WorldWideScience

Sample records for bystander goat lymphocytes

  1. Activation/proliferation and apoptosis of bystander goat lymphocytes induced by a macrophage-tropic chimeric caprine arthritis encephalitis virus expressing SIV Nef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzar, Baya Amel; Rea, Angela; Hoc-Villet, Stephanie; Garnier, Celine; Guiguen, Francois; Jin Yuhuai; Narayan, Opendra; Chebloune, Yahia

    2007-01-01

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) is the natural lentivirus of goats, well known for its tropism for macrophages and its inability to cause infection in lymphocytes. The viral genome lacks nef, tat, vpu and vpx coding sequences. To test the hypothesis that when nef is expressed by the viral genome, the virus became toxic for lymphocytes during replication in macrophages, we inserted the SIVsmm PBj14 nef coding sequences into the genome of CAEV thereby generating CAEV-nef. This recombinant virus is not infectious for lymphocytes but is fully replication competent in goat macrophages in which it constitutively expresses the SIV Nef. We found that goat lymphocytes cocultured with CAEV-nef-infected macrophages became activated, showing increased expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R). Activation correlated with increased proliferation of the cells. Interestingly, a dual effect in terms of apoptosis regulation was observed in exposed goat lymphocytes. Nef was found first to induce a protection of lymphocytes from apoptosis during the first few days following exposure to infected macrophages, but later it induced increased apoptosis in the activated lymphocytes. This new recombinant virus provides a model to study the functions of Nef in the context of infection of macrophages, but in absence of infection of T lymphocytes and brings new insights into the biological effects of Nef on lymphocytes

  2. Vincristine-induced bystander effect in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testi, Serena; Azzarà, Alessia; Giovannini, Caterina; Lombardi, Sara [Unità di Genetica, Dipartimento di Biologia, Pisa University, Via Derna 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Piaggi, Simona [Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, Pisa University, Via Savi 10, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Facioni, Maria Sole [Unità di Genetica, Dipartimento di Biologia, Pisa University, Via Derna 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Scarpato, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.scarpato@unipi.it [Unità di Genetica, Dipartimento di Biologia, Pisa University, Via Derna 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Research Center of Nutraceuticals and Food for Health, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • We studied whether or not vincristine induced a bystander response in human lymphocytes. • Vincristine significantly increased MN frequencies in mononucleated recipient cells. • ROS or soluble proteins (IL-32 and TGF-β) may account for the observed response. - Abstract: Bystander effect is a known radiobiological effect, widely described using ionizing radiations and which, more recently, has also been related to chemical mutagens. In this study, we aimed to assess whether or not a bystander response can be induced in cultured human peripheral lymphocytes by vincristine, a chemotherapeutic mutagen acting as spindle poison, and by mitomycin-C, an alkylating agent already known to induce this response in human lymphoblastoid cells. Designing a modified ad hoc protocol for the cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) assay, we detected the presence of a dose-dependent bystander response in untreated cultures receiving the conditioned medium (CM) from mitomycin-C (MMC) or vincristine (VCR) treated cultures. In the case of MMC, MN frequencies, expressed as micronucleated binucleates, were: 13.5 ± 1.41 at 6 μM, 22 ± 2.12 at 12 μM or 28.25 ± 5.13 at 15 μM vs. a control value of 4.75 ± 1.59. MN levels for VCR, expressed as micronucleated mononucleates were: 2.75 ± 0.88 at 0.0 μM, 27.25 ± 2.30 at 0.4 μM, 46.25 ± 1.94 at 0.8 μM, 98.25 ± 7.25 at 1.6 μM. To verify that no mutagen residual was transferred to recipient cultures together with the CM, we evaluated MN levels in cultures receiving the medium immediately after three washings following the chemical treatment (unconditioned medium). We further confirmed these results using a cell-mixing approach where untreated lymphocytes were co-cultured with donor cells treated with an effect-inducing dose of MMC or VCR. A distinct production pattern of both reactive oxygen species and soluble mediator proteins by treated cells may account for the differences observed in the manifestation of the

  3. Vincristine-induced bystander effect in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testi, Serena; Azzarà, Alessia; Giovannini, Caterina; Lombardi, Sara; Piaggi, Simona; Facioni, Maria Sole; Scarpato, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied whether or not vincristine induced a bystander response in human lymphocytes. • Vincristine significantly increased MN frequencies in mononucleated recipient cells. • ROS or soluble proteins (IL-32 and TGF-β) may account for the observed response. - Abstract: Bystander effect is a known radiobiological effect, widely described using ionizing radiations and which, more recently, has also been related to chemical mutagens. In this study, we aimed to assess whether or not a bystander response can be induced in cultured human peripheral lymphocytes by vincristine, a chemotherapeutic mutagen acting as spindle poison, and by mitomycin-C, an alkylating agent already known to induce this response in human lymphoblastoid cells. Designing a modified ad hoc protocol for the cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) assay, we detected the presence of a dose-dependent bystander response in untreated cultures receiving the conditioned medium (CM) from mitomycin-C (MMC) or vincristine (VCR) treated cultures. In the case of MMC, MN frequencies, expressed as micronucleated binucleates, were: 13.5 ± 1.41 at 6 μM, 22 ± 2.12 at 12 μM or 28.25 ± 5.13 at 15 μM vs. a control value of 4.75 ± 1.59. MN levels for VCR, expressed as micronucleated mononucleates were: 2.75 ± 0.88 at 0.0 μM, 27.25 ± 2.30 at 0.4 μM, 46.25 ± 1.94 at 0.8 μM, 98.25 ± 7.25 at 1.6 μM. To verify that no mutagen residual was transferred to recipient cultures together with the CM, we evaluated MN levels in cultures receiving the medium immediately after three washings following the chemical treatment (unconditioned medium). We further confirmed these results using a cell-mixing approach where untreated lymphocytes were co-cultured with donor cells treated with an effect-inducing dose of MMC or VCR. A distinct production pattern of both reactive oxygen species and soluble mediator proteins by treated cells may account for the differences observed in the manifestation of the

  4. Cell kinetic and radiosensitivity of PHA stimulated goat lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debuyst, B.; Rosenthal, M.; Leonard, A.

    1982-01-01

    The harlequin-staining method has been used to study the cell kinetic of goat peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin and to assess their radiosensitivity. At 48 h, the standardized culture time employed for human lymphocytes, 71% of the goat lymphocytes are in first mitosis, 23% are in second mitosis and 5% in third. Irradiation with 200 rads X-rays induces an average of 24,5 dicentric chromosomes per hundred cells in first mitosis [fr

  5. Damage of chromosoms under irradiation of human blood lymphocytes and development of bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetun, O V

    2016-12-01

    the research the distribution of radiation induced damages among chromosomes and their bands in irra diated in vitro human blood lymphocytes and in unirradiated bystander cells.Material and methods of research: cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by semi micromethod D.A. Hungerford, modeling of radiation induced bystander effect in mixed cultures consisting of irradiated in vitro and non irradiated blood lymphocytes from persons of different gender, GTG staining of metaphase chromosomes and their cytogenetic analysis. Break points in chromosomes under the formation of aberrations were identified in exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes in doses 0.25 Gy (95 breaks in 1248 cells) and 1.0 Gy (227 breaks in 726 cells) and in non irradiated bystander cells under their joint cultivation with irradiated in vitro human lymphocytes (51 breaks in 1137 cells at irradiation of adjacent populations of lymphocytes in dose 0.25 Gy and 75 breaks in 1321 cells at irradiation of adjacent population of lymphocytes in a dose 1.0 Gy). The distribution of injuries among the chromo somes and their bands was investigated. in radiation exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in bystander cells the fre quency of damaged bands and number of breaks which localized in them exceeded the control value (p chromosomes were damaged according to their relative length. Location of bands with increasing number of breaks coincided with the «hot spots» of chromosome damage following irradiation and fragile sites. More sensitive to damage were G negative euchromatin chromosome bands, in which were localized 82 88 % breaks. Damageability of telomeric regions in the irradiated cells had no significant difference from the control, while in bystander cells was lower than control value (p < 0.05). O. V. Shemetun.

  6. Studies on bystander effects of 14MeV neutrons in human blood lymphocytes using CBMN assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkiam, D.; Arul Anantha Kumar, A.; Sonwani, Swetha; Alaguraja, E.; Mathiyarasu, R.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation induced Bystander Effects (RIBE) in cells generally describes the phenomenon that non-irradiated cells respond as if they have themselves been irradiated upon receiving signals from directly irradiated cells, either through partnering or medium transfer. While it has been well established that bystander effects could be induced by gamma radiation and alpha-particle radiation it is still a question whether neutrons induce bystander effects or not. In view of this, experiments were carried out to quantify cytogenetic damage in human blood lymphocytes induced by neutron directly and indirectly i.e. RIBE through medium transfer method. Cytokinesis Blocked MicroNucleus (CBMN) assay was used to study DNA damage events wherein micronuclei (MN) were scored in binucleated cells. Results of MN frequency in neutron direct and indirect irradiated blood lymphocytes (bystander samples) are compared

  7. Action of methotrexate and tofacitinib on directly stimulated and bystander-activated lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscianz, Elisa; Candilera, Vanessa; Valencic, Erica; Loganes, Claudia; Paron, Greta; De Iudicibus, Sara; Decorti, Giuliana; Tommasini, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation associated with autoimmune activation is characteristic of rheumatic diseases from childhood to adulthood. In recent decades, significant improvements in the treatment of these types of disease have been achieved using disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as methotrexate (MTX) and, more recently, using biologic inhibitors. The recent introduction of kinase inhibitors (for example, tofacitinib; Tofa) further increases the available ARDs. However, there are patients that do not respond to any treatment strategies, for whom combination therapies are proposed. The data regarding the combined action of different drugs is lacking and the knowledge of the mechanisms of ARDs and their actions upon pathogenic lymphocytes, which are hypothesized to sustain disease, is poor. An in vitro model of inflammation was developed in the current study, in which stimulated and unstimulated lymphocytes were cultured together, but tracked separately, to investigate the action of MTX and Tofa on the two populations. By analysing lymphocyte proliferation and activation, and cytokine secretion in the culture supernatants, it was established that, due to the presence of activated cells, unstimulated cells underwent a bystander activation that was modulated by the ARDs. Additionally, varying administration schedules were demonstrated to affect lymphocytes differently in vitro, either directly or via bystander activation. Furthermore, MTX and Tofa exerted different effects; while MTX showed an antiproliferative effect, Tofa marginally effected activation, although only a slight antiproliferative action, which could be potentiated by sequential treatment with MTX. Thus, it was hypothesized that these differences may be exploited in sequential therapeutic strategies, to maximize the anti‑rheumatic effect. These findings are notable and must be accounted for, as bystander‑activated cells in vivo could contribute to the spread of autoimmune activation

  8. Genomic instability after targeted irradiation of human lymphocytes: Evidence for inter-individual differences under bystander conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadhim, Munira A.; Lee, Ryonfa; Moore, Stephen R.; Macdonald, Denise A.; Chapman, Kim L.; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental 222 radon exposure is a human health concern, and many studies demonstrate that very low doses of high LET α-particle irradiation initiate deleterious genetic consequences in both irradiated and non-irradiated bystander cells. One consequence, radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI), is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and is often assessed by measuring delayed chromosomal aberrations. We utilised a technique that facilitates transient immobilization of primary lymphocytes for targeted microbeam irradiation and have reported that environmentally relevant doses, e.g. a single 3 He 2+ particle traversal to a single cell, are sufficient to induce RIGI. Herein we sought to determine differences in radiation response in lymphocytes isolated from five healthy male donors. Primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle per cell nucleus. We found evidence for inter-individual variation in radiation response (RIGI, measured as delayed chromosome aberrations). Although this was not highly significant, it was possibly masked by high levels of intra-individual variation. While there are many studies showing a link between genetic predisposition and RIGI, there are few studies linking genetic background with bystander effects in normal human lymphocytes. In an attempt to investigate inter-individual variation in the induction of bystander effects, primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle under conditions where fractions of the population were traversed. We showed a marked genotype-dependent bystander response in one donor after exposure to 15% of the population. The findings may also be regarded as a radiation-induced genotype-dependent bystander effect triggering an instability phenotype.

  9. Genomic instability after targeted irradiation of human lymphocytes: Evidence for inter-individual differences under bystander conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadhim, Munira A., E-mail: mkadhim@brookes.ac.uk [School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Lee, Ryonfa [Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Moore, Stephen R.; Macdonald, Denise A. [Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Chapman, Kim L. [School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    Environmental {sup 222}radon exposure is a human health concern, and many studies demonstrate that very low doses of high LET {alpha}-particle irradiation initiate deleterious genetic consequences in both irradiated and non-irradiated bystander cells. One consequence, radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI), is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and is often assessed by measuring delayed chromosomal aberrations. We utilised a technique that facilitates transient immobilization of primary lymphocytes for targeted microbeam irradiation and have reported that environmentally relevant doses, e.g. a single {sup 3}He{sup 2+} particle traversal to a single cell, are sufficient to induce RIGI. Herein we sought to determine differences in radiation response in lymphocytes isolated from five healthy male donors. Primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle per cell nucleus. We found evidence for inter-individual variation in radiation response (RIGI, measured as delayed chromosome aberrations). Although this was not highly significant, it was possibly masked by high levels of intra-individual variation. While there are many studies showing a link between genetic predisposition and RIGI, there are few studies linking genetic background with bystander effects in normal human lymphocytes. In an attempt to investigate inter-individual variation in the induction of bystander effects, primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle under conditions where fractions of the population were traversed. We showed a marked genotype-dependent bystander response in one donor after exposure to 15% of the population. The findings may also be regarded as a radiation-induced genotype-dependent bystander effect triggering an instability phenotype.

  10. Bystander CD4+ T lymphocytes survive in HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angelique; Ito, Yoshinori; Lima, Rosangela G.; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with depletion of CD4(+) T cells. The mechanisms of this phenomenon remain to be understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether and to what extent uninfected ("bystander") CD4(+) T cells die in HIV-infected individuals. We address this question using a system of human lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Tissue blocks were inoculated with HIV-1. After productive infection was established, they were treated with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine to protect from infection those CD4(+) T cells that had not yet been infected. These CD4(+) T cells residing in HIV-infected tissue are by definition bystanders. Our results demonstrate that after nevirapine application the number of bystander CD4(+) T cells is conserved. Thus, in the context of HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue, productive HIV infection kills infected cells but is not sufficient to cause the death of a significant number of uninfected CD4(+) T cells.

  11. Gamma-H2AX as a biomarker of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in targeted and bystander human artificial skin models and peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Christophe; Dickey, Jennifer; Bonner, William; Sedelnikova, Olga

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure is inevitable. In addition to exposure from cosmic rays, the sun and radioactive substances, modern society has created new sources of radiation exposure such as space and high altitude journeys, X-ray diagnostics, radiological treatments and the increasing threat of radiobiological terrorism. For these reasons, a reliable, reproducible and sensitive assessment of dose and time exposure to IR is essential. We developed a minimally invasive diagnostic test for IR exposure based on detection of a phosphorylated variant of histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which occurs specifically at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The phosphorylation of thousands of H2AX molecules forms a gamma-H2AX focus in the chromatin flanking the DSB site that can be detected in situ. We analyzed gamma- H2AX focus formation in both directly irradiated cells as well as in un-irradiated "bystanders" in close contact with irradiated cells. In order to insure minimal invasiveness, we examined commercially available artificial skin models as a surrogate for human skin biopsies as well as peripheral blood lymphocytes. In human skin models, cells in a thin plane were microbeamirradiated and gamma-H2AX formation was measured both in irradiated and in distal bystander cells over time. In irradiated cells DSB formation reached a maximum at 15-30 minutes post- IR and then declined within several hours; all cells were affected. In marked contrast, the incidence of DSBs in bystander cells reached a maximum by 12-48 hours post-irradiation, gradually decreasing over the 7 day time course. At the maxima, 40-60% of bystander cells were affected. Similarly, we analyzed blood samples exposed to IR ex vivo at doses ranging from 0.02 to 3 Gy. The amount of DNA damage was linear in respect to radiation dose and independent of the age or sex of the blood donor. The method is highly reproducible and highly sensitive. In directly irradiated cells, the number of gamma-H2AX foci peaked

  12. Dose-effect Curve for X-radiation in Lymphocytes in Goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasanbasic, D.; Saracevic, L.; Sacirbegovic, A.

    1998-01-01

    Dose-effect curve for X-radiation was made based on the analysis of chromosome aberrations in lympocytes of goats. Blood samples from seven goats were irradiated using MOORHEAD method, slightly modified and adapted to our conditions. Linear-square model was used, and the dose-effect curves were fitted by the smallest squares method. Dose-effect curve (collective) for goats is displayed as the following expression: y(D)= 8,6639·10 -3 D + 2,9748·10 -2 D 2 +2,9475·10 -3 . Comparison with some domestic animals such as sheep and pigs showed differences not only with respect to linear-square model, but to other mathematical presentations as well. (author)

  13. Oxidative stress as a significant factor for development of an adaptive response in irradiated and nonirradiated human lymphocytes after inducing the bystander effect by low-dose X-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Science, ul. Moskvorechye, 1, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Egolina, Natalya A.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Science, ul. Moskvorechye, 1, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2009-10-02

    X-radiation (10 cGy) was shown to induce in human lymphocytes transposition of homologous chromosomes loci from the membrane towards the centre of the nucleus and activation of the chromosomal nucleolus-forming regions (NFRs). These effects are transmitted by means of extracellular DNA (ecDNA) fragments to nonirradiated cells (the so-called bystander effect, BE). We demonstrated that in the development of the BE an important role is played by oxidative stress (which is brought about by low radiation doses and ecDNA fragments of the culture medium of the irradiated cells), by an enzyme of apoptosis called caspase-3, and by DNA-binding receptors of the bystander cells, presumably TLR9. Proposed herein is a scheme of the development of an adaptive response and the BE on exposure to radiation. Ionizing radiation induces apoptosis of the radiosensitive fraction of cells due to the development of the 'primary' oxidative stress (OS). DNA fragments of apoptotic cells are released into the intercellular space and interact with the DNA-binding receptors of the bystander cells. This interaction activates in lymphocytes signalling pathways associated with synthesis of the reactive oxygen species and nitrogen species, i.e., induces secondary oxidative stress accompanied by apoptosis of part of the cells, etc. Hence, single exposure to radiation may be followed by relatively long-lasting in the cellular population oxidative stress contributing to the development of an adaptive response. We thus believe that ecDNA of irradiated apoptotic lymphocytes is a significant factor of stress-signalling.

  14. Bystander deixis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to discuss non-standard speech forms of Romani and other languages in the larger context of bystander deixis, a subcategory of social deixis. First I will propose a three-way classification of instances of bystander deixis and illustrate them with examples from...... Romani and several other languages across the globe. The second part is concerned with the contextual factors that must have a place in a discourse model that wants to be able to handle linguistic manifestations of bystander deixis. Due the fact that Romani has typically been used for in......-group communication, this language presents a particularly rich source of information in the area of secret languages and other forms of bystander deixis. Moreover, as is also made abundantly clear in this volume, many jargons, trade varieties, secret languages and other more or less non-standard speech varieties...

  15. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells are active participants in microenvironmental cross-talk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Attekum, Martijn H. A.; Eldering, Eric; Kater, Arnon P.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is widely accepted. Nevertheless, the understanding of the complex interplay between the various types of bystander cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells is incomplete. Numerous studies have indicated that bystander

  16. Bystander effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Neethu Fathima; Daniel, Nittu

    2013-01-01

    The Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect is the phenomenon in which unirradiated cells show irradiated effects due to the signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Evidence suggests that targeted cytoplasmic irradiation results in mutation in the nucleus of the hit cells. Cells that are not directly hit by an alpha particle, but are in the vicinity of one that is hit, also contribute to the genotoxic response of the cell population. When cells are irradiated, and the medium is transferred to unirradiated cells, these unirradiated cells show bystander responses when assayed for clonogenic survival and oncogenic transformation. The demonstration of a bystander effect in human tissues and, more recently, in whole organisms have clear implication of the potential relevance of the non-targeted response to human health. This effect may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. The radiation-induced bystander effect represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation, in that extranuclear and extracellular events may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Multiple pathways are involved in the bystander phenomenon, and different cell types respond differently to bystander signalling. Using cDNA microarrays, a number of cellular signalling genes, including cyclooxygenase-2 (CQX-2), have been shown to be casually linked to the bystander phenomenon. The observation that inhibition of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) suppressed the bystander response further confirmed the important role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascade in the bystander process. The cells deficient in mitochondrial DNA showed a significantly reduced response to bystander signalling, suggesting a functional role of mitochondria in the signalling process. (author)

  17. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  18. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells are active participants in microenvironmental cross-talk

    OpenAIRE

    van Attekum, Martijn HA; Eldering, Eric; Kater, Arnon P

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is widely accepted. Nevertheless, the understanding of the complex interplay between the various types of bystander cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells is incomplete. Numerous studies have indicated that bystander cells provide chronic lymphocytic leukemia-supportive functions, but it has also become clear that chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells actively engage in the formation of a supportive tumor microenv...

  19. Development of an Immunoperoxidase Monolayer Assay for the Detection of Antibodies against Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus Based on BHK-21 Cell Line Stably Expressing the Goat Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialin Zhang

    Full Text Available From 2013 to 2015, peste des petits ruminants (PPR broke out in more than half of the provinces of China; thus, the application and development of diagnostic methods are very important for the control of PPR. Here, an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA was developed to detect antibodies against PPR. However, during IPMA development, we found that Vero cells were not the appropriate choice because staining results were not easily observed. Therefore, we first established a baby hamster kidney-goat signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (BHK-SLAM cell line that could stably express goat SLAM for at least 20 generations. Compared with Vero cells, the PPR-mediated cytopathic effect occurred earlier in BHK-SLAM cells, and large syncytia appeared after virus infection. Based on this cell line and recombinant PPR virus expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP (rPPRV-GFP, an IPMA for PPR diagnosis was developed. One hundred and ninety-eight PPR serum samples from goats or sheep were tested by the IPMA and virus neutralization test (VNT. Compared with the VNT, the sensitivity and specificity of the IPMA were 91% and 100%, respectively, and the coincidence rate of the two methods was 95.5%. The IPMA assay could be completed in 4 h, compared with more than 6 d for the VNT using rPPRV-GFP, and it is easily performed, as the staining results can be observed under a microscope. Additionally, unlike the VNT, the IPMA does not require antigen purification, which will reduce its cost. In conclusion, the established IPMA will be an alternative method that replaces the VNT for detecting antibodies against PPRV in the field.

  20. Radiation Bystander Effects Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokohzaman Soleymanifard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiation Induced Bystander Effect (RIBE which cause radiation effects in non-irradiated cells, has challenged the principle according to which radiation traversal through the nucleus of a cell is necessary for producing biological responses. What is the mechanism of this phenomenon? To have a better understanding of this rather ambiguous concept substantial number of original and reviewed article were carefully examined. Results: Irradiated cells release molecules which can propagate in cell environment and/or transmit through gap junction intercellular communication. These molecules can reach to non-irradiated cells and transmit bystander signals. In many investigations, it has been confirmed that these molecules are growth factors, cytokines, nitric oxide and free radicals like reactive oxygen species (ROS. Transmission of by stander signal to neighboring cells persuades them to produce secondary growth factors which in their turn cause further cell injuries. Some investigators suggest, organelles other than nucleus (mitochondria and cell membrane are the origin of these signals.  There is another opinion which suggests double strand breaks (DSB are not directly generated in bystander cells, rather they are due to smaller damage like single strand breaks which accumulate and end up to DSB. Although bystander mechanisms have not been exactly known, it can be confirmed that multiple mechanisms and various pathways are responsible for this effect. Cell type, radiation type, experimental conditions and end points identify the dominant mechanism. Conclusion: Molecules and pathways which are responsible for RIBE, also cause systemic responses to other non-irradiation stresses. So RIBE is a kind of systemic stress or innate immune responses, which are performed by cell microenvironment. Irradiated cells and their signals are components of microenvironment for creating bystander effects.

  1. Susceptibility to bystander DNA damage is influenced by replication and transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jennifer S.; Baird, Brandon J.; Redon, Christophe E.; Avdoshina, Valeriya; Palchik, Guillermo; Wu, Junfang; Kondratyev, Alexei; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Olga A.

    2012-01-01

    Direct cellular DNA damage may lead to genome destabilization in unexposed, bystander, cells sharing the same milieu with directly damaged cells by means of the bystander effect. One proposed mechanism involves double strand break (DSB) formation in S phase cells at sites of single strand lesions in the DNA of replication complexes, which has a more open structure compared with neighboring DNA. The DNA in transcription complexes also has a more open structure, and hence may be susceptible to bystander DSB formation from single strand lesions. To examine whether transcription predisposes non-replicating cells to bystander effect-induced DNA DSBs, we examined two types of primary cells that exhibit high levels of transcription in the absence of replication, rat neurons and human lymphocytes. We found that non-replicating bystander cells with high transcription rates exhibited substantial levels of DNA DSBs, as monitored by γ-H2AX foci formation. Additionally, as reported in proliferating cells, TGF-β and NO were found to mimic bystander effects in cell populations lacking DNA synthesis. These results indicate that cell vulnerability to bystander DSB damage may result from transcription as well as replication. The findings offer insights into which tissues may be vulnerable to bystander genomic destabilization in vivo. PMID:22941641

  2. Bystanders Are the Key to Stopping Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Sharon; Notar, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Bullying is the dominance over another. Bullying occurs when there is an audience. Peer bystanders provide an audience 85% of instances of bullying. If you remove the audience bullying should stop. The article is a review of literature (2002-2013) on the role of bystanders; importance of bystanders; why bystanders behave as they do; resources to…

  3. MRC5 and QU-DB bystander cells can produce bystander factors and induce radiation bystander effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni Toossi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation damages initiated by radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE are not limited to the first or immediate neighbors of the irradiated cells, but the effects have been observed in the cells far from the irradiation site. It has been postulated that bystander cells, by producing bystander factors, are actively involved in the propagation of bystander effect in the regions beyond the initial irradiated site. Current study was planned to test the hypothesis. MRC5 and QU-DB cell lines were irradiated, and successive medium transfer technique was performed to induce bystander effects in two bystander cell groups. Conditioned medium extracted from the target cells was transferred to the bystander cells (first bystander cells. After one hour, conditioned medium was substituted by fresh medium. Two hours later, the fresh medium was transferred to a second group of non-irradiated cells (second bystander cells. Micronucleated cells (MC were counted to quantify damages induced in the first and second bystander cell groups. Radiation effect was observed in the second bystander cells as well as in the first ones. Statistical analyses revealed that the number of MC in second bystander subgroups was significantly more than the corresponding value observed in control groups, but in most cases it was equal to the number of MC observed in the first bystander cells. MRC5 and QU-DB bystander cells can produce and release bystander signals in the culture medium and affect non-irradiated cells. Therefore, they may contribute to the RIBE propagation.

  4. Bystander or No Bystander for Gene Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam V. Patterson

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT of cancer aims to improve the selectivity of chemotherapy by gene transfer, thus enabling target cells to convert nontoxic prodrugs to cytotoxic drugs. A zone of cell kill around gene-modified cells due to transfer of toxic metabolites, known as the bystander effect, leads to tumour regression. Here we discuss the implications of either striving for a strong bystander effect to overcome poor gene transfer, or avoiding the bystander effect to reduce potential systemic effects, with the aid of three successful GDEPT systems. This review concentrates on bystander effects and drug development with regard to these enzyme prodrug combinations, namely herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK with ganciclovir (GCV, cytosine deaminase (CD from bacteria or yeast with 5-fluorocytodine (5-FC, and bacterial nitroreductase (NfsB with 5-(azaridin-1-yl-2,4-dinitrobenzamide (CB1954, and their respective derivatives.

  5. An extracellular DNA mediated bystander effect produced from low dose irradiated endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Malinovskaya, Elena M.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    The human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture was exposed to X-ray radiation in a low dose of 10 cGy. The fragments of extracellular genomic DNA (ecDNA{sup R}) were isolated from the culture medium after the short-term incubation. A culture medium of unirradiated endothelial cells was then supplemented with ecDNA{sup R}, followed by analysing the cells along the series of parameters (bystander effect). The exposed cells and bystander endotheliocytes showed similar response to low doses: approximation of the 1q12 loci of chromosome 1 and their transposition into the cellular nucleus, change in shape of the endotheliocytic nucleus, activation of the nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), actin polymerization, and an elevated level of DNA double-stranded breaks. Following blockade of TLR9 receptors with oligonucleotide-inhibitor or chloroquine in the bystander cells these effects - except of activation of NORs - on exposure to ecDNA{sup R} disappeared, with no bystander response thus observed. The presence of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the bystander effect being studied suggests a possibility for radiation-modified ecDNA fragments (i.e., stress signaling factors) to be released into the culture medium, whereas inhibition of TLR9 suggests the binding these ligands to the recipient cells. A similar DNA-signaling pathway in the bystander effect we previously described for human lymphocytes. Integrity of data makes it possible to suppose that a similar signaling mechanism which we demonstrated for lymphocytes (humoral system) might also be mediated in a monolayer culture of cells (cellular tissue) after the development of the bystander effect in them and transfer of stress signaling factors (ecDNA{sup R}) through the culture medium.

  6. An extracellular DNA mediated bystander effect produced from low dose irradiated endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V.; Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Malinovskaya, Elena M.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N.

    2011-01-01

    The human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture was exposed to X-ray radiation in a low dose of 10 cGy. The fragments of extracellular genomic DNA (ecDNA R ) were isolated from the culture medium after the short-term incubation. A culture medium of unirradiated endothelial cells was then supplemented with ecDNA R , followed by analysing the cells along the series of parameters (bystander effect). The exposed cells and bystander endotheliocytes showed similar response to low doses: approximation of the 1q12 loci of chromosome 1 and their transposition into the cellular nucleus, change in shape of the endotheliocytic nucleus, activation of the nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), actin polymerization, and an elevated level of DNA double-stranded breaks. Following blockade of TLR9 receptors with oligonucleotide-inhibitor or chloroquine in the bystander cells these effects - except of activation of NORs - on exposure to ecDNA R disappeared, with no bystander response thus observed. The presence of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the bystander effect being studied suggests a possibility for radiation-modified ecDNA fragments (i.e., stress signaling factors) to be released into the culture medium, whereas inhibition of TLR9 suggests the binding these ligands to the recipient cells. A similar DNA-signaling pathway in the bystander effect we previously described for human lymphocytes. Integrity of data makes it possible to suppose that a similar signaling mechanism which we demonstrated for lymphocytes (humoral system) might also be mediated in a monolayer culture of cells (cellular tissue) after the development of the bystander effect in them and transfer of stress signaling factors (ecDNA R ) through the culture medium.

  7. On the Actual Risk of Bystander Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebst, Lasse Suonperä; Heinskou, Marie Bruvik; Ejbye-Ernst, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Bystander studies have rarely considered the victimization risk associated with intervention into violent, dangerous emergencies. To address this gap, we aim to identify factors that influence bystanders’ risk of being physically victimized. Methods: We observed bystander behavior fro...

  8. Bystander signaling via oxidative metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawal HA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Humaira Aziz Sawal,1 Kashif Asghar,2 Matthias Bureik,3 Nasir Jalal4 1Healthcare Biotechnology Department, Atta-ur-Rahman School of Applied Biosciences, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad, 2Basic Sciences Research, Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan; 3Health Science Platform, School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; 4Health Science Platform, Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China Abstract: The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE is the initiation of biological end points in cells (bystander cells that are not directly traversed by an incident-radiation track, but are in close proximity to cells that are receiving the radiation. RIBE has been indicted of causing DNA damage via oxidative stress, besides causing direct damage, inducing tumorigenesis, producing micronuclei, and causing apoptosis. RIBE is regulated by signaling proteins that are either endogenous or secreted by cells as a means of communication between cells, and can activate intracellular or intercellular oxidative metabolism that can further trigger signaling pathways of inflammation. Bystander signals can pass through gap junctions in attached cell lines, while the suspended cell lines transmit these signals via hormones and soluble proteins. This review provides the background information on how reactive oxygen species (ROS act as bystander signals. Although ROS have a very short half-life and have a nanometer-scale sphere of influence, the wide variety of ROS produced via various sources can exert a cumulative effect, not only in forming DNA adducts but also setting up signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, aging, and even tumorigenesis. This review outlines the sources of the bystander effect linked to ROS in a cell, and provides methods of investigation for researchers who would like to

  9. Bystander signaling via oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawal, Humaira Aziz; Asghar, Kashif; Bureik, Matthias; Jalal, Nasir

    2017-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is the initiation of biological end points in cells (bystander cells) that are not directly traversed by an incident-radiation track, but are in close proximity to cells that are receiving the radiation. RIBE has been indicted of causing DNA damage via oxidative stress, besides causing direct damage, inducing tumorigenesis, producing micronuclei, and causing apoptosis. RIBE is regulated by signaling proteins that are either endogenous or secreted by cells as a means of communication between cells, and can activate intracellular or intercellular oxidative metabolism that can further trigger signaling pathways of inflammation. Bystander signals can pass through gap junctions in attached cell lines, while the suspended cell lines transmit these signals via hormones and soluble proteins. This review provides the background information on how reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as bystander signals. Although ROS have a very short half-life and have a nanometer-scale sphere of influence, the wide variety of ROS produced via various sources can exert a cumulative effect, not only in forming DNA adducts but also setting up signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, aging, and even tumorigenesis. This review outlines the sources of the bystander effect linked to ROS in a cell, and provides methods of investigation for researchers who would like to pursue this field of science.

  10. Moral Disengagement Among Bystanders to School Bullying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obermann, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the use of moral disengagement among children indirectly involved in bullying (bystanders). A sample of Danish adolescents (N = 660, M age 12.6 years) were divided into four groups depending on their bystander status: (a) outsiders, who did not experience bullying among...... their peers; (b) defenders, who were likely to help the victims in bullying episodes; (c) guilty bystanders, who did nothing to help bullied peers but felt guilty about it; and (d) unconcerned bystanders, who witnessed peers being bullied, without feeling responsible. Results indicated that, besides from...... active personal involvement in bullying others, being an unconcerned bystander to bullying also associates with moral disengagement. Unconcerned bystanders had significantly higher moral disengagement than guilty bystanders and defenders. Outsiders also showed significant higher disengagement than...

  11. Angora goat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angora goat, tables of nutritional requirements (NRC, 1981) have been derived by ..... may fall as low as 0.38%/min in diabetic cows (Kaneko,. 1989). The diagnostic ... dependent on glucose oxidation via the pentose-phosphate pathway in ...

  12. Differential effects of p53 on bystander phenotypes induced by gamma ray and high LET heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Konishi, Teruaki; Tu, Wenzhi; Liu, Weili; Shiomi, Naoko; Kobayashi, Alisa; Uchihori, Yukio; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Hei, Tom K.; Dang, Bingrong; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-04-01

    High LET particle irradiation has several potential advantages over γ-rays such as p53-independent response. The purpose of this work is to disclose the effect of p53 on the bystander effect induced by different LET irradiations and underlying mechanism. Lymphocyte cells of TK6 (wild type p53) and HMy2.CIR (mutated p53) were exposed to either low or high LET irradiation, then their mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS generation were detected. The micronuclei (MN) induction in HL-7702 hepatocytes co-cultured with irradiated lymphocytes was also measured. It was found that the mitochondrial dysfunction, p66Shc activation, and intracellular ROS were enhanced in TK6 but not in HMy2.CIR cells after γ-ray irradiation, but all of them were increased in both cell lines after carbon and iron irradiation. Consistently, the bystander effect of MN formation in HL-7702 cells was only triggered by γ-irradiated TK6 cells but not by γ-irradiated HMy2.CIR cells. But this bystander effect was induced by both lymphocyte cell lines after heavy ion irradiation. PFT-μ, an inhibitor of p53, only partly inhibited ROS generation and bystander effect induced by 30 keV/μm carbon-irradiated TK6 cells but failed to suppress the bystander effect induced by the TK6 cells irradiated with either 70 keV/μm carbon or 180 keV/μm iron. The mitochondrial inhibitors of rotenone and oligomycin eliminated heavy ion induced ROS generation in TK6 and HMy2.CIR cells and hence diminished the bystander effect on HL-7702 cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the bystander effect is p53-dependent for low LET irradiation, but it is p53-independent for high LET irradiation which may be because of p53-independent ROS generation due to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  13. Dairy goat nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ronchi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Good goat nutrition is fundamental to the success and sustainability of dairy goat farming in terms of economics, goat health, high quality products, and minimizing environmental impact.

  14. Vaccination against Louping Ill Virus Protects Goats from Experimental Challenge with Spanish Goat Encephalitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, L M; Casais, R; García Marín, J F; Dalton, K P; Royo, L J; Del Cerro, A; Gayo, E; Dagleish, M P; Alberdi, P; Juste, R A; de la Fuente, J; Balseiro, A

    2017-05-01

    Spanish goat encephalitis virus (SGEV) is a recently described member of the genus Flavivirus belonging to the tick-borne encephalitis group of viruses, and is closely related to louping ill virus (LIV). Naturally acquired disease in goats results in severe, acute encephalitis and 100% mortality. Eighteen goats were challenged subcutaneously with SGEV; nine were vaccinated previously against LIV and nine were not. None of the vaccinated goats showed any clinical signs of disease or histological lesions, but all of the non-vaccinated goats developed pyrexia and 5/9 developed neurological clinical signs, primarily tremors in the neck and ataxia. All non-vaccinated animals developed histological lesions restricted to the central nervous system and consistent with a lymphocytic meningomyeloencephalitis. Vaccinated goats had significantly (P goats throughout the experiment, but increased rapidly and were significantly (P goats against LIV confers highly effective protection against SGEV; this is probably mediated by IgG and prevents an increase in viral RNA load in serum such that vaccinated animals would not be an effective reservoir of the virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B. [Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases

    2017-01-17

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  16. Mechanisms of the Bystander Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Generations of students in radiation biology have been taught that heritable biological damage requires direct damage to DNA. We now know that this is not true. The Bystander Effect is the name given to the phenomenon whereby biological effects are observed in cells that are not themselves traversed by a charged particle, but are in close proximity to cells that are. Several research groups have convincingly demonstrated a bystander effect for alpha particle, which are heavy and high LET, because charged particles can be focused into a tiny beam that can be directed onto individual cells. The biological effects seen in adjacent non-hit cells clearly represents a bystander effect. It is not so easy to demonstrate a similar effect for x-rays or for the electrons set in motion by the absorption of x-rays. In this project we used two types of cell that could be recognized one from the other. One cell type was fed radioactive tritiated thymidine, which is incorporated into the DNA, . The tritium emits electrons which have a very short range so that they do not even get out of the cell. These cells were then mixed with a different type of cell which are routinely used to assess mutations. The mixed cells formed a cluster, where the two types of cells were in close contact, and left for some hours. Subsequently, the two types of cells were separated and studied. A substantial fraction of the cells that had incorporated the tritiated thymidine were killed by the radiation. The interesting finding is that the cells that had not incorporated tritiated thymidine, but had been in close contact with cells that had, exhibited a significant incidence of mutations. These experiments clearly demonstrated a bystander effect for low LET electrons. In further experiments, it was possible to show that the bystander effect was greatest when the two cell types were in gap junction communication.

  17. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, John B.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  18. Bystander effect: Biological endpoints and microarray analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad [Department of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Vermont, 302 Rowell Building, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States) and DNA Microarray Facility, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)]. E-mail: mchaudhr@uvm.edu

    2006-05-11

    In cell populations exposed to ionizing radiation, the biological effects occur in a much larger proportion of cells than are estimated to be traversed by radiation. It has been suggested that irradiated cells are capable of providing signals to the neighboring unirradiated cells resulting in damage to these cells. This phenomenon is termed the bystander effect. The bystander effect induces persistent, long-term, transmissible changes that result in delayed death and neoplastic transformation. Because the bystander effect is relevant to carcinogenesis, it could have significant implications for risk estimation for radiation exposure. The nature of the bystander effect signal and how it impacts the unirradiated cells remains to be elucidated. Examination of the changes in gene expression could provide clues to understanding the bystander effect and could define the signaling pathways involved in sustaining damage to these cells. The microarray technology serves as a tool to gain insight into the molecular pathways leading to bystander effect. Using medium from irradiated normal human diploid lung fibroblasts as a model system we examined gene expression alterations in bystander cells. The microarray data revealed that the radiation-induced gene expression profile in irradiated cells is different from unirradiated bystander cells suggesting that the pathways leading to biological effects in the bystander cells are different from the directly irradiated cells. The genes known to be responsive to ionizing radiation were observed in irradiated cells. Several genes were upregulated in cells receiving media from irradiated cells. Surprisingly no genes were found to be downregulated in these cells. A number of genes belonging to extracellular signaling, growth factors and several receptors were identified in bystander cells. Interestingly 15 genes involved in the cell communication processes were found to be upregulated. The induction of receptors and the cell

  19. Bystander effect: Biological endpoints and microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    In cell populations exposed to ionizing radiation, the biological effects occur in a much larger proportion of cells than are estimated to be traversed by radiation. It has been suggested that irradiated cells are capable of providing signals to the neighboring unirradiated cells resulting in damage to these cells. This phenomenon is termed the bystander effect. The bystander effect induces persistent, long-term, transmissible changes that result in delayed death and neoplastic transformation. Because the bystander effect is relevant to carcinogenesis, it could have significant implications for risk estimation for radiation exposure. The nature of the bystander effect signal and how it impacts the unirradiated cells remains to be elucidated. Examination of the changes in gene expression could provide clues to understanding the bystander effect and could define the signaling pathways involved in sustaining damage to these cells. The microarray technology serves as a tool to gain insight into the molecular pathways leading to bystander effect. Using medium from irradiated normal human diploid lung fibroblasts as a model system we examined gene expression alterations in bystander cells. The microarray data revealed that the radiation-induced gene expression profile in irradiated cells is different from unirradiated bystander cells suggesting that the pathways leading to biological effects in the bystander cells are different from the directly irradiated cells. The genes known to be responsive to ionizing radiation were observed in irradiated cells. Several genes were upregulated in cells receiving media from irradiated cells. Surprisingly no genes were found to be downregulated in these cells. A number of genes belonging to extracellular signaling, growth factors and several receptors were identified in bystander cells. Interestingly 15 genes involved in the cell communication processes were found to be upregulated. The induction of receptors and the cell

  20. Bystander effects in unicellular organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVeaux, Linda C.; Durtschi, Lynn S.; Case, Jonathan G.; Wells, Douglas P.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been seen in mammalian cells from diverse origins. These effects can be transmitted through the medium to cells not present at the time of irradiation. We have developed an assay for detecting bystander effects in the unicellular eukaryote, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This assay allows maximal exposure of unirradiated cells to cells that have received electron beam irradiation. S. pombe cells were irradiated with 16-18 MeV electrons from a pulsed electron LINAC. When survival of the irradiated cells decreased to approximately 50%, forward-mutation to 2-deoxy-D-glucose resistance increased in the unirradiated bystander cells. Further increase in dose had no additional effect on this increase. In order to detect this response, it was necessary for the irradiated cell/unirradiated cell ratio to be high. Other cellular stresses, such as heat treatment, UV irradiation, and bleomycin exposure, also caused a detectable response in untreated cells grown with the treated cells. We discuss evolutionary implications of these results

  1. Bystander effects in unicellular organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVeaux, Linda C. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Campus Box 8263, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States) and Department of Biological Sciences, Campus Box 8007, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)]. E-mail: develind@isu.edu; Durtschi, Lynn S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Campus Box 8007, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Case, Jonathan G. [Department of Physics, Campus Box 8106, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Wells, Douglas P. [Department of Physics, Campus Box 8106, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

    2006-05-11

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been seen in mammalian cells from diverse origins. These effects can be transmitted through the medium to cells not present at the time of irradiation. We have developed an assay for detecting bystander effects in the unicellular eukaryote, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This assay allows maximal exposure of unirradiated cells to cells that have received electron beam irradiation. S. pombe cells were irradiated with 16-18 MeV electrons from a pulsed electron LINAC. When survival of the irradiated cells decreased to approximately 50%, forward-mutation to 2-deoxy-D-glucose resistance increased in the unirradiated bystander cells. Further increase in dose had no additional effect on this increase. In order to detect this response, it was necessary for the irradiated cell/unirradiated cell ratio to be high. Other cellular stresses, such as heat treatment, UV irradiation, and bleomycin exposure, also caused a detectable response in untreated cells grown with the treated cells. We discuss evolutionary implications of these results.

  2. Bystander effects in unicellular organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVeaux, Linda C; Durtschi, Lynn S; Case, Jonathan G; Wells, Douglas P

    2006-05-11

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been seen in mammalian cells from diverse origins. These effects can be transmitted through the medium to cells not present at the time of irradiation. We have developed an assay for detecting bystander effects in the unicellular eukaryote, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This assay allows maximal exposure of unirradiated cells to cells that have received electron beam irradiation. S. pombe cells were irradiated with 16-18 MeV electrons from a pulsed electron LINAC. When survival of the irradiated cells decreased to approximately 50%, forward-mutation to 2-deoxy-d-glucose resistance increased in the unirradiated bystander cells. Further increase in dose had no additional effect on this increase. In order to detect this response, it was necessary for the irradiated cell/unirradiated cell ratio to be high. Other cellular stresses, such as heat treatment, UV irradiation, and bleomycin exposure, also caused a detectable response in untreated cells grown with the treated cells. We discuss evolutionary implications of these results.

  3. A Bully's Bystanders Are Never Innocent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloroso, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Though they play the least active role, bystanders are a critical element in bullying. With peers looking on and providing at least tacit support, the bully is no longer acting alone. The bystanders have become allies to the point of magnifying the supposed negative attributes of the target. If the bullying cycle is to be broken, the role of the…

  4. DNA damage and the bystander response in tumor and normal cells exposed to X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhashree, M; Venkateswarlu, R; Karthik, K; Shangamithra, V; Venkatachalam, P

    2017-09-01

    Monolayer and suspension cultures of tumor (BMG-1, CCRF-CEM), normal (AG1522, HADF, lymphocytes) and ATM-mutant (GM4405) human cells were exposed to X-rays at doses used in radiotherapy (high dose and high dose-rate) or radiological imaging (low dose and low dose-rate). Radiation-induced DNA damage, its persistence, and possible bystander effects were evaluated, based on DNA damage markers (γ-H2AX, p53 ser15 ) and cell-cycle-specific cyclins (cyclin B1 and cyclin D1). Dose-dependent DNA damage and a dose-independent bystander response were seen after exposure to high dose and high dose-rate radiation. The level of induced damage (expression of p53 ser15 , γ-H2AX) depended on ATM status. However, low dose and dose-rate exposures neither increased expression of marker proteins nor induced a bystander response, except in the CCRF-CEM cells. Bystander effects after high-dose irradiation may contribute to stochastic and deterministic effects. Precautions to protect unexposed regions or to inhibit transmission of DNA damage signaling might reduce radiation risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Goat production check list

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Mette Benedicte Olaf; Madsen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    This check list, financed by DanChurchAid, highlights all issues should be carefully investigated before investing in distribution of goats and in interventions to assist poor rural communities to improve their livelihood through goat production.......This check list, financed by DanChurchAid, highlights all issues should be carefully investigated before investing in distribution of goats and in interventions to assist poor rural communities to improve their livelihood through goat production....

  6. Horny Goat Weed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horny goat weed is an herb. The leaves are used to make medicine. As many as 15 horny goat weed species are known as “yin yang huo” in Chinese medicine. Horny goat weed is used for weak back and knees, ...

  7. Genotoxicity in the eyes of bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hei, Tom K.; Persaud, Rudranath; Zhou, Hongning; Suzuki, Masao

    2004-01-01

    The controversial use of a linear, no threshold extrapolation model for low dose risk assessment has become even more so in light of the recent reports on the bystander phenomenon. The answer to the question as to which of the two phenomena, bystander versus adaptive response, is more important has practical implication in terms of low dose radiation risk assessment. In this review, genotoxicity is used as an endpoint to introduce the two phenomena, provide some insight into the mechanisms of bystander effect and to bridge the two low dose phenomena which operate in opposite directions: the bystander effect tends to exaggerate the effect at low doses, by communicating damage from hit to non-hit cells whereas the adaptive response confers resistance to a subsequent challenging dose by an initial low priming dose

  8. Are Victims Truly Worse Off in the Presence of Bystanders? Revisiting the Bystander Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fromell, Hanna; Nosenzo, Daniele; Owens, Trudy; Tufano, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that individuals are less likely to help a person in need when there are “bystanders” present who can also offer help. We designed an experiment to re-examine this “bystander effect” using modified dictator games. We find lower giving rates in the presence of bystanders,

  9. GENERATION OF CYTOTOXIC LYMPHOCYTES IN MIXED LYMPHOCYTE REACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, James; Möller, Göran

    1973-01-01

    Generation of cytotoxic effector cells by a unidirectional mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) in the mouse H-2 system was studied using labeled YAC (H-2a) leukemia cells as targets. The responding effector cell displayed a specific cytotoxic effect against target cells of the same H-2 genotype as the stimulating cell population. Killing of syngeneic H-2 cells was not observed, even when the labeled target cells were "innocent bystanders" in cultures where specific target cells were reintroduced. Similar results were found with spleen cells taken from mice sensitized in vivo 7 days earlier. The effector cell was not an adherent cell and was not activated by supernatants from MLR. The supernatants were not cytotoxic by themselves. When concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin was added to the cytotoxic test system, target and effector cells were agglutinated. Under these conditions, killing of H-2a target cells was observed in mixed cultures where H-2a lymphocytes were also the effector cells. These findings indicate that specifically activated, probably thymus-derived lymphocytes, can kill nonspecifically once they have been activated and providing there is close contact between effector and target cells. Thus, specificity of T cell killing appears to be restricted to recognition and subsequent binding to the targets, the actual effector phase being nonspecific. PMID:4269560

  10. Bystander Programs: Accommodating or Derailing Sexism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Reid

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bystander programs implemented to meet federal requirements to reduce sexual assaults on college campuses in the United States must include primary prevention. Survey data (n = 280 and interview data (n = 20 presented in this paper explore students’ hypothetical and actual willingness to intervene as bystanders. Although most students surveyed (57% claim they would be very likely to intervene, fewer than half would be very suspicious of someone leading away an intoxicated individual at a party (45% of women and 28% of men: p < 0.01. Interview data reveal how students perceive risk factors at college parties and what types of bystander measures they attempt, including “distractions”, a nonconfrontational tactic in which bystanders avoid more direct but socially risky interventions. Subsumed in many current bystander programs is an invisible element of valorizing harmony. Condoning bystanders’ unwillingness to directly confront seemingly predatory individuals could make change seem out of reach and could also embolden offenders whose behavior is observed and only temporarily thwarted.

  11. Radiation-induced bystander effects enhanced by elevated sodium chloride through sensitizing cells to bystander factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Lingyan; Han Wei; Chen Shaopeng; Zhao Ye; Jiang Erkang; Bao Lingzhi; Pei Bei; Yang Gen; Zhao Guoping; Wang Jun; Xu An; Wu Lijun

    2008-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been demonstrated to occur widely in various cell lines. However, very little data is available on the genotoxic effects of RIBE combined with other factor(s). We reported previously that with a low dose of α-particle irradiation, the fraction of γ-H2AX foci-positive cells in non-irradiated bystander cells was significantly increased under elevated NaCl culture conditions. In this study, we further investigated the functional role of NaCl in the enhancement of RIBE using a specially designed co-culture system and micronucleus (MN) test. It was shown that the MN frequency was not increased significantly by elevated NaCl (9.0 g/L) alone or by medium exposure. However, with 1.0 cGy α-particle irradiation, the induced MN frequency increased significantly in both irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Additional studies showed that elevated NaCl made the non-irradiated bystander cells more vulnerable to bystander factors. Furthermore, it was found that the induced MN frequency in cells both in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions was weakened when the hypertonic medium was changed to normotonic medium for 2 h before irradiation. Such observations were quite similar to the co-effect of NaCl and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), indicating that elevated NaCl might sensitize non-irradiated cells to bystander factors-induced oxidative stress

  12. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  13. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr; Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G 0 -stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors’ blood irradiated in vitro to 0–40 Gy acute γ-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 ± 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 ± 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 ± 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2–4 Gy and 16.7 ± 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6–10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  14. Haemato-biochemical profiles of indigenous goats (Capra hircus at Chittagong, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossan Shaikat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A 6 month long study was undertaken to determine various hemato-biochemical profiles of indigenous goats (Caprahircus in Bangladesh.Materials and methods: Blood samples were collected from goats of different ages of 5 Upazilla of Chittagong. Atotal of 120goats (60 Black Bengal and 60 Jamnapari having > 6 months of age were included. The whole blood was analyzed forhematology, and plasma and serum samples for biochemical analysis.Results: The study found higher number of RBC (million/cumm and PCV% in the goats of age 48 months and above (18.23± 1.89 and 28 ± 3.2 respectively. Besides, total protein was found higher (78.9 ± 14.5g/L in the goats of 6-24 months of age.Significant increase (p<0.01 of the number of WBC (thousand/cumm, RBC (million/cumm, PCV% was observed in BlackBengal over Jamnapari goat. In contrast, WBC, lymphocytes, RBC, PCV, ALT, and ASTwere significantly (p<0.01 higher inBlack Bengal than Jamnapari goat; whereas, monocyte, TP, Albumin, and Urea levels were significantly (p<0.01 higher inJamnapari than Black Bengal goats.Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrate the normal haemato-biochemical values of two local goat breeds.Present results stated some significant variation of parameters between two goats whereas some shows no significant variationat all.

  15. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  16. Rethinking the bystander role in school violence prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueve, Ann; Dash, Kimberly; O'Donnell, Lydia; Tehranifar, Parisa; Wilson-Simmons, Renée; Slaby, Ronald G; Link, Bruce G

    2006-01-01

    Public concerns about school shootings and safety draw attention to the role bystanders can play in preventing school violence. Although school violence prevention plans are often required, there is little guidance about whether these should address the roles of bystanders and what actions bystanders should take in different circumstances, from more common instances of bullying and fighting to rare, but potentially lethal, threats and use of weapons. Literature pertaining to bystanders is reviewed and applied to the school setting. The definition of bystander is expanded, including parents, teachers, and other school staff as well as youths and those who have information about potential violence as well as those who witness its occurrence. Barriers preventing bystanders from taking positive actions are discussed. The authors call on health promotion researchers and practitioners to work with school communities to identify norms, attitudes, and outcome expectancies that shape bystander behaviors to inform prevention efforts.

  17. Bystanders not so innocent after all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, Marcel; Ghilardi, Nico

    2012-06-29

    Interleukin 27 (IL-27) regulates immune responses, including T helper 17 (Th17) cell activity. In this issue of Immunity, Hirahara et al. (2012) demonstrate that IL-27 suppresses Th17 cells in trans through induction of the inhibitory ligand PD-L1 on bystander T cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Radiation-induced bystander effect: the important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideł, Maria; Przybyszewski, Waldemar; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2009-08-18

    potentially harmful or a useful event in radiotherapy. The elevation of damage to tumor cells not directly hit by radiation or the initiation of tumor cell differentiation may increase the therapeutic ratio. If, however, molecular species secreted by irradiated tumor cells in vivo damage neighboring normal cells (epithelial and endothelial cells, fibroblasts, or lymphocytes), the bystander effect would be harmful and could lead to increased side effects in normal tissue. This is especially important in modern radiotherapy, as 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are aimed at diminishing the radiation dose in normal tissues. Recent in vivo studies on animals indicate that bystander effects may appear in organs and tissues remote from the irradiated field and the extension of tissue damage seems to be tissue-type dependent. However, recent experimental results indicate that non-irradiated cells that are neighbors of irradiated cells may diminish radiation damage in the radiation-focused cells. Less is known about the bystander effect during fractionated irradiation. Thus the clinical implications of the bystander effect and its possible modification for radiotherapeutic usefulness is still under debate.

  19. Radiation-induced bystander effect: The important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wideł

    2009-08-01

    bystander effect may be a potentially harmful or a useful event in radiotherapy. The elevation of damage to tumor cells not directly hit by radiation or the initiation of tumor cell differentiation may increase the therapeutic ratio. If, however, molecular species secreted by irradiated tumor cells in vivo damage neighboring normal cells (epithelial and endothelial cells, fi broblasts, or lymphocytes, the bystander effect would be harmful and could lead to increased side effects in normal tissue. This is especially important in modern radiotherapy, as 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT are aimed at diminishing the radiation dose in normal tissues. Recent in vivo studies on animals indicate that bystander effects may appear in organs and tissues remote from the irradiated fi eld and the extension of tissue damage seems to be tissue-type dependent. However, recent experimental results indicate that non-irradiated cells that are neighbors of irradiated cells may diminish radiation damage in the radiation-focused cells. Less is known about the bystander effect during fractionated irradiation. Thus the clinical implications of the bystander effect and its possible modifi cation for radiotherapeutic usefulness is still under debate.

