation. METHODS: Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to 20 h of hypoxia and then returned to normoxic conditions. Cells were treated with saline, Diprivan 5 microg\\/l or propofol 5 microg\\/l for 4 h after re-oxygenation and were then examined for P-selectin expression and supernatant nitric oxide concentrations for 24 h. P-selectin was determined by flow cytometry, and culture supernatant nitric oxide was measured as nitrite. RESULTS: In saline-treated cells, a biphasic increase in P-selectin expression was demonstrated at 30 min (P = 0.01) and 4 h (P = 0.023) after re-oxygenation. Propofol and Diprivan prevented these increases in P-selectin expression (P < 0.05). Four hours after re-oxygenation, propofol decreased endothelial nitric oxide production (P = 0.035). CONCLUSION: This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of propofol upon endothelial P-selectin expression. Such an effect may be important in situations of reperfusion injury such as cardiac transplantation and coronary artery bypass surgery. We conclude that propofol attenuates re-oxygenation-induced endothelial inflammation in vitro.

  10. Significance of Nitric Oxide Level in Giardiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarebavani, Mitra; Dargahi, Delaram; Einollahi, Nahid; Dashti, Nasrin; Safari, Fatemeh; Rezaeian, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Giardiasis is one of the most prevalent intestinal protozoa infections in humans. Nowadays, nitric oxide (NO) is known to be involved in the immune system against Giardia intestinalis. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the level of NO in individuals with giardiasis in comparison to normal subjects. This descriptive study was conducted among 49 Giadia positive and 39 age and gender matched healthy volunteers. Examination of stool samples was done by wet mount technique and formol-ether concentration method. Serum samples were obtained for laboratory examination. NO production was quantified by measuring nitrite, a stable end product of NO, using the Griess reaction based on ELISA method. By using the standard curve in Excel program, the concentration of NO2- in samples was obtained. Finally, all data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Values obtained from NO assays were placed into 4 groups: ≤ 10 (decline), 10.01 - 15 (normal), 15.01 - 25 (increase), and more than 25 µM (sharp increase). The mean level of NO in patients with G. intestinalis was 32.19 ± 2.15 µM and in people without G. intestinalis was 17.1 ± 1.33 µM. Eight point two percent of patients with Giardiasis were in normal range, but 2%, 20.4%, and 69.4% were in decline, increase, and sharp increase ranges, respectively. In group 2 (without infection), 17.9% were in normal range, and 20.5%, 51.3%, and 10.3% were in decline, increase, and sharp increase ranges, respectively. There was a statistical difference in nitric oxide levels between positive and negative groups with a 95% confidence interval. (p-value = 0.001). In our study, the number of people who showed a sharp increase in NO levels was significantly higher in individuals with giardiasis as compared to the control group, and patients infected with giardiasis showed significant increase in NO levels. Therefore, we suggest that further studies are required to understand the exact function of NO in the immune system

  11. Prognostic value of nitric oxide in pediatric septic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Ari L. Runtunuwu; Jeanette I. Ch. Manoppo; Dasril Daud; Irawan Yusuf; Idham Jaya Ganda

    2016-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) play a key role in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Nitrit oxide metabolite is reported as a good predictor for shock although its role as mortality predictor in sepsis still controversial. Objective To assess the serum nitric oxide (NO) levels and outcomes in pediatric patients with septic shock. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study from January 2013 to April 2014 in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) Prof. Dr. R. D. Kandou Hospital, Manad...

  12. Acute chemical pneumonitis caused by nitric acid inhalation: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Hyung Shim; Lee, In Jae; Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation is a rare clinical condition. The previously reported radiologic findings of this disease include acute permeability pulmonary edema, delayed bronchiolitis obliterans, and bronchiectasis. In very few published rare radiologic reports has this disease manifested as acute alveolar injury; we report a case of acute chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation which at radiography manifested as bilateral perihilar consolidation and ground-glass attenuation, suggesting acute alveolar injury.

  13. Involvement of nitric oxide in learning & memory processes

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Vanaja; Ekambaram, Perumal

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized from the amino acid, L-arginine by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has received attention as a neurotransmitter in the brain. NO has been found to induce cognitive behaviour in experimental animals. In order to show evidence for the involvement of NO in learning and memory processes, the reports indicating the effects of its precursor, donors, and inhibitors of its synthesis in mammals, birds, fishes and invertebrates have been reviewed. Further, learning and memory...

  14. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges for detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different than those for transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems.

  15. Detecting and Understanding the Roles of Nitric Oxide in Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Tonzetich, Zachary J.; McQuade, Lindsey E.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    We are pursuing a dual strategy for investigating the chemistry of nitric oxide as a biological signaling agent. In one approach, metal-based fluorescent sensors for the detection of NO in living cells are evaluated, and a sensor based on a copper fluorescein complex has proved to be a valuable lead compound. Sensors of this class permit identification of NO from both inducible and constitutive forms of nitric oxide synthase and facilitate investigation of different NO functions in response t...

  16. Nitric oxide in the flocculus works the inhibitory neural circuits after unilateral labyrinthectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, T; Takeda, N; Kubo, T; Kiyama, H

    1999-01-09

    We previously reported that nitric oxide (NO) production in the unipolar brush (UB) cells is involved in vestibular compensation [T. Kitahara, N. Takeda, P.C. Emson, T. Kubo, H. Kiyama, Changes in nitric oxide synthase-like immunoreactivities in unipolar brush cells in the rat cerebellar flocculus after unilateral labyrinthectomy, Brain Res. 765 (1997) 1-6]. To further elucidate the role of NO-mediated signaling in flocculus after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL), we examined UL-induced Fos expression, a marker of neural activity, in vestibular brainstem with continuous floccular infusions of Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). After UL with floccular l-NAME infusions, Fos expression appeared in bilateral medial vestibular (MVe) and prepositus hypoglossal (PrH) nuclei. After UL with floccular saline infusions, however, Fos expression was observed only in the ipsi-MVe and contra-PrH. Furthermore, it has been revealed that UL with l-NAME infusions caused more severe vestibulo-ocular disturbances than UL with saline infusions at the initial stage [Kitahara et al. Brain Res. 765 (1997) 1-6]. Therefore, it is suggested that UL with floccular l-NAME infusions activates the contra-MVe and ipsi-PrH neurons and causes more severe imbalance between intervestibular nuclear activities at the initial stage. NO-mediated signaling in flocculus could be a possible driving force of the flocculus-mediated inhibition on the contra-MVe and ipsi-PrH at the initial stage of vestibular compensation. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Direct measurements of nitric oxide release in relation to expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in isolated porcine mitral valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier; Aasted, Bent

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the direct release of nitric oxide (NO) from the porcine mitral valve using a NO microelectrode. Furthermore, the expression and localization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the mitral valve was studied using immunohistochemistry, Western blotti...... techniques for investigations into the role of local NO release in mitral valve diseases.......The aim of this study was to measure the direct release of nitric oxide (NO) from the porcine mitral valve using a NO microelectrode. Furthermore, the expression and localization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the mitral valve was studied using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting...... and RT-PCR. Results show that bradykinin increases NO release from mitral valves (¿Bradykinin: 33.71 ± 10.41 nM NO, P

  18. Farming environments and childhood atopy, wheeze, lung function, and exhaled nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Oliver; Genuneit, Jon; Latzin, Philipp; Büchele, Gisela; Horak, Elisabeth; Loss, Georg; Sozanska, Barbara; Weber, Juliane; Boznanski, Andrzej; Heederik, Dick; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Frey, Urs; von Mutius, Erika

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that children raised on farms are protected from asthma and allergies. It is unknown whether the farming effect is solely mediated by atopy or also affects nonatopic wheeze phenotypes. We sought to study the farm effect on wheeze phenotypes and objective markers, such as lung function and exhaled nitric oxide, and their interrelation with atopy in children. The GABRIEL Advanced Studies are cross-sectional, multiphase, population-based surveys of the farm effect on asthma and allergic disease in children aged 6 to 12 years. Detailed data on wheeze, farming exposure, and IgE levels were collected from a random sample of 8023 children stratified for farm exposure. Of those, another random subsample of 858 children was invited for spirometry, including bronchodilator tests and exhaled nitric oxide measurements. We found effects of exposure to farming environments on the prevalence and degree of atopy, on the prevalence of transient wheeze (adjusted odds ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.96), and on the prevalence of current wheeze among nonatopic subjects (adjusted odds ratio, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.32-0.63). There was no farm effect on lung function and exhaled nitric oxide levels in the general study population. Children living on farms are protected against wheeze independently of atopy. This farm effect is not attributable to improved airway size and lung mechanics. These findings imply as yet unknown protective mechanisms. They might include alterations of immune response and susceptibility to triggers of wheeze, such as viral infections. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitric oxide acts as a positive regulator to induce metamorphosis of the ascidian Herdmania momus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Ueda

    Full Text Available Marine invertebrates commonly have a biphasic life cycle in which the metamorphic transition from a pelagic larva to a benthic post-larva is mediated by the nitric oxide signalling pathway. Nitric oxide (NO is synthesised by nitric oxide synthase (NOS, which is a client protein of the molecular chaperon heat shock protein 90 (HSP90. It is notable, then, that both NO and HSP90 have been implicated in regulating metamorphosis in marine invertebrates as diverse as urochordates, echinoderms, molluscs, annelids, and crustaceans. Specifically, the suppression of NOS activity by the application of either NOS- or HSP90-inhibiting pharmacological agents has been shown consistently to induce the initiation of metamorphosis, leading to the hypothesis that a negative regulatory role of NO is widely conserved in biphasic life cycles. Further, the induction of metamorphosis by heat-shock has been demonstrated for multiple species. Here, we investigate the regulatory role of NO in induction of metamorphosis of the solitary tropical ascidian, Herdmania momus. By coupling pharmacological treatments with analysis of HmNOS and HmHSP90 gene expression, we present compelling evidence of a positive regulatory role for NO in metamorphosis of this species, in contrast to all existing ascidian data that supports the hypothesis of NO as a conserved negative regulator of metamorphosis. The exposure of competent H. momus larvae to a NOS inhibitor or an NO donor results in an up-regulation of NOS and HSP90 genes. Heat shock of competent larvae induces metamorphosis in a temperature dependent manner, up to a thermal tolerance that approaches 35°C. Both larval/post-larval survival and the appearance of abnormal morphologies in H. momus post-larvae reflect the magnitude of up-regulation of the HSP90 gene in response to heat-shock. The demonstrated role of NO as a positive metamorphic regulator in H. momus suggests the existence of inter-specific adaptations of NO regulation

  20. Critical Role for Telomerase in the Mechanism of Flow-Mediated Dilation in the Human Microcirculation

    OpenAIRE

    Beyer, Andreas M.; Freed, Julie K.; Durand, Matthew J.; Riedel, Michael; Ait-Aissa, Karima; Green, Paula; Hockenberry, Joseph C.; Morgan, R. Garret; Donato, Anthony J.; Peleg, Refael; Gasparri, Mario; Rokkas, Chris K.; Santos, Janine H.; Priel, Esther; Gutterman, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Telomerase is a nuclear regulator of telomere elongation with recent reports suggesting a role in regulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Flow-mediated dilation in patients with cardiovascular disease is dependent on the formation of reactive oxygen species. Objective: We examined the hypothesis that telomerase activity modulates microvascular flow-mediated dilation, and loss of telomerase activity contributes to the change of mediator from nitric oxide to mitochondria...

  1. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Gardner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs. Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry.

  2. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  3. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  4. Tapentadol and nitric oxide synthase systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Wolińska, Renata; Gąsińska, Emilia; Nagraba, Łukasz

    2015-04-01

    Tapentadol, a new analgesic drug with a dual mechanism of action (μ-opioid receptor agonism and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition), is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe acute and chronic pain. In this paper, the possible additional involvement of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system in the antinociceptive activity of tapentadol was investigated using an unspecific inhibitor of NOS, L-NOArg, a relatively specific inhibitor of neuronal NOS, 7-NI, a relatively selective inhibitor of inducible NOS, L-NIL, and a potent inhibitor of endothelial NOS, L-NIO. Tapentadol (1-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) increased the threshold for mechanical (Randall-Selitto test) and thermal (tail-flick test) nociceptive stimuli in a dose-dependent manner. All four NOS inhibitors, administered intraperitoneally in the dose range 0.1-10 mg/kg, potentiated the analgesic action of tapentadol at a low dose of 2 mg/kg in both models of pain. We conclude that NOS systems participate in tapentadol analgesia.

  5. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livio Dai Cas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium is a dynamic organ with many properties that takes part in the regulation of the principal mechanisms of vascular physiology. Its principal functions include the control of blood-tissue exchange and permeability, the vascular tonus, and the modulation of inflammatory or coagulatory mechanisms. Many vasoactive molecules, produced by the endothelium, are involved in the control of these functions. The most important is nitric oxide (NO, a gaseous molecule electrically neutral with an odd number of electrons that gives the molecule chemically reactive radical properties. Already known in the twentieth century, NO, sometimes considered as a dangerous molecule, recently valued as an important endogenous vasodilator factor. Recently, it was discovered that it is involved in several physiological mechanisms of endothelial protection (Tab. I. In 1992, Science elected it as “molecule of the year”; 6 yrs later three American researchers (Louis Ignarro, Robert Furchgott and Fried Murad obtained a Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology “for their discoveries about NO as signal in the cardiovascular system”.

  6. Structures of human constitutive nitric oxide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiying; Jamal, Joumana; Plaza, Carla; Pineda, Stephanie Hai; Chreifi, Georges; Jing, Qing; Cinelli, Maris A; Silverman, Richard B; Poulos, Thomas L

    2014-10-01

    Mammals produce three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS): neuronal NOS (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS). The overproduction of NO by nNOS is associated with a number of neurodegenerative disorders; therefore, a desirable therapeutic goal is the design of drugs that target nNOS but not the other isoforms. Crystallography, coupled with computational approaches and medicinal chemistry, has played a critical role in developing highly selective nNOS inhibitors that exhibit exceptional neuroprotective properties. For historic reasons, crystallography has focused on rat nNOS and bovine eNOS because these were available in high quality; thus, their structures have been used in structure-activity-relationship studies. Although these constitutive NOSs share more than 90% sequence identity across mammalian species for each NOS isoform, inhibitor-binding studies revealed that subtle differences near the heme active site in the same NOS isoform across species still impact enzyme-inhibitor interactions. Therefore, structures of the human constitutive NOSs are indispensible. Here, the first structure of human neuronal NOS at 2.03 Å resolution is reported and a different crystal form of human endothelial NOS is reported at 1.73 Å resolution.

  7. Nitric oxide in legume-rhizobium symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilhoc, Eliane; Boscari, Alexandre; Bruand, Claude; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2011-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous signaling molecule with a broad spectrum of regulatory functions in plant growth and development. NO has been found to be involved in various pathogenic or symbiotic plant-microbe interactions. During the last decade, increasing evidence of the occurrence of NO during legume-rhizobium symbioses has been reported, from early steps of plant-bacteria interaction, to the nitrogen-fixing step in mature nodules. This review focuses on recent advances on NO production and function in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. First, the potential plant and bacterial sources of NO, including NO synthase-like, nitrate reductase or electron transfer chains of both partners, are presented. Then responses of plant and bacterial cells to the presence of NO are presented in the context of the N(2)-fixing symbiosis. Finally, the roles of NO as either a regulatory signal of development, or a toxic compound with inhibitory effects on nitrogen fixation, or an intermediate involved in energy metabolism, during symbiosis establishment and nodule functioning are discussed. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Nitric oxide synthase localized in a subpopulation of vestibular efferents with NADPH diaphorase histochemistry and nitric oxide synthase immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysakowski, A; Singer, M

    2000-11-27

    Efferent innervation of the vestibular labyrinth is known to be cholinergic. More recent studies have also demonstrated the presence of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide in this system. Nitric oxide is one of a new class of neurotransmitters, the gaseous transmitters. It acts as a second messenger and neurotransmitter in diverse physiological systems. We decided to investigate the anatomical distribution of the synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), to clarify the role of nitric oxide in the vestibular periphery. NADPH diaphorase histochemical and NOS I immunohistochemical studies were done in the adult chinchilla and rat vestibular brainstem; diaphorase histochemistry was done in the chinchilla periphery. Retrograde tracing studies to verify the presence of NOS in brainstem efferent neurons were performed in young chinchillas. Our light microscopic results show that NOS I, as defined mainly by the presence of NADPH diaphorase, is present in a subpopulation of both brainstem efferent neurons and peripheral vestibular efferent boutons. Our ultrastructural results confirm these findings in the periphery. NADPH diaphorase is also present in a subpopulation of type I hair cells, suggesting that nitric oxide might be produced in and act locally upon these cells and other elements in the sensory epithelium. A hypothesis about how nitric oxide is produced in the vestibular periphery and how it may interact with other elements in the vestibular sensory apparatus is presented in the discussion. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  10. Nitric oxide, interorganelle communication, and energy flow: a novel route to slow aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eValerio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial lifecycle (mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, and removal by mitophagy is carefully orchestrated to ensure the efficient generation of cellular energy and to maintain reactive oxygen species production within an optimal range for cellular health. Based on latest research, these processes largely depend on mitochondrial interactions with other cell organelles, so that the ER- and peroxisome-mitochondrial connections might intervene in the control of cellular energy flow. Damaged organelles are cleared by autophagic mechanisms to assure the quality and proper function of the intracellular organelle pool. Nitric oxide (NO generated through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS acts a gas signaling mediator to promote mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics, with a favorable impact in diverse chronic diseases of the elderly. Obesity, diabetes and aging share common pathophysiological mechanisms, including mitochondrial impairment and dysfunctional eNOS. Here we review the evidences that that eNOS-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis and quality control, and possibly the complex interplay among cellular organelles, may be affected by metabolic diseases and the aging processes, contributing to reduce healthspan and lifespan. Drugs or nutrients able to sustain the eNOS-NO generating system might contribute to maintain organelle homeostasis and represent novel preventive and/or therapeutic approaches to chronic age-related diseases.

