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Sample records for bystander effects induced

  1. MRC5 and QU-DB bystander cells can produce bystander factors and induce radiation bystander effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni Toossi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation damages initiated by radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE are not limited to the first or immediate neighbors of the irradiated cells, but the effects have been observed in the cells far from the irradiation site. It has been postulated that bystander cells, by producing bystander factors, are actively involved in the propagation of bystander effect in the regions beyond the initial irradiated site. Current study was planned to test the hypothesis. MRC5 and QU-DB cell lines were irradiated, and successive medium transfer technique was performed to induce bystander effects in two bystander cell groups. Conditioned medium extracted from the target cells was transferred to the bystander cells (first bystander cells. After one hour, conditioned medium was substituted by fresh medium. Two hours later, the fresh medium was transferred to a second group of non-irradiated cells (second bystander cells. Micronucleated cells (MC were counted to quantify damages induced in the first and second bystander cell groups. Radiation effect was observed in the second bystander cells as well as in the first ones. Statistical analyses revealed that the number of MC in second bystander subgroups was significantly more than the corresponding value observed in control groups, but in most cases it was equal to the number of MC observed in the first bystander cells. MRC5 and QU-DB bystander cells can produce and release bystander signals in the culture medium and affect non-irradiated cells. Therefore, they may contribute to the RIBE propagation.

  2. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  3. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Erkang; WU Lijun

    2009-01-01

    A bstract In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy a-particle irradiated and non-irradiated by- stander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensi- tive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline- 1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose a-particle radiation-induced damage in ir- radiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  4. Bystander effects and biota: implications of radiation-induced bystander effects for protection of the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystander effects are now known to be induced by both high and low LET in a variety of cells in culture. They have been proven to occur in vivo in mice following 0.5Gy total body irradiation and in blood from humans being treated for cancer by radiotherapy. Effects have also been detected in fish, crustacea and molluscs. The important questions now are not whether bystander effects occur but why and what implications they have, if any, for radiation protection. Different species and different genetic backgrounds within a species produce different types of bystander effect, different organs also produce different effects. This paper will review the data in this field and will discuss likely implications for protection of man and non-human biota. In particular it will look at the potential long-term outcomes for different organisational levels, from cell to ecosystem, of bystander mechanisms. In view of new concerns about the effects of low level radiation on non-human biota, emphasis will be placed on considering how bystander effects might operate at chronic low doses versus acute accidental low doses. Problems of radiation interaction with chemicals, whether chemicals can also induce 'bystander effects' , and how regulators might handle these situations which occur all the time in real environments, will be presented for discussion. Finally the paper will discuss likely implications of these mechanisms for evolutionary biology

  5. Expression of Genes Involved in a Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Furlong, Hayley

    2011-01-01

    The radiation induced bystander effect is relevant to carcinogenesis, it may have significant implications for risk estimation for radiation exposure. Currently the mechanisms and cellular events are the subject of intense investigation, because little is known. It is thought that the radiation induced bystander response is due to a bystander factor secreted in the medium post irradiation. However the biological nature of this factor is currently unknown, but it is thought to be a protein of ...

  6. Vincristine-induced bystander effect in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, Serena; Azzarà, Alessia; Giovannini, Caterina; Lombardi, Sara; Piaggi, Simona; Facioni, Maria Sole; Scarpato, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Bystander effect is a known radiobiological effect, widely described using ionizing radiations and which, more recently, has also been related to chemical mutagens. In this study, we aimed to assess whether or not a bystander response can be induced in cultured human peripheral lymphocytes by vincristine, a chemotherapeutic mutagen acting as spindle poison, and by mitomycin-C, an alkylating agent already known to induce this response in human lymphoblastoid cells. Designing a modified ad hoc protocol for the cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) assay, we detected the presence of a dose-dependent bystander response in untreated cultures receiving the conditioned medium (CM) from mitomycin-C (MMC) or vincristine (VCR) treated cultures. In the case of MMC, MN frequencies, expressed as micronucleated binucleates, were: 13.5±1.41 at 6μM, 22±2.12 at 12μM or 28.25±5.13 at 15μM vs. a control value of 4.75±1.59. MN levels for VCR, expressed as micronucleated mononucleates were: 2.75±0.88 at 0.0μM, 27.25±2.30 at 0.4μM, 46.25±1.94 at 0.8μM, 98.25±7.25 at 1.6μM. To verify that no mutagen residual was transferred to recipient cultures together with the CM, we evaluated MN levels in cultures receiving the medium immediately after three washings following the chemical treatment (unconditioned medium). We further confirmed these results using a cell-mixing approach where untreated lymphocytes were co-cultured with donor cells treated with an effect-inducing dose of MMC or VCR. A distinct production pattern of both reactive oxygen species and soluble mediator proteins by treated cells may account for the differences observed in the manifestation of the bystander effect induced by VCR. In fact, we observed an increased level of ROS, IL-32 and TGF-β in the CM from VCR treated cultures, not present in MMC treated cultures. PMID:27050754

  7. Radiation-induced bystander effect in non-irradiated glioblastoma spheroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs) are detected in cells that are not irradiated but receive signals from treated cells. The present study explored these bystander effects in a U87MG multicellular tumour spheroid model. A medium transfer technique was employed to induce the bystander effect, and colony formation assay was used to evaluate the effect. Relative changes in expression of BAX, BCL2, JNK and ERK genes were analysed using RT-PCR to investigate the RIBE mechanism. A significant decrease in plating efficiency was observed for both bystander and irradiated cells. The survival fraction was calculated for bystander cells to be 69.48% and for irradiated cells to be 34.68%. There was no change in pro-apoptotic BAX relative expression, but anti-apoptotic BCL2 showed downregulation in both irradiated and bystander cells. Pro-apoptotic JNK in bystander samples and ERK in irradiated samples were upregulated. The clonogenic survival data suggests that there was a classic RIBE in U87MG spheroids exposed to 4 Gy of X-rays, using a medium transfer technique. Changes in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes indicate involvement of both intrinsic apoptotic and MAPK pathways in inducing these effects. (author)

  8. Influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect induced by alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W.; Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, the influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect in alpha-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined. The bystander effect was studied through medium transfer experiments. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was performed to quantify the chromosome damage induced by alpha-particle irradiation. Our results showed that the alpha-particle induced micronuclei (MN) frequencies were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol.

  9. Investigation of the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-induced Bystander Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Furlong, Hayley

    2014-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in radiation-induced bystander effects in HaCaT cells, predominantly at low-doses of irradiation. They do not follow the original dose-response theory and exhibit a unique cascade of signalling events, which are under intense investigation for radiation risk purposes. An in vitro system was first used to observe the bystander effect, comparing two cell viability assays while measuring apoptotic cel...

  10. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kobayashi, Alisa [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Maeda, Takeshi [Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Fu, Qibin [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Oikawa, Masakazu [Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yang, Gen, E-mail: gen.yang@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Konishi, Teruaki, E-mail: tkonishi@nirs.go.jp [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Uchihori, Yukio [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); and others

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Existence of radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) between cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. • Existence of significant difference in generation and response of bystander signals between CSCs and NSCCs. • CSCs are significantly less sensitive to NO scavenger than that of NSCCs in terms of DNA double strand breaks induced by RIBE. - Abstract: Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy.

  11. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Existence of radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) between cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. • Existence of significant difference in generation and response of bystander signals between CSCs and NSCCs. • CSCs are significantly less sensitive to NO scavenger than that of NSCCs in terms of DNA double strand breaks induced by RIBE. - Abstract: Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy

  12. Mechanism of protection of bystander cells by exogenous carbon monoxide: Impaired response to damage signal of radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wu, L.J. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Y.C. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Wang, H.Z. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2011-05-10

    A protective effect of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO), generated by CO releasing molecule ticarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2), on the bystander cells from the toxicity of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was revealed in our previous study. In the present work, a possible mechanism of this CO effect was investigated. The results from medium transfer experiments showed that {alpha}-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells would release nitric oxide (NO), which was detected with specific NO fluorescence probe, to induce p53 binding protein 1 (BP1) formation in the cell population receiving the medium, and the release peak was found to be at 1 h post irradiation. Treating the irradiated or bystander cells separately with CO (CORM-2) demonstrated that CO was effective in the bystander cells but not the irradiated cells. Measurements of NO production and release with a specific NO fluorescence probe also showed that CO treatment did not affect the production and release of NO by irradiated cells. Protection of CO on cells to peroxynitrite, an oxidizing free radical from NO, suggested that CO might protect bystander cells via impaired response of bystander cells to NO, a RIBE signal in our research system.

  13. Mechanism of protection of bystander cells by exogenous carbon monoxide: Impaired response to damage signal of radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A protective effect of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO), generated by CO releasing molecule ticarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2), on the bystander cells from the toxicity of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was revealed in our previous study. In the present work, a possible mechanism of this CO effect was investigated. The results from medium transfer experiments showed that α-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells would release nitric oxide (NO), which was detected with specific NO fluorescence probe, to induce p53 binding protein 1 (BP1) formation in the cell population receiving the medium, and the release peak was found to be at 1 h post irradiation. Treating the irradiated or bystander cells separately with CO (CORM-2) demonstrated that CO was effective in the bystander cells but not the irradiated cells. Measurements of NO production and release with a specific NO fluorescence probe also showed that CO treatment did not affect the production and release of NO by irradiated cells. Protection of CO on cells to peroxynitrite, an oxidizing free radical from NO, suggested that CO might protect bystander cells via impaired response of bystander cells to NO, a RIBE signal in our research system.

  14. The bystander effect in experimental systems and compatibility with radon-induced lung cancer in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystander effects following exposure to α-particles have been observed in C3H 10T 1/2 cells and in other experimental systems, and imply that linearly extrapolating low-dose risks from high-dose data might materially underestimate risk. The ratio of lung cancer risk among persons exposed to low and high doses of radon daughters is 2.4-4.0, with an upper 95% confidence limit (CL) of about 14. Assuming that the bystander effect observed in the C3H 10T 1/2 data applies to human lung cells in vivo, the epidemiological data imply that the number of neighbouring cells that can contribute to the bystander effect is between 0 and 1, with an upper 95% CL of about 7. As a consequence, the bystander effect observed in the C3H 10T 1/2 system probably does not play a large part in the process of radon-induced lung carcinogenesis in humans. Other experimental data relating to the bystander effect after α-particle exposure are surveyed; some of these data are more compatible with the epidemiological data. (author)

  15. Bystander effects induced by the low-fluence irradiation of carbon and iron ions (6 MeV/n)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many reports are available regarding bystander effects after exposure to low fluences of alpha particles and helium ions. However, few studies have examined bystander cellular effects after exposure to low fluences of ion species heavier than helium. We has been investigating bystander effects using both human normal fibroblasts and tumor cell lines irradiated with low energy (6 MeV/n) carbon or iron ions generated with the Medium Energy Beam Course. This year we focused on the bystander cellular effects as follows; Bystander cell-killing effect in human tumor cell lines irradiated with carbon ions. Relationship of bystander lethal effect between p53-wild and p53-mutated cells. Bystander cell-killing effect was observed in human normal and tumor cells harboring wild-type p53, but not in p53-mutated tumor cells. Moreover, observed bystander effect was suppressed by treating with a specific inhibitor of gap-junction mediated cell-cell communication. There is evidence that p53- and gap-junction-related bystander effect is an important role of carbon-ion induced lethal effect. (author)

  16. Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.h [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to the biological response found in cells (called bystander cells) which are not irradiated directly by ionizing radiation but are next to cells irradiated directly by ionizing radiation. In the present paper, the effects of Magnolol, an extract from the bark of Magnolia officinalis which is used as a traditional Chinese medicine, were studied on alpha-particle induced bystander effects. In our experiments, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in PADC-film based dishes and were irradiated with low fluences of alpha particles passing through the PADC films. The precise number of cells traversed or missed by alpha particles could be determined by studying the alpha-particle tracks developed on the PADC films upon subsequent chemical etching. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was employed to analyze the biological response of bystander cells in terms of DNA strand breaks. With the pretreatment of Magnolol, the DNA strand breaks in bystander cells were reduced, which showed that the alpha-particle induced bystander effects were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol. Since Magnolol is an antioxidant which can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), our results give support to that ROS play a role in the bystander signal transmission in our experiments.

  17. Effects of exogenous carbon monoxide on radiation-induced bystander effect in zebrafish embryos in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, the influence of a low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) liberated from tricarbonylchloro(glycinato)ruthenium (II) (CORM-3) on the radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in vivo between embryos of the zebrafish was studied. RIBE was assessed through the number of apoptotic signals revealed on embryos at 25 h post fertilization (hpf). A significant attenuation of apoptosis on the bystander embryos induced by RIBE in a CO concentration dependent manner was observed. - Highlights: ► RIBE between zebrafish embryos in vivo was assessed by the level of apoptosis. ► CO from 10 and 20 μM CORM-3 entirely suppressed the RIBE. ► CO from 5 μM CORM-3 significantly attenuated the level of apoptosis. ► Inactive CORM-3 did not lead to suppression of RIBE. ► Suppression of RIBE by CO depended on the concentration of CORM-3.

  18. The relevance of radiation induced bystander effects for low dose radiation carcinogenic risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Where epidemiology studies lack the ability to prescribe radiation doses, customise sample sizes and replicate findings, radiobiology experiments provide greater flexibility to control experimental conditions. This control simplifies the process of answering questions concerning carcinogenic risk after low dose radiation exposures. However, the flexibility requires critical evaluation of radiobiology findings to ensure that the right questions are being asked, the experimental conditions are relevant to human exposure scenarios and that the data are cautiously interpreted in the context of the experimental model. In particular, low dose radiobiology phenomena such as adaptive responses, genomic instability and bystander effects need to be investigated thoroughly, with continual reference to the way these phenomena might occur in the real world. Low dose radiation induced bystander effects are of interest since their occurrence in vivo could complicate the shape of the radiation dose-response curve in the low dose range for a number of biological endpoints with subsequent effects on radiation-induced cancer risk. Conversely, radiation-induced abscopal effects implicate biological consequences of radiation exposure outside irradiated volumes, and complicate the notion of effective dose calculations. Achieving a consensus on the boundaries that distinguish the radiobiology phenomena of bystander and abscopal effects will aid progress towards understanding their relevance to in vivo radiation exposures. A proposed framework for discussing bystander effects and abscopal effects in their appropriate context will be outlined, with a discussion on the future investigation of radiation-induced bystander effects. Such frameworks can assist the integration of results from experimental radiobiology to risk evaluation and management practice. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, BioI. and Environ. Research, US Dept. of Energy, Grant DE

  19. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Xue, Bei; Wang, Xinwen; Wang, Jiawen

    2016-07-01

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to bystander effect in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced bystander effect in distant organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in bystander effect. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were cranial exposed to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of carbon heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. The γH2AX foci as the DNA damage biomarker in directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 0, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplifcation polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that cranial irradiated mice could induce the γH2AX foci and genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate were highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation in ear. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. We also found that the numbers of γH2AX foci and the genomic methylation changes of heavy-ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Bystander effect; DNA methylation; γH2

  20. Antitumor bystander effect induced by radiation-inducible target gene therapy combined with α particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we investigated the bystander effect of the tumor and normal cells surrounding the target region caused by radiation-inducible target gene therapy combined with α-particle irradiation. The receptor tumor cell A549 and normal cell MRC-5 were co-cultured with the donor cells irradiated to 0.5 Gy or the non-irradiated donor cells, and their survival and apoptosis fractions were evaluated. The results showed that the combined treatment of Ad-ET and particle irradiation could induce synergistic antitumor effect on A549 tumor cell, and the survival fraction of receptor cells co-cultured with the irradiated cells decreased by 6%, compared with receptor cells co-cultured with non-irradiated cells, and the apoptosis fraction increased in the same circumstance, but no difference was observed with the normal cells. This study demonstrates that Ad-ET combined with α-particle irradiation can significantly cause the bystander effect on neighboring tumor cells by inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis, without obvious toxicity to normal cells. This suggests that combining radiation-inducible TRAIL gene therapy and irradiation may improve tumor treatment efficacy by specifically targeting tumor cells and even involving the neighboring tumor cells. (authors)

  1. Radiation-induced bystander effect: The important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wideł

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available It has long been a central radiobiological dogma that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, such as cell death, cytogenetic changes, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, are the results of the direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or indirect damage via water radiolysis products. However, several years ago attention turned to a third mechanism of radiation, termed the “bystander effect” or “radiation-induced bystander effect” (RIBE. This is induced by agents and signals emitted by directly irradiated cells and manifests as a lowering of survival, cytogenetic damage, apoptosis enhancement, and biochemical changes in neighboring non-irradiated cells. The bystander effect is mainly observed in in vitro experiments using very low doses of alpha particles (range; mGy, cGy, but also after conventional irradiation (X-rays, gamma rays at low as well as conventional doses. The mechanisms responsible for the bystander effect are complex and still poorly understood. It is believed that molecular signals released from irradiated cells induce different signaling ways in non-irradiated neighboring cells, leading to the observed events. The molecular signals may be transmitted through gap junction intercellular communication and through a medium transfer mechanism. The nature of these transmitted factors are diverse, and still not defi nitely established. It seems that RIBE may have important clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure. Potentially, this effectmay have important implications in the creation of whole-body or localized side effects in tissues beyond the irradiation fi eld and also in low-dose radiological and radioisotope diagnostics. Factors emitted by irradiated cells may result in the risk of genetic instability, mutations, and second primary cancer induction. They might also have their own part in inducing and extending post-radiation side effects in normal tissue. The

  2. Radiation-induced bystander effects: Are they good bad or both?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different contributions are as follow: the current events on the cellular responses to irradiation ( part one and two); From physico-chemistry to radiobiology: new knowledge (part one and two); Radiation-induced bystander effects: are they good bad or both; recognition of the multi visceral failure in the acute irradiation syndrome; integrated approach of the tissue carcinogenesis: differential effect sane tissue-tumoral tissue; differential diagnosis of thyroid cancers by the transcriptoma analysis. (N.C.)

  3. The different radiation response and radiation-induced bystander effects in colorectal carcinoma cells differing in p53 status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widel, Maria, E-mail: maria.widel@polsl.pl [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Lalik, Anna; Krzywon, Aleksandra [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Poleszczuk, Jan [College of Inter-faculty Individual Studies in Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Warsaw, 93 Zwirki i Wigury Street, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Integrated Mathematical Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We tested radiation response and bystander effect on HCT116p53+/+ and p53−/− cells. • The p53+/+ cells developed premature senescence in exposed and bystander neighbors. • Directly exposed and bystander p53−/− cells died profoundly through apoptosis. • Interleukins 6 and 8 were differently generated by both cell lines. • NFκB path was activated mainly in p53+/+ hit cells, in p53 −/− in bystanders only. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect, appearing as different biological changes in cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation but are under the influence of molecular signals secreted by irradiated neighbors, have recently attracted considerable interest due to their possible implication for radiotherapy. However, various cells present diverse radiosensitivity and bystander responses that depend, inter alia, on genetic status including TP53, the gene controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. Here we compared the ionizing radiation and bystander responses of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with wild type or knockout TP53 using a transwell co-culture system. The viability of exposed to X-rays (0–8 Gy) and bystander cells of both lines showed a roughly comparable decline with increasing dose. The frequency of micronuclei was also comparable at lower doses but at higher increased considerably, especially in bystander TP53-/- cells. Moreover, the TP53-/- cells showed a significantly elevated frequency of apoptosis, while TP53+/+ counterparts expressed high level of senescence. The cross-matched experiments where irradiated cells of one line were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of opposite line show that both cell lines were also able to induce bystander effects in their counterparts, however different endpoints revealed with different strength. Potential mediators of bystander effects, IL-6 and IL-8, were also generated differently in both lines. The knockout cells secreted IL-6 at

  4. The different radiation response and radiation-induced bystander effects in colorectal carcinoma cells differing in p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We tested radiation response and bystander effect on HCT116p53+/+ and p53−/− cells. • The p53+/+ cells developed premature senescence in exposed and bystander neighbors. • Directly exposed and bystander p53−/− cells died profoundly through apoptosis. • Interleukins 6 and 8 were differently generated by both cell lines. • NFκB path was activated mainly in p53+/+ hit cells, in p53 −/− in bystanders only. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect, appearing as different biological changes in cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation but are under the influence of molecular signals secreted by irradiated neighbors, have recently attracted considerable interest due to their possible implication for radiotherapy. However, various cells present diverse radiosensitivity and bystander responses that depend, inter alia, on genetic status including TP53, the gene controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. Here we compared the ionizing radiation and bystander responses of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with wild type or knockout TP53 using a transwell co-culture system. The viability of exposed to X-rays (0–8 Gy) and bystander cells of both lines showed a roughly comparable decline with increasing dose. The frequency of micronuclei was also comparable at lower doses but at higher increased considerably, especially in bystander TP53-/- cells. Moreover, the TP53-/- cells showed a significantly elevated frequency of apoptosis, while TP53+/+ counterparts expressed high level of senescence. The cross-matched experiments where irradiated cells of one line were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of opposite line show that both cell lines were also able to induce bystander effects in their counterparts, however different endpoints revealed with different strength. Potential mediators of bystander effects, IL-6 and IL-8, were also generated differently in both lines. The knockout cells secreted IL-6 at

  5. Probability of bystander effect per mSv induced by α-particle radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced bystander effect represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation in sense that they may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. There exist the need to include the influence of the bystander effect in dosimetry of the human lung. The purpose of this work is to calculate the probability of bystander effect per one mSv, induced by α-particle radiation on sensitive cells of human lung. In this aim, a analytical model of cylinder bifurcation was created to simulate the geometry of human lung, with the distribution of cell in the airway wall of the tracheobronchial tree. This analytical model of the human tracheobronchial tree represents the extension of the ICRP66 model. Propagation of α-particle in human lung and airway tubes was simulated by Monte Carlo method. Calculations have been performed for the various source-target combinations. The results are given for two initial alpha particle energies (6 and 7.69 MeV) and two existing sources (fast and slow clearing mucus). (author)

  6. Modulation of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sun, Qiao [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Xu, Wei; Li, Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Huasheng; Lu, Jinying [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Min [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Bian, Po [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of microgravity on the radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) were definitely demonstrated. • The effects of microgravity on RIBE might be divergent for different biological events. • The microgravity mainly modified the generation or transport of bystander signals at early stage. - Abstract: Both space radiation and microgravity have been demonstrated to have inevitable impact on living organisms during space flights and should be considered as important factors for estimating the potential health risk for astronauts. Therefore, the question whether radiation effects could be modulated by microgravity is an important aspect in such risk evaluation. Space particles at low dose and fluence rate, directly affect only a fraction of cells in the whole organism, which implement radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in cellular response to space radiation exposure. The fact that all of the RIBE experiments are carried out in a normal gravity condition bring forward the need for evidence regarding the effect of microgravity on RIBE. In the present study, a two-dimensional rotation clinostat was adopted to demonstrate RIBE in microgravity conditions, in which the RIBE was assayed using an experimental system of root-localized irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants. The results showed that the modeled microgravity inhibited significantly the RIBE-mediated up-regulation of expression of the AtRAD54 and AtRAD51 genes, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of multicopy P35S:GUS, but made no difference to the induction of homologous recombination by RIBE, showing divergent responses of RIBE to the microgravity conditions. The time course of interaction between the modeled microgravity and RIBE was further investigated, and the results showed that the microgravity mainly modulated the processes of the generation or translocation of the bystander signal(s) in roots.

  7. Emerging role of radiation induced bystander effects: Cell communications and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskar Rajamanickam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ionizing radiation is an invaluable diagnostic and treatment tool used in various clinical applications. On the other hand, radiation is a known cytotoxic with a potential DNA damaging and carcinogenic effects. However, the biological effects of low and high linear energy transfer (LET radiations are considerably more complex than previously thought. In the past decade, evidence has mounted for a novel biological phenomenon termed as "bystander effect" (BE, wherein directly irradiated cells transmit damaging signals to non-irradiated cells thereby inducing a response similar to that of irradiated cells. BE can also be induced in various cells irrespective of the type of radiation, and the BE may be more damaging in the longer term than direct radiation exposure. BE is mediated either through gap-junctions or via soluble factors released by irradiated cells. DNA damage response mechanisms represent a vital line of defense against exogenous and endogenous damage caused by radiation and promote two distinct outcomes: survival and the maintenance of genomic stability. The latter is critical for cancer avoidance. Therefore, efforts to understand and modulate the bystander responses will provide new approaches to cancer therapy and prevention. This review overviews the emerging role of BE of low and high LET radiations on the genomic instability of bystander cells and its possible implications for carcinogenesis.

  8. Radiation induced bystander effects in modification of cellular radio-sensitivity in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced Bystander Effect is manifestation of radiation effects in non-irradiated cells in the population. The phenomenon may have significant implication in risk of radiation induced cancer incidence and outcome of cancer radiotherapy. To understand the bystander interaction in tumor cells, we have studied secretion of diffusible factors from control and irradiated tumor cells of different origin. Our results showed a good correlation between magnitude of secretion of diffusible factors and survival of tumor cells. These diffusible factors are shown to affect proliferation and survival of tumor cells involving regulation of kinases and genes/proteins involved in apoptotic machinery. Our experiments using pharmacological inhibitors showed involvement of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) signaling in survival of tumor cells after treatment with diffusible factors. These factors seem to be involved in exerting radio-resistance in tumor cells. Furthermore, in proton microbeam irradiation studies showed induction of double strand break measured as gH2AX foci in human lung carcinoma cells, which was found to propagate to bystander tumor cells during post-irradiation incubation. Implication of these observations in outcome of cancer radiotherapy scenario would be discussed. (author)

  9. Radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events: telomere shortening and bridge formation coupled with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The bridge breakage fusion cycle is a chromosomal instability mechanism responsible for genomic changes. Radiation bystander effects induce genomic instability; however, the mechanism driving this instability is unknown. We examined if radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events such as telomere shortening and bridge formation using a human colon cancer explant model. We assessed telomere lengths, bridge formations, mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of reactive oxygen species in bystander cells exposed to medium from irradiated and chemotherapy-treated explant tissues. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy, 5Gy, FOLFOX treated tumor and matching normal tissue showed a significant reduction in telomere lengths (all p values <0.018) and an increase in bridge formations (all p values <0.017) compared to bystander cells treated with media from unirradiated tissue (0Gy) at 24h. There was no significant difference between 2Gy and 5Gy treatments, or between effects elicited by tumor versus matched normal tissue. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy irradiated tumor tissue showed significant depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (p=0.012) and an increase in reactive oxygen species levels. We also used bystander cells overexpressing a mitochondrial antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) to examine if this antioxidant could rescue the mitochondrial changes and subsequently influence nuclear instability events. In MnSOD cells, ROS levels were reduced (p=0.02) and mitochondrial membrane potential increased (p=0.04). These events were coupled with a decrease in percentage of cells with anaphase bridges and a decrease in the number of cells undergoing telomere length shortening (p values 0.01 and 0.028 respectively). We demonstrate that radiation and chemotherapy bystander responses induce early genomic instability coupled with defects in mitochondrial function. Restoring mitochondrial

  10. Differential effects of p53 on bystander phenotypes induced by gamma ray and high LET heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Konishi, Teruaki; Tu, Wenzhi; Liu, Weili; Shiomi, Naoko; Kobayashi, Alisa; Uchihori, Yukio; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Hei, Tom K.; Dang, Bingrong; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-04-01

    High LET particle irradiation has several potential advantages over γ-rays such as p53-independent response. The purpose of this work is to disclose the effect of p53 on the bystander effect induced by different LET irradiations and underlying mechanism. Lymphocyte cells of TK6 (wild type p53) and HMy2.CIR (mutated p53) were exposed to either low or high LET irradiation, then their mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS generation were detected. The micronuclei (MN) induction in HL-7702 hepatocytes co-cultured with irradiated lymphocytes was also measured. It was found that the mitochondrial dysfunction, p66Shc activation, and intracellular ROS were enhanced in TK6 but not in HMy2.CIR cells after γ-ray irradiation, but all of them were increased in both cell lines after carbon and iron irradiation. Consistently, the bystander effect of MN formation in HL-7702 cells was only triggered by γ-irradiated TK6 cells but not by γ-irradiated HMy2.CIR cells. But this bystander effect was induced by both lymphocyte cell lines after heavy ion irradiation. PFT-μ, an inhibitor of p53, only partly inhibited ROS generation and bystander effect induced by 30 keV/μm carbon-irradiated TK6 cells but failed to suppress the bystander effect induced by the TK6 cells irradiated with either 70 keV/μm carbon or 180 keV/μm iron. The mitochondrial inhibitors of rotenone and oligomycin eliminated heavy ion induced ROS generation in TK6 and HMy2.CIR cells and hence diminished the bystander effect on HL-7702 cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the bystander effect is p53-dependent for low LET irradiation, but it is p53-independent for high LET irradiation which may be because of p53-independent ROS generation due to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  11. Spatio-temporal analysis of tamoxifen-induced bystander effects in breast cancer cells using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Mondragon, Ivan; Wang, Xiang; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann

    2012-06-01

    The bystander effect in cancer therapy is the inhibition or killing of tumor cells that are adjacent to those directly affected by the agent used for treatment. In the case of chemotherapy, little is known as to how much and by which mechanisms bystander effects contribute to the elimination of tumor cells. This is mainly due to the difficulty to distinguish between targeted and bystander cells since both are exposed to the pharmaceutical compound. We here studied the interaction of tamoxifen-treated human breast cancer MCF-7 cells with their neighboring counterparts by exploiting laminar flow patterning in a microfluidic chip to ensure selective drug delivery. The spatio-temporal evolution of the bystander response in non-targeted cells was analyzed by measuring the mitochondrial membrane potential under conditions of free diffusion. Our data show that the bystander response is detectable as early as 1 hour after drug treatment and reached effective distances of at least 2.8 mm. Furthermore, the bystander effect was merely dependent on diffusible factors rather than cell contact-dependent signaling. Taken together, our study illustrates that this microfluidic approach is a promising tool for screening and optimization of putative chemotherapeutic drugs to maximize the bystander response in cancer therapy. PMID:23750189

  12. Mathematical modelling of the radiation-induced bystander effect and transmissible genomic instability applied to cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, M.P. (Dept. of Epidemiology and Public Health, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)); Prise, K.; Folkard, M. (Gray Cancer Institute, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom)); Belyakov, O. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Research and Environmental Surveillance, Radiation Biology Laboratory, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-12-15

    A variety of quasi-mechanistic models of carcinogenesis are reviewed, and in particular, the multi-stage model of Armitage and Doll and the two-mutation model of Moolgavkar, Venzon, and Knudson. Both the latter models, and various generalizations of them also, are capable of describing at least qualitatively many of the observed patterns of excess cancer risk following ionizing radiation exposure. However, there are certain inconsistencies with the biological and epidemiological data both for the multi-stage model and the two-mutation model. In particular, there are indications that the two-mutation model is not totally suitable for describing the pattern of excess risk for solid cancers that is often seen after exposure to radiation, although leukaemia may be better fitted by this type of model. Generalizations of the model of Moolgavkar, Venzon, and Knudson which require three or more mutations, and models allowing for genomic instability, are easier to reconcile with the epidemiological and biological data relating to solid cancers. Bystander effects, whereby cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation exhibit adverse biological effects, have been observed in a number of experimental systems. In contrast to the large amount of work on developing carcinogenesis models over the last 50 years, there has been comparatively little work on developing quasi-mechanistic models of the bystander effect, reflecting the comparatively recently available experimental data elucidating this phenomenon. The few quasi-mechanistic models of the bystander effect that have been developed are surveyed. In particular, a novel stochastic model of the radiation-induced bystander effect is considered that takes account of spatial location, cell killing and repopulation, features not explicitly taken into account in many previous models. The ionizing radiation dose- and time-responses of this model are explored, and it is shown to exhibit pronounced downward curvature in the

  13. Protective and detrimental bystander effects induced by x-irradiation in the limb bud cell cultures of fetal mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radioadaptive response and bystander effect represent important phenomena in radiobiology with an impact on the novel bioresponse mechanisms and risk estimates. The micromass cultures of limb bud cells (LBCs) provide an in vitro cellular maturation system, in which progress of cellular proliferation and differentiation is comparably paralleled to that of in vivo. This paper reports for the first time the evidential correlation and interaction, which simultaneously exist in the micromass culture system, between radioadaptive response and bystander effect. A radioadaptive response was induced in LBCs of embryonic day 11 (E11) ICR mice. Conditioning irradiation of the E11 cells with 30 cGy resulted in a significant protective effect against the occurrence of apoptosis, inhibition of cellular proliferation and differentiation induced by a challenging dose of 5 Gy given next day. Both protective and detrimental bystander effects were observed, namely, irradiating 50% of the E11 cells with 30 cGy led to a successful induction of radioadaptive response, and irradiating 70% of the E12 cells with 5 Gy produced comparably the detrimental effect to that of when all the cells were irradiated. Further, the bystander effects were markedly vanished by pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors to block the gap junction-mediated intracellular communication. These results indicated that the bystander effect played an important role in both the induction of a protective effect by the conditioning dose and the detrimental effect by the challenging irradiation. Concerning the underlying mechanism, the gap junction-mediated intracellular communication was suggested being involved in the induction of the bystander effects

  14. Radiation-induced bystander effects and the DNA paradigm: An 'out of field' perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 20 years there has been increasing evidence that cells and the progeny of cells surviving a very low dose of ionizing radiation [μ-mGy] can exhibit a wide range of non-monotonic effects such as adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity and other delayed effects. These effects are inconsistent with the expected dose-response, when based on extrapolation of high dose data and cast doubt on the reliability of extrapolating from high dose data to predict low dose effects. Recently the cause of many of these effects has been tentatively ascribed to so-called 'bystander effects'. These are effects that occur in cells not directly hit by an ionizing track but which are influenced by signals from irradiated cells and are thus highly relevant in situations where the dose is very low. Not all bystander effects may be deleterious although most endpoints measured involve cell damage or death. In this commentary, we consider how these effects impact the historical central dogma of radiobiology and radiation protection, which is that DNA double strand breaks are the primary radiation-induced lesion which can be quantifiably related to received dose and which determine the probability that a cancer will result from a radiation exposure. We explore the low dose issues and the evidence and conclude that in the very low dose region, the primary determinant of radiation exposure outcome is the genetic and epigenetic background of the individual and not solely the dose. What this does is to dissociate dose from effect as a quantitative relationship, but it does not necessarily mean that the effect is ultimately unrelated to DNA damage. The fundamental thesis we present is that at low doses fundamentally different mechanisms underlie radiation action and that at these doses, effect is not quantitatively related to dose

  15. Bystander effects induced by the low-fluence irradiation of carbon and iron ions (6 MeV/n)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reported here until now that bystander cellular effects, such as cell death and gene mutation induction, were strictly dependent on radiation quality. Bystander cellular effects were observed in carbon-ion irradiations, not iron-ion irradiations using low energy (6 MeV/n) carbon or iron ions generated with the Medium Energy Beam Course. Also, we reported in the last year that the bystander cell-killing effect was observed in human normal and tumor cells harboring wild-type p53-, but not in p53-mutated tumor cells. This year, we examine the bystander cell-killing effect using a human lung cancer cell line with same origin but different p53 status irradiated with carbon ions. The human lung cancer cell line (H1299) harboring either wild-type (H1299/wtp53) or mutated-type p53 (H1299/mp53), which cells were distributed by Dr. Takeo Ohnishi and Dr. Hediki Matsumoto, were used. The cell survivals between ''all cell irradiation group'' and ''half-cell irradiation group'' were almost the same level (55-60%) for H1299/wtp53 cells, but the cell survival of ''half cell irradiation group'' (around 55%) was higher than ''all cell irradiation group'' (around 80%) for H1299/mp53 cells. The results clearly showed that the bystander cell-killing effect occurred in H1299/wtp53 cells, not in H1299/mp53 cells. Together with the last year's report, there is evidence that p53 gene is an important role of carbon-ion induced bystander cell-killing effect. (author)

  16. Low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide protects mammalian cells against proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Liping [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Bao, Lingzhi; Wu, Wenqing; Wang, Hongzhi [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han, Wei, E-mail: hanw@hfcas.cn [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • We show the possibility of modulate proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect with low concentration carbon monoxide. • Carbon monoxide inhibited proliferation via modulating the transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway. • Exogenous carbon monoxide has potential application in clinical radiotherapy. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been proposed to have tight relationship with the irradiation-caused secondary cancers beyond the irradiation-treated area after radiotherapy. Our previous studies demonstrated a protective effect of low concentration carbon monoxide (CO) on the genotoxicity of RIBE after α-particle irradiation. In the present work, a significant inhibitory effect of low-dose exogenous CO, generated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer [CO-releasing molecule (CORM-2)], on both RIBE-induced proliferation and chromosome aberration was observed. Further studies on the mechanism revealed that the transforming growth factor β1/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, which mediated RIBE signaling transduction, could be modulated by CO involved in the protective effects. Considering the potential of exogenous CO in clinical applications and its protective effect on RIBE, the present work aims to provide a foundation for potential application of CO in radiotherapy.