  20. FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF ORGANIC GOAT KID MEAT FROM DAIRY GOAT AND CROSSBRED MEAT GOAT KIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Sophia; Ude, Gracia; Rahmann, Gerold; Aulrich, Karen; Georg, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the increasing demand for dairy goat products in Germany, a market for goat kid meat as a related product does not exist. Thus, the objective of this study was to develop a concept for organic goat kid meat production for dairy goat farms. In collaboration with a wholesaler, organic dairy goat farmers and marketing research the experimental part of this study was to find out if cross-breeding of meat-goats could improve meat quality and performance of fattening goat kids togeth...

  1. Reactivity of eleven anti-human leucocyte monoclonal antibodies with lymphocytes from several domestic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Larsen, Else Bang

    1988-01-01

    Nine commercially available monoclonal antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies from The American Type Culture Collection, raised against various human leucocyte surface antigens, were tested on lymphocytes from cow, sheep, goat, swine, horse, cat, dog, mink, and rabbit as well as man. Four...... antibodies bound to lymphocytes from some of the animals. These were the antibodies against CD8 and CD4 antigen, the antibody to C3b-receptor, and the antibody to the HLA-DR antigen. The CD8 antigen-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink, cat, dog, and sheep, while the CD4 antigen......-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink. The anti-C3b-R antibody reacted with lymphocytes from horse, swine, dog, and cat, and the anti-HLA-DR reacted with lymphocytes from cow, goat, sheep, horse, dog, cat, and mink....

  2. Radiation-induced bystander effects enhanced by elevated sodium chloride through sensitizing cells to bystander factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Lingyan; Han Wei; Chen Shaopeng; Zhao Ye; Jiang Erkang; Bao Lingzhi; Pei Bei; Yang Gen; Zhao Guoping; Wang Jun; Xu An [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China)], E-mail: ljw@ipp.ac.cn

    2008-09-26

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been demonstrated to occur widely in various cell lines. However, very little data is available on the genotoxic effects of RIBE combined with other factor(s). We reported previously that with a low dose of {alpha}-particle irradiation, the fraction of {gamma}-H2AX foci-positive cells in non-irradiated bystander cells was significantly increased under elevated NaCl culture conditions. In this study, we further investigated the functional role of NaCl in the enhancement of RIBE using a specially designed co-culture system and micronucleus (MN) test. It was shown that the MN frequency was not increased significantly by elevated NaCl (9.0 g/L) alone or by medium exposure. However, with 1.0 cGy {alpha}-particle irradiation, the induced MN frequency increased significantly in both irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Additional studies showed that elevated NaCl made the non-irradiated bystander cells more vulnerable to bystander factors. Furthermore, it was found that the induced MN frequency in cells both in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions was weakened when the hypertonic medium was changed to normotonic medium for 2 h before irradiation. Such observations were quite similar to the co-effect of NaCl and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), indicating that elevated NaCl might sensitize non-irradiated cells to bystander factors-induced oxidative stress.

  3. Hemato-biochemical parameters of Pesti-des Petits Ruminants (PPR affected goats in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Bari

    2018-06-01

    Materials and methods: A presumptive diagnosis of PPR was done based on clinical signs and symptoms. A structured record keeping sheet was used for the estimation of prevalence and risk factors of PPR in goat. A total of 103 blood samples were collected randomly and analyzed for hemato–biochemical parameters using automated hemo-analyzer. Results: Out of 103 cases, Black Bengal (59% and young goats aging minimum-12 months (43.85% were recognized as highly susceptible to PPR disease. Strong association was found among all the three factors such as age, breed and sex (RR>1. All the values of hematological parameters such as TEC, TLC, Hb, PCV, and DLC were decreased in PPR affected goat as compared to healthy goats except lymphocyte counts, which was increased significantly (P=0.00. The amount of total protein (3.15 gm/L and albumin (16.88 gm/L were reduced drastically in PPR affected goats. Conclusion: The lymphocyte content in blood was significantly increased where as the total protein and albumin percent were decreased in the goats affected with PPR. Moreover, this variation in blood profile due to PPR virus infected in goat might be a good indicator in this disease diagnosis. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2018; 5(2.000: 211-217

  4. Interview with Alison Goate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goate, Alison

    2008-12-01

    Alison M Goate is the Samuel & Mae S Ludwig Professor of Genetics in Psychiatry, Professor of Genetics and Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis (MO, USA). Dr Goate studied for her undergraduate degree in biochemistry at the University of Bristol (UK) and received her graduate training at Oxford University (UK). She performed postdoctoral studies with Professor Theodore Puck, Professor Louis Lim and Dr John Hardy before receiving a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to support her independent research program at St Mary's Hospital Medical School in London. In 1991, Dr Goate and colleagues reported the first mutation linked to an inherited form of Alzheimer's disease, in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene on chromosome 21. The mutation was found to be linked to inherited cases of early-onset Alzheimer's disease. In 1992, Dr Goate moved to Washington University as an Associate Professor in Genetics and Psychiatry. Dr Goate and colleagues have since identified mutations in four other genes, including two that cause Alzheimer's disease and two that cause the related dementia frontotemporal dementia. In addition to her work on dementia, Dr Goate's laboratory also studies the genetics of alcohol and nicotine dependence. Dr Goate has received numerous awards including the Potamkin Award from the American Academy of Neurology, the Zenith Award from the Alzheimer's Association, the Senior Investigator Award from the Metropolitan Life Foundation, the St Louis Academy of Science Innovation Award and the Carl and Gerty Cori Faculty Achievement Award at Washington University. Dr Goate has been a member of many scientific Review Boards and currently serves on the Editorial Boards of several journals.

  5. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bystander Tactics: Life on Turf in Karachi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Ahmad

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article posits an analytic of the bystander, as a supplement to studies of perpetrators and victims, in relation to political affiliation, mobilization and violence in Karachi. In particular, I use ethnographic findings to elucidate the tactics of anticipation used by Karachi residents of neighborhoods widely considered the turf of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM. The examples of students’ and teachers’ reactions to a college rumble between rival groups, parents’ attempts to keep their sons from being recruited into party politics, and young people confident in their ability to navigate an economy of affiliation demonstrate a range of bystander tactics, in which subjection and subversion are aligned. Although metanarratives of democratization frequently elide the everyday activity of standing by, it constitutes a pervasive mode of participation in Karachi’s political landscape.

  7. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  8. Bystander-witnessed cardiac arrest is associated with reported agonal breathing and leads to less frequent bystander CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkrolf, P; Metelmann, B; Scharte, C; Zarbock, A; Hahnenkamp, K; Bohn, A

    2018-04-18

    Although the importance of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown in multiple studies, the rate of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation is still relatively low in many countries. Little is known on bystanders' perceptions influencing the decision to start cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Our study aims to determine such factors. Semi-structured telephone interviews with bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests between December 2014 and April 2016 were performed in a prospective manner. This single-center survey was conducted in the city of Münster, Germany. The bystander's sex and age, the perception of the victim's breathing and initial condition were correlated with the share of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the corresponding group. 101 telephone interviews were performed with 57 male and 44 female participants showing a mean age of 52.7 (SD ± 16.3). In case of apnoea 38 out of 46 bystanders (82.6%) started cardiopulmonary resuscitation; while in case of descriptions indicating agonal breathing 19 out of 35 bystanders (54.3%) started cardiopulmonary resuscitation (p = .007). If the patient was found unconscious 47 out of 63 bystanders (74.7%) performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation, while in cases of witnessed cardiac arrest 19 out of 38 bystanders (50%) attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (p = .012). Witnessed change of consciousness is an independent factor significantly lowering the probability of starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (regression coefficient -1.489, p bystander-CPR was started. These data reinforce the importance of teaching the recognition of early cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Measuring Bystander Attitudes and Behavior to Prevent Sexual Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Allen, Christopher T.; Postmus, Judy L.; McMahon, Sheila M.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Lowe Hoffman, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to further investigate the factor structure and strength of the Bystander Attitude Scale-Revised and Bystander Behavior Scale-Revised (BAS-R and BBS-R). Participants: First-year students (N = 4,054) at a large public university in the Northeast completed a survey in 2010 as part of a larger longitudinal…

  10. Lipids, atherosclerosis and CVD risk: is CRP an innocent bystander?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Zacho, J

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate recent human studies with respect to the interpretation of whether elevated plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) cause cardiovascular disease (CVD), or whether elevated CRP levels more likely is an innocent bystander. DATA SYNTHESIS: Elevated CRP concentrations...... and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques, and thus simply an innocent bystander in CVD....

  11. The Bystander in Commercial Life : Obliged by Beneficence or Rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbink, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Liberalist thinking argues that moral agents have a right (or duty) to pursue an ordinary life. It also insists that moral agent can be bystanders. A bystander is involved with morally bad states of affairs in the sense that they are bound by moral duty, but for a non-blameworthy reason. A common

  12. Rape Myth Beliefs and Bystander Attitudes among Incoming College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The bystander approach to rape prevention is gaining popularity on college campuses, although research is limited. This study explored bystander attitudes and their relationship with rape myths in a sample of college students. Participants: Surveys from 2,338 incoming undergraduate students at a large, northeastern university were…

  13. Bystander cells enhance NK cytotoxic efficiency by reducing search time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Renping; Schwarz, Karsten; Mangeat, Matthieu; Schwarz, Eva C; Hamed, Mohamed; Bogeski, Ivan; Helms, Volkhard; Rieger, Heiko; Qu, Bin

    2017-03-13

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a central role during innate immune responses by eliminating pathogen-infected or tumorigenic cells. In the microenvironment, NK cells encounter not only target cells but also other cell types including non-target bystander cells. The impact of bystander cells on NK killing efficiency is, however, still elusive. In this study we show that the presence of bystander cells, such as P815, monocytes or HUVEC, enhances NK killing efficiency. With bystander cells present, the velocity and persistence of NK cells were increased, whereas the degranulation of lytic granules remained unchanged. Bystander cell-derived H 2 O 2 was found to mediate the acceleration of NK cell migration. Using mathematical diffusion models, we confirm that local acceleration of NK cells in the vicinity of bystander cells reduces their search time to locate target cells. In addition, we found that integrin β chains (β1, β2 and β7) on NK cells are required for bystander-enhanced NK migration persistence. In conclusion, we show that acceleration of NK cell migration in the vicinity of H 2 O 2 -producing bystander cells reduces target cell search time and enhances NK killing efficiency.

  14. The bystander effect in an N-person dictator game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panchanathan, K.; Frankenhuis, W.E.; Silk, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Dozens of studies show that bystanders are less likely to help victims as bystander number increases. However, these studies model one particular situation, in which victims need only one helper. Using a multi-player dictator game, we study a different but common situation, in which a recipient’s

  15. Bystander Approaches: Empowering Students to Model Ethical Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Annette; Fleming, Wm. Michael

    2005-01-01

    Sexual violence on college campuses is well documented. Prevention education has emerged as an alternative to victim-- and perpetrator--oriented approaches used in the past. One sexual violence prevention education approach focuses on educating and empowering the bystander to become a point of ethical intervention. In this model, bystanders to…

  16. When bystanders become bothersome : The negative consequences of bystander conflict and the moderating role of resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, Kim J.P.M.; Rispens, Sonja; Gevers, Josette M.P.; Demerouti, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Bystander conflict is a situation in which employees are hindered in their work by parties not involved in the primary process. Public service employees and emergency care workers, such as ambulance employees and firefighters, often encounter this kind of conflict with potentially far-reaching

  17. When bystanders become bothersome : the negative consequences of bystander conflict and the moderating role of resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, Kim; Rispens, Sonja; Gevers, Josette M.P.; Demerouti, Evangelia

    2014-01-01

    Bystander conflict is a situation in which employees are hindered in their work by parties not involved in the primary process. Public service employees and emergency care workers, such as ambulance employees and firefighters, often encounter this kind of conflict with potentially far-reaching

  18. The lonely bystander: ostracism leads to less helping in virtual bystander situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, Marco; van Prooijen, Jan-Willem; Elffers, Henk; van Lange, Paul A.M.

    2016-01-01

    People are less likely to help when they have been ostracized, or when they are in the presence of bystanders. In the current manuscript we test both these influences simultaneously. We postulated two opposing hypotheses: first, helping decreases after ostracism, even when intervention is already

  19. The bystander effect: is reactive oxygen species the driver?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumiel, I.

    2003-01-01

    The paper reviews selected examples of the bystander effect, such as clonogenic survival decrease, chromosomal aberrations and mutations. The similarities and differences between the biological effects in directly targeted and bystander cells are briefly discussed. Also reviewed are the experimental data which support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially *O 2 - , as mediators of the bystander effect. Endogenously generated ROS, due to activation of NAD(P)H oxidases, play a kay role in the introduction of DNA damage in bystander cells. All the observed effects in bystander cells, such as alteration in gene expression patterns, chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, mutations, genome instability and neoplastic transformation are the consequence of DNA damage. (author)

  20. Non-targeted bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects refer to those responses occurring in cells that were not subject to energy deposition events following ionizing radiation. These bystander cells may have been neighbors of irradiated cells, or physically separated but subject to soluble secreted signals from irradiated cells. Bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in vivo and for various radiation qualities. In tribute to an old friend and colleague, Anthony V. Carrano, who would have said 'well what are the critical questions that should be addressed, and so what?', we review the evidence for non-targeted radiation-induced bystander effects with emphasis on prevailing questions in this rapidly developing research field, and the potential significance of bystander effects in evaluating the detrimental health effects of radiation exposure

  1. Glioma in a goat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, C.L.; Weinstock, D.; Kramer, R.W.; Bagley, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    An adult goat was examined because of behavioral changes and circling. Results of neurologic examination, CSF analysis, hematologic evaluation, and computed tomography of the brain were suggestive of an intra-axial mass. The goat was euthanatized because of worsening neurologic condition and poor prognosis. Necropsy revealed a large mass in the right cerebral hemisphere and caudal brain herniation through the foramen magnum. The mass was diagnosed as a glioma, with oligodendrocyte differentiation. Results of immunohistochemical evaluation were compatible with a malignant, poorly differentiated tumor

  2. The Bystander-Effect: A Meta-Analytic Review on Bystander Intervention in Dangerous and Non-Dangerous Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Krueger, Joachim I.; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Vogrincic, Claudia; Kastenmuller, Andreas; Frey, Dieter; Heene, Moritz; Wicher, Magdalena; Kainbacher, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Research on bystander intervention has produced a great number of studies showing that the presence of other people in a critical situation reduces the likelihood that an individual will help. As the last systematic review of bystander research was published in 1981 and was not a quantitative meta-analysis in the modern sense, the present…

  3. 7 CFR 65.150 - Goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.150 Goat. Goat means meat produced from goats. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Goat. 65.150 Section 65.150 Agriculture Regulations of...

  4. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: foe or innocent bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jia; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) remain one the most important pathogens infecting children and they are one of the main causes of persistent diarrhea worldwide. Historically, typical EPEC (tEPEC), defined as those isolates with the attaching and effacement (A/E) genotype (eae+), which possess bfpA+ and lack the stx- genes are found strongly associated with diarrheal cases. However, occurrence of atypical EPEC (aEPEC; eae+ bfpA- stx-) in diarrheal and asymptomatic hosts has made investigators question the role of these pathogens in human disease. Current epidemiological data is helping answering the question whether EPEC is mainly a foe or an innocent bystander during infection. PMID:25726041

  5. Kudzu -- Goat Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Mount

    1994-01-01

    Researchers at Tuskegee University have joined together to study the impact of grazing Angora goats on kudzu (Pueraria lobata). A pilot project funded by the Southern Forest Experiment Station of the USDA Forest Service was started in 1990. The problem was to find an environmentally acceptable way to control and eradicate kudzu in forest situations...

  6. Brock Cole's The Goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Pat

    1997-01-01

    Summarizes Brock Cole's novel for young adolescents: "The Goats." Provides discussion questions and classroom activities in language arts, drama, research; mathematics, creative writing, similes; and presents an annotated bibliography of fiction for young adolescents dealing with runaways, self-reliance, family, friendship, courage, overweight,…

  7. Radiation-induced bystander effects in vivo are sex specific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koturbash, Igor; Kutanzi, Kristy; Hendrickson, Karl; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Kogosov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) effects span beyond the area of direct exposure and can be observed in neighboring and distant naive cells and organs. This phenomenon is termed a 'bystander effect'. IR effects in directly exposed tissue in vivo are epigenetically mediated and distinct in males and females. Yet, IR-induced bystander effects have never been explored in a sex-specificity domain. We used an in vivo mouse model, whereby the bystander effects are studied in spleen of male and female animals subjected to head exposure when the rest of the body is protected by a medical-grade lead shield. We analyzed the induction of DNA damage and alterations in global DNA methylation. Molecular parameters were correlated with cellular proliferation and apoptosis levels. The changes observed in bystander organs are compared to the changes in unexposed animals and animals exposed to predicted and measured scatter doses. We have found the selective induction of DNA damage levels, global DNA methylation, cell proliferation and apoptosis in exposed and bystander spleen tissue of male and female mice. Sex differences were significantly diminished in animals subjected to a surgical removal of gonads. These data constitute the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced bystander effects in mouse spleen in vivo. We show the role of sex hormones in spleen bystander responses and discuss implications of the observed changes

  8. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  9. Bystander effects and their implications for clinical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, Alastair J

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as those biological effects expressed, after irradiation, by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. Radiation oncologists are only gradually beginning to appreciate the clinical relevance of radiation-induced bystander effects and associated phenomena: adaptive responses, genomic instability and abscopal effects. Incorporating bystander effects into the science underpinning clinical radiotherapy will involve moving beyond simple mechanistic models and towards a more systems-based approach. It is, given the protean nature of bystander effects, difficult to devise a coherent research strategy to investigate the clinical impact and relevance of bystander phenomena. Epidemiological approaches will be required, the traditional research models based on randomised controlled trials are unlikely to be adequate for the task. Any consideration of bystander effects challenges not only clinicians' preconceptions concerning the effects of radiation on tumours and normal tissues but also their ingenuity. This review covers, from a clinical perspective, the issues and problems associated with radiation-induced bystander effects.

  10. Radiation-induced bystander effects in vivo are sex specific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koturbash, Igor; Kutanzi, Kristy; Hendrickson, Karl; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Kogosov, Dmitry [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Kovalchuk, Olga [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada)], E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca

    2008-07-03

    Ionizing radiation (IR) effects span beyond the area of direct exposure and can be observed in neighboring and distant naive cells and organs. This phenomenon is termed a 'bystander effect'. IR effects in directly exposed tissue in vivo are epigenetically mediated and distinct in males and females. Yet, IR-induced bystander effects have never been explored in a sex-specificity domain. We used an in vivo mouse model, whereby the bystander effects are studied in spleen of male and female animals subjected to head exposure when the rest of the body is protected by a medical-grade lead shield. We analyzed the induction of DNA damage and alterations in global DNA methylation. Molecular parameters were correlated with cellular proliferation and apoptosis levels. The changes observed in bystander organs are compared to the changes in unexposed animals and animals exposed to predicted and measured scatter doses. We have found the selective induction of DNA damage levels, global DNA methylation, cell proliferation and apoptosis in exposed and bystander spleen tissue of male and female mice. Sex differences were significantly diminished in animals subjected to a surgical removal of gonads. These data constitute the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced bystander effects in mouse spleen in vivo. We show the role of sex hormones in spleen bystander responses and discuss implications of the observed changes.

  11. Radiation-induced bystander effects in vivo are sex specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koturbash, Igor; Kutanzi, Kristy; Hendrickson, Karl; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Kogosov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-07-03

    Ionizing radiation (IR) effects span beyond the area of direct exposure and can be observed in neighboring and distant naïve cells and organs. This phenomenon is termed a 'bystander effect'. IR effects in directly exposed tissue in vivo are epigenetically mediated and distinct in males and females. Yet, IR-induced bystander effects have never been explored in a sex-specificity domain. We used an in vivo mouse model, whereby the bystander effects are studied in spleen of male and female animals subjected to head exposure when the rest of the body is protected by a medical-grade lead shield. We analyzed the induction of DNA damage and alterations in global DNA methylation. Molecular parameters were correlated with cellular proliferation and apoptosis levels. The changes observed in bystander organs are compared to the changes in unexposed animals and animals exposed to predicted and measured scatter doses. We have found the selective induction of DNA damage levels, global DNA methylation, cell proliferation and apoptosis in exposed and bystander spleen tissue of male and female mice. Sex differences were significantly diminished in animals subjected to a surgical removal of gonads. These data constitute the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced bystander effects in mouse spleen in vivo. We show the role of sex hormones in spleen bystander responses and discuss implications of the observed changes.

  12. Obstacles to bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, K; Taniguchi, T; Yoshida, M; Yamamoto, K

    2000-05-01

    bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is performed infrequently in Japan. We conducted this study to identify Japanese attitudes toward the performance of bystander CPR. participants were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with varying scenarios and CPR techniques (mouth-to-mouth ventilation plus chest compression (MMV plus CC) versus chest compression alone (CC)). a total of 1302/1355 individuals completed the questionnaire, including high school students, teachers, emergency medical technicians, medical nurses, and medical students. About 2% of high school students, 3% of teachers, 26% of emergency medical technicians, 3% of medical nurses and 16% of medical students claimed they would 'definitely' perform MMV plus CC on a stranger. However, 21-72% claimed they would prefer the alternative of performing CC alone. Respondents claimed their unwillingness to perform MMV is not due to the fear of contracting a communicable disease, but the lack of confidence in their ability to perform CPR properly. in all categories of respondents, willingness to perform MMV plus CC for a stranger was disappointingly low. Better training in MMV together with teaching awareness that CC alone can be given should be instituted to maximize the number of potential providers of CPR in the community, even in communities where the incidence of HIV is very low.

  13. Genetic Signatures of HIV-1 Envelope-mediated Bystander Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anjali; Lee, Raphael T. C.; Mohl, Jonathan; Sedano, Melina; Khong, Wei Xin; Ng, Oon Tek; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Garg, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    The envelope (Env) glycoprotein of HIV is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence support the role of HIV-1 Env in inducing bystander apoptosis that may be a contributing factor in CD4+ T cell loss. However, most of the studies testing this phenomenon have been conducted with laboratory-adapted HIV-1 isolates. This raises the question of whether primary Envs derived from HIV-infected patients are capable of inducing bystander apoptosis and whether specific Env signatures are associated with this phenomenon. We developed a high throughput assay to determine the bystander apoptosis inducing activity of a panel of primary Envs. We tested 38 different Envs for bystander apoptosis, virion infectivity, neutralizing antibody sensitivity, and putative N-linked glycosylation sites along with a comprehensive sequence analysis to determine if specific sequence signatures within the viral Env are associated with bystander apoptosis. Our studies show that primary Envs vary considerably in their bystander apoptosis-inducing potential, a phenomenon that correlates inversely with putative N-linked glycosylation sites and positively with virion infectivity. By use of a novel phylogenetic analysis that avoids subtype bias coupled with structural considerations, we found specific residues like Arg-476 and Asn-425 that were associated with differences in bystander apoptosis induction. A specific role of these residues was also confirmed experimentally. These data demonstrate for the first time the potential of primary R5 Envs to mediate bystander apoptosis in CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we identify specific genetic signatures within the Env that may be associated with the bystander apoptosis-inducing phenotype. PMID:24265318

  14. Bystander effect induced by ionizing radiation and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Tu Yu

    2009-01-01

    An indirect effect induced by ionizing radiation called bystander effect is being highly concentrated. Many domestic and foreign researchers have verified the existence of bystander effect and have got more understanding of the mechanism with advanced detection techniques and methods. So far, the research about it has expanded from a single cell to multiple cells, from the in vitro to the whole, and has extended to in vivo from in vitro, which provides powerful evidence to explain how bystander effects happen and the regulation mechanism and especially gives scientific evidence to clinical radiation oncology application in the future. (authors)

  15. Goat for Azazel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwester Jędrzejewski

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The rite included in Leviticus 16 belongs to penitential rites of purification. It may be a reminiscence of antic religious medical-magic rites, practiced in multiple regions of ancient world. The rites contained the idea of substitution, “magic elimination.” Sending the goat represents rejection of anything that should not and can not exist among the people of Israel. The desert as an “infertile” place, the theological idea of separating the good from the evil as well as the ancient idea of substitution point at the theology of penance expressed in the rite of separation. The text of Leviticus 16 applies the term sa‘ir for the goat. The same term is also applied in priestly text to describe demons relating to the misshapen form of Israel religion. There is an undoubted connection with the idea of Convenant that constitutes the basic background and point of reference for the rite of Leviticus 16.

  16. Are nonparticipants in prosocial behavior merely innocent bystanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Ashley E; Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Latané and Darley's (1970) bystander intervention theory was used to model individuals' participation in two prosocial behaviors (organ donation, green living). It is argued that nonparticipants in prosocial helping are innocent bystanders who likely fail to notice the need, do not interpret the cause as an emergency, do not accept responsibility for the need to help, and have little knowledge on how to help. Data in study 1 (n = 494) indicate support for the proposed innocent bystander path model (notice event → interpret event as emergency → accept responsibility → knowledge of how to help) in organ donation. Study 2 (n = 519) replicated the model in the context of green living and additionally found a direct path from noticing the event to knowledge of how to help. Implications of framing nonparticipation in prosocial behaviors as innocent bystander effects are discussed in context of campaign communication.

  17. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Erkang; Wu Lijun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy α-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)- 4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose α-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). (ion beam bioengineering)

  18. Computer modelling of radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostunov, Igor K.; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2002-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects are now well established consequences of exposure of living cells to ionising radiation. It has been observed that cells not directly hit by radiation tracks may still exhibit radiation effects. We present a quantitative modelling of the radiation-induced bystander effect based on a diffusion model of spreading the bystander signal. The model assumes the bystander factor to be a protein of low molecular weight, given out by the hit cell, diffusing in the medium and reacting with non-hit cells. The model calculations successfully predict the results of cell survival in an irradiated conditioned medium. The model predicts the shape of dose-effect relationship for cell survival and oncogenic transformation induced by broad-beam and micro-beam irradiation by alpha-particles. (author)

  19. ATR-dependent bystander effects in non-targeted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, S.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Radiation induced non-targeted bystander effects have been reported for a range of endpoints including the induction of γH2AX foci which serve as a marker for DNA double strand breaks. We have recently reported the induction of γH2AX foci in non-targeted bystander cells up to 48 hours after irradiation and the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TGF-beta 1 in the induction of γH2AX foci (Oncogene (2007) 26:993-1002). Here, we wanted to determine the role of the PI3-like kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in DNA damage signalling in bystander cells. Conditioned medium from T98G cells irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays was transferred onto non-irradiated cells that were subsequently analysed for the induction of γH2AX, ATR and 53BP1 foci as well as clonogenic survival. Irradiated T98G glioma cells generated signals that induced γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in cells treated with the conditioned medium from irradiated cells. These foci co-localised with ATR foci. Inhibition of ATM and DNA-PK could not suppress the induction of bystander γH2AX foci whereas the mutation of ATR in Seckel cells abrogated bystander foci induction. A restriction of bystander foci to the S-phase of the cell cycle both in T98G cells and in ATR- proficient fibroblasts was observed. These results identify ATR as a central player within the bystander signalling cascade leading to γH2AX and 53BP1 foci formation, and suggest a mechanism of DNA damage induction in non-targeted cells. Further investigations have shown decreased clonogenic cell survival in bystander T98G and ATR wild-type fibroblasts. ATR mutated Seckel cells and also ATM-/- fibroblasts were resistant to this effect suggesting a role for both ATR and ATM in the bystander signalling cascade with regard to cell survival. Taken together, these observations support a hypothesis of DNA damage-induced accumulation of stalled replication forks in bystander cells which are subsequently processed by

  20. Significance and nature of bystander responses induced by various agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neha; Tiku, Ashu Bhan

    2017-07-01

    Bystander effects in a biological system are the responses shown by non-targeted neighbouring cells/tissues/organisms. These responses are triggered by factors released from targeted cells when exposed to a stress inducing agent. The biological response to stress inducing agents is complex, owing to the diversity of mechanisms and pathways activated in directly targeted and bystander cells. These responses are highly variable and can be either beneficial or hazardous depending on the cell lines tested, dose of agent used, experimental end points and time course selected. Recently non-targeted cells have even been reported to rescue the directly exposed cells by releasing protective signals that might be induced by non-targeted bystander responses. The nature of bystander signal/s is not yet clear. However, there are evidences suggesting involvement of ROS, RNS, protein factors and even DNA molecules leading to the activation of a number of signaling pathways. These can act independently or in a cascade, to induce events leading to changes in gene expression patterns that could elicit detrimental or beneficial effects. Many review articles on radiation induced bystander responses have been published. However, to the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive review on bystander responses induced by other genotoxic chemicals and stress inducing agents has not been published so far. Therefore, the aim of the present review is to give an overview of the literature on different aspects of bystander responses: agents that induce these responses, factors that can modulate bystander responses and the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Guidelines for Bystander First Aid 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Jen Heng

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac life support is a form of first aid for cardiac emergencies. However, research and evidence in this field is lacking compared with other forms of first aid. Having identified the common emergencies that are encountered in the hospital, based on the available evidence, we have put together what could be an evidence-based approach to the first aid management of some of these common emergencies, viz. breathlessness, chest pain, allergies, stroke, heat injury, poisoning, unconsciousness, seizures, and trauma situations such as bleeding, wounds, contusions, head injury, burns and fractures. Educating the public is the key to developing a first responder bystander. These guidelines could become the basis for training of the public. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  2. Public Knowledge and Attitudes towards Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of bystander CPR is much lower in China than in developed countries. This survey was implemented to assess the current status of layperson CPR training, to analyze the willingness of bystanders to perform CPR, and to identify barriers to improving bystander CPR rates. The questionnaire included individual information, current status of bystander CPR training, and individual’s willingness and attitude towards performing CPR. There were 25.6% laypersons who took CPR training. The majority (98.6% of laypersons would perform CPR on their family members, but fewer laypersons (76.3% were willing to perform CPR on strangers. Most respondents (53.2% were worried about legal issues. If laws were implemented to protect bystanders who give aid, the number of laypersons who were not willing to perform CPR on strangers dropped from 23.7% to 2.4%. An increasing number of people in China know CPR compared with the situation in the past. CPR training in China is much less common than in many developed countries. The barriers are that laypersons are not well-trained and they fear being prosecuted for unsuccessful CPR. More accredited CPR training courses are needed in China. The laws should be passed to protect bystanders who provide assistance.

  3. Significance of radiation-induced bystander effects in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Since 1994, a Phase I/II clinical study and radiotherapy have carried out using carbon-ion beams produced with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Now we constructed the new treatment facility for the advanced carbon-ion therapy at HIMAC applying a 3D fast spot scanning system with pencil beams. In the field of fundamental biological studies for high-LET heavy ions, there are some reports regarding bystander effects after exposure to alpha particles derived from 238 Pu or He-ion microbeams. However, only limited sets of studies have examined bystander effects after exposure to different ion species heavier than helium, such as carbon ions. We have been investigating bystander cellular responses in both normal human and human tumor cells irradiated with the HIMAC carbon ions. Bystander cell-killing effect was observed in the cells harboring wild-type P53 gene, but not in the P53-mutated cells. Moreover, observed bystander effect was suppressed by treating with a specific inhibitor of gap-junction mediated cell-cell communication. There is clear evidence that the carbon-ion irradiation enables the enhanced cell killing in cells with wild-type P53 gene via gap-junction mediated bystander effect. (author)

  4. The positive bystander effect: passive bystanders increase helping in situations with high expected negative consequences for the helper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Greitemeyer, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The present field study investigated the interplay between the presence of a passive bystander (not present versus present) in a simulated bike theft and expected negative consequences (low versus high) in predicting intervention behavior when no physical victim is present. It was found that an additional bystander increases individual intervention in situations where the expected negative consequences for the helper in case of intervention were high (i.e., when the bike thief looks fierce) compared to situations where the expected negative consequences for the helper were low (i.e., when the bike thief does not look fierce). In contrast, no such effect for high vs. low expected negative consequences was observed when no additional bystander observed the critical situation. The results are discussed in light of previous laboratory findings on expected negative consequences and bystander intervention.

  5. The Goat in the Rug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Charles L.; Link, Martin

    Based on the activities of the real Window Rock weaver, Glenmae, and her goat, Geraldine, this illustrated story incorporates authentic details relative to the Navajo art of rug weaving and is designed for children aged four to eight. Capitalizing on the humor inherent in Geraldine's point of view, the story centers on the goat's observation of…

  6. Bystander effects and biota: implications of radiation-induced bystander effects for protection of the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothersill, C.E.; Seymour, C.B.

    2003-01-01

    Bystander effects are now known to be induced by both high and low LET in a variety of cells in culture. They have been proven to occur in vivo in mice following 0.5Gy total body irradiation and in blood from humans being treated for cancer by radiotherapy. Effects have also been detected in fish, crustacea and molluscs. The important questions now are not whether bystander effects occur but why and what implications they have, if any, for radiation protection. Different species and different genetic backgrounds within a species produce different types of bystander effect, different organs also produce different effects. This paper will review the data in this field and will discuss likely implications for protection of man and non-human biota. In particular it will look at the potential long-term outcomes for different organisational levels, from cell to ecosystem, of bystander mechanisms. In view of new concerns about the effects of low level radiation on non-human biota, emphasis will be placed on considering how bystander effects might operate at chronic low doses versus acute accidental low doses. Problems of radiation interaction with chemicals, whether chemicals can also induce 'bystander effects' , and how regulators might handle these situations which occur all the time in real environments, will be presented for discussion. Finally the paper will discuss likely implications of these mechanisms for evolutionary biology

  7. 7 CFR 65.165 - Ground goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground goat. 65.165 Section 65.165 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.165 Ground goat. Ground goat means comminuted...

  8. A cytogenetic study of Korean native goat bred in the nuclear power plant using the micronucleus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang-Mo; Ji, Young-Hoon; Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Se-Ra; Kim, Jong-Choon; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2005-01-01

    Cytogenetic and hematological analysis was performed on the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) obtained from Korean native goats bred in two nuclear power plants (Wolsong and Uljin) and a control area. The frequencies of gamma-ray-induced micronuclei (MN) in the cytokinesis-blocked (CB) lymphocytes at several doses were measured in three Korean native goats. The measurements performed after irradiation showed dose-related increases in the MN frequency in each of the donors. The results were analyzed using a linear-quadratic model with a line of best fit of y=0.1019D+0.0045D 2 +0.0093 (y=number of MN/GB cells and D=irradiation dose in Gy). The MN rates in the goats from the Wolsong and Uljin nuclear power plant, and the control area were 9.60±2.88, 6.83±1.47 and 9.88±4.32 per 1,000 CB lymphocytes, respectively. The apparent difference is not statistically significant. The MN frequencies of PBLs from goats bred in three areas means that the values are within the background variation in this experiment. The MN frequencies and hematological values were similar regardless of whether the goats were bred in the nuclear power plant or the control area. (author)

  9. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is used for painful and enlarged lymph nodes. Blood transfusions or platelet transfusions may be required if blood ... unexplained fatigue, bruising, excessive sweating, or weight loss. Alternative ... Leukemia - chronic lymphocytic (CLL); Blood cancer - chronic lymphocytic leukemia; Bone marrow cancer - chronic ...

  10. Bystander effects: intercellular transmission of radiation damage signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.B.; Azzam, E.I.; Toledo, S.M. de; Nagasawa, H

    2002-07-01

    Biological effects were examined in confluent cultures of fibroblasts and epithelial cells exposed to very low mean doses of alpha radiation, doses by which only 1-2% of the cells were actually traversed by an alpha particle. Enhanced frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges and HPRT mutations occurred in the non-irradiation, 'bystander' cells associated with a similar increase in the frequency of micronuclei, indicating the induction of DNA damage in these cells. In order to gain information concerning molecular pathways, changes in gene expression were examined in bystander cells by western analysis and in situ immunofluorescence staining. The expression levels of p53, p21 and MDM2 were significantly modulated in bystander cells: the damage signals leading to these changes were transmitted from irradiated to bystander cells by gap junction mediated intracellular communication. The bystander response was suppressed by incubation with superoxide dismutase as well as an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, suggesting the effect may be mediated by oxidative stress. To examine other signalling pathways responsive to oxidative stress, the activation of stress-related kinases and their downstream transcription factors were analysed in bystander cells by western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays: a 2-4 fold increase in the phosphorylation levels of JNK, EPK1/2, p90RSK, Elk-1 and ATF2 was observed. These changes were detected by 15 min after irradiation and persisted for at least 1 h. These findings indicate the activation of multiple signal transduction pathways in bystander cells, involving signals arising from the plasma membrane as well as from DNA damage. (author)

  11. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  12. Radioprotection of targeted and bystander cells by methylproamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Smith, Andrea; Lobachevsky, Pavel; Martin, Roger; Prise, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Radioprotective agents are of interest for application in radiotherapy for cancer and in public health medicine in the context of accidental radiation exposure. Methylproamine is the lead compound of a class of radioprotectors which act as DNA binding anti-oxidants, enabling the repair of transient radiation-induced oxidative DNA lesions. This study tested methylproamine for the radioprotection of both directly targeted and bystander cells. T98G glioma cells were treated with 15 μM methylproamine and exposed to 137 Cs γ-ray/X-ray irradiation and He 2+ microbeam irradiation. Radioprotection of directly targeted cells and bystander cells was measured by clonogenic survival or γH2AX assay. Radioprotection of directly targeted T98G cells by methylproamine was observed for 137 Cs γ-rays and X-rays but not for He 2+ charged particle irradiation. The effect of methylproamine on the bystander cell population was tested for both X-ray irradiation and He 2+ ion microbeam irradiation. The X-ray bystander experiments were carried out by medium transfer from irradiated to non-irradiated cultures and three experimental designs were tested. Radioprotection was only observed when recipient cells were pretreated with the drug prior to exposure to the conditioned medium. In microbeam bystander experiments targeted and nontargeted cells were co-cultured with continuous methylproamine treatment during irradiation and postradiation incubation; radioprotection of bystander cells was observed. Methylproamine protected targeted cells from DNA damage caused by γ-ray or X-ray radiation but not He 2+ ion radiation. Protection of bystander cells was independent of the type of radiation which the donor population received. (orig.) [de

  13. Up-regulation of ROS by mitochondria-dependent bystander signaling contributes to genotoxicity of bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shaopeng; Zhao Ye; Zhao Guoping; Han Wei; Bao Lingzhi; Yu, K.N.; Wu Lijun

    2009-01-01

    Genomic instability can be observed in bystander cells. However, the underlying mechanism(s) is still relatively unclear. In a previous study, we found that irradiated cells released mitochondria-dependent intracellular factor(s) which could lead to bystander γ-H2AX induction. In this paper, we used normal (ρ + ) and mtDNA-depleted (ρ 0 ) human-hamster hybrid cells to investigate mitochondrial effects on the genotoxicity in bystander effect through medium transfer experiments. Through the detection of DNA double-strand breaks with γ-H2AX, we found that the fraction of γ-H2AX positive cells changed with time when irradiation conditioned cell medium (ICCM) were harvested. ICCM harvested from irradiated ρ + cells at 10 min post-irradiation (ρ + ICCM 10min ) caused larger increases of bystander γ-H2AX induction comparing to ρ 0 ICCM 10min , which only caused a slight increase of bystander γ-H2AX induction. The ρ + ICCM 10min could also result in the up-regulation of ROS production (increased by 35% at 10 min), while there was no significant increase in cells treated with ρ 0 ICCM 10min . We treated cells with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the scavenger of ROS, and quenched γ-H2AX induction by ρ + ICCM. Furthermore, after the medium had been transferred and the cells were continuously cultured for 7 days, we found significantly increased CD59 - gene loci mutation (increased by 45.9%) and delayed cell death in the progeny of ρ + ICCM-treated bystander cells. In conclusion, the work presented here suggested that up-regulation of the mitochondria-dependent ROS might be very important in mediating genotoxicity of bystander effects.

  14. Up-regulation of ROS by mitochondria-dependent bystander signaling contributes to genotoxicity of bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shaopeng [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Zhao Ye; Zhao Guoping [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Bao Lingzhi [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun, E-mail: ljw@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2009-06-18

    Genomic instability can be observed in bystander cells. However, the underlying mechanism(s) is still relatively unclear. In a previous study, we found that irradiated cells released mitochondria-dependent intracellular factor(s) which could lead to bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction. In this paper, we used normal ({rho}{sup +}) and mtDNA-depleted ({rho}{sup 0}) human-hamster hybrid cells to investigate mitochondrial effects on the genotoxicity in bystander effect through medium transfer experiments. Through the detection of DNA double-strand breaks with {gamma}-H2AX, we found that the fraction of {gamma}-H2AX positive cells changed with time when irradiation conditioned cell medium (ICCM) were harvested. ICCM harvested from irradiated {rho}{sup +} cells at 10 min post-irradiation ({rho}{sup +} ICCM{sub 10min}) caused larger increases of bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction comparing to {rho}{sup 0} ICCM{sub 10min}, which only caused a slight increase of bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction. The {rho}{sup +} ICCM{sub 10min} could also result in the up-regulation of ROS production (increased by 35% at 10 min), while there was no significant increase in cells treated with {rho}{sup 0} ICCM{sub 10min}. We treated cells with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the scavenger of ROS, and quenched {gamma}-H2AX induction by {rho}{sup +} ICCM. Furthermore, after the medium had been transferred and the cells were continuously cultured for 7 days, we found significantly increased CD59{sup -} gene loci mutation (increased by 45.9%) and delayed cell death in the progeny of {rho}{sup +} ICCM-treated bystander cells. In conclusion, the work presented here suggested that up-regulation of the mitochondria-dependent ROS might be very important in mediating genotoxicity of bystander effects.

  15. Radioprotection of targeted and bystander cells by methylproamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom); Oxford University Hospitals, Cellular Pathology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Smith, Andrea; Lobachevsky, Pavel; Martin, Roger [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Prise, Kevin M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-23

    Radioprotective agents are of interest for application in radiotherapy for cancer and in public health medicine in the context of accidental radiation exposure. Methylproamine is the lead compound of a class of radioprotectors which act as DNA binding anti-oxidants, enabling the repair of transient radiation-induced oxidative DNA lesions. This study tested methylproamine for the radioprotection of both directly targeted and bystander cells. T98G glioma cells were treated with 15 μM methylproamine and exposed to {sup 137}Cs γ-ray/X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} microbeam irradiation. Radioprotection of directly targeted cells and bystander cells was measured by clonogenic survival or γH2AX assay. Radioprotection of directly targeted T98G cells by methylproamine was observed for {sup 137}Cs γ-rays and X-rays but not for He{sup 2+} charged particle irradiation. The effect of methylproamine on the bystander cell population was tested for both X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} ion microbeam irradiation. The X-ray bystander experiments were carried out by medium transfer from irradiated to non-irradiated cultures and three experimental designs were tested. Radioprotection was only observed when recipient cells were pretreated with the drug prior to exposure to the conditioned medium. In microbeam bystander experiments targeted and nontargeted cells were co-cultured with continuous methylproamine treatment during irradiation and postradiation incubation; radioprotection of bystander cells was observed. Methylproamine protected targeted cells from DNA damage caused by γ-ray or X-ray radiation but not He{sup 2+} ion radiation. Protection of bystander cells was independent of the type of radiation which the donor population received. (orig.) [German] Radioprotektive Agenzien sind sowohl in der Strahlentherapie von Krebserkrankungen als auch im Strahlenschutz im Zusammenhang mit akzidenteller Exposition von Bedeutung. Methylproamine ist die Leitsubstanz einer Klasse von

  16. Beyond the Situational Model: Bystander Action Consequences to Intervening in Situations Involving Sexual Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschella, Elizabeth A; Bennett, Sidney; Banyard, Victoria L

    2016-03-02

    Sexual violence is a widely reported problem in college communities. To date, research has largely focused on bystander intervention as one way to help prevent this problem. Although perceived consequences of bystander intervention, such as the weighting of costs and benefits, have been examined, little research has explored what happens after a bystander intervenes. The current study investigated what bystanders report as perceived outcomes and actual consequences of their bystander actions in response to risk for sexual assault. Of the 545 surveyed, 150 reported having taking bystander action in the past month and qualitatively described their bystander behavior and the responses of those parties involved. A range of behavioral responses and intervention methods were identified. The most frequent responses reported by participants were victims conveying positive and perpetrators conveying negative responses. Different types of helping were associated with bystanders reporting different types of responses to their actions. Future research should incorporate additional measures of consequences of bystander intervention. Implications for policy and bystander intervention programs are discussed, stressing the need for bystander intervention programs to address a range of bystander behaviors and explain the potential consequences and risks of intervening. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Multi-Dose Bystander Intervention Program Using Peer Education Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Winter, Samantha C.; Palmer, Jane E.; Postmus, Judy L.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Zucker, Sharon; Koenick, RuthAnne

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings from a longitudinal, experimental evaluation of a peer education theater program, Students Challenging Realities and Educating Against Myths (SCREAM) Theater. This study examines the impact of SCREAM Theater on a range of bystander-related outcomes (i.e. bystander intentions, bystander efficacy, perception of friend…

  18. Promoting Prosocial Behaviors to Prevent Dating Violence among College Students: Evaluation of a Bystander Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsky, Amanda E.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation was to evaluate a bystander behavior program at the Jefferson College of Health Sciences (JCHS) in Roanoke, Virginia. Specifically, this dissertation examined the: (1) preliminary measurement properties of a newly developed bystander behavior intention scale; (2) impact of the bystander intervention at JCHS; and…

  19. LGBT Discrimination on Campus and Heterosexual Bystanders: Understanding Intentions to Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessel, Adrienne B.; Goodman, Kevin D.; Woodford, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Discrimination targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students on college campuses occurs. Bystander intervention is important in supporting targeted students and improving campus climate for LGBT students. Peer-familiarity context (i.e., who the bystander knows in the situation) can play a role in bystander intervention, but…

  20. Adolescent Bystander Behavior in the School and Online Environments and the Implications for Interventions Targeting Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Lisa J.; Allan, Alfred; Cross, Donna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to add to the emerging knowledge about the role of bystanders in cyberbullying. To differentiate online versus offline bystander behaviors, 292 Australian children (mean age = 15.2; female = 54.4%) reviewed hypothetical scenarios experimentally manipulated by bystander sex, relationship to target and perpetrator, and…

  1. Nitric oxide mediated bystander responses induced by microbeam targeted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, C.; Prise, K.M.; Folkard, M.; Michael, B.D.

    2003-01-01

    Considerable evidence has recently been accumulated in support of the existence of a 'bystander effect', which cells having received no irradiation show biological consequences from their vicinal irradiated cells. The application of microbeams is providing new insights into the radiation-induced bystander effect. The present study found that when a fraction of radioresistant human glioblastoma cells were individually targeted with a precise number of helium ions generated from the Gray Cancer Institute Charged Particle Microbeam, micronucleus (MN) induction significantly exceeded the expected value that was calculated from the number of MN observed when all of the cells were targeted assuming no bystander effect occurring. Even when only a single cell within a population was hit by one helium ion, the MN induction in the population could be increased by 16%. These results provide direct evidence of radiation-induced bystander effect. Moreover, MN was effectively induced in the unirradiated primary human fibroblasts and glioblastoma cells either co-cultured with irradiated cells or treated with the medium harvested from irradiated cells, indicating a signal molecule was produced from the irradiated cells. However, when c-PTIO, a nitric oxide (NO)-specific scavenger, was present in the medium during and after irradiation until MN analysis, the production of MN in all of the above cases was reduced to low levels. Consequently, NO plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effect

  2. Radiation-Induced Bystander Response: Mechanism and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation (IR) to the genetic material in the cell gives rise to damage to DNA in a dose-dependent manner. There are two types of DNA damage; by a high dose (causing acute or deterministic effects) and by a low dose (related to chronic or stochastic effects), both of which induce different health effects. Among radiation effects, acute cutaneous radiation syndrome results from cell killing as a consequence of high-dose exposure. Recent advances: Recent advances in radiation biology and oncology have demonstrated that bystander effects, which are emerged in cells that have never been exposed, but neighboring irradiated cells, are also involved in radiation effects. Bystander effects are now recognized as an indispensable component of tissue response related to deleterious effects of IR. Critical issues: Evidence has indicated that nonapoptotic premature senescence is commonly observed in various tissues and organs. Senesced cells were found to secrete various proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, most of which are equivalent to those identified as bystander factors. Secreted factors could trigger cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell migration, inflammatory response, etc., which provide a tissue microenvironment assisting tissue repair and remodeling. Future directions: Understandings of the mechanisms and physiological relevance of radiation-induced bystander effects are quite essential for the beneficial control of wound healing and care. Further studies should extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of bystander effects and mode of cell death in response to IR. PMID:24761341

  3. Evaluation of carcass performance of Matebele goats managed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    users

    KEYWORDS: Permanent Incisors; Carcass; Matebele Goats. INTRODUCTION ... Africa's goat population increased by ... local farmers to maximize on pricing of their goats. The ..... goats of Northern Mexico: Part 1- The effects of body weight on ...

  4. Radiation effects on lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, B.

    1976-01-01

    This review of the ontogeny of lymphocyte populations concentrates on sites of production, rates of production, and the factors governing the differentiation and longevity of the various lymphocyte pools. The physiology of the lymphocyte pools is described with particular emphasis on recirculation from blood to lymph through lymphoid tissues. The separate routes of recirculation of both thymus-derived and nonthymus-derived lymphocytes and the possible anatomical sites and mechanisms of lymphocyte cooperation are discussed. Radiation effects on lymphocyte populations are divided into two sections. First, the effects of whole-body irradiation on the total lymphocyte pools are discussed including the differential effects of irradiation on T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, lymphoblasts, and plasma cells. The differential sensitivity of various types of immune response is correlated, where possible, with the differential sensitivity of the lymphocyte types involved. Second, experimental attempts to selectively deplete discrete subpopulations of the total lymphocyte pools, e.g., recirculating cells, are briefly discussed with particular emphasis on studies on the effects of the localization of radionuclides in lymphoid tissue

  5. Novel features of radiation-induced bystander signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrated using root micro-grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Li, Fanghua; Xu, Wei; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been well demonstrated in whole organisms, as well as in single-cell culture models in vitro and multi-cellular tissues models in vitro, however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, including the temporal and spatial course of bystander signaling. The RIBE in vivo has been shown to exist in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana). Importantly, the unique plant grafting provides a delicate approach for studying the temporal and spatial course of bystander signaling in the context of whole plants. In our previous study, the time course of bystander signaling in plants has been well demonstrated using the root micro-grafting technique. In this study, we further investigated the temporal cooperation pattern of multiple bystander signals, the directionality of bystander signaling, and the effect of bystander tissues on the bystander signaling. The results showed that the bystander response could also be induced efficiently when the asynchronously generated bystander signals reached the bystander tissues in the same period, but not when they entered into the bystander tissues in an inversed sequence. The absence of bystander response in root-inversed grafting indicated that the bystander signaling along roots might be of directionality. The bystander signaling was shown to be independent of the bystander tissues. PMID:23072991

  6. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, J.I.; Martin, P.S.; Euler, R.C.; Long, A.; Jull, A.J.T.; Toolin, L.J.; Donahue, D.J.; Linick, T.W.

    1986-01-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 +/- 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters

  7. Workplace mobbing: How the victim's coping behavior influences bystander responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Roelie; Bos, Arjan E R; Pouwelse, Mieneke; van Dam, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Victims of workplace mobbing show diverse coping behavior. We investigated the impact of this behavior on bystander cognitions, emotions, and helping toward the victim, integrating coping literature with attribution theory. Adult part-time university students (N = 161) working at various organizations participated in a study with a 3(Coping: approach/avoidance/neutral) × 2(Gender Victim: male/female) × 2(Gender Bystander: male/female) design. Victims showing approach (vs. avoidance) coping were considered to be more self-reliant and less responsible for the continuation of the mobbing, and they elicited less anger. Continuation responsibility and self-reliance mediated the relationship between the victim's coping behavior and bystanders' helping intentions. Female (vs. male) participants reported more sympathy for the victim and greater willingness to help, and female (vs. male) victims elicited less anger. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  8. GOATS Image Projection Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Benjamin M.; Green, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    When doing mission analysis and design of an imaging system in orbit around the Earth, answering the fundamental question of imaging performance requires an understanding of the image products that will be produced by the imaging system. GOATS software represents a series of MATLAB functions to provide for geometric image projections. Unique features of the software include function modularity, a standard MATLAB interface, easy-to-understand first-principles-based analysis, and the ability to perform geometric image projections of framing type imaging systems. The software modules are created for maximum analysis utility, and can all be used independently for many varied analysis tasks, or used in conjunction with other orbit analysis tools.

  9. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Zhou Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph; Held, Kathryn D.; Prise, Kevin M.; Redmond, Robert W.; Liber, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naive recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to 1 h to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least 1 h of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12-24 h to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent γ-ray exposures.

  10. Engagement of NKG2D on bystander memory CD8 T cells promotes increased immunopathology following Leishmania major infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika J Crosby

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of adaptive immunity is the development of a long-term pathogen specific memory response. While persistent memory T cells certainly impact the immune response during a secondary challenge, their role in unrelated infections is less clear. To address this issue, we utilized lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV and Listeria monocytogenes immune mice to investigate whether bystander memory T cells influence Leishmania major infection. Despite similar parasite burdens, LCMV and Listeria immune mice exhibited a significant increase in leishmanial lesion size compared to mice infected with L. major alone. This increased lesion size was due to a severe inflammatory response, consisting not only of monocytes and neutrophils, but also significantly more CD8 T cells. Many of the CD8 T cells were LCMV specific and expressed gzmB and NKG2D, but unexpectedly expressed very little IFN-γ. Moreover, if CD8 T cells were depleted in LCMV immune mice prior to challenge with L. major, the increase in lesion size was lost. Strikingly, treating with NKG2D blocking antibodies abrogated the increased immunopathology observed in LCMV immune mice, showing that NKG2D engagement on LCMV specific memory CD8 T cells was required for the observed phenotype. These results indicate that bystander memory CD8 T cells can participate in an unrelated immune response and induce immunopathology through an NKG2D dependent mechanism without providing increased protection.

  11. Bystander Effects During Synchrotron Imaging Procedures?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueltke, Elisabeth; Nikkhah, Guido; Bewer, Brian; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2010-01-01

    Using monochromatic beam and synchrotron phase-contrast technique at the biomedical beamline of the Italian synchrotron facility Elettra (SYRMEP), we have shown in a small animal model of malignant brain tumor that it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of very small tumors when they have developed from implanted tumor cells loaded with colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNP). All previous experiments were conducted in post-mortem samples. We have now designed a cell culture experiment to investigate the effects of synchrotron radiation with an energy and dose profile similar to that expected in our first in vivo imaging studies according to the protocol developed at SYRMEP.Materials and Methods: Culture flasks containing either gold-loaded or naieve C6 glioma cells were exposed to a dose of 0.5 Gy at 24 keV. The irradiated medium was aspirated and replaced with fresh growth medium. Twenty-four hours later this non-irradiated medium exposed to irradiated cells was aspirated, then added to non-irradiated C6 cells in order to investigate whether bystander effects are seen under the conditions of our image acquisition protocol. The irradiated medium was added to a number of other non-irradiated cell cultures. Cell counts were followed until 72 hrs after irradiation. Western blots were conducted with H2AX antibodies. This experiment was one of the first biomedical experiments conducted at BMIT, the new biomedical imaging and therapy beamline of the Canadian Light Source.Results: No significant differences in proliferation were seen between cells that were directly irradiated, exposed to irradiated medium or exposed to the non-irradiated 24-hr-medium from the irradiated cells. However, there was a tendency towards a higher number of double strand breaks in previously irradiated cells when they were exposed to non-irradiated medium that had been in contact with irradiated cells for 24 hrs.

  12. Bystander defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Public vs Residential Locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Bystander-delivered defibrillation (hereinafter referred to as bystander defibrillation) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains limited despite the widespread dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). Objective: To examine calendar changes...... in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationwide study......, 2016. Exposures: Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher...