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase: From biochemistry and gene structure to clinical implications of NOS3 polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Lacchini, Riccardo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-01-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important vasodilator with a well-established role in cardiovascular homeostasis. While mediator is synthesized from L-arginine by neuronal, endothelial, and inducible nitric oxide synthases (NOS1,NOS3 and NOS2 respectively), NOS3 is the most important isoform for NO formation in the cardiovascular system. NOS3 is a dimeric enzyme whose expression and activity are regulated at transcriptional, posttranscriptional,and posttranslational levels. The NOS3 gene, which encodes NOS3, exhibits a number of polymorphic sites including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs), microsatellites, and insertions/deletions. Some NOS3 polymorphisms show functional effects on NOS3 expression or activity, thereby affecting NO formation. Interestingly, many studies have evaluated the effects of functional NOS3 polymorphisms on disease susceptibility and drug responses. Moreover, some studies have investigated how NOS3 haplotypes may impact endogenous NO formation and disease susceptibility. In this article,we carried out a comprehensive review to provide a basic understanding of biochemical mechanisms involved in NOS3 regulation and how genetic variations in NOS3 may translate into relevant clinical and pharmacogenetic implications.

  12. Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors: a review of patents from 2011 to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanyan; Yu, Tao; Lian, Yu-Ji; Ma, Rujun; Yang, Sungjae; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are a family of enzymes that play an essential role in synthesizing nitric oxide (NO) by oxidizing l-arginine. As previously reported, NO is a significant mediator in cellular signaling pathways. It serves as a crucial regulator in insulin secretion, vascular tone, peristalsis, angiogenesis, neural development and inflammation. Due to its important role, the inhibition of these vital enzymes provides, as tools, the opportunity to gain an insight into potential therapeutic applications targeting NOSs. This paper reviews the patent literature between 2011 and mid-2014 that specified inhibitors of NOS family members as the significant targets. Google and Baidu search engines were used to find relevant patents and clinical information using NOSs or NOS inhibitor as search terms. Considerable recent progress has been made in the development of NOS inhibitors with pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and such development is likely to continue. The patented compounds attenuated mostly embodying evidence from in vitro and in vivo trials that demonstrate good potential for future clinical human trials and industrial applications. Furthermore, new techniques such as X-ray ligand crystallographic study and structure-activity relationship were popularly utilized, which give new insights for developing novel, safe, efficient and selective NOS inhibitors.

  13. Nitric oxide prevents axonal degeneration by inducing HIF-1-dependent expression of erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Sanjay C; Bosch-Marcé, Marta; Reed, Nicole; Fischer, Angela; Semenza, Gregg L; Höke, Ahmet

    2011-03-22

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule that can trigger adaptive (physiological) or maladaptive (pathological) responses to stress stimuli in a context-dependent manner. We have previously reported that NO may signal axonal injury to neighboring glial cells. In this study, we show that mice deficient in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-/-) are more vulnerable than WT mice to toxin-induced peripheral neuropathy. The administration of NO donors to primary dorsal root ganglion cultures prevents axonal degeneration induced by acrylamide in a dose-dependent manner. We demonstrate that NO-induced axonal protection is dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1-mediated transcription of erythropoietin (EPO) within glial (Schwann) cells present in the cultures. Transduction of Schwann cells with adenovirus AdCA5 encoding a constitutively active form of HIF-1α results in amelioration of acrylamide-induced axonal degeneration in an EPO-dependent manner. Mice that are partially deficient in HIF-1α (HIF-1α+/-) are also more susceptible than WT littermates to toxic neuropathy. Our results indicate that NO→HIF-1→EPO signaling represents an adaptive mechanism that protects against axonal degeneration.

  14. Immune effector mechanisms of the nitric oxide pathway in malaria: cytotoxicity versus cytoprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Nahrevanian

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to be an important mediator and critical signaling molecule for malaria immunopathology; it is also a target for therapy and for vaccine. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS is synthesized by a number of cell types under inflammatory conditions. The most relevant known triggers for its expression are endotoxins and cytokines. To date, there have been conflicting reports concerning the clinical significance of NO in malaria. Some researchers have proposed that NO contributes to the development of severe and complicated malaria, while others have argued that NO has a protective role. Infection with parasites resistant to the microbicidal action of NO may result in high levels of NO being generated, which could then damage the host, instead of controlling parasitemia. Consequently, the host-parasite interaction is a determining factor for whether the parasite is capable of stimulating NO production; the role of NO in resistance to malaria appears to be strain specific. It is known that NO and/or its related molecules are involved in malaria, but their involvement is not independent of other immune events. NO is an important, but possibly not an essential contributor to the control of acute-phase malaria infection. The protective immune responses against malaria parasite are multifactorial; however, they necessarily involve final effector molecules, including NO, iNOS and RNI.

  15. Constitutive expression of mammalian nitric oxide synthase in tobacco plants triggers disease resistance to pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Hyun Jin; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Koo, Sung Cheol; Lee, Ju Huck; Park, Chan Young; Choi, Man Soo; Kang, Chang Ho; Baek, Dongwon; Cheong, Yong Hwa; Yun, Dae-Jin; Chung, Woo Sik; Cho, Moo Je; Kim, Min Chul

    2012-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known for its role in the activation of plant defense responses. To examine the involvement and mode of action of NO in plant defense responses, we introduced calmodulin-dependent mammalian neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which controls the CaMV35S promoter, into wild-type and NahG tobacco plants. Constitutive expression of nNOS led to NO production and triggered spontaneous induction of leaf lesions. Transgenic plants accumulated high amounts of H(2)O(2), with catalase activity lower than that in the wild type. nNOS transgenic plants contained high levels of salicylic acid (SA), and they induced an array of SA-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and/or ethylene (ET)-related genes. Consequently, NahG co-expression blocked the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-associated genes in transgenic plants, implying SA is involved in NO-mediated induction of SAR genes. The transgenic plants exhibited enhanced resistance to a spectrum of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Our results suggest a highly ranked regulatory role for NO in SA-, JA-, and/or ET-dependent pathways that lead to disease resistance.

  16. Role of Rutin on Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Ugusman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO, produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, is a major antiatherogenic factor in the blood vessel. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. Decreased availability of endothelial NO promotes the progression of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Rutin is a flavonoid with multiple cardiovascular protective effects. This study aimed to investigate the effects of rutin on eNOS and NO production in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. HUVEC were divided into four groups: control; oxidative stress induction with 180 μM H2O2; treatment with 300 μM rutin; and concomitant induction with rutin and H2O2 for 24 hours. HUVEC treated with rutin produced higher amount of NO compared to control (P<0.01. In the oxidative stress-induced HUVEC, rutin successfully induced cells’ NO production (P<0.01. Rutin promoted NO production in HUVEC by inducing eNOS gene expression (P<0.05, eNOS protein synthesis (P<0.01, and eNOS activity (P<0.05. Treatment with rutin also led to increased gene and protein expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF in HUVEC. Therefore, upregulation of eNOS expression by rutin may be mediated by bFGF. The results showed that rutin may improve endothelial function by augmenting NO production in human endothelial cells.

  17. Nitric oxide synthases: regulation and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förstermann, Ulrich; Sessa, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), the smallest signalling molecule known, is produced by three isoforms of NO synthase (NOS; EC 1.14.13.39). They all utilize l-arginine and molecular oxygen as substrates and require the cofactors reduced nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and (6R-)5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). All NOS bind calmodulin and contain haem. Neuronal NOS (nNOS, NOS I) is constitutively expressed in central and peripheral neurons and some other cell types. Its functions include synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS), central regulation of blood pressure, smooth muscle relaxation, and vasodilatation via peripheral nitrergic nerves. Nitrergic nerves are of particular importance in the relaxation of corpus cavernosum and penile erection. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil) require at least a residual nNOS activity for their action. Inducible NOS (NOS II) can be expressed in many cell types in response to lipopolysaccharide, cytokines, or other agents. Inducible NOS generates large amounts of NO that have cytostatic effects on parasitic target cells. Inducible NOS contributes to the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases and septic shock. Endothelial NOS (eNOS, NOS III) is mostly expressed in endothelial cells. It keeps blood vessels dilated, controls blood pressure, and has numerous other vasoprotective and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Many cardiovascular risk factors lead to oxidative stress, eNOS uncoupling, and endothelial dysfunction in the vasculature. Pharmacologically, vascular oxidative stress can be reduced and eNOS functionality restored with renin- and angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitors, with angiotensin receptor blockers, and with statins. PMID:21890489

  18. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes published information on levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24–48 hours with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma and/or red blood cells fell within three hours, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 hours, and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell associated nitrogen oxides were more than two hundred times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree showed by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors’ and the Tibetans’ high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function

  19. Mediatized Humanitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts to legiti......The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts...... legitimation by accountancy, legitimation by institutionalization, and legitimation by compensation. The analysis relates these changes to a problem of trust associated with mediatization through processes of mediation....

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase and heme oxygenase-1 act independently in liver ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Gourab; Luong, Tu V; Fuller, Barry J; Davidson, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protects against liver ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. The mechanism involves nitric oxide metabolism but the importance of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has not been established. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protects against liver IR but it is unclear if this depends on nitric oxide synthase. A mouse model of IPC with liver IR using wild-type (WT) and eNOS transgenic knockout (eNOS-/-) mice was developed to study the role of eNOS and its relationship to HO-1. Serum alanine aminotransferase level, liver histopathologic injury scores, and liver microcirculatory blood flow were measured. Western blots measured liver HO-1/2, eNOS, phosphorylated eNOS, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (HO-1). A set of 24-h recovery experiments was undertaken on WT mice with measurement of serum alanine aminotransferase level, histologic injury score, and HO-1 by Western blot. In WT animals, IPC preceding IR resulted in a reduction in hepatocellular and histologic injury, and improvement in parenchymal perfusion. In contrast, IPC in the eNOS-/- model did not protect the animals from IR injury. There was no difference between the eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS expression in all the WT groups. HO-1 protein was not detected in the nonrecovery groups but HO-1 messenger RNA was detected in all groups. In WT recovery experiments, IPC was protective against IR injury. HO-1 protein was detected in the IPC + IR and IR only groups but not in the sham group. This study developed and used an eNOS-/- model to demonstrate that eNOS mediates protection against liver IR injury by IPC. The eNOS expression and activity and HO-1 expression are increased independently in liver IPC and IR, with HO-1 expression increased in the later stages of IPC and IR. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Plant survival in a changing environment: the role of nitric oxide in plant responses to abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela eSimontacchi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide in plants may originate endogenously or come from surrounding atmosphere and soil. Interestingly, this gaseous free radical is far from having a constant level and varies greatly among tissues depending on a given plant´s ontogeny and environmental fluctuations.Proper plant growth, vegetative development, and reproduction require the integration of plant hormonal activity with the antioxidant network, as well as the maintenance of concentration of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species within a narrow range. Plants are frequently faced with abiotic stress conditions such as low nutrient availability, salinity, drought, high ultraviolet (UV radiation and extreme temperatures, which can influence developmental processes and lead to growth restriction making adaptive responses the plant´s priority. The ability of plants to respond and survive under environmental-stress conditions involves sensing and signalling events where nitric oxide becomes a critical component mediating hormonal actions, interacting with reactive oxygen species, and modulating gene expression and protein activity. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the role of nitric oxide in adaptive plant responses to some specific abiotic stress conditions, particularly low mineral nutrient supply, drought, salinity and high UV-B radiation.

  2. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ji, Yajing [Department of Biomedical Science and Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot [Department of Biology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ash, David E. [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Mohanty, Dillip K., E-mail: Mohan1dk@cmich.edu [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well.

  3. Nitric oxide induces cotyledon senescence involving co-operation of the NES1/MAD1 and EIN2-associated ORE1 signalling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jing; Li, Manli; Kong, Dongdong; Wang, Lei; Lv, Qiang; Wang, Jinzheng; Bao, Fang; Gong, Qingqiu; Xia, Jinchan; He, Yikun

    2014-07-01

    After germination, cotyledons undertake the major role in supplying nutrients to the pre-photoautorophy angiosperm seedlings until they senesce. Like other senescence processes, cotyledon senescence is a programmed degenerative process. Nitric oxide can induce premature cotyledon senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana, yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. A screen for genetic mutants identified the nes1 mutant, in which cotyledon senescence was accelerated by nitric oxide. Map-based cloning revealed that NES1 is allelic to a previously reported mitotic checkpoint family gene, MAD1. The nes1/mad1 mutants were restored to the wild type, in response to nitric oxide, by transforming them with pNES1::NES1. Ectopic expression of NES1 in the wild type delayed nitric oxide-mediated cotyledon senescence, confirming the repressive role of NES1. Moreover, two positive regulators of leaf senescence, the ethylene signalling component EIN2 and the transcription factor ORE1/AtNAC2/ANAC092, were found to function during nitric oxide-induced senescence in cotyledons. The block of ORE1 function delayed senescence and ectopic expression induced the process, revealing the positive role of ORE1. EIN2 was required to induce ORE1. Furthermore, the genetic interaction analysis between NES1 and ORE1 showed that the ore1 loss-of-function mutants were epistatic to nes1, suggesting the dominant role of ORE1 and the antagonistic role of NES1 during nitric oxide-induced cotyledon senescence in Arabidopsis. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Thrombin Has Biphasic Effects on the Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway in Endothelial Cells and Contributes to Experimental Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Katrin F.; Laux, Volker; Heumann, Rolf; von Degenfeld, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Background A potential role for coagulation factors in pulmonary arterial hypertension has been recently described, but the mechanism of action is currently not known. Here, we investigated the interactions between thrombin and the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in pulmonary endothelial cells and experimental pulmonary hypertension. Principal Findings Chronic treatment with the selective thrombin inhibitor melagatran (0.9 mg/kg daily via implanted minipumps) reduced right ventricular hypertrophy in the rat monocrotaline model of experimental pulmonary hypertension. In vitro, thrombin was found to have biphasic effects on key regulators of the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in endothelial cells (HUVECs). Acute thrombin stimulation led to increased expression of the cGMP-elevating factors endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) subunits, leading to increased cGMP levels. By contrast, prolonged exposition of pulmonary endothelial cells to thrombin revealed a characteristic pattern of differential expression of the key regulators of the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, in which specifically the factors contributing to cGMP elevation (eNOS and sGC) were reduced and the cGMP-hydrolyzing PDE5 was elevated (qPCR and Western blot). In line with the differential expression of key regulators of the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, a reduction of cGMP by prolonged thrombin stimulation was found. The effects of prolonged thrombin exposure were confirmed in endothelial cells of pulmonary origin (HPAECs and HPMECs). Similar effects could be induced by activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1). Conclusion These findings suggest a link between thrombin generation and cGMP depletion in lung endothelial cells through negative regulation of the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, possibly mediated via PAR-1, which could be of relevance in pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:23785394