  17. Low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide protects mammalian cells against proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We show the possibility of modulate proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect with low concentration carbon monoxide. • Carbon monoxide inhibited proliferation via modulating the transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway. • Exogenous carbon monoxide has potential application in clinical radiotherapy. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been proposed to have tight relationship with the irradiation-caused secondary cancers beyond the irradiation-treated area after radiotherapy. Our previous studies demonstrated a protective effect of low concentration carbon monoxide (CO) on the genotoxicity of RIBE after α-particle irradiation. In the present work, a significant inhibitory effect of low-dose exogenous CO, generated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer [CO-releasing molecule (CORM-2)], on both RIBE-induced proliferation and chromosome aberration was observed. Further studies on the mechanism revealed that the transforming growth factor β1/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, which mediated RIBE signaling transduction, could be modulated by CO involved in the protective effects. Considering the potential of exogenous CO in clinical applications and its protective effect on RIBE, the present work aims to provide a foundation for potential application of CO in radiotherapy

  18. Studies of ionising radiation induced bystander effects in 3D artificial tissue system and applications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. The bystander effect cannot be comprehensively explained on the basis of a single cell reaction. It is well known that an organism is composed of different cell types that interact as functional units in a way to maintain normal tissue function. Therefore the radiation response is not simply the sum of cellular responses as assumed in classical radiobiology, predominantly from studies using cell cultures. Experimental models, which maintain tissue-like intercellular cell signalling and 3D structure, are essential for proper understanding of the bystander effect. Our work relates to experimentation with novel 3D artificial human tissue systems available from MatTek Corporation (Boston, USA). Air-liquid interface culture technique is used to grow artificial tissues, which allow to model conditions present in vivo. The Gray Cancer Institute (Northwood, UK) charged particle microbeam was used to irradiate tissue samples in a known pattern with a known number of 3He2+ particles or protons. After irradiation, the tissues models were incubated for 3 days, fixed in 10 % NBF, paraffin embedded and then sliced into 5 μm histological sections located at varying distances from the plane of the irradiated cells. We studied in situ apoptosis and markers of differentiation. Significantly elevated bystander induced apoptosis was observed with 3'-OH DNA end-labelling based technique in 3D artificial tissue systems. Our results also suggested an importance of proliferation and differentiation status for bystander

  19. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  20. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlong, Hayley, E-mail: hayley.furlong@dit.ie [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Nuclear Research Building, 1280 Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Lyng, Fiona M. [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Howe, Orla [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  1. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  2. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  3. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in A549 Cells Exposed to 6 MV X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuning; Xu, Jing; Shao, Weixian; Geng, Chong; Li, Jia; Guo, Feng; Miao, Hui; Shen, Wenbin; Ye, Tao; Liu, Yazhou; Xu, Haiting; Zhang, Xuguang

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the bystander effects in A549 cells that have been exposed to 6MV X-ray. Control group, irradiated group, irradiated conditioned medium (ICM)-received group, and fresh medium group were designed in this study. A549 cells in the logarithmic growth phase were irradiated with 6MV X-ray at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2. In ICM-received group, post-irradiation A549 cells were cultured for 3 h and were transferred into non-irradiated A549 cells for further cultivation. Clone forming test was applied to detect the survival fraction of cells. Annexin V-FITC/PI double-staining assay was used to detect the apoptosis of A549 cells 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation, and the curves of apoptosis were drawn. The changes in the cell cycles 4, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation were detected using PI staining flow cytometry. With the increase of irradiation dose, the survival fraction of A549 cells after the application of 0.5 Gy irradiation was decreasing continuously. In comparison to the control group, the apoptosis rate of the ICM-received group was increased in a time-dependent pattern, with the highest apoptosis rate observed at 72 h (p A549 cell damage, indicating that 6MV X-ray irradiation can induce bystander effect on A549 cells, which reaches a peak at 72 h. PMID:25686868

  4. Space radiation-induced bystander effect: kinetics of biologic responses, mechanisms, and significance of secondary radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    more cells than expected based on the fraction of cells traversed through the nucleus by an iron or silicon ion. The effect was expressed as early as 15 min after exposure, peaked at 1 h and decreased by 24 h. A similar tendency occurred after exposure to a mean absorbed dose of 0.2 cGy of 3.7 MeV a particles, but not after 0.2 cGy of 290 MeV/u carbon ions.Analyses in dishes that incorporate a CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector bottom identified the cells irradiated with iron or silicon ions and further supported the participation of bystander cells in the stress response. Mechanistic studies indicated that gap junction intercellular communication, DNA repair, and oxidative metabolism participate in the propagation of the induced effects. We also considered the possible contribution of secondary particles produced along the primary particle tracks to the biological responses. Simulations with the FLUKA multi-particle transport code revealed that fragmentation products, other than electrons, in cells cultures exposed to HZE particles comprise ≤1 % of the absorbed dose. Further, the radial spread of dose due to secondary heavy ion fragments is confined to approximately 10-20 μm. Thus, the latter are unlikely to significantly contribute to the stressful effects in cells not targeted by primary HZE particles. (author)

  5. Development of a mathematical model to study the radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Living organisms are composed of millions of cells that together perform tasks of great complexity. Although every cell has an internal structure that obeys the laws of chemistry and biochemistry, it is the interactions between cells that generate a range of different phenomena. Until the 1990s it was believed that the DNA was the single molecule affected by radiation, the so-called theory of the single target. But some observations began to challenge this theory; in 1992 the bystander effect was described by Nagasawa and Little. This effect is responsible for a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. Understanding the bystander effect may have important consequences for therapy and studies of low-dose risk. In this work, we have developed a computational model to study the bystander effect. This computational model is a two-dimensional cellular automata, consisting of two overlapping networks, where the first represents the cell culture, and the second one, the medium in which cells are embedded. The computational model allows the establishment of curves to describe the behavior of the effect for different levels of signals released in the irradiated medium by the irradiated cells or by the bystander cells when a second order effect is considered. The percentage of cell survival obtained from the mathematical model showed to be in good agreement with experimental data available in the literature. (author)

  6. Radiation-induced bystander effects: Are they good bad or both?; Les nouvelles orientations en radiobiologie et radiopathologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B.; Lallemand, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Averbeck, D. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Chetioui, A. [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France); Gardes-Albert, M. [Paris-5 Univ., 75 (France); Mothersill, C. [Mc Master Univ., Hamilton (Canada); Gourmelon, P.; Benderitter, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Clamart (France); Chevillard, S.; Martin, M. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dir. des sciences du vivant, 92 (France); Verrelle, P. [Centre Jean-Perrin, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2004-07-01

    The different contributions are as follow: the current events on the cellular responses to irradiation ( part one and two); From physico-chemistry to radiobiology: new knowledge (part one and two); Radiation-induced bystander effects: are they good bad or both; recognition of the multi visceral failure in the acute irradiation syndrome; integrated approach of the tissue carcinogenesis: differential effect sane tissue-tumoral tissue; differential diagnosis of thyroid cancers by the transcriptoma analysis. (N.C.)

  7. Low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide protects mammalian cells against proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Liping; Yu, K N; Bao, Lingzhi; Wu, Wenqing; Wang, Hongzhi; Han, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been proposed to have tight relationship with the irradiation-caused secondary cancers beyond the irradiation-treated area after radiotherapy. Our previous studies demonstrated a protective effect of low concentration carbon monoxide (CO) on the genotoxicity of RIBE after α-particle irradiation. In the present work, a significant inhibitory effect of low-dose exogenous CO, generated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer [CO-releasing molecule (CORM-2)], on both RIBE-induced proliferation and chromosome aberration was observed. Further studies on the mechanism revealed that the transforming growth factor β1/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, which mediated RIBE signaling transduction, could be modulated by CO involved in the protective effects. Considering the potential of exogenous CO in clinical applications and its protective effect on RIBE, the present work aims to provide a foundation for potential application of CO in radiotherapy. PMID:24333162

  8. Cytosine Deaminase/5-Fluorocytosine Exposure Induces Bystander and Radiosensitization Effects in Hypoxic Glioblastoma Cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is limited by therapeutic ratio; therefore, successful therapy must be specifically cytotoxic to cancer cells. Hypoxic cells are ubiquitous in GBM, and resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and, thus, are logical targets for gene therapy. In this study, we investigated whether cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) enzyme/prodrug treatment induced a bystander effect (BE) and/or radiosensitization in hypoxic GBM cells. Methods and Materials: We stably transfected cells with a gene construct consisting of the SV40 minimal promoter, nine copies of a hypoxia-responsive element, and the yeast CD gene. During hypoxia, a hypoxia-responsive element regulates expression of the CD gene and facilitates the conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil, a highly toxic antimetabolite. We used colony-forming efficiency (CFE) and immunofluorescence assays to assess for BE in co-cultures of CD-expressing clone cells and parent, pNeo- or green fluorescent protein-stably transfected GBM cells. We also investigated the radiosensitivity of CD clone cells treated with 5-FC under hypoxic conditions, and we used flow cytometry to investigate treatment-induced cell cycle changes. Results: Both a large BE and radiosensitization occurred in GBM cells under hypoxic conditions. The magnitude of the BE depended on the number of transfected cells producing CD, the functionality of the CD, the administered concentration of 5-FC, and the sensitivity of cell type to 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: Hypoxia-inducible CD/5-FC therapy in combination with radiation therapy shows both a pronounced BE and a radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic conditions

  9. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  10. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G. (Department of Molecular and Tumour Radiobiology, National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary))

    2008-12-15

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  11. Bystander effects in UV-induced genomic instability: Antioxidants inhibit delayed mutagenesis induced by ultraviolet A and B radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahle Jostein

    2005-01-01

    glutathione. Previously, we have shown that ultraviolet induced delayed mutations may be induced via a bystander effect and that this effect is 5-fold higher for UVB radiation than for UVA radiation. Therefore, we propose that the antioxidants inhibit an ultraviolet radiation-induced bystander effect and that the effect is transmitted via the medium and via an internal transfer between cells, like gap junctional intercellular communication, for UVB radiation and only by the latter mechanism for UVA radiation.

  12. Implications of radiation-induced bystander effects and other non-targeted radiation effects for multi pollutant environmental exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmentally relevant low doses of ionizing radiation are now accepted to induce a variety of biological effects at levels where it is difficult to implicate direct (targeted) DNA damage. These effects include bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive responses and low dose hypersensitivity. The importance of these effects is that all are induced at very low doses. Typically one track of high LET radiation or less than 5 mGy of low LET radiation can trigger these effects. Once induced the level of effect does not increase with increasing dose and is persistent. The mechanisms underlying these effects are not known but it is accepted that genetic background is crucial in determining what the consequences of the exposure will be. This presentation will show 1. That chemical pollutants (heavy metals and micro-organics) can also induce these low dose responses, 2. That these effects can be induced in vivo as well as in vitro using mouse models exposed to whole body doses, 3. That the mechanism involves persistent elevation of ROS and that the effect can persist over many cell generations, 4. That chronic low dose exposures may actually be more effective than acute doses at inducing certain types of response, 5. That combinations of these inducers (whether radiation or chemical) and classical mutagens, can enhance the frequency of mutations due to the mutagen. There are implications for radiation and environmental protection which at present treat radiation as a 'stand alone' agent and assume a linear correlation between radiation dose and effect. (author)

  13. Bystander/abscopal effects induced in intact Arabidopsis seeds by low-energy heavy-ion radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gen; Mei, Tao; Yuan, Hang; Zhang, Weiming; Chen, Lianyun; Xue, Jianming; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Yugang

    2008-09-01

    To date, radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed largely in in vitro single-cell systems; verification of both the effects and the mechanisms in multicellular systems in vivo is important. Previously we showed that bystander/ abscopal effects can be induced by irradiating the shoot apical meristem cells in Arabidopsis embryos. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects induced by 30 keV 40Ar ions in intact Arabidopsis seeds and traced the postembryonic development of both irradiated and nonirradiated shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem cells. Since the range of 30 keV 40Ar ions in water is about 0.07 microm, which is less than the distance from the testa to shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem in Arabidopsis seeds (about 100 microm), the incident low-energy heavy ions generally stop in the proximal surface. Our results showed that, after the 30 keV 40Ar-ion irradiation of shielded and nonshielded Arabidopsis seeds at a fluence of 1.5 x 10(17) ions/cm2, short- and long-term postembryonic development, including germination, root hair differentiation, primary root elongation, lateral root initiation and survival, was significantly inhibited. Since shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem cells were not damaged directly by radiation, the results suggested that a damage signal(s) is transferred from the irradiated cells to shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem cells and causes the ultimate developmental alterations, indicating that long-distance bystander/ abscopal effects exist in the intact seed. A further study of mechanisms showed that the effects are associated with either enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or decreased auxin-dependent transcription in postembryonic development. Treatment with the ROS scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) can significantly reverse both the alterations in postembryonic development and auxin

  14. SirT1 knockdown potentiates radiation-induced bystander effect through promoting c-Myc activity and thus facilitating ROS accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yuexia [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Central Laboratory, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Tu, Wenzhi; Zhang, Jianghong; He, Mingyuan; Ye, Shuang; Dong, Chen [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced bystander effects between hepatoma cells and hepatocyte cells. • SirT1 played a protective role in regulating this bystander effect. • SirT1 contributed to the protective effects via elimination the accumulation of ROS. • The activity of c-Myc is critical for maintaining the protective role of SirT1. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has important implications for secondary cancer risk assessment during cancer radiotherapy, but the bystander signaling processes, especially under hypoxic condition, are still largely unclear. The present study found that micronuclei (MN) formation could be induced in the non-irradiated HL-7702 hepatocyte cells after being treated with the conditioned medium from irradiated hepatoma HepG2 and SK-Hep-1 cells under either normoxia or hypoxia. This bystander response was dramatically diminished or enhanced when the SirT1 gene of irradiated hepatoma cells was overexpressed or knocked down, respectively, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, SirT1 knockdown promoted transcriptional activity for c-Myc and facilitated ROS accumulation. But both of the increased bystander responses and ROS generation due to SirT1-knockdown were almost completely suppressed by c-Myc interference. Moreover, ROS scavenger effectively abolished the RIBE triggered by irradiated hepatoma cells even with SirT1 depletion. These findings provide new insights that SirT1 has a profound role in regulating RIBE where a c-Myc-dependent release of ROS may be involved.

  15. Radiation-induced bystander effects and the DNA paradigm: An 'out of field' perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada)]. E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca; Seymour, C.B. [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2006-05-11

    Over the past 20 years there has been increasing evidence that cells and the progeny of cells surviving a very low dose of ionizing radiation [{mu}-mGy] can exhibit a wide range of non-monotonic effects such as adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity and other delayed effects. These effects are inconsistent with the expected dose-response, when based on extrapolation of high dose data and cast doubt on the reliability of extrapolating from high dose data to predict low dose effects. Recently the cause of many of these effects has been tentatively ascribed to so-called 'bystander effects'. These are effects that occur in cells not directly hit by an ionizing track but which are influenced by signals from irradiated cells and are thus highly relevant in situations where the dose is very low. Not all bystander effects may be deleterious although most endpoints measured involve cell damage or death. In this commentary, we consider how these effects impact the historical central dogma of radiobiology and radiation protection, which is that DNA double strand breaks are the primary radiation-induced lesion which can be quantifiably related to received dose and which determine the probability that a cancer will result from a radiation exposure. We explore the low dose issues and the evidence and conclude that in the very low dose region, the primary determinant of radiation exposure outcome is the genetic and epigenetic background of the individual and not solely the dose. What this does is to dissociate dose from effect as a quantitative relationship, but it does not necessarily mean that the effect is ultimately unrelated to DNA damage. The fundamental thesis we present is that at low doses fundamentally different mechanisms underlie radiation action and that at these doses, effect is not quantitatively related to dose.

  16. Low Doses of Gamma-Irradiation Induce an Early Bystander Effect in Zebrafish Cells Which Is Sufficient to Radioprotect Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sandrine; Malard, Véronique; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Davin, Anne-Hélène; Armengaud, Jean; Foray, Nicolas; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    The term “bystander effect” is used to describe an effect in which cells that have not been exposed to radiation are affected by irradiated cells though various intracellular signaling mechanisms. In this study we analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of bystander effect and radioadaptation in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to chronic low dose of gamma rays. ZF4 cells were irradiated for 4 hours with total doses of gamma irradiation ranging from 0.01–0.1 Gy. In two experimental conditions, the transfer of irradiated cells or culture medium from irradiated cells results in the occurrence of DNA double strand breaks in non-irradiated cells (assessed by the number of γ-H2AX foci) that are repaired at 24 hours post-irradiation whatever the dose. At low total irradiation doses the bystander effect observed does not affect DNA repair mechanisms in targeted and bystander cells. An increase in global methylation of ZF4 cells was observed in irradiated cells and bystander cells compared to control cells. We observed that pre-irradiated cells which are then irradiated for a second time with the same doses contained significantly less γ-H2AX foci than in 24 h gamma-irradiated control cells. We also showed that bystander cells that have been in contact with the pre-irradiated cells and then irradiated alone present less γ-H2AX foci compared to the control cells. This radioadaptation effect is significantly more pronounced at the highest doses. To determine the factors involved in the early events of the bystander effect, we performed an extensive comparative proteomic study of the ZF4 secretomes upon irradiation. In the experimental conditions assayed here, we showed that the early events of bystander effect are probably not due to the secretion of specific proteins neither the oxidation of these secreted proteins. These results suggest that early bystander effect may be due probably to a combination of multiple factors. PMID:24667817

  17. DUOX 1 is induced in human thyroid cells submitted to X-Ray irradiation and is responsible for the bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boufraqech, M.; Chevallier Lagente, O.; Weyemi, U.; Talbot, M.; Al Ghuzlan, A.; Courtin, F.; Bidart, J.M.; Schlumberger, M.; Dupuy, C. [UMR 8200 CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuit (France); Ameziane el Hassani, R. [UBRM, Centre National de l' Energie, des Sciences et des Techniques Nucleaires, Rabat (Morocco)

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is the mechanism by which cells that have not been directly exposed to ionizing radiation behave like exposed cells: they die or show chromosomal instability and other phenotypic abnormalities. Bystander cells may be either adjacent or at some distance from the exposed cells. Irradiated cells release soluble factors that can be transferred through cell culture medium to non-irradiated cells. These factors include cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to identify the ROS generating system induced by X-ray irradiation of human thyroid cells that could be responsible for the bystander effect. Irradiation of human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3 cells) induced an extracellular production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} after 4 days that was related to the radiation dose. Our study shows that radiation exposure increases DUOX-1 expression after several days, suggesting that this H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generating system could be responsible for the late bystander effect. This could have a potential importance for radiation risk assessment and for cancer radiotherapy

  18. Influence of catechins on bystander responses in CHO cells induced by alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Y.L.; Wong, T.P.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, we studied alpha-particle induced and medium-mediated bystander effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells through micronucleus (MN) assay. We showed that signal transduction from irradiated cells to bystander cells occur within a short time after irradiation. We then studied the effects of ROS (reactive oxygen species)-scavenging catechins in the medium before irradiation. We observed decreases in the percentage of bystander cells with MN formation and thus proved the protection effect of catechins on bystander cells from radiation.

  19. Novel mechanism for the radiation-induced bystander effect: Nitric oxide and ethylene determine the response in sponge cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until now the bystander effect had only been described in vertebrates. In the present study the existence of this effect has been demonstrated for the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum, the Porifera. We used the demosponge Suberites domuncula for the experiments in the two-chamber-system. The lower dish contained irradiated 'donor' cells (single cells) and the upper dish the primmorphs ('recipient' primmorphs). The 'donor' cells were treated with UV-B light (40 mJ/cm2) and 100 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), factors that exist also in the natural marine aquatic environment of sponges; these factors caused a high level of DNA strand breaks followed by a reduced viability of the cells. If these cells were added to the 'recipient' primmorphs these 3D-cell cultures started to undergo apoptosis. This effect could be abolished by the NO-specific scavenger PTIO and ethylene. The conclusion that NO is synthesized by the UV-B/H2O2-treated cells was supported analytically. The cDNA encoding the enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) was isolated from the 'donor' cells. High levels of DDAH transcripts were measured in UV-B/H2O2-treated 'donor' cells while after ethylene treatment the steady-state level of expression drops drastically. We conclude that in the absence of ethylene the concentration of the physiological inhibitor for the NO synthase ADMA is low, due to the high level of DDAH. In consequence, high amounts of NO are released from 'donor' cells which cause apoptosis in 'recipient' primmorphs. In contrast, ethylene reduces the DDAH expression with the consequence of higher levels of ADMA which prevent the formation of larger amounts of NO. This study describes the radiation-induced bystander effect also for the most basal metazoans and demonstrates that this effect is controlled by the two gasses NO and ethylene

  20. Bystander Effects Induced by Continuous Low-Dose-Rate 125I Seeds Potentiate the Killing Action of Irradiation on Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate bystander effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) 125I seed irradiation on human lung cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: A549 and NCI-H446 cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were directly exposed to LDR 125I seeds irradiation for 2 or 4 Gy and then cocultured with nonirradiated cells for 24 hours. Induction of micronucleus (MN), γH2AX foci, and apoptosis were assayed. Results: After 2 and 4 Gy irradiation, micronucleus formation rate (MFR) and apoptotic rate of A549 and NCI-H446 cells were increased, and the MFR and apoptotic rate of NCI-H446 cells was 2.1-2.8 times higher than that of A549 cells. After coculturing nonirradiated bystander cells with 125I seed irradiated cells for 24 hours, MFR and the mean number of γH2AX foci/cells of bystander A549 and NCI-H446 cells were similar and significantly higher than those of control (p 125I seeds could induce bystander effects, which potentiate the killing action on tumor cells and compensate for the influence of nonuniform distribution of radiation dosage on therapeutic outcomes

  1. Novel mechanism for the radiation-induced bystander effect: Nitric oxide and ethylene determine the response in sponge cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Werner E.G. [Institut fuer Physiologische Chemie, Abteilung Angewandte Molekularbiologie, Universitaet, Duesbergweg 6, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)]. E-mail: wmueller@uni-mainz.de; Ushijima, Hiroshi [Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, Institute of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Batel, Renato [Center for Marine Research, ' Ruder Boskovic' Institute, HR-52210 Rovinj (Croatia); Krasko, Anatoli [Institut fuer Physiologische Chemie, Abteilung Angewandte Molekularbiologie, Universitaet, Duesbergweg 6, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Borejko, Alexandra [Institut fuer Physiologische Chemie, Abteilung Angewandte Molekularbiologie, Universitaet, Duesbergweg 6, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Mueller, Isabel M. [Institut fuer Physiologische Chemie, Abteilung Angewandte Molekularbiologie, Universitaet, Duesbergweg 6, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Schroeder, Heinz-C. [Institut fuer Physiologische Chemie, Abteilung Angewandte Molekularbiologie, Universitaet, Duesbergweg 6, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2006-05-11

    Until now the bystander effect had only been described in vertebrates. In the present study the existence of this effect has been demonstrated for the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum, the Porifera. We used the demosponge Suberites domuncula for the experiments in the two-chamber-system. The lower dish contained irradiated 'donor' cells (single cells) and the upper dish the primmorphs ('recipient' primmorphs). The 'donor' cells were treated with UV-B light (40 mJ/cm{sup 2}) and 100 {mu}M hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), factors that exist also in the natural marine aquatic environment of sponges; these factors caused a high level of DNA strand breaks followed by a reduced viability of the cells. If these cells were added to the 'recipient' primmorphs these 3D-cell cultures started to undergo apoptosis. This effect could be abolished by the NO-specific scavenger PTIO and ethylene. The conclusion that NO is synthesized by the UV-B/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated cells was supported analytically. The cDNA encoding the enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) was isolated from the 'donor' cells. High levels of DDAH transcripts were measured in UV-B/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated 'donor' cells while after ethylene treatment the steady-state level of expression drops drastically. We conclude that in the absence of ethylene the concentration of the physiological inhibitor for the NO synthase ADMA is low, due to the high level of DDAH. In consequence, high amounts of NO are released from 'donor' cells which cause apoptosis in 'recipient' primmorphs. In contrast, ethylene reduces the DDAH expression with the consequence of higher levels of ADMA which prevent the formation of larger amounts of NO. This study describes the radiation-induced bystander effect also for the most basal metazoans and demonstrates that this effect is controlled by the two gasses NO and ethylene.

  2. Hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance and bystander effects in rodent and human cells as a function of radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past two decades, a body of experimental evidences in vitro has shown the presence of a plethora of phenomena occurring after low-dose irradiation [including hypersensitivity and induced radioresistance (IRR), adaptive response, bystander effect (BE) and genomic instability], which might imply a non-linear behaviour of cancer risk curves in the low-dose region and question the validity of the linear no-threshold model for cancer risk assessment in such a dose region. In this framework, a systematic investigation have been undertaken on non-linear effects at low doses as a function of different radiation quality and cellular radiosensitivity and in terms of different biological end points. The present article reports the recent results on hyper-radiosensitivity and IRR and BE phenomena, in terms of clonogenic survival in V79 Chinese hamster cells and T98G human glioblastoma cells irradiated with protons and carbon ions with different energy, as a function of dose (and fluence). (authors)

  3. Alpha-particles microbeam irradiation: impact of reactive oxygen species in bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects arise in bystander cells that receive signals from directly irradiated cells. To date, free radicals are believed to play an active role in the bystander response, but this is incompletely characterized. To mark temporal and spatial impacts of bystander effect, we employed a precise α-particle microbeam to target a small fraction of sub-confluent osteoblastic cell cultures (MC3T3-E1). We identified the cellular membrane and mitochondria like two distinct places generating reactive oxygen species. The global oxidative stress observed after irradiation was significantly attenuated after filipin treatment, evidencing the pivotal role of membrane in MC3T3-E1 cells bystander response. To determine impact of bystander effect at a cell level, cellular consequences of this membrane-dependant bystander effect were then investigated. A variable fraction of the cell population (10 to 100%) was individually targeted. In this case, mitotic death and micronuclei yield both increased in bystander cells as well as in targeted cells demonstrating a role of bystander signals between irradiated cells in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Our results indicate a complex interaction of direct irradiation and bystander signals that lead to a membrane-dependant amplification of cell responses. (author)

  4. The bystander effect-induced formation of micronucleated cells is inhibited by antioxidants, but the parallel induction of apoptosis and loss of viability are not affected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-rays induce various DNA damages including strand breaks that lead to formation of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations as well as increased number of apoptotic cells. Similar effects appear when non-irradiated cells are treated with medium collected from cultures of irradiated cells (irradiation conditioned medium - ICM). This phenomenon was termed 'bystander effect'. A number of studies suggest that bystander effect appears to be associated with up-regulation of oxidative metabolism. We thus compared the effects of antioxidant Vitamins C and E on the frequency of micronuclei and apoptotic cells in both directly irradiated cell cultures and in cultures exposed to ICM. Addition of Vitamins C or E (1-40 μg/ml) to culture medium after exposure to radiation or ICM reduced the frequency of micronuclei in a concentration-dependent manner. These vitamins had no effect on cell viability, clonogenic survival or the frequency of apoptotic cells under both conditions tested. These results show that the bystander effect causes micronucleation in addition to other known effects and suggest that the factors causing micronucleation by X-irradiation, oxidative DNA damage and incomplete repair, are regulated by apoptosis-independent pathways

  5. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects: inter-related inflammatory-type non-targeted effects of exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, E.G. (Molecular and Cellular Pathology Laboratories, Division of Pathology and Neuroscience, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    The dogma that genetic alterations are restricted to directly irradiated cells has been challenged by observations in which effects of ionizing radiation, characteristically associated with the consequences of energy deposition in the cell nucleus, arise in non-irradiated cells. These, so called, untargeted effects are demonstrated in cells that are the descendants of irradiated cells (radiation-induced genomic instability) or in cells that have communicated with neighbouring irradiated cells (radiation-induced bystander effects). There are also reports of long-range signals in vivo, known as clastogenic factors, with the capacity to induce damage in unirradiated cells. Clastogenic factors may be related to the inflammatory responses that have been implicated in some of the pathological consequences of radiation exposures. The phenotypic expression of untargeted effects reflects a balance between the type of signals produced and the responses of cell populations to such signals, both of which may be significantly influenced by cell type and genotype. There is accumulating evidence that untargeted effects in vitro involve inter-cellular signalling, production of cytokines and free radical generation. These are also features of inflammatory responses in vivo that are known to have the potential for both bystander-mediated and persisting damage as well as for conferring a predisposition to malignancy. At present it is far from clear how untargeted effects contribute to overall cellular radiation responses and in vivo consequences but it is possible that the various untargeted effects may reflect inter-related aspects of a non-specific inflammatory-type response to radiation-induced stress and injury and be involved in a variety of the pathological consequences of radiation exposures. (orig.)

  6. X-ray-induced bystander response reduce spontaneous mutations in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for carcinogenic risks is increased by radiation-induced bystander responses; these responses are the biological effects in unirradiated cells that receive signals from the neighboring irradiated cells. Bystander responses have attracted attention in modern radiobiology because they are characterized by non-linear responses to low-dose radiation. We used a synchrotron X-ray microbeam irradiation system developed at the Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, and showed that nitric oxide (NO)-mediated bystander cell death increased biphasically in a dose-dependent manner. Here, we irradiated five cell nuclei using 10 × 10 µm2 5.35 keV X-ray beams and then measured the mutation frequency at the hypoxanthine-guanosine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in bystander cells. The mutation frequency with the null radiation dose was 2.6 × 10-5 (background level), and the frequency decreased to 5.3 × 10-6 with a dose of approximately 1 Gy (absorbed dose in the nucleus of irradiated cells). At high doses, the mutation frequency returned to the background level. A similar biphasic dose-response effect was observed for bystander cell death. Furthermore, we found that incubation with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO), a specific scavenger of NO, suppressed not only the biphasic increase in bystander cell death but also the biphasic reduction in mutation frequency of bystander cells. These results indicate that the increase in bystander cell death involves mechanisms that suppress mutagenesis. This study has thus shown that radiation-induced bystander responses could affect processes that protect the cell against naturally occurring alterations such as mutations. (author)

  7. Non-targeted radiation effects in radiotherapy - Roles of radiation-induced genomic instability and of the bystander effect in cancer cure by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local tumour control by radiotherapy requires the complete sterilization of all tumour 'stem' cells in the tumour volume. Neither bystander effect nor radiation-induced genomic instability is able to contribute substantially to the probability of local tumour control of the primary cancer by radiotherapy. However, the progeny of these surviving tumour 'stem' cells are likely to suffer from radiation-induced genomic instability, which results in the persistent appearance of non-stem cells, i.e. a reduced probability of self-maintenance. This results in a slower growth rate of the recurrent tumour, a reduced stem-cell fraction and, as a consequence, an increased radiosensitivity of the recurrent tumour. In some recurrent tumours, particularly those that develop very late and grow very slowly, radiosensitivity may be further increased by increased intrinsic radiosensitivity, which could be related to the as yet poorly defined phenotype of 'small colony formation'

  8. Low-dose energetic protons induce adaptive and bystander effects that protect human cells against DNA damage caused by a subsequent exposure to energetic iron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During interplanetary missions, astronauts are exposed to mixed types of ionizing radiation. The low 'flux' of the high atomic number and high energy (HZE) radiations relative to the higher 'flux' of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons makes it highly probable that for any given cell in the body, proton events will precede any HZE event. Whereas progress has been made in our understanding of the biological effects of low-LET protons and high-LET HZE particles, the interplay between the biochemical processes modulated by these radiations is unclear. Here we show that exposure of normal human fibroblasts to a low mean absorbed dose of 20 cGy of 0.05 or 1-GeV protons (LET ∼ 1.25 or 0.2 keV/μm, respectively) protects the irradiated cells (P < 0.0001) against chromosomal damage induced by a subsequent exposure to a mean absorbed dose of 50 cGy from 1 GeV/u iron ions (LET ∼ 151 keV/μm). Surprisingly, unirradiated (i.e. bystander) cells with which the proton-irradiated cells were co-cultured were also significantly protected from the DNA-damaging effects of the challenge dose. The mitigating effect persisted for at least 24 h. These results highlight the interactions of biological effects due to direct cellular traversal by radiation with those due to bystander effects in cell populations exposed to mixed radiation fields. They show that protective adaptive responses can spread from cells targeted by low-LET space radiation to bystander cells in their vicinity. The findings are relevant to understanding the health hazards of space travel. (author)

  9. The influence of melanin on bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of melanin on bystander effect has been studied. Melanin is known to be a natural substance with proved radioprotective properties. It is effective only against low dose radiation. The observed result in colony-forming activity of HPV-G cells may be due to the potential radioprotective effect of melanin. HPV-G cells (human keratinocyte line, immortalised by transfection with the HVP virus) are cultured in Dulbecco's MEM: F12 (1:1) Medium. In addition, 50 ml of Fetal Calf Serum, 5 ml penicillin-streptomycin, 5 ml L-glutamine and 1 g/ml of hydrocortisone were added to medium. Cells were maintained in an incubator at 37 degrees Celsius, with 95% humidity and 5% Carbon Dioxide and routinely subcultured every 8-10 days. Melanin was isolated from animal hair (Belarus Pharmaceutical Association, Minsk). Melanin was added to cell medium at 1 mg/l concentration. Cell suspension after dilution was counted using a Coulter counter. Appropriate cell numbers were plated according to the Puck and Marcus technique in 5 ml medium in 25cm2 NUNC flasks. There were 3 types of flasks: direct irradiation, bystander donor and bystander recipient. Each of 3 them had 4 triplet sets: control, melanin, irradiated cells 0,5 Gy and irradiated cells 0,5 Gy with melanin added. Melanin is added into flasks 30 min - 1 hour before irradiation. Bystander donor and direct flasks are irradiated and replaced back in the incubator at 37 degree centigrade for one hour. Culture flasks are irradiated at room temperature using a Co 60 teletherapy source, delivering approximately 2 Gy per minute at a source-to cell distance of 80 cm. 1 hour after irradiation the medium from bystander donor flasks is removed and filtered through NALGENE 0,2 m sterile syringe filter to ensure that no cells are present in the medium. This filtered medium is used to replace the medium from bystander recipient flasks. All flasks are left for 9-10 days (until colonies are visible) and then stained with Carbol Fusion

  10. RAD9 deficiency enhances radiation induced bystander DNA damage and transcriptomal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced bystander effects are an important component of the overall response of cells to irradiation and are associated with human health risks. The mechanism responsible includes intra-cellular and inter-cellular signaling by which the bystander response is propagated. However, details of the signaling mechanism are not well defined. We measured the bystander response of Mrad9+/+ and Mrad9−/− mouse embryonic stem cells, as well as human H1299 cells with inherent or RNA interference-mediated reduced RAD9 levels after exposure to 1 Gy α particles, by scoring chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei formation, respectively. In addition, we used microarray gene expression analyses to profile the transcriptome of directly irradiated and bystander H1299 cells. We demonstrated that Mrad9 null enhances chromatid aberration frequency induced by radiation in bystander mouse embryonic stem cells. In addition, we found that H1299 cells with reduced RAD9 protein levels showed a higher frequency of radiation induced bystander micronuclei formation, compared with parental cells containing inherent levels of RAD9. The enhanced bystander response in human cells was associated with a unique transcriptomic profile. In unirradiated cells, RAD9 reduction broadly affected stress response pathways at the mRNA level; there was reduction in transcript levels corresponding to genes encoding multiple members of the UVA-MAPK and p38MAPK families, such as STAT1 and PARP1, suggesting that these signaling mechanisms may not function optimally when RAD9 is reduced. Using network analysis, we found that differential activation of the SP1 and NUPR1 transcriptional regulators was predicted in directly irradiated and bystander H1299 cells. Transcription factor prediction analysis also implied that HIF1α (Hypoxia induced factor 1 alpha) activation by protein stabilization in irradiated cells could be a negative predictor of the bystander response, suggesting that local hypoxic stress

  11. Bystander effects and their implications for clinical radiation therapy: Insights from multiscale in silico experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powathil, Gibin G; Munro, Alastair J; Chaplain, Mark A J; Swat, Maciej

    2016-07-21

    Radiotherapy is a commonly used treatment for cancer and is usually given in varying doses. At low radiation doses relatively few cells die as a direct response to radiation but secondary radiation effects, such as DNA mutation or bystander phenomena, may affect many cells. Consequently it is at low radiation levels where an understanding of bystander effects is essential in designing novel therapies with superior clinical outcomes. In this paper, we use a hybrid multiscale mathematical model to study the direct effects of radiation as well as radiation-induced bystander effects on both tumour cells and normal cells. We show that bystander responses play a major role in mediating radiation damage to cells at low-doses of radiotherapy, doing more damage than that due to direct radiation. The survival curves derived from our computational simulations showed an area of hyper-radiosensitivity at low-doses that are not obtained using a traditional radiobiological model. PMID:27084360

  12. Lack of Bystander Effects From High LET Radiation For Early Cytogenetic Endpoints.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groesser, Torsten; Cooper, Brian; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2008-05-07

    The aim of this work was to study radiation-induced bystander effects for early cytogenetic end points in various cell lines using the medium transfer technique after exposure to high- and low-LET radiation. Cells were exposed to 20 MeV/ nucleon nitrogen ions, 968 MeV/nucleon iron ions, or 575 MeV/nucleon iron ions followed by transfer of the conditioned medium from the irradiated cells to unirradiated test cells. The effects studied included DNA double-strand break induction, {gamma}-H2AX focus formation, induction of chromatid breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes, and micronucleus formation using DNA repair-proficient and -deficient hamster and human cell lines (xrs6, V79, SW48, MO59K and MO59J). Cell survival was also measured in SW48 bystander cells using X rays. Although it was occasionally possible to detect an increase in chromatid break levels using nitrogen ions and to see a higher number of {gamma}-H2AX foci using nitrogen and iron ions in xrs6 bystander cells in single experiments, the results were not reproducible. After we pooled all the data, we could not verify a significant bystander effect for any of these end points. Also, we did not detect a significant bystander effect for DSB induction or micronucleus formation in these cell lines or for clonogenic survival in SW48 cells. The data suggest that DNA damage and cytogenetic changes are not induced in bystander cells. In contrast, data in the literature show pronounced bystander effects in a variety of cell lines, including clonogenic survival in SW48 cells and induction of chromatid breaks and micronuclei in hamster cells. To reconcile these conflicting data, it is possible that the epigenetic status of the specific cell line or the precise culture conditions and medium supplements, such as serum, may be critical for inducing bystander effects.

  13. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after {alpha}-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chen Shaopeng [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-02-03

    Low-dose {alpha}-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose {alpha}-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-{beta}1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  14. Experimental verification for in vitro technique confirmation of bystander effect induced by gamma radiation in CHO-K1 cell line; Verificacao experimental para confirmacao da tecnica in vitro do efeito bystander induzido por radiacao gama na linhagem celular CHO-K1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, P.H.L.; Goes, A.M.; Gomes, D.A., E-mail: pedroleroybio@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento Bioquimica e Imunologia. Lab. de Imunologia Celular e Molecular; Grynberg, S.E., E-mail: seg@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    The bystander effect refers to biological responses detected in cells not directly irradiated but influenced, somehow, by signals transmitted from neighboring irradiated cells. These biological responses include sister chromatid exchange, mutations, micronucleus formation, chromosomal aberrations, carcinogenesis, apoptosis and necrosis. Although its existence is unquestionable, the mechanisms involved on triggering the bystander effect are not yet completely elucidated. Previous studies have shown that the bystander effect depends on a large variety of parameters including the radiation dose, the dose rate, the type of radiation and type of cells or tissue. This study aims to confirm the technique previously used in the literature in human cell lines for the bystander effect verification. The results suggest that the working conditions adopted by the group show technical efficiency and enables the reproduction of the bystander effect. (author)

  15. Genomic instability and bystander effects: a paradigm shift in radiation biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2002-01-01

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, following exposure to ionizing radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the principal target, are responsible for the radiation's deleterious biological effects. Findings in two rapidly expanding fields of research--radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects--have caused us to reevaluate these central tenets. In this article, the potential influence of induced genomic instability and bystander effects on cellular injury after exposure to low-level radiation will be reviewed.

  16. Bystander effects and compartmental stress response to X-ray irradiation in L929 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temelie, Mihaela; Stroe, Daniela; Petcu, Ileana; Mustaciosu, Cosmin; Moisoi, Nicoleta; Savu, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Bystander effects are indirect consequences of radiation and many other stress factors. They occur in cells that are not directly exposed to these factors, but receive signals from affected cells either by gap junctions or by molecules released in the medium. Characterizing these effects and deciphering the underlying mechanisms involved in radiation-induced bystander effects are relevant for cancer radiotherapy and radioprotection. At doses of X-ray radiation 0.5 and 1 Gy, we detected bystander effects as increased numbers of micronuclei shortly after the treatment, through medium transfer and by co-cultures. Interestingly, bystander cells did not exhibit long-term adverse changes in viability. Evaluation of several compartmental stress markers (CHOP, BiP, mtHsp60, cytHsp70) by qRT-PCR did not reveal expression changes at transcriptional level. We investigated the involvement of ROS and NO in this process by addition of specific scavengers of these molecules, DMSO or c-PTIO in the transferred medium. This approach proved that ROS but not NO is involved in the induction of lesions in the acceptor cells. These results indicate that L929 cells are susceptible to stress effects of radiation-induced bystander signaling. PMID:27025606

  17. An examination of the bystander effect in multiple models: from cell line to in-vivo exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Vines, Alice, (Thesis)

    2007-01-01

    In recent years there has been a paradigm shift in radiobiology, to one which induces non-targeted effects, such as the bystander effect and genomic instability. The bystander effect has been defined as effects seen in cells that although never exposed to radiation, display similar effects to those that have, due to some form of communication with directly hit cells. This investigation aims to further the current understanding of this effect using three different models, cell lines, primary e...