  13. Mechanism of bystander-blaming: defensive attribution, counterfactual thinking, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Inna; Ben-David, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary victimology recognizes that an understanding of the mechanism of blaming requires a comprehensive approach that includes the victim, the offender, and the bystander. However, most of the existing research on blaming focuses on the victim and the offender, ignoring the issue of bystander-blaming. This study highlights the bystander and investigates bystander-blaming by exploring some theoretical explanations, including counterfactual thinking, defensive attribution, and gender differences. The study included 363 young male and female participants, who read vignettes describing the behavior of the victim and the bystander in a rape scenario and answered questions regarding bystander-blaming. The results show that both counterfactual thinking and defensive attribution play a role in bystander-blaming. This article addresses the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Predicting Improvement After a Bystander Program for the Prevention of Sexual and Dating Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Denise A; Palm Reed, Kathleen M

    2015-07-01

    Although evidence suggests that bystander prevention programs are promising interventions for decreasing sexual violence and dating violence on college campuses, there have been no studies to date evaluating moderators of bystander program effectiveness. The current study evaluates whether different demographic characteristics, attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors at pretest predict change over a 6-month follow-up for students who participated in a bystander prevention program. Participants in the three assessments (pretest, posttest, 6-month follow-up) included 296 college students who were mandated to attend a bystander program during their first year orientation. Analyses showed that with few exceptions, the bystander program worked best for students who were most at risk given their pretest demographics and levels of attitudes condoning dating violence and sexual violence, bystander efficacy, and bystander behaviors. Results are discussed in terms of suggestions for future research. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  15. Biodistribution of radiolabeled lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Oluwole, S.; Wang, T.S.; Kuromoto, N.; Iga, C.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1985-01-01

    Factors that might affect the biodistribution and clinical utility of radiolabeled lymphocytes were evaluated in experimental animals. Indium-111 (In-111) labeled lymphocytes obtained from peripheral blood, lymph node, or spleen were found in significant amounts in the lymphoid tissues of Lewis rats as early as 3 hours after infusion. A progressive increase in nodal activity with concomitant fall of activity in other organs followed, indicating active recirculation of the lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation of the In-111 labeled lymphocytes resulted in no detectable lymphocyte recirculation and/or reduced localization in lymphoid tissue. Splenectomized animals and those sensitized to an organ allograft before cell infusion showed increased activity in their bone marrow. These results suggest that the source of the injected cells, cell irradiation dose level and host sensitization should be considered when radiolabeled lymphocytes are being prepared for use in clinical diagnosis and therapy

  16. 9 CFR 91.6 - Goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Goats. 91.6 Section 91.6 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.6 Goats. (a) In order to be eligible for export, goats shall be...) Tuberculosis. All goats over 1 month of age shall be negative to a caudal intradermal tuberculin test using 0.1...

  17. Incoming College Students' Bystander Behaviors to Prevent Sexual Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Banyard, Victoria L.; McMahon, Sheila M.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluations of bystander intervention education programs demonstrate that this approach results in students' increased willingness to intervene in prosocial ways to prevent sexual violence (e.g., Moynihan, Banyard, Arnold, Eckstein, & Stapleton, 2010). These programs often focus on first-year college students, though theories and research on…

  18. A Qualitative Exploration of Cyber-Bystanders and Moral Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Deborah; Green, Deborah; Spears, Barbara; Scrimgeour, Margaret; Barnes, Alan; Geer, Ruth; Johnson, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Studies have found that moral disengagement plays a significant role in the continuation of bullying situations (Bonanno, 2005); however, the moral stance of cyber-bystanders--those who witness online bullying--is not yet clear. While research into traditional face-to-face bullying reported that peers would probably or certainly intervene to…

  19. Delayed innocent bystander cell death following hypoxia in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C-L; Kim, E; Crowder, C M

    2014-04-01

    After hypoxia, cells may die immediately or have a protracted course, living or dying depending on an incompletely understood set of cell autonomous and nonautonomous factors. In stroke, for example, some neurons are thought to die from direct hypoxic injury by cell autonomous primary mechanisms, whereas other so called innocent bystander neurons die from factors released from the primarily injured cells. A major limitation in identifying these factors is the inability of current in vivo models to selectively target a set of cells for hypoxic injury so that the primarily injured cells and the innocent bystanders are clearly delineated. In order to develop such a model, we generated transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains where 2-3% of somatic cells were made selectively sensitive to hypoxia. This was accomplished by cell type-specific wild-type rescue in either pharyngeal myocytes or GABAergic neurons of a hypoxia resistance-producing translation factor mutation. Surprisingly, hypoxic targeting of these relatively small subsets of non-essential cells produced widespread innocent bystander cell injury, behavioral dysfunction and eventual organismal death. The hypoxic injury phenotypes of the myocyte or neuron sensitized strains were virtually identical. Using this model, we show that the C. elegans insulin receptor/FOXO transcription factor pathway improves survival when activated only after hypoxic injury and blocks innocent bystander death.

  20. Friends, strangers, and bystanders: Informal practices of sexual assault intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamboldt, Alexander; Khan, Shamus R; Mellins, Claude Ann; Hirsch, Jennifer S

    2018-05-07

    Sexual assault is a part of many students' experiences in higher education. In U.S. universities, one in four women and one in ten men report being sexually assaulted before graduation. Bystander training programmes have been shown to modestly reduce campus sexual assault. Like all public health interventions, however, they have unintended social consequences; this research examines how undergraduate men on one campus understand bystander interventions and how those understandings shape their actual practices. We draw on ethnographic data collected between August 2015 and January 2017 at Columbia University and Barnard College. Our findings show that university training and an earnest desire to be responsible lead many men to intervene in possible sexual assaults. However, students' gendered methods target more socially vulnerable and socially distant men while protecting popular men and those to whom they are socially connected. Students' actual bystander practices thus reproduce social hierarchies in which low prestige may or may not be connected to actual risks of sexual assault. These results suggest that understanding intragroup dynamics and social hierarchies is essential to assault prevention in universities and that students' actions as bystanders may be effective at preventing assaults in some circumstances but may lead to new risks of sexual assault.

  1. Bystander Obligations at the Domestic and International Level Compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkers, Otto|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328454559

    2014-01-01

    This article examines whether States have a legal obligation to assist victims of serious breaches of fundamental obligations owed to the international community as a whole. This so-called ‘bystander State responsibility’ is compared with a similar legal obligation to assist victims at the domestic

  2. Bystander Reaction to Women Fighting: Developing a Theory of Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Robert D.; Levine, Mark; Best, Rachel M.; Heim, Derek

    2012-01-01

    This article explores accounts of bystanders to female-on-female public violence. Group interviews with participants in the night-time economy are carried out. Whereas men tend to respond to the discussion topic of female-on-female violence with laughter, this laughter reveals ambivalence and discomfort as much as amusement. Men seem to negotiate…

  3. Bystanders' Supportive and Passive Responses to Cyberaggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machackova, Hana; Dedkova, Lenka; Sevcikova, Anna; Cerna, Alena

    2018-01-01

    Bystanders in cyberaggression can support the victim, join the aggressor, or remain passive. We examined how supportive and passive adolescent Czech cyberbystanders (N = 443, ages 12-18) differ in terms of individual characteristics, emotional responses, and contextual factors. The most substantial distinguishing factor between the two groups…

  4. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide signaling in bystander cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jella, Kishore Kumar; Moriarty, Roisin; McClean, Brendan; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2018-01-01

    It is now well accepted that radiation induced bystander effects can occur in cells exposed to media from irradiated cells. The aim of this study was to follow the bystander cells in real time following addition of media from irradiated cells and to determine the effect of inhibiting these signals. A human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT cells, was irradiated (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy) with γ irradiation, conditioned medium was harvested after one hour and added to recipient bystander cells. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, Glutathione levels, caspase activation, cytotoxicity and cell viability was measured after the addition of irradiated cell conditioned media to bystander cells. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels in bystander cells treated with 0.5Gy ICCM were analysed in real time using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. The levels of reactive oxygen species were also measured in real time after the addition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase pathway inhibitors. ROS and glutathione levels were observed to increase after the addition of irradiated cell conditioned media (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM). Caspase activation was found to increase 4 hours after irradiated cell conditioned media treatment (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM) and this increase was observed up to 8 hours and there after a reduction in caspase activation was observed. A decrease in cell viability was observed but no major change in cytotoxicity was found in HaCaT cells after treatment with irradiated cell conditioned media (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM). This study involved the identification of key signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, glutathione and caspases generated in bystander cells. These results suggest a clear connection between reactive oxygen species and cell survival pathways with persistent production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in bystander cells following exposure to irradiated cell

  5. Investigations into the bystander effect: signal versus response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vines, A.M.; Seymour, C.B.; Mothersill, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The bystander effect is the general term used to describe the effects seen in cells or tissue that have never been directly irradiated, but display similar symptoms to those that have. Some of these symptoms include reduced cell survival, chromosomal aberrations, and increased apoptosis. This investigation aims to explore the signal produced by certain cell and tissue types, and the relationship this has with the subsequent response. The goal is to elucidate whether the reduction in cell survival frequently seen in response to the bystander effect is determined by the signal produced or the response of the cell type. Firstly, a matrix design experiment was set up using 3 cell lines. Each cell line was irradiated to produce ICCM (Irradiated Cell Conditioned Medium), which was in turn used to treat all cell lines in the study. Medium transfer is carried out within cell lines, (ICCM from CHO onto CHO cells) and between cell lines (ICCM from CHO onto HPV-G cells). In the second set of experiments, tissue samples from male Wister rats were used to generate ITCM (Irradiated Tissue Conditioned Medium). This medium was then tested on a cell line with an established response to the bystander effect. As an extension to these two experimental protocols, both ICCM and ITCM were used to investigate if there is calcium flux in the cells as a response to the bystander medium. This has recently been shown to be an early response to the bystander signal. Results indicate that it is the signal produced by the irradiated cells that determine the overall effect of the bystander signal, and not the response of the cells expose to it. CHO-K1 cells treated with autologous ICCM show a 16.2% drop in cell survival. However, when this cell line is treated with HPV-G ICCM, it shows a 36.5% drop in survival. HPV-G cells treated with autologous medium display a similar response to this, with a 41.1% drop in survival, though when treated with CHO-K1 ICCM, the drop in survival is 22.9%. This

  6. Multi-College Bystander Intervention Evaluation for Violence Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Ann L; Bush, Heather M; Fisher, Bonnie S; Swan, Suzanne C; Williams, Corrine M; Clear, Emily R; DeGue, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    The 2013 Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act requires U.S. colleges to provide bystander-based training to reduce sexual violence, but little is known about the efficacy of such programs for preventing violent behavior. This study provides the first multiyear evaluation of a bystander intervention's campus-level impact on reducing interpersonal violence victimization and perpetration behavior on college campuses. First-year students attending three similarly sized public university campuses were randomly selected and invited to complete online surveys in the spring terms of 2010-2013. On one campus, the Green Dot bystander intervention was implemented in 2008 (Intervention, n=2,979) and two comparison campuses had no bystander programming at baseline (Comparison, n=4,132). Data analyses conducted in 2014-2015 compared violence rates by condition over the four survey periods. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate violence risk on Intervention relative to Comparison campuses, adjusting for demographic factors and time (2010-2013). Interpersonal violence victimization rates (measured in the past academic year) were 17% lower among students attending the Intervention (46.4%) relative to Comparison (55.7%) campuses (adjusted rate ratio=0.83; 95% CI=0.79, 0.88); a similar pattern held for interpersonal violence perpetration (25.5% in Intervention; 32.2% in Comparison; adjusted rate ratio=0.79; 95% CI=0.71, 0.86). Violence rates were lower on Intervention versus Comparison campuses for unwanted sexual victimization, sexual harassment, stalking, and psychological dating violence victimization and perpetration (pSexual Violence Elimination Act bystander training requirements. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. Timely bystander CPR improves outcomes despite longer EMS times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwan Jin; Song, Kyoung Jun; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Kyung Won; Ahn, Ki Ok; Lee, Eui Jung; Hong, Ki Jeong; Ro, Young Sun

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact of bystander CPR on clinical outcomes in patients with increasing response time from collapse to EMS response. A population-based observational study was conducted in patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) of presumed cardiac etiology from 2012 to 2014. The time interval from collapse to CPR by EMS providers was categorized into quartile groups: fastest group (bystander CPR and the time interval from collapse to CPR by EMS providers. A total of 15,354 OHCAs were analyzed. Bystander CPR was performed in 8591 (56.0%). Survival to hospital discharge occurred in 1632 (10.6%) and favorable neurological outcome in 996 (6.5%). In an interaction model of bystander CPR, compared to the fastest group, adjusted odds ratios (AORs) (95% CIs) for survival to discharge were 0.89 (0.66-1.20) in the fast group, 0.76 (0.57-1.02) in the late group, and 0.52 (0.37-0.73) in the latest group. For favorable neurological outcome, AORs were 1.12 (0.77-1.62) in the fast group, 0.90 (0.62-1.30) in the late group, 0.59 (0.38-0.91) in the latest group. The survival from OHCA decreases as the ambulance response time increases. The increase in mortality and worsening neurologic outcomes appear to be mitigated in those patients who receive bystander CPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preventing Interpersonal Violence on College Campuses: The Effect of One Act Training on Bystander Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría-Flores, Kei; Raker, Kelli; Pleasants, Robert K; Weaver, Mark A; Weinberger, Morris

    2015-05-22

    Sexual assault, stalking, dating violence, and intimate partner violence, herein collectively termed interpersonal violence (IV), are public health problems affecting 20% to 25% of female college students. Currently, One Act is one of the few IV prevention training programs at universities that teach students bystander skills to intervene in low- and high-risk IV situations. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate One Act's effects on date rape attitudes and behaviors, and bystanders' confidence, willingness to help, and behavior, and 2) to compare the effects on bystander skills between One Act and Helping Advocates for Violence Ending Now (HAVEN), an IV response training program with similar participants. Data were collected over 2 years, before and after One Act and HAVEN trainings. We measured outcomes with four scales: College Date Rape Attitudes and Behaviors, Bystander Confidence, Willingness to Help, and Bystander Behavior. The analysis compared within- and between-group mean differences in scale scores pre- and post-trainings using linear mixed models. One Act showed improvements for date rape attitudes and behaviors (p trainings' effects on bystander willingness to help and behavior had similar patterns but were not statistically significant. We found a larger positive impact on bystander confidence among students who participated in the bystander prevention training compared with the response training. Further research is needed to improve the measures for bystander behavior and measure the bystander trainings' larger impact on the community. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Predicting High-School Students' Bystander Behavior in Simulated Dating Violence Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N; Rosenfield, David; Yule, Kristen; Sargent, Kelli S; McDonald, Renee

    2016-03-01

    Dating violence among adolescents is associated with a variety of negative health consequences for victims. Bystander programs are being developed and implemented with the intention of preventing such violence, but determinants of high-school students' responsive bystander behavior remain unclear. The present study examines hypothesized determinants of high-school students' bystander behavior in simulated situations of dating violence. Participants were 80 high-school students who completed self-reports of hypothesized determinants of bystander behavior (responsibility, efficacy, and perceived benefits for intervening) at a baseline assessment. A virtual-reality paradigm was used to observationally assess bystander behavior at 1-week and 6-month assessments after baseline. Efficacy for intervening was positively associated with observed bystander behavior at the 1-week and 6-month assessments. Moreover, efficacy predicted bystander behavior over and above feelings of responsibility and perceived benefits for intervening. Contrary to our predictions, neither responsibility nor perceived benefits for intervening were associated with observed bystander behavior. This research advances our understanding of determinants of bystander behavior for high-school students and can inform prevention programming for adolescents. The study also introduces an innovative way to assess high-school students' bystander behavior. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of ROS-mediated autophagy in radiation-induced bystander effect of hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jianghong; Fu, Jiamei; Wang, Juan; Ye, Shuang; Liu, Weili; Shao, Chunlin

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy plays a crucial role in cellular response to ionizing radiation, but it is unclear whether autophagy can modulate radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Here, we investigated the relationship between bystander damage and autophagy in human hepatoma cells of HepG2. HepG2 cells were treated with conditioned medium (CM) collected from 3 Gy γ-rays irradiated hepatoma HepG2 cells for 4, 12, or 24 h, followed by the measurement of micronuclei (MN), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and protein expressions of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) and Beclin-1 in the bystander HepG2 cells. In some experiments, the bystander HepG2 cells were respectively transfected with LC3 small interfering RNA (siRNA), Beclin-1 siRNA or treated with 1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Additional MN and mitochondrial dysfunction coupled with ROS were induced in the bystander cells. The expressions of protein markers of autophagy, LC3-II/LC3-I and Beclin-1, increased in the bystander cells. The inductions of bystander MN and overexpressions of LC3 and Beclin-1 were significantly diminished by DMSO. However, when the bystander cells were transfected with LC3 siRNA or Beclin-1 siRNA, the yield of bystander MN was significantly enhanced. The elevated ROS have bi-functions in balancing the bystander effects. One is to cause MN and the other is to induce protective autophagy.

  11. Alpha-particles microbeam irradiation: impact of reactive oxygen species in bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanot, M.

    2008-11-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects arise in bystander cells that receive signals from directly irradiated cells. To date, free radicals are believed to play an active role in the bystander response, but this is incompletely characterized. To mark temporal and spatial impacts of bystander effect, we employed a precise α-particle microbeam to target a small fraction of sub-confluent osteoblastic cell cultures (MC3T3-E1). We identified the cellular membrane and mitochondria like two distinct places generating reactive oxygen species. The global oxidative stress observed after irradiation was significantly attenuated after filipin treatment, evidencing the pivotal role of membrane in MC3T3-E1 cells bystander response. To determine impact of bystander effect at a cell level, cellular consequences of this membrane-dependant bystander effect were then investigated. A variable fraction of the cell population (10 to 100%) was individually targeted. In this case, mitotic death and micronuclei yield both increased in bystander cells as well as in targeted cells demonstrating a role of bystander signals between irradiated cells in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Our results indicate a complex interaction of direct irradiation and bystander signals that lead to a membrane-dependant amplification of cell responses. (author)

  12. Bystander Interventions for Sexual Assault and Dating Violence on College Campuses: Are We Putting Bystanders in Harm's Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Tricia H.; Casper, Deborah M.; Hackman, Christine L.; Mulla, Mazheruddin M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The present study investigated the well-being of bystanders who witness and intervene in sexual assault and dating violence situations on campus. Participants: Participants were 321 young men and women from a large university in the southeastern United States. Methods: Participants completed a survey at the end of the Spring semester of…

  13. Histological and immunohistochemical characterization of the inflammatory and glial cells in the central nervous system of goat fetuses and adult male goats naturally infected with Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rafael Carneiro; Orlando, Débora Ribeiro; Abreu, Camila Costa; Nakagaki, Karen Yumi Ribeiro; Mesquita, Leonardo Pereira; Nascimento, Lismara Castro; Silva, Aline Costa; Maiorka, Paulo César; Peconick, Ana Paula; Raymundo, Djeison Lutier; Varaschin, Mary Suzan

    2014-12-14

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan protozoan that is considered one of the main agents responsible for abortion in ruminants. The lesions found in the central nervous system (CNS) of aborted fetuses show multifocal necrosis, gliosis, and perivascular cuffs of mononuclear cells, but the inflammatory and glial cells have not been immunophenotypically characterized. The lesions in the CNS of infected adult animals have rarely been described. Therefore, in this study, we characterized the lesions, the immunophenotypes of the inflammatory and glial cells and the expression of MHC-II and PCNA in the CNS of goats infected with N. caninum. The CNS of eight aborted fetuses and six adult male goats naturally infected with N. caninum were analyzed with lectin histochemistry (RCA1) and immunohistochemistry (with anti-CD3, -CD79α, -GFAP, -MHC-II, and -PCNA antibodies). All animals were the offspring of dams naturally infected with N. caninum. The microscopic lesions in the CNS of the aborted fetuses consisted of perivascular cuffs composed mainly of macrophages (RCA1(+)), rare T lymphocytes (CD3(+)), and rare B lymphocytes (CD79α(+)). Multifocal necrosis surrounded by astrocytes (GFAP(+)), gliosis composed predominantly of monocytic-lineage cells (macrophages and microglia, RCA1(+)), and the cysts of N. caninum, related (or not) to the lesions were present. Similar lesions were found in four of the six male goats, and multinucleate giant cells related to focal gliosis were also found in three adult goats. Anti-GFAP immunostaining showed astrocytes characterizing areas of glial scarring. Cysts of N. caninum were found in three adult male goats. The presence of N. caninum was evaluated with histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and PCR. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated anti-PCNA labeling of macrophages and microglia in the perivascular cuffs and the expression of MHC-II by microglia and endothelial cells in the CNS of the aborted fetuses and adult male goats. Macrophages and

  14. Nutritional fibrous osteodystrophy in goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M Bandarra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seven out of 25 goats from a southern Brazilian flock developed nutritional fibrous osteodystrophy. Affected animals were younger than 1 year of age and were confined in stalls and fed a concentrate ration containing 1:6 calcium:phosphorus ratio. The remaining flock (35 goats was managed at pasture and showed no disease. Clinical signs were characterized by mandibular and maxillary enlargements, varying degrees of mouth opening and protruding tongue, dyspnea, apart of abnormalities of prehension and mastication. Affected animals had increased seric levels of phosphorus and parathormone, as well as higher alkaline phosphatase activity. Postmortem examination on three succumbed goats revealed bilateral enlargement of the maxilla and mandibula, and loose teeth, apart of multiple incomplete rib fractures in one of them. Severe diffuse proliferation of loose connective tissue surrounded the osteoid trabeculae, many of which were partially or completely non-mineralized. Mineralized osteoid trabeculae showed osteoclasts in the Howship's lacunae.

  15. GOATS - Orbitology Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Benjamin M.; Green, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The GOATS Orbitology Component software was developed to specifically address the concerns presented by orbit analysis tools that are often written as stand-alone applications. These applications do not easily interface with standard JPL first-principles analysis tools, and have a steep learning curve due to their complicated nature. This toolset is written as a series of MATLAB functions, allowing seamless integration into existing JPL optical systems engineering modeling and analysis modules. The functions are completely open, and allow for advanced users to delve into and modify the underlying physics being modeled. Additionally, this software module fills an analysis gap, allowing for quick, high-level mission analysis trades without the need for detailed and complicated orbit analysis using commercial stand-alone tools. This software consists of a series of MATLAB functions to provide for geometric orbit-related analysis. This includes propagation of orbits to varying levels of generalization. In the simplest case, geosynchronous orbits can be modeled by specifying a subset of three orbit elements. The next case is a circular orbit, which can be specified by a subset of four orbit elements. The most general case is an arbitrary elliptical orbit specified by all six orbit elements. These orbits are all solved geometrically, under the basic problem of an object in circular (or elliptical) orbit around a rotating spheroid. The orbit functions output time series ground tracks, which serve as the basis for more detailed orbit analysis. This software module also includes functions to track the positions of the Sun, Moon, and arbitrary celestial bodies specified by right ascension and declination. Also included are functions to calculate line-of-sight geometries to ground-based targets, angular rotations and decompositions, and other line-of-site calculations. The toolset allows for the rapid execution of orbit trade studies at the level of detail required for the

  16. Galveston Orientation Amnesia Test (GOAT Galveston Orientation Amnesia Test (GOAT Galveston Orientation Amnesia Test (GOAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cristina Fürbringer e Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O trauma crânio-encefálico contuso (TCEC é freqüentemente seguido pela amnésia pós-traumática (APT, caracterizada como um estado transitório de confusão e desorientação. Sua duração tem sido utilizada para quantificar a gravidade do TCEC e prever distúrbios nas funções cognitivas, assim como para antever as alterações na capacidade funcional das vítimas pós-trauma. O Galveston Orientation Amnesia Test (GOAT é o primeiro instrumento sistematizado criado e o mais amplamente utilizado para avaliar a APT. Este artigo apresenta esse instrumento, as bases conceituais para seu desenvolvimento e a adaptação e validação do GOAT para cultura brasileira. Além disso, descreve sua aplicação e comenta as restrições do seu uso. Resultados de pesquisas realizadas em nosso meio contribuíram para as evidências sobre a validade do GOAT. Também apontaram os indicadores do momento pós-trauma em que o GOAT deve ser aplicado e destacaram as dificuldades no uso desse instrumento.El trauma cráneo-encefálico contuso (TCEC es frecuentemente seguido por la amnesia pos-traumática (APT, caracterizada como un estado transitorio de confusión y desorientación. Su duración ha sido utilizada para cuantificar la severidad del TCEC y prever alteraciones en las funciones cognitivas, tanto como para antever las dificultades en la capacidad funcional de las víctimas pos-trauma. El Galveston Orientation Amnésia Test (GOAT es la primera encuesta sistematizada que fue creada y el mas ampliamente utilizada para evaluar la APT. Esta publicación presenta esta encuesta, las bases conceptuales para su desarrollo y la adaptación y validación del GOAT para la cultura brasileña. Además, describe su aplicación y limitaciones en el uso. Resultados de pesquisas brasileñas contribuyeron para las evidencias sobre la validad del GOAT. También apuntaron los indicadores del momento pos-trauma en que el GOAT debe ser aplicado y destacaron las dificultades

  17. Self-protective function of post-conflict bystander affiliation in mandrills.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Schino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Affiliative interactions exchanged between victims of aggression and individuals not involved in the original aggression (bystanders have been observed in various species. Three hypothetical functions have been proposed for these interactions: consolation, self-protection and substitute reconciliation, but data to test them are scanty. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted post-conflict and matched control observations on a captive group of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx. We found that victims often redirected aggression to bystanders, that they received most affiliation from those bystanders that were frequently the target of redirection, and that bystander affiliation reduced the likelihood of redirection. Bystander affiliation did not reduce the victim's distress (as measured by its scratching rates and was not received primarily from kin/friends. Finally, bystander affiliation did not reduce the likelihood of renewed aggression from the original aggressor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide support for the self-protection hypothesis but not for the consolation and substitute reconciliation hypotheses.

  18. Preference for goat meat and milk products consumption in Bauchi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Very few people were involved in the consumption of goat milk and milk products, with the highest percentage coming from respondents who consume goat milk only on certain occasions. In general, the study indicated that goat meat is well cherished, while milk from goats is unpopular in the state. Since goat milk is known ...

  19. Role of ATM in bystander signaling between human monocytes and lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Ghosh, Anu; Krishna, Malini

    2015-12-01

    The response of a cell or tissue to ionizing radiation is mediated by direct damage to cellular components and indirect damage mediated by radiolysis of water. Radiation affects both irradiated cells and the surrounding cells and tissues. The radiation-induced bystander effect is defined by the presence of biological effects in cells that were not themselves in the field of irradiation. To establish the contribution of the bystander effect in the survival of the neighboring cells, lung carcinoma A549 cells were exposed to gamma-irradiation, 2Gy. The medium from the irradiated cells was transferred to non-irradiated A549 cells. Irradiated A549 cells as well as non-irradiated A549 cells cultured in the presence of medium from irradiated cells showed decrease in survival and increase in γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci, indicating a bystander effect. Bystander signaling was also observed between different cell types. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated and gamma-irradiated U937 (human monocyte) cells induced a bystander response in non-irradiated A549 (lung carcinoma) cells as shown by decreased survival and increased γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci. Non-stimulated and/or irradiated U937 cells did not induce such effects in non-irradiated A549 cells. Since ATM protein was activated in irradiated cells as well as bystander cells, it was of interest to understand its role in bystander effect. Suppression of ATM with siRNA in A549 cells completely inhibited bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. On the other hand suppression of ATM with siRNA in PMA stimulated U937 cells caused only a partial inhibition of bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. These results indicate that apart from ATM, some additional factor may be involved in bystander effect between different cell types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 4-H Club Goat Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. Kipp

    This guide provides information for 4-H Club members who have decided on a club goat project. Topics include general information in the following areas: show rules; facilities and equipment (barns/sheds, fences, feeders, water containers, and equipment); selection (structural correctness, muscle, volume and capacity, style and balance, and growth…

  1. MiR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Ding, Nan; Pei, Hailong; Hu, Wentao; Wei, Wenjun; Zhang, Xurui; Zhou, Guangming; Wang, Jufang

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are well-established phenomena, in which DNA damage responses are induced not only in the directly irradiated cells but also in the non-irradiated bystander cells through intercellular signal transmission. Recent studies hint that bystander effects are possibly mediated via small non-coding RNAs, especially microRNAs. Thus, more details about the roles of microRNA in bystander effects are urgently needed to be elucidated. Here we demonstrated that bystander effects were induced in human fetal lung MRC-5 fibroblasts through medium-mediated way by different types of radiation. We identified a set of differentially expressed microRNAs in the cell culture medium after irradiation, among which the up-regulation of miR-21 was further verified with qRT-PCR. In addition, we found significant upregulation of miR-21 in both directly irradiated cells and bystander cells, which was confirmed by the expression of miR-21 precursor and its target genes. Transfection of miR-21 mimics into non-irradiated MRC-5 cells caused bystander-like effects. Taken together, our data reveals that miR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects. Elucidation of such a miRNA-mediated bystander effect is of utmost importance in understanding the biological processes related to ionizing radiation and cell-to-cell communication. PMID:25483031

  2. Students as Prosocial Bystanders to Sexual Assault: Demographic Correlates of Intervention Norms, Intentions, and Missed Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxmeier, Jill C; Acock, Alan C; Flay, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    Sexual assault is a major public health issue. Bystander engagement programs are becoming widely used to combat sexual assault on college campuses. The purpose of this study was to examine students' intervention norms, intentions, opportunities, and behaviors as bystanders to sexual assault. Undergraduate students ( N = 779) completed the Sexual Assault Bystander Behavior Questionnaire in the fall of 2014. The t tests revealed differences in students' intervention norms, intentions, opportunities, and missed opportunities based on sex, race/ethnicity, athletic participation, and fraternity/sorority membership. The findings support the use of additional measures to assess bystander behavior and to identify student subpopulations that may benefit from programs aimed at increasing prosocial intervention.

  3. Influence of catechins on bystander responses in CHO cells induced by alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Y.L.; Wong, T.P.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, we studied alpha-particle induced and medium-mediated bystander effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells through micronucleus (MN) assay. We showed that signal transduction from irradiated cells to bystander cells occur within a short time after irradiation. We then studied the effects of ROS (reactive oxygen species)-scavenging catechins in the medium before irradiation. We observed decreases in the percentage of bystander cells with MN formation and thus proved the protection effect of catechins on bystander cells from radiation.

  4. Contribution of bystander effects in radiation induced genotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Persaud, R.; Gillispie, J.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Hei, T.K.; Suzuki, Masao

    2005-01-01

    The controversial use of a linear, no threshold extrapolation model for low dose risk assessment is based on the accepted dogma that the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation such as mutagenesis and carcinogenesis are attributable mainly to direct damage to DNA. However, this extrapolation was challenged by the recent reports on the bystander phenomenon. The bystander effect contributes to this debate by implying that the biological effects of low doses, where not all cells are traversed by a charged particle, are amplified by the transfer of factors to un-irradiated neighbors. This interested phenomenon implies that a linear extrapolation of risks from high to low doses may underestimate rather than over estimate low dose risks. Together with some radiation-induced phenomena such as adaptive response and genomic instability, the radiobiological response at low doses is likely to be a complex interplay among many factors. (author)

  5. Bystander effects on mammalian cells induced by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Zhao Jing; Ma Qiufeng; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Li Weijian; Zhou Guangming; Dang Bingrong; Mao Limin; Feng Yan

    2004-01-01

    Bystander effects on unirradiated V79 cells were observed by irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) method and co-cultured with carbon-ion-irradiated V79 cells. The results showed that the colony formation efficiency of unirradiated cells is obviously decreased by ICM. After co-culture with carbon-ion-irradiated cells for some time, the colony formation efficiency of co-cultured cells was lower than expected results assuming no bystander effects. The micronucleus frequency and hprt gene mutation rate was almost the same as expected results. Cytotoxic factor(s), which was effective for cell growth but not for micronucleus and mutation on unirradiated cells, might be released by irradiated cells. (authors)

  6. INDONESIAN EFFORTS TO CONSERVE GEMBRONG GOATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanatun Hasinah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gembrong goat are mainly found in eastern part of Bali Island, especially in the village of Tumbu, Karangasem. Throughout Indonesia these goats are found no more than 50 heads. This condition puts Gembrong goat in a critical status that indicates the need of emergency and quick action. The present study was carried out to assess the characteristic of this breed and to preserve it through some proposed action plan.  Information was obtained by personal observation and discussion with the leader of farmer group.  Body weight (BW and various body measurement were taken from 15 head of Gembrong goat. In general, the color of Gembrong goat body is white, or partly brown or solid brown. The average body weight is of 23.2 kg for females and 30.7 kg for males.  The averages Body length of males is 60 cm, height 58.2 cm, and 14.4 cm ear length in males, and in females body length is 56.2 cm, height 55.1 cm and ear length 14.2 cm. To preserve Gembrong goat population from extinction collaborative activities is needed, namely: (1 multiplication of existing Gembrong goat population, (2 Rescuing animal genetic material and (3 up-grading female Kacang goat with Gembrong male goat as to achieve 99% Gembrong goat genetic composition.

  7. Attitudes toward the performance of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Takumi; Omi, Wataru; Inaba, Hideo

    2007-10-01

    Early initiation of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves the chances of successful resuscitation and survival. The importance of bystander CPR is attracting more interest, and there has been an increase in attendance at CPR training courses in Japan. However, there have been few reports regarding Japanese attitudes toward the performance of bystander CPR. The present study was performed to identify current Japanese attitudes toward bystander CPR compared to our previous study performed in 1998. Between February and March 2006, participants were asked about their willingness to perform CPR in five varying scenarios, i.e., performing CPR on a stranger, a trauma patient, a child, an elderly person, and a relative, and CPR techniques consisting of chest compression plus mouth-to-mouth ventilation (CC plus MMV) versus chest compression only (CC only). A total of 4223 individuals (male 50%) completed the questionnaire, including high school students, teachers, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), medical nurses, and medical students. About 70% of the subjects had experienced CPR training more than once. Only 10-30% of high school students, teachers, and health care providers reported willingness to perform CC plus MMV, especially on a stranger or trauma victim. In contrast, 70-100% of these subjects reported willingness to perform CC only, which was the same as in our previous study. The reasons for the unwillingness among laypeople to perform CC plus MMV were inadequate knowledge and/or doubt regarding whether they could perform the techniques effectively, while health care providers reported a fear contracting of a disease. Most laypeople and health care providers are unlikely to perform CC plus MMV, especially on a stranger or trauma victim, but are more likely to perform CC only, as also found in our previous study in 1998. These findings suggest that MMV training should be de-emphasised and the awareness of CC alone should be emphasised because

  8. Cytokines shape chemotherapy-induced and 'bystander' senescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hodný, Zdeněk; Hubáčková, Soňa; Bartek, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2010), s. 375-376 ISSN 1945-4589 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/1418; GA ČR GA301/08/0353 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : bystander cellular senescence * cytokines * PML Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.964, year: 2010

  9. Bystander Helping Behavior in Response to Workplace Bullying

    OpenAIRE

    Hellemans, Catherine; Dal Cason, Davide; Casini, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    This research examines the role of colleagues in workplace bullying. While colleagues could often intervene to support the victim or stop the situation, passive behaviors and non-intervention are more frequent. The bystander effect highlighted by Latané and Darley (1970) has been studied in the context of school bullying and sexual harassment, but only rarely in the context of workplace bullying. We tested the impact of the belief in a just world for others, self-efficacy, perceived severity,...

  10. Effects of whole-body cobalt 60 gamma irradiation on the young korean native goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Gyu; Sung, Jai Ki

    1989-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of whole-body cobolt-60 gamma irradiation on clinical signs, mortality, hematological, blood chemical, chromosomal and pathologic changes in the young Korean native goats. Groups of goats were exposed to 200, 400, 600 and 800 rads of gamma irradiation from a cobalt-60 source. Clinical signs such as diarrhea, anorexia, weakness and depression of the irradiated goats were observed. Mortalities were 66.7 percent in the group irradiated with 200 rads and 100 percent in the groups irradiated with higher doses. Death times were shortened with the increment of irradiation doses. With time after irradiation, the values of erythrocytes, hemoglobin and packed cell volume decreased in the 200 and 400 rads groups and increased in the 600 and 800 rads groups. The number of total leukocytes of the irradiated goats decreased significantly in all irradiated groups. The degrees of decrease were severe as the irradiated doses were increased. Significant decrease of lymphocyte counts were observed from 6 hours in the 800 rads group and 1 day post irradiation(PI) in all other groups. Post irradiation times for significant reduction of neutrophils were 1, 3, 3 and 5 days for 800, 600, 400 and 200 rads groups, respectively. Serum sorbitol dehydrogenase and serum aspartate aminotransferase activities increased remarkably at 6 hours PI in the 800 rads group and 1 day PI in all other groups. Thereafter the activities returned to normal values. Since mitoses of lymphocytes were completely inhibited in blood cultures of all irradiated goats, chromosomal pictures could not be observed. However, mitoses were observed on 28 days PI in 200 rads group and no abberration in the number and structures of lymphocyte chromosomes were detected. Histopathologic findings in various organs of the irradiated goats were severe necrosis and depletion of lymphoid cells in the lymph nodes and spleen, hypoplasia of hemopoietic cells in the bone marrow

  11. A composite microdose Adaptive Response (AR) and Bystander Effect (BE) model-application to low LET and high LET AR and BE data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Bobby E

    2008-08-01

    It has been suggested that Adaptive Response (AR) may reduce risk of adverse health effects due to ionizing radiation. But very low dose Bystander Effects (BE) may impose dominant deleterious human risks. These conflicting behaviors have stimulated controversy regarding the Linear No-Threshold human risk model. A dose and dose rate-dependent microdose model, to examine AR behavior, was developed in prior work. In the prior work a number of in vitro and in vivo dose response data were examined with the model. Recent new data show AR behavior with some evidence of very low dose BE. The purpose of this work is to supplement the microdose model to encompass the Brenner and colleagues BaD (Bystander and Direct Damage) model and apply this composite model to obtain new knowledge regarding AR and BE and illustrate the use of the model to plan radio-biology experiments. The biophysical composite AR and BE Microdose Model quantifies the accumulation of hits (Poisson distributed, microdose specific energy depositions) to cell nucleus volumes. This new composite AR and BE model provides predictions of dose response at very low dose BE levels, higher dose AR levels and even higher dose Direct (linear-quadratic) Damage radiation levels. We find good fits of the model to both BE data from the Columbia University microbeam facility and combined AR and BE data for low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) and high LET data. A Bystander Factor of about 27,000 and an AR protection factor of 0.61 are obtained for the low LET in vivo mouse spleen exposures. A Bystander Factor of 317 and an AR protection factor of 0.53 are obtained for high LET radon alpha particles in human lymphocytes. In both cases the AR is activated at most by one or two radiation induced charged particle traversals through the cell nucleus. The results of the model analysis is consistent with a premise that both Bystander damage and Adaptive Response radioprotection can occur in the same cell type, derived from the same

  12. Host and Viral Factors in HIV-Mediated Bystander Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections lead to a progressive loss of CD4 T cells primarily via the process of apoptosis. With a limited number of infected cells and vastly disproportionate apoptosis in HIV infected patients, it is believed that apoptosis of uninfected bystander cells plays a significant role in this process. Disease progression in HIV infected individuals is highly variable suggesting that both host and viral factors may influence HIV mediated apoptosis. Amongst the viral factors, the role of Envelope (Env) glycoprotein in bystander apoptosis is well documented. Recent evidence on the variability in apoptosis induction by primary patient derived Envs underscores the role of Env glycoprotein in HIV disease. Amongst the host factors, the role of C-C Chemokine Receptor type 5 (CCR5), a coreceptor for HIV Env, is also becoming increasingly evident. Polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene and promoter affect CCR5 cell surface expression and correlate with both apoptosis and CD4 loss. Finally, chronic immune activation in HIV infections induces multiple defects in the immune system and has recently been shown to accelerate HIV Env mediated CD4 apoptosis. Consequently, those factors that affect CCR5 expression and/or immune activation in turn indirectly regulate HIV mediated apoptosis making this phenomenon both complex and multifactorial. This review explores the complex role of various host and viral factors in determining HIV mediated bystander apoptosis. PMID:28829402

  13. Identifiable images of bystanders extracted from corneal reflections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Jenkins

    Full Text Available Criminal investigations often use photographic evidence to identify suspects. Here we combined robust face perception and high-resolution photography to mine face photographs for hidden information. By zooming in on high-resolution face photographs, we were able to recover images of unseen bystanders from reflections in the subjects' eyes. To establish whether these bystanders could be identified from the reflection images, we presented them as stimuli in a face matching task (Experiment 1. Accuracy in the face matching task was well above chance (50%, despite the unpromising source of the stimuli. Participants who were unfamiliar with the bystanders' faces (n = 16 performed at 71% accuracy [t(15 = 7.64, p<.0001, d = 1.91], and participants who were familiar with the faces (n = 16 performed at 84% accuracy [t(15 = 11.15, p<.0001, d = 2.79]. In a test of spontaneous recognition (Experiment 2, observers could reliably name a familiar face from an eye reflection image. For crimes in which the victims are photographed (e.g., hostage taking, child sex abuse, reflections in the eyes of the photographic subject could help to identify perpetrators.

  14. An investigation of bystander effects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVeaux, L.C.; Wells, D.P.; Durtschi, L.S.; Reda, M.; Frujinoiu, C.; Harmon, F.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: 'Bystander' effects have been documented in various mammalian cell types and appear to act by two distinct mechanisms. One response requires a functional gap-junction. A non gap-junction-mediated response has also been observed in human cell lines, indicating release of a signaling factor. No analogous response has been investigated in unicellular organisms. Given that DNA damage signaling pathways are present in simple eukaryotes, we investigated bystander signaling effects using a single-celled organism, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This organism may provide a much simpler model system than higher eukaryotic cells for studying these effects. We measured survival and mutation rate in an unirradiated culture after exposure to an irradiated culture. These two cultures were mixed immediately after irradiation, and any signaling factor that was produced had direct and continuous access to the unirradiated cells during subsequent cell divisions. The irradiated culture was from a multiply auxotrophic strain, whereas the unirradiated culture was from a prototrophic strain. Surviving colonies of the unirradiated culture were thus easily distinguished from those arising from irradiated cells. Mutation rates were measured as forward mutation to 2-deoxyglucose resistance. We have investigated bystander effects with electron and gamma dose from 6 to 20 MeV electron linacs. We varied electron beam energies, dose rates and temporal distributions of dose. The importance of this research stems from the fundamental evolutionary significance of cell signaling of any kind in unicellular systems, representing a major step toward the evolution of multi-cellular states

  15. The Tankwa Karoo National Park feral goat population: A unique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tankwa Karoo National Park feral goat population: A unique genetic ... The feral goats from Tankwa Karoo National Park in the Northern Cape, South Africa, ... Park and former Tankwa goats, now kept on a private farm were genotyped, ...

  16. quality and consumer acceptability of goat milk with respect to goat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    African Crop Science Journal by African Crop Science Society is licensed under ... farmers' goats in Trans Nzoia County was also determined. ..... Consumer acceptability (panelists scores*) of goat milk products in the north rift region in Kenya.

  17. Homeostatic 'bystander' proliferation of human peripheral blood B cells in response to polyclonal T-cell stimulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Pietruczuk, Krzysztof; Frąckowiak, Joanna; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of maintenance of adequate numbers of B lymphocytes and of protective levels of immunoglobulins in the absence of antigenic (re)stimulation remain not fully understood. Meanwhile, our results presented here show that both peripheral blood naive and memory B cells can be activated strongly and non-specifically (in a mitogen-like fashion) in 5-day in vitro cultures of anti-CD3- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy people. This polyclonal, bystander activation of the B cells includes multiple divisions of most of them (assessed here by the flow cytometric technique of dividing cell tracking) and significant antibody [immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG] secretion. Observed proliferation of the CD19(+) B cells depends on contact with stimulated T helper (Th) cells (via CD40-CD40L interaction) and on the response of B cells to secreted interleukins IL-5, IL-10 and IL-4, and is correlated with the levels of these Th-derived molecules, while it does not involve the ligation of the BCR/CD19 complex. We suggest that the effect might reflect the situation occurring in vivo as the homeostatic proliferation of otherwise non-stimulated, peripheral B lymphocytes, providing an always ready pool for efficient antibody production to any new (or cognate) antigen challenge. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Peripheral neuropathy in a copper-deficient goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Morais de Almeida

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This report aimed to describe a case of peripheral neuropathy in a copper-deficient goat, and highlights the clinical, and pathological features of the disease. The goat had low body score, hyporexia, alopecia, achromotrichia, left hindlimb protraction, paralysis with dragging of digit and difficulty to stand up and microcytic normochromic anemia. Copper concentration in serum was markedly lower (2.0µmol L-1 whereas the iron serum content was significantly increased (51.0µmol L-1. The main gross alteration was the reduction of the quadriceps vastus laterallis muscle volume. Histologically, there was atrophy of the quadriceps vastus laterallis muscle and presence of satellite cells, infiltration of lymphocytes, macrophages and replacement of the fibers by connective tissue. In the femoral nerve, there was axonal degeneration with myelin sheath expansion and presence of vacuoles, usually in chains and containing axonal debris or macrophages. Clinical, laboratorial and pathologic findings are consistent with peripheral neuropathy due to a severy copper deficiency.

  19. Bystander Defibrillation for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Public vs Residential Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik; Rajan, Shahzleen; Kragholm, Kristian; Ejlskov, Linda; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Gerds, Thomas A; Hjortshøj, Søren; Lippert, Freddy; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Wissenberg, Mads

    2017-05-01

    Bystander-delivered defibrillation (hereinafter referred to as bystander defibrillation) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains limited despite the widespread dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). To examine calendar changes in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. This nationwide study identified 18 688 patients in Denmark with first-time OHCA from June 1, 2001, to December 31, 2012, using the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Patients had a presumed cardiac cause of arrest that was not witnessed by emergency medical services personnel. Data were analyzed from April 1, 2015, to December 10, 2016. Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher-assisted guidance of bystander resuscitation efforts. The proportion of patients who received bystander defibrillation according to the location of the cardiac arrest and their subsequent 30-day survival. Of the 18 688 patients with OHCAs (67.8% men and 32.2% women; median [interquartile range] age, 72 [62-80] years), 4783 (25.6%) had a cardiac arrest in a public location and 13 905 (74.4%) in a residential location. The number of registered AEDs increased from 141 in 2007 to 7800 in 2012. The distribution of AED location was consistently skewed in favor of public locations. Bystander defibrillation increased in public locations from 3 of 245 (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.4%-3.5%) in 2001 to 78 of 510 (15.3%; 95% CI, 12.4%-18.7%) in 2012 (P bystander defibrillation increased in public locations from 8.3% (95% CI, 1.5%-35.4%) in 2001/2002 to 57

  20. Involvement of MAPK proteins in bystander effects induced by chemicals and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asur, Rajalakshmi; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Marples, Brian; Thomas, Robert A.; Tucker, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have examined bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation, however few have evaluated the ability of chemicals to induce similar effects. We previously reported the ability of two chemicals, mitomycin C (MMC) and phleomycin (PHL) to induce bystander effects in normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The focus of the current study was to determine the involvement of the MAPK proteins in bystander effects induced by physical and chemical DNA damaging agents and to evaluate the effects of MAPK inhibition on bystander-induced caspase 3/7 activation. The phosphorylation levels of the MAPK proteins ERK1/2, JNK, and p38, were measured from 1 to 24 h following direct or bystander exposure to MMC, PHL or radiation. We observed transient phosphorylation, at early time points, of all 3 proteins in bystander cells. We also evaluated the effect of MAPK inhibition on bystander-induced caspase 3/7 activity to determine the role of MAPK proteins in bystander-induced apoptosis. We observed bystander-induced activation of caspase 3/7 in bystander cells. Inhibition of MAPK proteins resulted in a decrease in caspase 3/7 activity at the early time points, and the caspase activity increased (in the case of ERK inhibition) or returned to basal levels (in the case of JNK or p38 inhibition) between 12 and 24 h. PHL is considered to be a radiomimetic agent, however in the present study PHL behaved more like a chemical and not like radiation in terms of MAPK phosphorylation. These results point to the involvement of MAPK proteins in the bystander effect induced by radiation and chemicals and provide additional evidence that this response is not limited to radiation but is a generalized stress response in cells.

  1. Expression profiles are different in carbon ion-irradiated normal human fibroblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwakawa, Mayumi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Imadome, Kaori; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Testuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Imai, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that ionizing radiation induces biological effects in non-irradiated bystander cells having received signals from directly irradiated cells; however, energetic heavy ion-induced bystander response is incompletely characterized. Here we performed microarray analysis of irradiated and bystander fibroblasts in confluent cultures. To see the effects in bystander cells, each of 1, 5 and 25 sites was targeted with 10 particles of carbon ions (18.3 MeV/u, 103 keV/μm) using microbeams, where particles traversed 0.00026, 0.0013 and 0.0066% of cells, respectively. diated cells, cultures were exposed to 10% survival dose (D), 0.1D and 0.01D of corresponding broadbeams (108 keV/μm). Irrespective of the target numbers (1, 5 or 25 sites) and the time (2 or 6 h postirradiation), similar expression changes were observed in bystander cells. Among 874 probes that showed more than 1.5-fold changes in bystander cells, 25% were upregulated and the remainder downregulated. These included genes related to cell communication (PIK3C2A, GNA13, FN1, ANXA1 and IL1RAP), stress response (RAD23B, ATF4 and EIF2AK4) and cell cycle (MYCN, RBBP4 and NEUROG1). Pathway analysis revealed serial bystander activation of G protein/PI-3 kinase pathways. Instead, genes related to cell cycle or death (CDKN1A, GADD45A, NOTCH1 and BCL2L1), and cell communication (IL1B, TCF7 and ID1) were upregulated in irradiated cells, but not in bystander cells. Our results indicate different expression profiles in irradiated and bystander cells, and imply that intercellular signaling between irradiated and bystander cells activate intracellular signaling, leading to the transcriptional stress response in bystander cells

  2. Cellular composition of granulomatous lesions in gut-associated lymphoid tissues of goats during the first year after experimental infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, C; Köhler, H; Liebler-Tenorio, E M

    2015-01-15

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes lesions in naturally and experimentally infected ruminants which greatly differ in severity, cellular composition and number of mycobacteria. Morphologically distinct lesions are already found during the clinically inapparent phase of infection. The complex local host response and number of MAP were characterized at the initial sites of lesions, organized gut-associated lymphoid tissue, in experimentally infected goats. Tissues were collected at 3, 6, 9 and 12 month post-inoculation (mpi) from goat kids that had orally received 10 times 10mg of bacterial wet mass of MAP (JII-1961). The cellular composition of lesions in Peyer's patches in the jejunum and next to the ileocecal valve was evaluated in 21 MAP-inoculated goats, where lesions were compared with unaltered tissue of six control goats. CD68+, CD4+, CD8+, γδ T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes and plasma cells, MHC class II+ and CD25+ cells were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in serial cryostat sections. At 3 mpi, extensive granulomatous infiltrates predominated, consisting of numerous epitheloid cells admixed with many CD4 and γδ T lymphocytes. Only single MAP were detected. This indicates a strong cellular immune reaction able to control MAP infection. γδ T lymphocytes were markedly increased in this type of lesion which may reflect their important role early in the pathogenesis of paratuberculosis. At 9 and 12 mpi, divergent lesions were observed which may reflect different outcomes of host-pathogen interactions. In five goats, minimal granulomatous lesions were surrounded by extensive lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and no MAP were detected by immunohistochemistry. This was interpreted as effective host response that was able to eliminate MAP locally. In three goats, decreased numbers of lymphocytes, but extensive granulomatous infiltrates with numerous epitheloid cells containing increased numbers of mycobacteria were seen. This shift of the

  3. Radiation-induced bystander effects in cultured human stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykyta V Sokolov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The radiation-induced "bystander effect" (RIBE was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR. RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed.Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC and embryonic stem cells (hESC were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05. A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05.These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative-based therapies.

  4. Prevalence of Campylobacter among goats and retail goat meat in Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    a Mpalang, Rosette Kabwang; Boreux, Raphaël; Melin, Pierrette; Akir Ni Bitiang, Khang'Mate; Daube, Georges; De Mol, Patrick

    2014-02-13

    The prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli was determined in goat and goat meat sold at retail outlets in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo). A total of 644 samples, including 177 goat meat, 86 goat stomachs, 139 ready to eat (RTE) goat skewers, and 242 goat faecal samples were examined for the presence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli using polymerase chain reaction. Overall, Campylobacter spp. were found in 34.6% of the examined samples. C. jejuni was isolated in 10.1% and C. coli in 26.7% of samples. Only 2.2% of all samples were positive for both species. There was a significant association between the prevalence of C. coli and the type of sample (p goat meat, goat stomachs, RTE goat skewers, and goat faecal samples, respectively. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the prevalence observed in the rainy season (16.7%) and the dry season (20.0%). Moreover, the overall prevalence of Campylobacter in slaughter sites, open-air markets, warehouses, and semi-open-air markets was 28.2%, 34.2%, 35.4%, and 42.9%, respectively. Statistically, there was no influence of the sample collection site on the frequency of isolation of Campylobacter (p > 0.05). This study shows that, considering the relatively high prevalence of this pathogen, live goat and goat meat are major sources of human and environmental contamination by Campylobacter spp. in Lubumbashi.

  5. Do Sexual Assault Bystander Interventions Change Men's Intentions? Applying the Theory of Normative Social Behavior to Predicting Bystander Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Amanda; Turner, Monique Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of sexual assault on college campuses has led to the implementation of health communication programs to prevent sexual assault. A few novel programs focus on primary prevention by targeting social norms related to gender and masculinity among men through bystander intervention. Guided by the theory of normative social behavior, this study sought to examine the relative effect of campaigns communicating positive versus negative injunctive norms and the interaction between exposure to such campaign messages and perceived descriptive norms and relevant cognitive moderators (e.g., outcome expectations, injunctive norms, group identity, ego involvement) among men. A 2 (high/low descriptive norms) × 2 (high/low moderator) × 3 (public service announcement) independent groups quasi-experimental design (N = 332) was used. Results indicated that messages communicating positive injunctive norms were most effective among men who were least likely to engage in bystander intervention. Furthermore, descriptive norms played a significant role in behavioral intentions, such that those with stronger norms were more likely to report intentions to engage in bystander behaviors in the future. Similarly, the moderators of aspiration, injunctive norms, social approval, and ego involvement had a significant positive effect on behavioral intentions. These findings have important implications for future message design strategy and audience segmentation.

  6. Meat quality of goat and sheep sausages

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, A.; Pereira, Etelvina; Rodrigues, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to contribute to the characterization of a new product, based on goat and sheep meat with a strategy, which gives value-added to meat from culled goats and sheep, which have a very low commercial price. Carcasses from animals weighing more than the body weight allowed by PDO label specifications were used to produce fresh sausages. Sheep and goats sausages were produced in a traditional industry, in Northeast Portugal. The following character...