  5. Thrombin has biphasic effects on the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in endothelial cells and contributes to experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin F Nickel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A potential role for coagulation factors in pulmonary arterial hypertension has been recently described, but the mechanism of action is currently not known. Here, we investigated the interactions between thrombin and the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in pulmonary endothelial cells and experimental pulmonary hypertension. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chronic treatment with the selective thrombin inhibitor melagatran (0.9 mg/kg daily via implanted minipumps reduced right ventricular hypertrophy in the rat monocrotaline model of experimental pulmonary hypertension. In vitro, thrombin was found to have biphasic effects on key regulators of the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in endothelial cells (HUVECs. Acute thrombin stimulation led to increased expression of the cGMP-elevating factors endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC subunits, leading to increased cGMP levels. By contrast, prolonged exposition of pulmonary endothelial cells to thrombin revealed a characteristic pattern of differential expression of the key regulators of the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, in which specifically the factors contributing to cGMP elevation (eNOS and sGC were reduced and the cGMP-hydrolyzing PDE5 was elevated (qPCR and Western blot. In line with the differential expression of key regulators of the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, a reduction of cGMP by prolonged thrombin stimulation was found. The effects of prolonged thrombin exposure were confirmed in endothelial cells of pulmonary origin (HPAECs and HPMECs. Similar effects could be induced by activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a link between thrombin generation and cGMP depletion in lung endothelial cells through negative regulation of the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, possibly mediated via PAR-1, which could be of relevance in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  6. Morphine inhibits AP-1 activity and CD14 expression in leukocytes by a nitric oxide and opioid receptor-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welters, I D; Menzebach, A; Goumon, Y; Langefeld, T W; Harbach, H; Mühling, J; Cadet, P; Stefano, G B

    2007-11-01

    Activator protein 1 is a transcription factor involved in the regulation of proinflammatory mediators. Activation of phagocytes by lipopolysaccharide depends on the expression of CD14 on the cell surface. In this study, we investigated the effects of morphine and nitric oxide on CD14 expression and activator protein 1 activation in human blood monocytes and neutrophils as well as the leukocyte cell line HL-60. Whole blood was incubated with morphine, the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine, naloxone or nitric oxide synthase inhibitors Nomega-nitro-l-arginine and Nomega-nitro-l-arginine-methylester and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Activator protein 1 nuclear content was determined by flow cytometry in human blood neutrophils and monocytes. CD14 expression on neutrophils was measured after incubation with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled antibodies. Electric mobility shift assay served for evaluation of activator protein 1 nuclear binding in HL-60 cells. Incubation of whole blood with morphine and subsequent stimulation with lipopolysaccharide decreased activator protein 1 nuclear content. Exposure to naloxone before morphine treatment abolished morphine-induced inhibition of activator protein 1 activity in human blood monocytes and neutrophils. Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors also reversed morphine's effects. CD14 expression on neutrophils was reduced after morphine treatment. These effects were antagonized by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors and naloxone. Morphine inhibits activator protein 1 activation by a mu opioid receptor pathway coupled to nitric oxide as second messenger. The decrease in CD14 expression caused by morphine may play a role in inhibition of activator protein 1 activation following lipopolysaccharide treatment of phagocytes.

  7. Calcium-activated potassium channels - a therapeutic target for modulating nitric oxide in cardiovascular disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Thomas; Kroigaard, Christel; Simonsen, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD: Cardiovascular risk factors are often associated with endothelial dysfunction, which is also prognostic for occurrence of cardiovascular events. Endothelial dysfunction is reflected by blunted vasodilatation and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Endothelium......-dependent vasodilatation is mediated by NO, prostacyclin, and an endothelium-derived hyperpolarising factor (EDHF), and involves small (SK) and intermediate (IK) conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. Therefore, SK and IK channels may be drug targets for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular...... disease. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: SK and IK channels are involved in EDHF-type vasodilatation, but recent studies suggest that these channels are also involved in the regulation of NO bioavailability. Here we review how SK and IK channels may regulate NO bioavailability. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN...

  8. Cytoglobin regulates blood pressure and vascular tone through nitric oxide metabolism in the vascular wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoping; El-Mahdy, Mohamed A.; Boslett, James; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Hemann, Craig; Abdelghany, Tamer M.; Ismail, Raed S.; Little, Sean C.; Zhou, Danlei; Thuy, Le Thi Thanh; Kawada, Norifumi; Zweier, Jay L.

    2017-04-01

    The identity of the specific nitric oxide dioxygenase (NOD) that serves as the main in vivo regulator of O2-dependent NO degradation in smooth muscle remains elusive. Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a recently discovered globin expressed in fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells with unknown function. Cygb, coupled with a cellular reducing system, efficiently regulates the rate of NO consumption by metabolizing NO in an O2-dependent manner with decreased NO consumption in physiological hypoxia. Here we show that Cygb is a major regulator of NO degradation and cardiovascular tone. Knockout of Cygb greatly prolongs NO decay, increases vascular relaxation, and lowers blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. We further demonstrate that downregulation of Cygb prevents angiotensin-mediated hypertension. Thus, Cygb has a critical role in the regulation of vascular tone and disease. We suggest that modulation of the expression and NOD activity of Cygb represents a strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  9. Modulation of Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis by Nitric Oxide and Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Dooley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma: SSc is a multisystem, connective tissue disease of unknown aetiology characterized by vascular dysfunction, autoimmunity, and enhanced fibroblast activity resulting in fibrosis of the skin, heart, and lungs, and ultimately internal organ failure, and death. One of the most important and early modulators of disease activity is thought to be oxidative stress. Evidence suggests that the free radical nitric oxide (NO, a key mediator of oxidative stress, can profoundly influence the early microvasculopathy, and possibly the ensuing fibrogenic response. Animal models and human studies have also identified dietary antioxidants, such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, to function as a protective system against oxidative stress and fibrosis. Hence, targeting EGCG may prove a possible candidate for therapeutic treatment aimed at reducing both oxidant stress and the fibrotic effects associated with SSc.

  10. Nitric oxide dysregulation in platelets from patients with advanced Huntington disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Carrizzo

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a biologically active inorganic molecule involved in the regulation of many physiological processes, such as control of blood flow, platelet adhesion, endocrine function, neurotransmission and neuromodulation. In the present study, for the first time, we investigated the modulation of NO signaling in platelets of HD patients. We recruited 55 patients with manifest HD and 28 gender- and age-matched healthy controls. Our data demonstrated that NO-mediated vasorelaxation, when evoked by supernatant from insulin-stimulated HD platelets, gradually worsens along disease course. The defective vasorelaxation seems to stem from a faulty release of NO from platelets of HD patients and, it is associated with impairment of eNOS phosphorylation (Ser(1177 and activity. This study provides important insights about NO metabolism in HD and raises the hypothesis that the decrease of NO in platelets of HD individuals could be a good tool for monitoring advanced stages of the disease.

  11. Relevance of nitric oxide to the response of tumors to photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Cecic, Ivana

    1998-05-01

    Oxidative stress is the term used for a sudden and intense exposure of living tissue to reactive oxygen radicals. Tumor tissue response to oxidative stress, invoked in the action of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and some other modalities for cancer treatment, at the level of vascular endothelium has important therapeutic implications. Nitric oxide (NO), a transient radical species which is an important bioregulatory molecule involved in a diverse array of physiological events, has important functions in the regulation of progression of cancerous growth. Response to cancer therapies associated with the induction of oxidative stress was suggested to be amenable to NO mediation. Events involved in antitumor effects of PDT that can be markedly affected by changes in NO availability are listed. The correlation between endogenous NO production in tumors and the response of these lesions to PDT is discussed. Results of treatments aimed at modulating NO levels in PDT treated tumors are reviewed and evaluated.

  12. A nitric oxide donor (nitroglycerin) triggers genuine migraine attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Kruuse, C; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1994-01-01

    Supersensitivity to induction of headache and arterial dilatation by a donor of nitric oxide (nitroglycerin) has recently been demonstrated in migraine sufferers. The aims of the present study were to examine whether the nitric oxide donor nitroglycerin may induce a typical migraine attack, to ex.......03). The time pattern of headache and estimated middle cerebral artery dilatation corresponded well. The study therefore demonstrates that activation of the nitric oxide cGMP pathway may cause typical migraine attacks.......Supersensitivity to induction of headache and arterial dilatation by a donor of nitric oxide (nitroglycerin) has recently been demonstrated in migraine sufferers. The aims of the present study were to examine whether the nitric oxide donor nitroglycerin may induce a typical migraine attack......, to exclude placebo-related effects and to describe the relation between middle cerebral artery dilatation and provoked migraine. Nitroglycerin (0.5 μg/kg/min for 20 min) or placebo was infused into 12 migraine patients in a double-blind cross-over trial. Blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery...

  13. Phospholipase C delta regulates germination of Dictyostelium spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijken, P.; Van Haastert, PJM

    2001-01-01

    Background: Many eukaryotes including plants and fungi make spores that resist severe environmental stress. The micro-organism Dictyostelium contains a single phospholipase C gene (PLC); deletion of the gene has no effect on growth cell movement and differentiation. In this report we show that PLC

  14. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in the mud-dwelled air-breathing singhi catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis under condition of water shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Mahua G; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2012-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to be an important regulator molecule for regulating the multiple signaling pathways and also to play diverse physiological functions in mammals including that of adaptation to various stresses. The present study reports on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme that produces NO from l-arginine in the freshwater air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) while dwelling inside the mud peat under semidry conditions. Desiccation stress, due to mud-dwelling for 2 weeks, led to significant increase of NO concentration in different tissues and in plasma of singhi catfish, and also the increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver with an accompanying increase of toxic ammonia level in different tissues. Mud-dwelling also resulted to induction of iNOS activity, expression of iNOS protein in different tissues after 7 days with further increase after 14 days, which otherwise was not detectable in control fish. Further, mud-dwelling also resulted to a significant expression of iNOS mRNA after 7 days with a more increase of mRNA level after 14 days, suggesting that the desiccation stress caused transcriptional regulation of iNOS gene. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated the zonal specific expression of iNOS protein in different tissues. Desiccation stress also led to activation and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor кB (NFкB) in hepatic cells. These results suggest that the activation of iNOS gene under desiccation-induced stresses such as high ammonia load was probably mediated through the activation of one of the major transcription factors, the NFкB. This is the first report of desiccation-induced induction of iNOS gene, iNOS protein expression leading to more generation of NO while living inside the mud peat under condition of water shortage in any air-breathing teleosts. 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  15. Contribution of glutaredoxin-1 to S-glutathionylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase for mesenteric nitric oxide generation in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Qingjuan; Bao, Lei; Guo, Hongjie; Hao, Fabao; Luo, Qianfu; Chen, Jiaping; Guo, Chunbao

    2017-10-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is critical for intestinal microcirculatory perfusion and therefore plays a key role in the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). eNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) is inhibited by S-glutathionylation of eNOS (eNOS-SSG), which can be reversed by glutaredoxin-1 (Grx1). Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the interplay between Grx1 and eNOS in regulating the following inflammation signal during the development of NEC. Primary mouse intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (MIMECs) and peritoneal macrophages were subjected to lipopolysaccharide treatment, and Grx1-/- mice were subjected to an NEC-inducing regimen of formula feeding in combination with hypoxia and hypothermia. The eNOS-SSG level and its activity were assessed using immunoprecipitated assay and NO production evaluation. NO-mediated Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling and inflammation injury were further defined. NEC severity was significantly increased in Grx1-/- mice. Grx1-/- mice with NEC showed significantly decreased NO and increased O2•- production with increases in eNOS-SSG. Furthermore, TLR4 signaling, which is required for the development of NEC, was enhanced in the Grx1-deficient mice. These results suggest that eNOS-SSG within the MIMECs inhibited NO production and enhanced TLR4 activity, which were implicated in the pathogenesis of NEC. Grx1 deficiency increases the severity of NEC in association with eNOS-SSG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in cardiac function and pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin Hua; Jin, Chun Zi; Jang, Ji Hyun; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS or NOS1) is the major endogenous source of myocardial nitric oxide (NO), which facilitates cardiac relaxation and modulates contraction. In the healthy heart it regulates intracellular Ca2+, signalling pathways and oxidative homeostasis and is upregulated from early phases upon pathogenic insult. nNOS plays pivotal roles in protecting the myocardium from increased oxidative stress, systolic/diastolic dysfunction, adverse structural remodelling and arrhythmias in the failing heart. Here, we show that the downstream target proteins of nNOS and underlying post-transcriptional modifications are shifted during disease progression from Ca2+-handling proteins [e.g. PKA-dependent phospholamban phosphorylation (PLN-Ser16)] in the healthy heart to cGMP/PKG-dependent PLN-Ser16 with acute angiotensin II (Ang II) treatment. In early hypertension, nNOS-derived NO is involved in increases of cGMP/PKG-dependent troponin I (TnI-Ser23/24) and cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMBP-C-Ser273). However, nNOS-derived NO is shown to increase S-nitrosylation of various Ca2+-handling proteins in failing myocardium. The spatial compartmentation of nNOS and its translocation for diverse binding partners in the diseased heart or various nNOS splicing variants and regulation in response to pathological stress may be responsible for varied underlying mechanisms and functions. In this review, we endeavour to outline recent advances in knowledge of the molecular mechanisms mediating the functions of nNOS in the myocardium in both normal and diseased hearts. Insights into nNOS gene regulation in various tissues are discussed. Overall, nNOS is an important cardiac protector in the diseased heart. The dynamic localization and various mediating mechanisms of nNOS ensure that it is able to regulate functions effectively in the heart under stress. PMID:24756636

  17. The redox interplay between nitrite and nitric oxide: From the gut to the brain☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cassilda; Ferreira, Nuno R.; Rocha, Bárbara S.; Barbosa, Rui M.; Laranjinha, João

    2013-01-01

    The reversible redox conversion of nitrite and nitric oxide (•NO) in a physiological setting is now widely accepted. Nitrite has long been identified as a stable intermediate of •NO oxidation but several lines of evidence support the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in vivo. In the gut, this notion implies that nitrate from dietary sources fuels the longstanding production of nitrite in the oral cavity followed by univalent reduction to •NO in the stomach. Once formed, •NO boosts a network of reactions, including the production of higher nitrogen oxides that may have a physiological impact via the post-translational modification of proteins and lipids. Dietary compounds, such as polyphenols, and different prandial states (secreting specific gastric mediators) modulate the outcome of these reactions. The gut has unusual characteristics that modulate nitrite and •NO redox interplay: (1) wide range of pH (neutral vs acidic) and oxygen tension (c.a. 70 Torr in the stomach and nearly anoxic in the colon), (2) variable lumen content and (3) highly developed enteric nervous system (sensitive to •NO and dietary compounds, such as glutamate). The redox interplay of nitrite and •NO might also participate in the regulation of brain homeostasis upon neuronal glutamatergic stimulation in a process facilitated by ascorbate and a localized and transient decrease of oxygen tension. In a way reminiscent of that occurring in the stomach, a nitrite/•NO/ascorbate redox interplay in the brain at glutamatergic synapses, contributing to local •NO increase, may impact on •NO-mediated process. We here discuss the implications of the redox conversion of nitrite to •NO in the gut, how nitrite-derived •NO may signal from the digestive to the central nervous system, influencing brain function, as well as a putative ascorbate-driven nitrite/NO pathway occurring in the brain. PMID:24024161

  18. Skeletal Muscle Function during Exercise—Fine-Tuning of Diverse Subsystems by Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Bloch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is responsible for altered acute and chronic workload as induced by exercise. Skeletal muscle adaptations range from immediate change of contractility to structural adaptation to adjust the demanded performance capacities. These processes are regulated by mechanically and metabolically induced signaling pathways, which are more or less involved in all of these regulations. Nitric oxide is one of the central signaling molecules involved in functional and structural adaption in different cell types. It is mainly produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS and by non-enzymatic pathways also in skeletal muscle. The relevance of a NOS-dependent NO signaling in skeletal muscle is underlined by the differential subcellular expression of NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3, and the alteration of NO production provoked by changes of workload. In skeletal muscle, a variety of highly relevant tasks to maintain skeletal muscle integrity and proper signaling mechanisms during adaptation processes towards mechanical and metabolic stimulations are taken over by NO signaling. The NO signaling can be mediated by cGMP-dependent and -independent signaling, such as S-nitrosylation-dependent modulation of effector molecules involved in contractile and metabolic adaptation to exercise. In this review, we describe the most recent findings of NO signaling in skeletal muscle with a special emphasis on exercise conditions. However, to gain a more detailed understanding of the complex role of NO signaling for functional adaptation of skeletal muscle (during exercise, additional sophisticated studies are needed to provide deeper insights into NO-mediated signaling and the role of non-enzymatic-derived NO in skeletal muscle physiology.