  18. An extracellular DNA mediated bystander effect produced from low dose irradiated endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture was exposed to X-ray radiation in a low dose of 10 cGy. The fragments of extracellular genomic DNA (ecDNAR) were isolated from the culture medium after the short-term incubation. A culture medium of unirradiated endothelial cells was then supplemented with ecDNAR, followed by analysing the cells along the series of parameters (bystander effect). The exposed cells and bystander endotheliocytes showed similar response to low doses: approximation of the 1q12 loci of chromosome 1 and their transposition into the cellular nucleus, change in shape of the endotheliocytic nucleus, activation of the nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), actin polymerization, and an elevated level of DNA double-stranded breaks. Following blockade of TLR9 receptors with oligonucleotide-inhibitor or chloroquine in the bystander cells these effects - except of activation of NORs - on exposure to ecDNAR disappeared, with no bystander response thus observed. The presence of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the bystander effect being studied suggests a possibility for radiation-modified ecDNA fragments (i.e., stress signaling factors) to be released into the culture medium, whereas inhibition of TLR9 suggests the binding these ligands to the recipient cells. A similar DNA-signaling pathway in the bystander effect we previously described for human lymphocytes. Integrity of data makes it possible to suppose that a similar signaling mechanism which we demonstrated for lymphocytes (humoral system) might also be mediated in a monolayer culture of cells (cellular tissue) after the development of the bystander effect in them and transfer of stress signaling factors (ecDNAR) through the culture medium.

  19. A Mouse Ear Model for Bystander Studies Induced by Microbeam Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, M; Randers-Pehrson, G; Smilenov, L B; Kleiman, N J; Young, E; Ponnayia, B; Brenner, D J

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in cell and tissue culture models, however, there are few reported studies showing these effects in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on bystander effects induced by microbeam irradiation in an intact living mammal. The mouse ear was used to investigate radiation-induced bystander effects in keratinocytes, utilizing a 3 MeV proton microbeam (LET 13.1 keV/μm) with a range in skin of about 135 μm. Using a custom-designed holder, the ear of an anesthetized C57BL/6J mouse was flattened by gentle suction and placed over the microbeam port to irradiate cells along a 35 μm wide, 6 mm long path. Immunohistochemical analysis of γ-H2AX foci formation in tissue sections revealed, compared to control tissue, proton-induced γ-H2AX foci formation in one of the two epidermal layers of the mouse ear. Strikingly, a higher number of cells than expected showed foci from direct irradiation effects. Although the proton-irradiated line was ~35 μm wide, the average width spanned by γ-H2AX-positive cells exceeded 150 μm. Cells adjacent to or in the epidermal layer opposite the γ-H2AX-positive region did not exhibit foci. These findings validate this mammalian model as a viable system for investigating radiation-induced bystander effects in an intact living organism. PMID:26207682

  20. Radiation-induced preventive bystander response and adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced bystander response (BR) is a phenomenon not observed in cells irradiated directly but in cells nearby. Recently, the relationship between BR and adaptive response (AR) has been studied and BR is suggested to be one of important mechanisms involved in AR induction through key molecules like reactive oxygen (RO) and nitrogen species. In this paper, the possible contribution of BR to AR is discussed on recent findings including author's ones. Many biological responses in bystander cells, cultured tissues and mice by cell-cell communication molecules such as cytokines and nitrogen oxide (NO) have been elucidated for BR to involve the cell death, sister chromatid exchange, chromosome instability, mutation, increased/ decreased p53 level, etc. However, BR has been recently found to contain biologically favorable events like the increase of radio-resistance and of cellular take rate and decrease of micronucleus formation through NO by X-ray and HIMAC C-ion. AR is observed in irradiated cell population with previous exposure to low dose and involves the above mentioned biologically favorable responses, which having lead to the possible interrelationship between BR and AR. Together with findings obtained hitherto, hypothesized is that AR is induced in bystander cells through a sequence of signals of evoked radicals like RO/ NO by pre-irradiation, and of consequent intermediating molecules like transforming growth factor (TGF)-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1 and estrogen to activate NF-KB for inducing COX-2 and NO synthase, which resulting in stimulation of damaged DNA repairing mechanism and of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade that constructs the signaling between plasma membrane and nucleus. (K.T.)

  1. Recursive mentalizing and common knowledge in the bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kyle A; De Freitas, Julian; DeScioli, Peter; Pinker, Steven

    2016-05-01

    The more potential helpers there are, the less likely any individual is to help. A traditional explanation for this bystander effect is that responsibility diffuses across the multiple bystanders, diluting the responsibility of each. We investigate an alternative, which combines the volunteer's dilemma (each bystander is best off if another responds) with recursive theory of mind (each infers what the others know about what he knows) to predict that actors will strategically shirk when they think others feel compelled to help. In 3 experiments, participants responded to a (fictional) person who needed help from at least 1 volunteer. Participants were in groups of 2 or 5 and had varying information about whether other group members knew that help was needed. As predicted, people's decision to help zigzagged with the depth of their asymmetric, recursive knowledge (e.g., "John knows that Michael knows that John knows help is needed"), and replicated the classic bystander effect when they had common knowledge (everyone knowing what everyone knows). The results demonstrate that the bystander effect may result not from a mere diffusion of responsibility but specifically from actors' strategic computations. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26913616

  2. Complex damage, low doses and Bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , there has been a wealth of new data showing that there are also 'untargeted' intracellular and extracellular processes that can be observed as high frequencies of delayed cellular effects (eg genomic instability) or effects in cells that have not themselves been irradiated ('bystander' effects). In considering risks from low doses and/or low dose rates of radiation, what are the relative contributions from untargeted mechanisms and how should this balance be applied to guide extrapolations of robust epidemiological data to the low exposure levels of practical relevance?

  3. Culture of three-dimensional tissue model and its application in bystander-effect research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared with the cultured monolayer (2D) cells, three-dimensional (3D) tissue could be more similar to the environment in vivo including the physical support, chemical factors, cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction and so on. With the development of three-dimensional cell culture techniques (TDCC), 3D tissue is widely used in the areas of bystander effect research. This review focuses on introducing the TDCC method and its application in bystander-effect research. First, the development process of 3D tissue culture method was introduced. Secondly, the induction of radiation induced bystander effects both in 2D cell and 3D tissue and its mechanisms were reviewed. Finally, because heavy ion (carbon ion beam) has been developed as a useful tool to cure solid cancer, and the 3D tissue model is an ideal material to study the damages on body after being irradiated and to understand the underlying mechanisms, future study about heavy ion radiation inducing bystander effect in 3D tissue was discussed. (authors)

  4. The induction of bystander mutagenic effects in vivo by alpha-particle irradiation in whole Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fanghua; Liu, Ping; Wang, Ting; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-08-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated distant/abscopal bystander effects in A. thaliana seeds and embryos; the postembryonic development of bystander tissues, such as root hair differentiation, primary root elongation, lateral root initiation and survival, were inhibited significantly by localized irradiation with microbeam protons and low-energy ions. In the present study, we further investigated radiation-induced bystander mutagenic effects in vivo in A. thaliana plants using homologous recombination (HR) and the expression level of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene as mutagenic end points. We found that alpha-particle irradiation of distal primary roots of young seedlings resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of HR in the aerial plants; the increased induction of HR occurred in every true leaf over the course of rosette development. Moreover, we also found that localized alpha-particle irradiation of roots induced a short-term up-regulated expression of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene in the nonirradiated aerial plants. These results suggested the existence of bystander mutagenic effects in vivo in plants. Treatment with the ROS scavenger DMSO dramatically reduced the effects of localized root irradiation on the induction of HR and expression of the AtRAD54 gene in bystander tissues, suggesting that ROS play a critical role in mediating the bystander mutagenic effects in plants. PMID:20681789

  5. Bystander effects of ionizing radiation can be modulated by signaling amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actual risk and risk management of exposure to ionizing radiation are among the most controversial areas in environmental health protection. Recent developments in radiobiology especially characterization of bystander effects have called into question established dogmas and are thought to cast doubt on the scientific basis of the risk assessment framework, leading to uncertainty for regulators and concern among affected populations. In this paper we test the hypothesis that small signaling molecules widely used throughout the animal kingdom for signaling stress or environmental change, such as 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin), L-DOPA, glycine or nicotine are involved in bystander signaling processes following ionizing radiation exposure. We report data which suggest that nano to micromolar concentrations of these agents can modulate bystander-induced cell death. Depletion of 5-HT present in tissue culture medium, occurred following irradiation of cells. This suggested that 5-HT might be bound by membrane receptors after irradiation. Expression of 5-HT type 3 receptors which are Ca2+ ion channels was confirmed in the cells using immunocytochemistry and receptor expression could be increased using radiation or 5-HT exposure. Zofran and Kitryl, inhibitors of 5-HT type 3 receptors, and reserpine a generic serotonin antagonist block the bystander effect induced by radiation or by serotonin. The results may be important for the mechanistic understanding of how low doses of radiation interact with cells to produce biological effects

  6. Up-regulation of ROS by mitochondria-dependent bystander signaling contributes to genotoxicity of bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genomic instability can be observed in bystander cells. However, the underlying mechanism(s) is still relatively unclear. In a previous study, we found that irradiated cells released mitochondria-dependent intracellular factor(s) which could lead to bystander γ-H2AX induction. In this paper, we used normal (ρ+) and mtDNA-depleted (ρ0) human-hamster hybrid cells to investigate mitochondrial effects on the genotoxicity in bystander effect through medium transfer experiments. Through the detection of DNA double-strand breaks with γ-H2AX, we found that the fraction of γ-H2AX positive cells changed with time when irradiation conditioned cell medium (ICCM) were harvested. ICCM harvested from irradiated ρ+ cells at 10 min post-irradiation (ρ+ ICCM10min) caused larger increases of bystander γ-H2AX induction comparing to ρ0 ICCM10min, which only caused a slight increase of bystander γ-H2AX induction. The ρ+ ICCM10min could also result in the up-regulation of ROS production (increased by 35% at 10 min), while there was no significant increase in cells treated with ρ0 ICCM10min. We treated cells with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the scavenger of ROS, and quenched γ-H2AX induction by ρ+ ICCM. Furthermore, after the medium had been transferred and the cells were continuously cultured for 7 days, we found significantly increased CD59- gene loci mutation (increased by 45.9%) and delayed cell death in the progeny of ρ+ ICCM-treated bystander cells. In conclusion, the work presented here suggested that up-regulation of the mitochondria-dependent ROS might be very important in mediating genotoxicity of bystander effects.

  7. Up-regulation of ROS by mitochondria-dependent bystander signaling contributes to genotoxicity of bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shaopeng [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Zhao Ye; Zhao Guoping [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Bao Lingzhi [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun, E-mail: ljw@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2009-06-18

    Genomic instability can be observed in bystander cells. However, the underlying mechanism(s) is still relatively unclear. In a previous study, we found that irradiated cells released mitochondria-dependent intracellular factor(s) which could lead to bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction. In this paper, we used normal ({rho}{sup +}) and mtDNA-depleted ({rho}{sup 0}) human-hamster hybrid cells to investigate mitochondrial effects on the genotoxicity in bystander effect through medium transfer experiments. Through the detection of DNA double-strand breaks with {gamma}-H2AX, we found that the fraction of {gamma}-H2AX positive cells changed with time when irradiation conditioned cell medium (ICCM) were harvested. ICCM harvested from irradiated {rho}{sup +} cells at 10 min post-irradiation ({rho}{sup +} ICCM{sub 10min}) caused larger increases of bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction comparing to {rho}{sup 0} ICCM{sub 10min}, which only caused a slight increase of bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction. The {rho}{sup +} ICCM{sub 10min} could also result in the up-regulation of ROS production (increased by 35% at 10 min), while there was no significant increase in cells treated with {rho}{sup 0} ICCM{sub 10min}. We treated cells with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the scavenger of ROS, and quenched {gamma}-H2AX induction by {rho}{sup +} ICCM. Furthermore, after the medium had been transferred and the cells were continuously cultured for 7 days, we found significantly increased CD59{sup -} gene loci mutation (increased by 45.9%) and delayed cell death in the progeny of {rho}{sup +} ICCM-treated bystander cells. In conclusion, the work presented here suggested that up-regulation of the mitochondria-dependent ROS might be very important in mediating genotoxicity of bystander effects.

  8. Bystander-induced apoptosis and premature differentiation in primary urothelial explants after charged particle microbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ureter primary explant technique was developed to study bystander effects under in vivo like conditions where stem and differentiated cells are present. Irradiation was performed with a 3He2+ charged particle microbeam available at the Gray Cancer Institute, with high (∼2 μm) precision. Tissue sections from porcine ureters were pre-irradiated with the microbeam at a single location with 103He2+ particles (5 MeV; LET 70 keV.μm-1). After irradiation, the tissue section was incubated for 7 days, thus allowing the explant outgrowth to form. Total cellular damage (total fraction of micronucleated and apoptotic cells) was measured according to morphological criteria. Apoptosis was also assessed using a 3'-OH DNA end-labelling technique. Premature differentiation was estimated using antibodies to uroplakin III, a specific marker of terminal urothelial differentiation. Results of our experiments demonstrated a significant bystander-induced differentiation and a less significant increase in apoptotic and micronucleated cells. A hypothesis based on the protective nature of the bystander effect is proposed. (author)

  9. Effects of Low-Dose Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Human Cells: The Role of Induced Genes and the Bystander Effect. Final Technical Report (9/15/1998-5/31/2005)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B.

    2013-09-17

    This grant was designed to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bystander effect of radiation (initially described in this laboratory) whereby damage signals are passed from irradiated to non-irradiated cells in a population. These signals induce genetic effects including DNA damage, mutations and chromosomal aberrations in the nonirradiated cells. Experiments were carried out in cultured mammalian cells, primarily human diploid cells, irradiated with alpha particles. This research resulted in 17 publications in the refereed literature and is described in the Progress Report where it is keyed to the publication list. This project was initiated at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and continued in collaboration with students/fellows at Colorado State University (CSU) and the New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

  10. Studies of Bystander Effects in 3-D Tissue Systems Using a Low-LET Microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-17

    It is now accepted that biological effects may occur in cells that were not themselves traversed by ionizing radiation but are close to those that were. Little is known about the mechanism underlying such a bystander effect, although cell-to-cell communication is thought to be important. Previous work demonstrated a significant bystander effect for clonogenic survival and oncogenic transformation in C3H 10T(1/2) cells. Additional studies were undertaken to assess the importance of the degree of cell-to-cell contact at the time of irradiation on the magnitude of this bystander effect by varying the cell density. When 10% of cells were exposed to a range of 2-12 alpha particles, a significantly greater number of cells were inactivated when cells were irradiated at high density than at low density. In addition, the oncogenic transformation frequency was significantly higher in high-density cultures. These results suggest that when a cell is hit by radiation, the transmission of the bystander signal through cell-to-cell contact is an important mediator of the effect, implicating the involvement of intracellular communication through gap junctions. Additional studies to address the relationship between the bystander effect and the adaptive response were undertaken. A novel apparatus, where targeted and non-targeted cells were grown in close proximity, was used to investigate these. It was further examined whether a bystander effect or an adaptive response could be induced by a factor(s) present in the supernatants of cells exposed to a high or low dose of X-rays, respectively. When non-hit cells were co-cultured for 24 h with cells irradiated with 5 Gy alpha-particles, a significant increase in both cell killing and oncogenic transformation frequency was observed. If these cells were treated with 2 cGy X-rays 5 h before co-culture with irradiated cells, approximately 95% of the bystander effect was cancelled out. A 2.5-fold decrease in the oncogenic transformation

  11. An investigation of bystander effects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 'Bystander' effects have been documented in various mammalian cell types and appear to act by two distinct mechanisms. One response requires a functional gap-junction. A non gap-junction-mediated response has also been observed in human cell lines, indicating release of a signaling factor. No analogous response has been investigated in unicellular organisms. Given that DNA damage signaling pathways are present in simple eukaryotes, we investigated bystander signaling effects using a single-celled organism, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This organism may provide a much simpler model system than higher eukaryotic cells for studying these effects. We measured survival and mutation rate in an unirradiated culture after exposure to an irradiated culture. These two cultures were mixed immediately after irradiation, and any signaling factor that was produced had direct and continuous access to the unirradiated cells during subsequent cell divisions. The irradiated culture was from a multiply auxotrophic strain, whereas the unirradiated culture was from a prototrophic strain. Surviving colonies of the unirradiated culture were thus easily distinguished from those arising from irradiated cells. Mutation rates were measured as forward mutation to 2-deoxyglucose resistance. We have investigated bystander effects with electron and gamma dose from 6 to 20 MeV electron linacs. We varied electron beam energies, dose rates and temporal distributions of dose. The importance of this research stems from the fundamental evolutionary significance of cell signaling of any kind in unicellular systems, representing a major step toward the evolution of multi-cellular states

  12. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5, and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells.

  13. Expression of FHIT in AHH-1 cells irradiated by 60Co γ-ray and bystander effect cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the expression of FHIT gene in the 60Co gamma-ray irradiated human lymphocytoblast (AHH-1) cell and the bystander effect cell, and to explore the function of FHIT gene in the bystander effect of ionizing radiation. Method: Preparation of bystander effect cell model: after inadiated with different dose of 60Co gamma-ray (0, 2, 5 Gy), the directly irradiated AHH-1 cells were collected immediately by centrifugation and co-cultivated with non-irradiated cells in Transwell, forming the bystander effect group P1. In addition, some culture media supematant of directly irradiated cells were transferred to the non- irradiated cells culture medium, forming the group P2. Then cells were collected at 0, 6, 12, and 24 h after irradiation and the total RNA and protein were extracted. RT-PCR and Western blot were performed to determine the FHIT mRNA and protein level, respectively. Flow cytometry assay and cell counting were conducted to detect the alteration of cell cycle and cell proliferation, respectively at 0, 24 h after irradiation. Results: The mRNA level of FHIT gene among control cells, directly irradiated cells and bystander cells showed no obvious difference, while the FHIT protein level of the directly irradiated cells and bystander cells was significantly down-regulated compared with the control cells (F=102.45, P2 phase arrest and obviously inhibited the proliferation ability. Conclusions: 2 and 5 Gy of 60Co γ-ray irradiated AHH-1 cells can result in down regulation of the FHIT protein expression, which suggests that FHIT gene is involved in the process of bystander effect induced by irradiation. (authors)

  14. Dependence of the bystander effect for micronucleus formation on dose of heavy-ion radiation in normal human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionising radiation-induced bystander effects are well recognised, but its dependence on dose or linear energy transfer (LET) is still a matter of debate. To test this, 49 sites in confluent cultures of AG01522D normal human fibroblasts were targeted with microbeams of carbon (103 keV μm-1), neon (375 keV μm-1) and argon ions (1260 keV μm-1) and evaluated for the bystander-induced formation of micronucleus that is a kind of a chromosome aberration. Targeted exposure to neon and argon ions significantly increased the micronucleus frequency in bystander cells to the similar extent irrespective of the particle numbers per site of 1- 6. In contrast, the bystander micronucleus frequency increased with increasing the number of carbon-ion particles in a range between 1 and 3 particles per site and was similar in a range between 3 and 8 particles per site. These results suggest that the bystander effect of heavy ions for micronucleus formation depends on dose. (authors)

  15. Microbeam studies of soft X-ray induced bystander cell killing using microbeam X-ray cell irradiation system at CRIEPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation induced bystander response is defined as a response in cells which have not been directly targeted by radiation, but which are in the neighborhood of cells which have been directly exposed. In many cases, the bystander response is saturated with increasing dose and is observed when only one cell in a population is targeted by high-LET particle radiations or ultrasoft X-rays (278 eV). However, in our studies using synchrotron X-ray microbeams (5.35 keV), the bystander cell killing effect in normal human fibroblast WI-38 cells had a parabolic relationship to the irradiating dose and was detected if 5 or more cell nuclei were irradiated. To evaluate the feature of the X-ray-induced bystander cell killing effect at a wider dose range and the existence of photon energy dependence, the effects were assessed by irradiating cell nuclei in confluent WI-38 cells with aluminum K-shell (AlK) X-ray microbeams (1.49 keV). The surviving fraction decreased when only a single cell nucleus was irradiated, suggesting the minimal number of targeted cells to induce the effect may depend on the energy of photons used. In this study, we found that the bystander cell killing effect showed a biphasic relationship to the irradiating dose. The decrease in bystander cell survival at the doses higher than 0.23 Gy was partially suppressed between 2.3 and 7.0 Gy, followed by level-off around 90% above 14 Gy, suggesting that the X-ray-induced bystander response is dose dependent. In addition, NO is one of chief initiators/mediators of the effect at least 0.47 Gy. (author)

  16. Reciprocal bystander effect between α-irradiated macrophage and hepatocyte is mediated by cAMP through a membrane signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mingyuan [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, China–Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130033 (China); Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Li, Jitao; Yuan, Dexiao; Bai, Yang [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • α-Irradiation induced reciprocal effects between macrophage and hepatocyte cells. • cAMP played a protective role in regulating the reverse bystander effect. • cAMP communication contributed to the reciprocal effects via membrane signaling. • p53 was required for cAMP-regulated bystander effect in the recipient cells. - Abstract: Irradiated cells can induce biological effects on vicinal non-irradiated bystander cells, meanwhile the bystander cells may rescue the irradiated cells through a feedback signal stress. To elucidate the nature of this reciprocal effect, we examined the interaction between α-irradiated human macrophage cells U937 and its bystander HL-7702 hepatocyte cells using a cell co-culture system. Results showed that after 6 h of cell co-culture, mitochondria depolarization corresponding to apoptosis was significantly induced in the HL-7702 cells, but the formation of micronuclei in the irradiated U937 cells was markedly decreased compared to that without cell co-culture treatment. This reciprocal effect was not observed when the cell membrane signaling pathway was blocked by filipin that inhibited cAMP transmission from bystander cells to irradiated cells. After treatment of cells with exogenous cAMP, forskolin (an activator of cAMP) or KH-7 (an inhibitor of cAMP), respectively, it was confirmed that cAMP communication from bystander cells to targeted cells could mitigate radiation damage in U739 cells, and this cAMP insufficiency in the bystander cells contributed to the enhancement of bystander apoptosis. Moreover, the bystander apoptosis in HL-7702 cells was aggravated by cAMP inhibition but it could not be evoked when p53 of HL-7702 cells was knocked down no matter of forskolin and KH-7 treatment. In conclusion, this study disclosed that cAMP could be released from bystander HL-7702 cells and compensated to α-irradiated U937 cells through a membrane signaling pathway and this cAMP communication played a profound role in

  17. Reciprocal bystander effect between α-irradiated macrophage and hepatocyte is mediated by cAMP through a membrane signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • α-Irradiation induced reciprocal effects between macrophage and hepatocyte cells. • cAMP played a protective role in regulating the reverse bystander effect. • cAMP communication contributed to the reciprocal effects via membrane signaling. • p53 was required for cAMP-regulated bystander effect in the recipient cells. - Abstract: Irradiated cells can induce biological effects on vicinal non-irradiated bystander cells, meanwhile the bystander cells may rescue the irradiated cells through a feedback signal stress. To elucidate the nature of this reciprocal effect, we examined the interaction between α-irradiated human macrophage cells U937 and its bystander HL-7702 hepatocyte cells using a cell co-culture system. Results showed that after 6 h of cell co-culture, mitochondria depolarization corresponding to apoptosis was significantly induced in the HL-7702 cells, but the formation of micronuclei in the irradiated U937 cells was markedly decreased compared to that without cell co-culture treatment. This reciprocal effect was not observed when the cell membrane signaling pathway was blocked by filipin that inhibited cAMP transmission from bystander cells to irradiated cells. After treatment of cells with exogenous cAMP, forskolin (an activator of cAMP) or KH-7 (an inhibitor of cAMP), respectively, it was confirmed that cAMP communication from bystander cells to targeted cells could mitigate radiation damage in U739 cells, and this cAMP insufficiency in the bystander cells contributed to the enhancement of bystander apoptosis. Moreover, the bystander apoptosis in HL-7702 cells was aggravated by cAMP inhibition but it could not be evoked when p53 of HL-7702 cells was knocked down no matter of forskolin and KH-7 treatment. In conclusion, this study disclosed that cAMP could be released from bystander HL-7702 cells and compensated to α-irradiated U937 cells through a membrane signaling pathway and this cAMP communication played a profound role in

  18. Diffusible Factors Secreted by Glioblastoma and Medulloblastoma Cells Induce Oxidative Stress in Bystander Neural Stem Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Colangelo, Nicholas W; de Toledo, Sonia M; Azzam, Edouard I

    2016-08-01

    Harmful effects that alter the homeostasis of neural stem or progenitor cells (NSPs) can affect regenerative processes in the central nervous system. We investigated the effect of soluble factors secreted by control or (137)Cs-γ-irradiated glioblastoma or medulloblastoma cells on redox-modulated endpoints in recipient human NSPs. Growth medium harvested from the nonirradiated brain tumor cells, following 24 h of growth, induced prominent oxidative stress in recipient NSPs as judged by overall increases in mitochondrial superoxide radical levels (p medulloblastoma cells that was more potent at inducing apoptosis in the NSPs than medium from nonirradiated cells (p < .001). The elucidation of such stressful bystander effects provides avenues to understand the biochemical events underlying the development or exacerbation of degenerative outcomes associated with brain cancers. It is also relevant to tissue culture protocols whereby growth medium conditioned by tumor cells is often used to support the growth of stem cells. PMID:27511909

  19. Vanguards of paradigm shift in radiation biology. Radiation-induced adaptive and bystander responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv) are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation, using a linear no-threshold model (LNT model). However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose/low dose-rate radiation than they do to high dose/high dose-rate radiation. In other words, there are accumulated findings which cannot be explained by the classical ''target theory'' of radiation biology. The radioadaptive response, radiation-induced bystander effects, low-dose radio-hypersensitivity, and genomic instability are specifically observed in response to low dose/low dose-rate radiation, and the mechanisms underlying these responses often involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. Recently, correlations between the radioadaptive and bystander responses have been increasingly reported. The present review focuses on the latter two phenomena by summarizing observations supporting their existence, and discussing the linkage between them from the aspect of production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. (author)

  20. The Significance of the Bystander Effect: Modeling, Experiments, and More Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-22

    -term models is needed. As an example of this novel approach, we integrated a stochastic short-term initiation/inactivation/repopulation model with a deterministic two-stage long-term model. Within this new formalism, the following assumptions are implemented: radiation initiates, promotes, or kills pre-malignant cells; a pre-malignant cell generates a clone, which, if it survives, quickly reaches a size limitation; the clone subsequently grows more slowly and can eventually generate a malignant cell; the carcinogenic potential of pre-malignant cells decreases with age. The effectiveness of high-LET radiation per unit dose increases as dose rate decreases. This “inverse dose rate effect” is seen in radon-induced lung carcinogenesis. We suggest a biologically-motivated mechanism based on radiation-induced direct and bystander-effect-related risks: During radon exposure, only a fraction of cells are traversed by alpha particles. These irradiated cells have an increased probability of being initiated into a pre-malignant state. They release signals, which convert some nearby unirradiated cells to an activated state. When already pre-malignant cells are activated, their proliferation (promotion) rate increases. If a radiation dose is sufficient to activate most susceptible cells, protracting the exposure does not substantially decrease the number of activated cells, but prolongs the activated state during which pre-malignant cell proliferation is accelerated. This mechanism is implemented in a low-dose-rate extension of our carcinogenesis model, which integrates both short- and long-term modeling approaches, and was applied to radiotherapy-induced second cancer risk estimation. Model predictions adequately describe the data on radon-induced lung carcinogenesis in humans and rats, using few adjustable parameters. Conclusions about the relative importance of promotion vs. initiation for radon carcinogenesis are similar to those reported with the two-stage clonal expansion model

  1. Cytokines shape chemotherapy-induced and 'bystander' senescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hodný, Zdeněk; Hubáčková, Soňa; Bartek, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2010), s. 375-376. ISSN 1945-4589 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/1418; GA ČR GA301/08/0353 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : bystander cellular senescence * cytokines * PML Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.964, year: 2010

  2. Heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy in irradiated C2C12 myoblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is one of the major processes involved in the degradation of intracellular materials. Here, we examined the potential impact of heavy ion irradiation on the induction of autophagy in irradiated C2C12 mouse myoblasts and their non-targeted bystander cells. In irradiated cells, ultrastructural analysis revealed the accumulation of autophagic structures at various stages of autophagy (id est (i.e.) phagophores, autophagosomes and autolysosomes) within 20 min after irradiation. Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and autolysosomes containing MVBs (amphisomes) were also observed. Heavy ion irradiation increased the staining of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and LysoTracker Red (LTR). Such enhanced staining was suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. In addition to irradiated cells, bystander cells were also positive with LTR staining. Altogether, these results suggest that heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy not only in irradiated myoblasts but also in their bystander cells. (author)

  3. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M S; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu; Pandey, B N

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  4. Mechanisms and biological importance of photon-induced bystander responses. Do they have an impact on low-dose radiation responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elucidating the biological effect of low linear energy transfer (LET), low-dose and/or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation is essential in ensuring radiation safety. Over the past two decades, non-targeted effects, which are not only a direct consequence of radiation-induced initial lesions produced in cellular DNA but also of intra- and inter-cellular communications involving both targeted and non-targeted cells, have been reported and are currently defining a new paradigm in radiation biology. These effects include radiation-induced adaptive response, low-dose hypersensitivity, genomic instability, and radiation-induced bystander response (RIBR). RIBR is generally defined as a cellular response that is induced in non-irradiated cells that receive bystander signals from directly irradiated cells. RIBR could thus play an important biological role in low-dose irradiation conditions. However, this suggestion was mainly based on findings obtained using high-LET charged-particle radiations. The human population (especially the Japanese, who are exposed to lower doses of radon than the world average) is more frequently exposed to low-LET photons (X-rays or γ-rays) than to high-LET charged-particle radiation on a daily basis. There are currently a growing number of reports describing a distinguishing feature between photon-induced bystander response and high-LET RIBR. In particular, photon-induced by-stander response is strongly influenced by irradiation dose, the irradiated region of the targeted cells, and p53 status. The present review focuses on the photon-induced bystander response, and discusses its impact on the low-dose radiation effect. (author)

  5. Radiation induced bystander signals are independent of DNA damage and DNA repair capacity of the irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence is accumulating that irradiated cells produce signals, which interact with non-exposed cells in the same population. Here, we analysed the mechanism for bystander signal arising in wild-type CHO cells and repair deficient varients, focussing on the relationship between DNA repair capacity and bystander signal arising in irradiated cells. In order to investigate the bystander effect, we carried out medium transfer experiments after X-irradiation where micronuclei were scored in non-targeted DSB repair deficient xrs5 cells. When conditioned medium from irradiated cells was transferred to unirradiated xrs5 cells, the level of induction was independent of whether the medium came from irradiated wild-type, ssb or dsb repair deficient cells. This result suggests that the activation of a bystander signal is independent of the DNA repair capacity of the irradiated cells. Also, pre-treatment of the irradiated cells with 0.5% DMSO, which suppresses micronuclei induction in CHO but not in xrs5 cells, suppressed bystander effects completely in both conditioned media, suggesting that DMSO is effective for suppression of bystander signal arising independently of DNA damage in irradiated cells. Overall the work presented here adds to the understanding that it is the repair phenotype of the cells receiving bystander signals, which determines overall response rather than that of the cell producing the bystander signal

  6. A Role for Bioelectric Effects in the Induction of Bystander Signals by Ionizing Radiation?

    OpenAIRE

    Mothersill, C; Moran, G; McNeill, F.; Gow, M.D.; Denbeigh, J.; Prestwich, W.; Seymour, C. B.

    2007-01-01

    The induction of “bystander effects” i.e. effects in cells which have not received an ionizing radiation track, is now accepted but the mechanisms are not completely clear. Bystander effects following high and low LET radiation exposure are accepted but mechanisms are still not understood. There is some evidence for a physical component to the signal. This paper tests the hypothesis that bioelectric or biomagnetic phenomena are involved. Human immortalized skin keratinocytes and primary expla...

  7. Bystander autophagy mediated by radiation-induced exosomal miR-7-5p in non-targeted human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Man; Wang, Yu; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Xie, Da-Fei; Wang, Qi; Guan, Hua; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) describes a set of biological effects in non-targeted cells that receive bystander signals from the irradiated cells. RIBE brings potential hazards to adjacent normal tissues in radiotherapy, and imparts a higher risk than previously thought. Excessive release of some substances from irradiated cells into extracellular microenvironment has a deleterious effect. For example, cytokines and reactive oxygen species have been confirmed to be involved in RIBE process via extracellular medium or gap junctions. However, RIBE-mediating signals and intercellular communication pathways are incompletely characterized. Here, we first identified a set of differentially expressed miRNAs in the exosomes collected from 2 Gy irradiated human bronchial epithelial BEP2D cells, from which miR-7-5p was found to induce autophagy in recipient cells. This exosome-mediated autophagy was significantly attenuated by miR-7-5p inhibitor. Moreover, our data demonstrated that autophagy induced by exosomal miR-7-5p was associated with EGFR/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Together, our results support the involvement of secretive exosomes in propagation of RIBE signals to bystander cells. The exosomes-containing miR-7-5p is a crucial mediator of bystander autophagy. PMID:27417393

  8. Signaling factors and pathways of α-particle irradiation induced bilateral bystander responses between Beas-2B and U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiamei; Wang, Juan; Wang, Xiangdong; Wang, Ping; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Cuiping; Bai, Yang; Shao, Chunlin

    2016-07-01

    Although radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been investigated for decades for their potential health risk, the underlying gene regulation is still largely unclear, especially the roles of immune system and inflammatory response in RIBE. In the present study, macrophage U937 cells and epithelial Beas-2B cells were co-cultured to disclose the cascades of bystander signaling factors and intercellular communications. After α-particle irradiation, both ERK and p38 pathways were activated in Beas-2B cells and were associated with the autocrine and paracrine signaling of TNF-α and IL-8, resulting in direct damage to the irradiated cells. Similar upregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 was induced in the bystander U937 cells after co-culture with α-irradiated Beas-2B cells. This upregulation was dependent on the activation of NF-κB pathway and was responsible for the enhanced damage of α-irradiated Beas-2B cells. Interestingly, the increased expressions of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs in the bystander U937 cells were clearly relayed on the activated ERK and p38 pathways in the irradiated Beas-2B cells, and the upregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs in co-cultured Beas-2B cells was also partly due to the activated NF-κB pathway in the bystander U937 cells. With the pretreatment of U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor), SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) or BAY 11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor), the aggravated damage in the α-irradiated Beas-2B cells could be largely alleviated. Our results disclosed novel signaling cascades of macrophage-mediated bilateral bystander responses that the release of TNF-α and IL-8 regulated by MAPK and NF-κB pathways synergistically increased cellular injury after α-particle irradiation. PMID:27155559

  9. Extracellular signaling through the microenvironment: a hypothesis relating carcinogenesis, bystander effects, and genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Brooks, A. L.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Cell growth, differentiation and death are directed in large part by extracellular signaling through the interactions of cells with other cells and with the extracellular matrix; these interactions are in turn modulated by cytokines and growth factors, i.e. the microenvironment. Here we discuss the idea that extracellular signaling integrates multicellular damage responses that are important deterrents to the development of cancer through mechanisms that eliminate abnormal cells and inhibit neoplastic behavior. As an example, we discuss the action of transforming growth factor beta (TGFB1) as an extracellular sensor of damage. We propose that radiation-induced bystander effects and genomic instability are, respectively, positive and negative manifestations of this homeostatic process. Bystander effects exhibited predominantly after a low-dose or a nonhomogeneous radiation exposure are extracellular signaling pathways that modulate cellular repair and death programs. Persistent disruption of extracellular signaling after exposure to relatively high doses of ionizing radiation may lead to the accumulation of aberrant cells that are genomically unstable. Understanding radiation effects in terms of coordinated multicellular responses that affect decisions regarding the fate of a cell may necessitate re-evaluation of radiation dose and risk concepts and provide avenues for intervention.

  10. H2AX phosphorylation in response to DNA double-strand break formation during bystander signalling: Effect of micro-RNA knockdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation, hundreds of H2AX molecules in the chromatin flanking the break site are phosphorylated on serine residue 139, termed gamma-H2AX, so that virtually every DSB site in a nucleus can be visualised within 10 min of its formation using an antibody to gamma-H2AX. One application of this sensitive assay is to examine the induction of DNA double-strand damage in subtle non-targeted cellular effects such as the bystander effect. Here whether micro-RNA (miRNA) serve as a primary signalling mechanism for bystander effect propagation by comparing matched human colon carcinoma cell lines with wild-type or depleted levels of mature miRNAs was investigated. No major differences were found in the levels of induced gamma-H2AX foci in the tested cell lines, indicating that though miRNAs play a role in bystander effect manifestation, they appear not to be the primary bystander signalling molecules in the formation of bystander effect-induced DSBs. (authors)

  11. The importance of bystander effects in radiation therapy in melanoma skin-cancer cells and umbilical-cord stromal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine direct and bystander radiation-induced effects in normal umbilical-cord stromal stem cell (HCSSC) lines and in human cancer cells. Materials and methods: The UCSSC lines used in this study were obtained in our laboratory. Two cell lines (UCSSC 35 and UCSSC 37) and two human melanoma skin-cancer cells (A375 and G361) were exposed to ionizing radiation to measure acute radiation-dosage cell-survival curves and radiation-induced bystander cell-death response. Normal cells, although extremely sensitive to ionizing radiation, were resistant to the bystander effect whilst tumor cells were sensitive to irradiated cell-conditioned media, showing a dose–response relationship that became saturated at relatively low doses. We applied a biophysical model to describe bystander cell-death through the binding of a ligand to the cells. This model allowed us to calculate the maximum cell death (χmax) produced by the bystander effect together with its association constant (KBy) in terms of dose equivalence (Gy). The values obtained for KBy in A375 and G361 cells were 0.23 and 0.29 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings help to understand how anticancer therapy could have an additional decisive effect in that the response of sub-lethally hit tumor cells to damage might be required for therapy to be successful because the survival of cells communicating with irradiated cells is reduced.

  12. Stochastic models of the bystander effect and of transmissible genomic instability: implications for mechanisms and low dose risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, M. P.