  7. Conceptualizing the Engaging Bystander Approach to Sexual Violence Prevention on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Postmus, Judy L.; Koenick, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    Bystander intervention offers promise as a sexual violence prevention tool for student affairs administrators on college campuses, but the conceptualization and definition of the approach is in its infancy and needs further development. In an effort to emphasize the potential role of bystanders in the primary prevention of sexual violence, we put…

  8. Sorority Women's and Fraternity Men's Rape Myth Acceptance and Bystander Intervention Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, R. Sean; Brosi, Matthew W.; Foubert, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Sorority women and fraternity men are more likely than other students to be survivors and perpetrators of sexual assault, respectively. The present study examined sorority and fraternity members' rape myth acceptance, bystander efficacy, and bystander willingness to help in potential sexual assault situations. Sorority women were more rejecting of…

  9. Effects of a Rape Awareness Program on College Women: Increasing Bystander Efficacy and Willingness to Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, John D.; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Brasfield, Hope; Hill, Brent

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study evaluated the efficacy of a sexual assault risk-reduction program on 279 college women that focused on learning characteristics of male perpetrators and teaching bystander intervention techniques. After seeing The Women's Program, participants reported significantly greater bystander efficacy and significantly greater…

  10. Role of iNOS in Bystander Signaling Between Macrophages and Lymphoma Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Maurya, Dharmendra Kumar; Krishna, Malini

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The present report describes the bystander effects of radiation between similar and dissimilar cells and the role of iNOS in such communication. Materials and Methods: EL-4 and RAW 264.7 cells were exposed to 5 Gy γ-irradiation. The medium from irradiated cells was transferred to unirradiated cells. Results: Irradiated EL-4 cells as well as those cultured in the presence of medium from γ-irradiated EL-4 cells showed an upregulation of NF-κB, iNOS, p53, and p21/waf1 genes. The directly irradiated and the bystander EL-4 cells showed an increase in DNA damage, apoptosis, and NO production. Bystander signaling was also found to exist between RAW 264.7 (macrophage) and EL-4 (lymphoma) cells. Unstimulated or irradiated RAW 264.7 cells did not induce bystander effect in unirradiated EL-4 cells, but LPS stimulated and irradiated RAW 264.7 cells induced an upregulation of NF-κB and iNOS genes and increased the DNA damage in bystander EL-4 cells. Treatment of EL-4 or RAW 264.7 cells with L-NAME significantly reduced the induction of gene expression and DNA damage in the bystander EL-4 cells, whereas treatment with cPTIO only partially reduced the induction of gene expression and DNA damage in the bystander EL-4 cells. Conclusions: It was concluded that active iNOS in the irradiated cells was essential for bystander response

  11. Engaging Upstanders: Class-Wide Approach to Promoting Positive Bystander Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Laura; Smith, Jennifer; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Positive and supportive bystander behaviors have been associated with decreases in the frequency and negative impact of bullying. This article addresses the design, implementation, evaluation, and continuation of a classroom-based intervention that promotes positive bystander behaviors. The Engaging Upstanders curriculum was piloted with two…

  12. Effective suppression of bystander effects by DMSO treatment of irradiated CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashino, Genro; Prise, K.M.; Suzuki, Keiji

    2007-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that irradiated cells produce some signals which interact with non-exposed cells in the same population via a bystander effect. Here, we examined whether dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is effective in suppressing radiation induced bystander effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and repair deficient xrs5 cells. When 1 Gy-irradiated CHO cells were treated with 0.5% DMSO for 1 hr before irradiation, the induction of micronuclei in irradiated cells was suppressed to 80% of that in non-treated irradiated cells. The suppressive effect of DMSO on the formation of bystander signals was examined and the results demonstrated that 0.5% DMSO treatment of irradiated cells completely suppressed the induction of micronuclei by the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells. It is suggested that irradiated cells ceased signal formation for bystander effects by the action of DMSO. To determine the involvement of reactive oxygen species on the formation of bystander signals, we examined oxidative stress levels using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) staining method in irradiated populations. The results showed that the treatment of irradiated cells with 0.5% DMSO did not suppress oxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the prevention of oxidative stress is independent of the suppressive effect of DMSO on the formation of the bystander signal in irradiated cells. It is suggested that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in irradiated cells is not a substantial trigger of a bystander signal. (author)

  13. Individual Motivations and Characteristics Associated with Bystander Intervention during Bullying Episodes among Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Pepler, Debra; Cummings, Joanne G.; Craig, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore bystander experiences during bullying episodes among children and youth attending a residential summer camp by investigating rates of witnessing and intervention, as well as individual motivations and characteristics associated with bystander intervention. The majority of children had witnessed bullying…

  14. What Would You Do? Strategies for Bystander Intervention to Prevent Sexual Violence by College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Hoffman, Melanie Lowe; McMahon, Sheila M.; Zucker, Sharon; Koenick, Ruth Anne

    2013-01-01

    Bystander education is an increasingly utilized strategy for addressing sexual assault prevention and intervention on U.S. college campuses. Given the paramount importance of peers among college students, what types of pro-social bystander interventions do students themselves deem feasible in the campus context? Drawing on self-reports from…

  15. Action Research Evaluation of Bystander Intervention Training Created by Munche, Stern, and O'Brien

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiflet, Jacqueline H.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, appreciative inquiry study was an examination of bystander intervention as related to sexual assault in the military. The purpose of the study was to examine how military personnel and Department of Defense civilian employees reflecting diverse backgrounds perceived the effectiveness of bystander intervention training and sexual…

  16. Roles of Fatalism and Parental Support in the Relationship between Bullying Victimization and Bystander Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiqiong; Chen, Peter Y.; Chen, Fu-Li; Wu, Wen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how past bullied victims engage two types of bystander behaviors (defender and outsider) when they witness bullying situations.We also investigate if fatalism mediates the relationship between past victimization and two bystander behaviors. Finally, we test if parental support moderates the relationship between fatalism and…

  17. Booze, Bars, and Bystander Behavior: People Who Consumed Alcohol Help Faster in the Presence of Others

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, Marco; van Prooijen, Jan-Willem; Elffers, Henk; van Lange, Paul A.M.

    2016-01-01

    People help each other less often and less quickly when bystanders are present. In this paper, we propose that alcohol consumption could attenuate or reverse this so-called bystander effect. Alcohol impairs people cognitively and perceptually, leading them to think less about the presence of others

  18. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. AIM: To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OH...

  19. On Standby? A Comparison of Online and Offline Witnesses to Bullying and Their Bystander Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Roslynn; Campbell, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Given their ubiquitous presence as witnesses to school-yard bullying, the role of the "bystander" has been studied extensively. The prevalence and behaviour of bystanders to "cyberbullying," however, is less understood. In an anonymous, school-based questionnaire, 716 secondary school students from South-East Queensland…

  20. Debriefing bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is valuable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Fjordholt, Martin; Pedersen, Birgitte Dahl; Østergaard, Doris; Lippert, Freddy K

    2014-11-01

    To explore the concept of debriefing bystanders after participating in an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation attempt including (1) bystanders' most commonly addressed reactions after participating in a resuscitation attempt when receiving debriefing from medical dispatchers; (2) their perception of effects of receiving debriefing and (3) bystanders' recommendations for a systematic debriefing concept. Qualitative study based on telephone debriefing to bystanders and interviews with bystanders who received debriefing. Data was analyzed using the phenomenological approach. Six themes emerged from analysis of debriefing audio files: (1) identification of OHCA; (2) emotional and perceptual experience with OHCA; (3) collaboration with healthcare professionals; (4) patients outcome; (5) coping with the experience and (6) general reflections. When evaluating the concept, bystanders expressed positive short term effect of receiving debriefing and a retention of this effect after two months. Recommendations for a future debriefing concept were given. Debriefing by emergency medical dispatchers to OHCA bystanders stimulates reflection, positively influencing the ability to cope with the emotional reactions and the cognitive perception of own performance and motivates improvement of CPR skills. Importantly, it increases confidence to provide CPR in the future. Implementation of telephone debriefing to bystanders at Emergency Medical Dispatch Centres is a low complexity and a low cost intervention though the logistic challenges have to be considered. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Cow's milk and goat's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turck, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Cow's milk is increasingly suggested to play a role in the development of chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders whereas goat's milk is advocated as having several health benefits. Cow's milk is a rich and cheap source of protein and calcium, and a valuable food for bone health. Despite their high content in saturated fats, consumption of full-fat dairy products does not seem to cause significant changes in cardiovascular disease risk variables. Early introduction of cow's milk is a strong negative determinant of iron status. Unmodified cow's milk does not meet nutritional requirements of infants although it is acceptable to add small volumes of cow's milk to complementary foods. Cow's milk protein allergy has a prevalence ranging from 2 to 7%, and the age of recovery is usually around 2-3 years. The evidence linking cow's milk intake to a later risk of type 1 diabetes or chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders (obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension) is not convincing. Milk probably protects against colorectal cancer, diets high in calcium are a probable cause of prostate cancer, and there is limited evidence suggesting that high consumption of milk and dairy products increases the risk for prostate cancer. There is no evidence to support the use of a cow's milk-free diet as a primary treatment for individuals with autistic spectrum disorders. Unmodified goat's milk is not suitable for infants because of the high protein and minerals content and of a low folate content. Goat's milk has no clear nutritional advantage over cow's milk and is not less allergenic. The European Food Safety Authority recently stated that proteins from goat's milk can be suitable as a protein source for infant and follow-on formula, provided the final product complies with the compositional criteria laid down in Directive 2006/141/EC. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Liver irradiation causes distal bystander effects in the rat brain and affects animal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Slava; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kolb, Bryan

    2016-01-26

    Radiation therapy can not only produce effects on targeted organs, but can also influence shielded bystander organs, such as the brain in targeted liver irradiation. The brain is sensitive to radiation exposure, and irradiation causes significant neuro-cognitive deficits, including deficits in attention, concentration, memory, and executive and visuospatial functions. The mechanisms of their occurrence are not understood, although they may be related to the bystander effects.We analyzed the induction, mechanisms, and behavioural repercussions of bystander effects in the brain upon liver irradiation in a well-established rat model.Here, we show for the first time that bystander effects occur in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus regions upon liver irradiation, where they manifest as altered gene expression and somewhat increased levels of γH2AX. We also report that bystander effects in the brain are associated with neuroanatomical and behavioural changes, and are more pronounced in females than in males.

  3. Getting angry matters: Going beyond perspective taking and empathic concern to understand bystanders' behavior in bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Tiziana; Gini, Gianluca; Thornberg, Robert

    2017-12-01

    The present study examined the relations between different empathic dimensions and bystanders' behavior in bullying. Specifically, the indirect effects of empathic concern and perspective taking via empathic anger on defending and passive bystanding were tested in a sample of Italian young adolescents (N = 398; M age  = 12 years, 3 months, 47.2% girls). Path analysis confirmed the direct and indirect effects, via empathic anger, of empathic concern and perspective taking on bystanders' behavior, with the exception of the direct association between perspective taking and passive bystanding that was not significant. Our findings suggest that considering empathic anger together with empathic concern and perspective taking could help researchers to better understand the links between empathic dispositions and bystanders' behavior in bullying. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Chemokines, lymphocytes, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farber J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are members of a family of more than 30 human cytokines whose best-described activities are as chemotactic factors for leukocytes and that are presumed to be important in leukocyte recruitment and trafficking. While many chemokines can act on lymphocytes, the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology are poorly understood. The recent discoveries that chemokines can suppress infection by HIV-1 and that chemokine receptors serve, along with CD4, as obligate co-receptors for HIV-1 entry have lent urgency to studies on the relationships between chemokines and lymphocytes. My laboratory has characterized Mig and Crg-2/IP-10, chemokines that are induced by IFN-g and that specifically target lymphocytes, particularly activated T cells. We have demonstrated that the genes for these chemokines are widely expressed during experimental infections in mice with protozoan and viral pathogens, but that the patterns of mig and crg-2 expression differed, suggesting non-redundant roles in vivo. Our related studies to identify new chemokine receptors from activated lymphocytes resulted in the cloning of STRL22 and STRL33. We and others have shown that STRL22 is a receptor for the CC chemokine MIP-3a, and STRL22 has been re-named CCR6. Although STRL33 remains an orphan receptor, we have shown that it can function as a co-receptor for HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, and that it is active with a broader range of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins than the major co-receptors described to date. The ability of STRL33 to function with a wide variety of envelope glycoproteins may become particularly important if therapies are instituted to block other specific co-receptors. We presume that investigations into the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology will provide information important for understanding the pathogenesis of AIDS and for manipulating immune and inflammatory responses for clinical benefit

  5. A sightability model for mountain goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, C.G.; Jenkins, K.J.; Chang, W.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    Unbiased estimates of mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) populations are key to meeting diverse harvest management and conservation objectives. We developed logistic regression models of factors influencing sightability of mountain goat groups during helicopter surveys throughout the Cascades and Olympic Ranges in western Washington during summers, 20042007. We conducted 205 trials of the ability of aerial survey crews to detect groups of mountain goats whose presence was known based on simultaneous direct observation from the ground (n 84), Global Positioning System (GPS) telemetry (n 115), or both (n 6). Aerial survey crews detected 77 and 79 of all groups known to be present based on ground observers and GPS collars, respectively. The best models indicated that sightability of mountain goat groups was a function of the number of mountain goats in a group, presence of terrain obstruction, and extent of overstory vegetation. Aerial counts of mountain goats within groups did not differ greatly from known group sizes, indicating that under-counting bias within detected groups of mountain goats was small. We applied HorvitzThompson-like sightability adjustments to 1,139 groups of mountain goats observed in the Cascade and Olympic ranges, Washington, USA, from 2004 to 2007. Estimated mean sightability of individual animals was 85 but ranged 0.750.91 in areas with low and high sightability, respectively. Simulations of mountain goat surveys indicated that precision of population estimates adjusted for sightability biases increased with population size and number of replicate surveys, providing general guidance for the design of future surveys. Because survey conditions, group sizes, and habitat occupied by goats vary among surveys, we recommend using sightability correction methods to decrease bias in population estimates from aerial surveys of mountain goats.

  6. Temporally distinct response of irradiated normal human fibroblasts and their bystander cells to energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Ni, Meinan; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects have been documented for a multitude of endpoints such as mutations, chromosome aberrations and cell death, which arise in nonirradiated bystander cells having received signals from directly irradiated cells; however, energetic heavy ion-induced bystander response is incompletely characterized. To address this, we employed precise microbeams of carbon and neon ions for targeting only a very small fraction of cells in confluent fibroblast cultures. Conventional broadfield irradiation was conducted in parallel to see the effects in irradiated cells. Exposure of 0.00026% of cells led to nearly 10% reductions in the clonogenic survival and twofold rises in the apoptotic incidence regardless of ion species. Whilst apoptotic frequency increased with time up to 72 h postirradiation in irradiated cells, its frequency escalated up to 24 h postirradiation but declined at 48 h postirradiation in bystander cells, indicating that bystander cells exhibit transient commitment to apoptosis. Carbon- and neon-ion microbeam irradiation similarly caused almost twofold increments in the levels of serine 15-phosphorylated p53 proteins, irrespective of whether 0.00026, 0.0013 or 0.0066% of cells were targeted. Whereas the levels of phosphorylated p53 were elevated and remained unchanged at 2 h and 6 h postirradiation in irradiated cells, its levels rose at 6 h postirradiation but not at 2 h postirradiation in bystander cells, suggesting that bystander cells manifest delayed p53 phosphorylation. Collectively, our results indicate that heavy ions inactivate clonogenic potential of bystander cells, and that the time course of the response to heavy ions differs between irradiated and bystander cells. These induced bystander responses could be a defensive mechanism that minimizes further expansion of aberrant cells

  7. A Role for Bioelectric Effects in the Induction of Bystander Signals by Ionizing Radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, C.; Moran, G.; McNeill, F.; Gow, M.D.; Denbeigh, J.; Prestwich, W.; Seymour, C.B.

    2007-01-01

    The induction of “bystander effects” i.e. effects in cells which have not received an ionizing radiation track, is now accepted but the mechanisms are not completely clear. Bystander effects following high and low LET radiation exposure are accepted but mechanisms are still not understood. There is some evidence for a physical component to the signal. This paper tests the hypothesis that bioelectric or biomagnetic phenomena are involved. Human immortalized skin keratinocytes and primary explants of mouse bladder and fish skin, were exposed directly to ionizing radiation or treated in a variety of bystander protocols. Exposure of cells was conducted by shielding one group of flasks using lead, to reduce the dose below the threshold of 2mGy 60Cobalt gamma rays established for the bystander effect. The endpoint for the bystander effect in the reporter system used was reduction in cloning efficiency (RCE). The magnitude of the RCE was similar in shielded and unshielded flasks. When cells were placed in a Faraday cage the magnitude of the RCE was less but not eliminated. The results suggest that liquid media or cell-cell contact transmission of bystander factors may be only part of the bystander mechanism. Bioelectric or bio magnetic fields may have a role to play. To test this further, cells were placed in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine for 10min using a typical head scan protocol. This treatment also induced a bystander response. Apart from the obvious clinical relevance, the MRI results further suggest that bystander effects may be produced by non-ionizing exposures. It is concluded that bioelectric or magnetic effects may be involved in producing bystander signaling cascades commonly seen following ionizing radiation exposure. PMID:18648606

  8. Lay Bystanders' Perspectives on What Facilitates Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Use of Automated External Defibrillators in Real Cardiac Arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    factors encourage lay bystanders to initiate CPR and AED use in a cohort of bystanders previously trained in CPR techniques who were present at an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: One-hundred and twenty-eight semistructured qualitative interviews with CPR-trained lay bystanders...... obligation to act. CONCLUSIONS: Several factors other than previous hands-on CPR training facilitate lay bystander instigation of CPR and AED use. The recognition and modification of these factors may increase lay bystander CPR rates and patient survival following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest....

  9. Mechanism of protection of bystander cells by exogenous carbon monoxide: Impaired response to damage signal of radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, W.; Yu, K.N.; Wu, L.J.; Wu, Y.C.; Wang, H.Z.

    2011-01-01

    A protective effect of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO), generated by CO releasing molecule ticarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2), on the bystander cells from the toxicity of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was revealed in our previous study. In the present work, a possible mechanism of this CO effect was investigated. The results from medium transfer experiments showed that α-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells would release nitric oxide (NO), which was detected with specific NO fluorescence probe, to induce p53 binding protein 1 (BP1) formation in the cell population receiving the medium, and the release peak was found to be at 1 h post irradiation. Treating the irradiated or bystander cells separately with CO (CORM-2) demonstrated that CO was effective in the bystander cells but not the irradiated cells. Measurements of NO production and release with a specific NO fluorescence probe also showed that CO treatment did not affect the production and release of NO by irradiated cells. Protection of CO on cells to peroxynitrite, an oxidizing free radical from NO, suggested that CO might protect bystander cells via impaired response of bystander cells to NO, a RIBE signal in our research system.

  10. Mechanism of protection of bystander cells by exogenous carbon monoxide: Impaired response to damage signal of radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wu, L.J. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Y.C. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Wang, H.Z. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2011-05-10

    A protective effect of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO), generated by CO releasing molecule ticarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2), on the bystander cells from the toxicity of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was revealed in our previous study. In the present work, a possible mechanism of this CO effect was investigated. The results from medium transfer experiments showed that {alpha}-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells would release nitric oxide (NO), which was detected with specific NO fluorescence probe, to induce p53 binding protein 1 (BP1) formation in the cell population receiving the medium, and the release peak was found to be at 1 h post irradiation. Treating the irradiated or bystander cells separately with CO (CORM-2) demonstrated that CO was effective in the bystander cells but not the irradiated cells. Measurements of NO production and release with a specific NO fluorescence probe also showed that CO treatment did not affect the production and release of NO by irradiated cells. Protection of CO on cells to peroxynitrite, an oxidizing free radical from NO, suggested that CO might protect bystander cells via impaired response of bystander cells to NO, a RIBE signal in our research system.

  11. Embryo transfer using cryopreserved Boer goat blastocysts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effect of embryo cryopreservation techniques on the survivability of embryos and fertility following transfer to Boer goat does. The oestrous cycles of 27 mature recipients Boer goat does were synchronised using controlled internal drug release dispensers (CIDR's) for 16 days. At CIDR ...

  12. Thoracic radiographic anatomy in goats | Makungu | Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to describe the normal radiographic anatomy of the thorax of small East African goats as a reference for clinical use. Radiography of the thorax was performed under general anaesthesia in 10 healthy small East African goats. Right lateral (RL), left lateral (LL), dorsoventral (DV) and ventrodorsal ...

  13. Response to Commentaries on Bystander Training as Leadership Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jackson

    2018-03-01

    In this article, the author responds to three commentaries about his article "Bystander Training as Leadership Training: Notes on the Origins, Philosophy, and Pedagogy of the Mentors in Violence Prevention Model," published in this volume. Topics covered in the commentaries and response include questions about evaluation and evidence for program effectiveness; the necessity for gender violence prevention education to be gender transformative and part of a comprehensive, multilevel prevention approach, especially for adolescents; and the degree to which Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP), as a "social justice"-oriented program, incorporates intersectional and anti-oppression frameworks and perspectives.

  14. Helminthiasis, bystander diseases and vaccines: analysis of interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Miles B; Fincham, John E

    2007-11-01

    Helminthiasis has assumed a new medical and veterinary significance following the recognition of its immunomodulatory consequences for the severity of bystander conditions and the efficacy of immunization against non-helminthic diseases of humans and livestock. Recent papers by Jackson et al. and Turner et al. have an important bearing on research in these areas. One of the implications of their work is that the parasitological criterion of egg-positivity versus egg-negativity is too simplistic to use in co-infection and related studies unless accompanied by immunological analysis.

  15. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that may increase the risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia include: Previous cancer treatment. Children and adults who've had certain types of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for other kinds of cancer may have an increased ... leukemia. Exposure to radiation. People exposed to very high ...

  16. 36 CFR 13.1114 - May I collect goat hair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I collect goat hair? 13... General Provisions § 13.1114 May I collect goat hair? The collection of naturally shed goat hair is... conditions for collecting goat hair is prohibited. ...

  17. Production Systems for the Muslim Goat's Meat Market | Asheim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A goat's meat production system based on suckling cashmere goats might also be ... The demand for goat's meat is high when sold at equal price of lamb's meat, but ... It is concluded that goat farmers should be paid a premium when keeping ...

  18. The placenta shed from goats with classical scrapie is infectious to goat kids and lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, David A; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Zhuang, Dongyue; Truscott, Thomas C; Dassanayake, Rohana P; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2015-08-01

    The placenta of domestic sheep plays a key role in horizontal transmission of classical scrapie. Domestic goats are frequently raised with sheep and are susceptible to classical scrapie, yet potential routes of transmission from goats to sheep are not fully defined. Sparse accumulation of disease-associated prion protein in cotyledons casts doubt about the role of the goat's placenta. Thus, relevant to mixed-herd management and scrapie-eradication efforts worldwide, we determined if the goat's placenta contains prions orally infectious to goat kids and lambs. A pooled cotyledon homogenate, prepared from the shed placenta of a goat with naturally acquired classical scrapie disease, was used to orally inoculate scrapie-naïve prion genotype-matched goat kids and scrapie-susceptible lambs raised separately in a scrapie-free environment. Transmission was detected in all four goats and in two of four sheep, which importantly identifies the goat's placenta as a risk for horizontal transmission to sheep and other goats.

  19. What role for DNA damage and repair in the bystander response?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prise, Kevin M.; Folkard, Melvyn; Kuosaite, Virginija; Tartier, Laurence; Zyuzikov, Nikolai; Shao, Chunlin

    2006-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect challenges the accepted paradigm of direct DNA damage in response to energy deposition driving the biological consequences of radiation exposure. With the bystander response, cells which have not been directly exposed to radiation respond to their neighbours being targeted. In our own studies we have used novel targeted microbeam approaches to specifically irradiate parts of individual cells within a population to quantify the bystander response and obtain mechanistic information. Using this approach it has become clear that energy deposited by radiation in nuclear DNA is not required to trigger the effect, with cytoplasmic irradiation required. Irradiated cells also trigger a bystander response regardless of whether they themselves live or die, suggesting that the phenotype of the targeted cell is not a determining factor. Despite this however, a range of evidence has shown that repair status is important for dealing with the consequences of a bystander signal. Importantly, repair processes involved in the processing of dsb appear to be involved suggesting that the bystander response involves the delayed or indirect production of dsb-type lesions in bystander cells. Whether these are infact true dsb or complexes of oxidised bases in combination with strand breaks and the mechanisms for their formation, remains to be elucidated

  20. The development of bystander intentions and social-moral reasoning about intergroup verbal aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sally B; Rutland, Adam; Cameron, Lindsey

    2015-11-01

    A developmental intergroup approach was taken to examine the development of prosocial bystander intentions among children and adolescents. Participants as bystanders (N = 260) aged 8-10 and 13-15 years were presented with scenarios of direct aggression between individuals from different social groups (i.e., intergroup verbal aggression). These situations involved either an ingroup aggressor and an outgroup victim or an outgroup aggressor and an ingroup victim. This study focussed on the role of intergroup factors (group membership, ingroup identification, group norms, and social-moral reasoning) in the development of prosocial bystander intentions. Findings showed that prosocial bystander intentions declined with age. This effect was partially mediated by the ingroup norm to intervene and perceived severity of the verbal aggression. However, a moderated mediation analysis showed that only when the victim was an ingroup member and the aggressor an outgroup member did participants become more likely with age to report prosocial bystander intentions due to increased ingroup identification. Results also showed that younger children focussed on moral concerns and adolescents focussed more on psychological concerns when reasoning about their bystander intention. These novel findings help explain the developmental decline in prosocial bystander intentions from middle childhood into early adolescence when observing direct intergroup aggression. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays a role in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Wang, Jufang; Ding, Nan; Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Xurui; Wang, Bing; Hua, Junrui; Wei, Wenjun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Bystander effects can be induced through cellular communication between irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells. The signals that mediate this cellular communication, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and even microRNAs, can be transferred between cells via gap junctions or extracellular medium. We have previously reported that miR-21, a well described DDR (DNA damage response) microRNA, is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects through a medium-mediated way. However, the mechanisms of the microRNA transfer have not been elucidated in details. In the present study, it was found that exosomes isolated from irradiated conditioned medium could induce bystander effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated plenty of evidences that miR-21, which is up-regulated as a result of mimic transfection or irradiation, can be transferred from donor or irradiated cells into extracellular medium and subsequently get access to the recipient or bystander cells through exosomes to induce bystander effects. Inhibiting the miR-21 expression in advance can offset the bystander effects to some extent. From all of these results, it can be concluded that the exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effects. These findings provide new insights into the functions of microRNAs and the cellular communication between the directly irradiated cells and the non-irradiated cells.

  2. New aspects of studies on stress response. Radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hideki; Hayashi, Sachiko; Jin, Zhao-Hui; Hatashita, Masanori; Kano, Eiichi

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the bystander effect which is the secondary stress response induced by the primary target affected by radiation and other environmental factors. The bystander effect can be exerted from the primary target cells through the gap junction, through interaction between ligands and receptors, through interaction between secreted bystander factors and receptors and through secreted bystander factors. Through the first, the typical one firstly shown in AG1521 cells is that, despite the pass of only 2% of irradiated α-particles through the target cell nucleus, much more cells respond to express p53 and p21/WAF1. Through the second, the Fas/Fas ligand in the target induce apoptosis of the non-target cells. As for the third, participation of cytokines and growth factors is suggested. Many investigations concern the fourth of bystander effects by the bystander factors: e.g., authors have studied the effects of X-ray, carbon beam or hyperthermia on nitric oxide synthase induction in A-172 cells. Studies of bystander effects possibly extend the concept of radiation biology. (K.H.)

  3. TakeCARE, a Video to Promote Bystander Behavior on College Campuses: Replication and Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N; Sargent, Kelli S; Salis, Katie Lee; Caiozzo, Christina; Rosenfield, David; Cascardi, Michele; Grych, John H; O'Leary, K Daniel; McDonald, Renee

    2017-08-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that college students who view TakeCARE, a video bystander program designed to encourage students to take action to prevent sexual and relationship violence (i.e., bystander behavior), display more bystander behavior relative to students who view a control video. The current study aimed to replicate and extend these findings by testing two different methods of administering TakeCARE and examining moderators of TakeCARE's effects on bystander behavior. Students at four universities ( n = 557) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (a) view TakeCARE in a monitored computer lab, (b) view TakeCARE at their own convenience after receiving an email link to the video, or (c) view a video about study skills (control group). Participants completed measures of bystander behavior at baseline and at a 1-month follow-up. Participants in both TakeCARE conditions reported more bystander behavior at follow-up assessments, compared with participants in the control condition. The beneficial effect of TakeCARE did not differ significantly across administration methods. However, the effects of TakeCARE on bystander behavior were moderated by students' perceptions of campus responsiveness to sexual violence, with more potent effects when students perceived their institution as responsive to reports of sexual violence.

  4. The effect of melanin on the bystander effect in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosse, I. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology of the National Academy of Sciences, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk (Belarus)]. E-mail: i.mosse@igc.bas-net.by; Marozik, P. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology of the National Academy of Sciences, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk (Belarus); Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, DIT, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Seymour, C. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. (Canada); Mothersill, C. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. (Canada)

    2006-05-11

    The influence of melanin on radiation-induced bystander effects has been studied. Melanin is known to be a natural substance with proved radioprotective properties in different organisms and cell lines. It is non-toxic and is effective against acute and chronic irradiation. The lower the radiation dose, the higher the relative impact of melanin protection. In this study influence of melanin on human keratinocytes (HPV-G cells) has been studied using the colony-forming assay. We have shown that bystander donor medium from 0.5 Gy irradiated cells when transferred to unirradiated cells, caused almost the same effect as direct irradiation. Melanin increased the colony-forming ability of bystander recipient cells when it was added into culture medium before irradiation. The effect of melanin added after irradiation was to produce less protection in both the directly irradiated and bystander medium treated groups. The absorption spectrum of the filtered medium is identical to one of the intact culture medium showing that melanin was not present in filtered medium. Thus, it cannot protect recipient cells but reduces the amount of the bystander effect. It is concluded that melanin added before irradiation effectively decreased the radiation dose. The reduction of the impact of the bystander signal on recipient cells when melanin was added to the donor medium after harvest but before filtration, may mean that the bystander signal has a physical component as melanin can absorb all types of physical energy.

  5. Intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways mediating ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Hara, Takamitsu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    A rapidly growing body of experimental evidence indicates that ionizing radiation induces biological effects in non-irradiated bystander cells that have received signals from adjacent or distant irradiated cells. This phenomenon, which has been termed the ionizing radiation-induced bystander effect, challenges the long-standing paradigm that radiation traversal through the nucleus of a cell is a prerequisite to elicit genetic damage or a biological response. Bystander effects have been observed in a number of experimental systems, and cells whose nucleus or cytoplasm is irradiated exert bystander responses. Bystander cells manifest a multitude of biological consequences, such as genetic and epigenetic changes, alterations in gene expression, activation of signal transduction pathways, and delayed effects in their progeny. Several mediating mechanisms have been proposed. These involve gap junction-mediated intercellular communication, secreted soluble factors, oxidative metabolism, plasma membrane-bound lipid rafts, and calcium fluxes. This paper reviews briefly the current knowledge of the bystander effect with a focus on proposed mechanisms. The potential benefit of bystander effects to cancer radiotherapy will also be discussed. (author)

  6. Bystander Effect Induced by UV Radiation; why should we be interested? 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Widel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The bystander effect, whose essence is an interaction of cells directly subjected to radiation with adjacent non-subjected cells, via molecular signals, is an important component of ionizing radiation action. However, knowledge of the bystander effect in the case of ultraviolet (UV radiation is quite limited. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by UV in exposed cells induce bystander effects in non-exposed cells, such as reduction in clonogenic cell survival and delayed cell death, oxidative DNA damage and gene mutations, induction of micronuclei, lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Although the bystander effect after UV radiation has been recognized in cell culture systems, its occurrence in vivo has not been studied. However, solar UV radiation, which is the main source of UV in the environment, may induce in human dermal tissue an inflammatory response and immune suppression, events which can be considered as bystander effects of UV radiation. The oxidative damage to DNA, genomic instability and the inflammatory response may lead to carcinogenesis. UV radiation is considered one of the important etiologic factors for skin cancers, basal- and squamous-cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. Based on the mechanisms of actions it seems that the UV-induced bystander effect can have some impact on skin damage (carcinogenesis?, and probably on cells of other tissues. The paper reviews the existing data about the UV-induced bystander effect and discusses a possible implication of this phenomenon for health risk. 

  7. The effect of melanin on the bystander effect in human keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosse, I.; Marozik, P.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of melanin on radiation-induced bystander effects has been studied. Melanin is known to be a natural substance with proved radioprotective properties in different organisms and cell lines. It is non-toxic and is effective against acute and chronic irradiation. The lower the radiation dose, the higher the relative impact of melanin protection. In this study influence of melanin on human keratinocytes (HPV-G cells) has been studied using the colony-forming assay. We have shown that bystander donor medium from 0.5 Gy irradiated cells when transferred to unirradiated cells, caused almost the same effect as direct irradiation. Melanin increased the colony-forming ability of bystander recipient cells when it was added into culture medium before irradiation. The effect of melanin added after irradiation was to produce less protection in both the directly irradiated and bystander medium treated groups. The absorption spectrum of the filtered medium is identical to one of the intact culture medium showing that melanin was not present in filtered medium. Thus, it cannot protect recipient cells but reduces the amount of the bystander effect. It is concluded that melanin added before irradiation effectively decreased the radiation dose. The reduction of the impact of the bystander signal on recipient cells when melanin was added to the donor medium after harvest but before filtration, may mean that the bystander signal has a physical component as melanin can absorb all types of physical energy

  8. Bystanders intervene to impede grooming in Western chimpanzees and sooty mangabeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuni, Liran; Preis, Anna; Wittig, Roman M.

    2017-01-01

    Grooming interactions benefit groomers, but may have negative consequences for bystanders. Grooming limits bystanders' grooming access and ensuing alliances could threaten the bystander's hierarchy rank or their previous investment in the groomers. To gain a competitive advantage, bystanders could intervene into a grooming bout to increase their own grooming access or to prevent the negative impact of others' grooming. We tested the impact of dominance rank and social relationships on grooming intervention likelihood and outcome in two sympatric primate species, Western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys atys). In both species, rather than increasing their own access to preferred partners, bystanders intervened mainly when an alliance between groomers could have a negative impact on them: when the lower-ranking groomer was close to the bystander in rank, when either groomer was an affiliation partner whose services they could lose, or the groomers were not yet strongly affiliated with each other. Thus, bystanders in both species appear to monitor grooming interactions and intervene based on their own dominance rank and social relationships, as well as triadic awareness of the relationship between groomers. While the motivation to intervene did not differ between species, mangabeys appeared to be more constrained by dominance rank than chimpanzees. PMID:29291114

  9. Association of Bystander Interventions With Neurologically Intact Survival Among Patients With Bystander-Witnessed Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Shinji; Tomio, Jun; Ichikawa, Masao; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Nishida, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideto; Morimura, Naoto; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2015-07-21

    Neurologically intact survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has been increasing in Japan. However, associations between increased prehospital care, including bystander interventions and increases in survival, have not been well estimated. To estimate the associations between bystander interventions and changes in neurologically intact survival among patients with OHCA in Japan. Retrospective descriptive study using data from Japan's nationwide OHCA registry, which started in January 2005. The registry includes all patients with OHCA transported to the hospital by emergency medical services (EMS) and recorded patients' characteristics, prehospital interventions, and outcomes. Participants were 167,912 patients with bystander-witnessed OHCA of presumed cardiac origin in the registry between January 2005 and December 2012. Prehospital interventions by bystander, including defibrillation using public-access automated external defibrillators and chest compression. Neurologically intact survival was defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance category score 1 or 2 and overall performance category scores 1 or 2 at 1 month or at discharge. The association between the interventions and neurologically intact survival was evaluated. From 2005 to 2012, the number of bystander-witnessed OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin increased from 17,882 (14.0 per 100,000 persons [95% CI, 13.8-14.2]) to 23,797 (18.7 per 100,000 persons [95% CI, 18.4-18.9]), and neurologically intact survival increased from 587 cases (age-adjusted proportion, 3.3% [95% CI, 3.0%-3.5%]) to 1710 cases (8.2% [95% CI, 7.8%-8.6%]). The rates of bystander chest compression increased from 38.6% to 50.9%, bystander-only defibrillation increased from 0.1% to 2.3%, bystander defibrillation combined with EMS defibrillation increased from 0.1% to 1.4%, and EMS-only defibrillation decreased from 26.6% to 23.5%. Performance of bystander chest compression, compared with no bystander chest compression

  10. Rescue Effects: Irradiated Cells Helped by Unirradiated Bystander Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R. K. K.; Fung, Y. K.; Han, W.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    The rescue effect describes the phenomenon where irradiated cells or organisms derive benefits from the feedback signals sent from the bystander unirradiated cells or organisms. An example of the benefit is the mitigation of radiation-induced DNA damages in the irradiated cells. The rescue effect can compromise the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) (and actually all radiotherapy). In this paper, the discovery and subsequent confirmation studies on the rescue effect were reviewed. The mechanisms and the chemical messengers responsible for the rescue effect studied to date were summarized. The rescue effect between irradiated and bystander unirradiated zebrafish embryos in vivo sharing the same medium was also described. In the discussion section, the mechanism proposed for the rescue effect involving activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway was scrutinized. This mechanism could explain the promotion of cellular survival and correct repair of DNA damage, dependence on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and modulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in irradiated cells. Exploitation of the NF-κB pathway to improve the effectiveness of RIT was proposed. Finally, the possibility of using zebrafish embryos as the model to study the efficacy of RIT in treating solid tumors was also discussed. PMID:25625514

  11. X-ray-induced bystander response reduce spontaneous mutations in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Matsumoto, Hideki; Usami, Noriko; Tomiya, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    The potential for carcinogenic risks is increased by radiation-induced bystander responses; these responses are the biological effects in unirradiated cells that receive signals from the neighboring irradiated cells. Bystander responses have attracted attention in modern radiobiology because they are characterized by non-linear responses to low-dose radiation. We used a synchrotron X-ray microbeam irradiation system developed at the Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, and showed that nitric oxide (NO)-mediated bystander cell death increased biphasically in a dose-dependent manner. Here, we irradiated five cell nuclei using 10 × 10 µm 2 5.35 keV X-ray beams and then measured the mutation frequency at the hypoxanthine-guanosine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in bystander cells. The mutation frequency with the null radiation dose was 2.6 × 10 -5 (background level), and the frequency decreased to 5.3 × 10 -6 with a dose of approximately 1 Gy (absorbed dose in the nucleus of irradiated cells). At high doses, the mutation frequency returned to the background level. A similar biphasic dose-response effect was observed for bystander cell death. Furthermore, we found that incubation with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO), a specific scavenger of NO, suppressed not only the biphasic increase in bystander cell death but also the biphasic reduction in mutation frequency of bystander cells. These results indicate that the increase in bystander cell death involves mechanisms that suppress mutagenesis. This study has thus shown that radiation-induced bystander responses could affect processes that protect the cell against naturally occurring alterations such as mutations. (author)

  12. Dispatcher-assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Shibuta, Hidetoshi; Hasegawa, Manabu; Nagata, Takashi

    2018-04-19

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is critical to the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, it is unknown whether bystander CPR with or without dispatcher assistance is more effective or why. Thus, we evaluated the association between dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR (vs. bystander CPR without dispatcher assistance) and survival of patients with OHCA. This is a retrospective, nonrandomized, observational study using national registry data for all OHCAs. We performed a propensity analysis. Patients with OHCA of cardiac origin were 18-100 years of age and received bystander chest compression in Japan between 2005 and 2014. Outcome measures were bystander rescue breathing, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before hospital arrival, and survival and Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) 1 or 2 at 1 month after the event. During the study period, 1,176,351 OHCAs occurred, and 87,400 cases met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, a negative association was observed between dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR and outcome measures in a fully-adjusted model [odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) for ROSC = 0.87 (0.78-0.97), P < 0.05; OR (95% CI) for 1-month survival = 0.81 (0.65-1.00), P < 0.05; OR (95% CI) for CPC 1 or 2 = 0.64 (0.43-0.93), P < 0.05]. OR of survival for dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR tended to decrease as the emergency medical services response time increased. Survival benefit was less for dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR with dispatcher assistance than without dispatcher assistance. Low quality is hypothesized to be the cause of the reduced benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiation induced bystander effects: mechanisms and implication for low dose radiation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hei, T.L.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Zhou, H.

    2003-01-01

    Using a precision microbeam to target an exact fraction of cells in a population and irradiated their nuclei with exactly one alpha particle each, we found that the frequencies of induced mutations and chromosomal changes in populations where some known fractions of nuclei were hit are consistent with non-hit cells contributing significantly to the response. In fact, irradiation of 10% of a mammalian cell population with a single alpha particle per cell results in a mutant yield similar to that observed when all of the cells in the population are irradiated. Although the bystander observations have been well established, the underlying mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. There are indications that multiple pathways are involved in the bystander phenomenon and different cell types respond differently to the bystander signaling. In confluent monolayers, there is evident that gap junctional communication is crucial in mediating the bystander effect whereas reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species have been implicated as the mediating molecules in sub-confluent cultures. Although p53 is not necessary for the expression of bystander effect, there is evident that repair deficient cells may express a higher bystander response. Using cDNA microarrays, a number of cellular signaling genes have been shown to be differentially expressed among bystander cells. The functional roles of these genes in the bystander effect will be discussed. The bystander observations imply that the relevant target for various radiobiological endpoints is larger than an individual cell and suggest a need to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimate for low dose radiation exposure. (Work supported by NIH grants CA 49062 and CA-RR11623)

  14. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  15. Does Non-Targeted Community CPR Training Increase Bystander CPR Frequency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uber, Amy; Sadler, Richard C; Chassee, Todd; Reynolds, Joshua C

    2018-05-01

    Only 37% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) receive bystander Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in Kent County, MI. In May 2014, prehospital providers offered one-time, point-of-contact compression-only CPR training to 2,253 passersby at 7 public locations in Grand Rapids, Michigan. To assess the impact of this intervention, we compared bystander CPR frequency and clinical outcomes in regions surrounding training sites before and after the intervention, adjusting for prehospital covariates. We aimed to assess the effect of this broad, non-targeted intervention on bystander CPR frequency, type of CPR utilized, and clinical outcomes. We also tested for differences in geospatial variation of bystander CPR and clinical outcomes clustered around training sites. Retrospective, observational, before-after study of adult, EMS-treated OHCA in Kent County from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2015. We generated a 5-kilometer radius surrounding each training site to estimate any geospatial influence that training sites might have on bystander CPR frequency in nearby OHCA cases. Chi-squared, Fisher's exact, and t-tests assessed differences in subject features. Difference-in-differences analysis with generalized estimating equation (GEE) modeling assessed bystander CPR frequency, adjusting for training site, covariates (age, sex, witnessed, shockable rhythm, public location), and clustering around training sites. Similar modeling tested for changes in bystander CPR type, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to hospital discharge, and cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1-2 at hospital discharge. We included 899 cases before and 587 cases post-intervention. Overall, we observed no increase in the frequency of bystander CPR or favorable clinical outcomes. We did observe an increase in compression-only CPR, but this was paradoxically restricted to OHCA cases falling outside radii around training sites. In adjusted modeling, the bystander CPR training

  16. DMPD: TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16027039 TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? Schroder M, Bowie AG.... Trends Immunol. 2005 Sep;26(9):462-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player... or bystander? PubmedID 16027039 Title TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? Authors Schr... File (.png) SVG File (.svg) HTML File (.html) CSML File (.csml) Open .csml file with CIOPlayer Open .csml file with CIOPlayer... - ※CIO Playerのご利用上の注意 Open .csml file with CIO Open .csml file with CIO - ※CIOのご利用上の注意 ...

  17. Association of bystander interventions and hospital length of stay and admission to intensive care unit in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddersholm, Signe; Kragholm, Kristian; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Pape, Marianne; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Lippert, Freddy K; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Christiansen, Christian F; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2017-10-01

    The impact of bystander interventions on post-arrest hospital course is sparsely studied. We examined the association between bystander interventions and length of hospital stay and admission to intensive care unit (ICU) in one-day survivors after OHCA. This cohort study linked data of 4641 one-day OHCA survivors from 2001 to 2014 to data on hospital length of stay and ICU admission. We examined associations between bystander efforts and outcomes using regression, adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, calendar year and witnessed status. We divided bystander efforts into three categories: 1. No bystander interventions; 2.Bystander CPR only; 3. Bystander defibrillation with or without bystander CPR. For patients surviving to hospital discharge, hospital length of stay was 20days for patients without bystander interventions, compared to 16 for bystander CPR, and 13 for bystander defibrillation. 82% of patients without bystander interventions were admitted to ICU compared to 77.2% for bystander CPR, and 61.2% for bystander defibrillation. In-hospital mortality was 60% in the first category compared to 40.5% and 21.7% in the two latter categories. In regression models, bystander CPR and bystander defibrillation were associated with a reduction of length of hospital stay of 21% (Estimate: 0.79 [95% CI: 0.72-0.86]) and 32% (Estimate: 0.68 [95% CI: 0.59-0.78]), respectively. Both bystander CPR (OR: 0.94 [95% CI: 0.91-0.97]) and bystander defibrillation (OR: 0.81 [0.76-0.85]), were associated with lower risk of ICU admission. Bystander interventions were associated with reduced hospital length of stay and ICU admission, suggesting that these efforts improve recovery in OHCA survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Milk drink with goat milk and goat serum is alternative for exploitation of pulp umbu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkarthe Guerra Araújo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to develop and evaluate the acceptance and intention to purchase two dairy beverages formulations prepared with fermented umbus, goat serum and goat milk in order to add greater economic value to the three raw materials. The treatments consisted of the variation in serum concentrations goat (28,5% and 44% and goat milk (44% and 28,5%, respectively. The pulp has previously been analyzed and showed 15,21mg/100g of ascorbic acid. The fermented dairy beverages showed microbiological characteristics within the established by the legislation. It was found that there was no significant difference (p > 0,05 for color attributes, flavor and consistency of both, however, the flavor attributes and global acceptance have been significantly affected. The formulation with 28,5% of goat serum and 44% goat milk had the best average from 10 days, and acceptances up to 25 days of storage.

  19. Eimeria infections in goats in Southern Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Machado Ribeiro da Silva

    Full Text Available Coccidiosis caused by Eimeria species is a major form of intestinal infection affecting intensively and semi-intensively reared goats. The province of Alentejo is the main goat-producing area in Portugal. Therefore, all 15 Serpentina goat farms in Alentejo were analyzed regarding the occurrence and diversity of Eimeria species. Fecal samples obtained from 144 animals (52.1% dairy goats, 47.9% pre-pubertal goats were examined using the modified McMaster technique to determine the number of oocysts per gram of feces. Eimeria spp. oocysts were present in 98.61% of the fecal samples and, overall, nine different Eimeria species were identified. The most prevalent species were E. ninakohlyakimovae (88% and E. arloingi (85%, followed by E. alijevi (63% and E. caprovina(63%. The average number of oocysts shed was significantly lower in dairy goats than in pre-adult animals. Astonishingly, no clinical signs of coccidiosis were observed in any of the animals examined, even though they were shedding high numbers of oocysts and were infected with highly pathogenic species. Thus, implementation of routine diagnostic investigation of the occurrence and diversity of caprine Eimeria species may be a useful tool for determination and better understanding of their potential economic impact on goat herds in southern Portugal.

  20. Flemingia macrophylla in goat feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel das Neves Oiticica

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe objective of this work was to evaluate the inclusion of Fabaceae Flemingia macrophylla (Willd. Kuntze ex Merr. in the diet of lactating dairy goats arranged in a 5 × 5 Latin square. The diets were composed of 40% of concentrate and 60% of roughage, and the dietary treatments were defined by the level of Flemingia hay inclusion (0%, 8%, 16%, 24%, and 32% in the diet dry matter replacing Cynodon dactyloncv. Tifton 85 hay. The diets were isonitrogenous, with 14% crude protein. Feed intake, nutrient digestibility, feeding behavior, and ruminal pH and ammonia nitrogen were evaluated. There was no difference in dry matter intake with the inclusion of Flemingia hay in the diet. The digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and total carbohydrates decreased with the inclusion of Flemingia in the diet. The diet did not change rumen ammonia nitrogen concentration or ruminal pH. There were no differences in the feeding behavior or feed and rumination efficiencies. Flemingia macrophylla can be used up to the level of 32% in the dry matter in diets for lactating goats.

  1. Imaging Polarized Secretory Traffic at the Immune Synapse in Living T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Víctor; Izquierdo, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Immune synapse (IS) formation by T lymphocytes constitutes a crucial event involved in antigen-specific, cellular and humoral immune responses. After IS formation by T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells, the convergence of secretory vesicles toward the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) and MTOC polarization to the IS are involved in polarized secretion at the synaptic cleft. This specialized mechanism appears to specifically provide the immune system with a fine strategy to increase the efficiency of crucial secretory effector functions of T lymphocytes, while minimizing non-specific, cytokine-mediated stimulation of bystander cells, target cell killing and activation-induced cell death. The molecular bases involved in the polarized secretory traffic toward the IS in T lymphocytes have been the focus of interest, thus different models and several imaging strategies have been developed to gain insights into the mechanisms governing directional secretory traffic. In this review, we deal with the most widely used, state-of-the-art approaches to address the molecular mechanisms underlying this crucial, immune secretory response.

  2. Persistent infections after natural transmission of bovine viral diarrhoea virus from cattle to goats and among goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important pathogen of cattle worldwide. Infection of a pregnant animal may lead to persistent infection of the foetus and birth of a persistently infected (PI) calf that sheds the virus throughout its life. However, BVD viruses are not strictly species specific. BVDV has been isolated from many domesticated and wild ruminants. This is of practical importance as virus reservoirs in non-bovine hosts may hamper BVDV control in cattle. A goat given as a social companion to a BVDV PI calf gave birth to a PI goat kid. In order to test if goat to goat infections were possible, seronegative pregnant goats were exposed to the PI goat. In parallel, seronegative pregnant goats were kept together with the PI calf. Only the goat to goat transmission resulted in the birth of a next generation of BVDV PI kids whereas all goats kept together with the PI calf aborted. To our knowledge, this is the first report which shows that a PI goat cannot only transmit BVD virus to other goats but that such transmission may indeed lead to the birth of a second generation of PI goats. Genetic analyses indicated that establishment in the new host species may be associated with step-wise adaptations in the viral genome. Thus, goats have the potential to be a reservoir for BVDV. However, the PI goats showed growth retardation and anaemia and their survival under natural conditions remains questionable. PMID:23675947

  3. Persistent infections after natural transmission of bovine viral diarrhoea virus from cattle to goats and among goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachofen, Claudia; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Stalder, Hanspeter; Mathys, Tanja; Zanoni, Reto; Hilbe, Monika; Schweizer, Matthias; Peterhans, Ernst

    2013-05-15

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important pathogen of cattle worldwide. Infection of a pregnant animal may lead to persistent infection of the foetus and birth of a persistently infected (PI) calf that sheds the virus throughout its life. However, BVD viruses are not strictly species specific. BVDV has been isolated from many domesticated and wild ruminants. This is of practical importance as virus reservoirs in non-bovine hosts may hamper BVDV control in cattle. A goat given as a social companion to a BVDV PI calf gave birth to a PI goat kid. In order to test if goat to goat infections were possible, seronegative pregnant goats were exposed to the PI goat. In parallel, seronegative pregnant goats were kept together with the PI calf. Only the goat to goat transmission resulted in the birth of a next generation of BVDV PI kids whereas all goats kept together with the PI calf aborted. To our knowledge, this is the first report which shows that a PI goat cannot only transmit BVD virus to other goats but that such transmission may indeed lead to the birth of a second generation of PI goats. Genetic analyses indicated that establishment in the new host species may be associated with step-wise adaptations in the viral genome. Thus, goats have the potential to be a reservoir for BVDV. However, the PI goats showed growth retardation and anaemia and their survival under natural conditions remains questionable.

  4. BIOLOGICAL VALUE OF GOAT MILK CASEIN

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Ahmed Salem; Elsayed Ibrahim Elagamy; Fatma Salama; Nagwa Hussein Abosoliman

    2009-01-01

    The effect of feeding of goat and cow milk caseins on the body weight gain, body organs, erythrocytic & leukocytic counts and their parameters, plasma lipid profile, liver enzyme activities, renal function and plasma proteins of rats over a period of 45 days was studied. Feeding of goat or cow milk caseins had no significant effect on the parameters studied (P≤0.05) between rats fed either milk. However, rats fed on goat milk casein showed a significant increase in high density lipoproteins...

  5. GOAT MILK PRODUCTION UNDER ORGANIC FARMING STANDARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerold Hartmut Rahmann

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Organic farming has emerged from its niche. This holds true for organic goat milk, yoghurt and cheese as well. Particularly in the EU many dairy goat farms have converted or want to convert towards organic farming to profit from the positive image and the good prices for milk (+100% in Western Europe and Alpine regions. High performance dairy goats demand excellent feedstuffs, a sound environment and top management. It was not clear how organic farming can fulfil these demands. The restrictive factors influencing the productivity of the animals in organic farming are as follows: limited concentrate feeding (

  6. Rotavirus activates lymphocytes from non-obese diabetic mice by triggering toll-like receptor 7 signaling and interferon production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Pane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that rotavirus infection promotes the progression of genetically-predisposed children to type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease marked by infiltration of activated lymphocytes into pancreatic islets. Non-obese diabetic (NOD mice provide a model for the human disease. Infection of adult NOD mice with rhesus monkey rotavirus (RRV accelerates diabetes onset, without evidence of pancreatic infection. Rather, RRV spreads to the pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes where its association with antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells, induces cellular maturation. RRV infection increases levels of the class I major histocompatibility complex on B cells and proinflammatory cytokine expression by T cells at these sites. In autoimmunity-resistant mice and human mononuclear cells from blood, rotavirus-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute to bystander polyclonal B cell activation through type I interferon expression. Here we tested the hypothesis that rotavirus induces bystander activation of lymphocytes from NOD mice by provoking dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. NOD mouse splenocytes were stimulated with rotavirus and assessed for activation by flow cytometry. This stimulation activated antigen-presenting cells and B cells independently of virus strain and replicative ability. Instead, activation depended on virus dose and was prevented by blockade of virus decapsidation, inhibition of endosomal acidification and interference with signaling through Toll-like receptor 7 and the type I interferon receptor. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells were more efficiently activated than conventional dendritic cells by RRV, and contributed to the activation of B and T cells, including islet-autoreactive CD8+ T cells. Thus, a double-stranded RNA virus can induce Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, resulting in lymphocyte activation. Our findings suggest that bystander activation mediated by type I

  7. Rotavirus Activates Lymphocytes from Non-Obese Diabetic Mice by Triggering Toll-Like Receptor 7 Signaling and Interferon Production in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Jessica A.; Webster, Nicole L.; Coulson, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that rotavirus infection promotes the progression of genetically-predisposed children to type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease marked by infiltration of activated lymphocytes into pancreatic islets. Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice provide a model for the human disease. Infection of adult NOD mice with rhesus monkey rotavirus (RRV) accelerates diabetes onset, without evidence of pancreatic infection. Rather, RRV spreads to the pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes where its association with antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells, induces cellular maturation. RRV infection increases levels of the class I major histocompatibility complex on B cells and proinflammatory cytokine expression by T cells at these sites. In autoimmunity-resistant mice and human mononuclear cells from blood, rotavirus-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute to bystander polyclonal B cell activation through type I interferon expression. Here we tested the hypothesis that rotavirus induces bystander activation of lymphocytes from NOD mice by provoking dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. NOD mouse splenocytes were stimulated with rotavirus and assessed for activation by flow cytometry. This stimulation activated antigen-presenting cells and B cells independently of virus strain and replicative ability. Instead, activation depended on virus dose and was prevented by blockade of virus decapsidation, inhibition of endosomal acidification and interference with signaling through Toll-like receptor 7 and the type I interferon receptor. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells were more efficiently activated than conventional dendritic cells by RRV, and contributed to the activation of B and T cells, including islet-autoreactive CD8+ T cells. Thus, a double-stranded RNA virus can induce Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, resulting in lymphocyte activation. Our findings suggest that bystander activation mediated by type I interferon

  8. Empowering public service workers to face bystander conflict : Enhancing resources through a training intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, K.J.P.M.; Gevers, J.M.P.; Rispens, S.; Demerouti, E.

    2018-01-01

    Public service employees work in occupations that are accompanied with high psychosocial risks. Police, firefighters, and paramedics are increasingly being confronted with argumentative, conflicting bystanders that frustrate them in executing their task. We developed a resource-enhancement

  9. Bystander chronic infection negatively impacts development of CD8+ T cell memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelekati, Erietta; Shin, Haina; Doering, Travis A.; Dolfi, Douglas V.; Ziegler, Carly G.; Beiting, Daniel P.; Dawson, Lucas; Liboon, Jennifer; Wolski, David; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A.; Katsikis, Peter D.; Shen, Hao; Roos, David S.; Haining, W. Nicholas; Lauer, Georg M.; Wherry, E. John

    2014-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological evidence suggests that chronic infections impair immune responses to unrelated pathogens and vaccines. The underlying mechanisms, however, are unclear and distinguishing effects on priming versus development of immunological memory has been challenging. We investigated whether bystander chronic infections impact differentiation of memory CD8+ T cells, the hallmark of protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. Chronic bystander infections impaired development of memory CD8+ T cells in several mouse models and humans. These effects were independent of initial priming and were associated with chronic inflammatory signatures. Chronic inflammation negatively impacted the number of bystander CD8+ T cells and their memory development. Distinct underlying mechanisms of altered survival and differentiation were revealed with the latter regulated by the transcription factors T-bet and Blimp-1. Thus, exposure to prolonged bystander inflammation impairs the effector to memory transition. These data have relevance for immunity and vaccination during persisting infections and chronic inflammation. PMID:24837104

  10. The application of microbeam in the research on radiation-induced bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jie; Han Ling

    2002-01-01

    There has been more and more attention to the phenomenon known as radiation-induced bystander effects, which will have a tremendous effect on the research in low -dose radiation biological effects. However, due to the stochastic nature of energy deposition and the random position of tracts, direct evidence for bystander effects and exact results of single particle interacts with a cell cannot be provided by using conventional broad-field irradiation. The availability of microbeam, especially the single particle microbeam in the world, whereby individual cells or precise location of cells can be irradiated with either a single or an exact number of particles provides a useful tool for the research on radiation-induced bystander effects. The author describes the radiation -induced bystander effect and the application of microbeam in the research on it

  11. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated...... with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. METHODS: We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from...... the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. RESULTS: We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised...