  19. Activation of Secretagogue Independent Gastric Acid Secretion via Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Stimulation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Miriam Kitay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: L-arginine is an important mediator of cell division, wound healing, and immune function. It can be transformed by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS to nitric oxide (NO, an important cell signaling molecule. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrate specific effects of L-arginine (10mM exposure on gastric acid secretion in rat parietal cells. Methods: Studies were performed with isolated gastric glands and the pH sensitive dye BCECF-AM +/- L-arginine to examine its effects on acid secretion. The direct NO-donor diethylamine NONOate sodium salt hydrate, was also used while monitoring intracellular pH. The specific inhibitor of the intracellular NO signal cascade ODQ was also used. Results: We found that gastric proton extrusion was activated with application of L-arginine (10mM, in a separate series when L-arginine (10mM + L-NAME (30µM were added there was no acid secretion. Addition of the NO-donor diethylamine NONOate sodium salt hydrate (10µM also induced acid secretion. When the selective sGC-inhibitor ODQ was added with NONOate we did not observe acid secretion. Conclusion: We conclude that L-arginine is a novel secretagogue, which can mediate gastric acid secretion. Furthermore, the intake of L-arginine causes direct activation of the H+, K+ ATPase and increased proton extrusion from parietal cells resulting in the increased risk for acid-related diseases. The NO/sGC/cGMP pathway has never been described as a possible intracellular mechanism for H+, K+ ATPase activation before and presents a completely new scientific finding. Moreover, our studies demonstrate a novel role for L-NAME to effectively eliminate NOS induced acid secretion and thereby reducing the risk for L-arginine inducible ulcer disease.

  20. Nitric oxide antagonizes the acid tolerance response that protects Salmonella against innate gastric defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J Bourret

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive nitrogen species (RNS derived from dietary and salivary inorganic nitrogen oxides foment innate host defenses associated with the acidity of the stomach. The mechanisms by which these reactive species exert antimicrobial activity in the gastric lumen are, however, poorly understood.The genetically tractable acid tolerance response (ATR that enables enteropathogens to survive harsh acidity was screened for signaling pathways responsive to RNS. The nitric oxide (NO donor spermine NONOate derepressed the Fur regulon that controls secondary lines of resistance against organic acids. Despite inducing a Fur-mediated adaptive response, acidified RNS largely repressed oral virulence as demonstrated by the fact that Salmonella bacteria exposed to NO donors during mildly acidic conditions were shed in low amounts in feces and exhibited ameliorated oral virulence. NO prevented Salmonella from mounting a de novo ATR, but was unable to suppress an already functional protective response, suggesting that RNS target regulatory cascades but not their effectors. Transcriptional and translational analyses revealed that the PhoPQ signaling cascade is a critical ATR target of NO in rapidly growing Salmonella. Inhibition of PhoPQ signaling appears to contribute to most of the NO-mediated abrogation of the ATR in log phase bacteria, because the augmented acid sensitivity of phoQ-deficient Salmonella was not further enhanced after RNS treatment.Since PhoPQ-regulated acid resistance is widespread in enteric pathogens, the RNS-mediated inhibition of the Salmonella ATR described herein may represent a common component of innate host defenses.

  1. Pharmacological models for inner ear therapy with emphasis on nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumida, M; Anniko, M; Popa, R; Zhang, D M

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated neurotoxicity may be an appropriate pathophysiological model with which to explain a variety of inner ear diseases characterized by acute or progressive hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo. The localization of NO synthase (NOS) isoforms was examined in the inner ear of the pigmented guinea pig after intratympanic injection of 1 mg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or 5 mg gentamicin (GM) using an immunohistochemical method, revealing the expression of NOS II in the inner ear. Production of NO in the isolated organ of Corti and utricle or in the isolated vestibular and cochlear hair cells after stimulation with L-arginine, glutamate, GM and LPS was investigated using the fluorescence indicator 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate. The fluorescence intensity of the sensory cells was augmented by stimulation with L-arginine, glutamate, GM and LPS. A significant increase in NO production was also noted in the LPS-treated animals. These findings imply that NO from constitutive NOS may mediate ototoxicity in the early phase, whereas NO from NOS II may contribute to the late phase of tissue damage in the inner ear. Based on this hypothesis, reduction of glutamatergic excitotoxicity and inhibition of NOS, scavenging superoxide and scavenging peroxynitrite are thought to attenuate NO-mediated otoneurotoxicity.

  2. The effects of nitric oxide on the immune response during giardiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wander Rogério Pavanelli

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a free radical synthesized from L-arginine by different isoforms NO-synthases. NO possesses multiple and complex biological functions. NO is an important mediator of homeostasis, and changes in its generation or actions can contribute or not to pathological states. The knowledge of effects of NO has been not only important to our understanding of immune response, but also to new tools for research and treatment of various diseases. Knowing the importance of NO as inflammatory mediator in diverse infectious diseases, we decided to develop a revision that shows the participation/effect of this mediator in immune response induced against Giardia spp. Several studies already demonstrated the participation of NO with microbicidal and microbiostatic activity in giardiasis. On the other hand, some works report that Giardia spp. inhibit NO production by consuming the intermediate metabolite arginine. In fact, studies in vitro showed that G. lamblia infection of human intestinal epithelial cells had reduced NO production. This occurs due to limited offer of the crucial substrate arginine (essential aminoacid for NO production, consequently reducing NO production. Therefore, the balance between giardial arginine consumption and epithelial NO production could contribute to the variability of the duration and severity of infections by this ubiquitous parasite.

  3. Genistein attenuates hypoxic pulmonary hypertension via enhanced nitric oxide signaling and the erythropoietin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Sachiko; Morio, Yoshiteru; Toba, Michie; Nagaoka, Tetsutaro; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Iwakami, Shin-Ichiro; Seyama, Kuniaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-06-01

    Upregulation of the erythropoietin (EPO)/EPO receptor (EPOR) system plays a protective role against chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (hypoxic PH) through enhancement of endothelial nitric oxide (NO)-mediated signaling. Genistein (Gen), a phytoestrogen, is considered to ameliorate NO-mediated signaling. We hypothesized that Gen attenuates and prevents hypoxic PH. In vivo, Sprague-Dawley rats raised in a hypobaric chamber were treated with Gen (60 mkg/kg) for 21 days. Pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling were ameliorated in Gen-treated hypoxic PH rats. Gen also restored cGMP levels and phosphorylated endothelial NO synthase (p-eNOS) at Ser(1177) and p-Akt at Ser(473) expression in the lungs. Additionally, Gen potentiated plasma EPO concentration and EPOR-positive endothelial cell counts. In experiments with hypoxic PH rats' isolated perfused lungs, Gen caused NO- and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-dependent vasodilation that reversed abnormal vasoconstriction. In vitro, a combination of EPO and Gen increased the p-eNOS and the EPOR expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells under a hypoxic environment. Moreover, Gen potentiated the hypoxic increase in EPO production from human hepatoma cells. We conclude that Gen may be effective for the prevention of hypoxic PH through the improvement of PI3K/Akt-dependent, NO-mediated signaling in association with enhancement of the EPO/EPOR system. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand...... as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these aspects. In a dialogue with our empirical findings we move on to propose a number of types of mediation...... that have helped to enrich our understanding of mediated work and the design of computer mediation for such work....

  5. Desflurane inhibits endothelium-dependent vasodilation more than sevoflurane with inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuma, Satoshi; Tokinaga, Yasuyuki; Takada, Yukimasa; Azumaguchi, Ryu; Kimizuka, Motonobu; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2018-01-01

    The effects of desflurane on endothelium-dependent vasodilation remain uncertain, whereas sevoflurane is known to inhibit it. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation is mainly mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase. The effects of desflurane on endothelium-dependent vasodilation were compared with those of sevoflurane, and inhibition mechanisms, including phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the calcium pathway, were evaluated for the two anesthetics. We hypothesized that desflurane would inhibit endothelium-dependent vasodilation in a concentration-dependent manner more than sevoflurane, with inhibition of a calcium pathway. Isolated rat aortic rings were randomly assigned to treatment with desflurane or sevoflurane for measurements of the vasodilation ratio. To determine NO production with desflurane and sevoflurane, an in vitro assay was performed with cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. These cells were also used for measurement of intracellular calcium or Western blotting. For endothelium-dependent vasodilation, the ratio of vasodilation was more significantly inhibited by 11.4% desflurane than by 4.8% sevoflurane. Inhibition did not between 5.7% desflurane and 2.4% sevoflurane. No inhibitory effect of desflurane or sevoflurane was observed in endothelium-denuded aorta. Desflurane inhibited nitric oxide production caused by stimulation of bradykinin significantly more than sevoflurane. Desflurane had a greater suppressive effect on the bradykinin-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration than did sevoflurane. Sevoflurane, but not desflurane, inhibited phosphorylation of the serine 1177 residue by bradykinin stimulation. Desflurane inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation more than sevoflurane through inhibition of a calcium pathway. Sevoflurane inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation by inhibition of phosphorylation of the serine 1177 residue of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  6. Targeting Bacterial Nitric Oxide Synthase with Aminoquinoline-Based Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Jeffrey K; Lewis, Matthew C; Cinelli, Maris A; Abdullatif, Ziad; Pensa, Anthony V; Silverman, Richard B; Poulos, Thomas L

    2016-10-04

    Nitric oxide is produced in Gram-positive pathogens Bacillus anthracis and Staphylococcus aureus by the bacterial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Inhibition of bacterial nitric oxide synthase (bNOS) has been identified as a promising antibacterial strategy for targeting methicillin-resistant S. aureus [Holden, J. K., et al. (2015) Chem. Biol. 22, 785-779]. One class of NOS inhibitors that demonstrates antimicrobial efficacy utilizes an aminoquinoline scaffold. Here we report on a variety of aminoquinolines that target the bacterial NOS active site, in part, by binding to a hydrophobic patch that is unique to bNOS. Through mutagenesis and crystallographic studies, our findings demonstrate that aminoquinolines are an excellent scaffold for further aiding in the development of bNOS specific inhibitors.

  7. Pain modulation by nitric oxide in the spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio M Freire

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a versatile messenger molecule first associated with endothelial relaxing effects. In the central nervous system (CNS, NO synthesis is primarily triggered by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors and has a Janus face, with both beneficial and harmful properties, depending on concentration and the identity of its synthetic enzyme isoform. There are three isoforms of the NO synthesizing enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS: neuronal (nNOS, endothelial (eNOS, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, each one involved with specific events in the brain. In CNS, nNOS is involved with modulation of synaptic transmission through long-term potentiation in several regions, including nociceptive circuits in the spinal cord. Here, we review the role played by NO on central pain sensitization.

  8. Detecting and understanding the roles of nitric oxide in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonzetich, Zachary J; McQuade, Lindsey E; Lippard, Stephen J

    2010-07-19

    We are pursuing a dual strategy for investigating the chemistry of nitric oxide as a biological signaling agent. In one approach, metal-based fluorescent sensors for the detection of NO in living cells are evaluated, and a sensor based on a copper fluorescein complex has proved to be a valuable lead compound. Sensors of this class permit identification of NO from both inducible and constitutive forms of nitric oxide synthase and facilitate investigation of different NO functions in response to external stimuli. In the other approach, we employ synthetic model complexes of iron-sulfur clusters to probe their reactivity toward nitric oxide as biomimics of the active sites of iron-sulfur proteins. Our studies reveal that NO disassembles the Fe-S clusters to form dinitrosyl iron complexes.

  9. Nitric oxide and changes of iron metabolism in exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhong Ming

    2002-11-01

    Accumulated data imply that exercise itself might not lead to a true iron deficiency or 'sport anaemia' in a healthy athlete who has adequate iron intake. The higher prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in younger female athletes might be not due to exercise itself, but probably results from dietary choices, inadequate iron intake and menstruation. These factors can also induce iron deficiency or anaemia in the general population. However, exercise does affect iron metabolism, leading to low or sub-optimal iron status. The underlying mechanism is unknown. In this review, recent advances in the study of the effect of exercise on iron metabolism and nitric oxide, and the relationship between nitric oxide and iron status in exercise are discussed. A hypothesis that increased production of nitric oxide might contribute to sub-optimal iron status in exercise is proposed.

  10. Hypoxia increases tumor cell shedding of MHC class I chain-related molecule: role of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, D Robert; Hu, Nianping; Sheikhi, Abdol Karim; Chung, Eugene; Frederiksen, Lisa J; Pross, Hugh; Graham, Charles H

    2008-06-15

    The MHC class I chain-related (MIC) molecules play important roles in tumor immune surveillance through their interaction with the NKG2D receptor on natural killer and cytotoxic T cells. Thus, shedding of the MIC molecules from the tumor cell membrane represents a potential mechanism of escape from NKG2D-mediated immune surveillance. Tumor hypoxia is associated with a poor clinical outcome for cancer patients. We show that hypoxia contributes to tumor cell shedding of MIC through a mechanism involving impaired nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Whereas hypoxia increased MIC shedding in human prostate cancer cells, activation of NO signaling inhibited hypoxia-mediated MIC shedding. Similar to incubation in hypoxia, pharmacologic inhibition of endogenous NO signaling increased MIC shedding. Parallel studies showed hypoxia-mediated tumor cell resistance to lysis by interleukin 2-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and NO-mediated attenuation of this resistance to lysis. Inhibition of NO production also led to resistance to PBL-mediated lysis. Interference of MIC-NKG2D interaction with a blocking anti-MIC antibody abrogated the effect of hypoxia and NO signaling on tumor cell sensitivity to PBL-mediated lysis. Finally, continuous transdermal delivery of the NO mimetic glyceryl trinitrate (7.3 mug/h) attenuated the growth of xenografted MIC-expressing human prostate tumors. These findings suggest that the hypoxic tumor microenvironment contributes to resistance to immune surveillance and that activation of NO signaling is of potential use in cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Nitric oxide donors for the treatment of preterm labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckitt, K; Thornton, S

    2002-01-01

    A number of tocolytics have been advocated for the treatment of threatened preterm labour in order to delay delivery. The rationale is that a delay in delivery may be associated with improved neonatal morbidity or mortality. Nitric oxide donors, such as nitroglycerin, have been used to relax the uterus. This review addresses their efficacy, side effects and influence on neonatal outcome. To determine whether nitric oxide donors administered in threatened preterm labour are associated with a delay in delivery, adverse side effects or improved neonatal outcome. A comprehensive search of the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register (March 2002) and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2002) was undertaken. Randomised controlled trials of nitric oxide donors administered for tocolysis. Trial quality assessment and data extraction were done independently by two reviewers. Five randomised controlled trials (466 women) were included. Nitroglycerine was the NO donor used in all these trials. Nitric oxide donors did not delay delivery nor improve neonatal outcome when compared with placebo, no treatment or alternative tocolytics such as ritodrine, albuterol and magnesium sulphate. There was, however, a reduction in number of deliveries less than 37 weeks when compared with alternative tocolytics but the numbers of deliveries before 32 and 34 weeks were not influenced. Side effects (other than headache) were reduced in women who received nitric oxide donors rather than other tocolytics. However, women were significantly more likely to experience headache when NO donors had been used. There is currently insufficient evidence to support the routine administration of nitric oxide donors in the treatment of threatened preterm labour.

  12. [Localization of nitric oxide synthase in the chicken vestibular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Guohui; Wang, Jibao

    2002-08-01

    To locate nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the chicken vestibular system. The frozen section were processed for NADPH-d histochemistry in a solution containing NADPH and nitroblue tetnazolium (NBT) to demonstrate NOS positive reactivity. NOS positive staining, black-blue in color, was seen at the nerve ending, nerve fibers of the utricul and saculla and ampiculium. Ganglion cells had different activity. The shape of the cells seems to be round or oral. Collectively, data indicate the presence of active NOS in these tissue and suggest modulation of vestibular neurotransmission by nitric oxide.

  13. Involvement of nitric oxide in aminoglycoside vestibulotoxicity in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T; Yamane, H; Takayama, M; Sunami, K; Nakai, Y

    1999-05-21

    Involvement of nitric oxide (NO) has been reported in physiological and pathological conditions in the inner ear. Recently, the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was demonstrated in the vestibular epithelium. In this study we used nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diapholase staining to monitor NOS activity during degeneration of guinea pig vestibular epithelia affected by streptomycin. Increased NOS activity was observed in affected epithelia in a dose- and time-dependent manner and a NOS inhibitor could protect hair cells from apoptosis. Additionally, cycloheximide significantly reduced NOS activity and the occurrence of apoptosis. These findings suggest that NO is involved in the degenerative process of vestibular epithelia caused by aminoglycosides.