    Bystander effects following exposure to α -particles have been observed in C3H 10T cells and in other experimental systems, and imply that linearly extrapolating low dose risks from high-dose data might materially underestimate risk. In many experimental systems there is evidence of saturation of dose response that would be expected from the bystander effect. The ratio of lung cancer risk among persons exposed to low and high doses of radon daughters is 2.4 -- 4.0, with an upper 95% confidence limit of about 14. Assuming the bystander effect observed in the C3H 10T data applies to human lung cells in vivo, the epidemiological data imply that the number of neighbouring cells that can contribute to the bystander effect is between 0 and 1, with an upper 95% confidence limit of about 7. As a consequence, the bystander effect observed in the C3H 10T system probably does not play a large part in the process of radon-induced lung carcinogenesis in humans. Other experimental data relating to the bystander effect after α -particle exposure are surveyed; some of these data are more compatible with the epidemiological data. Three models of genomic instability recently developed by Little and Wright (Math. Biosci. 2003;183:111-34), with two, three and five stages, are compared with the four-stage model proposed by Luebeck and Moolgavkar (PNAS 2002;99:15095-100) and the two-stage model of Nowak et al. (PNAS 2002;99:16226-31). All models are fitted to SEER colon cancer data. Although the five-stage model of Little and Wright (2003) provides the best fit, it is not much superior to that of the model of Nowak et al. (2002) or the two- and three-stage models of Little and Wright (2003). The fit of the model of Luebeck and Moolgavkar (2002) is somewhat worse than these three, particularly for females under the age of 40. Comparison of the predictions of the two-stage models of Little and Wright (2003) and Nowak (2002) with patterns of excess risk in the Japanese atomic bomb

  13. Bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive response, and cancer risk assessment for radiation and chemical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increased interest in utilizing mechanistic data in support of the cancer risk assessment process for ionizing radiation and environmental chemical exposures. In this regard, the use of biologically based dose-response models is particularly advocated. The aim is to provide an enhanced basis for describing the nature of the dose-response curve for induced tumors at low levels of exposure. Cellular responses that might influence the nature of the dose-response curve at low exposures are understandably receiving attention. These responses (bystander effects, genomic instability, and adaptive responses) have been studied most extensively for radiation exposures. The former two could result in an enhancement of the tumor response at low doses and the latter could lead to a reduced response compared to that predicted by a linear extrapolation from high dose responses. Bystander responses, whereby cells other than those directly traversed by radiation tracks are damaged, can alter the concept of target cell population per unit dose. Similarly, induced genomic instability can alter the concept of total response to an exposure. There appears to be a role for oxidative damage and cellular signaling in the etiology of these cellular responses. The adaptive response appears to be inducible at very low doses of radiation or of some chemicals and reduces the cellular response to a larger challenge dose. It is currently unclear how these cellular toxic responses might be involved in tumor formation, if indeed they are. In addition, it is not known how widespread they are as regards inducing agents. Thus, their impact on low dose cancer risk remains to be established

  14. Tanshinone IIA increases the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir gene therapy via enhanced gap junctional intercellular communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Xiao

    Full Text Available The bystander effect is an intriguing phenomenon by which adjacent cells become sensitized to drug treatment during gene therapy with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV. This effect is reported to be mediated by gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC, and therefore, we postulated that upregulation of genes that facilitate GJIC may enhance the HSV-tk/GCV bystander effect. Previous findings have shown Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA, a chemical substance derived from a Chinese medicine herb, promotes the upregulation of the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in B16 cells. Because gap junctions are formed by connexins, we hypothesized that Tan IIA might increase GJIC. Our results show that Tan IIA increased GJIC in B16 melanoma cells, leading to more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in cells stably expressing HSV-tk. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that tumors in mice with 10% HSV-tk positive B16 cells and 90% wild-type B16 cells became smaller following treatment with the combination of GCV and Tan IIA as compared to GCV or Tan IIA alone. These data demonstrate that Tan IIA can augment the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system through increased gap junction coupling, which adds strength to the promising strategy that develops connexins inducer to potentiate the effects of suicide gene therapy.

  15. A Meta-Analysis of School-Based Bullying Prevention Programs' Effects on Bystander Intervention Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanin, Joshua R.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Pigott, Therese D.

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized bullying prevention programs' effectiveness at increasing bystander intervention in bullying situations. Evidence from 12 school-based programs, involving 12,874 students, indicated that overall the programs were successful (Hedges's g = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11 to 0.29, p = 0.001), with larger…

  16. Using Role-Taking and Behavioral Mimicking in Games to Increase Awareness on the Bystander Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard Andersen, Josephine; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    behavioral mimicking. The game concept should include a relatable (preferably player modifiable) avatar, so the player can relate and adhere to the empathy and intent to help. Since the bystander effect takes place in groups where deindividuation also is common, this should require a behavioral change of...

  17. Role of ATM in bystander signaling between human monocytes and lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Ghosh, Anu; Krishna, Malini

    2015-12-01

    The response of a cell or tissue to ionizing radiation is mediated by direct damage to cellular components and indirect damage mediated by radiolysis of water. Radiation affects both irradiated cells and the surrounding cells and tissues. The radiation-induced bystander effect is defined by the presence of biological effects in cells that were not themselves in the field of irradiation. To establish the contribution of the bystander effect in the survival of the neighboring cells, lung carcinoma A549 cells were exposed to gamma-irradiation, 2Gy. The medium from the irradiated cells was transferred to non-irradiated A549 cells. Irradiated A549 cells as well as non-irradiated A549 cells cultured in the presence of medium from irradiated cells showed decrease in survival and increase in γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci, indicating a bystander effect. Bystander signaling was also observed between different cell types. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated and gamma-irradiated U937 (human monocyte) cells induced a bystander response in non-irradiated A549 (lung carcinoma) cells as shown by decreased survival and increased γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci. Non-stimulated and/or irradiated U937 cells did not induce such effects in non-irradiated A549 cells. Since ATM protein was activated in irradiated cells as well as bystander cells, it was of interest to understand its role in bystander effect. Suppression of ATM with siRNA in A549 cells completely inhibited bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. On the other hand suppression of ATM with siRNA in PMA stimulated U937 cells caused only a partial inhibition of bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. These results indicate that apart from ATM, some additional factor may be involved in bystander effect between different cell types. PMID:26653982

  18. Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

    2007-10-26

    We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

  19. Adoptive transfer of dying cells causes bystander-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwulst, Steven J; Davis, Christopher G; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hotchkiss, Richard S

    2007-02-16

    The anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein has the remarkable ability to prevent cell death from several noxious stimuli. Intriguingly, Bcl-2 overexpression in one cell type has been reported to protect against cell death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cell types. The mechanism of this "trans" protection has been speculated to be secondary to the release of a cytoprotective factor by Bcl-2 overexpressing cells. We employed a series of adoptive transfer experiments in which lymphocytes that overexpress Bcl-2 were administered to either wild type mice or mice lacking mature T and B cells (Rag-1-/-) to detect the presence or absence of the putative protective factor. We were unable to demonstrate "trans" protection. However, adoptive transfer of apoptotic or necrotic cells exacerbated the degree of apoptotic death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cells (p < or= 0.05). Therefore, this data suggests that dying cells emit signals triggering cell death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cells, i.e., a "trans" destructive effect. PMID:17194455

  20. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 04: What if bystander effects influence cell kill within a target volume? Potential consequences of dose heterogeneity on TCP and EUD on intermediate risk prostate patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro evidence has suggested that radiation induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing which may influence radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms. This work applies a bystander effect model, which has been derived from published in vitro data, to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumour control probability (TCP) and compare them with predictions from standard linear quadratic (LQ) models that assume a response due only to local absorbed dose. Comparisons between the models were made under increasing dose heterogeneity scenarios. Dose throughout the CTV was modeled with normal distributions, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity yields as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. Intermediate risk prostate prescriptions of 78 Gy over 39 fractions had maximum EUD and TCP values at SD of around 5Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. The bystander model demonstrates the potential to deviate from the common local LQ model predictions as dose heterogeneity through a prostate CTV is varies. The results suggest the potential for allowing some degree of dose heterogeneity within a CTV, although further investigations of the assumptions of the bystander model are warranted

  1. Bystander effects of the ionizing radiation and his implications in radiotherapy and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the classical paradigm, biological effects of ionizing radiation are attributed to DNA damage induced in each irradiated cell. Demonstration of ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) has generated a deep change in current understanding of radiobiology. RIBE are radiation-induced effects produced in cells that have not been actually irradiated. Several technical advances, particularly the use of microbeams, allowed in vitro study of RIBE. There are two known ways by which irradiated cells can communicate with non-irradiated cells, namely: through gap junctions connecting the cytoplasms of adjacent cells, and through the secretion of soluble factors to the extracellular medium. These factors include several cytokines and reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. In the affected cells, signalling pathways mostly involve activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), NF-kB transcription factor and of the enzymes cyclooxygenase 2, nitric oxide synthase 2 and NAD (P)H oxidase. RIBE induce point mutations and epigenetic changes. Effects on cellular signalling pathways can persist indefinitely and even be transmitted to the progeny of affected cells. Paradoxically, under certain conditions RIBE may be adaptive, which means that they turn affected cells more resistant to ionizing radiation. Adaptation demands protein synthesis. It enhances DNA repair mechanisms and resistance to oxidative stress. RIBE have also been demonstrated in vivo. Thus, they may have important implications for radiotherapy, both to improve therapeutic efficacy and to reduce the incidence of adverse effects. Furthermore, a better understanding of RIBE may have an influence on international radioprotection standards. (authors)

  2. The Role of Bystander Effects in the Antitumor Activity of the Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug PR-104

    OpenAIRE

    Foehrenbacher, Annika; Patel, Kashyap; Abbattista, Maria R; Guise, Chris P.; Timothy W Secomb; Wilson, William R; Hicks, Kevin O.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of prodrugs in tumors (e.g., by bioreduction in hypoxic zones) has the potential to generate active metabolites that can diffuse within the tumor microenvironment. Such “bystander effects” may offset spatial heterogeneity in prodrug activation but the relative importance of this effect is not understood. Here, we quantify the contribution of bystander effects to antitumor activity for the first time, by developing a spatially resolved pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (SR-PK/PD) mode...

  3. Dexamethasone inhibits the HSV-tk/ ganciclovir bystander effect in malignant glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HSV-tk/ ganciclovir (GCV) gene therapy has been extensively studied in the setting of brain tumors and largely relies on the bystander effect. Large studies have however failed to demonstrate any significant benefit of this strategy in the treatment of human brain tumors. Since dexamethasone is a frequently used symptomatic treatment for malignant gliomas, its interaction with the bystander effect and the overall efficacy of HSV-TK gene therapy ought to be assessed. Stable clones of TK-expressing U87, C6 and LN18 cells were generated and their bystander effect on wild type cells was assessed. The effects of dexamethasone on cell proliferation and sensitivity to ganciclovir were assessed with a thymidine incorporation assay and a MTT test. Gap junction mediated intercellular communication was assessed with microinjections and FACS analysis of calcein transfer. The effect of dexamethasone treatment on the sensitivity of TK-expressing to FAS-dependent apoptosis in the presence or absence of ganciclovir was assessed with an MTT test. Western blot was used to evidence the effect of dexamethasone on the expression of Cx43, CD95, CIAP2 and BclXL. Dexamethasone significantly reduced the bystander effect in TK-expressing C6, LN18 and U87 cells. This inhibition results from a reduction of the gap junction mediated intercellular communication of these cells (GJIC), from an inhibition of their growth and thymidine incorporation and from a modulation of the apoptotic cascade. The overall efficacy of HSV-TK gene therapy is adversely affected by dexamethasone co-treatment in vitro. Future HSV-tk/ GCV gene therapy clinical protocols for gliomas should address this interference of corticosteroid treatment

  4. Contribution of nitric oxide radicals in bystander and adaptive responses induced by heavy ion-beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether radioadaptive responses were induced after irradiation with accelerated ion beams through nitric oxide-mediated bystander response in cultured cells in vitro and in some organs of mice in vivo. Human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells transfected with wild-type p53 (H1299/wtp53 cells) were used. The cells were irradiated with accelerated neon (400 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm) or iron (500 MeV/u, 200 keV/μm) ion beams. Then, the cells were allowed forming colonies, were cultured for 48 h to obtained samples for Western blot analysis, or were cultured for several weeks to fix mutations in the locus of hprt gene. ICR male mice (Jcl:ICR) were used. The mice were irradiated on 2 days with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 13 keV/μm) or argon ion beams (500 MeV/u, 90 keV/μm). The intestine and testis were excised 2 days after the last irradiation. These excised tissues were fixed, embedded in paraffin and made of thin-sections on slide glasses. Then the TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL)- and activated caspase-3-positive cells in the thin-sections of tissues were detected by the immunohistochemical method. A significant reduction of mutation rate of the hprt gene was observed when the cells were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate neon or iron ion beams. This reduction was partially suppressed by NO radical scavenger, carboxy-PTIO. The bystander-induced apoptotic and activated caspase-3-positive cells were obviously observed in unirradiated intestine and testis when mice were irradiated with carbon or argon ion beams across the upper body. These observations were partially suppressed by carboxy-PTIO into the peritoneal cavity. (author)

  5. Bystander effect studies using heavy-ion microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have established a single cell irradiation system, which allows selected cells to be individually hit with defined number of heavy charged particles, using a collimated heavy-ion microbeam apparatus at JAEA-Takasaki. This system has been developed to study radiobiological processes in hit cells and bystander cells exposed to low dose and low dose-rate high-LET radiations, in ways that cannot be achieved using conventional broad-field exposures. Individual cultured cells grown in special dishes were irradiated in the atmosphere with a single or defined numbers of 18.3 MeV/amu 12C, 13.0 or 17.5 MeV/amu 20Ne, and 11.5 MeV/amu 40Ar ions. Targeting and irradiation of the cells were performed automatically according to the positional data of the target cells microscopically obtained before irradiation. The actual number of particle tracks that pass through target cells was detected with prompt etching of the bottom of the cell dish made of ion track detector TNF-1 (modified CR-39). (author)

  6. Theoretical models and simulation codes to investigate bystander effects and cellular communication at low doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, F.; Alloni, D.; Facoetti, A.; Mairani, A.; Nano, R.; Ottolenghi, A.

    Astronauts in space are continuously exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays During the last ten years the effects of low radiation doses have been widely re-discussed following a large number of observations on the so-called non targeted effects in particular bystander effects The latter consist of induction of cytogenetic damage in cells not directly traversed by radiation most likely as a response to molecular messengers released by directly irradiated cells Bystander effects which are observed both for lethal endpoints e g clonogenic inactivation and apoptosis and for non-lethal ones e g mutations and neoplastic transformation tend to show non-linear dose responses This might have significant consequences in terms of low-dose risk which is generally calculated on the basis of the Linear No Threshold hypothesis Although the mechanisms underlying bystander effects are still largely unknown it is now clear that two types of cellular communication i e via gap junctions and or release of molecular messengers into the extracellular environment play a fundamental role Theoretical models and simulation codes can be of help in elucidating such mechanisms In the present paper we will review different available modelling approaches including one that is being developed at the University of Pavia The focus will be on the different assumptions adopted by the various authors and on the implications of such assumptions in terms of non-targeted radiobiological damage and more generally low-dose

  7. The use of radiation microbeams to investigate the bystander effect in cells and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkard, M.; Prise, K. M.; Michette, A. G.; Vojnovic, B.

    2007-09-01

    Microbeams are ideally suited to the study of so-called 'non-targeted' phenomena that are now known to occur when living cells and tissues are irradiated. Non-targeted effects are those where cells are seen to respond to ionising radiation through pathways other than direct damage to the DNA. One such phenomenon is the 'bystander effect'; the observation that unirradiated cells can be damaged through signalling pathways initiated by a nearby irradiated cell. The effect leads to a highly non-linear dose-response at low doses and is forcing a rethink of established models used to estimate low-dose radiation risk, which are largely based on linear extrapolations from epidemiological data at much higher doses. The bystander effect may also provide an opportunity for improvements in the treatment of cancer by radiotherapy, as it may be possible to chemically influence the bystander response in such a way as to enhance cell killing in tumour cells or to protect healthy tissue.

  8. The Effects of Cell Phone Conversations on the Attention and Memory of Bystanders

    OpenAIRE

    Galván, Veronica V.; Vessal, Rosa S.; Golley, Matthew T.

    2013-01-01

    The pervasive use of cell phones impacts many people–both cell phone users and bystanders exposed to conversations. This study examined the effects of overhearing a one-sided (cell phone) conversation versus a two-sided conversation on attention and memory. In our realistic design, participants were led to believe they were participating in a study examining the relationship between anagrams and reading comprehension. While the participant was completing an anagram task, the researcher left t...

  9. Contribution of nitric oxide radicals in bystander and adaptive responses induced by heavy ion-beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether radioadaptive responses were induced after irradiation with accelerated ion beams through nitric oxide-mediated bystander response in cultured cells in vitro and in some organs of mice in vivo. Human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells transfected with wild-type p53 (H1299/wtp53 cells) were used. The cells were irradiated with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm or 135 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm). Then, the cells were allowed forming colonies. ICR male mice (Jcl: ICR) were used. The mice were irradiated on 2 days with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 13 keV/μm or 135 MeV/u, 25 keV/μm) or argon ion beams (500 MeV/u, 90 keV/μm). The small intestine and testis were excised 2 days after the last irradiation. These excised tissues were fixed, embedded in paraffin and made of thin-sections on slide glasses. Then the TUNEL- and activated caspase-3-positive cells in the thin-sections of tissues were detected by the immunohistochemical method. A significant elevated surviving fractions of cells was observed when the cells were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate carbon ion beams. This enhancement was partially suppressed by Nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenger, carboxy-PTIO (c-PTIO). The bystander-induced apoptotic and activated caspase-3-positive cells were obviously observed in the unirradiated small intestine and testis when mice were irradiated with carbon or argon ion beams across the upper body. In addition, a significant reduction of apoptotic cells in the intestine and testis, when mice were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate carbon or argon ion beams. These observations were partially suppressed by c-PTIO into the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, it is suggested that the apoptosis may be induced in the tissue stem cells of small intestine and testis. (author)

  10. G(2)-M phase-correlative bystander effects are co-mediated by DNA-PKcs and ATM after carbon ion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenzhi; Dong, Chen; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uchihori, Yukio; Xie, Yuexia; Dang, Bingrong; Li, Wenjian; Shao, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has shown that radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) may have significant implications to the efficiency of radiotherapy. Although cellular radiosensitivity relies on cell cycle status, it is largely unknown how about the relationship between RIBE and cell cycle distribution, much less the underlying mechanism. In the present study, the lung cancer A549 cells were synchronized into different cell cycle phases of G1, S and G2/M and irradiated with high linear energy transfer (LET) carbon ions. By treating nonirradiated cells with the conditioned medium from these irradiated cells, it was found that the G2-M phase cells had the largest contribution to RIBE. Meanwhile, the activity of DNA-PKcs but not ATM was increased in the synchronized G2-M phase cells in spite of both of them were activated in the asynchronous cells after carbon ion irradiation. When the G2-M phased cells were transferred with DNA-PKcs siRNA and ATM siRNA individually or treated with an inhibitor of either DNA-PKcs or ATM before carbon ion irradiation, the RIBE was effectively diminished. These results provide new evidence linking cell cycle to bystander responses and demonstrate that DNA-PKcs and ATM are two associated factors in co-regulating G2-M phase-related bystander effects. PMID:26774662

  11. Synergy between chemotherapy and alpha particles: effects in cells directly hit and in bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-emitting nuclides offers the potential for selective targeting of micrometastatic sites. The short range of alpha particles and limited penetration of the labeled antibody into the tumor make it difficult to deliver a lethal dose to all tumor cells. In an effort to improve the extent and uniformity of tumor cell kill, experiments are underway to evaluate the ability of chemotherapy agents to produce synergistic effects in cells directly hit by alpha particles and in bystander cells. An alpha particle cell irradiation system comprised of planar americium-241 alpha particle sources together with custom-made cell culture dishes with replaceable mylar bottoms has been constructed and characterized. By changing the alpha particle source, the dose rate to cells on the mylar membrane can be varied from 0.0013 Gy/min to 13 Gy/min. The residual range of the alpha particles after exiting the mylar membrane is approximately 30 ∝/m. Preliminary results with alpha particle exposure in the presence or absence of low concentrations of either taxol or oxaliplatin show evidence of synergistic effects. A series of plastic grids have been designed and constructed that can be interposed between the alpha particle source and the cells to partially block the alpha particles. The ratio of open area to shielded area is kept constant at 50% but the diameter and total number of circular openings in the grid is varied, thus changing the proportion of bystander cells present close to the edge between the open and shielded zones. This approach creates a two-dimensional model system for micrometastatic tumors of various sizes where the shielded areas represent the deeper portions of a tumor beyond the range of surface-bound alpha particles. Experiments are underway to determine whether there are synergistic effects between the chemotherapy agents and the bystander cells

  12. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Sejal [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu [Radiation System and Engineering Section, Department of Technical Support and Development, Research, Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: badrinarain@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy.

  13. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy

  14. GAP junctional intercellular communication confers an enhanced bystander effect as well as a protective effect in HSV-TK/gancyclovir mediated cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The 'Bystander Effect' is the phenomenon by which cells which are not transduced with the Herpes Simplex Virus - Thymidine Kinase (HSV-TK) gene are killed by the guanosine analog Gancyclovir (GCV) when they are nearby HSV-TK positive cells. Since currently available gene transfer technologies have a low efficiency (typically less than 10% of cells are transduced), a better understanding of the mechanism underlying the bystander effect is crucial for the success of the HSV-TK/GCV enzyme prodrug gene therapy approach. Gap junctions, which are specialized cell membrane channels allowing the passage of molecules < 1000 daltons in size directly from cell to cell, have been proposed as a possible mediator of the bystander effect. In particular, gap junctions could permit the transfer of toxic metabolites from the HSV-TK positive cells to the bystander cells. Our aim was to assess the role of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in the bystander effect. Materials and Methods: Co-culture of an HSV-TK transduced rat liver epithelial cell line (WB-TK), with either its communication competent parental cell line (WB), or an isogenic cell line differing by its communication incompetence (aB1). The ratios of effector cells (WB-TK) to bystander cells (WB or aB1), were (100(0)), (50(50)), (5(95)), or(0(100)) . These various mixed populations were exposed for 24 hours to 10μM GCV and thereafter placed at clonal density into selective media, allowing for growth of either the bystander (TK negative) cells or the effector (TK-positive) cells. Results: 1) When the effector/bystander ratio was (50(50)) the surviving fraction of the bystander cells was 3.5% and 37% for the WB and aB1, respectively. When the effector/bystander ratio was (5(95)), the surviving fraction was 51% and 65% for the WB and aB1, respectively. Either cell line (WB or aB1) cultured alone was unaffected by GCV. These results demonstrate that the bystander effect is much higher when

  15. Bystander deixis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Romani and several other languages across the globe. The second part is concerned with the contextual factors that must have a place in a discourse model that wants to be able to handle linguistic manifestations of bystander deixis. Due the fact that Romani has typically been used for in...

  16. Activation of caspase-3 noninvolved in the bystander effect of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Lin, Juqiang; Chu, Jun; Ma, Yan; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2008-01-01

    Use of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV) system is one of the promising approaches in the rapidly growing area of gene therapy. The "bystander effect," a phenomenon in which HSV-tk+ cells exposed to GCV are toxic to adjacent HSV-tk- cells, was reported to play an important role in suicide gene therapy. However, the mechanism by which HSV-tk/GCV induces the bystander effect is poorly understood. We monitored the activation of caspase-3 in living cells induced by the HSV-tk/GCV system using a genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe CD3, , a caspase-3 recognition site fused with a cyan fluorescent protien (CFP) and a red fluorescent protein (DsRed) which we reported and named in a previous paper. Fluorescence protein (FP)-based multicolor cellular labeling, combined with the multichannel fluorescence imaging and FRET imaging techniques, provides a novel and improved approach to directly determine whether the activation of caspase-3 involved in the HSV-tk/GCV system induces cell apoptosis in tk gene-expressing cells and their neighboring cells. FRET ratio images of CD3, and fluorescence images of the fusion protein of thymidine kinase linked with green fluorescent protein (TK-GFP), indicated that HSV-tk/GCV system-induced apoptosis in human adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC-M) cells was via a caspase-3 pathway, and the activation of caspase-3 was not involved in the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system. PMID:18601533

  17. Intrinsic properties of tumour cells have a key impact on the bystander effect mediated by genetically engineered mesenchymal stromal cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matusková, M.; Baranovicová, L.; Kozovská, Z.; Duriniková, E.; Pastoráková, A.; Hunaková, L.; Waczulíková, I.; Nencka, Radim; Kučerová, L.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 12 (2012), s. 776-787. ISSN 1099-498X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : bystander effect * cancer gene therapy * mesenchymal stromal cells Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.163, year: 2012

  18. Genomic instability, bystander effects and radiation risks: implication for development of protection strategies for man and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last few years has seen what people are now referring to as a Paradigm shifting in the concept of radiation effects on biological systems. Concept of the central role of DNA damage due to double strand breaks induced by a radiation hit has been itself hit by many studies showing persistent effects in the distant progeny of radiation exposed cells. This phenomenon is known as radiation induced genomic instability. More recently evidence has been accumulating that not even the parent cell need be exposed to radiation (bystander effect). New paradigm suggests that cellular stress responses or damage signalling through a range of signal transduction pathways are involved and that cell-cell contact or secretion of damage signalling molecules can induce responses in undamaged and irradiated cells. Aim of this paper os to introduce the new concepts and to consider reasons why they might alter methods of risk estimation. The paper also considers impact of the new concepts on environmental protection and discusses need for research in the field of comparative radiobiology when developing policies which can adequately protect biodiversity

  19. Effects of a Rape Awareness Program on College Women: Increasing Bystander Efficacy and Willingness to Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, John D.; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Brasfield, Hope; Hill, Brent

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study evaluated the efficacy of a sexual assault risk-reduction program on 279 college women that focused on learning characteristics of male perpetrators and teaching bystander intervention techniques. After seeing The Women's Program, participants reported significantly greater bystander efficacy and significantly greater…

  20. Bystander responses in cells models; targets, dosimetry and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of microbeam approaches has been a major advance in probing the relevance of bystander responses in cell and tissue models. Our own studies at the Gray Cancer Institute have used both a charged particle microbeam, producing protons and helium ions and a soft X-ray microprobe, delivering focused carbon-K, aluminium-K and titanium-K soft X-rays. Using these techniques we have been able to build up a comprehensive picture of the underlying differences between bystander responses and direct effects in cell and tissue-like models. What is now clear is that bystander dose-response relationships, the underlying mechanisms of action and the targets involved are not the same as those observed for direct irradiation of DNA in the nucleus. Our recent studies have shown bystander responses induced in human or hamster cells even when radiation is deposited away from the nucleus in cytoplasmic targets either after charged particle or soft X-ray exposure. Importantly, the level of bystander effect, measured as cell killing was similar to that observed when the same amount of energy was deposited but targeted to the nucleus. In other studies, we have shown that underlying determination of the level of response is the energy deposited in a single cell rather than the number of cells hit. Also the overall response at low doses may be dominated by bystander signaling. These observations have significance for our understanding of radiation risk at low doses including those of environmental exposures and the applicability of the Linear Non Threshold model. The realization that cell to cell signaling is important for radiation response may also open up new therapeutic opportunities to either improve tumor cell kill or protect normal tissues if the pathways underpinning bystander signaling can be elucidated and controlled

  1. The Effect of a Class-wide Training on Prosocial Bystander Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Charity Deanne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to decrease school bullying by implementing a class-wide intervention that targets bystanders. Hypotheses include that an intervention will increase prosocial bystander behaviors that will result in reduced rates of bullying and improved positive peer responses. Ross and Horner’s Positive Behavior Supports bullying prevention program was modified to increase incentives for students who defend others from bullying. A multiple baseline design across three general e...

  2. Cancer Stem Cells Protect Non-Stem Cells From Anoikis: Bystander Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seog-Young; Hong, Se-Hoon; Basse, Per H; Wu, Chuanyue; Bartlett, David L; Kwon, Yong Tae; Lee, Yong J

    2016-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are capable of initiation and metastasis of tumors. Therefore, understanding the biology of CSCs and the interaction between CSCs and their counterpart non-stem cells is crucial for developing a novel cancer therapy. We used CSC-like and non-stem breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 cells to investigate mammosphere formation. We investigated the role of the epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) axis in anoikis. Data from E-cadherin small hairpin RNA assay and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor study show that activation of Erk, but not modulation of E-cadherin level, may play an important role in anoikis resistance. Next, the two cell subtypes were mixed and the interaction between them during mammosphere culture and xenograft tumor formation was investigated. Unlike CSC-like cells, increased secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and growth-related oncogene (Gro) chemokines was detected during mammosphere culture in non-stem cells. Similar results were observed in mixed cells. Interestingly, CSC-like cells protected non-stem cells from anoikis and promoted tumor growth. Our results suggest bystander effects between CSC-like cells and non-stem cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2289-2301, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26918647

  3. Systemic mechanisms and effects of ionizing radiation: A new 'old' paradigm of how the bystanders and distant can become the players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Mavragani, Ifigeneia V; Laskaratou, Danae A; Gika, Violeta; Moskvin, Vadim P; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vougas, Konstantinos; Stewart, Robert D; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2016-06-01

    Exposure of cells to any form of ionizing radiation (IR) is expected to induce a variety of DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs), single strand breaks (SSBs) and oxidized bases, as well as loss of bases, i.e., abasic sites. The damaging potential of IR is primarily related to the generation of electrons, which through their interaction with water produce free radicals. In their turn, free radicals attack DNA, proteins and lipids. Damage is induced also through direct deposition of energy. These types of IR interactions with biological materials are collectively called 'targeted effects', since they refer only to the irradiated cells. Earlier and sometimes 'anecdotal' findings were pointing to the possibility of IR actions unrelated to the irradiated cells or area, i.e., a type of systemic response with unknown mechanistic basis. Over the last years, significant experimental evidence has accumulated, showing a variety of radiation effects for 'out-of-field' areas (non-targeted effects-NTE). The NTE involve the release of chemical and biological mediators from the 'in-field' area and thus the communication of the radiation insult via the so called 'danger' signals. The NTE can be separated in two major groups: bystander and distant (systemic). In this review, we have collected a detailed list of proteins implicated in either bystander or systemic effects, including the clinically relevant abscopal phenomenon, using improved text-mining and bioinformatics tools from the literature. We have identified which of these genes belong to the DNA damage response and repair pathway (DDR/R) and made protein-protein interaction (PPi) networks. Our analysis supports that the apoptosis, TLR-like and NOD-like receptor signaling pathways are the main pathways participating in NTE. Based on this analysis, we formulate a biophysical hypothesis for the regulation of NTE, based on DNA damage and apoptosis gradients between the irradiation point and various distances

  4. Cytokine profile of conditioned medium from human tumor cell lines after acute and fractionated doses of gamma radiation and its effect on survival of bystander tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Laskar, S; Pandey, B N

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play pivotal roles in cancer initiation, progression and pathogenesis. Accumulating evidences suggest differences in basal and stress-induced cytokine profiles of cancers with diverse origin. However, a comprehensive investigation characterising the cytokine profile of various tumor types after acute and fractionated doses of gamma-irradiation, and its effect on survival of bystander cells is not well known in literature. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytokine secretion profile of human tumor cell lines (HT1080, U373MG, HT29, A549 and MCF-7) either before (basal) or after acute (2, 6 Gy) and fractionated doses (3×2 Gy) of gamma-irradiation in culture medium obtained from these cells by multiplex bead array/ELISA. Moreover, clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium (CM) on the survival and growth of respective cells. Based on the screening of 28 analytes, our results showed that the basal profiles of these cell lines varied considerably in terms of the number and magnitude of secreted factors, which was minimum in MCF-7. Interestingly, TNF-α, IL-1β, PDGF-AA, TGF-β1, fractalkine, IL-8, VEGF and GCSF were found in CM of all the cell lines. However, secretion of certain cytokines was cell line-specific. Moreover, CM caused increase in clonogenic survival of respective tumor cells (in the order HT1080>U373MG>HT29>A549>MCF-7), which was correlated with the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, GMCSF and VEGF in their CM. After irradiation, the levels of most of the cytokines increased markedly in a dose dependent manner. The fold change in cytokine levels was lower in irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) of tumor cells collected after fractionated than respective acute dose, except in MCF-7. Interestingly, amongst these cell lines, the radiation-induced fold increase in cytokine levels was maximum in ICM of A549 cells. Moreover, bystander A549 cells treated with respective ICM showed dose dependent

  5. The role of TGF-β1–miR-21–ROS pathway in bystander responses induced by irradiated non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Y.; Chen, X.; W. Tian; Yin, X.; Wang, J.; Yang, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many studies have indicated an important implication of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs) in cancer radiotherapy, but the detailed signalling remains unclear. Methods: The roles of tumour growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) and miR-21 in medium-mediated RIBEs in H1299 non-small-cell lung cancer cells were investigated using DNA damage, changes in proliferation and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as end points. SB431542, a specific inhibitor of TGF-β type 1 receptor kina...

  6. Through the Eyes of a Bystander: Understanding VR and Video Effectiveness on Bystander Empathy, Presence, Behavior, and Attitude in Bullying Situations

    OpenAIRE

    McEvoy, Kelly Anne

    2015-01-01

    Peer bullying is a widespread and longstanding problem in school settings. Teachers, students, administrators, government, and researchers alike have all tried to combat bullying through bullying prevention campaigns. One strategy used in bullying prevention campaigns is to call on bystanders in bullying situations to take responsible action. While many different forms of campaigns, including print and media campaigns, have aimed at trying to reduce the presence of bullying in schools by info...

  7. The effects of cell phone conversations on the attention and memory of bystanders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica V Galván

    Full Text Available The pervasive use of cell phones impacts many people-both cell phone users and bystanders exposed to conversations. This study examined the effects of overhearing a one-sided (cell phone conversation versus a two-sided conversation on attention and memory. In our realistic design, participants were led to believe they were participating in a study examining the relationship between anagrams and reading comprehension. While the participant was completing an anagram task, the researcher left the room and participants overheard a scripted conversation, either two confederates talking with each other or one confederate talking on a cell phone. Upon the researcher's return, the participant took a recognition memory task with words from the conversation, and completed a questionnaire measuring the distracting nature of the conversation. Participants who overheard the one-sided conversation rated the conversation as significantly higher in distractibility than those who overheard the two-sided conversation. Also, participants in the one-sided condition scored higher on the recognition task. In particular they were more confident and accurate in their responses to words from the conversation than participants in the two-sided condition. However, participants' scores on the anagram task were not significantly different between conditions. As in real world situations, individual participants could pay varying amounts of attention to the conversation since they were not explicitly instructed to ignore it. Even though the conversation was irrelevant to the anagram task and contained less words and noise, one-sided conversations still impacted participants' self-reported distractibility and memory, thus showing people are more attentive to cell phone conversations than two-sided conversations. Cell phone conversations may be a common source of distraction causing negative consequences in workplace environments and other public places.

  8. The effect of victims' responses to overt bullying on same-sex peer bystander reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Nicole; Bussey, Kay; Rapee, Ronald M

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the impact of victims' responses to overt bullying on peer bystanders' attitudes and reactions. Fifth- and seventh-grade students (N = 206; M(age) = 11.13 and 13.18 years, respectively) completed online questionnaires about gender-consistent videotaped hypothetical bullying scenarios in which the victims' responses (angry, sad, confident, ignoring) were experimentally manipulated. Victims' responses significantly influenced bystanders' attitudes towards the victim, perceptions of the victimization, emotional reactions, and behavioral intentions. In general, angry victims elicited more negative reactions, sad victims elicited greater intentions to act, while incidents involving confident victims were perceived as less serious. Several variations depending on the bullying type and students' grade, gender, and personal experiences with bullying were evident. Implications for individual-level and peer-level anti-bullying interventions are discussed. PMID:26407835

  9. Virtual bystanders in a language lesson: examining the effect of social evaluation, vicarious experience, cognitive consistency and praising on students' beliefs, self-efficacy and anxiety in a virtual reality environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, C.; Ling, Y.; Heynderickx, I.; Brinkman, W.-P.

    2015-01-01

    Bystanders in a real world's social setting have the ability to influence people’s beliefs and behavior. This study examines whether this effect can be recreated in a virtual environment, by exposing people to virtual bystanders in a classroom setting. Participants (n = 26) first witnessed virtual s

  10. Real-time Molecular Study of Bystander Effects of Low dose Low LET radiation Using Living Cell Imaging and Nanoparticale Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Mohan [UT Health Science Center at San Antonio; Xu, Nancy R [Old Dominion University; Mohan, Sumathy [UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

    2013-06-03

    cGy on coverslips will be examined for (a) low LET radiation-induced alterations of cellular function and its physiological relevance in real time; and (b) radiation damage triggered bystander effect on the neighboring unirradiated cells. First, to determine the low LET radiation induced alteration of cellular function we will examine: (i) the real time transformation of single membrane transporters in single living cells; (ii) the pump efficiency of membrane efflux pump of live cells in real time at the molecular level; (iii) the kinetics of single-ligand receptor interaction on single live cell surface (Figure C); and (iv) alteration in chromosome replication in living cell. Second, to study the radiation triggered bystander responses, we will examine one of the key signaling pathway i.e. TNF- alpha/NF-kappa B mediated signaling. TNF-alpha specific nano particle sensors (green) will be developed to detect the releasing dynamics, transport mechanisms and ligand-receptor binding on live cell surface in real time. A second sensor (blue) will be developed to simultaneously monitor the track of NF-kB inside the cell. The proposed nano-particle optics approach would complement our DOE funded study on biochemical mechanisms of TNF-alpha- NF-kappa B-mediated bystander effect.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and the bystander effect in CD::UPRT/5-FC bi-gene therapy of glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI De-zhi; HU Wei-xing; LI Li-xin; CHEN Gong; WEI Dong; GU Pei-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Background Cytosine deaminase (CD) converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in CD/5-FC gene therapy, 5-FU will be mostly converted into nontoxic β-alanine without uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT). UPRT catalyzes the conversion of 5-FU to 5-fluorouridine monophosphate, which directly kills CD::UPRT-expressing ceils and surrounding cells via the bystander effect. But the pharmacokinetics and the bystander effect of CD::UPRT/5-FC has not been verified in vivo and in vitro. Before the CD::UPRT/5-FC bi-gene therapy system is used in clinical trial, it is essential to monitor the transgene expression and function in vivo. Thus, we developed a preclinical tumor model to investigate the feasibility of using 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F-MRS) and optical imaging to measure non-invasive CD and UPRT expression and its bystander effect.Methods C6 and C6-CD::UPRT cells were cultured with 5-FC. The medium, cells and their mixture were analyzed by 19F-MRS. Rats with intracranial xenografted encephalic C6-CD::UPRT glioma were injected intraperitoneally with 5-FC and their 19F-MRS spectra recorded. Then the pharmacokinetics of 5-FC was proved. Mixtures of C6 and C6-CD::UPRT cells at different ratios were cultured with 5-FC and the cytotoxic efficacy and survival rate of cells recorded. To determine the mechanism of the bystander effect, the culture media from cell comprising 25% and 75% C6-CD::UPRT cells were examined by19F-MRS. A comparative study of mean was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results 19F-MRS on samples from C6-CD::UPRT cells cultured with 5-FC showed three broad resonance signals corresponding to 5-FC, 5-FU and fluorinated nucleotides (F-Nuctd). For the C6 mixture, only the 5-FC peak was detected. In vivo serial 19F-MRS spectra showed a strong 5-FC peak and a weak 5-FU peak at 20 minutes after 5-FC injection. The 5-FU concentration reached a maximum at about 50 minutes. The F-Nuctd signal appeared after about I hour

  12. Virtual bystanders in a language lesson: examining the effect of social evaluation, vicarious experience, cognitive consistency and praising on students' beliefs, self-efficacy and anxiety in a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chao; Ling, Yun; Heynderickx, Ingrid; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Bystanders in a real world's social setting have the ability to influence people's beliefs and behavior. This study examines whether this effect can be recreated in a virtual environment, by exposing people to virtual bystanders in a classroom setting. Participants (n = 26) first witnessed virtual students answering questions from an English teacher, after which they were also asked to answer questions from the teacher as part of a simulated training for spoken English. During the experiment the attitudes of the other virtual students in the classroom was manipulated; they could whisper either positive or negative remarks to each other when a virtual student was talking or when a participant was talking. The results show that the expressed attitude of virtual bystanders towards the participants affected their self-efficacy, and their avoidance behavior. Furthermore, the experience of witnessing bystanders commenting negatively on the performance of other students raised the participants' heart rate when it was their turn to speak. Two-way interaction effects were also found on self-reported anxiety and self-efficacy. After witnessing bystanders' positive attitude towards peer students, participants' self-efficacy when answering questions received a boost when bystanders were also positive towards them, and a blow when bystanders reversed their attitude by being negative towards them. Still, inconsistency, instead of consistency, between the bystanders' attitudes towards virtual peers and the participants was not found to result in a larger change in the participants' beliefs. Finally the results also reveal that virtual flattering or destructive criticizing affected the participants' beliefs not only about the virtual bystanders, but also about the neutral teacher. Together these findings show that virtual bystanders in a classroom can affect people's beliefs, anxiety and behavior. PMID:25884211

  13. Virtual bystanders in a language lesson: examining the effect of social evaluation, vicarious experience, cognitive consistency and praising on students' beliefs, self-efficacy and anxiety in a virtual reality environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Qu

    Full Text Available Bystanders in a real world's social setting have the ability to influence people's beliefs and behavior. This study examines whether this effect can be recreated in a virtual environment, by exposing people to virtual bystanders in a classroom setting. Participants (n = 26 first witnessed virtual students answering questions from an English teacher, after which they were also asked to answer questions from the teacher as part of a simulated training for spoken English. During the experiment the attitudes of the other virtual students in the classroom was manipulated; they could whisper either positive or negative remarks to each other when a virtual student was talking or when a participant was talking. The results show that the expressed attitude of virtual bystanders towards the participants affected their self-efficacy, and their avoidance behavior. Furthermore, the experience of witnessing bystanders commenting negatively on the performance of other students raised the participants' heart rate when it was their turn to speak. Two-way interaction effects were also found on self-reported anxiety and self-efficacy. After witnessing bystanders' positive attitude towards peer students, participants' self-efficacy when answering questions received a boost when bystanders were also positive towards them, and a blow when bystanders reversed their attitude by being negative towards them. Still, inconsistency, instead of consistency, between the bystanders' attitudes towards virtual peers and the participants was not found to result in a larger change in the participants' beliefs. Finally the results also reveal that virtual flattering or destructive criticizing affected the participants' beliefs not only about the virtual bystanders, but also about the neutral teacher. Together these findings show that virtual bystanders in a classroom can affect people's beliefs, anxiety and behavior.