  12. BYSTANDER EFFECTS GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIAION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    BYSTANDER EFFECTS, GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIATION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURESR. Julian PrestonEnvironmental Carcinogenesis Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N.C. 27711, USAThere ...

  13. Social Capital and Bystander Behavior in Bullying: Internalizing Problems as a Barrier to Prosocial Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Lyndsay N; Fredrick, Stephanie Secord

    2017-04-01

    Theory and research suggests that individuals with greater social capital (i.e., resources and benefits gained from relationships, experiences, and social interactions) may be more likely to be active, prosocial bystanders in bullying situations. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to examine the association of social capital (social support and social skills) with prosocial bystander behavior, and the role of internalizing problems as a potential barrier to this relation among 299 students (45.8% girls, 95% White) in sixth, seventh, and eighth grades. Results indicate a positive relation between social capital and prosocial bystander behavior. In addition, internalizing problems were a significant risk factor that may hinder youth-particularly girls-from engaging in defending behavior. Prosocial bystanders are an essential component to prevent and reduce bullying and further research is needed to better understand how to foster prosocial behavior in bullying situations, perhaps by utilizing social capital, related to school bullying.

  14. Addressing bystander exposure to agricultural pesticides in life cycle impact assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Morten Walbech; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Mosqueron, Luc

    2018-01-01

    Residents living near agricultural fields may be exposed to pesticides drifting from the fields after application to different field crops. To address this currently missing exposure pathway in life cycle assessment (LCA), we developed a modeling framework for quantifying exposure of bystanders...... magnitude of individual bystanders can be substantially larger than the exposure of populations not living in the proximity to agricultural fields. Our framework for assessing bystander exposure to pesticide applications closes a relevant gap in the exposure assessment included in LCA for agricultural...... to pesticide spray drift from agricultural fields. Our framework consists of three parts addressing: (1) loss of pesticides from an agricultural field via spray drift; (2) environmental fate of pesticide in air outside of the treated field; and (3) exposure of bystanders to pesticides via inhalation...

  15. Curcumin and Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage 0-II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-26

    Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  16. Lack of Bystander Effects From High LET Radiation For Early Cytogenetic Endpoints.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groesser, Torsten; Cooper, Brian; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2008-05-07

    The aim of this work was to study radiation-induced bystander effects for early cytogenetic end points in various cell lines using the medium transfer technique after exposure to high- and low-LET radiation. Cells were exposed to 20 MeV/ nucleon nitrogen ions, 968 MeV/nucleon iron ions, or 575 MeV/nucleon iron ions followed by transfer of the conditioned medium from the irradiated cells to unirradiated test cells. The effects studied included DNA double-strand break induction, {gamma}-H2AX focus formation, induction of chromatid breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes, and micronucleus formation using DNA repair-proficient and -deficient hamster and human cell lines (xrs6, V79, SW48, MO59K and MO59J). Cell survival was also measured in SW48 bystander cells using X rays. Although it was occasionally possible to detect an increase in chromatid break levels using nitrogen ions and to see a higher number of {gamma}-H2AX foci using nitrogen and iron ions in xrs6 bystander cells in single experiments, the results were not reproducible. After we pooled all the data, we could not verify a significant bystander effect for any of these end points. Also, we did not detect a significant bystander effect for DSB induction or micronucleus formation in these cell lines or for clonogenic survival in SW48 cells. The data suggest that DNA damage and cytogenetic changes are not induced in bystander cells. In contrast, data in the literature show pronounced bystander effects in a variety of cell lines, including clonogenic survival in SW48 cells and induction of chromatid breaks and micronuclei in hamster cells. To reconcile these conflicting data, it is possible that the epigenetic status of the specific cell line or the precise culture conditions and medium supplements, such as serum, may be critical for inducing bystander effects.

  17. Lack of Bystander Effects From High-LET Radiation For Early Cytogenetic End Points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groesser, Torsten; Cooper, Brian; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study radiation-induced bystander effects for early cytogenetic end points in various cell lines using the medium transfer technique after exposure to high- and low-LET radiation. Cells were exposed to 20 MeV/ nucleon nitrogen ions, 968 MeV/nucleon iron ions, or 575 MeV/nucleon iron ions followed by transfer of the conditioned medium from the irradiated cells to unirradiated test cells. The effects studied included DNA double-strand break induction, γ-H2AX focus formation, induction of chromatid breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes, and micronucleus formation using DNA repair-proficient and -deficient hamster and human cell lines (xrs6, V79, SW48, MO59K and MO59J). Cell survival was also measured in SW48 bystander cells using X rays. Although it was occasionally possible to detect an increase in chromatid break levels using nitrogen ions and to see a higher number of γ-H2AX foci using nitrogen and iron ions in xrs6 bystander cells in single experiments, the results were not reproducible. After we pooled all the data, we could not verify a significant bystander effect for any of these end points. Also, we did not detect a significant bystander effect for DSB induction or micronucleus formation in these cell lines or for clonogenic survival in SW48 cells. The data suggest that DNA damage and cytogenetic changes are not induced in bystander cells. In contrast, data in the literature show pronounced bystander effects in a variety of cell lines, including clonogenic survival in SW48 cells and induction of chromatid breaks and micronuclei in hamster cells. To reconcile these conflicting data, it is possible that the epigenetic status of the specific cell line or the precise culture conditions and medium supplements, such as serum, may be critical for inducing bystander effects.

  18. Temporal variations in dispatcher-assisted and bystander-initiated resuscitation efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akira; Maeda, Tetsuo; Myojo, Yasuhiro; Wato, Yukihiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Inaba, Hideo

    2018-04-03

    To investigate temporal variations in dispatcher-assisted and bystander-initiated resuscitation efforts and their association with survival after bystander-witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). We retrospectively analyzed the neurologically favorable 1-month survival and the parameters related to dispatcher assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DA-CPR) and bystander CPR (BCPR) for 227,524 OHCA patients between 2007 and 2013 in Japan. DA-CPR sensitivity for OHCAs, bystander's compliance to DA-CPR assessed by the proportion of bystanders who follow DA-CPR, and performance of BCPR measured by the rate of bystander-initiated CPR in patients without DA-CPR were calculated as indices of resuscitation efforts. Performance of BCPR was only similar to temporal variations in the survival (correlation between hourly paired values, R 2 =0.263, P=0.01): a lower survival rate (3.4% vs 4.2%) and performance of BCPR (23.1% vs 30.8%) during night-time (22:00-5:59) than during non-night-time. In subgroup analyses based on interaction tests, all three indices deteriorated during night-time when OHCAs were witnessed by non-family (adjusted odds ratio, 0.73-0.82), particularly in non-elderly patients. The rate of public access defibrillation for these OHCAs markedly decreased during night-time (adjusted odds ratio, 0.49) with delayed emergency calls and BCPR initiation. Multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed that the survival rate of non-family-witnessed OHCAs was 1.83-fold lower during night-time than during non-night-time. Dispatcher-assisted and bystander-initiated resuscitation efforts are low during night-time in OHCAs witnessed by non-family. A divisional alert system to recruit well-trained individuals is needed in order to improve the outcomes of night-time OHCAs witnessed by non-family bystanders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular pathways in the bystander response of cells exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We have examined biological effects in cell populations exposed to very low mean doses of alpha radiation by which only a small fraction of the cells are actually traversed by an alpha particle. We showed earlier that an enhanced frequency of sister chromatid exchanges and HPRT mutations occur in the non-irradiated, 'bystander' cells. The frequency of mutations induced by a single alpha particle traversing the nucleus of a cell was increased nearly fivefold at the lowest fluence studied, a result of mutations occurring in bystander cells. This was associated with a similar increase in the induction of micronuclei, indicating the induction of DNA damage in bystander cells. In order to gain information concerning molecular pathways, we studied changes in gene expression in bystander cells in confluent cultures of human diploid fibroblasts or mouse embryo-derived fibroblasts (MEFs) by western analysis and in-situ immunofluorescence. The expression levels of p53, p21 Waf1 and p34 cdc2 were significantly modulated in bystander cells. The upregulation of p53 and p21 Waf1 did not occur in cultures irradiated at low density, and was markedly reduced in the presence of the gap junction inhibitor lindane. The importance of gap-junction mediated intercellular communication was confirmed in connexin-43 knockout MEFs. Western blot analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicate that the bystander response is suppressed by incubation with superoxide dismutase as well as an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, and is associated with the induction of NFKB, suggesting the effect is mediated by oxidative stress. The stress-activated protein kinase p38 and its downstream effector ATF2 are also induced in bystander cells independent of oxidative stress. These results will be discussed in terms of whether activation of the p53 damage response pathway is the direct result of signaling from irradiated cells, or rather is a consequence of DNA induced damage in the bystander

  20. Bystander-mediated genomic instability after high LET radiation in murine primary haemopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, Deborah A.; Moore, Stephen R.; Macdonald, Denise A.; Smyth, Sharon H.; Clapham, Peter; Kadhim, Munira A.

    2006-01-01

    Communication between irradiated and unirradiated (bystander) cells can result in responses in unirradiated cells that are similar to responses in their irradiated counterparts. The purpose of the current experiment was to test the hypothesis that bystander responses will be similarly induced in primary murine stem cells under different cell culture conditions. The experimental systems used here, co-culture and media transfer, are similar in that they both restrict communication between irradiated and bystander cells to media borne factors, but are distinct in that with the media transfer technique, cells can only communicate after irradiation, and with co-culture, cells can communication before, during and after irradiation. In this set of parallel experiments, cell type, biological endpoint, and radiation quality and dose, were kept constant. In both experimental systems, clonogenic survival was significantly decreased in all groups, whether irradiated or bystander, suggesting a substantial contribution of bystander effects (BE) to cell killing. Genomic instability (GI) was induced under all radiation and bystander conditions in both experiments, including a situation where unirradiated cells were incubated with media that had been conditioned for 24 h with irradiated cells. The appearance of delayed aberrations (genomic instability) 10-13 population doublings after irradiation was similar to the level of initial chromosomal damage, suggesting that the bystander factor is able to induce chromosomal alterations soon after irradiation. Whether these early alterations are related to those observed at later timepoints remains unknown. These results suggest that genomic instability may be significantly induced in a bystander cell population whether or not cells communicate during irradiation

  1. Influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect induced by alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W.; Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, the influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect in alpha-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined. The bystander effect was studied through medium transfer experiments. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was performed to quantify the chromosome damage induced by alpha-particle irradiation. Our results showed that the alpha-particle induced micronuclei (MN) frequencies were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol.

  2. Bystander motivation in bullying incidents: to intervene or not to intervene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert; Tenenbaum, Laura; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel; Jungert, Tomas; Vanegas, Gina

    2012-08-01

    This research sought to extend knowledge about bystanders in bullying situations with a focus on the motivations that lead them to different responses. The 2 primary goals of this study were to investigate the reasons for children's decisions to help or not to help a victim when witnessing bullying, and to generate a grounded theory (or conceptual framework) of bystander motivation in bullying situations. Thirty students ranging in age from 9 to 15 years (M = 11.9; SD = 1.7) from an elementary and middle school in the southeastern United States participated in this study. Open- ended, semi-structured interviews were used, and sessions ranged from 30 to 45 minutes. We conducted qualitative methodology and analyses to gain an in-depth understanding of children's perspectives and concerns when witnessing bullying. A key finding was a conceptual framework of bystander motivation to intervene in bullying situations suggesting that deciding whether to help or not help the victim in a bullying situation depends on how bystanders define and evaluate the situation, the social context, and their own agency. Qualitative analysis revealed 5 themes related to bystander motives and included: interpretation of harm in the bullying situation, emotional reactions, social evaluating, moral evaluating, and intervention self-efficacy. Given the themes that emerged surrounding bystanders' motives to intervene or abstain from intervening, respondents reported 3 key elements that need to be confirmed in future research and that may have implications for future work on bullying prevention. These included: first, the potential importance of clear communication to children that adults expect bystanders to intervene when witnessing bullying; second, the potential of direct education about how bystanders can intervene to increase children's self-efficacy as defenders of those who are victims of bullying; and third, the assumption that it may be effective to encourage children's belief that

  3. Gambaran Darah Kambing Gembrong, Kambing Peranakan Etawah, dan Kambing Kacang di Bali (BLOOD ILLUSTRATION OF GEMBRONG GOAT, ETAWAH CROSSBRED GOAT AND KACANG GOAT IN BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayan Sayang Yupardhi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There were three kinds of goat developed in Bali since a long time ago i.e. Gembrong goat, EtawahCrossbred goat, and Kacang goat. Gembrong goat is nearly disappearingrecently due to decrease of itspopulation from year to year. The Gembrong goat has very interesting performance, funny, and this speciesis Balinese native goats. The objective of thisexperiment was to know the blood illustration among thethree speciesof the Balinese native goatwhere in the future it can be used as a guide to develop each ofthem. The experiment was used nine adults goats namely three adult male Gembrong goats, three adultmale Etawah Crossbred goats, and three adult male Kacang Goats respectively. The animal fed dailygreen feed grows around them and additional rice bran. Blood samples of the animals were collected forabout10-15 mL each with venoject, and then was kept in a cooler box and subsequently sent to the ProdiaClinic Laboratory at Denpasar. The results of the experiment showed that blood illustration of the threekinds of goat was not significantly different (P > 0.05 except the triglyseride.

  4. MEAT GOAT DEMOGRAPHICS AND NICHE MARKETING

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey Fisher; Richard Stock; David A. Mangione; Larry A. Nye

    2009-01-01

    Six focus groups were conducted with each having ten people who attend different Islamic Centers in Ohio. The objective of the focus groups was to understand Halal meat purchase patterns and consumption patterns of the Moslem population with special attention to goat. The Ohio State University Extension personnel are utilizing these results to work with meat goat producers to understand and meet the requirements of the Halal meat market.  Participants discussed the Zabiha approach to slaught...

  5. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  6. Bystander's willingness to report theft, physical assault, and sexual assault: the impact of gender, anonymity, and relationship with the offender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicksa, Sarah C

    2014-01-01

    This research examines bystander willingness to report three different crimes to the police or campus authorities among a college student sample (n = 295). Twelve original vignettes varied anonymity when reporting, bystander's relationship with the offender (friend or stranger), and crime type. A factorial analysis of variance showed that main effects were found for crime type, bystander's gender, and bystander's relationship with the offender; anonymity was not significant. The physical assault was the most likely to be reported (4.47), followed by theft (3.26), and sexual assault (2.36). Women were more likely than men to report each crime type, and bystanders who were good friends of the offender were less likely to report than strangers. No two- or three-way interactions were significant, but a significant four-way interaction indicated that anonymity, relationship with the offender, and bystander's gender predicted willingness to report for the sexual assault scenario.

  7. Critical role of gap junction communication, calcium and nitric oxide signaling in bystander responses to focal photodynamic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Bianca; Ceolin, Stefano; Ceriani, Federico; Bortolozzi, Mario; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Zorzi, Veronica; Predonzani, Andrea; Bronte, Vincenzo; Molon, Barbara; Mammano, Fabio

    2015-04-30

    Ionizing and nonionizing radiation affect not only directly targeted cells but also surrounding "bystander" cells. The underlying mechanisms and therapeutic role of bystander responses remain incompletely defined. Here we show that photosentizer activation in a single cell triggers apoptosis in bystander cancer cells, which are electrically coupled by gap junction channels and support the propagation of a Ca2+ wave initiated in the irradiated cell. The latter also acts as source of nitric oxide (NO) that diffuses to bystander cells, in which NO levels are further increased by a mechanism compatible with Ca(2+)-dependent enzymatic production. We detected similar signals in tumors grown in dorsal skinfold chambers applied to live mice. Pharmacological blockade of connexin channels significantly reduced the extent of apoptosis in bystander cells, consistent with a critical role played by intercellular communication, Ca2+ and NO in the bystander effects triggered by photodynamic therapy.

  8. Bystanders' responses to offline bullying and cyberbullying: The role of empathy and normative beliefs about aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machackova, Hana; Pfetsch, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Cyberbullying often takes place with the virtual presence or knowledge of bystanders. While we have some evidence about the determinants of bystanders' responses to offline bullying, we lack empirical studies concerning the variables that influence bystanders' responses to cyberbullying. The current study examines bystanders' responses to offline bullying and cyberbullying incidents. Two types of responses were captured: support toward the victims and the reinforcement of bullies' actions. Using data from 321 German adolescents (ages 12-18; M = 14.99; 44% girls), the association between bystanders' responses and normative beliefs about verbal aggression and cyberaggression, and affective and cognitive empathy, were tested in a path model. Both types of normative beliefs positively predicted the reinforcement of bullies, and normative belief about verbal aggression also predicted support for the victims of offline bullying. Both types of empathy predicted support in offline bullying, but only affective empathy predicted support in cyberbullying. There was no link between affective or cognitive empathy to the reinforcement of bullies. Moreover, bystanders' tendencies to respond supportively to the victim or to reinforce the bully were rather consistent in both cyber- and offline bullying, but there was no link between support and reinforcement. The findings are discussed with regard to implications for prevention and intervention efforts. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. An Online Bystander Intervention Program for the Prevention of Sexual Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, Anne; Jouriles, Ernest N; McDonald, Renee; Rosenfield, David

    2015-07-01

    Because of its high prevalence and serious consequences for victims, sexual violence is a significant problem on college campuses. Sexual assault prevention programs based on the bystander intervention model have been shown to be effective; however, current programs are limited in terms of ease of distribution. To address this issue, we developed and evaluated "Take Care," an online bystander intervention program. To our knowledge, this is the first empirical evaluation of an online bystander intervention program designed to prevent sexual violence. Ninety-three participants (80.6% female, 19.4% male) recruited from social psychology classes at a mid-size university were randomly assigned to view one of two online programs: Take Care or a control program on study skills. Before viewing the programs, participants completed measures of bystander behaviors and feelings of efficacy for performing such behaviors. Measures were administered again post-intervention and at a two-month follow-up assessment. Participants who viewed Take Care reported greater efficacy for engaging in bystander behaviors at post-treatment and two months following treatment, compared to those who viewed the control program. In addition, participants who viewed Take Care reported performing relatively more bystander behaviors for friends at the two-month follow-up assessment, compared to participants who viewed the control program. These results suggest that sexual violence prevention programs may be effectively adapted to an online format.

  10. Relationship between P53 and bystander effect induced by radiated hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Meijia; Shen Bo; Yuan Dexiao; Cheng Honghong; Shao Chunlin

    2009-01-01

    The role of p53 in bystander responses on normal liver cells were investigated by co-culturing irradiated hepatoma cells with non-irradiated bystander Chang liver cells. It was found that radiosensitivity of the hepatoma cells was relative to p53. HepG2 cells with wtp53 had the highest radiosensitivity followed by PLC/PRF/5 cells with mtp53 and Hep3B cells with null-p53. The induction of bystander micronucleus(MN) was observed only in the Chang liver cells that had been co-cultured with HepG2 cells but not co-cultured with PLC/PRF/5 or Hep3B. Also, this bystander MN was relative to the irradiation dose and the cell co-culture rime. When the hepatoma cells were treated with pifithrin-α, a p53 inhibitor, their radiosensitivities were reduced, and the bystander effect was diminished. The results indicate that p53 could regulate not only the radiosensitivity but also the bystander response. (authors)

  11. Detection of chromosomal instability in α-irradiated and bystander human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponnaiya, Brian; Jenkins-Baker, Gloria; Bigelow, Alan; Marino, Stephen; Geard, Charles R.

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing evidence biological responses to ionizing radiation are not confined to those cells that are directly hit, but may be seen in the progeny at subsequent generations (genomic instability) and in non-irradiated neighbors of irradiated cells (bystander effects). These so called non-targeted phenomena would have significant contributions to radiation-induced carcinogenesis, especially at low doses where only a limited number of cells in a population are directed hit. Here we present data using a co-culturing protocol examining chromosomal instability in α-irradiated and bystander human fibroblasts BJ1-htert. At the first cell division following exposure to 0.1 and 1 Gy α-particles, irradiated populations demonstrated a dose dependent increase in chromosome-type aberrations. At this time bystander BJ1-htert populations demonstrated elevated chromatid-type aberrations when compared to controls. Irradiated and bystander populations were also analyzed for chromosomal aberrations as a function of time post-irradiation. When considered over 25 doublings, all irradiated and bystander populations had significantly higher frequencies of chromatid aberrations when compared to controls (2-3-fold over controls) and were not dependent on dose. The results presented here support the link between the radiation-induced phenomena of genomic instability and the bystander effect

  12. Dispatcher instruction of chest compression-only CPR increases actual provision of bystander CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Tomonari; Iwami, Taku; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Nishiyama, Chika; Sakai, Tomohiko; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Yasuyuki; Kawamura, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    A preceding randomized controlled trial demonstrated that chest compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction by dispatcher was more effective to increase bystander CPR than conventional CPR instruction. However, the actual condition of implementation of each type of dispatcher instruction (chest compression-only CPR [CCCPR] or conventional CPR with rescue breathing) and provision of bystander CPR in real prehospital settings has not been sufficiently investigated. This registry prospectively enrolled patients aged =>18 years suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) of non-traumatic causes before emergency-medical-service (EMS) arrival, who were considered as target subjects of dispatcher instruction, resuscitated by EMS personnel, and transported to medical institutions in Osaka, Japan from January 2005 through December 2012. The primary outcome measure was provision of CPR by a bystander. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess factors that were potentially associated with provision of bystander CPR. Among 37,283 target subjects of dispatcher instruction, 5743 received CCCPR instruction and 13,926 received conventional CPR instruction. The proportion of CCCPR instruction increased from 5.7% in 2005 to 25.6% in 2012 (p for trend bystander CPR more frequently than conventional CPR instruction group (70.0% versus 62.1%, pbystander CPR compared with conventional CPR instruction (adjusted odds ratio 1.44, 95% CI 1.34-1.55). CCCPR dispatcher instruction among adult OHCA patients significantly increased the actual provision of bystander CPR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiation-induced bystander effects. Mechanisms, biological implications, and current investigations at the Leipzig LIPSION facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterreicher, J.; Prise, K.M.; Michael, B.D.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.; Tanner, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: The bystander effect is a relatively new area of radiobiological research, which is aimed at studying post-radiation changes in neighboring non-hit cells or tissues. The bystander effect of ionizing irradiation is important after low-dose irradiation in the range of up to 0.2 Gy, where a higher incidence of stochastic damage was observed than was expected from a linear-quadratic model. It is also important when the irradiation of a cell population is highly non-uniform. Objective: This review summarizes most of the important results and proposed bystander effect mechanisms as well as their impact on theory and clinical practice. The literature, in parts contradictory, is collected, the main topics are outlined, and some basic papers are described in more detail. In order to illustrate the microbeam technique, which is considered relevant for the bystander effect research, the state of the Leipzig LIPSION nanoprobe facility is described. Results: The existence of a radiation-induced bystander effect is now generally accepted. The current state of knowledge on it is summarized here. Several groups worldwide are working on understanding its different aspects and its impact on radiobiology and radiation protection. Conclusion: The observation of a bystander effect has posed many questions, and answering them is a challenging topic for radiobiology in the future. (orig.)

  14. Radiation-induced bystander effects. Mechanisms, biological implications, and current investigations at the Leipzig LIPSION facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesterreicher, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Dept. of Radiobiology and Immunology, Purkyne Military Medical Academy, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Prise, K.M.; Michael, B.D. [Gray Cancer Inst., Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Vogt, J.; Butz, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Tanner, J.M. [Clinic and Polyclinic of Radiation Oncology, Martin Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Background: The bystander effect is a relatively new area of radiobiological research, which is aimed at studying post-radiation changes in neighboring non-hit cells or tissues. The bystander effect of ionizing irradiation is important after low-dose irradiation in the range of up to 0.2 Gy, where a higher incidence of stochastic damage was observed than was expected from a linear-quadratic model. It is also important when the irradiation of a cell population is highly non-uniform. Objective: This review summarizes most of the important results and proposed bystander effect mechanisms as well as their impact on theory and clinical practice. The literature, in parts contradictory, is collected, the main topics are outlined, and some basic papers are described in more detail. In order to illustrate the microbeam technique, which is considered relevant for the bystander effect research, the state of the Leipzig LIPSION nanoprobe facility is described. Results: The existence of a radiation-induced bystander effect is now generally accepted. The current state of knowledge on it is summarized here. Several groups worldwide are working on understanding its different aspects and its impact on radiobiology and radiation protection. Conclusion: The observation of a bystander effect has posed many questions, and answering them is a challenging topic for radiobiology in the future. (orig.)

  15. Radiation induced bystander effect on hepatoma HepG2 cells under hypoxia condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianghong; Jin Yizun; Shao Chunlin; Prise KM

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate radiation induced bystander effect and its mechanism on hepatoma HepG2 cells under hypoxia condition. Methods: Non-irradiated bystander hepatoma cells were co-cultured with irradiated cells or treated with the conditioned medium (CM) from irradiated cells, then micronuclei (MN) were measured for both irradiated cells and bystander cells. Results: The MN yield of irradiated HepG2 cells under hypoxic condition was significantly lower than that under normoxia, the oxygen enhancement ratio of HepG2 cells of MN was 1.6. For both hypoxic and normoxic condition, the MN yield of bystander cells were obviously enhanced to a similar high level after co-culturing with irradiated cells or with CM treatment, and it also correlated with the irradiation dose. When the hypoxic HepG2 cells were treated with either DMSO, a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS), or aminoguanidine, an iNOS inhibitor, the yield of bystander MN was partly diminished, and the reducing rate of DMSO was 42.2%-46.7%, the reducing rate of aminoguanidine was 42% . Conclusion: ROS, NO and their downstream signal factors are involved in the radiation induced bystander effect of hypoxic HepG2 cells. (authors)

  16. Potential association of bystander-patient relationship with bystander response and patient survival in daytime out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kamikura, Takahisa; Nishi, Taiki; Omi, Wataru; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Sakagami, Satoru; Inaba, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether the bystander-patient relationship affects bystander response to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and patient outcomes depending on the time of day. This population-based observational study in Japan involving 139,265 bystander-witnessed OHCAs (90,426 family members, 10,479 friends/colleagues, and 38,360 others) without prehospital physician involvement was conducted from 2005 to 2009. Factors associated with better bystander response [early emergency call and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR)] and 1-month neurologically favourable survival were assessed. The rates of dispatcher-assisted CPR during daytime (7:00-18:59) and nighttime (19:00-6:59) were highest in family members (45.6% and 46.1%, respectively, for family members; 28.7% and 29.2%, respectively, for friends/colleagues; and 28.1% and 25.3%, respectively, for others). However, the BCPR rates were lowest in family members (35.5% and 37.8%, respectively, for family members; 43.7% and 37.8%, respectively, for friends/colleagues; and 59.3% and 50.0%, respectively, for others). Large delays (≥ 5 min) in placing emergency calls and initiating BCPR were most frequent in family members. The overall survival rate was lowest (2.7%) for family members and highest (9.1%) for friends/colleagues during daytime. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the effect of bystander relationship on survival was significant only during daytime [adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for survival from daytime OHCAs with family as reference were 1.51 (1.36-1.68) for friends/colleagues and 1.23 (1.13-1.34) for others]. Family members are least likely to perform BCPR and OHCAs witnessed by family members are least likely to survive during daytime. Different strategies are required for family-witnessed OHCAs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of initial rhythm with neurologically favorable survival in non-shockable out-of-hospital cardiac arrest without a bystander witness or bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Matsubara, Takehiro; Doi, Kent; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-05-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a predominantly non-shockable rhythm. Non-shockable rhythm, and the absence of a bystander witness or bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are associated with poor outcomes. However, the association between the type of non-shockable rhythm and outcomes is not well known. To examine the association between the initial rhythm and neurologically favorable outcomes after non-shockable OHCA without a bystander witness or bystander CPR. In a nationwide, population-based, cohort study, we analyzed 213,984 adult OHCA patients with a non-shockable rhythm who had neither a bystander witness nor bystander CPR. They were identified through the Japanese national OHCA registry data from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2010. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival. Among 213,984 patients, the initial rhythm was Pulseless Electrical Activity (PEA) in 31,179 patients (14.6%) and Asystole in 182,805 patients (85.4%). The neurological outcome was more favorable in PEA than in Asystole (1.4% vs. 0.2%, padvanced airway management, time from call to contact with patient, and calendar year, PEA was associated with an increased neurologically favorable survival rate (odds ratio 7.86; 95% confidence interval 6.81-9.07). In subgroup analysis stratified by age group (18-64, 65-84, or ≥85years), the neurologically favorable survival rate was ≥1% in PEA, even for patients aged ≥85years, but <1% in Asystole among all age groups. PEA and Asystole should not be considered to be identical to non-shockable rhythm, but rather should be clearly distinguished from each other from the perspective of quantitative medical futility. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiosensitivities of sensitized lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Kazuto

    1979-01-01

    Immunization of mice with cell antigens such as allogeneic tumor cells or xenogeneic erythrocytes raises a variety of immune reactions mediated by T lymphocytes: i.e. delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH), cytotoxicity, and antibody production. The radiosensitivities of these reactions were examined in mice exposed to 600 R x-irradiation a few hours before or after immunization. 1) DTH to xenogeneic erythrocytes, as demonstrated by footpad reaction, was not suppressed by irradiation 3 h before or after immunization. DTH to allogeneic tumor cells, as demonstrated by a migration inhibition test, hardly developed in mice that had been irradiated before or after immunization. It may have belonged to distinct types of delayed reactions which were mediated by distinct subpopulations of T lymphocytes. 2) Cytotoxicity against allogeneic cells and xenogeneic erythrocytes showed almost the same radiosensitivity. It was scarcely detected in mice that had been irradiated before immunization. However, a low but definite degree of cytotoxicity was detected in mice that had been irradiated only a few hours after immunization. Solubilized allogeneic cells instead of native cells were used as immunizing antigens. It was also possible for precursor cells with cytotoxicity to acquire a radioresistant nature by immunization of solubilized antigens, but native cells were required as stimulation for radioresistant precursor cells to differentiated into nature cytotoxic effector cells. 3) Antibody production against xenogeneic erythrocytes or allogeneic cells was almost completely depleted in mice that had been irradiated before or after immunization. It is possible that antibody production essentially requires cell division and clonal expansion of B lymphocytes. (Bell, E.)

  19. Characterization of tuberculous granulomas in different stages of progression and associated tertiary lymphoid tissue in goats experimentally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinköthe, Jan; Köhler, Heike; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth M

    2016-08-01

    Oral infection of goats with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) resulted in a large variety of granulomas in organized gut-associated lymphatic tissues and intestinal lymph nodes. To characterize the cellular composition of granulomas, CD4(+), CD8(+), γδ, B lymphocytes and plasma, CD25(+), CD68(+), MHC-II(+), Ki67(+) and endothelial cells were labeled in consecutive frozen sections by immunohistochemistry and acid fast bacilli (AFB) by Kinyoun stain. Granulomas with extensive necrosis, little mineralization and variable numbers of AFB surrounded by many CD4(+) T cells, but only few epitheloid macrophages were observed in severely sick goats at 2-3mpi. They were interpreted as exuberant immune reaction. Organized granulomas with very few AFB were seen in clinically healthy goats at 13mpi. The necrotic cores were surrounded by a zone of granulomatous infiltrate with many epitheloid macrophages and few lymphocytes. This zone was initially wide and highly vascularized and became progressively smaller. It was enclosed by an increasing layer of connective tissue. All organized granulomas were surrounded by compartimentalized tertiary lymphoid tissue. The granulomas in experimental infection of goats with MAH reflect the heterogeneity of lesions seen in mycobacterial infections of humans and ruminants and are therefore valuable for comparative research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Regions With Low Rates of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Have Lower Rates of CPR Training in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Janet E; Straney, Lahn; Smith, Karen; Cartledge, Susie; Case, Rosalind; Bernard, Stephen; Finn, Judith

    2017-06-05

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) more than doubles the chance of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Recent data have shown considerable regional variation in bystander CPR rates across the Australian state of Victoria. This study aims to determine whether there is associated regional variation in rates of CPR training and willingness to perform CPR in these communities. We categorized each Victorian postcode as either a low or high bystander CPR region using data on adult, bystander-witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of presumed cardiac etiology (n=7175) from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. We then surveyed adult Victorians (n=404) and compared CPR training data of the respondents from low and high bystander CPR regions. Of the 404 adults surveyed, 223 (55%) resided in regions with low bystander CPR. Compared with respondents from high bystander CPR regions, respondents residing in regions with low bystander CPR had lower rates of CPR training (62% versus 75%, P =0.009) and lower self-ratings for their overall knowledge of CPR (76% versus 84%, P =0.04). There were no differences between the regions in their reasons for not having undergone CPR training or in their willingness to perform CPR. Rates of survival for bystander-witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests were significantly lower in low bystander CPR regions (15.7% versus 17.0%, P CPR training and lower survival in regions with lower rates of bystander CPR in Victoria, Australia. Targeting these regions with CPR training programs may improve bystander CPR rates and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  1. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Sejal; Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Pandey, Badri N.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy

  2. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Sejal [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu [Radiation System and Engineering Section, Department of Technical Support and Development, Research, Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: badrinarain@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy.

  3. Keeping goats or going north? Enhancing livelihoods of smallholder goat farmers through brucellosis control in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oseguera Montiel, D.

    2014-01-01

    Smallholder Mexican farmers are embedded in an adverse context, due to neoliberal globalization policies, which threatens their livelihoods, and has caused an unprecedented surge of migration to the US. Keeping goats is one strategy to diversify livelihoods. Goat husbandry is dairy oriented and

  4. Study on N-Amino, Protein and Total Glucose of Etawah Crossbreed Goat and Boer Crossbreed Goat Meat Sauce

    OpenAIRE

    Khothibul Umam Al Awwaly; Aris Sri Widati; Vina Rahmadani

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to know the difference between Etawah crossbreed goat meat sauce and Boer crossbreed goat meat sauce evaluated on N-amino, protein, and total glucose.The material used in the research were meat sauce from Etawah crossbreed goat and Boer crossbreed goat. The result showed that the different species of goat statistically gave  no significant  effect (P>0.05) on N-amino, protein and total glucose of goat meat sauce. Boer crossbreed meat sauce tend higher than Etawah cro...

  5. Characteristics and mechanisms of the bystander response in monolayer cell cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, John B.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Toledo, Sonia M. de; Nagasawa, Hatsumi

    2005-01-01

    When confluent cultures of mammalian cells are irradiated with very low fluences of alpha particles whereby only occasional cells receive any radiation exposure, genetic changes are observed in the non-irradiated ('bystander') cells. Upregulation of the p53 damage-response pathway as well as activation of proteins in the MAPK family occurred in bystander cells; p53 was phosphorylated on the serine 15 residue suggesting that the upregulation of p53 was a consequence of DNA damage. Damage signals were transmitted to bystander cells through gap junctions, as confirmed by the use of genetically manipulated cells including connexin43 knockouts. Expression of connexin43 was markedly enhanced by irradiation. A moderate bystander effect was observed for specific gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations. This effect was markedly enhanced in cells defective in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway. Finally, an upregulation of oxidative metabolism occurred in bystander cells; the increased levels of reactive oxygen species appeared to be derived from flavine-containing oxidase enzymes. We hypothesize that genetic effects observed in non-irradiated bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative base damage; >90% of mutations in bystander cells were point mutations. When bystander cells cannot repair DNA double strand breaks, they become much more sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations, the latter consisting primarily of deletion mutants. While we propose that the genetic effects occurring in bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative stress, the nature of the signal that initiates this process remains to be determined

  6. Evaluation of the Green Dot Bystander Intervention to Reduce Interpersonal Violence Among College Students Across Three Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Ann L.; Fisher, Bonnie S.; Bush, Heather M.; Swan, Suzanne C.; Williams, Corrine M.; Clear, Emily R.; DeGue, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Evidence suggests that interventions to engage bystanders in violence prevention increase bystander intentions and efficacy to intervene, yet the impact of such programs on violence remains unknown. This study compared rates of violence by type among undergraduate students attending a college campus with the Green Dot bystander intervention (n = 2,768) with students at two colleges without bystander programs (n = 4,258). Violent victimization rates were significantly (p Violence perpetration rates were lower among males attending the intervention campus. Implications of these results for research and practice are discussed. PMID:25125493

  7. Evaluation of the Green Dot Bystander Intervention to Reduce Interpersonal Violence Among College Students Across Three Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Ann L; Fisher, Bonnie S; Bush, Heather M; Swan, Suzanne C; Williams, Corrine M; Clear, Emily R; DeGue, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that interventions to engage bystanders in violence prevention increase bystander intentions and efficacy to intervene, yet the impact of such programs on violence remains unknown. This study compared rates of violence by type among undergraduate students attending a college campus with the Green Dot bystander intervention (n = 2,768) with students at two colleges without bystander programs (n = 4,258). Violent victimization rates were significantly (p < .01) lower among students attending the campus with Green Dot relative to the two comparison campuses. Violence perpetration rates were lower among males attending the intervention campus. Implications of these results for research and practice are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Body linear traits for identifying prolific goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avijit Haldar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted on prolific goat breed to identify body linear type traits that might be associated with prolificacy trait in goats. Materials and Methods: Two-stage stratified random sample survey based data were collected from 1427 non-pregnant goats with the history of single, twin and triplet litter sizes (LZ between January 2008 to February 2011 for 3 years in 68 villages located in East and North East India. Data on sixteen body linear traits were analyzed using logistic regression model to do the step-wise selection for identifying the body linear traits that could determine LZ. An average value for each identified body linear trait was determined for classifying the goats into three categories: Goats having the history of single LZ, goats having the history of twin LZ and goats having the history of triplet LZ. Results: The LZ proportions for single, twin and triplet, were 29.50, 59.14 and 11.36%, respectively, with the prolificacy rate of 181.85% in Indian Black Bengal goats. A total of eight body linear traits that could determine LZ in prolific goats were identified. Heart girth (HG measurement (>60.90 cm, paunch girth (PG (>70.22 cm, wither height (WH (>49.75 cm, neck length (>21.45 cm, ear length (>12.80 cm and distance between trochanter major (DTM bones (>12.28 cm, pelvic triangle area (PTA (>572.25 cm2 and clearance at udder (CU (>23.16 cm showed an increase likelihood of multiple LZ when compared to single LZ. Further, HG measurement (>62.29 cm, WH (>50.54 cm, PG (>71.85 cm and ear length (>13.00 cm, neck length (>22.01 cm, PTA (>589.64 cm2, CU (>23.20 cm and DTM bones (>12.47 cm were associated with increased likelihood of triplet LZ, when compared with that of twin LZ. Conclusion: HG measurement was the best discriminating factor, while PG, neck length, DTM bones, CU, PTA, WH and ear length measurements were other important factors that could be used for identifying prolific goats to achieve economic

  9. RAD9 deficiency enhances radiation induced bystander DNA damage and transcriptomal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghandhi, Shanaz A; Ponnaiya, Brian; Panigrahi, Sunil K; Hopkins, Kevin M; Cui, Qingping; Hei, Tom K; Amundson, Sally A; Lieberman, Howard B

    2014-01-01

    Radiation induced bystander effects are an important component of the overall response of cells to irradiation and are associated with human health risks. The mechanism responsible includes intra-cellular and inter-cellular signaling by which the bystander response is propagated. However, details of the signaling mechanism are not well defined. We measured the bystander response of Mrad9 +/+ and Mrad9 −/− mouse embryonic stem cells, as well as human H1299 cells with inherent or RNA interference-mediated reduced RAD9 levels after exposure to 1 Gy α particles, by scoring chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei formation, respectively. In addition, we used microarray gene expression analyses to profile the transcriptome of directly irradiated and bystander H1299 cells. We demonstrated that Mrad9 null enhances chromatid aberration frequency induced by radiation in bystander mouse embryonic stem cells. In addition, we found that H1299 cells with reduced RAD9 protein levels showed a higher frequency of radiation induced bystander micronuclei formation, compared with parental cells containing inherent levels of RAD9. The enhanced bystander response in human cells was associated with a unique transcriptomic profile. In unirradiated cells, RAD9 reduction broadly affected stress response pathways at the mRNA level; there was reduction in transcript levels corresponding to genes encoding multiple members of the UVA-MAPK and p38MAPK families, such as STAT1 and PARP1, suggesting that these signaling mechanisms may not function optimally when RAD9 is reduced. Using network analysis, we found that differential activation of the SP1 and NUPR1 transcriptional regulators was predicted in directly irradiated and bystander H1299 cells. Transcription factor prediction analysis also implied that HIF1α (Hypoxia induced factor 1 alpha) activation by protein stabilization in irradiated cells could be a negative predictor of the bystander response, suggesting that local hypoxic stress

  10. Single cell low dose studies of bystander cell killing with targeted ultrasoft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schettino, G.; Prise, K.M.; Folkard, M.; Vojnovic, B.; Michael, B.D.; Wu, L.; Held, K.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Bystander responses have attracted considerable interest in the recent years and several investigations have reported a binary behavior with the effect triggered by very small doses and immediately reaching a plateau. The Ultrasoft X-ray Microprobe in operation at the GCI is a facility designed to precisely assess the biological response of individual cells in vitro irradiated with a sub-micron size X-ray beam . Although recent improvements have upgrade the facility with AlK and TiK X-rays, most of the bystander studies have been performed using CK X-rays of 278 eV. The high sensitivity and the accurate irradiation and revisiting of the individual samples allowed us to investigate specific characteristics of the bystander phenomenon. In particular, evidences of a dose dependency of cell killing by bystander effect have been found at doses below 0.2 Gy where no differences is observed between all cell and single cell irradiation. Recent improvements have also allowed us to individually identify the phase of the cell cycle of all samples exposed. Although the G2-S phase have been found the most sensitive in responding to the bystander signal (a factor of 1.3), cells in the G1 phase also respond significantly while the phase of the irradiated cell doesn't seem to play a critical role. The time scale of the bystander effect has also been investigated by irradiating the same sample(s) twice with a few hours gap between exposures. Results indicate that the bystander signal is transmitted within a few minutes from the irradiation as replacing the medium immediately after irradiation does not influence the response, and it doesn't depend on the number of cells irradiated (up to 5). However, after a resting time of a few hours (3 h), the system seems to reset itself and a second irradiation has been shown to trigger a further bystander effect. Finally, by considering the total amount of energy deposited in to the sample population as critical parameter (instead

  11. Introduction of distillate rosemary leaves into the diet of the Murciano-Granadina goat: transfer of polyphenolic compounds to goats' milk and the plasma of suckling goat kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán, Maria José; Moñino, María Inmaculada; Martínez, Cristina; Lafuente, Arturo; Sotomayor, José Antonio

    2010-07-28

    The effect of the introduction of distilled rosemary leaves into the diet of the Murciano-Granadina goat on the polyphenolic profile of the goats' milk during the physiological stages of gestation and lactation was studied. The inclusion of rosemary leaves into the animal diet modified neither animal productivity (milk yield) nor milk quality. The following components were found in increased concentration (P goats' milk after the introduction of rosemary leaves into their diet: flavonoids hesperidin, naringin, and genkwanin; gallic acid; and phenolic diterpenes carnosol and carnosic acid. With regard to the transfer of polyphenols to the plasma of the suckling goat kid, a statistically significant increase (P goats' milk and allow for an increased concentration of polyphenolic components in the goats' milk and in the plasma of the suckling goat kid.

  12. Growth and performance of indigenous and crossbred goats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    breed is the most predominant in the country particularly in. Teso and Lango ... goats are the smallest in body size with average adult body. Uganda Journal of ... from crossbreeding indigenous breeds with exotic goats under different agro-.

  13. Antimicrobial residues screening in pigs and goats slaughtered in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ekene Vivienne Ezenduka

    2012-07-17

    Jul 17, 2012 ... Samples of tissues/organs from pigs and goats slaughtered at the Nsukka. Municipal abattoir .... Pig and goat farming are the major food producing livestock farming in ... Northern part of Nigeria and locally reared West African.

  14. Prevalence of Strongyle ova in Goats and comparative studies of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2018-01-16

    Jan 16, 2018 ... Keywords: Goats, Strongyle ova, Faecal Culture Techniques, Prevalence,. The Nigerian goat ... km located in the North eastern corner of Nigeria ... teaching and research farm, Maiduguri metropolitan ... West African Dwarf. 5.

  15. Marketing of Sahelian Goats in North -Eastern Nigeria: Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marketing of Sahelian Goats in North -Eastern Nigeria: Experience from Borno State. ... The study evaluated Sahelian goat marketing in Northeastern Nigeria, drawing experience from Borno State. ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  16. Participatory disease surveillance (PDS) of sheep and goats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Afar,Goat, Participatory disease surveillance, Sheep, PPR, Sheep and goat ... the region favors the pastoral livestock production system. ..... yellow color on carcass, in ... Foroda/Surota/ Bronchopnemonia fever, coughing, nostrils.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of goat pox viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, P; Jaisree, S; Balakrishnan, S; Senthilkumar, K; Mahaprabhu, R; Mishra, A; Maity, B; Ghosh, T K; Karmakar, A P

    2018-02-01

    Goat pox disease outbreaks were observed in different places affecting Black Bengal Goats in West Bengal (WB) and Tellicherry, Vembur and non-descriptive breeds in Tamil Nadu (TN) causing severe lesions and mortality up to 30%. Clinical specimens from all the outbreaks were screened by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and confirmed the diseases as Goat Pox. Virus isolation in Vero cell line was done with randomly selected ten samples, cytopathic effects (CPE) characterized by syncytia and intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed after several blind passages. Nucleotide sequence of complete p32 gene using randomly selected two isolates and three clinical specimens revealed presence of Goat pox virus (GTPV)-specific signature residues in all the sequences. Phylogenetic analysis using the present five sequences along with GenBank data of GTPV complete p32 gene sequences showed all the GTPV sequences cluster together except Pellor strain (NC004003) and FZ Chinese strain (KC951854). The five sequences either from WB or TN cluster more closely with GTPV isolates of Maharashtra state that were responsible for cross species outbreak of pox disease in both sheep (KF468759) and goats (KF468762) in India during the year 2010. All the Indian goat pox viruses, including the Mukteswar strain, isolated in 1946 and sequence reported in 2004 clustered together with the GTPVs causing the recent outbreaks. It was observed that GTPVs caused similar clinical manifestation irrespective of their geographical locations and breed characteristics, no variation observed among the Indian isolates based on p32 gene over the period of seventy years and disease outbreaks could not be observed or reported in vaccinated goats. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Bystander first aid in trauma - prevalence and quality: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, H K; Steinvik, T; Eidissen, S-I; Gilbert, M; Wisborg, T

    2015-10-01

    Bystander first aid and basic life support can likely improve victim survival in trauma. In contrast to bystander first aid and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, little is known about the role of bystanders in trauma response. Our aim was to determine how frequently first aid is given to trauma victims by bystanders, the quality of this aid, the professional background of first-aid providers, and whether previous first-aid training affects aid quality. We conducted a prospective 18-month study in two mixed urban-rural Norwegian counties. The personnel on the first ambulance responding to trauma calls assessed and documented first aid performed by bystanders using a standard form. A total of 330 trauma calls were included, with bystanders present in 97% of cases. Securing an open airway was correctly performed for 76% of the 43 patients in need of this first-aid measure. Bleeding control was provided correctly for 81% of 63 patients for whom this measure was indicated, and prevention of hypothermia for 62% of 204 patients. Among the first-aid providers studied, 35% had some training in first aid. Bystanders with documented first-aid training gave better first aid than those where first-aid training status was unknown. A majority of the trauma patients studied received correct pre-hospital first aid, but still there is need for considerable improvement, particularly hypothermia prevention. Previous first-aid training seems to improve the quality of first aid provided. The effect on patient survival needs to be investigated. © 2015 The Authors. The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kobayashi, Alisa [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Maeda, Takeshi [Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Fu, Qibin [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Oikawa, Masakazu [Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yang, Gen, E-mail: gen.yang@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Konishi, Teruaki, E-mail: tkonishi@nirs.go.jp [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Uchihori, Yukio [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); and others

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Existence of radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) between cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. • Existence of significant difference in generation and response of bystander signals between CSCs and NSCCs. • CSCs are significantly less sensitive to NO scavenger than that of NSCCs in terms of DNA double strand breaks induced by RIBE. - Abstract: Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy.

  20. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yu; Kobayashi, Alisa; Maeda, Takeshi; Fu, Qibin; Oikawa, Masakazu; Yang, Gen; Konishi, Teruaki; Uchihori, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Existence of radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) between cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. • Existence of significant difference in generation and response of bystander signals between CSCs and NSCCs. • CSCs are significantly less sensitive to NO scavenger than that of NSCCs in terms of DNA double strand breaks induced by RIBE. - Abstract: Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy

  1. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru, E-mail: wa@mbe.nifty.com [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  2. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru; Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  3. Lymphocyte signaling: beyond knockouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, Alexander; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2009-04-01

    The analysis of lymphocyte signaling was greatly enhanced by the advent of gene targeting, which allows the selective inactivation of a single gene. Although this gene 'knockout' approach is often informative, in many cases, the phenotype resulting from gene ablation might not provide a complete picture of the function of the corresponding protein. If a protein has multiple functions within a single or several signaling pathways, or stabilizes other proteins in a complex, the phenotypic consequences of a gene knockout may manifest as a combination of several different perturbations. In these cases, gene targeting to 'knock in' subtle point mutations might provide more accurate insight into protein function. However, to be informative, such mutations must be carefully based on structural and biophysical data.

  4. MRI of lymphocytic hypophysitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Feng; Li Mingli; Li Xiaozhen; Meng Chunling; Jin zhengyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To describe the MR findings in patients with lymphocytic hypophysitis (LyH), and to discuss MR diagnostic value and limit in this disease entity and its differentiation with pituitary adenoma. Methods: Five pathologically proven cases of LyH were recruited in this study. The main complaints of the patients were polydipsia, polyuria, and headache. The preoperative MR images and clinical manifestations were analyzed retrospectively. Results: MR findings of the 5 patients with LyH included enlargement of pituitary gland, stalk thickening, disappearance of high signal of neurohypophysis on T 1 WI, and marked Gadolinium enhancement of the lesions. Homogeneous enhancement was found in 2 cases, while heterogeneous enhancement was in 3 cases. Involvement of the cavernous sinus and dura mater on dorsum sella and clivus were found in 2 patients. Conclusion: The diagnosis of LyH should be suggested when the enlarged pituitary gland is associated with central diabetes insipidus, and with/without dysfunction of adenohypophysis. (authors)

  5. Reproductive Effeciency of an Indigenous Irabian Goat ( Capra Hircus)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is well known that goat can tolerate harsh conditions; however there are little information about its reproduction functions such as testis histomorphometry and efficiency of sertoli cells. This study aimed to estimate germ cell types and number per sertoli cell of an indigenous Iranian goat (Lori goat). Semen was collected ...

  6. Traditional goat husbandry may substantially contribute to human toxoplasmosis exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raising goats in settings that are highly contaminated with oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii may contribute significantly to human exposure to this zoonotic parasite. Increasing consumption of young goats in Romania, where goats are typically reared in backyards that are also home to cats (the definitiv...

  7. The Economics Of Goat Production In Southeastern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The West African Dwarf goat is indigenous to Southeastern Nigeria and is raised by many families under small·scale and intensive management systems. Results showed that the average households kept 6 goats, but that expansion was limited by hour and feed procurement problems. Both males and females owned goats ...

  8. Optimum stocking rate for goat production on improved highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of four stocking rates (SR; 7.5, 15, 30 and 45 goats ha-1) on goat performance and herbage productivity were examined on the perennial pastures. The experiment was applied by grazing 65 six-months old Chinese Yunling black goat wethers for two years. Significant year × SR interactions were observed on ...

  9. Gastrointestinal nematodes and anthelmintic resistance in Danish goat herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Signe A.; Sørensen, Camilla; Thamsborg, Stig M.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in Danish goats and the presence of anthelmintic resistance (AR) in 10 selected herds were investigated during April-September 2012. All Danish herds (n = 137) with 10 or more adult goats were invited to participate, and of these 27 herds met......, resistance to the most commonly used anthelmintics is widespread in larger goat herds throughout Denmark....

  10. 9 CFR 309.14 - Brucellosis-reactor goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis-reactor goats. 309.14 Section 309.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.14 Brucellosis-reactor goats. Goats which have...

  11. 9 CFR 93.435 - Sheep and goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sheep and goats. 93.435 Section 93.435... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Additional General Provisions § 93.435 Sheep and goats. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all sheep and goats imported into the United States...

  12. Behavioural responses of four goat genotypes to successive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eared, Nguni and Boer goats and their crosses were kept at the University of Fort Hare Farm, South Africa for eight weeks. The goats were randomly assigned to four pen groups with each pen having three goats of the same breed among the 12 ...

  13. Incidence and Pattern of Pneumonia in Goats Slaughtered at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at determining the incidence and pattern of pneumonia, in slaughtered goats in Kumasi abattoir, Ghana. One thousand three hundred and fifty lungs of goats; (1,012 Sahelian and 338 West Africa Dwarf goats (WAD) lungs) of different ages (less than a year to above 4 years) were used in this study.

  14. MEAT GOAT DEMOGRAPHICS AND NICHE MARKETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Fisher

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Six focus groups were conducted with each having ten people who attend different Islamic Centers in Ohio. The objective of the focus groups was to understand Halal meat purchase patterns and consumption patterns of the Moslem population with special attention to goat. The Ohio State University Extension personnel are utilizing these results to work with meat goat producers to understand and meet the requirements of the Halal meat market.  Participants discussed the Zabiha approach to slaughtering animals as the most merciful by causing the least pain. Many participants noted they had no way of knowing where the animal  came from and this held tremendous concerns relative to the feeding of animal by-products, use of hormones, and adulteration with pork. These trust concerns led to decisions about where to purchase their meat with 72% purchasing from a Moslem owned retail store. Only 13% purchased from a large grocery and 8% direct from a farmer.   Participants indicated their consumption patterns according to weekly, seasonal, and holiday use in addition to variations according to their personal geographic origin. The average meat purchase was 23 pounds with an average occurrence of 12.5 times per annum.  Purchasing trends indicated that 78% prefer lean over marbled cuts. Nearly 86% prefer fresh over frozen goat meat and nearly a third responded that they would pay more for fresh. Intact males were preferred by 42% of the respondents. Preferences for meat goat cuts were: Leg (71%, Chops (42%, Shoulder (24%, Breast (7%. Nearly a third indicated they also want the kidneys, heart, or head. Demographic shifts in the United States indicate that there are almost 53 million people who have a preference for goat meat. There are 2.4 million goats in the US according to the 2007 Agricultural Statistics. Based on consumption trends of this study, goat demand exceeds inventory by 160%. Meat goat consumer trends are changing regarding

  15. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.B., E-mail: ahmad.rabilal@gmail.com [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McNeill, F.E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Byun, S.H., E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Prestwich, W.V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Seymour, C., E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Mothersill, C.E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced 'bystander effects' studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2} s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, and 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps for wavelengths of 280 {+-} 5 nm, 320 {+-} 5 nm and 340 {+-} 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a 'damage cross section' of the order of 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  16. Demand Potential for Goat Meat in Southern States: Empirical Evidence from a Multi-State Goat Meat Consumer Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Mack C.; Liu, Xuanli

    2005-01-01

    A survey conducted in 11 Southeastern states elicits consumers' demand and preferences for various goat meat products. The data permit examination of goat meat demand of ethnic populations and the diversity among the states surveyed. The study uses five econometric models to examine the current demand, potential demand, and demand related to season and occasions on the goat meat market. Our analysis suggests that there exist a substantial demand for goat meat and the potential increase in the...