  14. Nitric oxide availability in deeply hypoxic crucian carp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie Niemann; Gerber, Lucie; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2016-01-01

    nitric oxide synthase-2 gene variant. The data support that ambient nitrite is taken up across the gills to be distributed via the blood to tissues, particularly the heart, where it assists in cytoprotection and other functions. Cardiac nitrite was not elevated in acutely exposed fish, revealing......Recent research suggest that anoxia-tolerant fish transfer extracellular nitrite into the tissues, where it is used for nitric oxide (NO) generation, iron-nitrosylation and S-nitrosation of proteins as part of the cytoprotective response towards prolonged oxygen lack and subsequent re...

  15. Recent Advances on Nitric Oxide in the Upper Airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniscalco, Mauro; Bianco, Andrea; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Motta, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) originates from the upper airways, and takes action, to varying extents, in regulation, protection and defense, as well as in noxious processes. Nitric oxide retains important functions in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes of the human body, including vaso-regulation, antimicrobial activity, neurotransmission and respiration. This review article reports the ongoing investigations regarding the source, biology and relevance of NO within upper respiratory tract. In addition, we discuss the role of NO, originating from nasal and paranasal sinuses, in inflammatory disorders such as allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, primary ciliary dyskinesia, and cystic fibrosis.

  16. Nitric oxide, S-nitrosation, and endothelial permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Walter N; Beuve, Annie V; Sánchez, Fabiola A

    2013-10-01

    S-Nitrosation is rapidly emerging as a regulatory mechanism in vascular biology, with particular importance in the onset of hyperpermeability induced by pro-inflammatory agents. This review focuses on the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO) in regulating S-Nitrosation of adherens junction proteins. We discuss evidence for translocation of eNOS, via caveolae, to the cytosol and analyze the significance of eNOS location for S-Nitrosation and onset of endothelial hyperpermeability to macromolecules. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  18. Nitric oxide availability in deeply hypoxic crucian carp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie Niemann; Gerber, Lucie; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggest that anoxia-tolerant fish transfer extracellular nitrite into the tissues, where it is used for nitric oxide (NO) generation, iron-nitrosylation and S-nitrosation of proteins as part of the cytoprotective response towards prolonged oxygen lack and subsequent re...... nitric oxide synthase-2 gene variant. The data support that ambient nitrite is taken up across the gills to be distributed via the blood to tissues, particularly the heart, where it assists in cytoprotection and other functions. Cardiac nitrite was not elevated in acutely exposed fish, revealing...

  19. Activation of nuclear factor kappaB and induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase by lipid-associated membrane proteins isolated from Mycoplasma penetrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan-hua; Wu, Yi-mou; Zhang, Wen-bo; Yu, Min-jun; Zhu, Cui-ming; Tan, Li-zhi

    2004-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential pathogenicity of Mycoplasma penetrans (M. penetrans) and its molecular mechanisms responsible for the induction of iNOS gene expression in mouse macrophages stimulated by lipid-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) prepared from M. penetrans. Mouse macrophages were stimulated with M. penetrans LAMPs to assay the production of nitric oxide (NO). The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The activity of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and the effects of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of NF-kappaB, on the production of nitric oxide and the expression of iNOS were also assessed in mouse macrophages treated with M. penetrans LAMPs by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blotting. M. penetrans LAMPs stimulated mouse macrophages to produce nitric oxide in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The mRNA and protein levels of iNOS were also upregulated in response to LAMP stimulation and inhibited by PDTC treatment. M. penetrans LAMPs were found to trigger NF-kappaB activation, a possible mechanism for the induction of iNOS expression. This study demonstrated that M. penetrans may be an important etiological factor of certain diseases due to the ability of M. penetrans LAMPs to stimulate the expression of iNOS, which is probably mediated through the activation of NF-kappaB.

  20. Nitric oxide and the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability. The G.L. Brown Prize Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, D

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic imbalance and arrhythmia; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the cholinergic modulation of cardiac excitability; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the sympathetic modulation of cardiac excitability; Functional significance of nitric oxide in the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability; Summary; References. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 1-12.

  1. Review Article: The Role of Nitric Oxide Synthase in Post-Operative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitric Oxide (NO) is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzymes. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is not a normal cellular constitute. It is expressed by cytokines and non-cytokines e.g. fasting, trauma, intravenous glucose, and lipid infusion, which are encountered in surgical operations. Review of current ...

  2. The PPAR-gamma agonist pioglitazone protects cortical neurons from inflammatory mediators via improvement in peroxisomal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation is known to play a pivotal role in mediating neuronal damage and axonal injury in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Among the range of inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide are potent neurotoxic agents. Recent evidence has suggested that oligodendrocyte peroxisomes may play an important role in protecting neurons from inflammatory damage. Methods To assess the influence of peroxisomal activation on nitric oxide mediated neurotoxicity, we investigated the effects of the peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor (PPAR gamma agonist, pioglitazone in primary cortical neurons that were either exposed to a nitric oxide donor or co-cultured with activated microglia. Results Pioglitazone protected neurons and axons against both nitric-oxide donor-induced and microglia-derived nitric oxide-induced toxicity. Moreover, cortical neurons treated with this compound showed a significant increase in the protein and gene expression of PPAR-gamma, which was associated with a concomitant increase in the enzymatic activity of catalase. In addition, the protection of neurons and axons against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity afforded by pioglitazone appeared to be dependent on catalase. Conclusions Collectively, these observations provide evidence that modulation of PPAR-gamma activity and peroxisomal function by pioglitazone attenuates both NO and hydrogen peroxide-mediated neuronal and axonal damage suggesting a new therapeutic approach to protect against neurodegenerative changes associated with neuroinflammation.

  3. Current perspectives and challenges in understanding the role of nitrite as an integral player in nitric oxide biology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitturi, Dario A; Patel, Rakesh P

    2011-08-15

    Beyond an inert oxidation product of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, current thinking posits a key role for nitrite as a mediator of NO signaling, especially during hypoxia. This concept has been discussed in the context of nitrite serving a role as an endogenous modulator of NO homeostasis, but also from a novel clinical perspective whereby nitrite therapy may replenish NO signaling and prevent ischemic tissue injury. Indeed, the relatively rapid translation of studies delineating mechanisms of action to ongoing and planned clinical trials has been critical in fuelling interest in nitrite biology, and several excellent reviews have been written on this topic. In this article we limit our discussions to current concepts and what we feel are questions that remain unanswered within the paradigm of nitrite being a mediator of NO biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Stimulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA levels by endogenous nitric oxide in cytokine-activated endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, J; Bereta, M

    1995-12-05

    Previous studies have shown that endogenous nitric oxide (NO) potentiates glycolysis in the cytokine-activated murine microvascular endothelial cells (MME). In the present study we investigate the influence of NO on the expression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. Activation of MME with TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma resulted in a strong elevation of GAPDH mRNA levels. This effect was impaired in the presence of L-NMMA, the inhibitor of NO synthesis. We discuss the possibility that NO-mediated elevation of GAPDH mRNA levels may compensate for NO-mediated inhibition of GAPDH enzymatic activity, representing another adaptive mechanism which protects cells producing large amounts of NO against its cytotoxic effects.

  5. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.M.J.W. Baars (Marianne); P. de Lijster; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractNitric oxide (NO) has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of influenza virus-induced pneumonia in mouse models. Here we show that replication of influenza A and B viruses in Mabin Darby canine kidney cells is severely impaired by the NO donor,

  6. Quantitative leaching of a Nigerian chalcopyrite ore by nitric acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Due to increasing uses of copper nitrate, Cu(NO3)2, as catalysts, textile and polishing agents for other metals, experiment on the leaching of a Nigerian chalcopyrite ore by nitric acid for possible production of copper nitrate was examined. The effects of acid concentration, temperature and particle size on the dissolution ...

  7. Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Epithelial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: iNOS was over expressed in OKCs when compared with DC and RC suggesting that iNOS may contribute to the aggressive behavior of OKC. This is yet another evidence to support that OKC is the neoplasm. Keywords: Dentigerous cyst, Immunohistochemistry, Inducible nitric oxide synthase, Odontogenic ...

  8. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  9. [Effect of nitric oxide on viscosity of nerve cell membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul'ianova, N A; Maksimov, G V; Churin, A A; Rubin, A B

    2005-01-01

    The influence of nitric oxide on the microviscosity of nerve cell membranes was investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. Changes in membrane viscosity were estimated from the resonance Raman-spectra of carotenoids localized in the axon plasmatic membrane and membranes of subcellular vesicles (cytosomes). For the nerve fibre, the extracellular addition of nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (0.5 mM), caused an increase in the 1526 cm(-1) band relative half-width and the modification of 1160 cm-1 band structure. Moreover, sodium nitroprusside led to an increase in the I1526/I1160 ratio by 13% in 25 min and a decrease in this ratio by 10% in 50 min. In the case of cytosomes, sodium nitroprusside (0.5 mM) resulted in the reduction of the I1526/I1160 ratio by 8% in 25 and 50 min. It was shown that the neuron rhythmic activity correlated with the I1526/I1160 ratio and cytosome membrane microviscosity. We suppose that nitric oxide causes a conformational transition of carotenoids in the axon plasmatic membrane and the membranes of cytosomes. This process can be due to nitric oxide-induced changes of the membrane microviscosity or potential.

  10. The levels of nitric oxide in megaloblastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Kaya

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between nitric oxide degradation products (nitrate and nitrite levels and megaloblastic anemia which is treated with cyalocobalamin. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients with megaloblastic anemia (16 Male, 14 Female were included in the study. Cyanocobalamin was administered (1.000 µg/day intramuscularly until the reticulocyte crisis occurred to the normal range. The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects (15 Male, 15 Female. Nitric oxide levels were measured before treatment and compared with the values obtained during peak reticulocyte count. Results: Plasma direct nitrite, total nitrite and nitrate levels were 24,86±3,87, 60.56±7,01 and 36,02±5,24 in before treatment versus 15,48±3,05, 38,92±6,44 and 22,77±6,04 μmol/dl in after treatment, respectively. Plasma direct nitrite, total nitrite and nitrate levels were significantly lower in after treatment compared with the before treatment (p<0.001. Conclusion: Nitric oxide levels are seen to increase in megaloblastic anemia. This study suggested that abnormalities in the nitric oxide levels in megaloblastic anemia are restored by vitamin B12 replacement therapy.

  11. Ginsenoside Rb1 Reduces Nitric Oxide Production via Inhibition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potential mechanisms of ginseng activity in OA treatment of TCM. Keywords: Ginsenoside Rb1, Nitric oxide, Nuclear factor-κB, Chondrocytes, Osteoarthritis. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus,. International Pharmaceutical Abstract, Chemical Abstracts, ...

  12. Role of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Polymorphisms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Previous studies indicated an association between endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and maintenance of pregnancy, but it is rather controversial whether polymorphisms of the gene encoding for eNOS are associated with recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSAs). Aim: The aim was to investigate ...

  13. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphism G298T in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphism G298T in association with oxidative DNA damage in coronary atherosclerosis. Rajesh G. Kumar, Mrudula K. Spurthi, Kishore G. Kumar, Sanjib K. Sahu and Surekha H. Rani. J. Genet. 91, 349–352. Table 1. The demographic and clinical data of the CHD ...

  14. Serum Iron and Nitric Oxide Production in Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infected rats, treated and untreated, were sacrificed daily for the serum iron levels and nitric oxide synthase activities. For haematological parameters, infected and uninfected but treated rats were sacrificed on days 7 and 12 along with untreated rats. Results showed that tetracycline brought about a significant reduction in ...

  15. Analysis of genetic variation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... The genetic diversity of 100 Malaysian native chickens was investigated using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for two candidate genes: inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS) and natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1). The two genes.

  16. Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, Cycleooxygenase-2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Purpose: To explore the antioxidant properties of the methanol extract of Pericarpium Zanthoxyli and its effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cycleooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced cell damage in macrophage cells. Methods: Anti-oxidant activities were tested by measuring free ...

  17. Ginsenoside Rb1 Reduces Nitric Oxide Production via Inhibition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect and the potential mechanisms of ginsenoside Rb1 on nitric oxide (NO) production in chondrocytes. Methods: SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells were stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the presence of 20, 40, 80 μM ginsenoside Rb1. NO concentration was assessed by the Griess reaction ...

  18. Nitric oxide in health and disease of the respiratory system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricciardolo, Fabio L. M.; Sterk, Peter J.; Gaston, Benjamin; Folkerts, Gert

    2004-01-01

    During the past decade a plethora of studies have unravelled the multiple roles of nitric oxide (NO) in airway physiology and pathophysiology. In the respiratory tract, NO is produced by a wide variety of cell types and is generated via oxidation of l-arginine that is catalyzed by the enzyme NO

  19. Nitric oxide radical scavenging potential of some Elburz medicinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some plants scavenge nitric oxide (NO) with high affinity. For this purpose, forty extracts from 26 medicinal plants, growing extensively in Elburz mountains, were evaluated for their NO scavenging activity. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents of these extracts were also measured by Folin Ciocalteu and AlCl3 colorimetric ...

  20. Nitric oxide production by rat bronchoalveolar macrophages or ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    contributions of AMs and PMNs to the amounts of NO produced by BAL cells following intratracheal (IT) instillation of ... [Huffman L J, Prugh D J, Millecchia L, Schuller K C, Cantrell S and Porter D W 2003 Nitric oxide production by rat bronchoalveolar macrophages or ..... dase blocking with methanol and H2O2. Slides were ...

  1. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath nitric oxide test system. 862.3080 Section 862.3080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test...

  2. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu, E-mail: yukitikawa@nifty.com [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.

  3. Simulated dry deposition of nitric acid near forest edges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeJong, JJM; Klaassen, W; Jong, J.J.M. de

    1997-01-01

    Dry deposition is simulated to understand and generalize observations of enhanced deposition of air pollution near forest edges. Nitric acid is taken as an example as its deposition velocity is often assumed to be determined by turbulent transport only. The simulations are based on the

  4. Serum Iron and Nitric Oxide Production in Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    dependent enzyme that plays a central role in cell division and proliferation6. Another importance of this therapy, which is of interest in this study, is the modulation of the activity of nitric oxide synthase- a cytokine inducible enzyme which catalyses the formation of ..... lifespan of the rats, unlike when tetracycline alone was ...

  5. The correlation between total antioxidant capacity and nitric oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-08-30

    Aug 30, 2010 ... Sperm DNA quality is important in male fertility. Oxidative stress increases sperm DNA damages. Antioxidants decrease production of free radicals and scavenge them. Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical which is produced by most cells and has a dual role on cells. Low concentrations of NO is essential in.

  6. Restoration Of Glutamine Synthetase Activity, Nitric Oxide Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Propolis has been proposed to be protective on neurodegenerative disorders. To understand the neuroprotective effects of honeybee propolis, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, nitric oxide (NO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were studied in different brain ...

  7. Evaluation of Fractioned Nitric Oxide in Chronic Cough Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Cough exceeding 3-8 weeks was defined as chronic cough in various guides. Asthma is the most common cause of chronic-specific cough. Causes other than asthma include prolonged bacterial bronchitis and upper airway cough syndrome (UACS). Nitric oxide (NO) causes vascular smooth muscle relaxation, ...

  8. Methodological aspects of exhaled nitric oxide measurements in infants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriele, C.; Wiel, E.C. van der; Nieuwhof, E.M.; Moll, H.A.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Jongste, J.C. de

    2007-01-01

    Guidelines for the measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) recommend refraining from lung function tests (LFT) and certain foods and beverages before performing FE(NO) measurements, as they may lead to transiently altered FE(NO) levels. Little is known of such factors in infants. The

  9. Methanol Extract of Codonopsis pilosula Inhibits Inducible Nitric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the mechanism of antioxidant activity of the methanol extract of Codonopsis pilosula. Methods: Anti-oxidative properties were assessed by measuring free radical scavenging activity, nitric oxide (NO) levels, protein oxidation and reducing power, while the mechanism of antioxidative effect of ...

  10. Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Metabolism in Peripheral Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Jason D; Giordano, Tony; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) represents a burgeoning form of cardiovascular disease associated with significant clinical morbidity and increased 5 year cardiovascular disease mortality. It is characterized by impaired blood flow to the lower extremities, claudication pain and severe exercise intolerance. Pathophysiological factors contributing to PAD include atherosclerosis, endothelial cell dysfunction, and defective nitric oxide metabolite physiology and biochemistry that collectively le...

  11. Evaluation of Fractioned Nitric Oxide in Chronic Cough Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    6 days ago ... 2018 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer ‑ Medknow. Evaluation of Fractioned Nitric ... Allergic Diseases Clinic with cough persisting for 4 weeks and 30 other patients representing to the control .... variation, cough failing to respond to treatment, and response to domperidone ...