  14. Expression of the bifunctional suicide gene CDUPRT increases radiosensitization and bystander effect of 5-FC in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that, with 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) treatment, the co-expression of cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) can lead to greater radiosensitization and bystander effect than CD-expression alone. Methods and materials: R3327-AT cell lines stably expressing CD or CDUPRT were generated. The 5-FC and 5-FU cytotoxicity, and the radiosensitivity with/without 5-FC treatment, of these cells were evaluated under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The bystander effect was assessed by apoptosis staining and clonogenic survival. The pharmacokinetics of 5-FU and 5-FC metabolism was monitored in mice bearing CD- or CDUPRT-expressing tumors using 19F MR spectroscopy (MRS). Results: CDUPRT-expressing cells were more sensitive to 5-FC and 5-FU than CD-expressing cells. CDUPRT-expression further enhanced the radiosensitizing effect of 5-FC, relative to that achieved by CD-expression alone. A 25-fold lower dose of 5-FC resulted in the same magnitude of radiosensitization in CDUPRT-expressing cells, relative to that in CD-expressing cells. The 5-FC cytotoxicity in co-cultures of parental cells mixed with 10-20% CDUPRT cells was similar to that in 100% CDUPRT cells. 19F MRS measurements showed that expression of CDUPRT leads to enhanced accumulation of fluorine nucleotide (FNuc), relative to that associated with CD-expression alone. Conclusion: Our study suggests that CDUPRT/5-FC strategy may be more effective than CD/5-FC, especially when used in combination with radiation.

  15. Microbeam facility extension for single-cell irradiation experiments. Investigations about bystander effect and reactive oxygen species impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LPS microbeam facility is based on a KN3750 Van de Graaff accelerator devoted to microbeam analysis [1]. It is equipped with two horizontal microbeam lines used in various fields such as material science, geological science, nuclear material science and biology. Since two years, a single ion hit device is being developed at the LPS. The setup is dedicated to the study of ionizing radiation effects on living cells by performing single ion irradiation at controlled doses and locations. This study will complete current researches conducted on uranium chemical toxicity on renal an d osteoblastic cells. After ingestion, most uranium is excreted from the body within a few days except small fraction that is absorbed into the blood-stream (0.2 to 5%) and then deposit and preferentially in kidneys and bones, where it can remain for many years. Uranium is a heavy metal and a primarily alpha emitter. It can lead to bone cancer as a result of the ionizing radiation associated with the radioactive decay products. The study of the response to an exposure to alpha particles will permit to distinguish radiotoxicity and chemical toxicity of uranium bone cells with a special emphasis or the bystander effect at low dose.All the beam lines at the LPS nuclear microprobe are horizontal and under vacuum. A dedicated deflecting magnet was inserted in one of the two available beam lines of the facility. The ion beam is extracted to air using a 100 nm thick silicon nitride membrane, thin enough to induce negligible effects on the ions in terms of energy loss and spatial resolution. By this way, we believe that we minimize the experimental setup impact on the living cells easing the detection of low irradiation dose impact. The atmosphere around the samples is also important to guaranty low stressed cell culture conditions. A temperature, hygrometry and CO2 controlled atmosphere device will be implanted in the future. The irradiation microbeam is produced using a fused silica capillary

  16. Virtual bystanders in a language lesson: examining the effect of social evaluation, vicarious experience, cognitive consistency and praising on students' beliefs, self-efficacy and anxiety in a virtual reality environment

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Qu; Yun Ling; Ingrid Heynderickx; Willem-Paul Brinkman

    2015-01-01

    Bystanders in a real world's social setting have the ability to influence people’s beliefs and behavior. This study examines whether this effect can be recreated in a virtual environment, by exposing people to virtual bystanders in a classroom setting. Participants (n = 26) first witnessed virtual students answering questions from an English teacher, after which they were also asked to answer questions from the teacher as part of a simulated training for spoken English. During the experiment ...

  17. Mutations in Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit C Increase Radiosensitivity and Bystander Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongning; Hei, Tom K.

    Although radiation-induced bystander effect is well studied in the past decade, the precise mech-anisms are still unclear. It is likely that a combination of pathways involving both primary and secondary signaling processes is involved in producing a bystander effect. There is recent evidence that mitochondria play a critical role in bystander responses. Recently studies found that a mutation in succinate dehydrogenese subunit C (SDHC), an integral membrane protein in complex II of the electron transport chain, resulted in increased superoxide, oxidative stress, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and genomic instability, indicating that SDHC play a critical role in maintaining mitochondrial function. In the present study, using Chinese hamster fibroblasts (B1 cells) and the mutants (B9 cells) containing a single base substitution that produced a premature stop codon resulting in a 33-amino acid COOH-terminal truncation of the SDHC protein, we found that B9 cells had an increase in intracellular superoxide content, nitric oxide species, and mitochondrial membrane potential when compared with wild type cells. After irradiated with a grade of doses of gamma rays, B9 cells show an increased radiosensitivity, especially at high doses. The HPRT- mutant yield after gamma-ray irradiation in B9 cells was significantly higher than that of B1 cells. A single, 3Gy dose of gamma-rays increased the background mutant level by more than 4 fold. In contrast, the mutant induction was less than 2 fold in B1 cells. In addition, B9 cells produced a higher bystander mutagenesis after alpha particle irradiation than the B1 cells. Furthermore, pretreated with carboxy-2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO), a nitric oxide scavenger, significantly decreased the bystander effect. Our findings demonstrate that a mutation in SDHC increases radiosensitivity in both directly irradiated cells and in neighboring bystander cells, and mito-chondrial function play an essential role in

  18. Gamma-H2AX as a biomarker of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in targeted and bystander human artificial skin models and peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Christophe; Dickey, Jennifer; Bonner, William; Sedelnikova, Olga

    30 min after irradiation and then declined at a relatively steady pace as the cell repaired the DNA damage. Radiation effects were still detectable after 48 hrs for doses greater than 1 Gy and remained linear to initial dose. Activated bystander lymphocytes cultured with media from irradiated lymphocytes exhibited a two-fold increased damage response as seen by gamma- H2AX formation. The effect reached a maximum 3 hrs post-exposure and was retained for over 24 hrs. Thus, detection of gamma-H2AX formation to determine DNA damage in a minimally invasive skin test and a non-invasive blood test could be useful and promising tools to analyze direct and indirect effects of radiation exposure.

  19. Evaluation of a bystander education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, Angela Frederick; Sutherland, Melissa; Kesler, Erin

    2012-12-01

    Sexual and partner violence are widespread problems on college campuses. By changing attitudes, beliefs, and behavior, bystander education programs have been found to prevent sexual and partner violence and improve the responses of peers to survivors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of a bystander education program that was adapted to a specific university setting. A convenience sample of 202, full-time undergraduate students aged 18-22 years participated in the bystander education program and completed pre- and post-test measures of attitudes related to sexual and partner violence and willingness to help. Paired sample t-tests were used to examine changes in scores between pre- and post-test conditions. After the program, participants' reported decreased rape myth acceptance and denial of interpersonal violence, and increased intention to act as a bystander and an increased sense of responsibility to intervene. Mental health nurses can use principles of bystander education in violence prevention programs and in providing support to survivors. PMID:23215986

  20. Implications of effects ''adaptive response'', ''low-dose hypersensitivity'' und ''bystander effect'' for cancer risk at low doses and low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for carcinogenesis (the TSCE model) was applied in order to examine the effects of ''Low-dose hypersensitivity (LDH)'' and the ''Bystander effect (BE)'' on the derivation of radiation related cancer mortality risks. LDH has been discovered to occur in the inactivation of cells after acute exposure to low LET radiation. A corresponding version of the TSCE model was applied to the mortality data on the Abomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The BE has been mainly observed in cells after exposure to high LET radiation. A Version of the TSCE model which included the BE was applied to the data on lung cancer mortality from the workers at the Mayak nuclear facilities who were exposed to Plutonium. In general an equally good description of the A-bomb survivor mortality data (for all solid, stomach and lung tumours) was found for the TSCE model and the (conventional) empirical models but fewer parameters were necessary for the TSCE model. The TSCE model which included the effects of radiation induced cell killing resulted in non-linear dose response curves with excess relative risks after exposure at young ages that were generally lower than in the models without cell killing. The main results from TSCE models which included cell killing described by either conventional survival curves or LDH were very similar. A sub multiplicative effect from the interaction of smoking and exposure to plutonium was found to result from the analysis of the Mayak lung cancer mortality data. All models examined resulted in the predominant number of Mayak lung cancer deaths being ascribed to smoking. The interaction between smoking and plutonium exposures was found to be the second largest effect. The TSCE model resulted in lower estimates for the lung cancer excess relative risk per unit plutonium dose than the empirical risk model, but this difference was not found to be statistically significant. The excess relative risk dose responses were linear in the empirical model and

  1. Student Voices: What Can Bystanders Do to Prevent Bullying of Students Who Are Different (or Perceived as Different) from Others?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordseth, Anna; Vepachedu, Vikas; Shipman, Grant; Alayachew, David

    2012-01-01

    In this article, four students share their ideas on what bystanders can do to prevent bullying of students who are different or perceived as different from others. Anna Nordseth says what bystanders need to realize is how to recognize bullying and what a lasting effect it can have on the individuals involved. One bold, compassionate bystander can…

  2. Adenoviral delivery of pan-caspase inhibitor p35 enhances bystander killing by P450 gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy using cyclophosphamide+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytochrome P450-based suicide gene therapy for cancer using prodrugs such as cyclophosphamide (CPA) increases anti-tumor activity, both directly and via a bystander killing mechanism. Bystander cell killing is essential for the clinical success of this treatment strategy, given the difficulty of achieving 100% efficient gene delivery in vivo using current technologies. Previous studies have shown that the pan-caspase inhibitor p35 significantly increases CPA-induced bystander killing by tumor cells that stably express P450 enzyme CYP2B6 (Schwartz et al, (2002) Cancer Res. 62: 6928-37). To further develop this approach, we constructed and characterized a replication-defective adenovirus, Adeno-2B6/p35, which expresses p35 in combination with CYP2B6 and its electron transfer partner, P450 reductase. The expression of p35 in Adeno-2B6/p35-infected tumor cells inhibited caspase activation, delaying the death of the CYP2B6 'factory' cells that produce active CPA metabolites, and increased bystander tumor cell killing compared to that achieved in the absence of p35. Tumor cells infected with Adeno-2B6/p35 were readily killed by cisplatin and doxorubicin, indicating that p35 expression is not associated with acquisition of general drug resistance. Finally, p35 did not inhibit viral release when the replication-competent adenovirus ONYX-017 was used as a helper virus to facilitate co-replication and spread of Adeno-2B6/p35 and further increase CPA-induced bystander cell killing. The introduction of p35 into gene therapeutic regimens constitutes an effective approach to increase bystander killing by cytochrome P450 gene therapy. This strategy may also be used to enhance other bystander cytotoxic therapies, including those involving the production of tumor cell toxic protein products

  3. Site Specific Microbeam Irradiation: Defining a Bystander Effect. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is evidence that low-energy x-rays as used in mammography have an increased biological effectiveness relative to higher-energy photons. However, the RBE values are not large, probably less than 2. Thus it is unlikely that the radiation risk alone could prove to be a ''show stopper'' regarding screening mammography because, for older women, the benefit is likely to considerably outweigh the radiation risk. Nevertheless, the RBE for low-energy x-rays might reasonably be taken into account when assessing the recommended age to commence such annual screening

  4. Bystanders Are the Key to Stopping Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Sharon; Notar, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Bullying is the dominance over another. Bullying occurs when there is an audience. Peer bystanders provide an audience 85% of instances of bullying. If you remove the audience bullying should stop. The article is a review of literature (2002-2013) on the role of bystanders; importance of bystanders; why bystanders behave as they do; resources to…

  5. The Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Plus Media on the Reduction of Bullying and Victimization and the Increase of Empathy and Bystander Response in a Bully Prevention Program for Urban Sixth-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Laura Pierce

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy plus media on the reduction of bullying and victimization and the increase in empathy and bystander response in a bully prevention program for urban sixth-graders. Sixty-eight students participated. Because one of the…

  6. Genomic instability after targeted irradiation of human lymphocytes: Evidence for inter-individual differences under bystander conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental 222radon exposure is a human health concern, and many studies demonstrate that very low doses of high LET α-particle irradiation initiate deleterious genetic consequences in both irradiated and non-irradiated bystander cells. One consequence, radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI), is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and is often assessed by measuring delayed chromosomal aberrations. We utilised a technique that facilitates transient immobilization of primary lymphocytes for targeted microbeam irradiation and have reported that environmentally relevant doses, e.g. a single 3He2+ particle traversal to a single cell, are sufficient to induce RIGI. Herein we sought to determine differences in radiation response in lymphocytes isolated from five healthy male donors. Primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle per cell nucleus. We found evidence for inter-individual variation in radiation response (RIGI, measured as delayed chromosome aberrations). Although this was not highly significant, it was possibly masked by high levels of intra-individual variation. While there are many studies showing a link between genetic predisposition and RIGI, there are few studies linking genetic background with bystander effects in normal human lymphocytes. In an attempt to investigate inter-individual variation in the induction of bystander effects, primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle under conditions where fractions of the population were traversed. We showed a marked genotype-dependent bystander response in one donor after exposure to 15% of the population. The findings may also be regarded as a radiation-induced genotype-dependent bystander effect triggering an instability phenotype.

  7. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  8. Action Research Evaluation of Bystander Intervention Training Created by Munche, Stern, and O'Brien

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiflet, Jacqueline H.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, appreciative inquiry study was an examination of bystander intervention as related to sexual assault in the military. The purpose of the study was to examine how military personnel and Department of Defense civilian employees reflecting diverse backgrounds perceived the effectiveness of bystander intervention training and sexual…

  9. Radiation-induced stress effects following low dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Recent advances in our understanding of effects of radiation on living cells suggest that fundamentally different mechanisms are operating at low doses compared with high doses. Also, acute low doses appear to involve different response mechanisms compared with chronic low doses. Both genomic instability and so called 'bystander effects' show many similarities with well known cellular responses to oxidative stress. These predominate following low dose exposures and are maximally expressed at doses as low as 5mGy. At the biological level this is not surprising. Chemical toxicity has been known for many years to show these patterns of dose response. Cell signaling and coordinated stress mechanisms appear to dominate acute low dose exposure to chemicals. Adaptation to chemical exposures is also well documented although mechanisms of adaptive responses are less clear. In the radiation field adaptive responses also become important when low doses are protracted or fractionated. Recent data from our group concerning bystander effects following multiple low dose exposures suggest that adaptive responses can be induced in cells which only receive signals from irradiated neighbours. We have data showing delayed and bystander effects in humans, rodents 3 fish species and in prawns following in vitro and/or in vivo irradiation of haematopoietic tissues and, from the aquatic groups, gill and skin/fin tissue. Bystander signals induced by radiation can be communicated from fish to fish in vivo and are detectable as early as the eyed egg stage, i.e. as soon as tissue starts to develop. Using proteomic approaches we have determined that the bystander and the direct irradiation proteomes are different. The former show significant upregulation of 5 proteins with anti-oxidant, regenerative and restorative functions while the direct radiation proteome has 2 upregulated proteins both involved in proliferation. These data have implications for

  10. Radioadaptive response to the medium-mediated bystander induction of DNA strand breaks in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Numerous investigators have reported two cellular responses of importance at low doses that have a potential impact on the risk estimation of ionizing radiation. The radioadaptive response confers resistance to a subsequent dose by a low priming dose, while the bystander effect exaggerates the effect of small doses. The present study was conducted to examine the interaction of the radioadaptive response with the bystander effect in HeLa cells. The culture was irradiated with 0.5 to 8 Gy of 140 kVp X-rays and one hour later, the medium was taken, passed through a filter and transferred to the parallel culture of non-irradiated HeLa cells as non-targeted cells. After incubation for 30 min, the induced DNA damage was analyzed by the single cell gel-electrophoresis assay under alkaline or neutral conditions. The treatments resulted in a dose-dependent increase in tail moment under either conditions, indicating the induction of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. The clonogenic survival of non-irradiated cells was also reduced after they were cultured in the medium that was taken from irradiated cultures. Any change was not observed when the medium alone was irradiated. These results give the disputed evidence that certain genotoxic factor(s) released from irradiated cells into the culture medium can induce DNA strand breaks leading to cell death. It is also suggested that physical contact between irradiated and non-irradiated cells may not be required for the bystander effect. In adapted cells that were pre-exposed to 5 cGy of X-rays and cultured for 4 h beforehand, the yield of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rayed medium was reduced by about 50 %. The results, in conjunction with our early finding (Ikushima et al., 1996) suggest that the radioadaptive response resulting from such a low dose may diminish the bystander effect through an enhanced DNA repair function

  11. DNA damaging bystander signalling from stem cells, cancer cells and fibroblasts after Cr(VI) exposure and its dependence on telomerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bystander effect is a feature of low dose radiation exposure and is characterized by a signaling process from irradiated cells to non irradiated cells, which causes DNA and chromosome damage in these 'nearest neighbour' cells. Here we show that a low and short dose of Cr(VI) can induce stem cells, cancer cells and fibroblasts to chronically secrete bystander signals, which cause DNA damage in neighboring cells. The Cr(VI) induced bystander signaling depended on the telomerase status of either cell. Telomerase negative fibroblasts were able to receive DNA damaging signals from telomerase positive or negative fibroblasts or telomerase positive cancer cells. However telomerase positive fibroblasts were resistant to signals from Cr(VI) exposed telomerase positive fibroblasts or cancer cells. Human embryonic stem cells, with positive Oct4 staining as a marker of pluripotency, showed no significant increase of DNA damage from adjacent Cr and mitomycin C exposed fibroblasts whilst those cells that were negatively stained did. This selectivity of DNA damaging bystander signaling could be an important consideration in developing therapies against cancer and in the safety and effectiveness of tissue engineering and transplantation using stem cells.

  12. DNA damaging bystander signalling from stem cells, cancer cells and fibroblasts after Cr(VI) exposure and its dependence on telomerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, Nicola [Bristol Implant Research Centre, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS10 5NB (United Kingdom); Baird, Duncan M. [Department of Pathology School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Henry Wellcome Building for Biomedical Research in Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XN (United Kingdom); Phillips, Ryan [Bristol Implant Research Centre, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS10 5NB (United Kingdom); Crompton, Lucy A.; Caldwell, Maeve A. [Henry Wellcome Laboratories for Integrative Neuroscience and Endocrinology, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS1 3NY (United Kingdom); Rubio, Miguel A. [Center of Regenerative Medicine in Barcelona, CMRB Dr. Aiguader, 88, 7th Floor, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Newson, Roger [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Focas Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Lyng, Fiona [National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Case, C. Patrick, E-mail: c.p.case@bristol.ac.uk [Bristol Implant Research Centre, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS10 5NB (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-05

    The bystander effect is a feature of low dose radiation exposure and is characterized by a signaling process from irradiated cells to non irradiated cells, which causes DNA and chromosome damage in these 'nearest neighbour' cells. Here we show that a low and short dose of Cr(VI) can induce stem cells, cancer cells and fibroblasts to chronically secrete bystander signals, which cause DNA damage in neighboring cells. The Cr(VI) induced bystander signaling depended on the telomerase status of either cell. Telomerase negative fibroblasts were able to receive DNA damaging signals from telomerase positive or negative fibroblasts or telomerase positive cancer cells. However telomerase positive fibroblasts were resistant to signals from Cr(VI) exposed telomerase positive fibroblasts or cancer cells. Human embryonic stem cells, with positive Oct4 staining as a marker of pluripotency, showed no significant increase of DNA damage from adjacent Cr and mitomycin C exposed fibroblasts whilst those cells that were negatively stained did. This selectivity of DNA damaging bystander signaling could be an important consideration in developing therapies against cancer and in the safety and effectiveness of tissue engineering and transplantation using stem cells.

  13. Moral Disengagement Among Bystanders to School Bullying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obermann, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the use of moral disengagement among children indirectly involved in bullying (bystanders). A sample of Danish adolescents (N = 660, M age 12.6 years) were divided into four groups depending on their bystander status: (a) outsiders, who did not experience bullying among their...... peers; (b) defenders, who were likely to help the victims in bullying episodes; (c) guilty bystanders, who did nothing to help bullied peers but felt guilty about it; and (d) unconcerned bystanders, who witnessed peers being bullied, without feeling responsible. Results indicated that, besides from...... active personal involvement in bullying others, being an unconcerned bystander to bullying also associates with moral disengagement. Unconcerned bystanders had significantly higher moral disengagement than guilty bystanders and defenders. Outsiders also showed significant higher disengagement than...

  14. Personal distress and the influence of bystanders on responding to an emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortensius, Ruud; Schutter, Dennis J L G; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneous helping behavior during an emergency is influenced by the personality of the onlooker and by social situational factors such as the presence of bystanders. Here, we sought to determine the influences of sympathy, an other-oriented response, and personal distress, a self-oriented response, on the effect of bystanders during an emergency. In four experiments, we investigated whether trait levels of sympathy and personal distress predicted responses to an emergency in the presence of bystanders by using behavioral measures and single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. Sympathy and personal distress were expected to be associated with faster responses to an emergency without bystanders present, but only personal distress would predict slower responses to an emergency with bystanders present. The results of a cued reaction time task showed that people who reported higher levels of personal distress and sympathy responded faster to an emergency without bystanders (Exp. 1). In contrast to our predictions, perspective taking but not personal distress was associated with slower reaction times as the number of bystanders increased during an emergency (Exp. 2). However, the decrease in motor corticospinal excitability, a direct physiological measure of action preparation, with the increase in the number of bystanders was solely predicted by personal distress (Exp. 3). Incorporating cognitive load manipulations during the observation of an emergency suggested that personal distress is linked to an effect of bystanders on reflexive responding to an emergency (Exp. 4). Taken together, these results indicate that the presence of bystanders during an emergency reduces action preparation in people with a disposition to experience personal distress. PMID:27126708

  15. Characteristics and mechanisms of the bystander response in monolayer cell cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, John B.; Azzam, Edouard I.; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Nagasawa, Hatsumi

    2005-02-01

    When confluent cultures of mammalian cells are irradiated with very low fluences of alpha particles whereby only occasional cells receive any radiation exposure, genetic changes are observed in the non-irradiated ("bystander") cells. Upregulation of the p53 damage-response pathway as well as activation of proteins in the MAPK family occurred in bystander cells; p53 was phosphorylated on the serine 15 residue suggesting that the upregulation of p53 was a consequence of DNA damage. Damage signals were transmitted to bystander cells through gap junctions, as confirmed by the use of genetically manipulated cells including connexin43 knockouts. Expression of connexin43 was markedly enhanced by irradiation. A moderate bystander effect was observed for specific gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations. This effect was markedly enhanced in cells defective in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway. Finally, an upregulation of oxidative metabolism occurred in bystander cells; the increased levels of reactive oxygen species appeared to be derived from flavine-containing oxidase enzymes. We hypothesize that genetic effects observed in non-irradiated bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative base damage; >90% of mutations in bystander cells were point mutations. When bystander cells cannot repair DNA double strand breaks, they become much more sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations, the latter consisting primarily of deletion mutants. While we propose that the genetic effects occurring in bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative stress, the nature of the signal that initiates this process remains to be determined.

  16. Characteristics and mechanisms of the bystander response in monolayer cell cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When confluent cultures of mammalian cells are irradiated with very low fluences of alpha particles whereby only occasional cells receive any radiation exposure, genetic changes are observed in the non-irradiated ('bystander') cells. Upregulation of the p53 damage-response pathway as well as activation of proteins in the MAPK family occurred in bystander cells; p53 was phosphorylated on the serine 15 residue suggesting that the upregulation of p53 was a consequence of DNA damage. Damage signals were transmitted to bystander cells through gap junctions, as confirmed by the use of genetically manipulated cells including connexin43 knockouts. Expression of connexin43 was markedly enhanced by irradiation. A moderate bystander effect was observed for specific gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations. This effect was markedly enhanced in cells defective in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway. Finally, an upregulation of oxidative metabolism occurred in bystander cells; the increased levels of reactive oxygen species appeared to be derived from flavine-containing oxidase enzymes. We hypothesize that genetic effects observed in non-irradiated bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative base damage; >90% of mutations in bystander cells were point mutations. When bystander cells cannot repair DNA double strand breaks, they become much more sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations, the latter consisting primarily of deletion mutants. While we propose that the genetic effects occurring in bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative stress, the nature of the signal that initiates this process remains to be determined

  17. HL60 human premyelocitic cell line as a model system for bystander response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: to evaluate HL60 human premyelocitic cell line as a model system to study bystander response. Methods: HL60 cell line, isolated from the blood of a patient affected by premyelocitic leukemia, has 45-46 chromosomes with abnormalities mainly on chromosomes 5, 8 and X and can undergo chemical-induced in vitro differentiation. Differentiation gives rise to granulocytes, monocytes or macrophages depending on the drug used. We define as proliferative (AP) cells those in log phase of growth with less than 10 passages from thawing and as differentiated (D) cells those treated with 10 nM TPA (phorbol ester) for 72 hours. Phorbol ester treatment induces differentiation to monocytes and macrophages. Differentiation has been evaluated through the expression of differentiation cluster membrane antigens (CD95, CD9 and CD14). Results: AP cells resulted positive for CD95 and negative for CD9 and CD14, while D cells resulted positive for CD9 and negative for CD95 and CD14. Our data on AP and D cells showed that: (i) the level of intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) is lower in D cells compared to AP cells; (ii) radiation induced DNA damage (single and double strand breaks, SSB and DSB, as measured with the comet assay technique) is lower in D cells than in AP cells. This different radiosensitivity can be related to the higher degree of compactness of nuclear structure in D cells. Radiation induced bystander effect (BE) was analyzed with the medium transfer technique. The medium from irradiated, with 0.5 Gy of γ-rays, AP cells was collected after 0, 2, 4 and 24 hours from irradiation and added to non irradiated log phase cells. The frequency of micronuclei formation in bystander cells was measured by using the cytokinesis block technique by adding cytochalasin B to the non irradiated culture together with the irradiated medium. Preliminary data indicate about 1.4-fold increase in micronuclei formation in

  18. Non-targeted effects induced by high LET charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Tom K.; Chai, Yunfei; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Uchihori, Yukio

    Radiation-induced non-targeted response represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation in that extranuclear and extracellular effects may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Using the gpt delta transgenic mouse model, there is evidence that irradiation of a small area (1 cm by 1 cm) of the lower abdominal area of animals with a 5 Gy dose of X-rays induced cyclooxygenase-2 as well as deletion mutations in the out-of-field lung tissues of the animals. The mutation correlated with an increase in prostaglandin levels in the bystander lung tissues and with an increase in the level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidative DNA damage marker. An increase in COX-2 level was also detected in the out-of-field lung tissues of animals similarly exposed to high LET argon and carbon ions accelerated at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These results provide the first evidence that the COX-2 -related pathway, which is essential in mediating cellular inflammatory response, is the critical signaling link for the non-targeted, bystander phenomenon. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the non-targeted, out of field phenomenon together with evidence of their occurrence in vivo will allow us to formulate a more accurate assessment of radiation risk.

  19. Morbidity among bystanders of bullying behavior at school: concepts, concerns, and clinical/research issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The role of the bystander is not one that is easily understood in the anti-bullying literature. Roles within the unofficial hierarchy of the school-yard and playground overlap considerably, and each role has its own social dynamic that brings with it a shifting behavioral landscape that affects every student. In this article, the mental health correlates of three categories of bystander are explored: the co-victim, the isolate, and the confederate. Each category of bystander has its own characterizations and mental health correlates. Reports of post-traumatic stress, internalized hostility, substance use, and suicide ideation are discussed with reference to studies involving witnesses of family abuse, community and school violence as well as bullying. It is argued that bystanders are the key to challenging bullying in schools, and their mental health and well-being is pivotal to the effectiveness of anti-bullying interventions. PMID:22909907

  20. Blame Conformity: Innocent Bystanders Can Be Blamed for a Crime as a Result of Misinformation from a Young, but Not Elderly, Adult Co-Witness

    OpenAIRE

    Thorley, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether or not exposing an eyewitness to a co-witness statement that incorrectly blames an innocent bystander for a crime can increase the likelihood of the eyewitness subsequently blaming the innocent bystander for the crime. It also examined whether or not the perceived age of the co-witness influences this effect. Participant eyewitnesses first watched a video of a crime featuring a perpetrator and an innocent bystander. They then read one of six bogus co-witness statem...

  1. X-ray microbeam bystander studies between stripes of dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence is emerging that radiation exposure can change communication between cells of the same type, as well as between cells of different cell compartments within tissues. We are using a novel X-ray Microprobe Beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL to investigate bystander effects of low doses in well-characterized human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human skin fibroblasts (HSF). The ALS facility is capable of producing a beam of 12.5 keV X-rays with a focussed spot size of 2 square micron and a wide range of doses and dose-rates. Unlike normal X-ray sources, this beam has a very small background of either low- or high-energy X-rays. In initial studies, cultures grown in microwell slide chambers have been irradiated with precise stripes of dose up to 100 micron wide. We are using fluorescence microscopy on a high-precision-controlled microscope stage to evaluate several classes of radiation-induced soluble signals, how these signals are communicated across cell compartments, and how radiation changes cell signaling both acutely and chronically. To evaluate the spatial dependence of intercellular communications, we varied the distance between dose stripes from 0-900 micrometers. We are investigating the radiation induction of p21Cip1 (CDKN1a), and phosphorylation of H2AX and p53 serine-15 as endpoints. Our preliminary results indicate that there is a dose- and cell-type-dependent expression of p53 serine-15P within 10 minutes after exposure to a 100 micron wide stripe of dose. Immunohistochemistry of p53-serine-15P-positive cells traversed by the beam illuminates the path of the X-ray microbeam, with epithelial cells responding more rapidly and with greater intensity than fibroblasts. The intensity of the immunofluorescence scales with the dose. The number of p53-serine-15P-positive cells in the unirradiated cell populations between the stripes has been counted as a measure of the bystander effect, and compared to appropriate controls. We will

  2. Study of influence of catechins on bystander responses in alpha-particle radiobiological experiments using thin PADC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.h [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    In this study, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in custom-made petri dishes with thin PADC films as substrates. Alpha particles with energies of 5 MeV were then irradiated from the bottom of PADC films. The DNA strand breaks in the bystander cells induced by irradiation were quantified with the use of terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. To study the influence of catechins on the bystander responses, catechins were added into the medium before alpha-particle irradiation of the cells. Fewer DNA strand breaks in the bystander cells were observed. As catechins are ROS (reactive oxygen species)-scavengers, the studied bystander cells might have been protected from radiation through scavenging of ROS by catechins.

  3. A mathematical framework for separating the direct and bystander components of cellular radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model for fractional tumor cell survival was developed incorporating components of cell killing due to direct radiation interactions and bystander signals resulting from non-local dose deposition. Material and methods. Three possible mechanisms for signal production were tested by fitting predictions to available experimental results for tumor cells (non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 and melanoma MM576) exposed to gradient x-ray fields. The parameter fitting allowed estimation of the contribution of bystander signaling to cell death (20-50% for all models). Separation of the two components of cell killing allowed determination of the α and β parameters of the linear-quadratic model both with and without the presence of bystander signaling. Results and discussion. For both cell lines, cell death from bystander signaling and direct radiation interactions were comparable. For NCI-H460 cells, the values for α and β were 0.18 Gy-1 and 0.10 Gy-2 respectively when direct and bystander effects were combined, and 0.053 Gy-1 and 0.061 Gy-2 respectively when the signaling component was removed. For MM576, the corresponding respective values were 0.09 Gy-1 and 0.011 Gy-2 for the combined response, and 0.014 Gy-1 and 0.002 Gy-2 for the isolated direct radiation response. The bystander component in cell death was found to be significant and should not be ignored. Further experimental evidence is required to determine how these results translate to the in vivo situation where tumor control probability (TCP) models that currently assume cellular independence may need to be revised

  4. A mathematical framework for separating the direct and bystander components of cellular radiation response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Martin A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia (Australia)), E-mail: Martin.Ebert@health.wa.gov.au; Suchowerska, Natalka; Jackson, Michael A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)); McKenzie, David R. (School of Physics, Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia))

    2010-11-15

    A mathematical model for fractional tumor cell survival was developed incorporating components of cell killing due to direct radiation interactions and bystander signals resulting from non-local dose deposition. Material and methods. Three possible mechanisms for signal production were tested by fitting predictions to available experimental results for tumor cells (non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 and melanoma MM576) exposed to gradient x-ray fields. The parameter fitting allowed estimation of the contribution of bystander signaling to cell death (20-50% for all models). Separation of the two components of cell killing allowed determination of the alpha and beta parameters of the linear-quadratic model both with and without the presence of bystander signaling. Results and discussion. For both cell lines, cell death from bystander signaling and direct radiation interactions were comparable. For NCI-H460 cells, the values for alpha and beta were 0.18 Gy-1 and 0.10 Gy-2 respectively when direct and bystander effects were combined, and 0.053 Gy-1 and 0.061 Gy-2 respectively when the signaling component was removed. For MM576, the corresponding respective values were 0.09 Gy-1 and 0.011 Gy-2 for the combined response, and 0.014 Gy-1 and 0.002 Gy-2 for the isolated direct radiation response. The bystander component in cell death was found to be significant and should not be ignored. Further experimental evidence is required to determine how these results translate to the in vivo situation where tumor control probability (TCP) models that currently assume cellular independence may need to be revised

  5. Bystander signalling: exploring clinical relevance through new approaches and new models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, K T; McMahon, S J; Hounsell, A R; O'Sullivan, J M; Prise, K M

    2013-10-01

    Classical radiation biology research has centred on nuclear DNA as the main target of radiation-induced damage. Over the past two decades, this has been challenged by a significant amount of scientific evidence clearly showing radiation-induced cell signalling effects to have important roles in mediating overall radiobiological response. These effects, generally termed radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs) have challenged the traditional DNA targeted theory in radiation biology and highlighted an important role for cells not directly traversed by radiation. The multiplicity of experimental systems and exposure conditions in which RIBEs have been observed has hindered precise definitions of these effects. However, RIBEs have recently been classified for different relevant human radiation exposure scenarios in an attempt to clarify their role in vivo. Despite significant research efforts in this area, there is little direct evidence for their role in clinically relevant exposure scenarios. In this review, we explore the clinical relevance of RIBEs from classical experimental approaches through to novel models that have been used to further determine their potential implications in the clinic. PMID:23849503

  6. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Suppresses in Vivo X-ray-Induced Targeted and Non-Targeted Effects in Zebrafish Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Y. Kong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper studied the X-ray-induced targeted effect in irradiated zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio, as well as a non-targeted effect in bystander naïve embryos partnered with irradiated embryos, and examined the influence of exogenous nitric oxide (NO on these targeted and non-targeted effects. The exogenous NO was generated using an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP. The targeted and non-targeted effects, as well as the toxicity of the SNAP, were assessed using the number of apoptotic events in the zebrafish embryos at 24 h post fertilization (hpf revealed through acridine orange (AO staining. SNAP with concentrations of 20 and 100 µM were first confirmed to have no significant toxicity on zebrafish embryos. The targeted effect was mitigated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 100 µM SNAP prior to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy but was not alleviated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 µM SNAP. On the other hand, the non-targeted effect was eliminated in the bystander naïve zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 or 100 µM SNAP prior to partnering with zebrafish embryos having been subjected to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy. These findings revealed the importance of NO in the protection against damages induced by ionizing radiations or by radiation-induced bystander signals, and could have important impacts on development of advanced cancer treatment strategies.