  17. Bystander effects in radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Australia Objectives The bystander effect causes a response in unirradiated cells that are in communication with cells that receive a radiation dose. In recent work we have shown that there are 3 types bystander effect and that the expression of these effects follows a Ii course. The aim of this work is to identify the conditions for the three types of bystander effects in radiotherapy of non-small cell II cancer. A human non small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460) was irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam produced from a Varian I i near accelerator to doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy. These cells v termed donor cells. At selected time intervals after exposure (5,15 and 60 min), the medium was transferred to receiver cells of the cell line in separate flasks. The clonogenic survival fraction of the receiver cells was determined following 5 days of incubation comparing cells receiving transfer of medium from exposed cells to cell receiving transfer from sham exposed cells. The experimental design controlled for the density of cells in the donor flask, the e of irradiation on the medium alone and on the donor cell metabolites. The results show a strong time course for the bystander signal expression, which is dependent on the density of cells in the donor receiver flasks. Sub lethal doses of radiation resulted in a proliferative response at short time intervals after exposure [15 min] but a toxic response when medium transfer was carried out after 60 min. A higher cell density in the donor flasks produces an increased response in the receiver flasks for the same volume of medium transferred. The latter response corresponds to Bystander Effect type 1 in which a reduced survival is observed in cells receiving medium from cells that receive a high but not lethal dose. The proliferative response, corresponding to Bystander Effect type 3 is more general and is not strongly dependent on dose. Following a lethal dose of

  18. Bystander Efforts and 1-Year Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N; Hansen, Steen M; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Rajan, Shahzleen; Lippert, Freddy; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Fonager, Kirsten; Jensen, Svend E; Gerds, Thomas A; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2017-05-04

    The effect of bystander interventions on long-term functional outcomes among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has not been extensively studied. We linked nationwide data on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Denmark to functional outcome data and reported the 1-year risks of anoxic brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause among patients who survived to day 30 after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed risks according to whether bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation was performed and evaluated temporal changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period. During the study period, among the 2084 patients who had cardiac arrests that were not witnessed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, the rate of bystander CPR increased from 66.7% to 80.6% (Pbystander defibrillation increased from 2.1% to 16.8% (Pbystander CPR was associated with a risk of brain damage or nursing home admission that was significantly lower than that associated with no bystander resuscitation (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 0.82), as well as a lower risk of death from any cause (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.99) and a lower risk of the composite end point of brain damage, nursing home admission, or death (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.84). The risks of these outcomes were even lower among patients who received bystander defibrillation as compared with no bystander resuscitation. In our study, we found that bystander CPR and defibrillation were associated with risks of brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause that were significantly lower than those associated with no bystander resuscitation. (Funded by Tryg

  19. Detection of genomic instability in α-irradiated and bystander human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponnaiya, B.; Jenkins-Baker, G.; Bigelow, A.; Marino, S.; Geard, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have previously demonstrated a radiation induced bystander effect using novel co-culturing techniques where irradiated and bystander cells were cultured on two surfaces of mylar separated by media. Here we present data from experiments designed to investigate the induction of chromosomal aberrations in irradiated and bystander fibroblasts using these co-culturing techniques. Immortalized fibroblasts ((BJ1-tert) were cultured on both mylar surfaces and cells on one side were irradiated with 0.1 or 1 Gy -particles (an average of 1 and 10 particles per cell nucleus respectively), the two sides were separated 1 hour post irradiation and analyzed for chromosomal aberrations using standard Giemsa staining at either immediate or delayed time points. At 24-30 hours post irradiation, frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in irradiated populations were increased in a dose dependent manner as expected. Populations that received 0.1 and 1 Gy had 0.3 and 1.3 aberrations/cell; these aberrations were almost exclusively chromosome type aberrations. In contrast, at these times bystander populations had elevated yields of chromatid-type aberrations. When assayed at later times (15-20 population doublings post irradiation) both irradiated and bystander cells demonstrated elevated frequencies of chromatid-type aberrations. Frequencies in the irradiated populations ranged from 0.07 to 0.09 aberrations/ cell at 15 doublings, and 0.09-0.14/cell at 20 doublings, with no apparent dose response. Aberration frequencies in the bystander populations were between 0.08-0.14 per cell at the delayed time points assayed. Interestingly, the chromatid-type aberrations observed immediately post irradiation in the bystander cells, and at later times in both the irradiated and bystander populations were qualitatively similar to those previously observed at delayed times in neutron irradiated epithelial cells. Furthermore, there was a similar lack of a dose response in those studies as

  20. New Jersey 4-H Goat Extravaganza: Efficiently Meeting the Educational Needs of 4-H Goat Project Members, Volunteers, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripberger, Chad

    2014-01-01

    The 4-H Goat Extravaganza maximizes limited resources to help youth and adults develop knowledge and skills in goat care and management. It capitalizes on the talents and interests of volunteers to efficiently combine a goat-themed art show, team presentation contest, quiz bowl, skillathon, and adult workshop into 1 day. This article outlines the…

  1. Goat Meat Consumer Preferences: Implications for Goat Meat Marketing in Metropolitan Nashville, Tennessee Area

    OpenAIRE

    Ekanem, Enefiok; Mafuyai-Ekanem, Mary; Tagegne, Fisseha; Singh, Surendra; Favors, Delicia

    2013-01-01

    Goat meat has become an increasingly good source of protein for meat eaters in the global marketplace. Goat meat constitutes about 63% of all red meat consumed worldwide. It is the main source of animal protein in many North African, Middle Eastern nations, Southeast Asia, the Caribbean, and other tropical regions. This notwithstanding, goat meat is yet to take such prominence in the U.S. diet. Despite the acknowledgement of the meat as lean, tasty and less fatty than other meats (USDA 2001),...

  2. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpeku, Moses; Esmailizadeh, Ali; Adeola, Adeniyi C; Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Peters, Sunday O; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats' populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima's D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat IRF3

  3. Disparities in Survival with Bystander CPR following Cardiopulmonary Arrest Based on Neighborhood Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Thakkar Rivera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Heart Association reports the annual incidence of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests (OHCA is greater than 300,000 with a survival rate of 9.5%. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR saves one life for every 30, with a 10% decrease in survival associated with every minute of delay in CPR initiation. Bystander CPR and training vary widely by region. We conducted a retrospective study of 320 persons who suffered OHCA in South Florida over 25 months. Increased survival, overall and with bystander CPR, was seen with increasing income (p=0.05, with a stronger disparity between low- and high-income neighborhoods (p=0.01 and p=0.03, resp.. Survival with bystander CPR was statistically greater in white- versus black-predominant neighborhoods (p=0.04. Increased survival, overall and with bystander CPR, was seen with high- versus low-education neighborhoods (p=0.03. Neighborhoods with more high school age persons displayed the lowest survival. We discovered a significant disparity in OHCA survival within neighborhoods of low-income, black-predominance, and low-education. Reduced survival was seen in neighborhoods with larger populations of high school students. This group is a potential target for training, and instruction can conceivably change survival outcomes in these neighborhoods, closing the gap, thus improving survival for all.

  4. First aid: level of knowledge of relatives and bystanders in emergency situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomruk, Onder; Soysal, Suna; Gunay, Turkan; Cimrin, Arif H

    2007-01-01

    Bystanders who are able to provide immediate first aid to patients who require emergency care can make a big difference in the outcome. Thus, first-aid training should be made available to as many people as possible. The aims of this study were to assess the level of first-aid knowledge among bystanders in emergency situations and to identify factors that affected this level of knowledge. At Dokuz Eylul University Emergency Service between February 1 and February 15, 2002, 318 bystanders were given a questionnaire. The first part of the questionnaire was concerned with demographic characteristics and factors that would affect first-aid knowledge level. The second part consisted of 16 multiple choice questions about first aid. Bystanders answered an average of 7.16+/-3.14 questions correctly. Bystanders who had graduated from a university, were health care personnel, had taken a first-aid course, had a first-aid certificate, or had a driver's license were considered to be more successful.

  5. The bystander effect in experimental systems and compatibility with radon-induced lung cancer in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M.P.; Wakeford, R.

    2002-01-01

    Bystander effects following exposure to α-particles have been observed in C3H 10T 1/2 cells and in other experimental systems, and imply that linearly extrapolating low-dose risks from high-dose data might materially underestimate risk. The ratio of lung cancer risk among persons exposed to low and high doses of radon daughters is 2.4-4.0, with an upper 95% confidence limit (CL) of about 14. Assuming that the bystander effect observed in the C3H 10T 1/2 data applies to human lung cells in vivo, the epidemiological data imply that the number of neighbouring cells that can contribute to the bystander effect is between 0 and 1, with an upper 95% CL of about 7. As a consequence, the bystander effect observed in the C3H 10T 1/2 system probably does not play a large part in the process of radon-induced lung carcinogenesis in humans. Other experimental data relating to the bystander effect after α-particle exposure are surveyed; some of these data are more compatible with the epidemiological data. (author)

  6. Bystander effects and compartmental stress response to X-ray irradiation in L929 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temelie, Mihaela; Stroe, Daniela; Petcu, Ileana; Mustaciosu, Cosmin; Moisoi, Nicoleta; Savu, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Bystander effects are indirect consequences of radiation and many other stress factors. They occur in cells that are not directly exposed to these factors, but receive signals from affected cells either by gap junctions or by molecules released in the medium. Characterizing these effects and deciphering the underlying mechanisms involved in radiation-induced bystander effects are relevant for cancer radiotherapy and radioprotection. At doses of X-ray radiation 0.5 and 1 Gy, we detected bystander effects as increased numbers of micronuclei shortly after the treatment, through medium transfer and by co-cultures. Interestingly, bystander cells did not exhibit long-term adverse changes in viability. Evaluation of several compartmental stress markers (CHOP, BiP, mtHsp60, cytHsp70) by qRT-PCR did not reveal expression changes at transcriptional level. We investigated the involvement of ROS and NO in this process by addition of specific scavengers of these molecules, DMSO or c-PTIO in the transferred medium. This approach proved that ROS but not NO is involved in the induction of lesions in the acceptor cells. These results indicate that L929 cells are susceptible to stress effects of radiation-induced bystander signaling.

  7. Role of nitric oxide in the radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Vasily A

    2015-12-01

    Cells that are not irradiated but are affected by "stress signal factors" released from irradiated cells are called bystander cells. These cells, as well as directly irradiated ones, express DNA damage-related proteins and display excess DNA damage, chromosome aberrations, mutations, and malignant transformation. This phenomenon has been studied widely in the past 20 years, since its first description by Nagasawa and Little in 1992, and is known as the radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Several factors have been identified as playing a role in the bystander response. This review will focus on one of them, nitric oxide (NO), and its role in the stimulation and propagation of RIBE. The hydrophobic properties of NO, which permit its diffusion through the cytoplasm and plasma membranes, allow this signaling molecule to easily spread from irradiated cells to bystander cells without the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication. NO produced in irradiated tissues mediates cellular regulation through posttranslational modification of a number of regulatory proteins. The best studied of these modifications are S-nitrosylation (reversible oxidation of cysteine) and tyrosine nitration. These modifications can up- or down-regulate the functions of many proteins modulating different NO-dependent effects. These NO-dependent effects include the stimulation of genomic instability (GI) and the accumulation of DNA errors in bystander cells without direct DNA damage. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A reaction-diffusion model for radiation-induced bystander effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olobatuyi, Oluwole; de Vries, Gerda; Hillen, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We develop and analyze a reaction-diffusion model to investigate the dynamics of the lifespan of a bystander signal emitted when cells are exposed to radiation. Experimental studies by Mothersill and Seymour 1997, using malignant epithelial cell lines, found that an emitted bystander signal can still cause bystander effects in cells even 60 h after its emission. Several other experiments have also shown that the signal can persist for months and even years. Also, bystander effects have been hypothesized as one of the factors responsible for the phenomenon of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and increased radioresistance (HRS/IRR). Here, we confirm this hypothesis with a mathematical model, which we fit to Joiner's data on HRS/IRR in a T98G glioma cell line. Furthermore, we use phase plane analysis to understand the full dynamics of the signal's lifespan. We find that both single and multiple radiation exposure can lead to bystander signals that either persist temporarily or permanently. We also found that, in an heterogeneous environment, the size of the domain exposed to radiation and the number of radiation exposures can determine whether a signal will persist temporarily or permanently. Finally, we use sensitivity analysis to identify those cell parameters that affect the signal's lifespan and the signal-induced cell death the most.

  9. Bystander effect of alpha-particle irradiation on mutagenicity and its associated mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Ying; Yang Zhihua; Cao Zhenshan; Fan Feiyue; Zhu Maoxiang

    2004-01-01

    The work is to investigate α-particle irradiation-induced bystander effects on the mutagenicity in human chromosome 11 in the human-hamster hybrid (A L cells) and its possible mechanism. A L cells were used for assaying mutation rates of human chromosome 11 through screening mutants in the presence of anti-CD59 surface antigen antibody (S1) and complement. A grid was interposed between α-particle source and the cells being irradiated, so as to fix proportion of the irradiated cells (15%) and the bystander effects on the mutagenicity were detected. Free radical scavenger DMSO and intercellular communication inhibitor Lindane were selected to investigate the potential mechanism of α-particle induced bystander effect. There was clear dose-dependent relationship between mutation rate and the dose of alpha particle radiation. However, the mutant fractions of cell population shielded by the grid in α-particle irradiation system were much higher than the expected levels of irradiated cells. Lindane, but not DMSO, could obviously decrease this bystander effect induced by α-particle irradiation. Alpha-particle irradiation can induce bystander effect on the mutagenicity, in which intercellular communication may play important roles

  10. Bystander responses in three-dimensional cultures containing radiolabelled and unlabelled human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, M.; Azzam, E. I.; Howell, R. W.

    2006-01-01

    Research on the radiation-induced bystander effect has been carried out mainly in 2-D tissue culture systems. This study uses a 3-D model, wherein apparently normal human diploid fibroblasts (AG1522) are grown in a carbon scaffold, to investigate the induction of a G 1 checkpoint in bystander cells present alongside radiolabelled cells. Cultures were simultaneously pulse-labelled with 3 H-deoxycytidine ( 3 HdC) to selectively irradiate a minor fraction of cells, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to identify the radiolabelled cells. After thorough washing of cultures, iododeoxyuridine (IdU) was administered to detect proliferating bystander cells. The cultures were harvested at various times thereafter, and cells were reacted with two monoclonal antibodies specific to IdU/BrdU or BrdU, respectively, stained with propidium iodide, and subjected to multi-parameter flow cytometry. Cell-cycle progression was followed in radiolabelled cells (BrdU + ) that were chronically irradiated by low energy beta particles emitted by DNA-incorporated 3 H, and in unlabelled bystander cells (BrdU - ) by a flow cytometry based cumulative labelling index assay. As expected, radiolabelled cells were delayed, in a dose-dependent manner, in G 2 and subsequently G 1 . No delay occurred in progression of bystander cells through G 1 , when the labelled cells were irradiated at dose rates up to 0.32 Gy h -1 . (authors)

  11. Measurement of the bystander intervention model for bullying and sexual harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Amanda B; Aloe, Ariel M; Livingston, Jennifer A; Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2014-06-01

    Although peer bystanders can exacerbate or prevent bullying and sexual harassment, research has been hindered by the absence of a validated assessment tool to measure the process and sequential steps of the bystander intervention model. A measure was developed based on the five steps of Latané and Darley's (1970) bystander intervention model applied to bullying and sexual harassment. Confirmatory factor analysis with a sample of 562 secondary school students confirmed the five-factor structure of the measure. Structural equation modeling revealed that all the steps were influenced by the previous step in the model, as the theory proposed. In addition, the bystander intervention measure was positively correlated with empathy, attitudes toward bullying and sexual harassment, and awareness of bullying and sexual harassment facts. This measure can be used for future research and to inform intervention efforts related to the process of bystander intervention for bullying and sexual harassment. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Study on bystander effect and associated mechanism mediated through culture medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Xumin; Lei Suwen; Zhang Zhixing; Lv Huimin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the bystander effect and associated mechanism mediated through the irradiated cell culture medium. Methods: Splenic natural killer (NK) cells were obtained from healthy male ICR strain mice. Culture medium irradiated with different doses of 60 Co γ-rays was used for culturing Yac-I lymphoma cells. The degree of injury of the latter by activated NK cells was observed. A part of the culture media were pretreated with 1% DMSO, a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS), in order to investigate the possible mechanism of a radiation-induced bystander response. Results: Severer injury was induced in Yac-I cells cultured in the media pre-irradiated with different doses of γ-rays than that in Yac-I cells cultured in unirradiated medium, as shown by increased sensitivity to murine splenic NK cells (P<0.01). Culturing Yac-I cells in DMSO-pretreated medium considerably reduced the activation of NK cells, especially in 0.25 Gy and 0.5 Gy γ-irradiated media. Therefore, it can be expected that DMSO can partly suppress ROS-induced bystander effect. Conclusion: The irradiated culture medium of Yac-I cells can trigger bystander effect. ROS likely plays an important role in radiation-induced bystander effect that can be partly suppressed by pretreatment with DMSO. (authors)

  13. Educational Possibilities of Keeping Goats in Elementary Schools in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Naoko; Kutsumi, Shiho; Hirose, Toshiya; Watanabe, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Many Japanese elementary schools keep small animals for educational purposes, and the effects and challenges have been investigated. Although goats are medium-sized animals that are familiar to Japanese, few practical studies have been conducted on keeping goats in schools. This study investigated the effects and challenges of keeping goats in elementary schools and discussed its educational possibilities. A semi-structured interview survey was conducted with 11 personnel that were responsible for keeping goats in 6 elementary schools in urban areas. They described benefits, problems, and tips related to keeping goats. Participant observation was also conducted on daily human–goat interactions in these schools. The results indicated that children in all six grades were able to care for goats. Goats were used for various school subjects and activities. As a result of keeping goats, children developed affection for them, attitude of respect for living things, greater sense of responsibility, and enhanced interpersonal interactional skills. Stronger ties between the schools and parents and community were developed through cooperation in goat-keeping. Some anxieties existed about the risk of injury to children when interacting with goats. Other challenges included the burden of taking care of the goats on holidays and insufficient knowledge about treatment in case of their illness or injury. The results suggested similarities to the benefits and challenges associated with keeping small animals in elementary schools, although the responsibility and the burden on the schools were greater for keeping goats than small animals because of their larger size and the need for children to consider the goats’ inner state and to cooperate with others when providing care. At the same time, goats greatly stimulated interest, cooperation, and empathy in children. Goats can expand educational opportunities and bring about many positive effects on child development. PMID:28083538

  14. Radiosensitivity of lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, S.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation-induced impairment of human T-lymphocytes was studied after in vitro exposure to 25.8 - 825.6 mC/kg (100 - 3200 R) of 60 Co γ-radiation by ascertaining the change in lymphocyte response to phytohaemagglutin stimulation. Following methods were used: (1) measurement of 3 H-thymidine uptake, (2) E-rosette test, and (3) morphological examination of transformed T-cells. The results revealed a dose-dependent decline in T-cell number which was still somewhat more marked with lymphocytes purified over Ficoll-Isopaque prior to irradiation. (author)

  15. Laboratorial diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    Full Text Available Meningitis is the main infectious central nervous system (CNS syndrome. Viruses or bacteria can cause acute meningitis of infectious etiology. The term "Aseptic Meningitis" denotes a clinical syndrome with a predominance of lymphocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, with no common bacterial agents identified in the CSF. Viral meningitis is considered the main cause of lymphocyte meningitis. There are other etiologies of an infectious nature. CSF examination is essential to establish the diagnosis and to identify the etiological agent of lymphocytic meningitis. We examined CSF characteristics and the differential diagnosis of the main types of meningitis.

  16. Bystander Effect Induced by Electroporation is Possibly Mediated by Microvesicles and Dependent on Pulse Amplitude, Repetition Frequency and Cell Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevc, Ajda; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Cemazar, Maja; Kloboves-Prevodnik, Veronika; Stimac, Monika; Todorovic, Vesna; Strojan, Primoz; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-10-01

    Bystander effect, a known phenomenon in radiation biology, where irradiated cells release signals which cause damage to nearby, unirradiated cells, has not been explored in electroporated cells yet. Therefore, our aim was to determine whether bystander effect is present in electroporated melanoma cells in vitro, by determining viability of non-electroporated cells exposed to medium from electroporated cells and by the release of microvesicles as potential indicators of the bystander effect. Here, we demonstrated that electroporation of cells induces bystander effect: Cells exposed to electric pulses mediated their damage to the non-electroporated cells, thus decreasing cell viability. We have shown that shedding microvesicles may be one of the ways used by the cells to mediate the death signals to the neighboring cells. The murine melanoma B16F1 cell line was found to be more electrosensitive and thus more prone to bystander effect than the canine melanoma CMeC-1 cell line. In B16F1 cell line, bystander effect was present above the level of electropermeabilization of the cells, with the threshold at 800 V/cm. Furthermore, with increasing electric field intensities and the number of pulses, the bystander effect also increased. In conclusion, electroporation can induce bystander effect which may be mediated by microvesicles, and depends on pulse amplitude, repetition frequency and cell type.

  17. Application of microbeam in bio-science and life science. Biological effects induced in bystander cells by particle microbeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao

    2006-01-01

    Biological events occurring in cells directly hit by radiation appear in bystander cells nearby not hit directly, which is called the bystander effect. This review describes the events and mechanisms of biological bystander effect yielded by the low-dose radiation including the microbeam. Bystander effects, particularly by charged particle beams, have been studied by two representative approaches by α-ray from plutonium (stochastic irradiation) and by particle microbeams (targeted irradiation), where a bystander effect like chromosome aberrations is shown to occur by communication between irradiated and non-irradiated cells through gap junction. Bystander effects that do not require the cell contact also occur in the irradiated cell-conditioned medium (ICCM), where, not only the short-life radicals like reactive oxygen species and NO, but also more long-life factors participate. Authors have shown the presence of such bystander-inducing factors in ICCM, producing the aberrations even 48 hr after irradiation of either low or high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Bystander effects can be important from the aspect of risk assessments of radiation in the terrestrial/spatial environment involving aircraft as well as in cancer therapy by low-dose heavy particle beams. (T.I)

  18. Radiation induced bystander signals are independent of DNA damage and DNA repair capacity of the irradiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashino, Genro [Gray Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex HA6 2JR (United Kingdom); Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Division of Radiation Biology, Department of Radiology and Radiation Biology, Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Matsuda, Naoki [Division of Radiation Biology and Protection, Center for Frontier Life Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8102 (Japan); Kodama, Seiji [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Radiation Research Center, Frontier Science Innovation Center, Organization for University-Industry-Government Cooperation, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan); Ono, Koji [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Watanabe, Masami [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Division of Radiation Life Science, Department of Radiation Life Science and Radiation Medical Science, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Prise, Kevin M [Gray Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex HA6 2JR (United Kingdom) and Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7AB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: prise@gci.ac.uk

    2007-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating that irradiated cells produce signals, which interact with non-exposed cells in the same population. Here, we analysed the mechanism for bystander signal arising in wild-type CHO cells and repair deficient varients, focussing on the relationship between DNA repair capacity and bystander signal arising in irradiated cells. In order to investigate the bystander effect, we carried out medium transfer experiments after X-irradiation where micronuclei were scored in non-targeted DSB repair deficient xrs5 cells. When conditioned medium from irradiated cells was transferred to unirradiated xrs5 cells, the level of induction was independent of whether the medium came from irradiated wild-type, ssb or dsb repair deficient cells. This result suggests that the activation of a bystander signal is independent of the DNA repair capacity of the irradiated cells. Also, pre-treatment of the irradiated cells with 0.5% DMSO, which suppresses micronuclei induction in CHO but not in xrs5 cells, suppressed bystander effects completely in both conditioned media, suggesting that DMSO is effective for suppression of bystander signal arising independently of DNA damage in irradiated cells. Overall the work presented here adds to the understanding that it is the repair phenotype of the cells receiving bystander signals, which determines overall response rather than that of the cell producing the bystander signal.

  19. Bystander effect studies using heavy-ion microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Wada, Seiichi; Yokota, Yuichiro; Kakizaki, Takehiko; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Hara, Takamitsu; Fukamoto, Kana; Suzuki, Michiyo; Ni, M.; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2007-01-01

    We have established a single cell irradiation system, which allows selected cells to be individually hit with defined number of heavy charged particles, using a collimated heavy-ion microbeam apparatus at JAEA-Takasaki. This system has been developed to study radiobiological processes in hit cells and bystander cells exposed to low dose and low dose-rate high-LET radiations, in ways that cannot be achieved using conventional broad-field exposures. Individual cultured cells grown in special dishes were irradiated in the atmosphere with a single or defined numbers of 18.3 MeV/amu 12 C, 13.0 or 17.5 MeV/amu 20 Ne, and 11.5 MeV/amu 40 Ar ions. Targeting and irradiation of the cells were performed automatically according to the positional data of the target cells microscopically obtained before irradiation. The actual number of particle tracks that pass through target cells was detected with prompt etching of the bottom of the cell dish made of ion track detector TNF-1 (modified CR-39). (author)

  20. Innocent Bystanders and Smoking Guns: Dwarf Carbon Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    As far as we know, most carbon throughout the Universe is created and dispersed by AGB stars. So it was at first surprising to find that the carbon stars most prevalent in the Galaxy are in fact dwarfs. We suspect that dC stars are most likely innocent bystanders in post-mass transfer binaries, and may be predominantly metal-poor. Among 1200 C stars found in the SDSS (Green 2013), we confirm 724 dCs, of which a dozen are DA/dC stars in composite spectrum binaries, quadrupling the total sample of these "smoking guns" for AGB binary mass transfer. The dCs likely span absolute magnitudes M_i from about 6.5 to 10.5. G-type dC stars with weak CN and relatively blue colors are probably the most massive dCs still cool enough to show C_2 bands. Eleven very red C stars with strong red CN bands appear to be N-type AGB stars at large Galactocentric distances, one likely a new discovery in the dIrr galaxy Le A. Two such stars within 30arcmin of each other may trace a previously unidentified dwarf galaxy or tidal stream at ~40 kpc. We describe follow-up projects to study the spatial, kinematic, and binary properties of these C-enriched dwarfs.

  1. Hybrid model of the radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Viviane V.B.; Faria, Fernando Pereira de; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein

    2013-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) refer to biological alterations in non-irradiated cells that occupy the same medium (culture or tissue) of irradiated cells. The biochemical mechanisms of the RIBE are not completely elucidated. However, several experiments indicate its existence. The objective of this work is to quantify the effect via stochastic and deterministic approaches. The hypotheses of the model are: a) one non-irradiated healthy cell interacts with signals that propagate through the medium. These signals are released by irradiated cells. At the time of interaction cell-signal, the cell can become damaged and signaling or damage and not signaling; b) Both types of damage cells repair with certain rate becoming health cells; c) The diffusion of signals obey the discrete diffusion equation with decay in two dimensions. d) The signal concentration released by irradiated cells depends on the dose in the low dose range (< 0.3 Gy) and saturates for higher dose values. As expected, the temporal analysis of the model as a function of the repair rate shows that the survival fraction decreases as the repair rate is reduced. The analysis of the extent of damage triggered by a signal concentration released by a single irradiated cell at time zero show that the damage grows with the maximum simulation time. The results show good agreement with the experimental data. The stochastic and deterministic methods used are in qualitative agreement, as expected. (author)

  2. Hybrid model of the radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Viviane V.B.; Faria, Fernando Pereira de; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: vitoriabraga06@gmail.com, E-mail: fernandopereirabh@gmail.com, E-mail: seg@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) refer to biological alterations in non-irradiated cells that occupy the same medium (culture or tissue) of irradiated cells. The biochemical mechanisms of the RIBE are not completely elucidated. However, several experiments indicate its existence. The objective of this work is to quantify the effect via stochastic and deterministic approaches. The hypotheses of the model are: a) one non-irradiated healthy cell interacts with signals that propagate through the medium. These signals are released by irradiated cells. At the time of interaction cell-signal, the cell can become damaged and signaling or damage and not signaling; b) Both types of damage cells repair with certain rate becoming health cells; c) The diffusion of signals obey the discrete diffusion equation with decay in two dimensions. d) The signal concentration released by irradiated cells depends on the dose in the low dose range (< 0.3 Gy) and saturates for higher dose values. As expected, the temporal analysis of the model as a function of the repair rate shows that the survival fraction decreases as the repair rate is reduced. The analysis of the extent of damage triggered by a signal concentration released by a single irradiated cell at time zero show that the damage grows with the maximum simulation time. The results show good agreement with the experimental data. The stochastic and deterministic methods used are in qualitative agreement, as expected. (author)

  3. Bystander Intervention Prior to The Arrival of Emergency Medical Services: Comparing Assistance across Types of Medical Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faul, Mark; Aikman, Shelley N; Sasser, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    To determine the situational circumstances associated with bystander interventions to render aid during a medical emergency. This study examined 16.2 million Emergency Medical Service (EMS) events contained within the National Emergency Medical Services Information System. The records of patients following a 9-1-1 call for emergency medical assistance were analyzed using logistic regression to determine what factors influenced bystander interventions. The dependent variable of the model was whether or not a bystander intervened. EMS providers recorded bystander assistance 11% of the time. The logistic regression model correctly predicted bystander intervention occurrence 71.4% of the time. Bystanders were more likely to intervene when the patient was male (aOR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.12-1.3) and if the patient was older (progressive aOR = 1.10, 1.46 age group 20-29 through age group 60-99). Bystanders were less likely to intervene in rural areas compared to urban areas (aOR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.58-0.59). The highest likelihood of bystander intervention occurred in a residential institution (aOR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.85-1.86) and the lowest occurred on a street or a highway (aOR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.95-0.96). Using death as a reference group, bystanders were most likely to intervene when the patient had cardiac distress/chest pain (aOR = 11.38, 95% CI = 10.93-11.86), followed by allergic reaction (aOR = 7.63, 95% CI = 7.30-7.99), smoke inhalation (aOR = 6.65, 95% CI = 5.98-7.39), and respiration arrest/distress (aOR = 6.43, 95% CI = 6.17-6.70). A traumatic injury was the most commonly recorded known event, and it was also associated with a relatively high level of bystander intervention (aOR = 5.81, 95% CI = 5.58-6.05). The type of injury/illness that prompted the lowest likelihood of bystander assistance was Sexual Assault/Rape (aOR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.32-1.84) followed by behavioral/psychiatric disorder (aOR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.57-1.71). Bystander intervention varies greatly on

  4. An economic analysis of communal goat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebel, P J; McCrindle, C M E; Webb, E C

    2004-03-01

    The economic impact of different extension messages used was calculated using enterprise budgeting (gross margin analysis). Input data were gleaned from the literature, from participatory appraisals, as well as a field study, spanning 12 months, of small-scale communal goat farming systems in Jericho in the Odi District of North West Province. The number of offspring weaned per annum, as a proportion of does owned, was selected as the desired output for analysis. This study has shown that small-scale communal goat farmers are not adopting or implementing extension messages to improve production capacity. In South Africa the majority of goats are slaughtered in the informal sector. If the informal sector is to be persuaded to market goats commercially through formal channels, then knowledge of the economics of goat farming on communal lands should be provided. The economic aspects of extension messages are probably an important factor in determining acceptance and sustainability yet appear to be seldom investigated. The probable reason for lack of adoption of standard extension messages, which promote improved nutrition, parasite control, vaccination and treatment of goats, was economic. In other words, the so-called 'poor management practices' used by communal farmers appeared to be economically more profitable than the 'good management practices' suggested to increase production. The price of communal goats was not related to their mass. A higher level of inputs would probably have resulted in a heavier kid, however it was established that this would not have influenced the price received as a majority of the goats were slaughtered for ritual purposes where age, colour and sex were more important to the purchaser than body mass. It is standard practice in commercial farming systems to evaluate the economic benefits of all management practices before they are implemented. Production animal veterinarians use veterinary economics to compare different scenarios to

  5. An economic analysis of communal goat production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Sebei

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The economic impact of different extension messages used was calculated using enterprise budgeting (gross margin analysis. Input data were gleaned from the literature, from participatory appraisals, as well as a field study, spanning 12 months, of small-scalecommunal goat farming systems in Jericho in the Odi District of NorthWest Province. The number of offspring weaned per annum, as a proportion of does owned, was selected as the desired output for analysis. This study has shown that small-scale communal goat farmers are not adopting or implementing extension messages to improve production capacity. In south Africa the majority of goats are slaughtered in the informal sector. If the informal sector is to be persuaded to market goats commercially through formal channels, then knowledge of the economics of goat farming on communal lands should be provided. The economic aspects of extension messages are probably an important factor in determining acceptance and sustainability yet appear to be seldom investigated. The probable reason for lack of adoption of standard extension messages, which promote improved nutrition, parasite control, vaccination and treatment of goats, was economic. In other words, the so-called 'poor management practices' used by communal farmers appeared to be economically more profitable than the 'good management practices' suggested to increase production. The price of communal goats was not related to their mass. A higher level of inputs would probably have resulted in a heavier kid, however it was established that this would not have influenced the price received as a majority of the goats were slaughtered for ritual purposes where age, colour and sex were more important to the purchaser than body mass. It is standard practice in commercial farming systems to evaluate the economic benefits of all management practices before they are implemented. Production animal veterinarians use veterinary economics to compare different

  6. Thermoregulatory responses of goats in hot environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Nascimento, Sheila Tavares; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; Pedroza, Heloisa Paula; Domingos, Herica Girlane Tertulino

    2015-08-01

    Notwithstanding the solar radiation is recognized as a detrimental factor to the thermal balance and responses of animals on the range in tropical conditions, studies on the amount of thermal radiation absorbed by goats therein associated with data on their production and heat exchange are still lacking. Metabolic heat production and the heat exchange of goats in the sun and in the shade were measured simultaneously, aiming to observe its thermal equilibrium. The results showed that black goats absorb twice as much as the white goats under intense solar radiation (higher than 800 W m-2). This observation leads to a higher surface temperature of black goats, but it must not be seen as a disadvantage, because they increase their sensible heat flow in the coat-air interface, especially the convection heat flow at high wind speeds. In the shade, no difference between the coat colours was observed and both presented a lower absorption of heat and a lower sensible heat flow gain. When solar radiation levels increases from 300 to 1000 W m-2, we observed an increase of the heat losses through latent flow in both respiratory and cutaneous surface. Cutaneous evaporation was responsible for almost 90 % of the latent heat losses, independently of the coat colour. Goats decrease the metabolic heat production under solar radiation levels up to 800 W m-2, and increase in levels higher than this, because there is an increase of the respiratory rate and of the respiratory flow, but the fractions of consumed oxygen and produced carbon dioxide are maintained stable. The respiratory rate of black goats was higher than the white ones, under 300 W m-2 (55 and 45 resp min-1) and 1000 W m-2 (120 and 95 resp min-1, respectively). It was concluded that shade or any protection against solar radiation levels above 800 Wm-2 is critical to guarantee goat's thermal equilibrium. Strategies concerning the grazing period in accordance with the time of the day alone are not appropriate, because the

  7. Lay Bystanders' Perspectives on What Facilitates Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Use of Automated External Defibrillators in Real Cardiac Arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest will fail to receive bystander intervention (cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] or defibrillation) despite widespread CPR training and the dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). We sought to investigate what...... factors encourage lay bystanders to initiate CPR and AED use in a cohort of bystanders previously trained in CPR techniques who were present at an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: One-hundred and twenty-eight semistructured qualitative interviews with CPR-trained lay bystanders...... to consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, where an AED was present were conducted (from January 2012 to April 2015, in Denmark). Purposive maximum variation sampling was used to establish the breadth of the bystander perspective. Twenty-six of the 128 interviews were chosen for further in-depth analyses...

  8. PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISON BETWEEN BOER AND KACANG GOAT DAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Elieser

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A study to evaluate the productivity of Boer and Kacang goats dam was carried out for 2 years atResearch Institute for Goat Production, Sungei Putih-North Sumatera. The materials used were goatsowned by the institute. The parameters observed were total birth and weaning weights of kid, litter size,parity of dam, pre-weaning mortality and kidding interval. The rate of reproduction and productivity ofthe dam were estimated using Amir and Knipscheer methods and were statistically analyzed usingGeneral Linear Model. The results showed that the total birth and weaning weight of Boer goats werehigher (P<0.05 than that of Kacang goats, while litter size of Boer goats were higher (P<0.05 than thatof Kacang goats. The pre-weaning mortality of Boer goat 15.1 ± 6.02% was lower than that ofKacang. The kidding interval of Boer goats was higher (P<0.05 than that of Kacang. Parity of dam hadsignificant effect on all production traits (P<0.05 except for pre-weaning mortality. Dam reproductionrate of Boer (1.81 was higher than that of Kacang (1.78, while productivity of Boer goat (37.12kg/head/year was higher than that of Kacang (18.12. It can be concluded that the reproductivity ofBoer and Kacang goats were similar, however the productivity of Boer goat had better than Kacang.

  9. Communal goat production in Southern Africa: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumosa Gwaze, F; Chimonyo, M; Dzama, K

    2009-10-01

    Despite the fact that about 64% of goats in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are located in rural arid (38%) and semi-arid (26%) agro-ecological zones and that more than 90% of goats in these zones are indigenous, information on indigenous breeds is inadequate. This paper reviews the social and economic importance of goats to the communal farmer and assesses the potential of using goats in rural development in Southern Africa. Farmers in Southern Africa largely use the village goat management system. There are various goat breeds in Southern Africa, of which the Mashona, Matabele, Tswana, Nguni and the Landim are the dominant ones. It is, however, not clear if these breeds are distinct. Major constraints to goat production include high disease and parasite prevalence, low levels of management, limited forage availability and poor marketing management. Potential research areas that are required to ensure that goats are vehicles for rural development include evaluation of constraints to goat production, assessing the contribution of goats to household economies and food securities throughout the year, genetic and phenotypic characterisation of the indigenous breeds to identify appropriate strains and sustainable methods of goat improvement through either selection or crossbreeding.

  10. Stages of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the lymph system . Having relatives who are Russian Jews or Eastern European Jews. Signs and symptoms ... information about clinical trials is also available. To Learn More About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia For more information ...

  11. Zootechnical Performances of Goats in Niger: Comparative Study of the Maradi Russet Goat with the Black-Coat Goat in Maradi Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Marichatou

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was not only to contribute to the knowledge of the Maradi russet goat, but also to compare some of its parameters (reproduction, adult weight, measurements, growth with those of the black goat. Retrospective oral surveys were carried out on three groups of black, and russet goats, in which 106 goats gave birth 3 or 4 times, 97 of them twice and 87 were primiparous. Seven measurements as well as adult weights were recorded in 125 russet, and black females of 4 years ± 3 months of age. Weight changes in 38 black, and russet kids were monitored from birth to three months of age in village conditions. Data statistical analysis on both coat-type groups showed, overall, similar results in village conditions. Nevertheless, prolificacy in russet goats was systematically higher than that in black goats regardless of parity.

  12. A Simulation Study of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect: Modeling with Stochastically Defined Signal Reemission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Sasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE has been experimentally observed for different types of radiation, cell types, and cell culture conditions. However, the behavior of signal transmission between unirradiated and irradiated cells is not well known. In this study, we have developed a new model for RIBE based on the diffusion of soluble factors in cell cultures using a Monte Carlo technique. The model involves the signal emission probability from bystander cells following Poisson statistics. Simulations with this model show that the spatial configuration of the bystander cells agrees well with that of corresponding experiments, where the optimal emission probability is estimated through a large number of simulation runs. It was suggested that the most likely probability falls within 0.63–0.92 for mean number of the emission signals ranging from 1.0 to 2.5.

  13. Heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy in irradiated C2C12 myoblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Mizuki; Tajika, Yuki; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the major processes involved in the degradation of intracellular materials. Here, we examined the potential impact of heavy ion irradiation on the induction of autophagy in irradiated C2C12 mouse myoblasts and their non-targeted bystander cells. In irradiated cells, ultrastructural analysis revealed the accumulation of autophagic structures at various stages of autophagy (id est (i.e.) phagophores, autophagosomes and autolysosomes) within 20 min after irradiation. Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and autolysosomes containing MVBs (amphisomes) were also observed. Heavy ion irradiation increased the staining of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and LysoTracker Red (LTR). Such enhanced staining was suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. In addition to irradiated cells, bystander cells were also positive with LTR staining. Altogether, these results suggest that heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy not only in irradiated myoblasts but also in their bystander cells. (author)

  14. Effects of manipulated aggressive 'interactions' on bystanding male fighting fish, Betta splendens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peake, Thomas More; Matos, Ricardo Jorge; McGregor, Peter Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive interactions between animals often take place in a social environment. Third parties not involved in those interactions, bystanders, have the opportunity to extract information from such interactions and such information may direct their future behaviour towards the interactants. Studies...... occurring differences between observed interactants and have therefore lacked this degree of control. We allowed bystanding male fighting fish to observe two male conspecifics that appeared to be interacting, but in reality the two males were displaying to mirrors. The apparent interactions were manipulated...... so as to increase or decrease the aggression of one ‘interactant' while leaving that of the other male constant. When subsequently introduced to the ‘interactants' individually, bystanders responded more strongly to males whose opponents' aggression had been decreased and to the winners of control...

  15. Effect of bystander CPR initiation prior to the emergency call on ROSC and 30day survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Palsgaard Møller, Thea; Kjær Ersbøll, Annette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed at evaluating if time for initiation of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) - prior to the emergency call (CPRprior) versus during the emergency call following dispatcher-assisted CPR (CPRduring) - was associated with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC...... and corresponding emergency calls were evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to evaluate the association between time for initiation of bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of CPRprior. RESULTS: The study...... included 548 emergency calls for OHCA patients receiving bystander CPR, 34.9% (n=191) in the CPRpriorgroup and 65.1% (n=357) in the CPRduringgroup. Multivariable analyses showed no difference in ROSC (OR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.56-1.38) or 30-day survival (OR=1.14, 95% CI: 0.68-1.92) between CPRpriorand CPRduring...

  16. An Application of the Reasoned Action Approach to Bystander Intervention for Sexual Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacena, Kaylee M; Reynolds-Tylus, Tobias; Quick, Brian L

    2017-10-25

    The high prevalence of sexual assault in US college campuses has led to a widespread implementation of bystander intervention programs aimed at preventing sexual assault. The current study examines predictors of college students' intentions to engage in bystander intervention through the theoretical lens of the reasoned action approach. An online survey with college students (N = 186) was conducted at a large Midwestern university. Our results indicated experiential attitudes, instrumental attitudes, descriptive norms, autonomy, and capacity, each positively associated with participants' intentions to intervene to stop a sexual assault. Against expectations, injunctive norms were unrelated to bystander intervention intentions. Finally, in addition to these main effects, an experiential attitude by autonomy interaction was also observed. The results are discussed with a focus on the theoretical and practical implications of our findings.

  17. Bystander effects of exposure to low-dose-rate 125I seeds on human lung cancers cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Rongfei; Chen Honghong; Yu Lei; Zhao Meijia; Shao Chunlin; Cheng Wenying

    2007-01-01

    The bystander effects induced by continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) 125 I seeds radiation on damage of human lung cancer cells were investigated. Human adenocarcinoma cell line A549 and human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446, which have different sensitivities to high-dose rate (HDR) external irradiation, were exposed directly to 125 I seeds in vitro and co-cultured with unirradiated cells for 24 h. Using cytokinesis-blocking micronucleus method and γ H2AX fluorescence immunoassay, bystander effects induced by 2Gy and 4Gy 125 I seed irradiation on micronucleus formation and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) of human lung cancer cells were detected and evaluated. The results showed that irradiation with 125 I seeds can induce medium-mediated bystander effects in A549 cells and NCI-H446 cells, exhibiting that both micronuclei formation and γ H2AX focus formation in bystander cells were increased significantly compared with non-irradiated cells. The extent of DNA damage induced by bystander effects was correlated with accumulated radiation dose and radiosensitive of tumor cells. NCI-H446 cells that were sensitive to HDR γ irradiation were more sensitive to continuous LDR irradiation and bystander effects than A549. However, a comparison between the bystander effects and direct effects elicits the intensity of bystander responses of A549 cells was higher than that of NCI-H446 cells. A dose-related reduction in bystander responses was observed both in A549 cells and NCI-H446 cells, suggesting that the signaling factors involved in the bystander signaling pathways may decrease with the increase of cell damages. (authors)

  18. Production, composition, fatty acid profile and sensory analysis of goat milk in goats fed buriti oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, J S; Bezerra, L R; Silva, A M A; Araújo, M J; Oliveira, R L; Edvan, R L; Torreão, J N C; Lanna, D P D

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of replacing ground corn with buriti oil ( L.) on feed intake and digestibility and on the production, composition, fatty acid profile and sensory characteristics of goat milk. A double Latin square (4 × 4) was used; eight goats were distributed in a completely randomized design. The square comprised four periods and four buriti oil concentration (0.00; 1.50; 3.00 and 4.50% of total DM) replacing corn. Intakes of DM, CP, NDF, ADF, non-fibrous carboydrates (NFC) and TDN were not affected by the replacement of corn with oil in the diet. However, lipids intake was increased ( goats with 4.50% oil inclusion, as total DM. DM and CP digestibility were similar between the buriti oil concentrations. However, lipid digestibility increased linearly ( = 0.01) and may have contributed to a quadratic reduction in NDF digestibility ( = 0.01) and a linear reduction of NFC ( = 0.04) with buriti oil content in the goat feed. Goat milk production, corrected production and chemical composition were not influenced by the concentration of buriti oil replacement; however, milk fat concentration ( = 0.04) and feed efficiency ( goat's diet. In contrast, the fatty acids C18:0 ( goats that were fed with buriti oil. However, CLA ( 0.05) by the replacement of corn with buriti oil in the goats' diet. It is recommended to replace corn with buriti oil in goat feed by up to 4.5% of total DM, resulting in improved feed efficiency and milk fat without affecting production; this recommendation satisfies the minimum requirements of the industry and preserves the organoleptic characteristics of the milk and its acceptability for human consumption. In addition, buriti oil replacing ground corn by up to 4.5% DM in the diet of lactating goats decrease medium-chain SFA which are hypercholesterolemic and increase the concentrations of the C18:19, CLA and DFA in goat milk fat, helping to protect against cardiovascular disease.

  19. Protective immune responses during prepatency in goat kids experimentally infected with Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, L; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Rodríguez, F; Perez, D; Lopez, A; Ferrer, O; Hermosilla, C; Taubert, A; Ruiz, A

    2017-08-15

    During the first schizogony, the goat coccidia Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae develops macroschizonts in lacteal duct endothelial cells, whose rupture leads to severe ileal damage and clinical signs during the prepatent period. The immune response elicited against early stages of the parasite development still requires to be investigated. In the present study we have evaluated immune reactions in goat kids primary- and challenged-infected with Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae, and sacrificed during prepatency (7days after challenge). The oocyst output during the primary infection, body weight and clinical condition of all the animals were examined and, at the end of the experiment, all the goat kids were euthanized and subjected to necropsy. Samples were taken from different sections of the ileum, colon and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of primary- and challenged E. ninakohlyakimovae-infected animals. Intestinal leukocyte subpopulations were characterized in E. ninakohlyakimovae-infected mucosa and counts of lymphocytes, eosinophils, polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), globular leukocytes and mast cells were recorded. Additionally, gene expression of caprine IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and INFγ of ileal, colonic and MLN tissues were performed, as well as the immunohistochemical characterization of immune cells. The E. ninakohlyakimovae primary infection resulted in moderate to severe enteritis with different degrees of diarrhoea and was accompanied by high OPG counts and an increase of most immune cells analyzed when compared to uninfected control animals. Furthermore, eosinophil-, lymphocyte-, globular leukocyte- and mast cell-counts were significantly higher in the challenge group compared to the primary infected animals, whilst the opposite was true for PMN counts. The challenge infection was also associated with moderate increased levels of local mucosal IgA. Interestingly, the number of immature schizonts found at the ileal mucosa was statistically higher in the challenge infected

  20. DESIGNING STUDY FOR A FAMILY FARM WITH 600 GOATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. PĂDEANU

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In the hilly and plains area of Banat region, goat rearing for milk production haschances to become a profitable business. After Romania integration into the EUmarket there will be no quotas for goat milk and meat production. Also, importantlow-production arable land areas (over 3 million hectares will be laying fallow inthe next years, spectacularly increasing the fodder area for ruminants. There a fewgoat family farms having an efficient technological flow and with possibilities toprocess the milk in Romania. In this paper the bases are laid down for projecting afarm with 600 indigenous goats, to be exploited in an intensive system andgenetically improved with Sannen or French Alpine he-goats. The followingreproduction indices were planned for the 600 goats: goats in estrus per season96%, fecundity 95%, goats that keep the pregnancy 98%, kidding goats 90%,prolificacy 170%, and birth rate 152 kids for 100 dam goats. The total populationafter weaning the kids is 600 goats, 24 he-goats, and 173 reproduction female kids.For feeding this population 66.8 ha are required out of which 43.1 ha with grassespasture, 2.1 ha alfalfa, 10.2 ha corn, 4.2 ha barley, and 6.6 ha oats. Goats arehoused in 4 shelters, in 12 group pens of 48 heads. Goats will be fed year-round withgrass haylage, oats straw and concentrate mixtures. This farm will produce 2250 Hlmilk per year (mechanical milking, 150 reproduction female kids for selling at 8-9months of age, 500 fattening kids, and 120 culled goats sold for meat. The annuallyestimated gross income will be 34000 EUR.

  1. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  2. The influence of a bystander agent's beliefs on children's and adults' decision-making process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttelmann, Frances; Buttelmann, David

    2017-01-01

    The ability to attribute and represent others' mental states (e.g., beliefs; so-called "theory of mind") is essential for participation in human social interaction. Despite a considerable body of research using tasks in which protagonists in the participants' attentional focus held false or true beliefs, the question of automatic belief attribution to bystander agents has received little attention. In the current study, we presented adults and 6-year-olds (N=92) with an implicit computer-based avoidance false-belief task in which participants were asked to place an object into one of three boxes. While doing so, we manipulated the beliefs of an irrelevant human-like or non-human-like bystander agent who was visible on the screen. Importantly, the bystander agent's beliefs were irrelevant for solving the task. Still, children's decision making was significantly influenced by the bystander agent's beliefs even if this was a non-human-like self-propelled object. Such an influence did not become obvious in adults' deliberate decisions but occurred only in their reaction times, which suggests that they also processed the bystander agent's beliefs but were able to suppress the influence of such beliefs on their behavior regulation. The results of a control study (N=53) ruled out low-level explanations and confirmed that self-propelledness of agents is a necessary factor for belief attribution to occur. Thus, not only do humans spontaneously ascribe beliefs to self-propelled bystander agents, but those beliefs even influence meaningful decisions in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Bækgaard, Josefine Stokholm; Claesson, Andreas; Hollenberg, Jacob; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy K

    2017-06-01

    Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from 01/01/2013-31/12/2013. OHCAs were collected from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry and the Mobile Critical Care Unit database. Emergency call recordings were identified and evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to all OHCAs and witnessed OHCAs only to analyse the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised; OHCA recognition was positively associated with bystander CPR (odds ratio [OR]=7.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.10-12.05) in all OHCAs; and ROSC (OR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.13-3.06) and 30-day survival (OR=2.80, 95% CI: 1.58-4.96) in witnessed OHCA. Predictors of OHCA recognition were addressing breathing (OR=1.76, 95% CI: 1.17-2.66) and callers located by the patient's side (OR=2.16, 95% CI: 1.46-3.19). Recognition of OHCA during emergency calls was positively associated with the provision of bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival in witnessed OHCA. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of nitric oxide in targeted-subcellular organelles induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Chunlin; Folkard, M.; Prise, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    The work is to investigate the bystander effect and related signaling factor induced by targeted irradiation on tumor cells. Human glioblastoma T98G cells were irradiated with a precise number of helium microbeam ions, which targeted to either nuclear or cytoplasm. Chromosome damage and intracellular NO level were assayed. Influence of a NO free radical scavenger on these radiation responses was measured. Using DEANO, the cellular effect of NO was also studied. It was found that even only one cell with a population was targeted with one particle through either nuclear or cytoplasm, additional cellular damage was induced in other 10s cells through a signaling amplification pathway and related bystander response. Although cell damage induced directly by nuclear irradiation was greater than that induced by cytoplasmic irradiation, bystander responses induced by these two kinds of irradiation were similar. When a fraction of cells were individually irradiated by helium ions, the yield of micronuclei was obviously higher than that assuming no bystander effect. However, these targeted irradiation induced bystander response were inhibited by c-PTIO, a scavenger of nitric oxide (NO) free radical. Detected with a NO molecular probe DAF-AM, it was observed that when only 1% of cells were irradiated either through nuclear or cytoplasm, the percentage of NO-positive cells increased by about 30% so that the NO-related fluorescence intensity increased by 15%. Moreover, micronuclei were induced indeed in T98G cells treated with a NO donor. These indicate that NO is a bystander signaling factor for both nuclear irradiation and cytoplasmic irradiation. (authors)

  5. Neutron Exposures in Human Cells: Bystander Effect and Relative Biological Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Stewart, Robert D.; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0±0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8±2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety. PMID:24896095

  6. "Please. Don't. Die.": A Grounded Theory Study of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausz, Justin; Snobelen, Paul; Tavares, Walter

    2018-02-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important determinant of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet rates of bystander CPR are highly variable. In an effort to promote bystander CPR, the procedure has been streamlined, and ultrashort teaching modalities have been introduced. CPR has been increasingly reconceptualized as simple, safe, and easy to perform; however, current methods of CPR instruction may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the various logistical, conceptual, and emotional challenges of resuscitating a victim of cardiac arrest. We adopted a constructivist grounded theory methodology to qualitatively explore bystander CPR and invited lay rescuers who had recently (ie, within 1 week) intervened in an OHCA to participate in semistructured interviews and focus groups. We used constant comparative analysis until theoretical saturation to derive a midrange explanatory theory of bystander CPR. We constructed a 3-stage theoretical model describing a common experiential process for lay rescuer intervention in OHCA: Being called to act is disturbing, causing panic, shock, and disbelief that must ultimately be overcome. Taking action to save the victim is complicated by several misconceptions about cardiac arrest, where victims are mistakenly believed to be choking, and agonal respirations are misinterpreted to mean the victim is alive. Making sense of the experience is challenging, at least in the short term, where lay rescuers have to contend with self-doubt, unanswered questions, and uncomfortable emotional reactions to a traumatic event. Our study suggests that current CPR training programs may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the reality of an OHCA and identifies several key knowledge gaps that should be addressed. The long-term psychological consequences of bystander intervention in OHCA remain poorly understood and warrant further study. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Genetic differentiation of chinese indigenous meat goats ascertained using microsatellite information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Y H; Zhang, X D; Yao, N; Ding, J P; Chen, H Q; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Y H; Ren, C H; Ma, Y H; Zhang, X R

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the genetic diversity of seven Chinese indigenous meat goat breeds (Tibet goat, Guizhou white goat, Shannan white goat, Yichang white goat, Matou goat, Changjiangsanjiaozhou white goat and Anhui white goat), explain their genetic relationship and assess their integrity and degree of admixture, 302 individuals from these breeds and 42 Boer goats introduced from Africa as reference samples were genotyped for 11 microsatellite markers. Results indicated that the genetic diversity of Chinese indigenous meat goats was rich. The mean heterozygosity and the mean allelic richness (AR) for the 8 goat breeds varied from 0.697 to 0.738 and 6.21 to 7.35, respectively. Structure analysis showed that Tibet goat breed was genetically distinct and was the first to separate and the other Chinese goats were then divided into two sub-clusters: Shannan white goat and Yichang white goat in one cluster; and Guizhou white goat, Matou goat, Changjiangsanjiaozhou white goat and Anhui white goat in the other cluster. This grouping pattern was further supported by clustering analysis and Principal component analysis. These results may provide a scientific basis for the characteristization, conservation and utilization of Chinese meat goats.

  8. Socio-economic and cultural functions of goats in Niger Delta of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results showed that goat keeping was not popular in the study area because the people did not cherish goat meat; they see goats as destructive, dirty, and often associated with witchcraft. Forty-six percent of the respondents practised free range, and 18 per cent confined their goats. Goats were, however, found to be widely ...

  9. Association of bystander interventions and hospital length of stay and admission to intensive care unit in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riddersholm, Signe; Kragholm, Kristian; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

    2017-01-01

    for bystander defibrillation. 82% of patients without bystander interventions were admitted to ICU compared to 77.2% for bystander CPR, and 61.2% for bystander defibrillation. In-hospital mortality was 60% in the first category compared to 40.5% and 21.7% in the two latter categories. In regression models.......76-0.85]), were associated with lower risk of ICU admission. CONCLUSIONS: Bystander interventions were associated with reduced hospital length of stay and ICU admission, suggesting that these efforts improve recovery in OHCA survivors....