  12. On EPR detection of nitric oxide in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, E.E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071100938

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO ) is a peculiar radical: Ground state is not paramagnetic (g = 0 since orbital and spin magnetic moments cancel); low reactivity with other molecules except superoxide (O2 ); thermodynamically unstable; dimerizes to N2O2; difficult to detect in-vivo.

  13. Protective effect of nitric oxide against arsenic-induced oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key molecule involved in many physiology processes. The effects of NO on alleviating arsenic-induced oxidative damage in tall fescue leaves were investigated. Arsenic (25 M) treatment induced significantly accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and led to serious lipid peroxidation in tall ...

  14. Variation of nitric oxide levels in imported Plasmodium falciparum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been recognized during the past two decades as one of the most versatile players in the immune system. Even though the molecular mechanisms responsible by the naturally acquired immunity against malaria are still to be clarified, the production of NO seems to play an important role as a marker for ...

  15. Alleviating effect of exogenous nitric oxide in cucumber seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study indicated that exogenous NO at 1.0 mmoll-1 SNP enhanced chilling stress tolerance. In comparison with cvZND 461, cvZND407 had higher tolerance ability to chilling stress. Key words: Antioxidative enzymes, chilling stress, cucumber, nitric oxide (NO) osmotic adjustment; reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  16. The role of nitrite in nitric oxide homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    Nitrite is endogenously produced as an oxidative metabolite of nitric oxide, but it also functions as a NO donor that can be activated by a number of cellular proteins under hypoxic conditions. This article discusses the physiological role of nitrite and nitrite-derived NO in blood flow regulatio...

  17. Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, I. van der

    2006-01-01

    The single breath diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is measure for gas uptake by the lung, and consists of a membrane and a vascular component. Nitric oxide (NO) binds 400 times faster to hemoglobin than carbon monoxide, thus the uptake of NO by the blood is very large.

  18. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene Glu298Asp polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preeclampsia (PE) is the most serious complication of pregnancy that causes maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Although the exact pathophysiology of PE is unknown, a large number of studies have shown that abnormalities in nitric oxide (NO) synthesis may contribute to the development of this disorder. There are ...

  19. Insecticidal, brine shrimp cytotoxicity, antifungal and nitric oxide free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The crude methanolic extract and various fractions derived from the aerial parts of Myrsine africana were screened in vitro for possible insecticidal, antifungal, brine shrimp lethality and nitric oxide free radical scavenging activities. Low insecticidal activity (20 %) was shown by chloroform (CHCl3) and aqueous fractions ...

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphism G298T in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jgen/091/03/0349-0352. Keywords. coronary artery disease; endothelial nitric oxide synthase; myocardial infarction; reactive oxygen species. Author Affiliations. Rajesh G. Kumar1 Mrudula K. Spurthi1 Kishore G. Kumar1 Sanjib K. Sahu2 Surekha H. Rani1. Department of Genetics, Osmania ...

  1. Inhaled nitric oxide improves lung allograft function after prolonged storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, K; Triantafillou, A N; Yamashita, M; Aoe, M; DeMeester, S R; Cooper, J D; Patterson, G A

    1996-08-01

    Morbidity caused by early allograft dysfunction, manifested by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and a decrease in oxygenation, remains a serious problem in lung transplantation. Inhalation of nitric oxide, an essential homeostatic molecule, has been shown to have beneficial effects on a variety of acute lung injuries. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of inhaled nitric oxide on posttransplant function of canine left lung allografts. Fourteen dogs underwent left lung allotransplantation. Donors received systemic heparin and prostaglandin E1 followed by pulmonary artery flush with modified Euro-Collins solution. Donor left lungs were stored for 18 hours at 1 degree C and subsequently implanted. Immediately after reperfusion, the contralateral right main pulmonary artery and bronchus were ligated. The chest was closed and recipients turned to the supine position for the 6-hour assessment period. Hemodynamic and arterial and venous blood gas analyses were made at 15-minute intervals at an inspired oxygen fraction of 1.0 and 5 cm of water positive end-expiratory pressure. Animals were killed at the end of the assessment. Allograft myeloperoxidase activity assays and wet/dry weight ratios were done. In group I (n = 5), nitric oxide gas was administered continuously at concentrations of 60 to 70 ppm before reperfusion and throughout the 6-hour assessment period. In group II (n = 5), nitric oxide administration was initiated at the same concentration after reperfusion injury had developed. Group III animals (n = 4) received no nitric oxide. Significant improvement in gas exchange was apparent in group I. At the end of the 6-hour assessment period, mean arterial oxygen tension was 253.8 +/- 44.7 mm Hg and 114.9 +/- 25.5 mm Hg in groups I and III, respectively (p < 0.05). Group II animals had no improvement in oxygenation with nitric oxide. Systemic hemodynamics were unaffected by nitric oxide. However, an immediate

  2. Haemoglobin modulates salicylate and jasmonate/ethylene-mediated resistance mechanisms against pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mur, Luis A J; Sivakumaran, Anushen; Mandon, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in defence against hemibiotrophic pathogens mediated by salicylate (SA) and also necrotrophic pathogens influenced by jasmonate/ethylene (JA/Et). This study examined how NO-oxidizing haemoglobins (Hb) encoded by GLB1, GLB2, and GLB3 in Arabidopsis could influence both...

  3. Effects of large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels on nitroglycerin-mediated vasorelaxation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruhn, Nicolai; Boesgaard, Søren; Eiberg, Jonas

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-induced vasorelaxation and the regulation of endothelial superoxide anion levels is partly mediated by vascular large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channels. Nitroglycerin acts through the release of NO and its effect is modulated by changes in endothelial superoxid...

  4. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and flow-mediated dilatation are related to the estimated risk of coronary heart disease independently from each other

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, D.R.; Broekmans, W.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Klopping-Ketelaars, I.A.A.; Poppel, van G.; Bots, M.L.; Kluft, C.; Princen, J.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Flow mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1) are measures of distinct functions of the endothelium, reflecting nitric oxide (NO)-mediated and pro-inflammatory status, respectively. The comparative value of the two measures

  5. Detection of nitric oxide in exhaled air using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrzycki, R.; Wojtas, J.; Rutecka, B.; Bielecki, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The article describes an application one of the most sensitive optoelectronic method - Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy in investigation of nitric oxide in exhaled breath. Measurement of nitric oxide concentration in exhaled breath is a quantitative, non-invasive, simple, and safe method of respiratory inflammation and asthma diagnosis. For detection of nitric oxide by developed optoelectronic sensor the vibronic molecular transitions were used. The wavelength ranges of these transitions are situated in the infrared spectral region. A setup consists of the optoelectronic nitric oxide sensor integrated with sampling and sample conditioning unit. The constructed detection system provides to measure nitric oxide in a sample of 0-97% relative humidity.

  6. Nitric oxide transport in normal human thoracic aorta: effects of hemodynamics and nitric oxide scavengers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liu

    Full Text Available Despite the crucial role of nitric oxide (NO in the homeostasis of the vasculature, little quantitative information exists concerning NO transport and distribution in medium and large-sized arteries where atherosclerosis and aneurysm occur and hemodynamics is complex. We hypothesized that local hemodynamics in arteries may govern NO transport and affect the distribution of NO in the arteries, hence playing an important role in the localization of vascular diseases. To substantiate this hypothesis, we presented a lumen/wall model of the human aorta based on its MRI images to simulate the production, transport and consumption of NO in the arterial lumen and within the aortic wall. The results demonstrated that the distribution of NO in the aorta was quite uneven with remarkably reduced NO bioavailability in regions of disturbed flow, and local hemodynamics could affect NO distribution mainly via flow dependent NO production rate of endothelium. In addition, erythrocytes in the blood could moderately modulate NO concentration in the aorta, especially at the endothelial surface. However, the reaction of NO within the wall could only slightly affect NO concentration on the luminal surface, but strongly reduce NO concentration within the aortic wall. A strong positive correlation was revealed between wall shear stress and NO concentration, which was affected by local hemodynamics and NO reaction rate. In conclusion, the distribution of NO in the aorta may be determined by local hemodynamics and modulated differently by NO scavengers in the lumen and within the wall.

  7. Significance of nitric oxide synthases: Lessons from triple nitric oxide synthases null mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Tsutsui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is synthesized by three distinct NO synthases (neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOSs, all of which are expressed in almost all tissues and organs in humans. The regulatory roles of NOSs in vivo have been investigated in pharmacological studies with non-selective NOS inhibitors. However, the specificity of the inhibitors continues to be an issue of debate, and the authentic significance of NOSs is still poorly understood. To address this issue, we generated mice in which all three NOS genes are completely disrupted. The triple NOSs null mice exhibited cardiovascular abnormalities, including hypertension, arteriosclerosis, myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy, diastolic heart failure, and reduced EDHF responses, with a shorter survival. The triple NOSs null mice also displayed metabolic abnormalities, including metabolic syndrome and high-fat diet-induced severe dyslipidemia. Furthermore, the triple NOSs null mice showed renal abnormalities (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and pathological renal remodeling, lung abnormalities (accelerated pulmonary fibrosis, and bone abnormalities (increased bone mineral density and bone turnover. These results provide evidence that NOSs play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders. This review summarizes the latest knowledge on the significance of NOSs in vivo, based on lessons learned from experiments with our triple mutant model.

  8. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase is not essential for nitric oxide production by osteoblasts subjected to fluid shear stress in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.D.; Huesa, C.; Hughes, A.; Aspden, R.M.; van 't Hof, R.J.; Klein-Nulend, J.; Helfrich, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has long been held responsible for NO production by mechanically stimulated osteoblasts, but this has recently been disputed. We investigated whether one of the three known NOS isoforms is essential for NO production by mechanically stimulated osteoblasts in

  9. L-arginine, a nitric oxide precursor, reduces dapsone-induced methemoglobinemia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Valadares de Moraes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dapsone use is frequently associated to hematological side effects such as methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia, which are related to N-hydroxylation mediated by the P450 enzyme system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of L-arginine supplementation, a precursor for the synthesis of nitric oxide, as single or multiple dose regimens on dapsone-induced methemoglobinemia. Male Wistar rats were treated with L-arginine at 5, 15, 30, 60 and 180 mg/kg doses (p.o., gavage in single or multiple dose regimens 2 hours prior to dapsone administration (40 mg/kg, i.p.. The effect of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME was investigated by treatment with multiple doses of 30 mg/kg (p.o., gavage 2 hours before dapsone administration. Blood samples were collected 2 hours after dapsone administration. Erythrocytic methemoglobin levels were assayed by spectrophotometry. The results showed that multiple dose supplementations with 5 and 15 mg/kg L-arginine reduced dapsone-induced methemoglobin levels. This effect is mediated by nitric oxide formation, since the reduction in methemoglobin levels by L-arginine is blocked by simultaneous administration with L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor.O uso da dapsona é frequentemente associado a efeitos adversos hematológicos, como a metemoglobinemia e anemia hemolítica, ambos relacionados com a N-hidroxilação mediada pelo sistema P450. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a influência da suplementação de L-arginina, um precursor da síntese de óxido nítrico, administrado em regime de dose única ou múltipla na metemoglobinemia induzida pela dapsona. Ratos machos Wistar foram tratados com L-arginina (po, gavagem em dose única ou múltipla de 5, 15, 30, 60 e 180 mg/kg 2 horas antes da administração de dapsona (40 mg/kg, ip. O efeito do L-NAME, um inibidor de óxido nítrico sintase (NOS, foi avaliado através do tratamento com doses múltiplas de 30 mg/kg. Amostras de sangue

  10. The participation of nitric oxide the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Baptista Galvão

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a free radical gas, inorganic, which has seven electrons of nitrogen and oxygen eight, possessing an unpaired electron. This radical is produced from L-arginine by a reaction mediated by the enzyme NO synthase. NO it is about a radical of who acts abundant on a variety of biological processes, particularly when produced by endothelial cells plays a significant role in cardiovascular control, as a modulator of peripheral vascular resistance and platelet aggregation. This free radical has also a neurotransmitter and mediator of the immune system. NO kidney function has been considered in many physiological functions such as: (a regulation of hemodynamics and glomerular function tubuloglomerular, (b participation in pressure natriuresis (c maintaining medullar perfusion (d inhibiting sodium reabsorption tubular, and (e acting as a modulator of the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Given these functions, the occurrence of its deficiency is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD in vasoconstriction and consequently glomerular hypertension, high blood pressure (HBP, proteinuria and progression of renal dysfunction. This work has the scope to describe the role of NO in renal physiology and pathophysiology of CKD.

  11. FLUORO/NO: A Nitric Oxide Donor with a Fluorescence Reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Govindan; Bagheri, Meisam; Saini, Deepak Kumar; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2017-08-04

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays significant signalling roles in cells; the controlled generation of NO is of therapeutic relevance. Although a number of methods for the delivery and detection of NO are available, these events are typically mutually exclusive. Furthermore, the efficiency of delivery of NO can be compromised by detection technologies that consume NO. Here, we report FLUORO/NO, an esterase-activated diazeniumdiolate-based NO donor with an in-built fluorescence reporter. We demonstrate that this compound is capable of enhancing NO within cells in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by a similar increase in fluorescence. The compatibility of this tool to study NO-mediated signalling as well as NO-mediated stress is demonstrated. FLUORO/NO is a convenient tool that shows NO-like activity and allows monitoring of NO release. This tool will help interrogate the redox biology of NO. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Involvement of Nitric Oxide in a Rat Model of Carrageenin-Induced Pleurisy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Iwata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some evidence indicates that nitric oxide (NO contributes to inflammation, while other evidence supports the opposite conclusion. To clarify the role of NO in inflammation, we studied carrageenin-induced pleurisy in rats treated with an NO donor (NOC-18, a substrate for NO formation (L-arginine, and/or an NO synthase inhibitor (S-(2-aminoethyl isothiourea or NG-nitro-L-arginine. We assessed inflammatory cell migration, nitrite/nitrate values, lipid peroxidation and pro-inflammatory mediators. NOC-18 and L-arginine reduced the migration of inflammatory cells and edema, lowered oxidative stress, and normalized antioxidant enzyme activities. NO synthase inhibitors increased the exudate formation and inflammatory cell number, contributed to oxidative stress, induced an oxidant/antioxidant imbalance by maintaining high O−2, and enhanced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. L-arginine and NOC-18 reversed the proinflammatory effects of NO synthase inhibitors, perhaps by reducing the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. Thus, our results indicate that NO is involved in blunting—not enhancing—the inflammatory response.

  13. Zinc regulates iNOS-derived nitric oxide formation in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Kulakov, Larissa; Opländer, Christian; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria; Kröncke, Klaus-D; Suschek, Christoph V

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Mechanisms responsible for the fine-tuning of iNOS activity in inflammation are still not fully understood. Zinc is an important structural element of NOS enzymes and is known to inhibit its catalytical activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of zinc on iNOS activity and expression in endothelial cells. We found that zinc down-regulated the expression of iNOS (mRNA+protein) and decreased cytokine-mediated activation of the iNOS promoter. Zinc-mediated regulation of iNOS expression was due to inhibition of NF-κB transactivation activity, as determined by a decrease in both NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter activity and expression of NF-κB target genes, including cyclooxygenase 2 and IL-1β. However, zinc did not affect NF-κB translocation into the nucleus, as assessed by Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Taken together our results demonstrate that zinc limits iNOS-derived high output NO production in endothelial cells by inhibiting NF-κB-dependent iNOS expression, pointing to a role of zinc as a regulator of iNOS activity in inflammation.

  14. Impaired endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability: a common link between aging, hypertension, and atherogenesis?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Thomas

    2012-01-31

    Endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) is responsible for maintaining continuous vasodilator tone and for regulating local perfusion and systemic blood pressure. It also has significant antiproliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle and platelet anti-aggregatory effects. Impaired endothelial-dependent (NO mediated) vasorelaxation is observed in most animal and human models of healthy aging. It also occurs in age-associated conditions such as atherosclerosis and hypertension. Such "endotheliopathy" increases vascular risk in older adults. Studies have indicated that pharmacotherapeutic intervention with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitors may improve NO-mediated vasomotor function. This review, evaluates the association between impaired endothelial NO bioavailability, accelerated vascular aging, and the age-associated conditions hypertension and atherogenesis. This is important, because pharmacotherapy aimed at improving endothelial NO bioavailability could modify age-related vascular disease and transform age into a potentially modifiable vascular risk factor, at least in a subpopulation of older adults.