  7. Participation in High School Sports and Bystander Intentions, Efficacy to Intervene, and Rape Myth Beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Debate exists as to whether male athletes are more prone to commit acts of sexual violence and maintain problematic attitudes about sexual assault. To contribute to the literature on this relationship, this study posed the following research questions: (1) Do those students who participated in high school sports and those who did not differ significantly in their attitudes about sexual violence and willingness to intervene as a bystander? Do these differ among types of rape myths and bystander intervention situations? (2) Within a group of athletes, are there significant differences by gender or type of sport (contact sport vs. non-contact?) To answer these questions, surveys were analyzed with a sample of recent high school graduates the summer before entering college (N = 3,588). Results indicate that there were only minor differences between those students who participated in high school varsity sports and those who did not. Students who participated in sports had greater acceptance of three out of five types of rape myths, and less willingness to intervene with perpetrators after an assault; however, the effect sizes were small. There were no significant differences for bystander efficacy. The interaction between sport and gender was significant, but contact sport was not. The findings suggest that there may be aspects of male athletic participation in sports that needs to be addressed, yet there also exists the potential for engaging athletes as leaders who can act as prosocial bystanders. PMID:25392384

  8. Bystander Motivation in Bullying Incidents: To Intervene or Not to Intervene?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Thornberg

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This research sought to extend knowledge about bystanders in bullying situations with a focus on the motivations that lead them to different responses. The 2 primary goals of this study were to investigate the reasons for children’s decisions to help or not to help a victim when witnessing bullying, and to generate a grounded theory (or conceptual framework of bystander motivation in bullying situations.Methods: Thirty students ranging in age from 9 to 15 years (M=11.9; SD=1.7 from an elementary and middle school in the southeastern United States participated in this study. Open- ended, semistructured interviews were used, and sessions ranged from 30 to 45 minutes. We conducted qualitative methodology and analyses to gain an in-depth understanding of children’s perspectives and concerns when witnessing bullying.Results: A key finding was a conceptual framework of bystander motivation to intervene in bullying situations suggesting that deciding whether to help or not help the victim in a bullying situation depends on how bystanders define and evaluate the situation, the social context, and their own agency. Qualitative analysis revealed 5 themes related to bystander motives and included: interpretation of harm in the bullying situation, emotional reactions, social evaluating, moral evaluating, and intervention self-efficacy.Conclusion: Given the themes that emerged surrounding bystanders’ motives to intervene or abstain from intervening, respondents reported 3 key elements that need to be confirmed in future research and that may have implications for future work on bullying prevention. These included: first, the potential importance of clear communication to children that adults expect bystanders to intervene when witnessing bullying; second, the potential of direct education about how bystanders can interveneto increase children’s self-efficacy as defenders of those who are victims of bullying; and third, the assumption

  9. Rape Myth Beliefs and Bystander Attitudes among Incoming College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The bystander approach to rape prevention is gaining popularity on college campuses, although research is limited. This study explored bystander attitudes and their relationship with rape myths in a sample of college students. Participants: Surveys from 2,338 incoming undergraduate students at a large, northeastern university were…

  10. Implications for Sexual Assault Prevention: College Students as Prosocial Bystanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, Deinera; Cummings, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Prosocial bystander interventions are promising approaches to sexual assault prevention on college campuses. Objective: To assess bystander attitudes among undergraduate students at a northeastern university. Participants: A convenience sample of 188 students from 4 undergraduate classes was surveyed during regularly scheduled class sessions.…

  11. When bystanders become bothersome: The negative consequences of bystander conflict and the moderating role of resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, van Kim J.P.M; Rispens, Sonja; Gevers, Josette M.P.; Demerouti, Evangelia

    2014-01-01

    Bystander conflict is a situation in which employees are hindered in their work by parties not involved in the primary process. Public service employees and emergency care workers, such as ambulance employees and firefighters, often encounter this kind of conflict with potentially far-reaching detri

  12. Pannexin-1 and P2X7-Receptor Are Required for Apoptotic Osteocytes in Fatigued Bone to Trigger RANKL Production in Neighboring Bystander Osteocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wing Yee; Fritton, J Christopher; Morgan, Stacy Ann; Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Thi, Mia M; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Spray, David C; Majeska, Robert J; Schaffler, Mitchell B

    2016-04-01

    Osteocyte apoptosis is required to induce intracortical bone remodeling after microdamage in animal models, but how apoptotic osteocytes signal neighboring "bystander" cells to initiate the remodeling process is unknown. Apoptosis has been shown to open pannexin-1 (Panx1) channels to release adenosine diphosphate (ATP) as a "find-me" signal for phagocytic cells. To address whether apoptotic osteocytes use this signaling mechanism, we adapted the rat ulnar fatigue-loading model to reproducibly introduce microdamage into mouse cortical bone and measured subsequent changes in osteocyte apoptosis, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression and osteoclastic bone resorption in wild-type (WT; C57Bl/6) mice and in mice genetically deficient in Panx1 (Panx1KO). Mouse ulnar loading produced linear microcracks comparable in number and location to the rat model. WT mice showed increased osteocyte apoptosis and RANKL expression at microdamage sites at 3 days after loading and increased intracortical remodeling and endocortical tunneling at day 14. With fatigue, Panx1KO mice exhibited levels of microdamage and osteocyte apoptosis identical to WT mice. However, they did not upregulate RANKL in bystander osteocytes or initiate resorption. Panx1 interacts with P2X7 R in ATP release; thus, we examined P2X7 R-deficient mice and WT mice treated with P2X7 R antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG) to test the possible role of ATP as a find-me signal. P2X7 RKO mice failed to upregulate RANKL in osteocytes or induce resorption despite normally elevated osteocyte apoptosis after fatigue loading. Similarly, treatment of fatigued C57Bl/6 mice with BBG mimicked behavior of both Panx1KO and P2X7 RKO mice; BBG had no effect on osteocyte apoptosis in fatigued bone but completely prevented increases in bystander osteocyte RANKL expression and attenuated activation of resorption by more than 50%. These results indicate that activation of Panx1 and P2X7 R are required for apoptotic osteocytes

  13. Unique aspects of mda-7/IL-24 antitumor bystander activity: establishing a role for secretion of MDA-7/IL-24 protein by normal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhaozhong; Emdad, Luni; Sauane, Moira; Lebedeva, Irina V; Sarkar, Devanand; Gupta, Pankaj; James, C David; Randolph, Aaron; Valerie, Kirstoffer; Walter, Mark R; Dent, Paul; Fisher, Paul B

    2005-11-17

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7) was cloned using subtraction hybridization from terminally differentiated human melanoma cells. Based on structural and functional properties, mda-7 is now recognized as interleukin-24 (IL-24), a new member of the expanding IL-10 gene family. Unique properties of mda-7/IL-24 include its ability to selectively induce growth suppression, apoptosis and radiosensitization in diverse human cancer cells, without causing similar effects in normal cells. The utility of mda-7/IL-24, administered by means of a replication-incompetent adenovirus, as a gene therapy for cancer has recently received validation in patients, highlighting an important phenomenon initially observed in pancreatic tumor cells, namely a 'potent bystander apoptosis-inducing effect' in adjacent tumor cells not initially receiving this gene product. We presently investigated the contribution of mda-7/IL-24 secreted by normal cells in mediating this 'bystander effect', and document that normal cells induced to produce mda-7/IL-24 following infection with recombinant adenoviruses expressing this cytokine secrete mda-7/IL-24, which modifies the anchorage-independent growth, invasiveness, survival and sensitivity to radiation of cancer cells that contain functional IL-20/IL-22 receptors, but not in cancer cells that lack a complete set of receptors. Moreover, the combination of secreted mda-7/IL-24 and radiation engenders a 'bystander antitumor effect' not only in inherently mda-7/IL-24 or radiation-sensitive cancer cells, but also in tumor cells overexpressing the antiapoptotic proteins bcl-2 or bcl-x(L) and displaying resistance to either treatment alone. The present studies provide definitive evidence that secreted mda-7/IL-24 from normal cells can induce direct antitumor and radiation-enhancing effects that are dependent on the presence of canonical receptors for this cytokine on tumor cells. Moreover, we now describe a novel means of enhancing mda-7/IL

  14. The impact of onlooking and including bystander behaviour on judgments and emotions regarding peer exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Strohmeier, Dagmar; Killen, Melanie

    2015-09-01

    We investigated judgments and emotions in contexts of social exclusion that varied as a function of bystander behaviour (N = 173, 12- and 16-year-olds). Adolescents responded to film vignettes depicting a target excluded by a group with no bystanders, onlooking bystanders, or bystanders who included the target. Adolescents were asked to judge the behaviour and attribute emotions to the excluding group, the excluded target, and the bystanders. Younger adolescents judged the behaviour of the excluding group as more wrong than older adolescents when there were no bystanders present, indicating that the presence of bystanders was viewed as lessening the negative outcome of exclusion by the younger group. Yet, bystanders play a positive role only when they are includers, not when they are silent observers. This distinction was revealed by the findings that adolescents rated the behaviour of onlooking bystanders as more wrong compared with the behaviour of including bystanders. Moreover, all adolescents justified the inclusive behaviour more frequently with empathy than the onlooking behaviour. Adolescents also anticipated more empathy to including bystanders than to onlooking bystanders, as well as anticipated more guilt to onlooking bystanders than including bystanders. The findings are discussed in light of the role of group norms and group processes regarding bystanders' roles in social exclusion peer encounters. PMID:25953459

  15. Blame Conformity: Innocent Bystanders Can Be Blamed for a Crime as a Result of Misinformation from a Young, but Not Elderly, Adult Co-Witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether or not exposing an eyewitness to a co-witness statement that incorrectly blames an innocent bystander for a crime can increase the likelihood of the eyewitness subsequently blaming the innocent bystander for the crime. It also examined whether or not the perceived age of the co-witness influences this effect. Participant eyewitnesses first watched a video of a crime featuring a perpetrator and an innocent bystander. They then read one of six bogus co-witness statements about the crime. All were presented as having been written by a female co-witness and they differed in terms of her age (young adult or elderly) and who she blamed for the crime (the perpetrator, the innocent bystander, or nobody). One week later the participants were asked who committed the crime. When the young adult co-witness had blamed the innocent bystander just over 40% of participants subsequently did the same. Few participants (less than 8%) in the other conditions subsequently blamed the innocent bystander. The elderly co-witness was also rated as less credible, less competent, and less accurate than the younger co-witness suggesting eyewitnesses were less likely to be influenced by her incorrect statement as they perceived her to be a less reliable source of information. The applied implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26230523

  16. Blame Conformity: Innocent Bystanders Can Be Blamed for a Crime as a Result of Misinformation from a Young, but Not Elderly, Adult Co-Witness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Thorley

    Full Text Available This study examined whether or not exposing an eyewitness to a co-witness statement that incorrectly blames an innocent bystander for a crime can increase the likelihood of the eyewitness subsequently blaming the innocent bystander for the crime. It also examined whether or not the perceived age of the co-witness influences this effect. Participant eyewitnesses first watched a video of a crime featuring a perpetrator and an innocent bystander. They then read one of six bogus co-witness statements about the crime. All were presented as having been written by a female co-witness and they differed in terms of her age (young adult or elderly and who she blamed for the crime (the perpetrator, the innocent bystander, or nobody. One week later the participants were asked who committed the crime. When the young adult co-witness had blamed the innocent bystander just over 40% of participants subsequently did the same. Few participants (less than 8% in the other conditions subsequently blamed the innocent bystander. The elderly co-witness was also rated as less credible, less competent, and less accurate than the younger co-witness suggesting eyewitnesses were less likely to be influenced by her incorrect statement as they perceived her to be a less reliable source of information. The applied implications of these findings are discussed.

  17. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  18. Immune checkpoint blockade in cancer treatment: a double-edged sword cross-targeting the host as an "innocent bystander".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelao, Lucia; Criscitiello, Carmen; Esposito, Angela; Goldhirsch, Aron; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Targeted immune checkpoint blockade augments anti-tumor immunity and induces durable responses in patients with melanoma and other solid tumors. It also induces specific "immune-related adverse events" (irAEs). IrAEs mainly include gastrointestinal, dermatological, hepatic and endocrinological toxicities. Off-target effects that arise appear to account for much of the toxicity of the immune checkpoint blockade. These unique "innocent bystander" effects are likely a direct result of breaking immune tolerance upon immune check point blockade and require specific treatment guidelines that include symptomatic therapies or systemic corticosteroids. What do we need going forward to limit immune checkpoint blockade-induced toxicity? Most importantly, we need a better understanding of the roles played by these agents in normal tissues, so that we can begin to predict potentially problematic side effects on the basis of their selectivity profile. Second, we need to focus on the predictive factors of the response and toxicity of the host rather than serially focusing on individual agents. Third, rigorous biomarker-driven clinical trials are needed to further elucidate the mechanisms of both the benefit and toxicity. We will summarize the double-edged sword effect of immunotherapeutics in cancer treatment. PMID:24594636

  19. Bystanders matter: associations between reinforcing, defending, and the frequency of bullying behavior in classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmivalli, Christina; Voeten, Marinus; Poskiparta, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether the bystanders' behaviors (reinforcing the bully vs. defending the victim) in bullying situations are related to the frequency of bullying in a classroom. The sample consisted of 6,764 primary school children from Grades 3 to 5 (9-11 years of age), who were nested within 385 classrooms in 77 schools. The students filled out Internet-based questionnaires in their schools' computer labs. The results from multilevel models showed that defending the victim was negatively associated with the frequency of bullying in a classroom, whereas the effect of reinforcing the bully was positive and strong. The results suggest that bystander responses influence the frequency of bullying, which makes them suitable targets for antibullying interventions. PMID:21916686

  20. What is the role of the bystander response in radionuclide therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DarrenBrady

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide therapy for cancer is undergoing a renaissance, with a wide range of radionuclide and clinical delivery systems currently under investigation. Dosimetry at the cellular and subcellular level is complex with inhomogeneity and incomplete targeting of all cells such that some tumour cells will receive little or no direct radiation energy. There is now sufficient preclinical evidence of a bystander response which can modulate the biology of these unirradiated cells with current research demonstrating both protective and inhibitory responses. Dependence upon fraction of irradiated cells has also been found has and the presence of functional gap junctions appears to be import for several bystander responses. The selection of either high or low LET radionuclides may be critical. While low LET radionuclides appear to have a bystander response proportional to dose, the dose-response from high LET radionuclides are more complex. In media transfer experiments a “U” shaped response curve has been demonstrated for high LET treatments. However this “U” shaped response has not been seen with co-culture experiments and its relevance remains uncertain. For high LET treatments there is a suggestion that dose rate effects may also be important with inhibitory effects noted with 125I labelling study and a stimulatory seen with 123I labelling in one study.

  1. Gender differences in attitudes and beliefs associated with bystander behavior and sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, Angela F; Sutherland, Melissa; Laughon, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Sexual violence is a significant problem on many college campuses. Bystander education programs have been found to train individuals to act to prevent sexual and partner violence and improve the responses of peers to survivors. Limited evidence suggests that gender differences exist between males and females regarding both attitudes toward, and use of, bystander behavior, with females reporting more supportive attitudes and greater use of bystander behavior. The purpose of this study is to compare male and female college students on attitudes toward date rape, bystander efficacy, intention to act as a bystander, and actual use of bystander behaviors. A secondary aim explored gender differences in theoretically driven bystander behaviors and barriers to acting as a bystander. A convenience sample of 157 full-time undergraduate students aged 18-24 years completed survey measures of attitudes related to sexual and partner violence and willingness to help. Analysis of variance and chi-square were used to compare gender differences in scores. Significant gender differences were found for date rape attitudes, efficacy, and intention to act as a positive bystander. Men reported more rape-supportive attitudes and greater intention to act as a bystander than women, whereas women reported greater levels of bystander efficacy than men. The findings can be used in tailoring gender-specific components of bystander education programs for sexual assault prevention and intervention. PMID:24762431

  2. DMPD: TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16027039 TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? Schroder M, Bowie AG.... Trends Immunol. 2005 Sep;26(9):462-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key pl...ayer or bystander? PubmedID 16027039 Title TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? Authors Schr

  3. Who intervenes against homophobic behavior? Attributes that distinguish active bystanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V Paul; Vecho, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Research on homophobic behavior has focused on students engaging in this behavior or students toward whom this behavior is directed. There has been little attention to the large segment of students who observe this behavior, including active bystanders who defend or support students when homophobic behavior occurs. Among 722 high school students (55% female, 87% white, 86% heterosexual), 66.8% had observed at least one instance of homophobic behavior in the past 30 days. Gender (in this case, girls more so than boys), leadership, courage, altruism, justice sensitivity, and number of LGBT friends were associated with engagement in more active bystander behavior in response to observing homophobic behavior. Further, gender, courage, altruism, and number of LGBT friends each made unique contributions in accounting for variability in students' defending behavior in a comprehensive regression model. Findings highlight qualities that interventionists should cultivate in students that could lead to more active bystander engagement against homophobic behavior. PMID:26790700

  4. The engineered thymidylate kinase (TMPK/AZT enzyme-prodrug axis offers efficient bystander cell killing for suicide gene therapy of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeya Sato

    Full Text Available We previously described a novel suicide (or 'cell fate control' gene therapy enzyme/prodrug system based on an engineered variant of human thymidylate kinase (TMPK that potentiates azidothymidine (AZT activation. Delivery of a suicide gene sequence into tumors by lentiviral transduction embodies a cancer gene therapy that could employ bystander cell killing as a mechanism driving significant tumor regression in vivo. Here we present evidence of a significant bystander cell killing in vitro and in vivo mediated by the TMPK/AZT suicide gene axis that is reliant on the formation of functional gap-junctional intercellular communications (GJICs. Potentiation of AZT activation by the engineered TMPK expressed in the human prostate cancer cell line, PC-3, resulted in effective bystander killing of PC-3 cells lacking TMPK expression--an effect that could be blocked by the GJIC inhibitor, carbenoxolone. Although GJICs are mainly formed by connexins, a new family of GJIC molecules designated pannexins has been recently identified. PC-3 cells expressed both connexin43 (Cx43 and Pannexin1 (Panx1, but Panx1 expression predominated at the plasma membrane, whereas Cx43 expression was primarily localized to the cytosol. The contribution of bystander effects to the reduction of solid tumor xenografts established by the PC-3 cell line was evaluated in an animal model. We demonstrate the contribution of bystander cell killing to tumor regression in a xenograft model relying on the delivery of expression of the TMPK suicide gene into tumors via direct intratumoral injection of recombinant therapeutic lentivirus. Taken together, our data underscore that the TMPK/AZT enzyme-prodrug axis can be effectively utilized in suicide gene therapy of solid tumors, wherein significant tumor regression can be achieved via bystander effects mediated by GJICs.

  5. Bullying victimization and the social and emotional maladjustment of bystanders: A propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Jilynn M; Nickerson, Amanda B; Aloe, Ariel M; Swearer, Susan M

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated how bystanders, who have and have not been bullied, perceive their social and emotional maladjustment depending on the form of bullying (physical or verbal) they witness. Using propensity score matching, equivalent groups of 270 victimized and 270 non-victimized bystander groups were created based on middle school students' responses on the Bully Survey-Student Version (BYS-S; Swearer, 2001). Victimized bystanders experienced higher social maladjustment than non-victimized bystanders. Path analysis results suggest that social and emotional maladjustment as a bystander is related not only to social-emotional maladjustment as victim, but to gender and the form of bullying witnessed. The way in which bystanders are influenced by their personal victimization may be a critical factor in predicting, understanding, and increasing active bystander intervention. PMID:26270274

  6. Preventing sexual aggression among college men: an evaluation of a social norms and bystander intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidycz, Christine A; Orchowski, Lindsay M; Berkowitz, Alan D

    2011-06-01

    Men and women living in randomly selected 1st-year dormitories participated in tailored single-sex sexual assault prevention or risk-reduction programs, respectively. An evaluation of the men's project is presented (N = 635). The program incorporated social norms and bystander intervention education and had an impact on self-reported sexual aggression and an effect on men's perceptions that their peers would intervene when they encountered inappropriate behavior in others. Relative to the control group, participants also reported less reinforcement for engaging in sexually aggressive behavior, reported fewer associations with sexually aggressive peers, and indicated less exposure to sexually explicit media. PMID:21571742

  7. A Qualitative Exploration of Cyber-Bystanders and Moral Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Deborah; Green, Deborah; Spears, Barbara; Scrimgeour, Margaret; Barnes, Alan; Geer, Ruth; Johnson, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Studies have found that moral disengagement plays a significant role in the continuation of bullying situations (Bonanno, 2005); however, the moral stance of cyber-bystanders--those who witness online bullying--is not yet clear. While research into traditional face-to-face bullying reported that peers would probably or certainly intervene to…

  8. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  9. Workplace mobbing and bystanders' helping behaviour towards victims: the role of gender, perceived responsibility and anticipated stigma by association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Roelie; Pouwelse, Mieneke; Lodewijkx, Hein; Bolman, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    We examined victims' perceived responsibility and bystanders' anticipated risk of being victimized themselves when others associate them with the victim (stigma by association, SBA) as possible antecedents of bystanders' helping behaviour towards a victim of workplace mobbing, and explored the effects of gender. Guided by the attribution model of social conduct (Weiner, 2006), a 2 × 2 vignette experiment was conducted. Participants were Dutch regional government employees (N = 161). Path analyses generally supported the hypotheses, but showed different results for women and men. In the strong (Vs. weak) responsibility condition, women reported less sympathy and more anger and men only more anger, which resulted in lower helping intention. Additionally, for men the results showed an unexpected direct positive effect of responsibility on helping intention. Furthermore, in the strong SBA condition, women and men reported more fear and men, unexpectedly, more anger. Consequently, helping intention decreased. The findings on gender are discussed in the context of social role theory, gender and emotion. Our findings suggest that to prevent and tackle mobbing, organizations and professionals should be aware of the attributional and emotional processes and gender differences in bystanders' helping behaviour. PMID:24990642

  10. Bystander T cells in human immune responses to dengue antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwannasaen Duangchan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of T cell activation in dengue infection have focused on restriction of specific T cell receptors (TCRs and classical MHC molecules. However, bystander T cell activation, which is TCR independent, occurs via cytokines in other viral infections, both in vitro and in vivo, and enables T cells to bypass certain control checkpoints. Moreover, clinical and pathological evidence has pointed to cytokines as the mediators of dengue disease severity. Therefore, we investigated bystander T cell induction by dengue viral antigen. Results Whole blood samples from 55 Thai schoolchildren aged 13-14 years were assayed for in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-γ induction in response to inactivated dengue serotype 2 antigen (Den2. The contribution of TCR-dependent and independent pathways was tested by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA, which inhibits TCR-dependent activation of T cells. ELISA results revealed that approximately 72% of IFN-γ production occurred via the TCR-dependent pathway. The major IFN-γ sources were natural killer (NK (mean ± SE = 55.2 ± 3.3, CD4+T (24.5 ± 3.3 and CD8+T cells (17.9 ± 1.5, respectively, as demonstrated by four-color flow cytometry. Interestingly, in addition to these cells, we found CsA-resistant IFN-γ producing T cells (CD4+T = 26.9 ± 3.6% and CD8+T = 20.3 ± 2.1% implying the existence of activated bystander T cells in response to dengue antigen in vitro. These bystander CD4+ and CD8+T cells had similar kinetics to NK cells, appeared after 12 h and were inhibited by anti-IL-12 neutralization indicating cytokine involvement. Conclusions This study described immune cell profiles and highlighted bystander T cell activation in response to dengue viral antigens of healthy people in an endemic area. Further studies on bystander T cell activation in dengue viral infection may reveal the immune mechanisms that protect or enhance pathogenesis of secondary dengue infection.

  11. The non-targeted effects of radiation are perpetuated by exosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Radiation induces a DNA damaging process in bystander cells through cell–cell signalling. • Exosome RNA and protein molecules play crucial roles in bystander effects. • Cell progeny inherit the ability to secret bystander effect-inducing exosomes. • This mechanism is most likely accountable for the propagation of GI. - Abstract: Exosomes contain cargo material from endosomes, cytosol, plasma membrane and microRNA molecules, they are released by a number of non-cancer and cancer cells into both the extracellular microenvironment and body fluids such as blood plasma. Recently we demonstrated radiation-induced non-targeted effects [NTE: genomic instability (GI) and bystander effects (BE)] are partially mediated by exosomes, particularly the RNA content. However the mechanistic role of exosomes in NTE is yet to be fully understood. The present study used MCF7 cells to characterise the longevity of exosome-induced activity in the progeny of irradiated and unirradiated bystander cells. Exosomes extracted from conditioned media of irradiated and bystander progeny were added to unirradiated cells. Analysis was carried out at 1 and 20/24 population doublings following medium/exosome transfer for DNA/chromosomal damage. Results confirmed exosomes play a significant role in mediating NTE of ionising radiation (IR). This effect was remarkably persistent, observed >20 doublings post-irradiation in the progeny of bystander cells. Additionally, cell progeny undergoing a BE were themselves capable of inducing BE in other cells via exosomes they released. Furthermore we investigated the role of exosome cargo. Culture media from cells exposed to 2 Gy X-rays was subjected to ultracentrifugation and four inoculants prepared, (a) supernatants with exosomes removed, and pellets with (b) exosome proteins denatured, (c) RNA degraded, and (d) a combination of protein–RNA inactivation. These were added to separate populations of unirradiated cells. The BE was

  12. The non-targeted effects of radiation are perpetuated by exosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mayah, Ammar; Bright, Scott; Chapman, Kim [Genomic Instability Group, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Irons, Sarah [Insect Virus Research Group, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Luo, Ping [Izon Science Ltd., The Oxford Science Park, Magdalen Centre, Robert Robinson Avenue, Oxford OX4 4GA (United Kingdom); Carter, David [Chromatin and non-coding RNA, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Goodwin, Edwin [The New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Kadhim, Munira, E-mail: mkadhim@brookes.ac.uk [Genomic Instability Group, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation induces a DNA damaging process in bystander cells through cell–cell signalling. • Exosome RNA and protein molecules play crucial roles in bystander effects. • Cell progeny inherit the ability to secret bystander effect-inducing exosomes. • This mechanism is most likely accountable for the propagation of GI. - Abstract: Exosomes contain cargo material from endosomes, cytosol, plasma membrane and microRNA molecules, they are released by a number of non-cancer and cancer cells into both the extracellular microenvironment and body fluids such as blood plasma. Recently we demonstrated radiation-induced non-targeted effects [NTE: genomic instability (GI) and bystander effects (BE)] are partially mediated by exosomes, particularly the RNA content. However the mechanistic role of exosomes in NTE is yet to be fully understood. The present study used MCF7 cells to characterise the longevity of exosome-induced activity in the progeny of irradiated and unirradiated bystander cells. Exosomes extracted from conditioned media of irradiated and bystander progeny were added to unirradiated cells. Analysis was carried out at 1 and 20/24 population doublings following medium/exosome transfer for DNA/chromosomal damage. Results confirmed exosomes play a significant role in mediating NTE of ionising radiation (IR). This effect was remarkably persistent, observed >20 doublings post-irradiation in the progeny of bystander cells. Additionally, cell progeny undergoing a BE were themselves capable of inducing BE in other cells via exosomes they released. Furthermore we investigated the role of exosome cargo. Culture media from cells exposed to 2 Gy X-rays was subjected to ultracentrifugation and four inoculants prepared, (a) supernatants with exosomes removed, and pellets with (b) exosome proteins denatured, (c) RNA degraded, and (d) a combination of protein–RNA inactivation. These were added to separate populations of unirradiated cells. The BE was

  13. Electronic Cigarettes and Indoor Air Quality: A Simple Approach to Modeling Potential Bystander Exposures to Nicotine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Colard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes (“vaping” in Europe, North America and elsewhere. With such increased prevalence, there is currently a debate on whether the aerosol exhaled following the use of e-cigarettes has implications for the quality of air breathed by bystanders. Conducting chemical analysis of the indoor environment can be costly and resource intensive, limiting the number of studies which can be conducted. However, this can be modelled reasonably accurately based on empirical emissions data and using some basic assumptions. Here, we present a simplified model, based on physical principles, which considers aerosol propagation, dilution and extraction to determine the potential contribution of a single puff from an e-cigarette to indoor air. From this, it was then possible to simulate the cumulative effect of vaping over time. The model was applied to a virtual, but plausible, scenario considering an e-cigarette user and a non-user working in the same office space. The model was also used to reproduce published experimental studies and showed good agreement with the published values of indoor air nicotine concentration. With some additional refinements, such an approach may be a cost-effective and rapid way of assessing the potential exposure of bystanders to exhaled e-cigarette aerosol constituents.

  14. An “Intention-Focused” paradigm for improving bystander CPR performance□

    OpenAIRE

    Panchal, Ashish R.; Fishman, Jessica; Camp-Rogers, Teresa; Starodub, Roksolana; Merchant, Raina M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite public education campaigns and a chest compression-only initiative, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is provided in approximately 30–40% of out of hospital cardiac arrests in the United States. Bystander CPR rates may not improve without addressing factors influencing bystanders’ probability of performing CPR. We propose an “intention-focused” model for the bystander CPR performance utilizing validated behavioral theory. This model describes a framework that may predict C...

  15. Increased frequency of spontaneous neoplastic transformation in progeny of bystander cells from cultures exposed to densely ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Buonanno

    Full Text Available An increased risk of carcinogenesis caused by exposure to space radiation during prolonged space travel is a limiting factor for human space exploration. Typically, astronauts are exposed to low fluences of ionizing particles that target only a few cells in a tissue at any one time. The propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to neighboring bystander cells and their transmission to progeny cells would be of importance in estimates of the health risks of exposure to space radiation. With relevance to the risk of carcinogenesis, we investigated, in model C3H 10T½ mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs, modulation of the spontaneous frequency of neoplastic transformation in the progeny of bystander MEFs that had been in co-culture 10 population doublings earlier with MEFs exposed to moderate doses of densely ionizing iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV. An increase (P<0.05 in neoplastic transformation frequency, likely mediated by intercellular communication through gap junctions, was observed in the progeny of bystander cells that had been in co-culture with cells irradiated with iron ions, but not with protons.

  16. When being a bystander is not so innocent

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Andrea L.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    A new mechanism to explain massive depletion of CD4+ T cells in HIV-1 infection despite the low frequency of productively infected cells involves innate immune sensing of HIV 1 by abortively infected “bystander” CD4+ T cells. The result is death of the bystander cells through an inflammatory process known as pyroptosis. These findings may provide long sought explanations for both CD4+ T cell depletion and HIV-associated inflammation. See Article on page X.

  17. Identifiable images of bystanders extracted from corneal reflections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Jenkins

    Full Text Available Criminal investigations often use photographic evidence to identify suspects. Here we combined robust face perception and high-resolution photography to mine face photographs for hidden information. By zooming in on high-resolution face photographs, we were able to recover images of unseen bystanders from reflections in the subjects' eyes. To establish whether these bystanders could be identified from the reflection images, we presented them as stimuli in a face matching task (Experiment 1. Accuracy in the face matching task was well above chance (50%, despite the unpromising source of the stimuli. Participants who were unfamiliar with the bystanders' faces (n = 16 performed at 71% accuracy [t(15 = 7.64, p<.0001, d = 1.91], and participants who were familiar with the faces (n = 16 performed at 84% accuracy [t(15 = 11.15, p<.0001, d = 2.79]. In a test of spontaneous recognition (Experiment 2, observers could reliably name a familiar face from an eye reflection image. For crimes in which the victims are photographed (e.g., hostage taking, child sex abuse, reflections in the eyes of the photographic subject could help to identify perpetrators.

  18. Gravitationally induced CP effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the gravitational analogues of CP violating effects in quantum chromodynamics. These arise through the addition to the action of terms THETA ∫Rsup(ab*)sub(μν)Rsup(μν)sub(ab) and THETA' ∫fsub(μν) *fsup(μν) where Rsup(ab)sub(μν) and fsub(μν) are respectively the curvature tensor and Maxwell field tensor. Both terms can be non-trivial in spacetimes with sufficiently complicated topology. The QCD plus QED plus QGD (quantum gravidynamics) contributions may be combined in a manner which leaves the QCD quark sector as before but the presence of massless neutrinos (or spin 3/2 gravitinos) removes the pure QGD CP violation. The dominant new effect thus arises in the charged leptonic sector from THETA' ∫fsub(μν)*fsup(μν) and is formally independent of the gravitational constant. (orig.)

  19. The Influence of Parental Mental Health and Family Psychosocial Functioning on Bystander Behavior of Elementary School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Joanna C.

    2014-01-01

    Being the victim of school bullying is associated with many negative outcomes, including depression, anxiety, substance abuse, school refusal, and suicide. Peer bystanders are present in the majority of bullying situations and bystander intervention has been found to be very important in ending a bullying incident. However, most of the time bystanders do not step in to help the victim. The present study investigated the impact of parent and family influences on children’s bystander behavior. ...

  20. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-Rays in cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathy Held; Kevin Prise; Barry Michael; Melvyn Folkard

    2002-12-14

    the biological ha sis of the relationship between high- and low-dose exposures. The targeting approach also allows us to study very clearly a newly recognized effect of radiation, the ''bystander effect'', which appears to dominate some low-dose responses and therefore may have a significant role in low-dose risk mechanisms. Our project also addresses the concept that the background of naturally occurring oxidative damage that takes place continually in cells due to byproducts of metabolism may play a role in low-dose radiation risk. This project therefore also examines how cells are damaged by treatments that modify the levels of oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with low-dose irradiation. In this project, we have used human and rodent cell lines and each set of experiments has been carried out on a single cell type. However, low-dose research has to extend into tissues because signaling between cells of different types is likely to influence the responses. Our studies have therefore also included microbeam experiments using a model tissue system that consists of an explant of a small piece of pig ureter grown in culture. The structure of this tissue is similar to that of epithelium and therefore it relates to the tissues in which carcinoma arises. Our studies have been able to measure bystander-induced changes in the cells growing out from the tissue fragment after it has been targeted with a few radiation tracks to mimic a low-dose exposure.

  1. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry D. Michael; Kathryn Held; Kevin Prise

    2002-12-19

    study the biological basis of the relationship between high- and low-dose exposures. The targeting approach also allows us to study very clearly a newly recognized effect of radiation, the ''bystander effect'', which appears to dominate some low-dose responses and therefore may have a significant role in low-dose risk mechanisms. Our project also addresses the concept that the background of naturally occurring oxidative damage that takes place continually in cells due to byproducts of metabolism may play a role in treatments that modify the levels of oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with low-dose irradiation. In this project, we have used human and rodent cell lines and each set of experiments has been carried out on a single cell type. However, low-dose research has to extend into tissues because signaling between cells of different types is likely to influence the responses. Our studies have therefore also included microbeam experiments using a model tissue system that consists of an explant of a small piece of pig ureter grown in culture. The structure of this tissue is similar to that of epithelium and there it relates to the tissues in which carcinoma arises. Our studies have been able to measure bystander-induced changes in the cells growing out from the tissue fragment after it has been targeted with a few radiation tracks to mimic a low-dose exposure.

  2. Contributions of Personal and Situational Factors to Bystanders' Reactions to School Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Insoo; Hazler, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    The intent of this study was to explore bystanders' personal and situational variables predicting their behavioural reactions to school bullying by investigating a sample of 298 college students who had witnessed bullying during middle or high school. Results indicated that the bystander personal variables, gender and past experience as a bully or…

  3. Individual Motivations and Characteristics Associated with Bystander Intervention during Bullying Episodes among Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Pepler, Debra; Cummings, Joanne G.; Craig, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore bystander experiences during bullying episodes among children and youth attending a residential summer camp by investigating rates of witnessing and intervention, as well as individual motivations and characteristics associated with bystander intervention. The majority of children had witnessed bullying…

  4. On Standby? A Comparison of Online and Offline Witnesses to Bullying and Their Bystander Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Roslynn; Campbell, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Given their ubiquitous presence as witnesses to school-yard bullying, the role of the "bystander" has been studied extensively. The prevalence and behaviour of bystanders to "cyberbullying," however, is less understood. In an anonymous, school-based questionnaire, 716 secondary school students from South-East Queensland…

  5. What Would You Do? Strategies for Bystander Intervention to Prevent Sexual Violence by College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Hoffman, Melanie Lowe; McMahon, Sheila M.; Zucker, Sharon; Koenick, Ruth Anne

    2013-01-01

    Bystander education is an increasingly utilized strategy for addressing sexual assault prevention and intervention on U.S. college campuses. Given the paramount importance of peers among college students, what types of pro-social bystander interventions do students themselves deem feasible in the campus context? Drawing on self-reports from…

  6. The Pinball Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Wiewiura, Joachim Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    You might have heard of the bystander-effect, but what about the Pinball-effect, which disrupts your attention on important tasks?......You might have heard of the bystander-effect, but what about the Pinball-effect, which disrupts your attention on important tasks?...

  7. Radiation-induced non-targeted effects: some open questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existence of non-targeted effects (NTEs) of radiation (genomic instability and bystander effects) has been generally accepted for >20 y; however, there is research, which was largely ignored going back to 1915 reporting these effects. Despite today's general acceptance of the phenomenon of NTE, there is little agreement about the mechanisms involved and the implications in radiation biology and radiation protection. The aim of this review was to consider some of the odd data, which have been published in the field with a view to obtaining insights or stimulating new ways of thinking about this field. By highlighting some key challenges and controversies, concerning the mechanisms and more importantly, the reason these effects exist, current ideas about the wider implications of NTEs in evolution and biology are also discussed. (authors)

  8. Measurement of the bystander intervention model for bullying and sexual harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Amanda B; Aloe, Ariel M; Livingston, Jennifer A; Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2014-06-01

    Although peer bystanders can exacerbate or prevent bullying and sexual harassment, research has been hindered by the absence of a validated assessment tool to measure the process and sequential steps of the bystander intervention model. A measure was developed based on the five steps of Latané and Darley's (1970) bystander intervention model applied to bullying and sexual harassment. Confirmatory factor analysis with a sample of 562 secondary school students confirmed the five-factor structure of the measure. Structural equation modeling revealed that all the steps were influenced by the previous step in the model, as the theory proposed. In addition, the bystander intervention measure was positively correlated with empathy, attitudes toward bullying and sexual harassment, and awareness of bullying and sexual harassment facts. This measure can be used for future research and to inform intervention efforts related to the process of bystander intervention for bullying and sexual harassment. PMID:24793386

  9. Adolescent bystanders' perspectives of aggression in the online versus school environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Lisa J; Allan, Alfred; Cross, Donna

    2016-06-01

    Researchers' understanding of bystanders' perspectives in the cyber-environment fails to take young people's perceptions into account and remains imperfect. Interventions encouraging adolescents to help targets of cyber-aggression are therefore typically based upon traditional school-based aggression research. Twenty-four in-depth interviews with Australian 13-16 year-olds revealed two themes that reflect how young bystanders perceive differences between aggression online and at school. The physical presence theme suggests that young bystanders struggle to determine online intentions in the absence of body language, leading to hesitancy in reactions and furthermore make it easier for them to ignore online transgressions and avoid becoming involved. The authority theme indicates young bystanders perceive that, compared to the school environment, the online environment lacks clearly established rules, authority figures and formal reporting mechanisms. These differences indicate that unique strategies should be developed to encourage young bystanders to intervene in cyber-aggression situations. PMID:27007497

  10. Adoptive Transfer of Dying Cells Causes Bystander-Induced Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Schwulst, Steven J.; Davis, Christopher G.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein has the remarkable ability to prevent cell death from several noxious stimuli. Intriguingly, Bcl-2 overexpression in one cell type has been reported to protect against cell death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cell types. The mechanism of this “trans” protection has been speculated to be secondary to the release of a cytoprotective factor by Bcl-2 overexpressing cells. We employed a series of adoptive transfer experiments in which lymphocytes that ove...