  10. I know what you did: The effects of interpersonal deviance on bystanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Merideth; Barry, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Using social information processing theory, we explore how interpersonally directed deviance affects work group members who observe or are aware of these insidious behaviors. In a field study, we find that indirect knowledge of work group member interpersonal deviance leads to subsequent interpersonal deviance of a focal individual. We also find that when work group cohesion is high, direct observation of deviance is more likely to result in subsequent bystander deviance. These findings add concretely to theory and research on the bystander effects of workplace deviance.

  11. Potential implications of the bystander effect on TCP and EUD when considering target volume dose heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael J; Kirkby, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In light of in vitro evidence suggesting that radiation-induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing, there is potential for impact on radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms such as the goal of delivering a uniform dose throughout the clinical target volume (CTV). This work applies a bystander effect model to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) for external beam prostate treatment and compares the results with a more common model where local response is dictated exclusively by local absorbed dose. The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. EUD and TCP of a prostate cancer target volume under conditions of increasing dose heterogeneity were calculated using two models: One incorporating bystander effects derived from previously published in vitro bystander data ( McMahon et al. 2012 , 2013a); and one using a common linear-quadratic (LQ) response that relies exclusively on local absorbed dose. Dose through the CTV was modelled as a normal distribution, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). Also, a representative clinical dose distribution was examined as cold (low dose) sub-volumes were systematically introduced. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity throughout a target volume will yield as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. For a typical intermediate risk prostate prescription of 78 Gy over 39 fractions maxima in EUD and TCP as a function of increasing SD occurred at SD ∼ 5 Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. Small, but potentially significant differences in the outcome metrics between the models were identified in the clinically-derived dose distribution as cold sub-volumes were introduced. In terms of

  12. Modifiers of Neighbors' Bystander Intervention in Intimate Partner Violence: A Concept Mapping Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Sara; Todd, Mary-Justine; Oshiro, Michael; Greene, Emily; Frye, Victoria

    2016-03-01

    Encouraging bystander intervention in intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is potentially an important method of reducing the prevalence of such violence in urban communities. Most existing research has been conducted on campuses and in relation to sexual violence among teens or young adults. Our understanding of which bystander behaviors are feasible is nascent, and our knowledge of which situational factors influence neighbors' self-reported willingness to intervene is underdeveloped. We conducted a concept mapping study to identify potential bystander intervention behaviors in IPV among neighbors in urban settings; we also assessed whether perceived feasibility and effectiveness of those behaviors varied by situational characteristics. Using data collected from 41 residents of a low-income New York City neighborhood in late 2011, concept mapping was used to create a conceptual map of the 74 behaviors identified by participants. We examined participant differences in mean feasibility (i.e., that the participants "could" or "would" enact a behavior), feasibility given two situational characteristics (if the couple was perceived to have a history of IPV, and if children were believed to be involved or present), and perceived effectiveness of bystander behaviors. Differences across select sociodemographic factors of participants were also analyzed. A 13-cluster solution emerged, with clusters of bystander behaviors grouped into four larger cluster areas: victim focused, parenting/education focused, perpetrator focused, and community involvement focused. Bivariate analyses revealed that participants rated the four cluster areas as more feasible when a child was believed to be involved. Male participants rated intervention as less feasible when the couple was believed to have a history of IPV. Participants who reported a history of IPV victimization rated all four cluster areas as less effective on average, as compared with participants without a history of

  13. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in Mediating Chemotherapeutic Drug Induced Bystander Response in Human Cancer Cells Exposed In-Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Mani; Rao, Bhavna S; Deepika, Ramasamy; Paul, Solomon F.D.; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2012-01-01

    Background The intention of cancer chemotherapy is to control the growth of cancer cells using chemical agents. However, the occurrence of second malignancies has raised concerns, leading to re-evaluation of the current strategy in use for chemotherapeutic agents. Although the mechanisms involved in second malignancy remain ambiguous, therapeutic-agent-induced non-DNA targeted effects like bystander response and genomic instability cannot be eliminated completely. Hence, Bleomycin (BLM) and Neocarzinostatin (NCS), chemotherapeutic drugs with a mode of action similar to ionizing radiation, were used to study the mechanism of bystander response in human cancer cells (A549, CCRF-CEM and HL-60) by employing co-culture methodology. Methods Bystander effect was quantified using micronucleus (MN) assay and in-situ immunofluorescence(γH2AX assay).The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in mediating the bystander response was explored by pre-treating bystander cells with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and C-PTIO respectively. Results Bystander response was observed only in CCRF-CEM and A549 cells (P bystander response on treatment with DMSO, suggests that ROS has a more significant role in mediating the bystander response.Since the possibility of the ROS and NO in mediating these bystander effect was confirmed, mechanistic control of these signaling molecules could either reduce radiation damage and potential carcinogenicity of normal tissues (by reducing bystander signaling) or maximize cell sterilization during chemotherapy (by amplifying bystander responses in tumors). PMID:29147282

  14. In Vivo Bystander Effect: Cranial X-Irradiation Leads to Elevated DNA Damage, Altered Cellular Proliferation and Apoptosis, and Increased p53 Levels in Shielded Spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koturbash, Igor; Loree, Jonathan; Kutanzi, Kristy; Koganow, Clayton; Pogribny, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is well accepted that irradiated cells may 'forward' genome instability to nonirradiated neighboring cells, giving rise to the 'bystander effect' phenomenon. Although bystander effects were well studied by using cell cultures, data for somatic bystander effects in vivo are relatively scarce. Methods and Materials: We set out to analyze the existence and molecular nature of bystander effects in a radiation target-organ spleen by using a mouse model. The animal's head was exposed to X-rays while the remainder of the body was completely protected by a medical-grade shield. Using immunohistochemistry, we addressed levels of DNA damage, cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and p53 protein in the spleen of control animals and completely exposed and head-exposed/body bystander animals. Results: We found that localized head radiation exposure led to the induction of bystander effects in the lead-shielded distant spleen tissue. Namely, cranial irradiation led to increased levels of DNA damage and p53 expression and also altered levels of cellular proliferation and apoptosis in bystander spleen tissue. The observed bystander changes were not caused by radiation scattering and were observed in two different mouse strains; C57BL/6 and BALB/c. Conclusion: Our study proves that bystander effects occur in the distant somatic organs on localized exposures. Additional studies are required to characterize the nature of an enigmatic bystander signal and analyze the long-term persistence of these effects and possible contribution of radiation-induced bystander effects to secondary radiation carcinogenesis

  15. Infiltrative Cutaneous Hemangiolipoma in a Goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. Collier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An approximately 4-year-old castrated male, Saanen cross goat presented to the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation and removal of a 22 cm × 22 cm, dark red, thickened, and crusted cutaneous lesion along the left ventrolateral thorax. An initial incisional biopsy performed approximately 8 weeks earlier was suspicious for cutaneous hemangiosarcoma. Surgical excision was deemed to be the most appropriate treatment option for this goat. A complete physical exam, complete blood count, and chemistry profile were performed and results were within normal limits. Thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound were performed to rule out metastatic disease and comorbid conditions; no metastatic lesions or other abnormalities were observed. En bloc surgical excision of the affected skin was performed and the entire tissue was submitted for histopathology. A final diagnosis of cutaneous hemangiolipoma was reached upon extensive sectioning and histologic examination of the larger tissue specimen. The goat recovered well from surgery and has had no further complications up to 9 months postoperatively. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a hemangiolipoma in a goat and surgical excision for such lesions appears to be a viable treatment method.

  16. Artificial insemination of Argora goat does with

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with fresh or deep-frozen semen. The results achieved were. 76,7o/o;90oh and 34,804 respectively. Although a signif icanily lower kidding percentage was obtained when frozen semen was used, these results warrant further investigation of techni- ques for freezing goat semen. S. Af r. J. Anim. Sci. 1983, 13: 134 - 135.

  17. Coxiella burnetii infections in sheep or goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brom, Van den R.; Engelen, van E.; Roest, H.I.J.; Hoek, van der W.; Vellema, P.

    2015-01-01

    Q fever is an almost ubiquitous zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, which is able to infect several animal species, as well as humans. Cattle, sheep and goats are the primary animal reservoirs. In small ruminants, infections are mostly without clinical symptoms, however, abortions and

  18. Plasma progesterone levels following breeding in goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, G.C.; Arora, R.C.; Pahwa, G.S.; Batra, S.K.; Pandey, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Progesterone concentration in the peripheral blood plasma of ten lactating goats of mixed breeds following breeding were determined by radioimmunoassay to diagnose early pregnancy. The mean concentration was very low (0.25 +- 0.15 ng/ml) on the day of oestrus and reached at peak level on day 13 (1.30 +- 0.07 ng/ml) and on day 19 (2.77 +- 1.18 ng/ml) in non-pregnant and pregnant goats, respectively. The level sharply declined on day 19 (0.40 +- 0.07 ng/ml) of oestrous cycle in non-pregnant goats. However, the level remained below 1.5 ng/ml on day 9, 13, 15 and 17 and 3 ng/ml on day 9, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21 and 23 in nonpregnant and pregnant goats, respectively. The progesterone concentration continued to increase to 2.94 +- 0.70, 4.42 +- 0.92 and 6.2 +- 0.61 ng/ml on day 45, 60 and 75 of gestation, respectively. (auth.)

  19. The different radiation response and radiation-induced bystander effects in colorectal carcinoma cells differing in p53 status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widel, Maria, E-mail: maria.widel@polsl.pl [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Lalik, Anna; Krzywon, Aleksandra [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Poleszczuk, Jan [College of Inter-faculty Individual Studies in Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Warsaw, 93 Zwirki i Wigury Street, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Integrated Mathematical Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We tested radiation response and bystander effect on HCT116p53+/+ and p53−/− cells. • The p53+/+ cells developed premature senescence in exposed and bystander neighbors. • Directly exposed and bystander p53−/− cells died profoundly through apoptosis. • Interleukins 6 and 8 were differently generated by both cell lines. • NFκB path was activated mainly in p53+/+ hit cells, in p53 −/− in bystanders only. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect, appearing as different biological changes in cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation but are under the influence of molecular signals secreted by irradiated neighbors, have recently attracted considerable interest due to their possible implication for radiotherapy. However, various cells present diverse radiosensitivity and bystander responses that depend, inter alia, on genetic status including TP53, the gene controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. Here we compared the ionizing radiation and bystander responses of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with wild type or knockout TP53 using a transwell co-culture system. The viability of exposed to X-rays (0–8 Gy) and bystander cells of both lines showed a roughly comparable decline with increasing dose. The frequency of micronuclei was also comparable at lower doses but at higher increased considerably, especially in bystander TP53-/- cells. Moreover, the TP53-/- cells showed a significantly elevated frequency of apoptosis, while TP53+/+ counterparts expressed high level of senescence. The cross-matched experiments where irradiated cells of one line were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of opposite line show that both cell lines were also able to induce bystander effects in their counterparts, however different endpoints revealed with different strength. Potential mediators of bystander effects, IL-6 and IL-8, were also generated differently in both lines. The knockout cells secreted IL-6 at

  20. Genomic instability induced in distant progeny of bystander cells depends on the connexins expressed in the irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toledo, Sonia M; Buonanno, Manuela; Harris, Andrew L; Azzam, Edouard I

    2017-10-01

    To examine the time window during which intercellular signaling though gap junctions mediates non-targeted (bystander) effects induced by moderate doses of ionizing radiation; and to investigate the impact of gap junction communication on genomic instability in distant progeny of bystander cells. A layered cell culture system was developed to investigate the propagation of harmful effects from irradiated normal or tumor cells that express specific connexins to contiguous bystander normal human fibroblasts. Irradiated cells were exposed to moderate mean absorbed doses from 3.7 MeV α particle, 1000 MeV/u iron ions, 600 MeV/u silicon ions, or 137 Cs γ rays. Following 5 h of co-culture, pure populations of bystander cells, unexposed to secondary radiation, were isolated and DNA damage and oxidative stress was assessed in them and in their distant progeny (20-25 population doublings). Increased frequency of micronucleus formation and enhanced oxidative changes were observed in bystander cells co-cultured with confluent cells exposed to either sparsely ionizing ( 137 Cs γ rays) or densely ionizing (α particles, energetic iron or silicon ions) radiations. The irradiated cells propagated signals leading to biological changes in bystander cells within 1 h of irradiation, and the effect required cellular coupling by gap junctions. Notably, the distant progeny of isolated bystander cells also exhibited increased levels of spontaneous micronuclei. This effect was dependent on the type of junctional channels that coupled the irradiated donor cells with the bystander cells. Previous work showed that gap junctions composed of connexin26 (Cx26) or connexin43 (Cx43) mediate toxic bystander effects within 5 h of co-culture, whereas gap junctions composed of connexin32 (Cx32) mediate protective effects. In contrast, the long-term progeny of bystander cells expressing Cx26 or Cx43 did not display elevated DNA damage, whereas those coupled by Cx32 had enhanced DNA

  1. Spatially Fractionated Radiation Induces Cytotoxicity and Changes in Gene Expression in Bystander and Radiation Adjacent Murine Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asur, Rajalakshmi S.; Sharma, Sunil; Chang, Ching-Wei; Penagaricano, Jose; Kommuru, Indira M.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Corry, Peter M.; Griffin, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been extensively studied at low doses, since evidence of bystander induced cell killing and other effects on unirradiated cells were found to be predominant at doses up to 0.5 Gy. Therefore, few studies have examined bystander effects induced by exposure to higher doses of radiation, such as spatially fractionated radiation (GRID) treatment. In the present study, we evaluate the ability of GRID treatment to induce changes in GRID adjacent (bystander) regions, in two different murine carcinoma cell lines following exposure to a single irradiation dose of 10 Gy. Murine SCK mammary carcinoma cells and SCCVII squamous carcinoma cells were irradiated using a brass collimator to create a GRID pattern of nine circular fields 12 mm in diameter with a center-to-center distance of 18 mm. Similar to the typical clinical implementation of GRID, this is approximately a 50:50 ratio of direct and bystander exposure. We also performed experiments by irradiating separate cultures and transferring the medium to unirradiated bystander cultures. Clonogenic survival was evaluated in both cell lines to determine the occurrence of radiation-induced bystander effects. For the purpose of our study, we have defined bystander cells as GRID adjacent cells that received approximately 1 Gy scatter dose or unirradiated cells receiving conditioned medium from irradiated cells. We observed significant bystander killing of cells adjacent to the GRID irradiated regions compared to sham treated controls. We also observed bystander killing of SCK and SCCVII cells cultured in conditioned medium obtained from cells irradiated with 10 Gy. Therefore, our results confirm the occurrence of bystander effects following exposure to a high-dose of radiation and suggest that cell-to-cell contact is not required for these effects. In addition, the gene expression profile for DNA damage and cellular stress response signaling in SCCVII cells after GRID exposure was studied

  2. The different radiation response and radiation-induced bystander effects in colorectal carcinoma cells differing in p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widel, Maria; Lalik, Anna; Krzywon, Aleksandra; Poleszczuk, Jan; Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We tested radiation response and bystander effect on HCT116p53+/+ and p53−/− cells. • The p53+/+ cells developed premature senescence in exposed and bystander neighbors. • Directly exposed and bystander p53−/− cells died profoundly through apoptosis. • Interleukins 6 and 8 were differently generated by both cell lines. • NFκB path was activated mainly in p53+/+ hit cells, in p53 −/− in bystanders only. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect, appearing as different biological changes in cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation but are under the influence of molecular signals secreted by irradiated neighbors, have recently attracted considerable interest due to their possible implication for radiotherapy. However, various cells present diverse radiosensitivity and bystander responses that depend, inter alia, on genetic status including TP53, the gene controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. Here we compared the ionizing radiation and bystander responses of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with wild type or knockout TP53 using a transwell co-culture system. The viability of exposed to X-rays (0–8 Gy) and bystander cells of both lines showed a roughly comparable decline with increasing dose. The frequency of micronuclei was also comparable at lower doses but at higher increased considerably, especially in bystander TP53-/- cells. Moreover, the TP53-/- cells showed a significantly elevated frequency of apoptosis, while TP53+/+ counterparts expressed high level of senescence. The cross-matched experiments where irradiated cells of one line were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of opposite line show that both cell lines were also able to induce bystander effects in their counterparts, however different endpoints revealed with different strength. Potential mediators of bystander effects, IL-6 and IL-8, were also generated differently in both lines. The knockout cells secreted IL-6 at

  3. Association of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Survival According to Ambulance Response Times After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gerds, Thomas A; Kragholm, Kristian; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Karlsson, Lena; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-12-20

    Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but it is unknown to what degree bystander CPR remains positively associated with survival with increasing time to potential defibrillation. The main objective was to examine the association of bystander CPR with survival as time to advanced treatment increases. We studied 7623 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients between 2005 and 2011, identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between time from 911 call to emergency medical service arrival (response time) and survival according to whether bystander CPR was provided (yes or no). Reported are 30-day survival chances with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals. With increasing response times, adjusted 30-day survival chances decreased for both patients with bystander CPR and those without. However, the contrast between the survival chances of patients with versus without bystander CPR increased over time: within 5 minutes, 30-day survival was 14.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8-16.4) versus 6.3% (95% CI: 5.1-7.6), corresponding to 2.3 times higher chances of survival associated with bystander CPR; within 10 minutes, 30-day survival chances were 6.7% (95% CI: 5.4-8.1) versus 2.2% (95% CI: 1.5-3.1), corresponding to 3.0 times higher chances of 30-day survival associated with bystander CPR. The contrast in 30-day survival became statistically insignificant when response time was >13 minutes (bystander CPR vs no bystander CPR: 3.7% [95% CI: 2.2-5.4] vs 1.5% [95% CI: 0.6-2.7]), but 30-day survival was still 2.5 times higher associated with bystander CPR. Based on the model and Danish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest statistics, an additional 233 patients could potentially be saved annually if response time was reduced from 10 to 5 minutes and 119 patients if response time was reduced from 7 (the median

  4. Testosterone replacement therapy and the heart: friend, foe or bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, David S; Canfield, Steven; Wang, Run

    2016-12-01

    The role of testosterone therapy (TTh) in cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes is still controversial, and it seems will remain inconclusive for the moment. An extensive body of literature has investigated the association of endogenous testosterone and use of TTh with CVD events including several meta-analyses. In some instances, a number of studies reported beneficial effects of TTh on CVD events and in other instances the body of literature reported detrimental effects or no effects at all. Yet, no review article has scrutinized this body of literature using the magnitude of associations and statistical significance reported from this relationship. We critically reviewed the previous and emerging body of literature that investigated the association of endogenous testosterone and use of TTh with CVD events (only fatal and nonfatal). These studies were divided into three groups, "beneficial (friendly use)", "detrimental (foe)" and "no effects at all (bystander)", based on their magnitude of associations and statistical significance from original research studies and meta-analyses of epidemiological studies and of randomized controlled trials (RCT's). In this review article, the studies reporting a significant association of high levels of testosterone with a reduced risk of CVD events in original prospective studies and meta-analyses of cross-sectional and prospective studies seems to be more consistent. However, the number of meta-analyses of RCT's does not provide a clear picture after we divided it into the beneficial, detrimental or no effects all groups using their magnitudes of association and statistical significance. From this review, we suggest that we need a study or number of studies that have the adequate power, epidemiological, and clinical data to provide a definitive conclusion on whether the effect of TTh on the natural history of CVD is real or not.

  5. Bystander Host Cell Killing Effects of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Shrestha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE binds to claudin receptors, e.g., claudin-4, and then forms a pore that triggers cell death. Pure cultures of host cells that do not express claudin receptors, e.g., fibroblasts, are unaffected by pathophysiologically relevant CPE concentrations in vitro. However, both CPE-insensitive and CPE-sensitive host cells are present in vivo. Therefore, this study tested whether CPE treatment might affect fibroblasts when cocultured with CPE-sensitive claudin-4 fibroblast transfectants or Caco-2 cells. Under these conditions, immunofluorescence microscopy detected increased death of fibroblasts. This cytotoxic effect involved release of a toxic factor from the dying CPE-sensitive cells, since it could be reproduced using culture supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells, particularly Caco-2 cells, were found to contain high levels of membrane vesicles, often containing a CPE species. However, most cytotoxic activity remained in those supernatants even after membrane vesicle depletion, and CPE was not detected in fibroblasts treated with supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Instead, characterization studies suggest that a major cytotoxic factor present in supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells may be a 10- to 30-kDa host serine protease or require the action of that host serine protease. Induction of caspase-3-mediated apoptosis was found to be important for triggering release of the cytotoxic factor(s from CPE-treated sensitive host cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxic factor(s in these supernatants was shown to induce a caspase-3-mediated killing of fibroblasts. This bystander killing effect due to release of cytotoxic factors from CPE-treated sensitive cells could contribute to CPE-mediated disease.

  6. Ovarian Follicular Dynamics around Estrus in Beetal and Teddy Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Riaz, Nasim Ahmad* and Muhammad Rizwan Yousuf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to higher fecundity rate over Beetal goats, it is assumed that Teddy goats have higher ovarian activity. Therefore, the current study tested the hypothesis that ovarian follicular population i.e. number of small (2-4 mm, medium (>4-6 mm and large follicles (>6 mm, size of the ovulatory follicle, and ovulation rate (No. of CL/No of ovulated goats, using transrectal ultrasonography are different between Beetal and Teddy goats of Pakistani origin. Beetal (n=6 and Teddy (n=8 does were synchronized using double PGF2a injections 10 d apart and were scanned on Days -2, 0 (estrus and +2. The onset of estrus was assessed by aproned bucks. Mean number of small follicles were higher (P<0.05 in Beetal goats, compared to Teddy goats, on days -2, estrus and +2. The ovulatory follicle diameter, and ovulation rate were found non-significant between Beetal and Teddy goats. It is concluded that Beetal goats have greater population of small follicles around estrus compared to Teddy goats. Future studies can be based on the follicle recruitment and atretic factors in Beetal goats to enhance the production.

  7. Association of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival according to ambulance response-times after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    30-day survival chances decreased for both patients with bystander CPR and those without. However, the contrast between the survival chances of patients with versus without bystander CPR increased over time: within 5 minutes, 30-day survival was 14.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8-16.4) versus...... 6.3% (95% CI: 5.1-7.6), corresponding to 2.3 times higher chances of survival associated with bystander CPR; within 10 minutes, 30-day survival chances were 6.7% (95% CI: 5.4-8.1) versus 2.2% (95% CI: 1.5-3.1), corresponding to 3.0 times higher chances of 30-day survival associated with bystander...... CPR. The contrast in 30-day survival became statistically insignificant when response time was >13 minutes (bystander CPR vs no bystander CPR: 3.7% [95% CI: 2.2-5.4] vs 1.5% [95% CI: 0.6-2.7]), but 30-day survival was still 2.5 times higher associated with bystander CPR. Based on the model and Danish...

  8. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after {alpha}-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chen Shaopeng [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-02-03

    Low-dose {alpha}-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose {alpha}-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-{beta}1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  9. X-ray radiation induced bystander effects of human glioblastoma T98G cells under hypoxia condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianghong; Jin Yizun; Shao Chunlin; Prise, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    Non-irradiated bystander human glioblastoma T98G cells were co-cultured (CC) with irradiated cells or treated with conditioned medium (CM) from irradiated cells under hypoxic condition, then micronucleus (MN) of both irradiated cells and bystander cells were measured for the investigation of radiation induced bystander effect and its mechanism. It has been found that the MN yield (Y MN ) of non-irradiated bystander T98G cells is obviously enhanced after the cell co-culture, or CM treatment, but this increment is diminished by free radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). When hypoxic or normoxic T98G cells are treated with CM obtained from irradiated cells under either hypoxic or normoxic condition, the biggest bystander response has been observed in the group of hypoxic by- stander cells treated with CM from irradiated normoxic cells. However, all of these increments of bystander Y MN could be eliminated by aminoguanidine, an iNOS inhibitor. Therefore, under hypoxic condition, free radicals, especially reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, are involved in the bystander response induced by irradiated T98G cells. (authors)

  10. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after α-particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Wei; Chen Shaopeng; Yu, K.N.; Wu Lijun

    2010-01-01

    Low-dose α-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose α-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-β1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  11. Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, T.P.W.; Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F.; Yu, K.N.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to the biological response found in cells (called bystander cells) which are not irradiated directly by ionizing radiation but are next to cells irradiated directly by ionizing radiation. In the present paper, the effects of Magnolol, an extract from the bark of Magnolia officinalis which is used as a traditional Chinese medicine, were studied on alpha-particle induced bystander effects. In our experiments, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in PADC-film based dishes and were irradiated with low fluences of alpha particles passing through the PADC films. The precise number of cells traversed or missed by alpha particles could be determined by studying the alpha-particle tracks developed on the PADC films upon subsequent chemical etching. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was employed to analyze the biological response of bystander cells in terms of DNA strand breaks. With the pretreatment of Magnolol, the DNA strand breaks in bystander cells were reduced, which showed that the alpha-particle induced bystander effects were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol. Since Magnolol is an antioxidant which can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), our results give support to that ROS play a role in the bystander signal transmission in our experiments.

  12. Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.h [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to the biological response found in cells (called bystander cells) which are not irradiated directly by ionizing radiation but are next to cells irradiated directly by ionizing radiation. In the present paper, the effects of Magnolol, an extract from the bark of Magnolia officinalis which is used as a traditional Chinese medicine, were studied on alpha-particle induced bystander effects. In our experiments, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in PADC-film based dishes and were irradiated with low fluences of alpha particles passing through the PADC films. The precise number of cells traversed or missed by alpha particles could be determined by studying the alpha-particle tracks developed on the PADC films upon subsequent chemical etching. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was employed to analyze the biological response of bystander cells in terms of DNA strand breaks. With the pretreatment of Magnolol, the DNA strand breaks in bystander cells were reduced, which showed that the alpha-particle induced bystander effects were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol. Since Magnolol is an antioxidant which can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), our results give support to that ROS play a role in the bystander signal transmission in our experiments.

  13. A High School-Based Evaluation of TakeCARE, a Video Bystander Program to Prevent Adolescent Relationship Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Kelli S; Jouriles, Ernest N; Rosenfield, David; McDonald, Renee

    2017-03-01

    Although bystander programs to prevent relationship and sexual violence have been evaluated with college students, few evaluations have been conducted with high school students. This study evaluated the effectiveness of TakeCARE, a brief video bystander program designed to promote helpful bystander behavior in situations involving relationship violence among high school students. Students (N = 1295; 52.5% female; 72.3% Hispanic) reported their bystander behavior at a baseline assessment. Classrooms (N = 66) were randomized to view TakeCARE or to a control condition, and high school counselors administered the video in the classrooms assigned to view TakeCARE. Students again reported their bystander behavior at a follow-up assessment approximately 3 months afterward. Results indicate that students who viewed TakeCARE reported more helpful bystander behavior at the follow-up assessment than students in the control condition. Results of exploratory analyses of the likelihood of encountering and intervening upon specific situations calling for bystander behavior are also reported. TakeCARE is efficacious when implemented in an urban high school by high school counselors.

  14. The different radiation response and radiation-induced bystander effects in colorectal carcinoma cells differing in p53 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, Maria; Lalik, Anna; Krzywon, Aleksandra; Poleszczuk, Jan; Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect, appearing as different biological changes in cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation but are under the influence of molecular signals secreted by irradiated neighbors, have recently attracted considerable interest due to their possible implication for radiotherapy. However, various cells present diverse radiosensitivity and bystander responses that depend, inter alia, on genetic status including TP53, the gene controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. Here we compared the ionizing radiation and bystander responses of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with wild type or knockout TP53 using a transwell co-culture system. The viability of exposed to X-rays (0-8 Gy) and bystander cells of both lines showed a roughly comparable decline with increasing dose. The frequency of micronuclei was also comparable at lower doses but at higher increased considerably, especially in bystander TP53-/- cells. Moreover, the TP53-/- cells showed a significantly elevated frequency of apoptosis, while TP53+/+ counterparts expressed high level of senescence. The cross-matched experiments where irradiated cells of one line were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of opposite line show that both cell lines were also able to induce bystander effects in their counterparts, however different endpoints revealed with different strength. Potential mediators of bystander effects, IL-6 and IL-8, were also generated differently in both lines. The knockout cells secreted IL-6 at lower doses whereas wild type cells only at higher doses. Secretion of IL-8 by TP53-/- control cells was many times lower than that by TP53+/+ but increased significantly after irradiation. Transcription of the NFκBIA was induced in irradiated TP53+/+ mainly, but in bystanders a higher level was observed in TP53-/- cells, suggesting that TP53 is required for induction of NFκB pathway after irradiation but another mechanism of activation must operate in

  15. Raising a Red Flag on Dating Violence: Evaluation of a Low-Resource, College-Based Bystander Behavior Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsky, Amanda E; McDonnell, Karen; Turner, Monique Mitchell; Rimal, Rajiv

    2016-03-09

    Encouraging bystanders to intervene safely and effectively in situations that could escalate to violence-known as bystander behavior programs-is a growing yet largely untested strategy to prevent dating violence. Using a quasi-experimental design, we evaluate a low-resource, low-intensity intervention aimed at preventing dating violence among college students. The integrated behavioral model (IBM) was used to guide the evaluation. We also assess which IBM variables were most strongly associated with bystander behaviors. Participants were drawn from two Virginia colleges that predominantly train females in the health profession sciences. The intervention group (n = 329) participated in a university-wide bystander behavior intervention consisting of a 30-min presentation on dating violence at new-student orientation and a week-long "red flag" social marketing campaign on campus to raise awareness of dating violence. Controlling for changes at the comparison university, results showed an increase in bystander behaviors, such as encouraging a friend who may be in an abusive relationship to get help, after the intervention and adjusting for potential confounders (increase of 1.41 bystander behaviors, p = .04). However, no significant changes were found for bystander intentions, self-efficacy, social norms, or attitudes related to dating violence from pre- to post-intervention. Self-efficacy had a direct relationship with bystander behaviors. Results suggest that low-resource interventions have a modest effect on increasing bystander behaviors. However, higher resource interventions likely are needed for a larger impact, especially among students who already demonstrate strong baseline intentions to intervene and prevent dating violence. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Occurrence and biology of goat warble fly infestation by Przhevalskiana silenus (Diptera, Oestridae) in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, A; Razavi, S M; Bahrami, S

    2009-12-03

    Goat warble fly infestation (GWFI) by the larvae of Przhevalskiana silenus is endemic in goats of semi-hilly and mountainous regions of Iran. This myiasis has severe economic impact on tanning industries, and it is responsible for impaired milk and meat production, growth retardation and carcass depreciation. To estimate the prevalence of GWFI in the southern areas of Iran, from October 2006 to December 2008, the carcasses of 8000 goats at a Shiraz slaughterhouse and 1000 each at Marvdasht and Darab cities were examined weekly for the presence of P. silenus larvae. In addition, appropriate sections from the skin and subcutaneous tissues were processed for histopathological investigation. The prevalence rate of infestation in different cities varied from 7.0% to 18.9% and the minimum and maximum infestation rate was 3 and 78, with an average rate of infestation of 26.2 warbles per animal. Significant differences were observed in the prevalence among different age groups with no significant difference between male and female animals. First instar larvae (L(1)) were found on infected animals from early August to end of September, second larval stage (L(2)) from early October to end of November and third-stage larvae (L(3)) from early December to mid-March. No larvae were found on skin or subcutaneous tissues from end of March to late July. Live L(1) initiated mild lymphocyte, macrophage and eosinophil infiltration while dead L(1) initiated granulomatous or pyogranulomatous reactions. Live L(2) induced severe inflammatory reaction and massive tissue necrosis, which continued for L(3) and until the end of infestation phase. The subcutaneous tissues, dermis and epidermis became necrotic and fragmented, and L(3) penetrated the necrotic area to start its aerobic life cycle.

  17. Potential disease agents in domestic goats and relevance to bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) management

    OpenAIRE

    Drew, Mark L.; Weiser, Glen C.

    2017-01-01

    Domestic goats are raised for meat, milk and hair production, in herds for rangeland weed control, and as pack animals. Domestic sheep, goats and wild bighorn sheep are all susceptible to a multifactorial pneumonia. We sampled 43 herd goats from 7 herds and 48 pack goats from 11 herds for viral and bacterial serology, parasitology, and Pasteurellaceae microbiology. The goats in this study were in generally good health, although most goats did harbor various pathogens and parasites including s...

  18. Reducing Sexual Violence on Campus: The Role of Student Leaders as Empowered Bystanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Victoria L.; Moynihan, Mary M.; Crossman, Maria T.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual violence is a widespread problem for college communities. Students, faculty, and staff are increasingly involved in prevention efforts. To date, however, evaluation of sexual violence prevention programs has shown mixed results. One promising new practice teaches segments of college communities to be engaged, positive bystanders. It aims to…

  19. Development of a mathematical model to study the radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Living organisms are composed of millions of cells that together perform tasks of great complexity. Although every cell has an internal structure that obeys the laws of chemistry and biochemistry, it is the interactions between cells that generate a range of different phenomena. Until the 1990s it was believed that the DNA was the single molecule affected by radiation, the so-called theory of the single target. But some observations began to challenge this theory; in 1992 the bystander effect was described by Nagasawa and Little. This effect is responsible for a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. Understanding the bystander effect may have important consequences for therapy and studies of low-dose risk. In this work, we have developed a computational model to study the bystander effect. This computational model is a two-dimensional cellular automata, consisting of two overlapping networks, where the first represents the cell culture, and the second one, the medium in which cells are embedded. The computational model allows the establishment of curves to describe the behavior of the effect for different levels of signals released in the irradiated medium by the irradiated cells or by the bystander cells when a second order effect is considered. The percentage of cell survival obtained from the mathematical model showed to be in good agreement with experimental data available in the literature. (author)

  20. Acting in solidarity : Testing an extended dual pathway model of collective action by bystander group members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing-Yee

    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one emotion-based path to collective action (Van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach,

  1. Culture of three-dimensional tissue model and its application in bystander-effect research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ruqun; Xu An; Wu Lijun; Hu Burong

    2012-01-01

    Compared with the cultured monolayer (2D) cells, three-dimensional (3D) tissue could be more similar to the environment in vivo including the physical support, chemical factors, cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction and so on. With the development of three-dimensional cell culture techniques (TDCC), 3D tissue is widely used in the areas of bystander effect research. This review focuses on introducing the TDCC method and its application in bystander-effect research. First, the development process of 3D tissue culture method was introduced. Secondly, the induction of radiation induced bystander effects both in 2D cell and 3D tissue and its mechanisms were reviewed. Finally, because heavy ion (carbon ion beam) has been developed as a useful tool to cure solid cancer, and the 3D tissue model is an ideal material to study the damages on body after being irradiated and to understand the underlying mechanisms, future study about heavy ion radiation inducing bystander effect in 3D tissue was discussed. (authors)

  2. Distinction of the memory B cell response to cognate antigen versus bystander inflammatory signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Micah J; Elgueta, Raul; Schpero, William; Molloy, Michael; Zhang, Weijun; Usherwood, Edward; Noelle, Randolph J

    2009-08-31

    The hypothesis that bystander inflammatory signals promote memory B cell (B(MEM)) self-renewal and differentiation in an antigen-independent manner is critically evaluated herein. To comprehensively address this hypothesis, a detailed analysis is presented examining the response profiles of B-2 lineage B220(+)IgG(+) B(MEM) toward cognate protein antigen in comparison to bystander inflammatory signals. After in vivo antigen encounter, quiescent B(MEM) clonally expand. Surprisingly, proliferating B(MEM) do not acquire germinal center (GC) B cell markers before generating daughter B(MEM) and differentiating into plasma cells or form structurally identifiable GCs. In striking contrast to cognate antigen, inflammatory stimuli, including Toll-like receptor agonists or bystander T cell activation, fail to induce even low levels of B(MEM) proliferation or differentiation in vivo. Under the extreme conditions of adjuvanted protein vaccination or acute viral infection, no detectable bystander proliferation or differentiation of B(MEM) occurred. The absence of a B(MEM) response to nonspecific inflammatory signals clearly shows that B(MEM) proliferation and differentiation is a process tightly controlled by the availability of cognate antigen.

  3. Bystander efforts and 1-year outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N.

    2017-01-01

    changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. RESULTS Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period...

  4. Masculinity and Bystander Attitudes: Moderating Effects of Masculine Gender Role Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Ruschelle M; Parrott, Dominic J; Swartout, Kevin M; Tharp, Andra Teten

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the bystander decision-making process as a mechanism by which men's adherence to various dimensions of traditional masculinity is associated with their confidence to intervene in sexually aggressive events. Further, this study examined the stress men experience from their attempts to adhere to traditional male gender roles as a moderator of this mediational path. Participants ( n = 252) completed measures of traditional masculinity, decisional balance (i.e., weighing the pros and cons) for intervening, masculine gender roles stress, and bystander efficacy. The belief that men must attain social status was associated with more confidence in men's ability to intervene. This effect was mediated by greater perceived positive consequences for intervention among men high, but not low, in masculine gender role stress. The belief that men should be tough and aggressive was associated with greater perceived negative consequences for intervention and less confidence to intervene. The belief that men should not act in stereotypically feminine ways was directly associated with less confidence for intervention. Findings highlight the importance of examining masculinity from a multidimensional perspective to better understand how adherence to various norms differentially influences bystander behavior. These findings may help to inform bystander intervention programming.

  5. Participation in High School Sports and Bystander Intentions, Efficacy to Intervene, and Rape Myth Beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Debate exists as to whether male athletes are more prone to commit acts of sexual violence and maintain problematic attitudes about sexual assault. To contribute to the literature on this relationship, this study posed the following research questions: (1) Do those students who participated in high school sports and those who did not differ significantly in their attitudes about sexual violence and willingness to intervene as a bystander? Do these differ among types of rape myths and bystander intervention situations? (2) Within a group of athletes, are there significant differences by gender or type of sport (contact sport vs. non-contact?) To answer these questions, surveys were analyzed with a sample of recent high school graduates the summer before entering college (N = 3,588). Results indicate that there were only minor differences between those students who participated in high school varsity sports and those who did not. Students who participated in sports had greater acceptance of three out of five types of rape myths, and less willingness to intervene with perpetrators after an assault; however, the effect sizes were small. There were no significant differences for bystander efficacy. The interaction between sport and gender was significant, but contact sport was not. The findings suggest that there may be aspects of male athletic participation in sports that needs to be addressed, yet there also exists the potential for engaging athletes as leaders who can act as prosocial bystanders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Bystander Automated External Defibrillator Use and Clinical Outcomes after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Mathias J; Vognsen, Mikael; Andersen, Mikkel S

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To systematically review studies comparing bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use to no AED use in regard to clinical outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and to provide a descriptive summary of studies on the cost-effectiveness of bystander AED use. Methods: We...... randomized trials, and 13 cost-effectiveness studies were included. Meta-analysis of 6 observational studies without critical risk of bias showed that bystander AED use was associated with survival to hospital discharge (all rhythms OR: 1.73 [95% CI: 1.36, 2.18], shockable rhythms OR: 1.66 [95% CI: 1.54, 1.......79]) and favorable neurological outcome (all rhythms OR: 2.12 [95% CI: 1.36, 3.29], shockable rhythms OR: 2.37 [95% CI: 1.58, 3.57]). There was no association between bystander AED use and neurological outcome for non-shockable rhythms (OR: 0.76 [95% CI: 0.10, 5.87]). The Public-Access Defibrillation trial found...

  7. Protective effect of mild endoplasmic reticulum stress on radiation-induced bystander effects in hepatocyte cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuexia; Ye, Shuang; Zhang, Jianghong; He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Tu, Wenzhi; Liu, Peifeng; Shao, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has important implications for secondary cancer risk assessment during cancer radiotherapy, but the defense and self-protective mechanisms of bystander normal cells are still largely unclear. The present study found that micronuclei (MN) formation could be induced in the non-irradiated HL-7702 hepatocyte cells after being treated with the conditioned medium from irradiated hepatoma HepG2 cells under either normoxia or hypoxia, where the ratio of the yield of bystander MN induction to the yield of radiation-induced MN formation under hypoxia was much higher than that of normoxia. Nonetheless, thapsigargin induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and dramatically suppressed this bystander response manifested as the decrease of MN and apoptosis inductions. Meanwhile, the interference of BiP gene, a major ER chaperone, amplified the detrimental RIBE. More precisely, thapsigargin provoked ER sensor of PERK to initiate an instantaneous and moderate ER stress thus defensed the hazard form RIBE, while BiP depletion lead to persistently destroyed homeostasis of ER and exacerbated cell injury. These findings provide new insights that the mild ER stress through BiP-PERK-p-eIF2α signaling pathway has a profound role in protecting cellular damage from RIBE and hence may decrease the potential secondary cancer risk after cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27958308

  8. A Bystander Bullying Psychoeducation Program with Middle School Students: A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgett, Aida; Doumas, Diana; Sears, Dara; Lundquist, Amanda; Hausheer, Robin

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a brief, stand-alone bystander bullying psychoeducation program for middle school students. The purpose of the program was to train students to take action as peer advocates. Pre- and post-tests indicated that after completing the 90-minute psychoeducation program, students reported an increase in their…

  9. Sticks, Stones, and Stigma: Student Bystander Behavior in Response to Hearing the Word "Retard"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Avery B.; Jacobs, Holly E.; Siperstein, Gary N.

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored the prevalence of the r-word in schools and students' bystander behavior in response to hearing the word. In total, 2,297 students from 12 high schools across the country participated in this study. Results revealed the r-word was used frequently among high school students, most often toward individuals without…

  10. A Meta-Analysis of School-Based Bullying Prevention Programs' Effects on Bystander Intervention Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanin, Joshua R.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Pigott, Therese D.

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized bullying prevention programs' effectiveness at increasing bystander intervention in bullying situations. Evidence from 12 school-based programs, involving 12,874 students, indicated that overall the programs were successful (Hedges's g = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11 to 0.29, p = 0.001), with larger…

  11. Bystander Behavior in Bullying Situations: Basic Moral Sensitivity, Moral Disengagement and Defender Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert; Jungert, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different…

  12. Bystander Involvement in Peer Victimization: The Value of Looking beyond Aggressors and Victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Brenda A.; Dempsey, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Peer victimization has been a focus of both research and prevention program development. This construct is typically measured from the victim and aggressor perspectives. However, prevention programming often includes an additional bystander perspective. The present study evaluated whether questions regarding witnessing peer victimization…

  13. Being a Positive Bystander: Male Antiviolence Allies' Experiences of "Stepping up"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Erin A.; Ohler, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    As bystander approaches become increasingly prevalent elements of sexual and domestic violence prevention efforts, it is necessary to better understand the factors that support or impede individuals in taking positive action in the face of aggressive or disrespectful behavior from others. This study presents descriptive findings about the…

  14. Aggressive Attitudes and Prevalence of Bullying Bystander Behavior in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pooja; Cornell, Dewey; Huang, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Separate lines of research find that proaggressive attitudes promote peer aggression and that bystanders play a pivotal role in deterring or facilitating bullying behavior. The current study hypothesized that proaggressive attitudes in middle school would deter students from standing up to bullying and encourage them to reinforce bullying…

  15. Masculinity and Bystander Attitudes: Moderating Effects of Masculine Gender Role Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Ruschelle M.; Parrott, Dominic J.; Swartout, Kevin M.; Tharp, Andra Teten

    2018-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the current study was to examine the bystander decision-making process as a mechanism by which men’s adherence to various dimensions of traditional masculinity is associated with their confidence to intervene in sexually aggressive events. Further, this study examined the stress men experience from their attempts to adhere to traditional male gender roles as a moderator of this mediational path. Method Participants (n = 252) completed measures of traditional masculinity, decisional balance (i.e., weighing the pros and cons) for intervening, masculine gender roles stress, and bystander efficacy. Results The belief that men must attain social status was associated with more confidence in men’s ability to intervene. This effect was mediated by greater perceived positive consequences for intervention among men high, but not low, in masculine gender role stress. The belief that men should be tough and aggressive was associated with greater perceived negative consequences for intervention and less confidence to intervene. The belief that men should not act in stereotypically feminine ways was directly associated with less confidence for intervention. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of examining masculinity from a multidimensional perspective to better understand how adherence to various norms differentially influences bystander behavior. These findings may help to inform bystander intervention programming. PMID:29593932

  16. Intervene to be seen: The power of a camera in attenuating the bystander effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, M.; van Prooijen, J.W.; Elffers, H.; van Lange, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Security cameras became such a part of everyday life that their presence may escape from our conscious attention. The present research examines the impact of cameras on intervening in crime, a situation in which the classic bystander effect has been uncovered. In our experimental set up,

  17. R.U. Ready?: Peer Education and Bystander Intervention Sexual Assault Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweer, Jen Luettel; Heather, Katie; Kay, Kathryn; Stewart, K. Leigh; Kovach, Laura

    2012-01-01

    R.U. Ready? at Georgetown University is an annual sexual assault awareness event that incorporates peer education and resources with opportunities for students, staff, and faculty to dialogue about providing bystander intervention throughout the campus community. Beyond dialogue, participants learn about student activism and the resources and…

  18. Development of a mathematical model to study the radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein; Nunes, Maria Eugenia S.

    2011-01-01

    Living organisms are composed of millions of cells that together perform tasks of great complexity. Although every cell has an internal structure that obeys the laws of chemistry and biochemistry, it is the interactions between cells that generate a range of different phenomena. Until the 1990s it was believed that the DNA was the single molecule affected by radiation, the so-called theory of the single target. But some observations began to challenge this theory; in 1992 the bystander effect was described by Nagasawa and Little. This effect is responsible for a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. Understanding the bystander effect may have important consequences for therapy and studies of low-dose risk. In this work, we have developed a computational model to study the bystander effect. This computational model is a two-dimensional cellular automata, consisting of two overlapping networks, where the first represents the cell culture, and the second one, the medium in which cells are embedded. The computational model allows the establishment of curves to describe the behavior of the effect for different levels of signals released in the irradiated medium by the irradiated cells or by the bystander cells when a second order effect is considered. The percentage of cell survival obtained from the mathematical model showed to be in good agreement with experimental data available in the literature. (author)

  19. It's Your Place: Development and Evaluation of an Evidence-Based Bystander Intervention Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrom, Beth; Ferrara, Merissa; DeMaria, Andrea L; Gabel, Colby; Booth, Kathleen; Cabot, Jeri

    2017-06-28

    Preventing sexual assault on college campuses is a national priority. Bystander intervention offers a promising approach to change social norms and prevent sexual misconduct. This study presents the implementation and evaluation of a theory-based campaign to promote active bystander intervention. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) served as a conceptual framework throughout campaign development and evaluation. Formative research published elsewhere was used to develop campaign strategies, communication channels, and messages, including "It is your place to prevent sexual assault: You're not ruining a good time." The It's Your Place multi-media campaign fosters a culture of bystander intervention through peer-to-peer facilitation and training, as well as traditional and new media platforms. A cross-sectional post-test only web-based survey was designed to evaluate the campaign and test the TPB's ability to accurately predict intention to intervene. Survey data were collected from 1,505 currently enrolled students. The TPB model predicted intention to intervene. There was a significant effect of campaign exposure on attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral intention. This theory-based communication campaign offers implications for promoting active bystander intervention and reducing sexual assault.

  20. Bystander effects of ionizing radiation can be modulated by signaling amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, R.C.C.; Agnihotri, N.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C.

    2007-01-01

    Actual risk and risk management of exposure to ionizing radiation are among the most controversial areas in environmental health protection. Recent developments in radiobiology especially characterization of bystander effects have called into question established dogmas and are thought to cast doubt on the scientific basis of the risk assessment framework, leading to uncertainty for regulators and concern among affected populations. In this paper we test the hypothesis that small signaling molecules widely used throughout the animal kingdom for signaling stress or environmental change, such as 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin), L-DOPA, glycine or nicotine are involved in bystander signaling processes following ionizing radiation exposure. We report data which suggest that nano to micromolar concentrations of these agents can modulate bystander-induced cell death. Depletion of 5-HT present in tissue culture medium, occurred following irradiation of cells. This suggested that 5-HT might be bound by membrane receptors after irradiation. Expression of 5-HT type 3 receptors which are Ca 2+ ion channels was confirmed in the cells using immunocytochemistry and receptor expression could be increased using radiation or 5-HT exposure. Zofran and Kitryl, inhibitors of 5-HT type 3 receptors, and reserpine a generic serotonin antagonist block the bystander effect induced by radiation or by serotonin. The results may be important for the mechanistic understanding of how low doses of radiation interact with cells to produce biological effects

  1. Bystander Intervention, Bullying, and Victimization: A Multilevel Analysis of New Zealand High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Simon; Peterson, Elizabeth R.; Stuart, Jaimee; Utter, Jennifer; Bullen, Pat; Fleming, Theresa; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Clark, Terryann; Milfont, Taciano

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the association between schools and student bullying behaviors and victimization among a nationally representative sample (N = 9,107) of New Zealand high school students. In particular, the study sought to explore the role of characteristics of schools and school culture with respect to bystander behavior, while controlling for…

  2. Using a Multimedia Social Marketing Campaign to Increase Active Bystanders on the College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the campus-wide administration of the Know Your Power bystander-oriented social marketing campaign. Participants: Undergraduate students at a public college were invited to participate in a public awareness survey before and after the 6-week campaign administration in February and March 2009. Methods: Pretest and posttests…

  3. Using Role-Taking and Behavioral Mimicking in Games to Increase Awareness on the Bystander Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard Andersen, Josephine; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a concept on how a serious game might raise awareness of the bystander effect by using elements of game theory as well as a few psychological terms. The paper summarizes the theories and concludes with the description of a concept, which is a third person role playing game wit...

  4. Total and Marginal Cost Analysis for a High School Based Bystander Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Joshua L.; Bush, Heather M.; Coker, Ann L.; Brancato, Candace J.; Clear, Emily R.; Recktenwald, Eileen A.

    2018-01-01

    Costs of providing the Green Dot bystander-based intervention, shown to be effective in the reduction of sexual violence among Kentucky high school students, were estimated based on data from a large cluster-randomized clinical trial. Rape Crisis Center Educators were trained to provide Green Dot curriculum to students. Implementing Green Dot in…

  5. Signaling pathways underpinning the manifestations of ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Munetoshi; Otsuka, Kensuke; Tomita, Masanori

    2011-06-01

    For nearly a century, ionizing radiation has been indispensable to medical diagnosis. Furthermore, various types of electromagnetic and particulate radiation have also been used in cancer therapy. However, the biological mechanism of radiation action remains incompletely understood. In this regard, a rapidly growing body of experimental evidence indicates that radiation exposure induces biological effects in cells whose nucleus has not been irradiated. This phenomenon termed the 'non-targeted effects' challenges the long-held tenet that radiation traversal through the cell nucleus is a prerequisite to elicit genetic damage and biological responses. The non-targeted effects include biological effects in cytoplasm-irradiated cells, bystander effects that arise in non-irradiated cells having received signals from irradiated cells, and genomic instability occurring in the progeny of irradiated cells. Such non-targeted responses are interrelated, and the bystander effect is further related with an adaptive response that manifests itself as the attenuated stressful biological effects of acute high-dose irradiation in cells that have been pre-exposed to low-dose or low-dose-rate radiation. This paper reviews the current body of knowledge about the bystander effect with emphasis on experimental approaches, in vitro and in vivo manifestations, radiation quality dependence, temporal and spatial dependence, proposed mechanisms, and clinical implications. Relations of bystander responses with the effects in cytoplasm-irradiated cells, genomic instability and adaptive response will also be briefly discussed.

  6. Building upon Bystander Intervention: A Multi-Component Prevention Programming Approach for University Sorority Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual violence on college campuses is a pervasive problem with the potential for extensive physical and psychological health consequences. Institutions have begun implementing prevention programs; however, more research is needed to understand whether these programs are effective. Bystander intervention programs have increased in popularity…

  7. Counseling and the Bystander-Equity Model of Supervisory Helping Behavior: Directions for EAP Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Bayer, Gregory A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses contribution of Bystander-Equity Model of Supervisory Helping Behavior to pursuit of employee assistance program (EAP) research based on traditions of field of counseling. Offers structure for pursuing empirical and applied activities in EAP settings. Encourages counseling researchers and practitioners to respond to challenge of working…

  8. Bystanders, parcelling, and an absence of trust in the grooming interactions of wild male chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaburu, Stefano S K; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas E

    2016-02-09

    The evolution of cooperation remains a central issue in socio-biology with the fundamental problem of how individuals minimize the risks of being short-changed ('cheated') should their behavioural investment in another not be returned. Economic decisions that individuals make during interactions may depend upon the presence of potential partners nearby, which offers co operators a temptation to defect from the current partner. The parcelling model posits that donors subdivide services into parcels to force cooperation, and that this is contingent on opportunities for defection; that is, the presence of bystanders. Here we test this model and the effect of bystander presence using grooming interactions of wild chimpanzees. We found that with more bystanders, initiators gave less grooming at the beginning of the bout and were more likely to abandon a grooming bout, while bouts were less likely to be reciprocated. We also found that the groomer's initial investment was not higher among frequent groomers or stronger reciprocators, suggesting that contrary to current assumptions, grooming decisions are not based on trust, or bonds, within dyads. Our work highlights the importance of considering immediate social context and the influence of bystanders for understanding the evolution of the behavioural strategies that produce cooperation.

  9. The Role of Self-Efficacy for Bystander Helping Behaviors in Risky Alcohol Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Heather; Serrano, Surizaday; Neighbors, Clayton

    2017-01-01

    We examined the role of self-efficacy in preventing bystander inaction in dangerous alcohol situations. Participants (N = 504) completed an online survey that assessed whether they had previously witnessed or intervened in alcohol-related emergencies, their self-efficacy for intervening, and their likelihood of intervening in the future.…

  10. T-cell-mediated immunity to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in beta2-integrin (CD18)- and ICAM-1 (CD54)-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1996-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice with deficient expression of beta2-integrins or ICAM-1. In such mice, the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes was only slightly impaired and bystander activation was as extensive as that observed in wild-type...... mice. T-cell-mediated inflammation, assessed as primary footpad swelling and susceptibility to intracerebral infection, was slightly compromised only in beta2-integrin-deficient mice. However, adoptive immunization of mutant mice soon after local infection did reveal a reduced capacity to support...... the inflammatory reaction, indicating that under conditions of more limited immune activation both molecules do play a role in formation of the inflammatory exudate. Finally, virus control was found to be somewhat impaired in both mutant strains. In conclusion, our results indicate that although LFA-1-ICAM-1...