  15. Leptin action through hypothalamic nitric oxide synthase-1-expressing neurons controls energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshan, Rebecca L; Greenwald-Yarnell, Megan; Patterson, Christa M; Gonzalez, Ian E; Myers, Martin G

    2012-05-01

    Few effective measures exist to combat the worldwide obesity epidemic(1), and the identification of potential therapeutic targets requires a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that control energy balance. Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone that signals the long-term status of bodily energy stores, acts through multiple types of leptin receptor long isoform (LepRb)-expressing neurons (called here LepRb neurons) in the brain to control feeding, energy expenditure and endocrine function(2-4). The modest contributions to energy balance that are attributable to leptin action in many LepRb populations(5-9) suggest that other previously unidentified hypothalamic LepRb neurons have key roles in energy balance. Here we examine the role of LepRb in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1)-expressing LebRb (LepRb(NOS1)) neurons that comprise approximately 20% of the total hypothalamic LepRb neurons. Nos1(cre)-mediated genetic ablation of LepRb (Lepr(Nos1KO)) in mice produces hyperphagic obesity, decreased energy expenditure and hyperglycemia approaching that seen in whole-body LepRb-null mice. In contrast, the endocrine functions in Lepr(Nos1KO) mice are only modestly affected by the genetic ablation of LepRb in these neurons. Thus, hypothalamic LepRb(NOS1) neurons are a key site of action of the leptin-mediated control of systemic energy balance.

  16. Zinc regulates iNOS-derived nitric oxide formation in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam M. Cortese-Krott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant production of nitric oxide (NO by inducible NO synthase (iNOS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Mechanisms responsible for the fine-tuning of iNOS activity in inflammation are still not fully understood. Zinc is an important structural element of NOS enzymes and is known to inhibit its catalytical activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of zinc on iNOS activity and expression in endothelial cells. We found that zinc down-regulated the expression of iNOS (mRNA+protein and decreased cytokine-mediated activation of the iNOS promoter. Zinc-mediated regulation of iNOS expression was due to inhibition of NF-κB transactivation activity, as determined by a decrease in both NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter activity and expression of NF-κB target genes, including cyclooxygenase 2 and IL-1β. However, zinc did not affect NF-κB translocation into the nucleus, as assessed by Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Taken together our results demonstrate that zinc limits iNOS-derived high output NO production in endothelial cells by inhibiting NF-κB-dependent iNOS expression, pointing to a role of zinc as a regulator of iNOS activity in inflammation.

  17. Nitric Oxide (NO in Plant Heat Stress Tolerance: Current Knowledge and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santisree Parankusam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High temperature is one of the biggest abiotic stress challenges for agriculture. While, Nitric oxide (NO is gaining increasing attention from plant science community due to its involvement in resistance to various plant stress conditions, its implications on heat stress tolerance is still unclear. Several lines of evidence indicate NO as a key signaling molecule in mediating various plant responses such as photosynthesis, oxidative defense, osmolyte accumulation, gene expression, and protein modifications under heat stress. Furthermore, the interactions of NO with other signaling molecules and phytohormones to attain heat tolerance have also been building up in recent years. Nevertheless, deep insights into the functional intermediaries or signal transduction components associated with NO-mediated heat stress signaling are imperative to uncover their involvement in plant hormone induced feed-back regulations, ROS/NO balance, and stress induced gene transcription. Although, progress is underway, much work remains to define the functional relevance of this molecule in plant heat tolerance. This review provides an overview on current status and discuss knowledge gaps in exploiting NO, thereby enhancing our understanding of the role of NO in plant heat tolerance.

  18. The Mechanism of Helium-Induced Preconditioning: A Direct Role for Nitric Oxide in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Paul S.; Krolikowski, John G.; Pratt, Phillip F.; Shim, Yon Hee; Amour, Julien; Warltier, David C.; Weihrauch, Dorothee

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Helium produces preconditioning against myocardial infarction by activating prosurvival signaling, but whether nitric oxide (NO) generated by endothelial NO synthase plays a role in this phenomenon is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that NO mediates helium-induced cardioprotection in vivo. METHODS Rabbits (n = 62) instrumented for hemodynamic measurement were subjected to a 30-min left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and 3 h reperfusion, and received 0.9% saline (control) or three cycles of 70% helium–30% oxygen administered for 5 min interspersed with 5 min of an air–oxygen mixture before left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion in the absence or presence of pretreatment with the nonselective NOS inhibitor N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 mg/kg), the selective inducible NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine hydrochloride (AG; 300 mg/kg), or selective neuronal NOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI; 50 mg/kg). In additional rabbits, the fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluroscein diacetate (DAF-2DA) and confocal laser microscopy were used to detect NO production in the absence or presence of helium with or without L-NAME pretreatment. RESULTS Helium reduced (P helium-induced cardioprotection. Helium enhanced DAF-2DA fluorescence compared with control (26 ± 8 vs 15 ± 5 U, respectively). Pretreatment with L-NAME abolished these helium-induced increases in DAF-2DA fluorescence. CONCLUSIONS The results indicate that cardioprotection by helium is mediated by NO that is probably generated by endothelial NOS in vivo. PMID:18713880

  19. Critical role of exogenous nitric oxide in ROCK activity in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Maruhashi

    Full Text Available Rho-associated kinase (ROCK signaling pathway has been shown to mediate various cellular functions including cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, apoptosis, and contraction, all of which may be involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO is well known to have an anti-atherosclerotic effect, whereas the exogenous NO-mediated cardiovascular effect still remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of exogenous NO on ROCK activity in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs in vitro and in vivo.VSMCs migration was evaluated using a modified Boyden chamber assay. ROCK activities were measured by Western blot analysis in murine and human VSMCs and aorta of mice treated with or without angiotensin II (Ang II and/or sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor.Co-treatment with SNP inhibited the Ang II-induced cell migration and increases in ROCK activity in murine and human VSMCs. Similarly, the increased ROCK activity 2 weeks after Ang II infusion in the mouse aorta was substantially inhibited by subcutaneous injection of SNP.These findings suggest that administration of exogenous NO can inhibit ROCK activity in VSMCs in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ ethylene plant defense pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur, Luis A. J.; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra; Hall, Michael A.; Hebelstrup, Kim H.

    2013-01-01

    Plant defense against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defense responses to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signaling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO into established SA/JA/ET interactions. NO has been shown to act as an inducer or suppressor of signaling along each pathway. NO will initiate SA biosynthesis and nitrosylate key cysteines on TGA-class transcription factors to aid in the initiation of SA-dependent gene expression. Against this, S-nitrosylation of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1) will promote the NPR1 oligomerization within the cytoplasm to reduce TGA activation. In JA biosynthesis, NO will initiate the expression of JA biosynthetic enzymes, presumably to over-come any antagonistic effects of SA on JA-mediated transcription. NO will also initiate the expression of ET biosynthetic genes but a suppressive role is also observed in the S-nitrosylation and inhibition of S-adenosylmethionine transferases which provides methyl groups for ET production. Based on these data a model for NO action is proposed but we have also highlighted the need to understand when and how inductive and suppressive steps are used. PMID:23818890

  1. Fiber type-specific nitric oxide protects oxidative myofibers against cachectic stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengli Yu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative skeletal muscles are more resistant than glycolytic muscles to cachexia caused by chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases. The molecular mechanism for the protection associated with oxidative phenotype remains elusive. We hypothesized that differences in reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO determine the fiber type susceptibility. Here, we show that intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS in mice resulted in higher level of ROS and greater expression of muscle-specific E3 ubiqitin ligases, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx/atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1, in glycolytic white vastus lateralis muscle than in oxidative soleus muscle. By contrast, NO production, inducible NO synthase (iNos and antioxidant gene expression were greatly enhanced in oxidative, but not in glycolytic muscles, suggesting that NO mediates protection against muscle wasting. NO donors enhanced iNos and antioxidant gene expression and blocked cytokine/endotoxin-induced MAFbx/atrogin-1 expression in cultured myoblasts and in skeletal muscle in vivo. Our studies reveal a novel protective mechanism in oxidative myofibers mediated by enhanced iNos and antioxidant gene expression and suggest a significant value of enhanced NO signaling as a new therapeutic strategy for cachexia.

  2. Hydroxocobalamins as biologically compatible donors of nitric oxide implicated in the acceleration of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J A

    1998-07-01

    In the late 1970s, research was unfolding that implicated nitric oxide involvement in the process of vasodilation. By 1986, research culminated in the identification of nitric oxide as the endothelium-derived relaxing factor responsible for the maintenance of vascular tone, thus implicating nitric oxide as a potential wound-healing agent. Biomedical researchers involved in wound-healing research quickly embraced the utility of developing a polymeric donor of nitric oxide which would enhance the wound-healing process. Several synthetic nitric oxide donors have been developed, dubbed 'NONOates', which have achieved great success in delivering nitric oxide to wounds. However, the impact on wound healing has been ambiguous and deemed antagonistic to the immune system in some cases. The propensity for the immune system to reject 'non-self' is a major factor in evaluating the usefulness of synthetic polymeric nitric oxide donors. The necessity of natural-product nitric oxide donors is apparent when examining the complications which are possible in a synthetic delivery system. Given the affinity nitric oxide has for transition metals, and the biological availability of transition-metal-centered products in vivo, it seems logical to pursue a transition-metal nitric oxide donor which is biologically friendly. Vitamin B12a (hydroxocobalamin), a natural product, offers an ideal environment to serve as a donor of nitric oxide.

  3. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to inhibit Escherichia coli growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reger, Nina A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Meng, Wilson S. [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Gawalt, Ellen S., E-mail: gawalte@duq.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Thin film functionalized PLGA nanoparticles were modified to release nitric oxide from an s-nitrosothiol donor. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles were bacteriostatic against Escherichia coli. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles increased the effectiveness of tetracycline against Escherichia coli. • The modified nitric oxide nanoparticles did not exhibit cytotoxic effects against fibroblasts. - Abstract: Polymer nanoparticles consisting of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) were surface functionalized to deliver nitric oxide. These biodegradable and biocompatible nanoparticles were modified with an S-nitrosothiol molecule, S-nitrosocysteamine, as the nitric oxide delivery molecule. S-nitrosocysteamine was covalently immobilized on the nanoparticle surface using small organic molecule linkers and carbodiimide coupling. Nanoparticle size, zeta potential, and morphology were determined using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Subsequent attachment of the S-nitrosothiol resulted in a nitric oxide release of 37.1 ± 1.1 nmol per milligram of nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli culture growth by 31.8%, indicating that the nitric oxide donor was effective at releasing nitric oxide even after attachment to the nanoparticle surface. Combining the nitric oxide modified nanoparticles with tetracycline, a commonly prescribed antibiotic for E. coli infections, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 87.8%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used in order to achieve the same effect. The functionalized nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts.

  4. Exhaled nitric oxide in children after accidental exposure to chlorine gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Tschiedel, Eva; Groch, Manuela; Klepper, Jörg; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-08-01

    Chronic exposure to chlorine gas has been shown to cause occupational asthma. Acute inhalation of chlorine is known to cause airway inflammation and induce airway nitric oxide formation. Exhaled nitric oxide may therefore be a marker of airway damage after chlorine gas exposure. After accidental chlorine gas exposure in a swimming pool, exhaled nitric oxide and pulmonary function were repeatedly measured in 18 children over a 1-mo period. Symptomatic children with impaired pulmonary function had higher nitric oxide levels on the day after the exposure compared to day 8 and day 28. Differences in exhaled nitric oxide were more pronounced at a higher exhalation flow compared to lower flow, suggesting peripheral rather than central airway damage. This was in accordance with the observed changes in pulmonary function. No changes in exhaled nitric oxide were seen in asymptomatic children. These data suggest that acute chlorine gas exposure results in a mild increase of exhaled nitric oxide in symptomatic children.

  5. Nitric oxide in prepubertal rat ovary contribution of the ganglionic nitric oxide synthase system via superior ovarian nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casais, Marilina; Delgado, Silvia Marcela; Vallcaneras, Sandra; Sosa, Zulema; Rastrilla, Ana María

    2007-02-01

    Both peripheral innervation and nitric oxide (NO) participate in ovarian steroidogenesis. Considering the existence of the nitric oxide/ nitric oxide synthase system in the peripheral neural system and in the ovary, the aim of this work was to analyze if the liberation of NO in the ovarian compartment of prepubertal rats is of ovarian and/or ganglionic origin. The analysis is carried out from a physiological point of view using the experimental coeliac ganglion--Superior Ovarian Nerve--ovary model with and without ganglionic cholinergic stimulus Acetylcholine (Ach) 10(-6) M. Non selective and selective inhibitors of the synthase nitric oxide enzyme were added to the ovarian and ganglionic compartment, and the liberation of nitrites (soluble metabolite of the nitric oxide) in the ovarian incubation liquid was measured. We found that the non-selective inhibitor L-nitro-arginina methyl ester (L-NAME) in the ovarian compartment decreased the liberation of nitrites, and that Aminoguanidine (AG) in two concentrations in a non-dose dependent form provoked the same effect. The addition of Ach in ganglion magnified the effect of the inhibitors of the NOS enzyme. The most relevant results after the addition of inhibitors in ganglion were obtained with AG 400 and 800 microM. The inhibition was made evident with and without the joint action of Ach in ganglion. These data suggest that the greatest production of NO in the ovarian compartment comes from the ovary, mainly the iNOS isoform, though the coeliac ganglion also contributes through the superior ovarian nerve but with less quantity.

  6. Do tobacco stimulate the production of nitric oxide by up regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthesis in cancer: Immunohistochemical determination of inducible nitric oxide synthesis in oral squamous cell carcinoma - A comparative study in tobacco habituers and non-habituers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate the enhanced expression in OSCC of tobacco habituers when compared to OSCC of tobacco non-habituers indicating the effect of tobacco on nitric oxide. Carcinogenic chemical compounds in Tobacco induce nitric oxide production by iNOS, by its tumor-promoting effects which may enhance the process of carcinogenesis.

  7. Mediatized play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv

    Children’s play must nowadays be understood as a mediatized field in society and culture. Media – understood in a very broad sense - holds severe explanatory power in describing and understanding the practice of play, since play happens both with, through and inspired by media of different sorts........ In this presentation the case of ‘playing soccer’ will be outlined through its different mediated manifestations, including soccer games and programs on TV, computer games, magazines, books, YouTube videos and soccer trading cards....

  8. Mediating Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and globally. The book explores the history of key innovations and innovators in the business press. It analyzes changes in the discourse of business journalism associated with the growth in business news and the development of new ways of framing business issues and events. Finally, it examines......"Mediating Business" is a study of the expansion of business journalism. Building on evidence from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, "Mediating Business" is a comparative and multidisciplinary study of one of the major transformations of the mass media and the realm of business - nationally...... the organizational implications of the increased media visibility of business and, in particular, the development of corporate governance and media relations....

  9. Dobesilate enhances endothelial nitric oxide synthase-activity in macro- and microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suschek, C; Kolb, H; Kolb-Bachofen, V

    1997-12-01

    1. Dobesilate is used for normalizing vascular dysfunction in a number of diseases. In search for an effect on endothelial NO production, macrovascular endothelial cells from rat aorta, microvascular endothelial cells from rat exocrine pancreatic tissue, and capillary endothelial cells from rat islets, were cultured in the presence or absence of Mg-Dobesilate. The activity of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) in resident cells as well as of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cytokine-activated cells was measured indirectly by recording the citrulline concentrations in culture supernatants. 2. In each of the different endothelial cells Mg-Dobesilate incubation (0.25-1 mM) for 24 h led to a significant and concentration-dependent increase in ecNOS-activities. With cytokine-activated endothelial cell cultures only moderate effects were seen with little or no concentration-dependency. Addition of the NOS-inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine led to a significant suppression of citrulline formation in all cultures as an evidence for the enzyme specificity of these effects. 3. iNOS- and ecNOS-specific reverse transcription and semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with RNA from resident or cytokine-activated endothelial cells gave no evidence for an increase in NOS-specific mRNA after Mg-Dobesilate-treatment. Furthermore, Dobesilate-mediated enhancement of NO synthesis in resting endothelial cells was not due to iNOS induction in these cells, as no iNOS-specific signal was found by RT-PCR.