  11. Risk Factors Associated with Peer Victimization and Bystander Behaviors among Adolescent Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zepeng; Liu, Zhenni; Liu, Xiangxiang; Lv, Laiwen; Zhang, Yan; Ou, Limin; Li, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of the phenomena of peer victimization and bystander behaviors, little data has generated to describe their relationships and risk factors. In this paper, a self-administered survey using a cross-sectional cluster-random sampling method in a sample of 5450 participants (2734 girls and 2716 boys) between 4th and 11th grades was conducted at six schools (two primary schools and four middle schools) located in Shantou, China. Self-reported peer victimization, bystander behaviors and information regarding parents’ risky behaviors and individual behavioral factors were collected. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was applied to evaluate risk factors affecting peer victimization and bystander behaviors. The results indicated that urban participants were more likely to become bullying victims but less likely to become passive bystanders. Contrarily, bullying victimization was related to the increasing of passive bystander behaviors. Father drinking and mother smoking as independent factors were risk factors for peer victimization. Participants who were smoking or drinking had a tendency to be involved in both peer victimization and passive bystander behaviors. This study suggested that bystander behaviors, victims’ and parents’ educations play a more important role in peer victimization than previously thought. PMID:27472354

  12. Risk Factors Associated with Peer Victimization and Bystander Behaviors among Adolescent Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zepeng; Liu, Zhenni; Liu, Xiangxiang; Lv, Laiwen; Zhang, Yan; Ou, Limin; Li, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of the phenomena of peer victimization and bystander behaviors, little data has generated to describe their relationships and risk factors. In this paper, a self-administered survey using a cross-sectional cluster-random sampling method in a sample of 5450 participants (2734 girls and 2716 boys) between 4th and 11th grades was conducted at six schools (two primary schools and four middle schools) located in Shantou, China. Self-reported peer victimization, bystander behaviors and information regarding parents' risky behaviors and individual behavioral factors were collected. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was applied to evaluate risk factors affecting peer victimization and bystander behaviors. The results indicated that urban participants were more likely to become bullying victims but less likely to become passive bystanders. Contrarily, bullying victimization was related to the increasing of passive bystander behaviors. Father drinking and mother smoking as independent factors were risk factors for peer victimization. Participants who were smoking or drinking had a tendency to be involved in both peer victimization and passive bystander behaviors. This study suggested that bystander behaviors, victims' and parents' educations play a more important role in peer victimization than previously thought. PMID:27472354

  13. Non-targeted radiation effects-An epigenetic connection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a pivotal diagnostic and treatment modality, yet it is also a potent genotoxic agent that causes genome instability and carcinogenesis. While modern cancer radiation therapy has led to increased patient survival rates, the risk of radiation treatment-related complications is becoming a growing problem. IR-induced genome instability has been well-documented in directly exposed cells and organisms. It has also been observed in distant 'bystander' cells. Enigmatically, increased instability is even observed in progeny of pre-conceptually exposed animals, including humans. The mechanisms by which it arises remain obscure and, recently, they have been proposed to be epigenetic in nature. Three major epigenetic phenomena include DNA methylation, histone modifications and small RNA-mediated silencing. This review focuses on the role of DNA methylation and small RNAs in directly exposed and bystander tissues and in IR-induced transgenerational effects. Here, we present evidence that IR-mediated effects are maintained by epigenetic mechanisms.

  14. Mechanism of bystander effect in therapy of stomach cancer with the KDR-CDglyTK suicide gene system%腺病毒介导的KDR-CDglyTK系统在治疗胃癌中的旁观者效应机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李强; 黄宗海; 陈飞; 俞金龙

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the relation between intercellular gap connection and bystander effect in therapy of stomach cancer with the KDR-CDglyTK suicide system.METHODS: SCG7901 and HeLa cells were infected with adenovirus-based KDR-CDglyTK system (AdKDR-CDglyTK), and the expression of CDglyTK fusion gene in infected cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. Gap junction intercellular communication was determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAC) in SCG7901 and HeLa cells in the presence or absence of versulin. Infected and non-infected cells were mixed with a proportion of 5% and 95% or 10% and 90%, cultured in the presence or absence of versulin, and then used to detect cell survival by MTT assay.RESULTS: The expression of GFP was observed in both infected SCG7901 cells and HeLa cells. Fluorescence intensity was gradually recovered at different time points after bleaching in SCG7901 cells cultured with versulin. Compared to SCG7901 cells cultured without versulin, the fluorescence recovery of bleached cells cultured with versulin was more obvious at the same time points. In contrast, fluorescence intensity showed no significant changes in HeLa cells cultured with versulin. The mean fluorescence recovery rate had a significant difference between SCG7901 and HeLa cells cultured with versulin. When infected and non-infected cells were mixed at different proportions, cell survival showed a significant difference between groups of SCG7901 cells (F = 144.42,407.83; both P = 0.000), but had no significance difference between groups of HeLa cells (F = 0.386, 0.895; P -0.765,0.472).CONCLUSION: There is a relation between intercellular communication and gap connection in SCG7901 cells but not in HeLa cells. Versulin can enhance the bystander effect in therapy with the suicide gene system in vitro. The mechanism of bystander effect in therapy with the suicide gene system may involve gap connection.%目的:探讨重组腺病毒介导KDR-CDglyTK系统杀伤胃癌SCG7901细胞

  15. Engagement of NKG2D on bystander memory CD8 T cells promotes increased immunopathology following Leishmania major infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika J Crosby

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of adaptive immunity is the development of a long-term pathogen specific memory response. While persistent memory T cells certainly impact the immune response during a secondary challenge, their role in unrelated infections is less clear. To address this issue, we utilized lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV and Listeria monocytogenes immune mice to investigate whether bystander memory T cells influence Leishmania major infection. Despite similar parasite burdens, LCMV and Listeria immune mice exhibited a significant increase in leishmanial lesion size compared to mice infected with L. major alone. This increased lesion size was due to a severe inflammatory response, consisting not only of monocytes and neutrophils, but also significantly more CD8 T cells. Many of the CD8 T cells were LCMV specific and expressed gzmB and NKG2D, but unexpectedly expressed very little IFN-γ. Moreover, if CD8 T cells were depleted in LCMV immune mice prior to challenge with L. major, the increase in lesion size was lost. Strikingly, treating with NKG2D blocking antibodies abrogated the increased immunopathology observed in LCMV immune mice, showing that NKG2D engagement on LCMV specific memory CD8 T cells was required for the observed phenotype. These results indicate that bystander memory CD8 T cells can participate in an unrelated immune response and induce immunopathology through an NKG2D dependent mechanism without providing increased protection.

  16. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  17. Heart rate modulation in bystanding geese watching social and non-social events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wascher, Claudia A. F.; Scheiber, Isabella B. R.; Kotrschal, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    Simply observing other individuals interacting has been shown to affect subsequent behaviour and also hormones in 'bystander' individuals. However, immediate physiological responses of an observer have been hardly investigated. Here we present results on individuals' heart rate (HR) responses during

  18. When can I help? A conceptual framework for the prevention of sexual violence through bystander intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Banyard, Victoria L

    2012-01-01

    The bystander intervention approach is gaining popularity as a means for engaging communities in sexual assault prevention, especially on college campuses. Many bystander programs are teaching community members how to intervene without first assisting them to identify the full range of opportunities when they can intervene. In this article, the authors review the literature on sexual violence bystander intervention and present a conceptual framework that lays out a continuum of bystander opportunities ranging from reactive situations after an assault has occurred, to situations before an assault has occurred (posing high to low risk to victims), as well as proactive situations where no risk to the victim is present. The implications of this typology are discussed in the context of program development, evaluation, and further research. PMID:22096017

  19. Lipids, atherosclerosis and CVD risk: is CRP an innocent bystander?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Zacho, J

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate recent human studies with respect to the interpretation of whether elevated plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) cause cardiovascular disease (CVD), or whether elevated CRP levels more likely is an innocent bystander. DATA SYNTHESIS: Elevated CRP concentrations are...... consistently associated with CVD risk. A recent study showed that aggressive statin treatment caused reductions of 50% in LDL cholesterol, 37% in CRP, 44% in CVD events, and 20% in total mortality, and that the highest treatment benefits were obtained in those with the lowest achieved levels of both LDL...... cholesterol and CRP. However, a reduction in CRP levels after statin treatment could be secondary to the reduced LDL cholesterol levels, and thereby less inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques. We recently performed 4 large Mendelian randomization studies, studies that demonstrated that elevated CRP...

  20. Bystander behavior in bullying situations : basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement and defender self-efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Thornberg, Robert; Jungert, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different bystander behaviors in bullying situations. Three hundred and forty-seven teenagers completed a bullying survey. Findings indicated that compared with...

  1. Bystander motivation in bullying incidents : To intervene or not to intervene?

    OpenAIRE

    Thornberg, Robert; Tenenbaum, Laura; Varjas, Kristen; Meyers, Joel; Jungert, Tomas; Vanegas, Gina

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This research sought to extend knowledge about bystanders in bullying situations with a focus on the motivations that lead them to different responses. The 2 primary goals of this study were to investigate the reasons for children’s decisions to help or not to help a victim when witnessing bullying, and to generate a grounded theory (or conceptual framework) of bystander motivation in bullying situations. Methods: Thirty students ranging in age from 9 to 15 years (M=11....

  2. A Web-Based Sexual Violence Bystander Intervention for Male College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Laura F.; Vivolo-Kantor, Alana; Hardin, James; Berkowitz, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bystander intervention approaches offer promise for reducing rates of sexual violence on college campuses. Most interventions are in-person small-group formats, which limit their reach and reduce their overall public health impact. Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of RealConsent, a Web-based bystander approach to sexual violence prevention, in enhancing prosocial intervening behaviors and preventing sexual violence perpetration. Methods A random probability sample of 743...

  3. Der Bystander-Effekt in alltäglichen Hilfesituationen : ein nicht-reaktives Feldexperiment

    OpenAIRE

    Alle, Katrin; Mayerl, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    "Der These der Verantwortungsdiffusion zufolge sinkt die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Hilfeleistung, wenn mehrere Zeugen eine Hilfesituation beobachten, da sich aufgrund der Anwesenheit mehrerer potentieller Helfer die individuell wahrgenommene Verantwortung reduziert (sog. Bystander-Effekt). Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt Ergebnisse eines nicht-reaktiven Feldexperiments mit verdeckter Beobachtung zur Untersuchung des Bystander-Effekts in einer ungefährlichen alltäglichen Hilfesituation mit 80 Ver...

  4. Der Bystander-Effekt in alltäglichen Hilfesituationen : ein nicht-reaktives Feldexperiment

    OpenAIRE

    Alle, Katrin; Mayerl, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Der These der Verantwortungsdiffusion zufolge sinkt die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Hilfeleistung, wenn mehrere Zeugen eine Hilfesituation beobachten, da sich aufgrund der Anwesenheit mehrerer potentieller Helfer die individuell wahrgenommene Verantwortung reduziert (sog. Bystander-Effekt). Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt Ergebnisse eines nicht-reaktiven Feldexperiments mit verdeckter Beobachtung zur Untersuchung des Bystander-Effekts in einer ungefährlichen alltäglichen Hilfesituation mit 80 Vers...

  5. Stem cells and radiation: effects in targeted and non-targeted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renewing tissues of the body are hierarchically organized and maintained by a small population of self-maintaining stem cells that are important targets for malignant transformation and also for gene therapy and tissue engineering approaches in regenerative medicine. Deleterious effects of toxic insults such as ionizing radiation may be due to stem cell death, with consequent loss of mature functional cells, or to stem cell damage that leads to aberrant responses to regulatory mechanisms. However, because the homeostatic regulation of these tissues is complex (involving intercellular signalling and cellular interactions that control cell proliferation, differentiation and death) radiation effects on stromal cells that perturb the microenvironmental control may also result in deleterious effects on the stem cell compartment. The rapidly developing fields of research investigating radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects also indicate that radiation effects on stem cells can be indirect. Although the non-targeted mechanisms responsible for bystander effects and the induction and maintenance of the inducible instability phenotype are not understood, inter-cellular signalling and free radical-mediated processes may be common features. Inter-cellular signalling and production of free radicals are also features of inflammatory responses; a recently identified indirect consequence of radiation with the potential for both persisting and bystander-mediated damage as well as for conferring a predisposition to malignancy. The production of clastogenic factors and their capacity for indirect cell damage after irradiation, the involvement of stromal cells in malignancy and bystander-mediated genetic instability may all reflect aspects of non-specific inflammatory-type responses to radiation-induced stress and injury. Recent investigations demonstrating that radiation-induced signalling processes are influenced by tissue-specific and genetic factors add

  6. Bystanders' responses to offline bullying and cyberbullying: The role of empathy and normative beliefs about aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machackova, Hana; Pfetsch, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Cyberbullying often takes place with the virtual presence or knowledge of bystanders. While we have some evidence about the determinants of bystanders' responses to offline bullying, we lack empirical studies concerning the variables that influence bystanders' responses to cyberbullying. The current study examines bystanders' responses to offline bullying and cyberbullying incidents. Two types of responses were captured: support toward the victims and the reinforcement of bullies' actions. Using data from 321 German adolescents (ages 12-18; M = 14.99; 44% girls), the association between bystanders' responses and normative beliefs about verbal aggression and cyberaggression, and affective and cognitive empathy, were tested in a path model. Both types of normative beliefs positively predicted the reinforcement of bullies, and normative belief about verbal aggression also predicted support for the victims of offline bullying. Both types of empathy predicted support in offline bullying, but only affective empathy predicted support in cyberbullying. There was no link between affective or cognitive empathy to the reinforcement of bullies. Moreover, bystanders' tendencies to respond supportively to the victim or to reinforce the bully were rather consistent in both cyber- and offline bullying, but there was no link between support and reinforcement. The findings are discussed with regard to implications for prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:26946454

  7. Radiation responses of stem cells: targeted and non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem cells are fundamental to the development of any tissue or organism via their ability to self-renew, which is aided by their unlimited proliferative capacity and their ability to produce fully differentiated offspring, often from multiple lineages. Stems cells are long lived and have the potential to accumulate mutations, including in response to radiation exposure. It is thought that stem cells have the potential to be induced into a cancer stem cell phenotype and that these may play an important role in resistance to radiotherapy. For radiation-induced carcinogenesis, the role of targeted and non-targeted effects is unclear with tissue or origin being important. Studies of genomic instability and bystander responses have shown consistent effects in haematopoietic models. Several models of radiation have predicted that stem cells play an important role in tumour initiation and that bystander responses could play a role in proliferation and self-renewal. (authors)

  8. Bystander Position Taking in School Bullying: The Role of Positive Identity, Self-Efficacy, and Self-Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, Sandra K. M.; Hui, Eadaoin K.P.; Law, Bella C. M.

    2011-01-01

    School bullying has become an explicit, burgeoning problem challenging the healthy development of children and adolescents in Hong Kong. Many bullying prevention and intervention programs focus on victims and bullies, with bystanders treated as either nonexistent or irrelevant. This paper asserts that bystanders actually play pivotal roles in deciding whether the bullying process and dynamics are benign or adversarial. Bystanders' own abilities and characteristics often influence how they res...

  9. Effects of radiation on levels of DNA damage in normal non-adjacent mucosa from colorectal cancer cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheridan, Juliette

    2013-03-01

    Defects in DNA repair pathways have been linked with colorectal cancer (CRC). Adjuvant radiotherapy has become commonplace in the treatment of rectal cancer however it is associated with a higher rate of second cancer formation. It is known that radiation results in DNA damage directly or indirectly by radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) by causing double-strand breaks (DSBs). The majority of work in RIBE has been performed in cell lines and limited studies have been in or ex vivo.

  10. Analysis of the common deletions in the mitochondrial DNA is a sensitive biomarker detecting direct and non-targeted cellular effects of low dose ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling-Toth, Boglarka; Sandor, Nikolett; Kis, Eniko [Department of Molecular and Tumor Radiobiology, Frederic Joliot-Curie National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Anna u 5, H-1221 Budapest (Hungary); Kadhim, Munira [Genomic Instability Research Group, School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Safrany, Geza, E-mail: safrany.geza@osski.hu [Department of Molecular and Tumor Radiobiology, Frederic Joliot-Curie National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Anna u 5, H-1221 Budapest (Hungary); Hegyesi, Hargita [Department of Molecular and Tumor Radiobiology, Frederic Joliot-Curie National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Anna u 5, H-1221 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-11-01

    One of the key issues of current radiation research is the biological effect of low doses. Unfortunately, low dose science is hampered by the unavailability of easily performable, reliable and sensitive quantitative biomarkers suitable detecting low frequency alterations in irradiated cells. We applied a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) based protocol detecting common deletions (CD) in the mitochondrial genome to assess direct and non-targeted effects of radiation in human fibroblasts. In directly irradiated (IR) cells CD increased with dose and was higher in radiosensitive cells. Investigating conditioned medium-mediated bystander effects we demonstrated that low and high (0.1 and 2 Gy) doses induced similar levels of bystander responses and found individual differences in human fibroblasts. The bystander response was not related to the radiosensitivity of the cells. The importance of signal sending donor and signal receiving target cells was investigated by placing conditioned medium from a bystander response positive cell line (F11-hTERT) to bystander negative cells (S1-hTERT) and vice versa. The data indicated that signal sending cells are more important in the medium-mediated bystander effect than recipients. Finally, we followed long term effects in immortalized radiation sensitive (S1-hTERT) and normal (F11-hTERT) fibroblasts up to 63 days after IR. In F11-hTERT cells CD level was increased until 35 days after IR then reduced back to control level by day 49. In S1-hTERT cells the increased CD level was also normalized by day 42, however a second wave of increased CD incidence appeared by day 49 which was maintained up to day 63 after IR. This second CD wave might be the indication of radiation-induced instability in the mitochondrial genome of S1-hTERT cells. The data demonstrated that measuring CD in mtDNA by qRT-PCR is a reliable and sensitive biomarker to estimate radiation-induced direct and non-targeted effects.

  11. Analysis of the common deletions in the mitochondrial DNA is a sensitive biomarker detecting direct and non-targeted cellular effects of low dose ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling-Tóth, Boglárka; Sándor, Nikolett; Kis, Eniko; Kadhim, Munira; Sáfrány, Géza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2011-11-01

    One of the key issues of current radiation research is the biological effect of low doses. Unfortunately, low dose science is hampered by the unavailability of easily performable, reliable and sensitive quantitative biomarkers suitable detecting low frequency alterations in irradiated cells. We applied a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) based protocol detecting common deletions (CD) in the mitochondrial genome to assess direct and non-targeted effects of radiation in human fibroblasts. In directly irradiated (IR) cells CD increased with dose and was higher in radiosensitive cells. Investigating conditioned medium-mediated bystander effects we demonstrated that low and high (0.1 and 2Gy) doses induced similar levels of bystander responses and found individual differences in human fibroblasts. The bystander response was not related to the radiosensitivity of the cells. The importance of signal sending donor and signal receiving target cells was investigated by placing conditioned medium from a bystander response positive cell line (F11-hTERT) to bystander negative cells (S1-hTERT) and vice versa. The data indicated that signal sending cells are more important in the medium-mediated bystander effect than recipients. Finally, we followed long term effects in immortalized radiation sensitive (S1-hTERT) and normal (F11-hTERT) fibroblasts up to 63 days after IR. In F11-hTERT cells CD level was increased until 35 days after IR then reduced back to control level by day 49. In S1-hTERT cells the increased CD level was also normalized by day 42, however a second wave of increased CD incidence appeared by day 49 which was maintained up to day 63 after IR. This second CD wave might be the indication of radiation-induced instability in the mitochondrial genome of S1-hTERT cells. The data demonstrated that measuring CD in mtDNA by qRT-PCR is a reliable and sensitive biomarker to estimate radiation-induced direct and non-targeted effects. PMID:21843534

  12. Analysis of the common deletions in the mitochondrial DNA is a sensitive biomarker detecting direct and non-targeted cellular effects of low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the key issues of current radiation research is the biological effect of low doses. Unfortunately, low dose science is hampered by the unavailability of easily performable, reliable and sensitive quantitative biomarkers suitable detecting low frequency alterations in irradiated cells. We applied a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) based protocol detecting common deletions (CD) in the mitochondrial genome to assess direct and non-targeted effects of radiation in human fibroblasts. In directly irradiated (IR) cells CD increased with dose and was higher in radiosensitive cells. Investigating conditioned medium-mediated bystander effects we demonstrated that low and high (0.1 and 2 Gy) doses induced similar levels of bystander responses and found individual differences in human fibroblasts. The bystander response was not related to the radiosensitivity of the cells. The importance of signal sending donor and signal receiving target cells was investigated by placing conditioned medium from a bystander response positive cell line (F11-hTERT) to bystander negative cells (S1-hTERT) and vice versa. The data indicated that signal sending cells are more important in the medium-mediated bystander effect than recipients. Finally, we followed long term effects in immortalized radiation sensitive (S1-hTERT) and normal (F11-hTERT) fibroblasts up to 63 days after IR. In F11-hTERT cells CD level was increased until 35 days after IR then reduced back to control level by day 49. In S1-hTERT cells the increased CD level was also normalized by day 42, however a second wave of increased CD incidence appeared by day 49 which was maintained up to day 63 after IR. This second CD wave might be the indication of radiation-induced instability in the mitochondrial genome of S1-hTERT cells. The data demonstrated that measuring CD in mtDNA by qRT-PCR is a reliable and sensitive biomarker to estimate radiation-induced direct and non-targeted effects.

  13. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjostedt, Svetlana; Bezak, Eva

    2010-09-01

    Modern radiobiology is undergoing rapid change due to new discoveries contradicting the target concept which is currently used to predict dose-response relationships. Thus relatively recently discovered radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs), that include additional death, mutation and radio-adaptation in non-irradiated cells, change our understanding of the target concept and broadens its boundaries. This can be significant from a radioprotection point of view and also has the potential to reassess radiation damage models currently used in radiotherapy. This article reviews briefly the general concepts of RIBEs such as the proposed underlying mechanisms of signal induction and propagation, experimental approaches and biological end points used to investigate these phenomena. It also summarises several mathematical models currently proposed in an attempt to quantify RIBE. The main emphasis of this article is to review and highlight the potential impact of the bystander phenomena in radiotherapy. PMID:20857259

  14. Non-Targeted effects of ionising radiation and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Modern radiobiology is undergoing rapid change due to new discoveries contradicting the target concept which is currently used to predict dose-response relationships. Thus relatively recently discovered radiation induced bystander effects (RlBEs), that include additional death, mutation and radio-adaptation in non-irradiated cells, change our understanding of the target concept and broadens its boundaries. This can be significant from a radioprotection point of view and also has the potential to reassess radiation damage models currently used in radiotherapy. This article reviews briefly the general concepts of RlBEs such as the proposed underlying mechanisms of signal induction and propagation, experimental approaches and biological end points used to investigate these phenomena. It also summ rises several mathematical models currently proposed in an attempt to quantify RlBE. The main emphasis of this al1icle is to review and highlight the potential impact of the bystander phenomena in radiotherapy.

  15. Fungi in the cystic fibrosis lung: bystanders or pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-07-01

    Improvement to the life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) brings about novel challenges including the need for evaluation of the role of fungi in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. To determine if such organisms represent bystanders or pathogens affecting clinical outcomes we review the existing knowledge from a clinical, biochemical, inflammatory and immunological perspective. The prevalence and importance of fungi in the CF airway has likely been underestimated with the most frequently isolated filamentous fungi being Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum and the major yeast Candida albicans. Developing non-culture based microbiological methods for fungal detection has improved both our classification and understanding of their clinical consequences including localized, allergic and systemic infections. Cross-kingdom interaction between bacteria and fungi are discussed as is the role of biofilms further affecting clinical outcome. A combination of host and pathogen-derived factors determines if a particular fungus represents a commensal, colonizer or pathogen in the setting of CF. The underlying immune state, disease severity and treatment burden represent key host variables whilst fungal type, form, chronicity and virulence including the ability to evade immune recognition determines the pathogenic potential of a specific fungus at a particular point in time. Further research in this emerging field is warranted to fully elucidate the spectrum of disease conferred by the presence of fungi in the CF airway and the indications for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24625547

  16. Sorority Women's and Fraternity Men's Rape Myth Acceptance and Bystander Intervention Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, R. Sean; Brosi, Matthew W.; Foubert, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Sorority women and fraternity men are more likely than other students to be survivors and perpetrators of sexual assault, respectively. The present study examined sorority and fraternity members' rape myth acceptance, bystander efficacy, and bystander willingness to help in potential sexual assault situations. Sorority women were more…

  17. The Possible Effect Of Tamoxifen Vs Whole Body Irradiation Treatment On Thyroid Hormones in Female Rats Bearing Mammary Tumors Chemically Induced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in most developed and developing regions of the world. In women, this drug has tissuespecific effects, acting as an estrogen antagonist on the breast, and as an estrogen agonist on bone, lipid metabolism (increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), and the endometrium. Thyroid hormones act on almost all organs throughout the body and regulate the basal metabolism of the organism. Thyroid hormone can also stimulate the proliferation in vitro of certain tumor cell lines. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the significant value of tamoxifen and/or irradiation treatment on thyroid hormones in breast cancer bearing female rats. Forty two female Sprague-Dawely rats randomly divided into seven groups and the effect of tamoxifen and post-irradiation was studied on breast cancer chemically induced. The results shows a T4 and estradiol levels not T3 were altered in different experimental groups. It could be concluded that irradiation-induced changes in the composition of the mammary microenvironment promote the expression of neoplastic potential by affecting both estradiol and thyroid hormones, and tamoxifen may alter the thyroid hormones. Irradiation and tamoxifen administration may have worth effects on T4 and estradiol levels and it is recommended to further studies towards the bystander effect of radiation and tamoxifen on the tissue culture and molecular biology scale.

  18. Cytokine switch and bystander suppression of autoimmune responses to multiple antigens in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by a single recombinant T-cell receptor ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sushmita; Subramanian, Sandhya; Miller, Lisa; Proctor, Thomas M; Roberts, Chris; Burrows, Gregory G; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2009-03-25

    Recombinant T-cell receptor ligands (RTLs) can reverse clinical and histological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in an antigen-specific manner, and are currently in clinical trials for treatment of subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS). Antigen specificity of RTL raises the question as to whether this treatment would be successful in MS patients where target antigens are unknown. Using spinal cord homogenate or combinations of two different peptides to induce disease, we found that treatment with single RTL could reverse EAE as long as targeted T-cells were present. Therapy with three different RTLs each caused a significant reduction in IL-17 and increases in IL-10 and IL-13 in peptide-activated splenocytes, reduced proliferation of both cognate and bystander specificities of lymph node cells, and reduced inflammatory lesions and secreted IL-17 and IL-2 from peptide-activated spinal cord cells. These results show that treatment with single RTLs can induce a cytokine switch in cognate T-cells that inhibits both the target and bystander T-cells, providing new evidence for the potential applicability of RTL therapy in MS. PMID:19321778

  19. New risk indicator approach for Operators, Workers, Bystanders and Residents for a sustainable use of plant protection products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchettini, Gabriele; Calliera, Maura; Marchis, Alexandru; Glass, Richard; Ellis, Clare Butler; Machera, Kyriaki; Gerritsen-Ebben, Rianda; Spanoghe, Pieter; Capri, Ettore

    2015-11-01

    In 2009, the European Union adopted the Directive on Sustainable Use of pesticides (SUD, Directive 2009/128/EC) establishing a framework for achieving a sustainable use of Plant Protection Products (PPPs) through reducing the risks and impacts of PPP use on human health and the environment, promoting integrated pest management and stimulating effective non-chemical alternatives. The core idea of the SUD is that it is necessary to monitor the use of PPPs through the implementation of an appropriate set of risk indicators to monitor progress and trends in risk reduction within the Member States. To contribute to this direction, following a comprehensive analysis of the risk (including procedures of risk assessment and risk management) and involving stakeholders in the decision process, specific toolboxes of practical indirect risk indicators of exposure of Operators, Workers, Bystanders and Residents were developed and are now available to be used by Member States (MSs) based on their specific context. PMID:26143544

  20. Bystander Behavior in Bullying Situations: Basic Moral Sensitivity, Moral Disengagement and Defender Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert; Jungert, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different…

  1. Participant Roles in Bullying: How Can Peer Bystanders Be Utilized in Interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmivalli, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a view of school bullying as a group phenomenon and practical implications stemming from this approach. The motivation for bullying perpetration often relates to one's social standing in the group. Peer bystanders are typically present when bullying takes place, often providing the perpetrators with social rewards. The…

  2. Bystander Intervention, Bullying, and Victimization: A Multilevel Analysis of New Zealand High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Simon; Peterson, Elizabeth R.; Stuart, Jaimee; Utter, Jennifer; Bullen, Pat; Fleming, Theresa; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Clark, Terryann; Milfont, Taciano

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the association between schools and student bullying behaviors and victimization among a nationally representative sample (N = 9,107) of New Zealand high school students. In particular, the study sought to explore the role of characteristics of schools and school culture with respect to bystander behavior, while controlling for…

  3. Debriefing bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is valuable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Fjordholt, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    , positively influencing the ability to cope with the emotional reactions and the cognitive perception of own performance and motivates improvement of CPR skills. Importantly, it increases confidence to provide CPR in the future. Implementation of telephone debriefing to bystanders at Emergency Medical...

  4. Using a Multimedia Social Marketing Campaign to Increase Active Bystanders on the College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the campus-wide administration of the Know Your Power bystander-oriented social marketing campaign. Participants: Undergraduate students at a public college were invited to participate in a public awareness survey before and after the 6-week campaign administration in February and March 2009. Methods: Pretest and posttests…

  5. Counseling and the Bystander-Equity Model of Supervisory Helping Behavior: Directions for EAP Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Bayer, Gregory A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses contribution of Bystander-Equity Model of Supervisory Helping Behavior to pursuit of employee assistance program (EAP) research based on traditions of field of counseling. Offers structure for pursuing empirical and applied activities in EAP settings. Encourages counseling researchers and practitioners to respond to challenge of working…

  6. R.U. Ready?: Peer Education and Bystander Intervention Sexual Assault Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweer, Jen Luettel; Heather, Katie; Kay, Kathryn; Stewart, K. Leigh; Kovach, Laura

    2012-01-01

    R.U. Ready? at Georgetown University is an annual sexual assault awareness event that incorporates peer education and resources with opportunities for students, staff, and faculty to dialogue about providing bystander intervention throughout the campus community. Beyond dialogue, participants learn about student activism and the resources and…

  7. Radiation induced COX-2 expression and mutagenesis at non-targeted lung tissues of gpt delta transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Y.; Calaf, G M; Zhou, H.; Ghandhi, S A; Elliston, C. D.; Wen, G.; Nohmi, T; Amundson, S A; Hei, T K

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although radiation-induced bystander effects have been confirmed using a variety of endpoints, the mechanism(s) underlying these effects are not well understood, especially for in vivo study. Methods: A 1-cm2 area (1 cm × 1 cm) in the lower abdominal region of gpt delta transgenic mice was irradiated with 5 Gy of 300 keV X-rays, and changes in out-of-field lung and liver were observed. Results: Compared with sham-treated controls, the Spi− mutation frequency increased 2.4-fold in ...

  8. Critical role of gap junction communication, calcium and nitric oxide signaling in bystander responses to focal photodynamic injury

    OpenAIRE

    Calì, Bianca; Ceolin, Stefano; Ceriani, Federico; Bortolozzi, Mario; Agnellini, Andrielly H.R.; Zorzi, Veronica; Predonzani, Andrea; Bronte, Vincenzo; Molon, Barbara; Mammano, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing and nonionizing radiation affect not only directly targeted cells but also surrounding “bystander” cells. The underlying mechanisms and therapeutic role of bystander responses remain incompletely defined. Here we show that photosentizer activation in a single cell triggers apoptosis in bystander cancer cells, which are electrically coupled by gap junction channels and support the propagation of a Ca2+ wave initiated in the irradiated cell. The latter also acts as source of nitric oxi...

  9. Transgenerational induction of leukaemia following parental irradiation. Genomic instability and the bystander in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    results in changes to haemopoiesis that demand stem cell proliferation, thus leading to elevated genomic instability which may be exploited by secondary leukaemia inducing agents - and evidence will be presented to demonstrate this potential. Additionally, changes in the regulatory haemopoietic microenvironment can be seen as the in vivo form of the potentiating 'bystander'. (author)

  10. That's What Friends Are For: Bystander Responses to Friends or Strangers at Risk for Party Rape Victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jennifer; Pazienza, Rena; Olin, Rachel; Rich, Hillary

    2015-10-01

    The present research examined bystander responses to potential party rape scenarios involving either a friend or a stranger at risk. Undergraduate students (N = 151) imagined attending a party and seeing a man lead an intoxicated woman (friend or stranger) into a bedroom. After random assignment to conditions, participants reported on intentions to help, barriers to helping, victim blame, and empathic concern. As expected, based on their shared social group membership, bystanders intended to offer more help to friends than to strangers. Bystanders also reported more personal responsibility to help and more empathic concern when the potential victim was a friend rather than stranger. Observing a friend versus stranger at risk did not affect audience inhibition or perceived victim blame. Compared with women, men reported more blame and less empathic concern for potential victims. However, there were no gender differences in bystander intent to help or barriers to helping. In multivariate analyses, both responsibility to help and empathic concern for the potential victim uniquely predicted bystanders' intent to help a woman at risk for party rape. Results suggest that promoting social identification with peers at risk could increase bystander intervention. PMID:25349015

  11. Efficacy of Bystander Programs to Prevent Dating Abuse Among Youth and Young Adults: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Heather L; Casey, Erin; Herrenkohl, Todd

    2016-07-01

    Estimates suggest that between 10% and 25% of adolescents have experienced some form of physical violence within a dating relationship, and one in four college-age women experiences attempted or completed sexual violence on campus. Bystander programs focus on equipping young adults with the skills to safely intervene when they witness behaviors that can result in dating abuse. This approach is promoted for its capacity both to transform community norms that contribute to dating abuse and to foster more positive social interactions among youth, however, there has been limited review of the literature on the outcomes of bystander programs. Therefore, this article provides an in-depth systematic literature review, which describes the content and program components of bystander programs and summarizes what is currently known about the impact of bystander interventions on participants' behaviors and attitudes. Results indicate that bystander programs are promising from the standpoint of increasing young adults' willingness to intervene and confidence in their ability to intervene when they witness dating or sexual violence, however, the utilization of actual bystander behaviors was less straightforward. Implications for prevention practice and for future research are presented. PMID:25951840

  12. Understanding the Role of Bystanders and Peer Support in School Bullying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Cowie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Research into school bullying has traditionally focussed on the actual protagonists – the perpetrators and the targets. Consequently, we know a great deal about the psychological characteristics of bullies and victims and the consequences of bullying in undermining the emotional well-being of both targets and perpetrators. While an understanding of the personal aspects of the bully-victim relationship is important, it only addresses part of the issue. Bullying is experienced within a group of peers who adopt different participant roles and who experience a range of emotions. In this article, I argue that bullies do not act alone but rely on reinforcement from their immediate group of friends as well as the tacit approval of the onlookers. This article explores the conflicting emotions often experienced by the bystanders. It also makes some suggestions about interventions to empower bystanders to take action against bullying through, for example, such interventions as peer support.

  13. Absent bystanders and cognitive dissonance: a comment on Timmins & de Vries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, John

    2015-04-01

    Timmins & de Vries are more sympathetic to my editorial than other critics, but they take issue with the details. They doubt whether the bystander phenomenon applies to Mid Staffs nurses; they believe that cognitive dissonance is a better explanation of why nurses fail to behave compassionately; and they think that I am 'perhaps a bit rash' to conclude that 'teaching compassion may be fruitless'. In this comment, I discuss all three points. I suggest that the bystander phenomenon is irrelevant; that Timmins & de Vries give an incomplete account of cognitive dissonance; and that it isn't rash to propose that educating nurses 'for compassion' is a red herring. Additionally, I comment on the idea that I wish to mount a 'defence of healthcare staff'. PMID:25549986

  14. Chimpanzees' Bystander Reactions to Infanticide: An Evolutionary Precursor of Social Norms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rohr, Claudia Rudolf; van Schaik, Carel P; Kissling, Alexandra; Burkart, Judith M

    2015-06-01

    Social norms-generalized expectations about how others should behave in a given context-implicitly guide human social life. However, their existence becomes explicit when they are violated because norm violations provoke negative reactions, even from personally uninvolved bystanders. To explore the evolutionary origin of human social norms, we presented chimpanzees with videos depicting a putative norm violation: unfamiliar conspecifics engaging in infanticidal attacks on an infant chimpanzee. The chimpanzees looked far longer at infanticide scenes than at control videos showing nut cracking, hunting a colobus monkey, or displays and aggression among adult males. Furthermore, several alternative explanations for this looking pattern could be ruled out. However, infanticide scenes did not generally elicit higher arousal. We propose that chimpanzees as uninvolved bystanders may detect norm violations but may restrict emotional reactions to such situations to in-group contexts. We discuss the implications for the evolution of human morality. PMID:26108616

  15. Angiogenic effect induced by mineral fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → In this study we described the angiogenetic effect of some mineral fibres. → Wollastonite fibres induce blood vessel formation. → The size and shape of the fibres were important factors for the cell signalling. → Wollastonite induce ROS-NFκB activation and EGFR signalling. → Involvement of wollastonite exposure in the development of pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Due to the toxic effect of asbestos, other materials with similar chemical-physical characteristics have been introduced to substitute it. We evaluate the angiogenic effect of certain asbestos substitute fibres such as glass fibres (GFs), ceramic fibres (CFs) and wollastonite fibres (WFs) and then compare angiogenic responses to those induced by crocidolite asbestos fibres (AFs). An in vitro model using human endothelial cells in small islands within a culture matrix of fibroblasts (Angio-Kit) was used to evaluate vessel formation. The release of IL-6, sIL-R6, IL-8, VEGF-A and their soluble receptors, sVEGFR-1, sVEGFR-2, was determined in the conditioning medium of Angio-Kit system after fibre treatment. ROS formation and cell viability were evaluated in cultured endothelial cells (HUVEC). To evaluate the involvement of intracellular mechanisms, EGFR signalling, ROS formation and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) pathway were then inhibited by incubating HUVEC cells with AG1478, NAC and PDTC respectively, and the cytokine and growth factor release was analyzed in the culture medium after 7 days of fibre incubation. Among the mineral fibres tested, WFs markedly induced blood vessel formation which was associated with release of IL-6 and IL-8, VEGF-A and their soluble receptors. ROS production was observed in HUVEC after WFs treatment which was associated with cell cytotoxicity. The EGFR-induced ERK phosphorylation and ROS-mediated NFκB activation were involved in the cytokine and angiogenic factor release. However, only the EGFR activation was able to induce angiogenesis. The WFs

  16. Eosinophils: Offenders or General Bystanders in Allergic Airway Disease and Pulmonary Immunity?

    OpenAIRE

    Akuthota, Praveen; Xenakis, Jason J.; Weller, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophils have long been noted to be present in asthma and other forms of pulmonary inflammation, but whether they act as true offenders or merely as bystanders has been a point of uncertainty. However, in recent years, there has been increasing evidence suggesting that eosinophils are not passive cells in the respiratory system, acting only as markers of allergic inflammation. This review discusses key evidence from animal models and human clinical trials that support the importance of eos...