  11. Microsatellite-based phylogeny of Indian domestic goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Pramod K; Joshi, Manjunath B; Mandal, Ajoy; Laloe, D; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2008-01-01

    Background The domestic goat is one of the important livestock species of India. In the present study we assess genetic diversity of Indian goats using 17 microsatellite markers. Breeds were sampled from their natural habitat, covering different agroclimatic zones. Results The mean number of alleles per locus (NA) ranged from 8.1 in Barbari to 9.7 in Jakhrana goats. The mean expected heterozygosity (He) ranged from 0.739 in Barbari to 0.783 in Jakhrana goats. Deviations from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) were statistically significant (P goat breeds. Both a phylogenetic tree and Principal Component Analysis showed the distribution of breeds in two major clusters with respect to their geographic distribution. Conclusion Our study concludes that Indian goat populations can be classified into distinct genetic groups or breeds based on the microsatellites as well as mtDNA information. PMID:18226239

  12. High prevalence of hepatitis E virus infection in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Feiyan; Yu, Wenhai; Yang, Chenchen; Wang, Jue; Li, Yunlong; Li, Yi; Huang, Fen

    2017-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of acute hepatitis worldwide, primarily transmitted by fecal-oral route. Zoonotic transmission of HEV from HEV-infected pigs (pork) or cows (milk) to human or non-human primate has been confirmed, but the risk of HEV in goat is still rarely assessed. In the present study, stool, blood, tissues, and milk of goat were collected for HEV infection investigation from Dali City of Yunnan Province in China, where raw mutton and goat milk are traditionally consumed. Surprisingly, a high prevalence of HEV infection in goat was found. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all HEV isolates from goat belong to genotype 4 and subtype 4h, and shared a high similarity homology (>99.6%) with HEV isolated from human, swine, and cows in the same area. Results suggested that goats are a previously unrecognized HEV host. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

    Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of

  14. Bystander Motivation in Bullying Incidents: To Intervene or Not to Intervene?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Thornberg

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This research sought to extend knowledge about bystanders in bullying situations with a focus on the motivations that lead them to different responses. The 2 primary goals of this study were to investigate the reasons for children’s decisions to help or not to help a victim when witnessing bullying, and to generate a grounded theory (or conceptual framework of bystander motivation in bullying situations.Methods: Thirty students ranging in age from 9 to 15 years (M=11.9; SD=1.7 from an elementary and middle school in the southeastern United States participated in this study. Open- ended, semistructured interviews were used, and sessions ranged from 30 to 45 minutes. We conducted qualitative methodology and analyses to gain an in-depth understanding of children’s perspectives and concerns when witnessing bullying.Results: A key finding was a conceptual framework of bystander motivation to intervene in bullying situations suggesting that deciding whether to help or not help the victim in a bullying situation depends on how bystanders define and evaluate the situation, the social context, and their own agency. Qualitative analysis revealed 5 themes related to bystander motives and included: interpretation of harm in the bullying situation, emotional reactions, social evaluating, moral evaluating, and intervention self-efficacy.Conclusion: Given the themes that emerged surrounding bystanders’ motives to intervene or abstain from intervening, respondents reported 3 key elements that need to be confirmed in future research and that may have implications for future work on bullying prevention. These included: first, the potential importance of clear communication to children that adults expect bystanders to intervene when witnessing bullying; second, the potential of direct education about how bystanders can interveneto increase children’s self-efficacy as defenders of those who are victims of bullying; and third, the assumption

  15. Observation of physiological changes after Detomidine administration in Pateri goat

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Tunio; Shamasuddin Bughio; Jam Kashif Sahito; Muhammad Ghiasuddin Shah; Mahdi Ebrahimi; Shazia Parveen Tunio

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the physiological effects of detomidine on Pateri goats. A total of six female Pateri goats were randomly treated with three different dose rates of Detomidine at 40 μg, 50 μg and 60 μg/kg body weights. The effects of Detomidine on respiratory and heart rate, rectal temperature and serum glucose level were investigated. Following detomidine intravenous administration in goats, it produced dose dependent effect on physiological parameters. Respirato...

  16. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinductive materials in goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Haanaes, H R; Roervik, M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether alveolar ridge augmentation could be induced in goats. In 12 male goats allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin or bone was implanted subperiosteally on the buccal sides of the natural edentulous regions of the alveolar process...... of the mandible. Light microscopic evaluation revealed fibrous encapsulation, a few multinuclear giant cells, little inflammatory reaction, and no osteoinduction. It was concluded that no osteoinduction took place in goats....

  17. Reproduction performance of Saanen goats raised under extensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-29

    Nov 29, 2010 ... and 150.1 day, respectively, while 2-5 age kidding rate, infertility and litter size were 81 and 81.3%, 11.5 and 0.09% ... Female goats. 27. -. 64. -. Goats in estrous. 25. 92.6. 60. 93.7. Kidding rate. 24. 81. 58. 81.3. Infertility rate. 3. 11.5. 6. 0.09. The goat's single birth. 22. 77.3. 57 .... adequate nutrition for twins.

  18. On the Inclusion of Short-distance Bystander Effects into a Logistic Tumor Control Probability Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, David G; Brodin, N Patrik; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2018-01-01

    Currently, interactions between voxels are neglected in the tumor control probability (TCP) models used in biologically-driven intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment planning. However, experimental data suggests that this may not always be justified when bystander effects are important. We propose a model inspired by the Ising model, a short-range interaction model, to investigate if and when it is important to include voxel to voxel interactions in biologically-driven treatment planning. This Ising-like model for TCP is derived by first showing that the logistic model of tumor control is mathematically equivalent to a non-interacting Ising model. Using this correspondence, the parameters of the logistic model are mapped to the parameters of an Ising-like model and bystander interactions are introduced as a short-range interaction as is the case for the Ising model. As an example, we apply the model to study the effect of bystander interactions in the case of radiation therapy for prostate cancer. The model shows that it is adequate to neglect bystander interactions for dose distributions that completely cover the treatment target and yield TCP estimates that lie in the shoulder of the dose response curve. However, for dose distributions that yield TCP estimates that lie on the steep part of the dose response curve or for inhomogeneous dose distributions having significant hot and/or cold regions, bystander effects may be important. Furthermore, the proposed model highlights a previously unexplored and potentially fruitful connection between the fields of statistical mechanics and tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability modeling.

  19. The effect of bystander medium on the apoptotic process in HPV-G cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, P.; Lyng, F.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: It has been shown in recent years that in both in vivo and in vitro situations irradiated cells cause what is known as the bystander effect. This presently unknown factor causes chromosomal aberrations, initiation of apoptosis and reduced clonogenic survival. Using the medium transfer method to study the bystander effect, this study investigated early events in the apoptotic cascade, which leads to cell death in cells receiving medium from irradiated cells but which were not themselves irradiated. Medium from irradiated ( 0.005Gy to 5Gy) human HPV G keratinocytes was harvested one hour after irradiation, sterile filtered and transferred on to unirradiated HPV-G cells. The appearance of apoptotic markers in the apoptotic cascade was monitored over a period of 48 hours following medium transfer. These apoptotic markers include loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and the activity of the death inducing caspase 3. Clonogenic survival of HPV-G cells over a nine day period was also monitored to assess the final survival of the cells. A TUNEL assay, which indicated the level of apoptosis over a 72 hour period after exposure to bystander medium was also performed. Data collected in this study indicates that for very low doses (0.005Gy) the appearance of well-characterised early 'apoptotic' markers such as changes in mitochondrial membrane potential doesn't mean the cell has committed to the apoptotic cascade leading to cell death. This has been illustrated for bystander medium from 0.005Gy irradiated cells, which causes mitochondrial membrane potential depolarisation after six-hour exposure but little difference has been noted for clonogenic survival for exposure to 0.005Gy bystander medium from that of the control. The results may help clarify how cells sector to death or survival following receipt of a signal from a radiation event

  20. Genetic characterization of the Mascaruna goat, a Sicilian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic characterization of the Mascaruna goat, a Sicilian autochthonous population, using molecular markers. Salvatore Mastrangelo, Marco Tolone, Maria Teresa Sardina, Rosalia Di Gerlando, Baldassare Portolano ...

  1. A new polymorphism in goat β-lactoglobulin promoter region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Graziano

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An individual variability in β-lactoglobulin content has been previously observed in Girgentana goat milk by HPLC analysis. To identify eventual mutations affecting the transcription level of the gene, the prooter region was characterized in goats showing an anomalous phenotype, consisting in a reduced content of β-lactoglobulin respect to α-lactoalbumine. A single nucleotide substitution not previously reported has been detected. A PCR-RFLP procedure was developed for fast detection of the mutation in different goat breeds: Girgentana, Garganica, Sarda, Alpine, Montefalcone and Saanen. The Montefalcone goat showed the highest frequency of the mutation, confirming one more the peculiarity of this breed.

  2. Studies of Bystander Effects in 3-D Tissue Systems Using a Low-LET Microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-01-01

    It is now accepted that biological effects may occur in cells that were not themselves traversed by ionizing radiation but are close to those that were. Little is known about the mechanism underlying such a bystander effect, although cell-to-cell communication is thought to be important. Previous work demonstrated a significant bystander effect for clonogenic survival and oncogenic transformation in C3H 10T(1/2) cells. Additional studies were undertaken to assess the importance of the degree of cell-to-cell contact at the time of irradiation on the magnitude of this bystander effect by varying the cell density. When 10% of cells were exposed to a range of 2-12 alpha particles, a significantly greater number of cells were inactivated when cells were irradiated at high density than at low density. In addition, the oncogenic transformation frequency was significantly higher in high-density cultures. These results suggest that when a cell is hit by radiation, the transmission of the bystander signal through cell-to-cell contact is an important mediator of the effect, implicating the involvement of intracellular communication through gap junctions. Additional studies to address the relationship between the bystander effect and the adaptive response were undertaken. A novel apparatus, where targeted and non-targeted cells were grown in close proximity, was used to investigate these. It was further examined whether a bystander effect or an adaptive response could be induced by a factor(s) present in the supernatants of cells exposed to a high or low dose of X-rays, respectively. When non-hit cells were co-cultured for 24 h with cells irradiated with 5 Gy alpha-particles, a significant increase in both cell killing and oncogenic transformation frequency was observed. If these cells were treated with 2 cGy X-rays 5 h before co-culture with irradiated cells, approximately 95% of the bystander effect was cancelled out. A 2.5-fold decrease in the oncogenic transformation

  3. [The lymphocyte transformation test in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, K; Braun-Falco, O

    1976-03-01

    At first, immunologie and methodic basies of the lymphocyte transformation test are discussed. Then the results gained by this test in several dermatologic diseases are summarized. Finally, practice of the lymphocyte transformation test is critically reviewed.

  4. Goat paddock cryptoexplosion crater, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, J.E.; Milton, D.J.; Ferguson, J.; Gilbert, D.J.; Harris, W.K.; Goleby, B.

    1980-01-01

    Goat Paddock, a crater slightly over 5 km in diameter (18??20??? S, 126??40???E), lies at the north edge of the King Leopold Range/Mueller Range junction in the Kimberley district, Western Australia (Fig. 1). It was noted as a geological anomaly in 1964 during regional mapping by the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics and the Geological Survey of Western Australia. The possibility of its being a meteorite impact crater has been discussed1, although this suggestion was subsequently ignored2. Two holes were drilled by a mining corporation in 1972 to test whether kimberlite underlay the structure. Here we report the findings of five days of reconnaissance in August 1979 which established that Goat Paddock is a cryptoexplosion crater containing shocked rocks and an unusually well exposed set of structural features. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  5. Policy or poverty trap? Attitude of goat farmers towards the conservation rule on goat rearing in Bhutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesang Wangchuk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study objectives were to gather feedback and opinions of goat farmers on the Forest and Nature Conservation Rule on goat rearing in Bhutan and identify field constraints arising from the conservation rule. Focus group and individual farmer survey methods were employed, and a semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview 180 goat farmers of six districts. All respondents were aware of the conservation rule. Majority of respondents knew goats as a threat to forest and crops. The vast majority of respondents felt that the conservation rule is not relevant in modern times, and all respondents felt the need to revise the rule. The main problem faced by farmers was difficulty in maintaining their goat numbers to four. The other problems faced were frequent conflicts with Forest personnel and restricted opportunities to earn more income. While the expected changes in the conservation rule included provisions to allow a farmer to rear more number of goats under stall-fed conditions, the additional rule suggested by farmers was allowing goats to browse freely in the forest. Majority of farmers reared goats under stall-fed conditions. The most common practice of managing goat populations was selling goats to fellow farmers. Despite the constraints, a majority of farmers expressed their willingness to continue goat rearing in the future, mainly to generate more income. The study findings suggest revision of the rule on goat rearing, with strong consideration of the needs of the modern farming system and growing economic demands. In revising the rule, the study recommends balanced representation from stakeholders and technical experts from both forest and livestock disciplines.

  6. An economic analysis of communal goat production

    OpenAIRE

    P.J. Sebei; C.M.E. McCrindle; E.C. Webb

    2004-01-01

    The economic impact of different extension messages used was calculated using enterprise budgeting (gross margin analysis). Input data were gleaned from the literature, from participatory appraisals, as well as a field study, spanning 12 months, of small-scalecommunal goat farming systems in Jericho in the Odi District of NorthWest Province. The number of offspring weaned per annum, as a proportion of does owned, was selected as the desired output for analysis. This study has shown that small...

  7. Effect of sunflower cake supplementation on meat quality of indigenous goat genotypes of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xazela, N M; Chimonyo, M; Muchenje, V; Marume, U

    2012-01-01

    The effect of four castrated goat genotypes and sunflower cake supplementation on goat meat quality was determined. Supplemented Boer (BOR) and Xhosa-Boer cross (XBC) goats had significantly higher (Pgoats had higher pH24 (Pgoats. For each genotype, the sunflower cake supplemented and non-supplemented goats had similar a* values, except for the XLE goats. In the XLE goats, the a* values were lower in the sunflower cake supplemented goats. Sunflower cake supplemented BOR goats had higher L*values than their non-supplemented counterparts (Pgoats also had higher b* values as compared to their non-supplemented counterparts. In comparison with the Boer goat, the XLE and NGN goats had lower CDM, L* and WBF values but generally had higher CL and a* values. Sunflower cake supplementation improved meat quality attributes of the goats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C.G.; Armstrong, G.D. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes.

  9. Study of influence of catechins on bystander responses in alpha-particle radiobiological experiments using thin PADC films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Y.L.; Yu, K.N.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in custom-made petri dishes with thin PADC films as substrates. Alpha particles with energies of 5 MeV were then irradiated from the bottom of PADC films. The DNA strand breaks in the bystander cells induced by irradiation were quantified with the use of terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. To study the influence of catechins on the bystander responses, catechins were added into the medium before alpha-particle irradiation of the cells. Fewer DNA strand breaks in the bystander cells were observed. As catechins are ROS (reactive oxygen species)-scavengers, the studied bystander cells might have been protected from radiation through scavenging of ROS by catechins.

  10. Study of influence of catechins on bystander responses in alpha-particle radiobiological experiments using thin PADC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.h [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    In this study, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in custom-made petri dishes with thin PADC films as substrates. Alpha particles with energies of 5 MeV were then irradiated from the bottom of PADC films. The DNA strand breaks in the bystander cells induced by irradiation were quantified with the use of terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. To study the influence of catechins on the bystander responses, catechins were added into the medium before alpha-particle irradiation of the cells. Fewer DNA strand breaks in the bystander cells were observed. As catechins are ROS (reactive oxygen species)-scavengers, the studied bystander cells might have been protected from radiation through scavenging of ROS by catechins.

  11. A microculture technique for rat lymphocyte transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, V J; Allardyce, R A

    1979-01-01

    We report the development of an economical microculture technique suitable for measuring rat lymphocyte response to mitogens and in mixed lymphocyte reactions. The effects of varying culture conditions, i.e. source of serum, addition and concentration of 2-mercaptoethanol, mitogen concentrations, culture incubation times, absorption of serum, lymphocyte numbers and microtitre plate well shape are described.

  12. Radiosensitivity of lymphocytes among Filipinos: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, F.I.S.; Gregorio, J.S.; Aguilar, C.P.; Poblete, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    This report is about the studies on the radiosensitivity of Filipino lymphocytes to radiation that can elucidate on the potential of blood chromosomes as biological dosimeters. The objective of this study is to determine the radiosensitivity of lymphocytes among Filipinos and to establish the radiation-induced chromosome anomaly standard curve in lymphocytes for radiological dosimetry. 47 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  13. Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Is Clustered and Associated With Neighborhood Socioeconomic Characteristics: A Geospatial Analysis of Kent County, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uber, Amy; Sadler, Richard C; Chassee, Todd; Reynolds, Joshua C

    2017-08-01

    Geographic clustering of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with demographic and socioeconomic features of the community where out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) occurred, although this association remains largely untested in rural areas. With a significant rural component and relative racial homogeneity, Kent County, Michigan, provides a unique setting to externally validate or identify new community features associated with bystander CPR. Using a large, countywide data set, we tested for geographic clustering of bystander CPR and its associations with community socioeconomic features. Secondary analysis of adult OHCA subjects (2010-2015) in the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) data set for Kent County, Michigan. After linking geocoded OHCA cases to U.S. census data, we used Moran's I-test to assess for spatial autocorrelation of population-weighted cardiac arrest rate by census block group. Getis-Ord Gi statistic assessed for spatial clustering of bystander CPR and mixed-effects hierarchical logistic regression estimated adjusted associations between community features and bystander CPR. Of 1,592 subjects, 1,465 met inclusion criteria. Geospatial analysis revealed significant clustering of OHCA in more populated/urban areas. Conversely, bystander CPR was less likely in these areas (99% confidence) and more likely in suburban and rural areas (99% confidence). Adjusting for clinical, demographic, and socioeconomic covariates, bystander CPR was associated with public location (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-1.39), initially shockable rhythms (OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.12-1.96), and those in urban neighborhoods (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.38-0.77). Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and bystander CPR are geographically clustered in Kent County, Michigan, but bystander CPR is inversely associated with urban designation. These results offer new insight into bystander CPR patterns in mixed urban and rural

  14. Use of a commercial probiotic supplement in meat goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, N C; Cazac, D; Rude, B J; Jackson-O'Brien, D; Parveen, S

    2009-02-01

    Sixty-three Boer crossbred goats were used in 5 separate experiments (Exp. 1 to 5) to evaluate the effects of a commercial probiotic supplement on growth performance (Exp. 1 to 4), diet digestibility (Exp. 5), carcass traits (Exp. 3), and fecal bacterial populations (Exp. 4). Goats were either fed a commercially pelleted concentrate diet and supplemented with a commercial probiotic (PRO) that had shown anecdotal positive effects on goat growth and performance according to local goat producers, or they remained as controls. The dose of PRO used was within the labeled dose for sheep for all studies. For Exp. 1, goat BW and feed intake were measured and G:F was calculated every 7 d for 56 d. For Exp. 2 to 4, BW and feed intake were measured and G:F was calculated every 14 d. The first day of supplementation was considered d 0. Carcass traits were also collected at slaughter on d 57 for Exp. 3, and fecal samples were collected every 14 d for microbial culture for Exp. 4. For Exp. 5, which was a digestibility trial that lasted for 10 d, animals were placed in metabolic pens for collection of feces and orts. Growth performance of goats was not affected by probiotic supplementation, with the exception of performance in Exp. 2, in which ADG and G:F were improved (P goats compared with control goats on d 56 only (treatment x day interaction; P goats and 0.11 +/- 0.02 kg/d for control goats for ADG and 0.17 +/- 0.02 for PRO goats and 0.10 +/- 0.02 for control goats for G:F. Carcass weights and weights of fabricated cuts (shoulder, loin, leg, rack, shank, and total parts) as well as carcass length, leg circumference, loin eye area, and backfat were not influenced by PRO supplementation. Apparent digestibilities of OM, DM, NDF, ADF, CP, and GE (on a DM basis) were similar for the PRO and control treatments. Fecal culture analysis of Escherichia coli and coliforms, Lactobacillus, and Bifidobacterium populations were not influenced by the PRO treatment. Overall, although the PRO

  15. INFLUENCE OF BETAINE ON GOAT MILK YIELD AND BLOOD METABOLITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Javier Fernandez

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Betaine is a natural occurring compound with methyl donor properties which is increasingly being used in animal feeding. Betaine, an oxidative product of choline is able to replace methionine in some physiologically important body processes. The subject of this work was to study the effect of betaine added to the diet on milk production and blood metabolites on Murciano-Granadina dairy goats.  Sixty lactating goats were selected from a commercial Murciano-Granadina goat herd (EXCAMUR S.L. located in Murcia Region (Spain. Goats were selected from a 250 goats herd, taken  into account the age, stage of lactation (2.5 as average, live weight (36 kg as average and type of birth (2 kids. Two homogenous groups of 30 goats were made and fed with 1.5 kg of compound feed and 1 kg of alfalfa hay per day and goat. Goats were fed twice a day and water was provided ad libitum. Both groups received the same diet but for the second group the diet was supplemented with 4 g∙kg-1 betaine (betaine anhydrous, Danisco Animal Nutrition. The feeds, presented in pellets, were formulated in based on recommendations of INRA (2007. The experimental period was 6 months and the experimental diets were provided 15 days before parturition. The herd was machine milked once at day. Chemical composition, milk production and blood metabolites of each goat were recorded and analyzed at the end of the trial. Variance analysis and means comparison were carried out using the general lineal model procedure and Tukey test for mean comparison. Goats fed with betaine diet had higher milk fat than goats fed control diet (4.8 vs. 5.2 % for control and betaine respectively; P

  16. Unraveling the genetic history of the European wild goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña, I.; Ersmark, E.; Samaniego, J. A.; Galindo-Pellicena, M. A.; Crégut-Bonnoure, E.; Bolívar, H.; Gómez-Olivencia, A.; Rios-Garaizar, J.; Garate, D.; Dalén, L.; Arsuaga, J. L.; Valdiosera, C. E.

    2018-04-01

    The population history of the Iberian wild goat and the Alpine ibex has been closely related to that of humans since the Palaeolithic. Current molecular and paleontological studies differ substantially on the phylogenetic origin of the European wild goats, possibly due the loss of genetic variation through time. We investigated the phylogenetic relationship between the Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) and the Iberian wild goat (Capra pyrenaica) including different Iberian wild goat subspecies by applying ancient DNA techniques combined with Next Generation Sequencing technologies. We analysed the cytochrome b gene of the mitochondrial genome in 33 ancient and modern European wild goats from Spain and France together with publicly available genetic information of modern wild goats. This work uncovers for the first time ancient genetic information of the Iberian wild goat and the Alpine ibex, spanning a time range of approximately 40,000 years to the present. Our results suggest genetic continuity between ancient and modern populations and indicate a monophyletic origin of the Alpine ibex and the Iberian wild goat when compared to other Capra species. The monophyly of both species is in agreement with other molecular studies based only on modern populations, therefore supporting one-wave migration of wild goats into Western Europe followed by possible allopatric speciation. We observe three major clades of wild goats in Western Europe: Capra ibex, Capra pyrenaica pyrenaica and the group containing the subspecies Capra pyrenaica hispanica and Capra pyrenaica victoriae. This genetic structure recognizes the distinctiveness of the bucardo (C. p. pyrenaica) from the rest of Iberian wild goats and thus supports the idea that this group is an Evolutionary Significant Unit. The divergence time estimated here indicates an almost contemporaneous split between the three clades around 50,000-90,000 years BP.

  17. Characterization of local goat breeds using RAP-DNA markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Barzinji, Yousif M. S.; Hamad, Aram O.

    2017-09-01

    The present study was conducted on different colors of local goat breeds. A number of 216 does were sampled from the seven groups. Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood samples. From the twenty used RAPD primers 12 of them were amplified, and presence of bands. The total fragment number of 12 primers over all the goat breed samples was 485 fragments. Out of the 485 fragments, 90 of them were Polymorphic fragments numbers (PFN). From all bands obtained, 20 of them possessed unique bands. The highest unique band was found in locus RAP 6 which has 4 unique bands, three of them in the Maraz Brown and one in the local Koor. Nei's gene diversity and Shanon's information index in this study were averaged 0.38 and 0.60, respectively. The genetic distance among several goat breeds ranged from 9.11 to 43.33%. The highest genetic distance 43.33% recorded between Maraz goat and other goat breeds and between local Koor and other goat (except Maraz goats) breeds (37.79%). However, the lowest genetic distance recorded between local white and Pnok. The distance between (local Black and Pnok) and (local Black and local white) was 22.75%. In conclusions, the high distance among these goat breeds, polymorphism and high numbers of unique bands found in present study indicates that these goat breeds have the required amount of genetic variation to made genetic improvement. This study helps us to clarify the image of the genetic diversity of the local goat breeds and the breeders can used it for mating system when need to make the crossing among these goat breeds.

  18. Radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events: telomere shortening and bridge formation coupled with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The bridge breakage fusion cycle is a chromosomal instability mechanism responsible for genomic changes. Radiation bystander effects induce genomic instability; however, the mechanism driving this instability is unknown. We examined if radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events such as telomere shortening and bridge formation using a human colon cancer explant model. We assessed telomere lengths, bridge formations, mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of reactive oxygen species in bystander cells exposed to medium from irradiated and chemotherapy-treated explant tissues. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy, 5Gy, FOLFOX treated tumor and matching normal tissue showed a significant reduction in telomere lengths (all p values <0.018) and an increase in bridge formations (all p values <0.017) compared to bystander cells treated with media from unirradiated tissue (0Gy) at 24h. There was no significant difference between 2Gy and 5Gy treatments, or between effects elicited by tumor versus matched normal tissue. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy irradiated tumor tissue showed significant depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (p=0.012) and an increase in reactive oxygen species levels. We also used bystander cells overexpressing a mitochondrial antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) to examine if this antioxidant could rescue the mitochondrial changes and subsequently influence nuclear instability events. In MnSOD cells, ROS levels were reduced (p=0.02) and mitochondrial membrane potential increased (p=0.04). These events were coupled with a decrease in percentage of cells with anaphase bridges and a decrease in the number of cells undergoing telomere length shortening (p values 0.01 and 0.028 respectively). We demonstrate that radiation and chemotherapy bystander responses induce early genomic instability coupled with defects in mitochondrial function. Restoring mitochondrial

  19. Regions of High Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Incidence and Low Bystander CPR Rates in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straney, Lahn D; Bray, Janet E; Beck, Ben; Finn, Judith; Bernard, Stephen; Dyson, Kylie; Lijovic, Marijana; Smith, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains a major public health issue and research has shown that large regional variation in outcomes exists. Of the interventions associated with survival, the provision of bystander CPR is one of the most important modifiable factors. The aim of this study is to identify census areas with high incidence of OHCA and low rates of bystander CPR in Victoria, Australia. We conducted an observational study using prospectively collected population-based OHCA data from the state of Victoria in Australia. Using ArcGIS (ArcMap 10.0), we linked the location of the arrest using the dispatch coordinates (longitude and latitude) to Victorian Local Government Areas (LGAs). We used Bayesian hierarchical models with random effects on each LGA to provide shrunken estimates of the rates of bystander CPR and the incidence rates. Over the study period there were 31,019 adult OHCA attended, of which 21,436 (69.1%) cases were of presumed cardiac etiology. Significant variation in the incidence of OHCA among LGAs was observed. There was a 3 fold difference in the incidence rate between the lowest and highest LGAs, ranging from 38.5 to 115.1 cases per 100,000 person-years. The overall rate of bystander CPR for bystander witnessed OHCAs was 62.4%, with the rate increasing from 56.4% in 2008-2010 to 68.6% in 2010-2013. There was a 25.1% absolute difference in bystander CPR rates between the highest and lowest LGAs. Significant regional variation in OHCA incidence and bystander CPR rates exists throughout Victoria. Regions with high incidence and low bystander CPR participation can be identified and would make suitable targets for interventions to improve CPR participation rates.

  20. Impact of Bystander Automated External Defibrillator Use on Survival and Functional Outcomes in Shockable Observed Public Cardiac Arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Ross A; Brown, Siobhan P; Rea, Thomas; Aufderheide, Tom; Barbic, David; Buick, Jason E; Christenson, James; Idris, Ahamed H; Jasti, Jamie; Kampp, Michael; Kudenchuk, Peter; May, Susanne; Muhr, Marc; Nichol, Graham; Ornato, Joseph P; Sopko, George; Vaillancourt, Christian; Morrison, Laurie; Weisfeldt, Myron

    2018-02-26

    Background - Survival following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with shockable rhythms can be improved with early defibrillation. Although shockable OHCA accounts for only ≈25% of overall arrests, ≈60% of public OHCAs are shockable, offering the possibility of restoring thousands of individuals to full recovery with early defibrillation by bystanders. We sought to determine the association of bystander automated external defibrillator use with survival and functional outcomes in shockable observed public OHCA. Methods - From 2011 to 2015, the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium prospectively collected detailed information on all cardiac arrests at 9 regional centers. The exposures were shock administration by a bystander-applied automated external defibrillator in comparison with initial defibrillation by emergency medical services. The primary outcome measure was discharge with normal or near-normal (favorable) functional status defined as a modified Rankin Score ≤2. Survival to hospital discharge was the secondary outcome measure. Results -Among 49 555 OHCAs, 4115 (8.3%) observed public OHCAs were analyzed, of which 2500 (60.8%) were shockable. A bystander shock was applied in 18.8% of the shockable arrests. Patients shocked by a bystander were significantly more likely to survive to discharge (66.5% versus 43.0%) and be discharged with favorable functional outcome (57.1% versus 32.7%) than patients initially shocked by emergency medical services. After adjusting for known predictors of outcome, the odds ratio associated with a bystander shock was 2.62 (95% confidence interval, 2.07-3.31) for survival to hospital discharge and 2.73 (95% confidence interval, 2.17-3.44) for discharge with favorable functional outcome. The benefit of bystander shock increased progressively as emergency medical services response time became longer. Conclusions - Bystander automated external defibrillator use before emergency medical services arrival in shockable observed

  1. The involvement of calcium and MAP kinase signaling pathways in the production of radiation-induced bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyng, F M

    2006-04-01

    Much evidence now exists regarding radiation-induced bystander effects, but the mechanisms involved in the transduction of the signal are still unclear. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways have been linked to growth factor-mediated regulation of cellular events such as proliferation, senescence, differentiation and apoptosis. Activation of multiple MAPK pathways such as the ERK, JNK and p38 pathways have been shown to occur after exposure of cells to radiation and a variety of other toxic stresses. Previous studies have shown oxidative stress and calcium signaling to be important in radiation-induced bystander effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate MAPK signaling pathways in bystander cells exposed to irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and the role of oxidative metabolism and calcium signaling in the induction of bystander responses. Human keratinocytes (HPV-G cell line) were irradiated (0.005-5 Gy) using a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. The medium was harvested 1 h postirradiation and transferred to recipient HPV-G cells. Phosphorylated forms of p38, JNK and ERK were studied by immunofluorescence 30 min-24 h after exposure to ICCM. Inhibitors of the ERK pathway (PD98059 and U0126), the JNK pathway (SP600125), and the p38 pathway (SB203580) were used to investigate whether bystander-induced cell death could be blocked. Cells were also incubated with ICCM in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, EGTA, verapamil, nifedipine and thapsigargin to investigate whether bystander effects could be inhibited because of the known effects on calcium homeostasis. Activated forms of JNK and ERK proteins were observed after exposure to ICCM. Inhibition of the ERK pathway appeared to increase bystander-induced apoptosis, while inhibition of the JNK pathway appeared to decrease apoptosis. In addition, reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and calcium signaling were found to be important modulators of

  2. SELECTING ANGORA GOATS TO CONSUME MORE JUNIPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher John Lupton

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This research project was initiated in 2003 to develop a more effective tool for biological management of invading juniper species on rangelands through herbivory by Angora goats.  After we had established that juniper consumption in free-ranging goats has a genetic component (heritability = 13%, male and female goats were bred selectively for above- (high and below-average (low juniper consumption that was estimated by fecal near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Divergent lines are being produced to facilitate the identification of physiological mechanisms that permit some goats to consume considerably more juniper than others as a regular component of their diet.  Because diet is known to affect growth and fiber production, another objective of the project is to establish the effects of the selection protocol on body weights, fleece weights, and fiber characteristics.  Mature females (age > 1.5 yr and kids were maintained on rangeland and shorn twice a year.  Extreme high- and low-consuming yearling males (10 of each per year were evaluated annually in a central performance test.  The selection protocol resulted in average EBV for percentage juniper consumption of 3.9 and -0.4 (P 0.1 in body weight, mohair production and properties between high and low consumers.  However, the adult data for the extreme males indicated that high consuming males have lower body weights than low consumers (53.8 vs. 57.9 kg, P = 0.01. Differences in body weight and several mohair production and quality traits have also been detected in the mature females but at this early stage of the selection program, no substantial differences have been observed and certainly none that would have an economic impact for producers.  Ultimately, we expect to demonstrate that the high-consuming line controls juniper more effectively than either the low-consuming line or unselected Angora goats.  Subsequently, we plan to release high juniper

  3. Short-term effects of regional irradiation on lymphocytes, T lymphocytes and eosinophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chazarin, C.; Roche, H.; Bugat, R.; Pris, F.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-three cancer patients treated only by regional irradiation were studied. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis in 14 patients and to the mediastinum in 9. T lymphocytes were evaluated with the Jondal technique. Before treatment, lymphocyte counts were identical in patients and control. Decreases in total lymphocytes and T lymphocytes became significant in both groups after 40 Gy. Significant rises in eosinophil counts were found only after abdominal irradiation and seemed unrelated to variations in lymphocyte counts [fr

  4. Effect of feeding Acacia nilotica pod meal on hematobiochemical profile and fecal egg count in goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Kumar Paswan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to observe the effect of feeding Acacia nilotica pod meal on hematobiochemical profile and gastrointestinal parasitic load in growing goats. Materials and Methods: To experiment was conducted for a period of 3-month on 24 male goats (3½ month old, average body weight [BW] 6.50±1.50 kg, distributed into four groups of six animals each. The experimental animals were fed graded level of A. nilotica pod meal (0%, 10%, 20% and 30% mixed in concentrate mixture equivalent to tannin concentration of 0%, 1.91%, 3.82% and 5.73% in the total mixed ration I, II, III and IV, respectively, but ad libitum measured quantity of green sorghum fodder (Sorghum bicolor feeding. The blood samples were collected from experimental goats during the feeding experiment for the examination of different hematological indices and serum biochemical profile to know the overall health status of animals and standard method was followed to analyze the samples. Fecal sample was collected directly from the anus of goats by inserting middle finger and kept the samples in labeled polythene bag. Further fresh sample was processed and examined by McMaster Technique for eggs per gram and oocysts per gram. It gives accurate information regarding severity of infection. Results: The feeding of babul pod meal did not address significant changes about the hematological parameters among various treatment groups. The lymphocyte count was significantly higher (p=0.07 in T3 group as compared to control and increase with increase in level of babul pod meal in the diet. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN level was 4.86 and 6.59% lower in T1 and T2 group as compared to control and inversely proportional with level of supplement in ration. The decrease in BUN reflected good dietary protein metabolism happened in animals supplemented with babul pod meal. Serum creatinine level was significantly lower (p<0.01 in T2 group as compared to control. The creatinine level was 20

  5. Bystander Action in Situations of Dating and Sexual Aggression: A Mixed Methodological Study of High School Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Katie M; Rodenhizer-Stämpfli, Kara Anne; Eckstein, Robert P

    2015-12-01

    Bystander action is a critical component of dating and sexual aggression prevention; however, little is known about barriers and facilitators of bystander action among high school youth and in what situations youth are willing to engage in bystander action. The current study examined bystander action in situations of dating and sexual aggression using a mixed methodological design. Participants included primarily Caucasian (83.0%, n = 181) male (54.6%, n = 119) and female (44.5%, n = 97) high school youth (N = 218). Most (93.6%) students had the opportunity to take action during the past year in situations of dating or sexual aggression; being female and histories of dating and sexual aggression related to bystander action. Thematic analysis of the focus group data identified barriers (e.g., the aggression not meeting a certain threshold, anticipated negative consequences) to bystander action, as well as insight on promising forms of action (e.g., verbally telling the perpetrator to stop, getting a teacher); problematic intervention methods (e.g., threatening or using physical violence to stop the perpetrator) were also noted. Implications for programming are discussed.

  6. No significant level of inheritable interchromosomal aberrations in the progeny of bystander primary human fibroblasts after alpha particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Burong; Zhu, Jiayun; Zhou, Hongning; Hei, Tom K.

    2013-02-01

    A major concern for bystander effects is the probability that normal healthy cells adjacent to the irradiated cells become genomically unstable and undergo further carcinogenesis after therapeutic irradiation or space mission where astronauts are exposed to low dose of heavy ions. Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer cells. In the present study, two irradiation protocols were performed in order to ensure pure populations of bystander cells and the genomic instability in their progeny were investigated. After irradiation, chromosomal aberrations of cells were analyzed at designated time points using G2 phase premature chromosome condensation (G2-PCC) coupled with Giemsa staining and with multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization (mFISH). Our Giemsa staining assay demonstrated that elevated yields of chromatid breaks were induced in the progeny of pure bystander primary fibroblasts up to 20 days after irradiation. mFISH assay showed no significant level of inheritable interchromosomal aberrations were induced in the progeny of the bystander cell groups, while the fractions of gross aberrations (chromatid breaks or chromosomal breaks) significantly increased in some bystander cell groups. These results suggest that genomic instability occurred in the progeny of the irradiation associated bystander normal fibroblasts exclude the inheritable interchromosomal aberration.

  7. Capture and treatment of goat manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Elzeário Castelo Branco Iapichini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate management and disposal of feces and urine derived from goat production systems can help minimize the environmental impact of the activity reflecting in animal welfare, good sanitary conditions, viable indexes and increase revenue by aggregating the activity value of the manure generated. Aiming to take advantage of zootechnical installation already used for the manure in rabbits’ husbandry, it was carried out the suitability of a 15.40 m² pen (5.7 x 2.7 meters, filled with dirt in the goat rearing of UPD Itapetininga/APTA-SAA being deployed on slatted floor system for capturing and processing goat manure. It was dug in the floor of the bay rectangular holes with 15 m² of surface and 80 cm of depth for capturing of the excrements, filled with layers of gravel (0.20 m, coal (0.20 m, medium sand (0, 15 m and clay (0.05 m being the surface in direct contact with feces and urine. The gap of 40 cm between the back of the slatted floor and the last layer allowed the accumulation of manure during the occupation of the stall. We used the pens for 10 consecutive months for the management of newly calved Saanen and crossbred Saanen/Boer goats for 10 to 15 days postpartum in controlled feeding and termination of 27 confined kids. The maintenance of the collection system and treatment of manure was done through constant sweeps in the slatted floor and periodical aplication of 30 g of superphosphate per m² directly in feces, in order to acidifying the compound. This measure contributed to the ambience and animal comfort, controlling flies and neutralizing odors and harmful actions of ammonia coming from the urine. To carry out the sanitary break in the stall, needed for new production cycle, the frames of the slatted floor were raised and about 2500 kg of manure was removed, followed by cleaning and disinfection of floors and pillars of support and rest for 45 days unused until the entry of the new batch of goats recently calved. Using

  8. Photon hormesis deactivates alpha-particle induced bystander effects between zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.Y.P.; Cheng, S.H.; Yu, K.N.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the effects of low-dose X-ray photons on the alpha-particle induced bystander effects between embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The effects on the naive whole embryos were studied through quantification of apoptotic signals (amounts of cells undergoing apoptosis) at 24 h post fertilization (hpf) using vital dye acridine orange staining, followed by counting the stained cells under a fluorescent microscope. We report data showing that embryos at 5 hpf subjected to a 4.4 mGy alpha-particle irradiation could release a stress signal into the medium, which could induce bystander effect in partnered naive embryos sharing the same medium. We also report that the bystander effect was deactivated when the irradiated embryos were subjected to a concomitant irradiation of 10 or 14 mGy of X-rays, but no such deactivation was achieved if the concomitant X-ray dose dropped to 2.5 or 5 mGy. In the present study, the significant drop in the amount of apoptotic signals on the embryos having received 4.4 mGy alpha particles together X-rays irradiation from 2.5 or 5 mGy to 10 or 14 mGy, together with the deactivation of RIBE with concomitant irradiation of 10 or 14 mGy of X-rays supported the participation of photon hormesis with an onset dose between 5 and 10 mGy, which might lead to removal of aberrant cells through early apoptosis or induction of high-fidelity DNA repair. As we found that photons and alpha particles could have opposite biological effects when these were simultaneously irradiated onto living organisms, these ionizing radiations could be viewed as two different environmental stressors, and the resultant effects could be regarded as multiple stressor effects. The present work presented the first study on a multiple stressor effect which occurred on bystander organisms. In other words, this was a non-targeted multiple stressor effect. The photon hormesis could also explain some failed attempts to observe neutron-induced bystander

  9. Inhibition of murine splenic B lymphocyte activation following oral exposure to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.P.; Burchiel, S.W.; Montano, R.M.; Seamer, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Previous results from this laboratory have demonstrated that oral exposure of B6C3F1 mice to DMBA inhibited mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte activation in cells recovered from several lymphoid organs. These studies showed that both LPS and PHA-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and PHA-induced Ca +2 mobilization were significantly inhibited by DMBA exposure, supporting the hypothesis that DMBA inhibits early events associated with lymphocyte activation. The purpose of the current studies was to test this hypothesis directly for B cell activation. B6C3F1 mice were treated with 0, 1.0, or 10 mg/kg/day doses of DMBA for 14 days (total cumulative doses of 0, 14, or 140 mg/kg). B lymphocyte populations were then selected on the flow cytometer by direct positive staining of spleen cells with phycoerythrin-labeled anti-Ly5 (B lymphocyte marker) antibodies. Ca +2 mobilization studies were performed using affinity-purified goat anti-mouse IgD antibodies as the stimulant and Indo-1 as the intracellular Ca +2 indicator. Cell proliferation studies were also performed using 3 H-thymidine and insoluble anti-IgD antibodies. Anti-IgD stimulated Ca +2 mobilization was significantly reduced at the 140 mg/kg dose of DMBA. A statistically significant decrease in anti-IgD stimulated B lymphocyte proliferation at the 14 mg/kg and 140 mg/kg doses of DMBA was found. These results suggest that B lymphocytes may be important targets for DMBA-mediated immunosuppression

  10. Nutrient selection by cattle, goats and sheep on natural Karoo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrient selection by cattle, goats and sheep on natural. Karoo pasture. 2. Nitrogen. P.J.L.Zeeman, P.G. Marais and M.J. Coetsee. Research Institute of the Karoo Region, Middelburg, Cape. The nitrogen (N) content of material selected by cattle, Boer goats,. Dorper and Merino sheep on natural Karoo pasture was ...

  11. Prion Protein Gene Polymorphisms in Turkish Native Goat Breeds ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    In these diseases, a neuronal glycoprotein known as prion protein PrPC ... sheep or goats in Turkey, but the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) does not .... Turkish goat breeds was approximately 6.3%, which is a low starting point for ...

  12. Characterization of Smallholder Sheep and Goat Farming in Bauchi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of Smallholder Sheep and Goat Farming in Bauchi, Northeastern Nigeria. ... Farmers kept more sheep (58.75%) than goats (41.25%). ... Disease occurrence showed that enteritis, foot rot, fracture/ dislocation, helmenthosis, mange/scabies, nutritional disorder, PPR, pneumonia and others having incidence ...

  13. Feed resources management of smallholder sheep and goat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted with the aid of questionnaires, farm visits and personal interviews, to determine the feed and feed resources management of smallholder sheep and goat producers in the area. Materials fed to sheep and goats included cut forage such as grasses, weeds, herbs, forbs, trees and shrubs, lianas, crop ...

  14. Goat meat does not cause increased blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Katsunori; Kishi, Tetsuya; Nagai, Ayako; Matsumura, Yuka; Nagamine, Itsuki; Uechi, Shuntoku

    2014-01-01

    While there are persistent rumors that the consumption of goat meat dishes increases blood pressure, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Two experiments were conducted to clarify whether or not blood pressure increases in conjunction with the consumption of goat meat dishes. In experiment 1, 24 Dahl/Iwai rats (15 weeks old, body weight 309.3±11.1 g) were evenly separated into 4 groups. The control group (CP) was fed a diet containing 20% chicken and 0.3% salt on a dry matter basis. The goat meat group (GM) was fed a diet containing 20% goat meat and 0.3% salt. The goat meat/salt group (GS) was fed a diet containing 20% goat meant and 3% to 4% salt. The Okinawan mugwort (Artemisia Princeps Pampan)/salt group (GY) was fed a diet containing 20% goat meat, 3% to 4% salt and 5% of freeze-dried mugwort powder. The experiment 1 ran for a period of 14 weeks during which time the blood pressure of the animals was recorded. The GS, and GY groups consumed significantly more water (pgoat meat does not cause increased blood pressure, rather the large amount of salt used in the preparation of goat meat dishes is responsible for the increase in blood pressure.

  15. The antibody loci of the domestic goat (Capra hircus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The domestic goat (Capra hircus) is an important ruminant species, both as a source of antibody-based reagents for research and biomedical applications, and as an economically important animal for agriculture, particularly for developing nations that maintain most of the global goat population. Char...

  16. Physiological and haematological indices of two Nigerian goat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introducing an indigenous or exotic breed to unfamiliar environment paves way for livestock improvement. This study examined the physiological and haematological indices of 24Red Sokoto (RS) and West African Dwarf (WAD) goats reared under uniform condition in Ilorin, to determine adaptability of RS goats over a ...

  17. Effects of Genotypes on Economic Traits in Chinese Dairy Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. P. Yue

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate allele frequencies at the CSN1S2 locus in two Chinese dairy goat breeds and the effects of its variation on dairy goat economic traits. Seven hundred and eight goats from Xinong Saanen (XS, n = 268 and Guanzhong (GZ, N = 440 breeds were selected. The milk samples of 268 XS goats were collected during the middle of lactation, body size parameters (708 goats and daily milk yield (202 goats were registered. The RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism and SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism were used to detect the polymorphisms in CSN1S2. The Hardy-Weinberg (HW equilibrium and the associations between body size, milk yield and composition and the genotypes were calculated. The results revealed that only A and F CSN1S2 alleles were found in the two Chinese dairy goat breeds. Allelic frequencies of A and F were 0.795, 0.205 and 0.739, 0.261 in Xinong Saanen and Guanzhong population respectively. Xinong Saanen breed was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, while Guanzhong breed deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p<0.05. The association of polymorphism with economic traits indicated that the goats with FF genotype have higher milk fat and total solid concentration than those with AA and AF genotypes (p<0.05.

  18. The responses of three nigerian indigenous goat breeds to primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Responses of three Nigerian breeds of goat; Red Sokoto (RS), West African Dwarf (WAD) and Sahel White (SW) were investigated following primary and secondary experimental infections ... On day 42 post infection, (n=12) goats, (4 per breed) of the infected animals were humanely euthanized and worm count determined.

  19. Anthelmintic resistant nematodes in goats in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, F.H.M.; Pekelder, J.J.; Dercksen, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    A suspected case of anthelmintic resistance on a farm with Angora and Anglo-Nubian goats was confirmed in a controlled test. Twelve lambs of sheep were infected with larvae cultured from faeces of the goats. The lambs were allocated to four groups: untreated controls and lambs treated 21 days after

  20. Coat pigmentation effects in West African Dwarf goats: live weights ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although coat pigmentation had no significant effect on all the body dimensions studied except leg length, it was observed that the white and or tan goats had the largest frame size on the average followed by the brown (Bbl) goats. They however, had shorter legs when compared with either 1he brown or black goals.

  1. Transcervical embryo recovery in Saanen goats | Lima-Verde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to study the embryo recovery rate using the transcervical technique in Saanen goats raised in the tropics, 20 donors were submitted to an oestrus synchronisation treatment using intravaginal progestagen sponges for 11 days. On the ninth day of treatment, goats received intramuscular injections of 50 µg ...

  2. Cryosurvival of goat spermatozoa in tris-egg yolk extender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of vitamin E supplementation in tris-egg yolk extender on sperm parameters of West African Dwarf (WAD) goat bucks was determined. Tris-egg yolk extenders supplemented with different levels of ... of WAD goat bucks during cryopreservation. Keywords: Antioxidants, bucks, freezing, oxidative stress, sperm ...

  3. Primarity and biometric indices of native goats in western Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Goats are well integrally part of communities' livelihoods in both rural and urban regions in Cameroon. Our study intended to contribute to genetic characterization of native goats populations found in one of the highest populated region based on morphometric indices as developed by Lauvergne and COGNOSAG ...

  4. Smallholder goat farmers' market participation in Choma District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With recent increases in demand for animal products smallholder goat producers have an opportunity to improve their livelihoods by increased market access and market participation. Thus this study was carried out to identify the live goat chain actors, their role, linkages, power relations and practices in the supply chain; ...

  5. Performance of West African Dwarf Goats fed maize stover based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to investigate the effect of exogenous fibrolytic enzyme additive (containing cellulase, xylanase and beta glucanase) on the growth performance and nutrient digestibility parameters of West African dwarf (WAD) goats fed total mixed ration in the dry season. A total of sixteen (16) WAD goats were ...

  6. Dairy goat demography and Q fever infection dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerwerf, Lenny; Courcoul, Aurélie; Klinkenberg, Don; Beaudeau, François; Vergu, Elisabeta; Nielen, Mirjam

    2013-04-26

    Between 2007 and 2009, the largest human Q fever epidemic ever described occurred in the Netherlands. The source was traced back to dairy goat farms, where abortion storms had been observed since 2005. Since one putative cause of these abortion storms is the intensive husbandry systems in which the goats are kept, the objective of this study was to assess whether these could be explained by herd size, reproductive pattern and other demographic aspects of Dutch dairy goat herds alone. We adapted an existing, fully parameterized simulation model for Q fever transmission in French dairy cattle herds to represent the demographics typical for Dutch dairy goat herds. The original model represents the infection dynamics in a herd of 50 dairy cows after introduction of a single infected animal; the adapted model has 770 dairy goats. For a full comparison, herds of 770 cows and 50 goats were also modeled. The effects of herd size and goat versus cattle demographics on the probability of and time to extinction of the infection, environmental bacterial load and abortion rate were studied by simulation. The abortion storms could not be fully explained by demographics alone. Adequate data were lacking at the moment to attribute the difference to characteristics of the pathogen, host, within-herd environment, or a combination thereof. The probability of extinction was higher in goat herds than in cattle herds of the same size. The environmental contamination was highest within cattle herds, which may be taken into account when enlarging cattle farming systems.

  7. Relative Occurrence of Fasciola species in cattle, sheep and goats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All liver flukes detected in cattle, sheep and goats were collected and transported to laboratory for analysis to determine the relative occurrence of Fasciola gigantica and Fasciola hepatic in slaughtered cattle, sheep, and goats by observing their size and morphology. The study showed that all the liver flukes collected in ...

  8. A genetic polymorphism and its genetic effects on goat myogenin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... higher than those of BB genotype goats for three growth traits, in the order of AA > AB > BB. These results suggest that the myogenin genotype has some effects on partial growth traits of goat, and selecting the individuals with A allele could be favorable to the birth weight, 1-month body weight and.

  9. Prevalence of tuberculosis-like lesions in goats slaughtered at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2016-02-12

    Feb 12, 2016 ... Tuberculosis in goat and sheep is caused by members of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex predominantly. Mycobacterium bovis and. Mycobacterium caprae (Crawshaw et al., 2008) and in some cases by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. (Cadmus et al., 2009). In goats, the disease normally spread through ...

  10. The GOAT Effect's Impact upon Educational R and D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Michael H.; McNamara, Thomas C.

    1979-01-01

    The "Goodbye To All That" (GOAT) Effect is introduced as a special research and evaluation "outcome" effect characterizing decision making unduly influenced by abandoning "write-off" tendencies. The "gradual refinement" approach offers an antidote to the GOAT Effect because it does not use the systems…

  11. Cardiac fiber orientation in goat measured with Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossevoort, L.; Bovendeerd, P.H.M.; Nicolaij, K.; Arts, M.G.J.

    2000-01-01

    We therefore hypothesize that fiber reorientation could be a local adaptive mechanism by which the strain distribution across the cardiac wall is homogenized. To test this hypothesis we measured fiber orientation in normal goat hearts and in goat hearts in which the mechanical load was locally

  12. Dataset: Multi Sensor-Orientation Movement Data of Goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Jacob Wilhelm

    2018-01-01

    This is a labeled dataset. Motion data were collected from six sensor nodes that were fixed with different orientations to a collar around the neck of goats. These six sensor nodes simultaneously, with different orientations, recorded various activities performed by the goat. We recorded the

  13. Paratuberculose em caprinos e ovinos no Brasil Paratuberculosis in goats and sheep in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M. Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    caprinos e ovinos no Brasil, determinar medidas de controle e avaliar a possibilidade de transmissão para humanos.This paper reports paratuberculosis in sheep and goats for the first time in Brazil. On Farm 1 in a flock of 33 goats and 13 sheep, one adult female goat presented progressive weight loss during about one year, and soft feces during one month before death. All the animals from the flock were submitted to the comparative tuberculin test. One sheep was positive to the avian tuberculin (2.2% and in two the results were inconclusive. On Farm 2, in a flock of 200 sheep and 80 goats, one adult ewe presented progressive weight loss during about one year, and soft feces during 20 days before death. All sheep older than four months of age and 23 goats were submitted to tuberculin test with avian tuberculin; 47 (25.4% sheep were positive, 115 (61.5% had inconclusive results, and 25 (13.4% were negative. No positive tuberculin test were observed in the goats, but in 11 (47.8% the test was inconclusive and in 12 (52.2% was negative. At necropsy both affected animals had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. In the affected sheep, the gut wall was thickened and corrugated, mainly in the ileum and ileocecal valve. Histologically, granulomas with mainly foamy macrophages were observed in the lamina propria and submucosa of the gut, in mesenteric lymph nodes, and in the goat also in the liver. One tuberculin positive sheep and one tuberculin negative goat from Farm 1 were euthanized and necropsied. A mild thickened of the intestinal wall was observed grossly in both animals. Inflammatory infiltrate with mainly lymphocytes was observed on the submucosa and lamina propria of the gut. In the four cases acid-alcohol positive rods, positive for Mycobacterium spp. on immunohistochemical examination were observed in macrophages and lymphocytes. New studies are necessary to know the prevalence and economical impact of paratuberculosis in goats and sheep in Brazil, to determine control

  14. Goats on alpine grazing: study on metabolic and hematologic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gaviraghi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Summering on alpine pastures from June to October has long been the traditional management of goat flocks in the mountain areas of Lombardy. At present most of the 50.000 goats farmed in Lombardy are still summered, even though only a few thousands - belonging to local breed - are regularly milked. For these goats summering appears to be fundamental not only to allow milk production but also to restore body reserves. The increasing interest in commercial goat milk production in Lombardy involves mainly intensive farming with zero or minimum grazing. However, semi-extensive goat milk production, including summering, could respond to social and environmental goals (Citterio et al., 2002 being able to exploit some economic opportunities...

  15. Forage selection by teddy goats versus sheep on thal ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasra, A.W.; Hanjra, S.H.

    2007-01-01

    Grazing behaviours of Teddy goats and Thalli sheep were studied on rangelands of ThaI. Bite count method was used to determine the dietary composition of both animal species. The overall preference of Teddy goats was higher for Khabble grass (Cynodon dactylon), which was 40.57% of the total number of bite made on different plant species during the study period (March-July). Teddy goats utilized a wide range of browsing plant species like Wan (Salvadora oleoides), Phog (Calligonum polygonoides), Babil (Acacia jacquemontii), Jandi (Prosopis spicigera) etc. Browsing species were major component (>50%) of goat diets dur- ing March through June. Whereas Thalli sheep had been consistent in their heavy use of Khabble grass (overall 89.27%). Browsing plant species were not an important component of their diets. Teddy goats and Thalli sheep were competitive for Khabble grass particularly at its vegetative growth stage. (author)

  16. Evaluation of MAP-specific peptides following vaccination of goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybeck, Kari; Sjurseth, Siri K.; Melvang, Heidi Mikkelsen

    species or 2) selected based on “experience”. Peptides predicted to bind bovine MHC II by in silico analysis were included in further studies, resulting in two panels 1) genome-based and 2) selected. Initially, two groups of 15 healthy goats were vaccinated with one of the two panels (50 µg/peptide in CAF......01 adjuvant/CAF04 for boosting). Four MAP-infected goats were also vaccinated. In a second vaccination trail, groups of 8 healthy goat kids were vaccinated with genome-based peptides, selected peptides or selected peptides linked together in a recombinant protein (20 µg/peptide or 50 µg protein...... peptides. IFN-γ responses in healthy goats after the first vaccination were low, but testing of T cell lines from MAP-infected goats identified peptides inducing strong proliferative responses. Peptides for a second vaccination were selected by combining results from this study with a parallel cattle study...

  17. Reasons for U.S. Producer Selection of a Goat Enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Brittany; Nyaupane, Narayan; Gillispie, Jeffrey; McMillan, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses 14 possible reasons why meat goat producers selected to engage in meat goat production, with results having implications for research, extension, and teaching efforts. A survey of meat goat producers was conducted. Reasons for entering meat goat production were assessed and analyzed using ordered probit models.

  18. A report on the metabolism of iron in goats artificially infected with Haemonchus contortus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perpuse, W.G.; Yumul, B.Y.; Anden, A.

    1976-03-01

    The determination of iron metabolism in goats artificially infected with N. contortus using tracer method has been conducted. Radioferric chloride ( 59 Fe) was given orally and intravenously and the distribution and utilization in goats were determined. Results showed that anemic goats have a higher absorption rate compared to non-anemic goats. Of all the organs examined the bone marrow showed the highest activity

  19. Use of goats in poverty alleviation and potential effects on the environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Mette Benedicte Olaf; Henriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    to this paper, financed by DanChurchAid, the solution to the dilemma between the very efficient and useful goats for the poor people and the potential very destructive goats for the environment is found in intelligent management of the goats and not in preventing poor people to keep goats. Education...

  20. 9 CFR 51.27 - Identification of goats, sheep, and horses to be destroyed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of goats, sheep, and... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Sheep, Goats, and Horses § 51.27 Identification of goats, sheep, and horses to be destroyed. The claimant must ensure that any goats, sheep, and...