  10. Nitric oxide-driven hypoxia initiates synovial angiogenesis, hyperplasia and inflammatory lesions in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Bao

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory articular disease with cartilage and bone damage due to hyperplasic synoviocyte invasion and subsequent matrix protease digestion. Although monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα have been approved for clinical use in patients with RA, desired therapeutic regimens suitable for non-responders are still unavailable because etiological initiators leading to RA remain enigmatic and unidentified.Bacteria-induced arthritis (BIA that simulates collagen-induced arthritis (CIA is developed in mice upon daily live bacterial feeding. The morphological lesions of paw erythema and edema together with the histological alterations of synovial hyperplasia and lymphocytic infiltration emerge as the early-phase manifestations of BIA and CIA. Bacteria- or collagen-mediated global upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines is accompanied by the burst of nitric oxide (NO. Elevation of the serum NO level is correlated with decline of the blood oxygen saturation percentage (SpO2, reflecting a hypoxic consequence during development towards arthritis. NO-driven hypoxia is further evident from a positive relationship between NO and lactic acid (LA, an end product from glycolysis. Upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF validates hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in the inflamed synovium of modeling mice. Administration of the NO donor compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP causes articular inflammation by inducing synovial hypoxia. Anti-bacteria by the antibiotic cefotaxime and/or the immunosuppressant rapamycin or artesunate that also inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS can abrogate NO production, mitigate hypoxia, and considerably ameliorate or even completely abort synovitis, hence highlighting that NO may serve as an initiator of inflammatory arthritis.Like collagen, bacteria also enable synovial lesions via upregulating pro

  11. Citrus nobiletin suppresses inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in interleukin-1β-treated hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshigai, Emi [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Machida, Toru [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Okuyama, Tetsuya [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Mori, Masatoshi; Murase, Hiromitsu; Yamanishi, Ryota [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Okumura, Tadayoshi [Research Organization of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka (Japan); Ikeya, Yukinobu [Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Nishino, Hoyoku [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nishizawa, Mikio, E-mail: nishizaw@sk.ritsumei.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •Nobiletin is a polymethoxylated flavone that is abundant in citrus peels. •Nobiletin is a major constituent of the Citrus unshiu peel extract. •Nobiletin suppresses induction of NO and reduces iNOS expression in hepatocytes. •Nobiletin reduces the iNOS promoter activity and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. -- Abstract: Background: Nobiletin is a polymethoxylated flavone that is abundant in the peels of citrus fruits, such as Citrus unshiu (Satsuma mandarin) and Citrus sinensis. The dried peels of C. unshiu (chinpi) have been included in several formulae of Japanese Kampo medicines. Nobiletin may suppress the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which synthesizes the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO) in hepatocytes. Methods: A C. unshiu peel (CUP) extract was prepared. Primary cultured rat hepatocytes were treated with the CUP extract or nobiletin in the presence of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), which induces iNOS expression. NO production and iNOS gene expression were analyzed. Results: High-performance liquid chromatography analyses revealed that the nobiletin content in the CUP extract was 0.14%. Nobiletin dose-dependently reduced the NO levels and decreased iNOS expression at the protein, mRNA and antisense transcript levels. Flavone, which does not contain any methoxy groups, also suppressed iNOS induction. Nobiletin reduced the transcriptional activity of iNOS promoter-luciferase constructs and the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in the nuclei. Conclusions: The suppression of iNOS induction by nobiletin suggests that nobiletin may be responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of citrus peels and have a therapeutic potential for liver diseases.

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide Increases Nitric Oxide Production and Subsequent S-Nitrosylation in Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Ho Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S and nitric oxide (NO, two endogenous gaseous molecules in endothelial cells, got increased attention with respect to their protective roles in the cardiovascular system. However, the details of the signaling pathways between H2S and NO in endothelia cells remain unclear. In this study, a treatment with NaHS profoundly increased the expression and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Elevated gaseous NO levels were observed by a novel and specific fluorescent probe, 5-amino-2-(6-hydroxy-3-oxo-3H-xanthen-9-ylbenzoic acid methyl ester (FA-OMe, and quantified by flow cytometry. Further study indicated an increase of upstream regulator for eNOS activation, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and protein kinase B (Akt. By using a biotin switch, the level of NO-mediated protein S-nitrosylation was also enhanced. However, with the addition of the NO donor, NOC-18, the expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase, cystathionine-β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase were not changed. The level of H2S was also monitored by a new designed fluorescent probe, 4-nitro-7-thiocyanatobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-SCN with high specificity. Therefore, NO did not reciprocally increase the expression of H2S-generating enzymes and the H2S level. The present study provides an integrated insight of cellular responses to H2S and NO from protein expression to gaseous molecule generation, which indicates the upstream role of H2S in modulating NO production and protein S-nitrosylation.

  13. Nitric oxide synthase-containing projections to the ventrobasal thalamus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usunoff, K G; Kharazia, V N; Valtschanoff, J G; Schmidt, H H; Weinberg, R J

    1999-09-01

    Microiontophoretic studies of thalamic neurons suggests that nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in mediating somatosensory transmission. The thalamus contains few nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-immunoreactive neurons; thus, the major source of thalamic NO is presumably from NOS-positive axons of extrathalamic origin. The cells of origin of these putative NOS-containing pathways to the ventrobasal thalamus were investigated in rats by combining retrograde tracing with immunocytochemistry for NOS. The location and morphology of double-labeled neurons was compared with that of single-labeled neurons. The most significant sources of NOS-containing afferents to the thalamus were found to be the pedunculopontine (PPN) and laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) nuclei. NOS-immunoreactive neurons in these cholinergic nuclei project bilaterally to the thalamus, most strongly ipsilaterally. The thalamus appears to be a major target of PPN, since even selective thalamic injections result in retrograde labeling of at least one third of its NOS-immunoreactive neurons. A significant number of NOS-negative neurons in both the PPN and LDT also project to the thalamus. Minor sources of NOS-containing thalamic afferents include the lateral hypothalamus, the dorsal, median and pontine raphe nuclei, the parabrachial nuclei, and the pontomedullary reticular formation. In all these structures, NOS-negative thalamopetal neurons greatly outnumber the NOS-positive ones. Ascending sensory pathways to the thalamus, including those from the sensory trigeminal nuclei, the dorsal column nuclei, and the spinal cord, as well as the auditory and vestibular centers, arise exclusively from NOS-negative neurons. The major NOS-positive projections are implicated in affective and alerting systems, supporting that NO may act to modulate attentiveness in thalamic relay nuclei.

  14. Gut Microbiota, Nitric Oxide, and Microglia as Prerequisites for Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Joyce K Y

    2017-07-19

    Regulating fluctuating endogenous nitric oxide (NO) levels is necessary for proper physiological functions. Aberrant NO pathways are implicated in a number of neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of NO in oxidative and nitrosative stress with pathological consequences involves reactions with reactive oxygen species (e.g., superoxide) to form the highly reactive peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochloride ions and hydroxyl radical. NO levels are typically regulated by endogenous nitric oxide synthases (NOS), and inflammatory iNOS is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, in which elevated NO mediates axonal degeneration and activates cyclooxygenases to provoke neuroinflammation. NO also instigates a down-regulated secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is essential for neuronal survival, development and differentiation, synaptogenesis, and learning and memory. The gut-brain axis denotes communication between the enteric nervous system (ENS) of the GI tract and the central nervous system (CNS) of the brain, and the modes of communication include the vagus nerve, passive diffusion and carrier by oxyhemoglobin. Amyloid precursor protein that forms amyloid beta plaques in AD is normally expressed in the ENS by gut bacteria, but when amyloid beta accumulates, it compromises CNS functions. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are among the many bacterial strains that express and secrete amyloid proteins and contribute to AD pathogenesis. Gut microbiota is essential for regulating microglia maturation and activation, and activated microglia secrete significant amounts of iNOS. Pharmacological interventions and lifestyle modifications to rectify aberrant NO signaling in AD include NOS inhibitors, NMDA receptor antagonists, potassium channel modulators, probiotics, diet, and exercise.

  15. Ubiquitination of inducible nitric oxide synthase is required for its degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejski, Pawel J.; Musial, Aleksandra; Koo, Ja-Seok; Eissa, N. Tony

    2002-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is responsible for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from l-arginine in response to inflammatory mediators. We have previously shown that iNOS is degraded through the 26S proteasome. Targeting of proteins for proteasomal degradation may or may not require their covalent linkage to multiubiquitin chains (ubiquitination). In addition, ubiquitination of a protein can serve functions other than signaling proteolysis. In this context, it is not known whether iNOS is subject to ubiquitination or whether ubiquitination is required for its degradation. In this study, we show that iNOS, expressed in HEK293 cells or induced in primary bronchial epithelial cells, A549 cells, or murine macrophages, is subject to ubiquitination. To investigate whether iNOS ubiquitination is required for its degradation, HEK293T cells were cotransfected with plasmids containing cDNAs of human iNOS and of the dominant negative ubiquitin mutant K48R. Disruption of ubiquitination by K48R ubiquitin resulted in inhibition of iNOS degradation. ts20 is a mutant cell line that contains a thermolabile ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1) that is inactivated at elevated temperature, preventing ubiquitination. Incubation of ts20 cells, stably expressing human iNOS, at the nonpermissive temperature (40°C) resulted in inhibition of iNOS degradation and marked accumulation of iNOS. These studies indicate that iNOS is subject to ubiquitination and that ubiquitination is required for its degradation. PMID:12221289

  16. Regulation of neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase by anabolic-androgenic steroid in skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Karina; Rocha, Thalita; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2012-11-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) and exercise share comparable effects on myogenic differentiation, force development, fiber growth and skeletal muscle plasticity. The participation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) on these effects was only demonstrated in response to exercise. Using immunohistochemistry and western blotting we examined the effect of AAS on the expression of NOS I and III isoforms in three muscles, distinct metabolically and physiologically: soleus (SOL), tibialis anterioris (TA) and gastrocnemius (GAS). Mice with a lipid profile akin to humans were used. Sedentary mice (Sed-C) or exercised, submitted to six-weeks of aerobic treadmill running (one hour/day, 5 days/week) were administered mesterolone (Sed-M and Ex-M, respectively) or gum arabic (vehicle, Ex-C) during the last three weeks, three alternate days per week. Consistently, The TA showed the strongest labeling and the SOL the weakest with NOS III predominating over NOS I. Mesterolone administered to sedentary mice (Sed-C x Sed-M) significantly upregulated NOS I in TA and SOL and NOS III in all three muscles. Mesterolone administered to exercised mice (Ex-C x Ex-M) upregulated NOS I in all three muscles and NOS III in TA and SOL. The exercise to mesterolone-treated mice (Sed-M x Ex-M) produced a strong increase in NOS I expression in GAS; in contrast it antagonized the mesterolone-induced upregulation of NOS I in TA muscle and NOS III in SOL and GAS. The data show nitric oxide (NO) as a potential signaling mediator of AAS effects in skeletal muscle and that NOS I and NOS III upregulations were muscle phenotype-specific. These may be regarded as an indication of the complex NOS/NO signaling mechanism related with AAS effects vs. metabolic/physiological muscle characteristics.

  17. Neonatal hyperthyroidism on rat heart: interrelation with nitric oxide and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, L; Detomaso, F; Braga, P; Prendes, M; Perosi, F; Cernadas, G; Balaszczuk, A; Fellet, A

    2015-06-01

    To clarify the mechanism mediating the effect of hyperthyroidism on cardiac function during the second month of life in rats. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to a control or to a triiodothyronine (T3)-treated group. Treatment of each group was started on the third day after birth. Control rats (Eut) received 0.9 NaCl [0.1 ml/100 g body weight (BW)] every second day during 60 days and T3-treated rats (Hyper) received subcutaneous (SC) T3 injections every second day during 60 days. Hyperthyroidism decreased left ventricle volume only in male rats. Female euthyroid rats presented higher atrial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity than male rats and hormonal treatment decreased this enzyme's activity in both sexes. Euthyroid male and female rats had similar atrial NOS protein levels, but females had higher caveolin (cav) 3 protein levels. T3 treatment increased this protein only in males. Female rats had lower ventricular NOS activity than male rats; hyperthyroidism increased NOS activity in both sexes but this effect was associated with lower cav 3 protein levels. Hyperthyroidism did not change cav 1 protein levels in both male and female rats. The results of this study demonstrating clinically relevant sex-related differences in the pathophysiology of the hyperthyroid heart have raised new questions regarding the mechanisms responsible for the observed differences. This study suggests that sex-related intrinsic factors such as nitric oxide may modulate the response to hyperthyroidism that leads to cardiovascular dysfunction.

  18. Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) in Microglia of the Developing Quail Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Ana; Navascués, Julio; Cuadros, Miguel A.; Calvente, Ruth; Martín-Oliva, David; Ferrer-Martín, Rosa M.; Martín-Estebané, María; Carrasco, María-Carmen; Marín-Teva, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which produce large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), is induced in macrophages and microglia in response to inflammatory mediators such as LPS and cytokines. Although iNOS is mainly expressed by microglia that become activated in different pathological and experimental situations, it was recently reported that undifferentiated amoeboid microglia can also express iNOS during normal development. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development and after their activation with LPS by using the quail retina as model. iNOS expression was analyzed by iNOS immunolabeling, western-blot, and RT-PCR. NO production was determined by using DAR-4M AM, a reliable fluorescent indicator of subcellular NO production by iNOS. Embryonic, postnatal, and adult in situ quail retinas were used to analyze the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development. iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-treated microglial cells were investigated by an in vitro approach based on organotypic cultures of E8 retinas, in which microglial cell behavior is similar to that of the in situ retina, as previously demonstrated in our laboratory. We show here that amoeboid microglia in the quail retina express iNOS during normal development. This expression is stronger in microglial cells migrating tangentially in the vitreal part of the retina and is downregulated, albeit maintained, when microglia differentiate and become ramified. LPS treatment of retina explants also induces changes in the morphology of amoeboid microglia compatible with their activation, increasing their lysosomal compartment and upregulating iNOS expression with a concomitant production of NO. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that immature microglial cells express iNOS during normal development, suggesting a certain degree of activation. Furthermore, LPS treatment induces overactivation of amoeboid

  19. Nitric oxide directly inhibits ghrelin-activated neurons of the arcuate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riediger, Thomas; Giannini, Petra; Erguven, Elif; Lutz, Thomas

    2006-12-13

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) is a target site for signals regulating energy homeostasis. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin directly activates neurons of the medial arcuate nucleus (ArcM) in rats. Nitric oxide (NO) is a neuromodulator implicated in the control of food intake and body weight. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and induces the formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) via a stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Both enzymes NOS and sGC have been identified in the Arc. Using extracellular recordings we characterized the effects of NO signaling on ArcM neurons and their co-sensitivity to ghrelin. The artificial NO donor sodium nitroprusside (10(-4) M) reversibly inhibited 91% of all ArcM neurons by a direct postsynaptic mechanism. 52% of ArcM neurons were excited by ghrelin. In all but one of these neurons SNP caused inhibitory responses. The SNP-induced inhibitions were mediated by cGMP since they were blocked by the specific sGC inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, 10(-4) M). Furthermore, the membrane permeating cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP (10(-4) M) mimicked the inhibitory responses of SNP. In immunohistological in vitro studies SNP induced a cGMP formation, which could also be blocked by ODQ. The current studies demonstrate that NO/cGMP signaling inhibits a large population of ArcM neurons including ghrelin-excited cells. Since an activation of the latter neurons is regarded as a correlate of negative energy balance, NO may represent an anorectic neuromodulator in the Arc and/or restrain the action of signals promoting energy intake. NO signaling in the Arc is also induced following inflammation suggesting a possible role of Arc-intrinsic NO in disease-related anorexia.

  20. Dinitroglyceryl and diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolated nitric oxide donor ester prodrugs of aspirin, indomethacin and ibuprofen: synthesis, biological evaluation and nitric oxide release studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Khaled R A; Chowdhury, Morshed Alam; Dong, Ying; Das, Dipankar; Yu, Gang; Velázquez, Carlos A; Suresh, Mavanur R; Knaus, Edward E

    2009-06-01

    A new group of hybrid nitric oxide (NO) releasing anti-inflammatory (AI) ester prodrugs (NONO-NSAIDs) wherein a 1,3-dinitrooxy-2-propyl (12a-c), or O(2)-acetoxymethyl-1-[2-(methyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (14a-c), NO-donor moiety is directly attached to the carboxylic acid group of aspirin, indomethacin or ibuprofen were synthesized. NO release from the dinitrooxypropyl, or diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, ester prodrugs was increased substantially upon incubation in the presence of l-cysteine (12a-c) or rat serum (14a-c). The ester prodrugs (12a-c, 14a-c), which did not inhibit the COX-1 isozyme, exhibited modest inhibitory activity against the COX-2 isozyme. The NONO-NSAIDs 12a-c and 14a-c exhibited in vivo AI activity that was similar to that exhibited by the parent drug aspirin, indomethacin or ibuprofen when the same oral dose (micromol/kg) was administered. These similarities in oral potency profiles suggest these NONO-NSAIDs act as classical prodrugs that require metabolic activation by esterase-mediated hydrolysis. Hybrid NO-donor/anti-inflammatory prodrugs of this type (NONO-NSAIDs) offer a potential drug design concept targeted toward the development of anti-inflammatory drugs with reduced adverse gastrointestinal effects.