  17. Video calls from lay bystanders to dispatch centers - risk assessment of information security

    OpenAIRE

    Hasvold Per; Bolle Stein R; Henriksen Eva

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Video calls from mobile phones can improve communication during medical emergencies. Lay bystanders can be instructed and supervised by health professionals at Emergency Medical Communication Centers. Before implementation of video mobile calls in emergencies, issues of information security should be addressed. Methods Information security was assessed for risk, based on the information security standard ISO/IEC 27005:2008. A multi-professional team used structured brainst...

  18. Electronic Cigarettes and Indoor Air Quality: A Simple Approach to Modeling Potential Bystander Exposures to Nicotine

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Colard; Grant O'Connell; Thomas Verron; Xavier Cahours; Pritchard, John D.

    2014-01-01

    There has been rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes (“vaping”) in Europe, North America and elsewhere. With such increased prevalence, there is currently a debate on whether the aerosol exhaled following the use of e-cigarettes has implications for the quality of air breathed by bystanders. Conducting chemical analysis of the indoor environment can be costly and resource intensive, limiting the number of studies which can be conducted. However, this can be modelled reasonably acc...

  19. Outcomes of a Bystander Intervention Community Health Service-Learning Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Kim; Hensel, Desiree; Fasone, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the integration of a college bystander intervention service-learning project into an entry-level community clinical course in a prelicensure program and its outcomes. Two years of data from 118 students showed that students helped improve campus safety while growing as professionals and gaining leadership and health promotion skills. Approximately one-third of the students described a specific incident in which they intervened in an ambiguous situation. PMID:26633150

  20. Simulating Social Situations in Immersive Virtual Reality - A Study of Bystander Responses to Violent Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Rovira Perez, A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to show how immersive virtual reality (IVR) can be used to study human responses to extreme emergencies in social situations. Participants interact realistically with animated virtual humans. We show this through experimental studies of bystander responses to a violent confrontation, and find that there are conditions under which people intervene to help virtual characters that are threatened. We go on to show that a reinforcement learning (RL) method can capture ...

  1. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-02-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields.

  2. Does lipophilicity per se induce adjuvant effects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Larsen, Søren Thor; Poulsen, Lars K.;

    2007-01-01

    ) or on lung function parameters. Thus, MP did not possess irritant or inflammatory properties, which may be a precursive stimulus for adjuvant effects. Second, mice were exposed to aerosols of MP, 6 or 323 mg/m3, for 1 h followed by a 20-min low-dose ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. OVA only and OVA + Al......Anthopogenically introduced substances and pollutants are suspected to promote sensitization and development of allergic airway diseases, that is, acting as adjuvants. Lipophilicity may serve as an immunological warning signal, promoting adjuvant effects. Whether the lipophilicity of an inhaled...... compound induces immunomodulatory effects was investigated in a murine inhalation model with the highly lipophilic methyl palmitate (MP) as model substance. First, studies of acute effects following a 1-h exposure of up to 348 mg/m3 MP showed no effects on cell composition in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL...

  3. Oesophagostomum dentatum extract modulates T cell-dependent immune responses to bystander antigens and prevents the development of allergy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Schabussova

    Full Text Available One third of the human population is currently infected by one or more species of parasitic helminths. Certain helminths establish long-term chronic infections resulting in a modulation of the host's immune system with attenuated responsiveness to "bystander" antigens such as allergens or vaccines. In this study we investigated whether parasite-derived products suppress the development of allergic inflammation in a mouse model. We show that extract derived from adult male Oesophagostomum dentatum (eMOD induced Th2 and regulatory responses in BALB/c mice. Stimulation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells induced production of regulatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. In a mouse model of birch pollen allergy, co-administration of eMOD with sensitizing allergen Bet v 1 markedly reduced the production of allergen-specific antibodies in serum as well as IgE-dependent basophil degranulation. Furthermore, eMOD prevented the development of airway inflammation, as demonstrated by attenuation of bronchoalveolar lavages eosinophil influx, peribronchial inflammatory infiltrate, and mucus secretion in lungs and IL-4 and IL-5 levels in lung cell cultures. Reduced secretion of Th2-related cytokines by birch pollen-re-stimulated splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells was observed in eMOD-treated/sensitized and challenged mice in comparison to sensitized and challenged controls. The suppressive effects of eMOD were heat-stable. Immunization with model antigens in the presence of eMOD reduced production of antibodies to thymus-dependent but not to thymus-independent antigen, suggesting that suppression of the immune responses by eMOD was mediated by interference with antigen presenting cell or T helper cell function but did not directly suppress B cell function. In conclusion, we have shown that eMOD possesses immunomodulatory properties and that heat-stable factors in eMOD are responsible for the dramatic suppression of allergic responses in a mouse model

  4. Microwave-induced effects on superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the effects of microwave radiation on superconducting tunnel junctions and on the critical currents of superconducting strips at 2.0 and 10.0 GHz. In the tunnel junctions both quantum mechanical and classical effects (photon-induced tunneling and classical rectification, respectively), were observed, but not gap enhancement. The application of microwave radiation on long, superconducting, thin-film bridges was found to increase their critical current. The microwave magnetic field was found to couple more efficiently to the superconductor. The increase in the critical current was found to be proportional to the square root of the incident power

  5. Sexual side effects induced by psychotropic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ellids

    2002-01-01

    The majority of psychotropic drugs entail sexual side effects. The sexual side effects may reduce quality of life and may give rise to non-compliance. For example, 30-60 per cent of patients treated with antidepressants are known to develop a sexual dysfunction. However, some psychotropic drugs...... with no or very few sexual side effects have begun to emerge. The treatment of sexual side effects induced by psychotropic drugs may consist of: modified sexual habits, reduction in dosage, switching to another medication, possibly in combination with different psychotropic agents, other varieties of...... pharmacologically active substances or specific products for the treatment of sexual dysfunction such as sildenafil. Above all, it should be acknowledged that relatively few data are available in this field and in particular that there is a lack of controlled studies....

  6. Bystander Position Taking in School Bullying: The Role of Positive Identity, Self-Efficacy, and Self-Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra K. M. Tsang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available School bullying has become an explicit, burgeoning problem challenging the healthy development of children and adolescents in Hong Kong. Many bullying prevention and intervention programs focus on victims and bullies, with bystanders treated as either nonexistent or irrelevant. This paper asserts that bystanders actually play pivotal roles in deciding whether the bullying process and dynamics are benign or adversarial. Bystanders' own abilities and characteristics often influence how they respond to victims and bullies. “P.A.T.H.S. to Adulthood: A Jockey Club Youth Enhancement Scheme” (P.A.T.H.S. = Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes is an evidence-based positive youth development program which shows that primary intervention programs have constructive impacts on junior secondary school students' beliefs and behavior. This paper asserts that intrapsychic qualities, namely identity, self-efficacy, and self-determination, greatly influence how bystanders react in school bullying situations. The paper also explains how classroom-based educational programs based on the P.A.T.H.S. model have been designed to help junior secondary school students strengthen these characteristics, so that they can be constructive bystanders when they encounter school bullying.

  7. Impact of Dispatcher‐Assisted Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Neurological Outcomes in Children With Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Prospective, Nationwide, Population‐Based Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Tetsuo; GOTO, YUMIKO

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of dispatcher‐assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on neurological outcomes in children is unclear. We investigated whether dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR shows favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2) in children with out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods and Results Children (n=5009, age

  8. Educating for Justice: Creating a Mission-Driven Model of Bystander Intervention to Address Sexual Violence at U.S. Catholic Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarneau, Joy; O'Neill, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    This article presents bystander intervention education as a best-practice approach to sexual violence prevention in college settings. It draws out a connection between mission-specific resources that can be used to advance the prevention agenda, while examining how bystander intervention education can deepen community engagement in collegiate…

  9. Non-targeted effects of radiation: applications for radiation protection and contribution to LNT discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the target theory of radiation induced effects (Lea, 1946), which forms a central core of radiation biology, DNA damage occurs during or very shortly after irradiation of the nuclei in targeted cells and the potential for biological consequences can be expressed within one or two cell generations. A range of evidence has now emerged that challenges the classical effects resulting from targeted damage to DNA. These effects have also been termed non-(DNA)-targeted (Ward, 1999) and include radiation-induced bystander effects (Iyer and Lehnert, 2000a), genomic instability (Wright, 2000), adaptive response (Wolff, 1998), low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) (Joiner, et al., 2001), delayed reproductive death (Seymour, et al., 1986) and induction of genes by radiation (Hickman, et al., 1994). An essential feature of non-targeted effects is that they do not require a direct nuclear exposure by irradiation to be expressed and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a new paradigm for radiation biology that challenges the universality of target theory. In this paper we will concentrate on the radiation-induced bystander effects because of its particular importance for radiation protection

  10. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  11. Ion-induced effects on metallic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the ion-irradiation of metallic nanoparticles in combination with various substrates. Particle diameters were systematically varied within the range of 2.5-14 nm, inter-particle distances range from 30-120 nm. Irradiations were performed with various inert gas ions with energies of 200 keV, resulting in an average ion range larger than the particle dimensions and therefore the effects of irradiation are mainly due to creation of structural defects within the particles and the underlying substrate as well. The main part of this work deals with ion-induced burrowing of metallic nanoparticles into the underlying substrate. The use of micellar nanoparticles with sharp size distribution combined with AFM and TEM analysis allows a much more detailed look at this effect than other works on that topic so far. With respect to the particle properties also a detailed look on the effect of irradiation on the particle structure would be interesting, which might lead to a deliberate influence on magnetic properties, for example. Within the context of this work, first successful experiments were performed on FePt particles, showing a significant reduction of the ordering temperature leading to the magnetically interesting, ordered L10 phase. (orig.)

  12. Achalasia and chronic opiate use: innocent bystanders or associated conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, K; Murray, J A; Geno, D M; Katzka, D A

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution manometry identifies three subtypes of achalasia. However, type 3 differs from classic achalasia. Although opiates affect esophageal motility, opiate use and achalasia have not been studied. Patients with a new diagnosis of achalasia at Mayo Clinic Rochester between June 1, 2012 and January 3, 2014 were identified. Clinical records were reviewed to assess symptoms, opiate use, and therapy. Fifty-six patients with achalasia were identified, 14 (25%) were on opiates. Opiate prescription was unrelated to achalasia in all cases, with chronic back and joint pain constituting the majority. Of patients on opiates, five (36%) had type 3 achalasia compared with four (10%) not on opiates (P = 0.02). No patients on opiates had type 1 achalasia. Clinical presentation did not differ with opiates, although those on opiates were more likely to report chest pain (39 vs. 14%, P = 0.05) and less likely to have esophageal dilation (62 vs. 82%, P = 0.13), none with greater than 5-cm diameter. Contractile vigor was greater with opiate use, with distal contractile integral of 7149 versus 2615.5 mmHg/cm/second (P = 0.08). Treatment response was inferior on opiates, with persistent symptoms in 22% compared with 3% without opiates (P = 0.06). Opiate use is common in type 3 achalasia, with the majority of patients on opiates. No patients on opiates were diagnosed with type 1 achalasia. Manometric findings of type 3 achalasia mimic those induced by opiates, suggesting a physiologic mechanism for opiate induced type 3 achalasia. Treatment outcome is inferior with opiates, with opiate cessation perhaps preferable. Further studies assessing opiate use and achalasia are needed. PMID:25604060

  13. Ombud’s Corner: Bystanders, you can have a role too

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2015-01-01

    If you find yourself repeatedly witnessing a situation of inter personal conflict or tension between other colleagues, you have a choice: you can either turn a blind eye to it or you can try to help. In the latter case, you may wish to get another perspective or some guidance before taking steps.   Stefan, Paul and Lucas work together on a challenging project. Over time, Lucas has started to notice Paul’s verbally aggressive behaviour towards Stefan: he frequently criticises him in public, cuts him short at meetings when he is trying to make his point and is known to make derogatory remarks about him behind his back. Stefan does not seem to react but the tension between them is evident and Lucas feels increasingly uncomfortable in their company. It is never easy to know whether or not to intervene in these delicate situations, and the ‘bystander effect’ - where people do nothing - tends to prevail in most workplace cultures. Bystanders hesitate to act because th...

  14. The role of gender, values, and culture in adolescent bystanders' strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Anni; Tulviste, Tiia

    2015-02-01

    We examined the relationship between adolescent bystanders' strategies for intervening in the bullying-like situation and their gender, values, and cultural origin. The sample consisted of 682 Estonian and Russian-Estonian adolescents (M age = 13.02 years). They were shown a video of a bullying-like situation with a non-intervening adult bystander and asked to describe what they would do if they, instead of the adult, witnessed that situation. Only 10% said that they would not intervene. Girls were more likely than boys to suggest multiple actions. Adolescents who valued conformity were less likely to propose using physical aggression. Doing nothing was less likely suggested by those who placed more importance on conformity and less on power. Estonian adolescents were more likely than their Russian-Estonian peers to suggest finding out what is going on, and less likely to say that they would do nothing. The findings suggest that although most adolescents express willingness to help the victim, they might not actually know how to intervene. PMID:24919991

  15. Bystanders' Reactions to Bullying: A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Personal Correlates among Italian and Singaporean Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Tiziana; Ang, Rebecca P.; Gini, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of attitudes against bullying and perceived peer pressure for intervention in explaining defending the victim and passive bystanding behavior in bullying. Participants were 1031 school-age children from two culturally diverse settings, namely Italy and Singapore, which are similar on several dimensions (e.g., quality…

  16. Perceptions of pesticides exposure risks by operators, workers, residents and bystanders in Greece, Italy and the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remoundou, K.; Brennana, M.; Sacchettini, G.; Panzone, L.; Butler-Ellis, M.C.; Capri, E.; Charistou, A.; Chaideftou, E.; Gerritsen-Ebben, M.G.; Machera, K.; Spanoghe, P; Glass, R.; Marchis, A.; Doanngoc, K.; Hart, A.; Frewer, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The EU Directive on the sustainable use of pesticides (EU128/2009/EC) requires European Member States to develop training activities targeting occupational exposure to pesticides, and communication material aimed at residents and bystanders. Risk perceptions, knowledge and attitudes associated with

  17. Active Defending and Passive Bystanding Behavior in Bullying: The Role of Personal Characteristics and Perceived Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Tiziana; Gini, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of pro-victim attitudes, personal responsibility, coping responses to observations of bullying, and perceived peer normative pressure in explaining defending the victim and passive bystanding behavior in bullying. A total of 462 Italian early adolescents (mean age = 13.4 years, SD = 9 months) participated in the study.…

  18. Association of National Initiatives to Improve Cardiac Arrest Management With Rates of Bystander Intervention and Patient Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K; Folke, Fredrik;

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major health problem associated with poor outcomes. Early recognition and intervention are critical for patient survival. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is one factor among many associated with improved survival. OBJECTIVE To examine...... temporal changes in bystander resuscitation attempts and survival during a 10-year period in which several national initiatives were taken to increase rates of bystander resuscitation and improve advanced care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for which...

  19. Emerging animal viruses: real threats or simple bystanders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Furtado Flores

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The list of animal viruses has been frequently added of new members raising permanent concerns to virologists and veterinarians. The pathogenic potential and association with disease have been clearly demonstrated for some, but not for all of these emerging viruses. This review describes recent discoveries of animal viruses and their potential relevance for veterinary practice. Dogs were considered refractory to influenza viruses until 2004, when an influenza A virus subtype H3N8 was transmitted from horses and produced severe respiratory disease in racing greyhounds in Florida/USA. The novel virus, named canine influenza virus (CIV, is considered now a separate virus lineage and has spread among urban canine population in the USA. A new pestivirus (Flaviviridae, tentatively called HoBi-like pestivirus, was identified in 2004 in commercial fetal bovine serum from Brazil. Hobi-like viruses are genetically and antigenically related to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV and induce similar clinical manifestations. These novel viruses seem to be widespread in Brazilian herds and have also been detected in Southeast Asia and Europe. In 2011, a novel mosquito-borne orthobunyavirus, named Schmallenberg virus (SBV, was associated with fever, drop in milk production, abortion and newborn malformation in cattle and sheep in Germany. Subsequently, the virus disseminated over several European countries and currently represents a real treat for animal health. The origin of SBV is still a matter of debate but it may be a reassortant from previous known bunyaviruses Shamonda and Satuperi. Hepatitis E virus (HEV, family Hepeviridae is a long known agent of human acute hepatitis and in 1997 was first identified in pigs. Current data indicates that swine HEV is spread worldwide, mainly associated with subclinical infection. Two of the four HEV genotypes are zoonotic and may be transmitted between swine and human by contaminated water and undercooked pork meat. The

  20. Contrast-induced nephrotoxicity: possible synergistic effect of stress hyperglycemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative stress on the renal tubules has been implicated as a mechanism of injury in both stress hyperglycemia and contrast-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of these effects has a synergistic effect on accentuating renal tubular apoptosis and therefore increasing the risk of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity.

  1. Mechanisms of Hexachlorobenzene-induced Adverse Immune Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam, Janine

    2004-01-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is an environmental pollutant that can induce adverse immune effects in humans and rats. Brown Norway rats (BN) appeared to be very susceptible to HCB-induced immune effects. Oral exposure causes inflammatory skin and lung lesions, enlarged spleen and lymph nodes (LN) and ele

  2. Preventive effects of geranylgeranylacetone on rat ethanol-induced gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ning, Jian-Wen; Lin, Guan-Bin; Ji, Feng; Xu, Jia; Sharify, Najeeb

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish a rat ethanol gastritis model, we evaluated the effects of ethanol on gastric mucosa and studied the preventive effects of geranylgeranylacetone on ethanol-induced chronic gastritis.

  3. Beneficial effect of Curcumin in Letrozole induced polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sushma Reddy

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Curcumin showed beneficial effects in Letrozole induced PCOS in female Wistar rats. Its effect was comparable to that of Clomiphene citrate, most widely used treatment for ovulation induction in PCOS condition.

  4. Non-targeted effects of radiation exposure: recent advances and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The target theory of radiation-induced effects has been challenged by numerous studies, which indicate that in addition to biological effects resulting from direct DNA damage within the cell, a variety of non-DNA targeted effects (NTE) may make important contributions to the overall outcome. Ionising radiation induces complex, global cellular responses, such as genomic instability (GI) in both irradiated and never-irradiated 'bystander' cells that receive molecular signals produced by irradiated cells. GI is a well-known feature of many cancers, increasing the probability of cells to acquire the 'hallmarks of cancer' during the development of tumours. Although epidemiological data include contributions of both direct and NTE, they lack (i) statistical power at low dose where differences in dose response for NTE and direct effects are likely to be more important and (ii) heterogeneity of non-targeted responses due to genetic variability between individuals. In this article, NTE focussing on GI and bystander effects were critically examined, the specific principles of NTE were discussed and the potential influence on human health risk assessment from low-dose radiation was considered. (authors)

  5. A Web-Based Sexual Violence Bystander Intervention for Male College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivolo-Kantor, Alana; Hardin, James; Berkowitz, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bystander intervention approaches offer promise for reducing rates of sexual violence on college campuses. Most interventions are in-person small-group formats, which limit their reach and reduce their overall public health impact. Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of RealConsent, a Web-based bystander approach to sexual violence prevention, in enhancing prosocial intervening behaviors and preventing sexual violence perpetration. Methods A random probability sample of 743 male undergraduate students (aged 18 to 24 years) attending a large, urban university located in the southeastern United States was recruited online and randomized to either RealConsent (n=376) or a Web-based general health promotion program (n=367). Participants were surveyed online at baseline, postintervention, and 6-months postintervention. RealConsent was delivered via a password-protected Web portal that contained six 30-minute media-based and interactive modules covering knowledge of informed consent, communication skills regarding sex, the role of alcohol and male socialization in sexual violence, empathy for rape victims, and bystander education. Primary outcomes were self-reported prosocial intervening behaviors and sexual violence perpetration. Secondary outcomes were theoretical mediators (eg, knowledge, attitudes). Results At 6-month follow-up RealConsent participants intervened more often (P=.04) and engaged in less sexual violence perpetration (P=.04) compared to controls. In addition, RealConsent participants reported greater legal knowledge of sexual assault (Prape myths (Prape victims (Prape attitudes (P<.001), less hostility toward women (P=.01), greater intentions to intervene (P=.04), less hyper-gender ideology (P<.001), less positive outcome expectancies for nonconsensual sex (P=.03), more positive outcome expectancies for intervening (P<.001), and less comfort with other men’s inappropriate behaviors (P<.001). Conclusions Our results support the

  6. The study on morphologic alteration of fetal mice and the change of MeCP2 in fetal brain induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: In order to investigate the effect and the possible mechanism of γ-rays on neuro development of fetal brain tissue as bystander effect organ. Methods: pregnant kunming mice were randomly divided into blank control group, 0.5 Gy whole-body exposed group, 0.5 Gy head exposed group, 1.0 Gy whole-body exposed group, 1.0 Gy head exposed group, 2.0 Gy whole-body exposed group and 2.0 Gy head exposed group. The exposed mice were exposed with a vertical single acute dose using 60Co therapy apparatus on the 9 th day of pregnancy, and cesarean operation were performed to gain fetal mice on the 18 th day of pregnancy. The number, the size, stillbirth, birth defects and abortion, and get fetal brains from live births were observed. Western-blot assay was used to detect the expression of MeCP2 protein. Results: Compared with the blank control group, the rates of stillbirth, birth defects and abortion ascended as the increase of doses; the expression of MeCP2 were upregulated except 0.5 Gy whole-body exposed group, there were no significant differences between groups. Conclusion: When the pregnant mice were exposed to ionizing radiation in the first trimester, bystander effect in fetal brain tissue was induced, within a certain range, the incidence of deterministic effects and stochastic effects ascended as the increase of doses. (authors)

  7. Induced Compton-scattering effects in radiation-transport approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of characteristics is used to solve radiation transport problems with induced Compton scattering effects included. The methods used to date have only addressed problems in which either induced Compton scattering is ignored, or problems in which linear scattering is ignored. Also, problems which include both induced Compton scattering and spatial effects have not been considered previously. The introduction of induced scattering into the radiation transport equation results in a quadratic nonlinearity. Methods are developed to solve problems in which both linear and nonlinear Compton scattering are important. Solutions to scattering problems are found for a variety of initial photon energy distributions

  8. Radiation induced effects in carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The level of safe exploiting nuclear reactor depends on radiation-induced changes of the neutron-absorbing material shape. The dimensional effects in carbon materials including those containing boron carbides B4C, irradiated in the water-water cooled reactor of the INP AS RUz operating at the power of 10 MW were studied in the temperature interval of 300-1500 K up to the integral fluence of 4·1021 neutrons per cm2. Two methods of dimensional control were used: dilatometry (change of linear dimensions and calculation of the volume change) and X-ray diffraction analysis (determination of the lattice parameters and the elementary unit volume). In all samples of low-ash and pyrolytic graphite (oriented parallel and normal to the pressing axis), irradiated up to the fluences above 1021 n/cm2 in the temperature range of 700-1100 K the shrinkage of linear dimensions was found from 6 to 8 %. While there occurred the primary swelling of graphite in the temperature interval of 300-700 K. The secondary swelling began at the fluence of 4·1021 cm-2 and 1100 K. Basing on these data, the neutron-absorbing graphite rods, containing B4C particles, were tested under the analogous irradiation conditions. The comparison of the rates of B4C swelling and graphite matrix shrinkage showed, that unfortunately, there was not gained the complete compensation of the swelling at the expense of shrinkage. The samples of fiber graphite, which were studied under the same conditions as the above mentioned, turned out stable in dimensions - changes in linear dimensions did not exceed 2 %. The X-diffraction study of ultra disperse amorphous carbon film irradiated in the water reactor discovered the formation of a denser carbon phase. The position of the observed structure reflection with d/n = 7.5 A did not correspond to the peaks of stable single phases of fullerenes C60 and C70. Perhaps, the irradiation creates a mixture of these phases in the amorphous matrix

  9. Re-Evaluating Sexual Violence Prevention Through Bystander Education: A Latent Growth Curve Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jessica; Janulis, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Recently, there has been a call for more advanced analytic techniques in violence against women research, particularly in community interventions that use longitudinal designs. The current study re-evaluates experimental evaluation data from a sexual violence bystander intervention program. Using an exploratory latent growth curve approach, we were able to model the longitudinal growth trajectories of individual participants over the course of the entire study. Although the results largely confirm the original evaluation findings, the latent growth curve approach better fits the demands of "messy" data (e.g., missing data, varying number of time points per participant, and unequal time spacing within and between participants) that are frequently obtained during a community-based intervention. The benefits of modern statistical techniques to practitioners and researchers in the field of sexual violence prevention, and violence against women more generally, are further discussed. PMID:25888503

  10. Dose response of micronuclei induced by combination radiation of α-particles and γ-rays in human lymphoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ruiping; He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Ye, Shuang; Yuan, Dexiao [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► α-Particle induced MN had a biphasic dose–response followed by a bystander model. ► MN dose–response of α- and γ-combination IR was similar to that of α-particle. ► α-Particles followed by γ-rays yielded a synergistic effect on MN induction. ► Low dose γ-rays triggered antagonistic and adaptive responses against α-particle. - Abstract: Combination radiation is a real situation of both nuclear accident exposure and space radiation environment, but its biological dosimetry is still not established. This study investigated the dose–response of micronuclei (MN) induction in lymphocyte by irradiating HMy2.CIR lymphoblast cells with α-particles, γ-rays, and their combinations. Results showed that the dose–response of MN induced by γ-rays was well-fitted with the linear-quadratic model. But for α-particle irradiation, the MN induction had a biphasic phenomenon containing a low dose hypersensitivity characteristic and its dose response could be well-stimulated with a state vector model where radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was involved. For the combination exposure, the dose response of MN was similar to that of α-irradiation. However, the yield of MN was closely related to the sequence of irradiations. When the cells were irradiated with α-particles at first and then γ-rays, a synergistic effect of MN induction was observed. But when the cells were irradiated with γ-rays followed by α-particles, an antagonistic effect of MN was observed in the low dose range although this combination radiation also yielded a synergistic effect at high doses. When the interval between two irradiations was extended to 4 h, a cross-adaptive response against the other irradiation was induced by a low dose of γ-rays but not α-particles.

  11. Dose response of micronuclei induced by combination radiation of α-particles and γ-rays in human lymphoblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► α-Particle induced MN had a biphasic dose–response followed by a bystander model. ► MN dose–response of α- and γ-combination IR was similar to that of α-particle. ► α-Particles followed by γ-rays yielded a synergistic effect on MN induction. ► Low dose γ-rays triggered antagonistic and adaptive responses against α-particle. - Abstract: Combination radiation is a real situation of both nuclear accident exposure and space radiation environment, but its biological dosimetry is still not established. This study investigated the dose–response of micronuclei (MN) induction in lymphocyte by irradiating HMy2.CIR lymphoblast cells with α-particles, γ-rays, and their combinations. Results showed that the dose–response of MN induced by γ-rays was well-fitted with the linear-quadratic model. But for α-particle irradiation, the MN induction had a biphasic phenomenon containing a low dose hypersensitivity characteristic and its dose response could be well-stimulated with a state vector model where radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was involved. For the combination exposure, the dose response of MN was similar to that of α-irradiation. However, the yield of MN was closely related to the sequence of irradiations. When the cells were irradiated with α-particles at first and then γ-rays, a synergistic effect of MN induction was observed. But when the cells were irradiated with γ-rays followed by α-particles, an antagonistic effect of MN was observed in the low dose range although this combination radiation also yielded a synergistic effect at high doses. When the interval between two irradiations was extended to 4 h, a cross-adaptive response against the other irradiation was induced by a low dose of γ-rays but not α-particles

  12. Cancer-drug induced insulin resistance : Innocent bystander or unusual suspect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariaans, G.; de Jong, S.; Gietema, J. A.; Lefrandt, J. D.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Jalving, M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence strongly suggests an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer. Insulin resistance, causing hyperinsulinaemia and eventually hyperglycaemia, appears to increase cancer incidence and disease progression. In addition, insulin resistance seems to

  13. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Bharti, Vineet; Wasan, Ajay; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch---near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the w...

  14. Effects of induced moods on economic choices

    OpenAIRE

    Stanton, Steven J.; Crystal Reeck; Scott A Huettel; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions can shape decision processes by altering valuation signals, risk perception, and strategic orientation. Although multiple theories posit a role for affective processes in mediating the influence of frames on decision making, empirical studies have yet to demonstrate that manipulated affect modulates framing phenomena. The present study asked whether induced affective states alter gambling propensity and the influence of frames on decision making. In a between-sub...

  15. Effect of AND#945;-tocopherol on antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Nehra

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: and #945;-tocopherol (200 mg/kg bw, oral was found to have hepatoprotective effect against antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity in albino rabbits. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1158-1162

  16. Engaging Active Bystanders in Mass Casualty Events and Other Life-Threatening Emergencies: A Pilot Training Course Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tracey O; Baker, Susan D; Roberts, Kathryn; Payne, Skip A

    2016-04-01

    Emerging research indicates the critical role members of the public can play in saving lives and reducing morbidity at the scene in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. It is anticipated that with training, more members of the public will be ready and able to assist should they be present at mass casualty events or other circumstances in which there are serious injuries or potential loss of life. This article describes a training course developed by multiple federal and nonfederal partners aimed at preparing the public to become "active bystanders" followed by a pilot demonstration project conducted by Medical Reserve Corps Units. The outcomes of the project indicated that the training was comprehensive and appropriate for members of the public with little or no first aid knowledge. National availability of the "Becoming an Active Bystander" training course is currently being planned. PMID:26841861

  17. An accelerator-based neutron microbeam system for studies of radiation effects

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Bigelow, Alan W.; Akselrod, Mark S.; Sykora, Jeff G.; Brenner, David J.

    2010-01-01

    A novel neutron microbeam is being developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The RARAF microbeam facility has been used for studies of radiation bystander effects in mammalian cells for many years. Now a prototype neutron microbeam is being developed that can be used for bystander effect studies. The neutron microbeam design here is based on the existing charged particle microbeam technology at the RARAF. The principle of the neutron microbeam...

  18. Starspot induced effects in microlensing events with rotating source star

    CERN Document Server

    Giordano, Mosè; De Paolis, Francesco; Ingrosso, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We consider the effects induced by the presence of hot and cold spots on the source star in the light curves of simulated microlensing events due to either single or binary lenses taking into account the rotation of the source star and the orbital motion of the lens system. Our goal is to study the anomalies induced by these effects on simulated microlensing light curves.

  19. Flow-induced dynamic surface tension effects at nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    Lukyanov, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate flow-induced dynamic surface tension effects, similar to the well-known Marangoni phenomena, but solely generated by the nanoscale topography of the substrates. The flow-induced surface tension effects are examined on the basis of a sharp interface theory. It is demonstrated how nanoscale objects placed at the boundary of the flow domain result in the generation of substantial surface forces acting on the bulk flow.

  20. Perceptions of pesticides exposure risks by operators, workers, residents and bystanders in Greece, Italy and the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EU Directive on the sustainable use of pesticides (EU128/2009/EC) requires European Member States to develop training activities targeting occupational exposure to pesticides, and communication material aimed at residents and bystanders. Risk perceptions, knowledge and attitudes associated with passive and occupational exposure to pesticide potentially influence the extent to which different stakeholders adopt self-protective behaviour. A methodology for assessing the link between attitudes, adoption of self-protective behaviours and exposure was developed and tested. A survey was implemented in the Greece, Italy and the UK, and targeted stakeholders associated with pesticide exposure linked to orchards, greenhouse crops and arable crops respectively. The results indicated that the adoption of protective measures is low for residents and bystanders, with the exception of residents in Greece, when compared to operators and workers, who tend to follow recommended safety practices. A regression analysis was used to examine the factors affecting the probability of adopting protective measures as well the as the level of exposure in the case of operators and workers where data are available. The results indicate that the likelihood of engaging in self-protective behaviour is not significantly affected by perceptions of own health being affected by pesticides for residents and bystanders. However, operators who perceive that their heath has been negatively affected by the use of pesticides are found to be more likely to adopt self-protective behaviours. Gender and country differences, in perceptions, attitudes and self-protection are also observed. Recommendations for improved communication, in particular for vulnerable groups, are provided. - Highlights: • Perceptions of risks associated with pesticide exposure were assessed • Surveys were conducted in Greece, Italy and the UK targeting vulnerable stakeholders • Perceptions of risk were associated with

  1. Bystander CD8 T-Cell-Mediated Demyelination is Interferon-γ-Dependent in a Coronavirus Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dandekar, Ajai A.; Anghelina, Daniela; Perlman, Stanley

    2004-01-01

    Mice infected with the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus, strain JHM (JHM) develop a disease that shares many histological characteristics with multiple sclerosis. We previously demonstrated that JHM-infected mice that only have CD8 T cells specific for an epitope not in the virus develop demyelination on specific activation of these cells. Herein we show that this process of bystander T-cell-mediated demyelination is interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-dependent. The absence of IFN-γ abrogated demyelinatio...

  2. Perceptions of pesticides exposure risks by operators, workers, residents and bystanders in Greece, Italy and the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remoundou, K.; Brennan, M. [Food and Society Group, Centre for Rural Economy, School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE19 1AA (United Kingdom); Sacchettini, G. [Opera Research Centre, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Piacenza, 29100 Piacenza (Italy); Panzone, L. [Food and Society Group, Centre for Rural Economy, School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE19 1AA (United Kingdom); Butler-Ellis, M.C. [Silsoe Spray Applications Unit, NIAB, Building 42, Wrest Park, Silsoe, Bedford MK45 4HP (United Kingdom); Capri, E. [Opera Research Centre, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Piacenza, 29100 Piacenza (Italy); Charistou, A.; Chaideftou, E. [Benaki Phytopathological Institute, 8 Stefanou Delta Street, Kifissia, Athens 14561 (Greece); Gerritsen-Ebben, M.G. [TNO Innovation for Life, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE Zeist (Netherlands); Machera, K. [Benaki Phytopathological Institute, 8 Stefanou Delta Street, Kifissia, Athens 14561 (Greece); Spanoghe, P. [Department of Crop Protection, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Glass, R. [Food and Environmental Research Agency, Sand Hutton, York Y0411LZ (United Kingdom); Marchis, A. [Opera Research Centre, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Piacenza, 29100 Piacenza (Italy); Doanngoc, K. [Department of Crop Protection, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Hart, A. [Food and Environmental Research Agency, Sand Hutton, York Y0411LZ (United Kingdom); Frewer, L.J., E-mail: Lynn.Frewer@newcastle.ac.uk [Food and Society Group, Centre for Rural Economy, School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE19 1AA (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    The EU Directive on the sustainable use of pesticides (EU128/2009/EC) requires European Member States to develop training activities targeting occupational exposure to pesticides, and communication material aimed at residents and bystanders. Risk perceptions, knowledge and attitudes associated with passive and occupational exposure to pesticide potentially influence the extent to which different stakeholders adopt self-protective behaviour. A methodology for assessing the link between attitudes, adoption of self-protective behaviours and exposure was developed and tested. A survey was implemented in the Greece, Italy and the UK, and targeted stakeholders associated with pesticide exposure linked to orchards, greenhouse crops and arable crops respectively. The results indicated that the adoption of protective measures is low for residents and bystanders, with the exception of residents in Greece, when compared to operators and workers, who tend to follow recommended safety practices. A regression analysis was used to examine the factors affecting the probability of adopting protective measures as well the as the level of exposure in the case of operators and workers where data are available. The results indicate that the likelihood of engaging in self-protective behaviour is not significantly affected by perceptions of own health being affected by pesticides for residents and bystanders. However, operators who perceive that their heath has been negatively affected by the use of pesticides are found to be more likely to adopt self-protective behaviours. Gender and country differences, in perceptions, attitudes and self-protection are also observed. Recommendations for improved communication, in particular for vulnerable groups, are provided. - Highlights: • Perceptions of risks associated with pesticide exposure were assessed • Surveys were conducted in Greece, Italy and the UK targeting vulnerable stakeholders • Perceptions of risk were associated with

  3. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Fei; Severson, Paul; Pacheco, Samantha; Futscher, Bernard W.; Klimecki, Walter T., E-mail: klimecki@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2013-08-15

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect.

  4. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect

  5. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Vineet; Wasan, Ajay; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch-near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  6. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Bharti, Vineet; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch---near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  7. Some important questions connected with non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper briefly reviews the highlights of experimental evidence that led to the adoption of the term 'non-targeted' to describe new effects induced by ionising radiation that did not fit the classical radiobiological paradigm, principally genomic instability and bystander effect, identifying the reports that were most influential on the subsequent course of radiobiological research. The issue of appropriate terminology for the new effects is discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the inheritance of genomic instability, where there are issues concerning which effects should be considered as transgenerational. Finally, in respect of the question as to whether these new effects are likely to have an impact on human health is addressed. It is concluded that there is a need for a clearer terminology to facilitate research progress, that real health effects cannot be ruled out and that therefore there is a need for new paradigms not only for radiobiology but also for risk assessment and radiological protection.

  8. Protective Effects of Cilastatin against Vancomycin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Humanes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vancomycin is a very effective antibiotic for treatment of severe infections. However, its use in clinical practice is limited by nephrotoxicity. Cilastatin is a dehydropeptidase I inhibitor that acts on the brush border membrane of the proximal tubule to prevent accumulation of imipenem and toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential protective effect of cilastatin on vancomycin-induced apoptosis and toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs. Porcine RPTECs were cultured in the presence of vancomycin with and without cilastatin. Vancomycin induced dose-dependent apoptosis in cultured RPTECs, with DNA fragmentation, cell detachment, and a significant decrease in mitochondrial activity. Cilastatin prevented apoptotic events and diminished the antiproliferative effect and severe morphological changes induced by vancomycin. Cilastatin also improved the long-term recovery and survival of RPTECs exposed to vancomycin and partially attenuated vancomycin uptake by RPTECs. On the other hand, cilastatin had no effects on vancomycin-induced necrosis or the bactericidal effect of the antibiotic. This study indicates that cilastatin protects against vancomycin-induced proximal tubule apoptosis and increases cell viability, without compromising the antimicrobial effect of vancomycin. The beneficial effect could be attributed, at least in part, to decreased accumulation of vancomycin in RPTECs.

  9. Macrophages are involved in hexachlorobenzene-induced adverse immune effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a persistent environmental pollutant that causes adverse immune effects in man and rat. The Brown Norway (BN) rat is very susceptible to HCB-induced immunopathology and oral exposure causes inflammatory skin and lung lesions, splenomegaly, lymph node (LN) enlargement, and increased serum levels of IgE and anti-ssDNA IgM. T cells play an important role but do not account for all adverse effects induced by HCB. Macrophages are probably also important and the relationship between macrophages and T cells was further investigated. To eliminate macrophages clodronate-liposomes were used. Furthermore, a kinetic study was performed to obtain insight in the early phase of the HCB-induced immune response. Also, experiments were performed to detect specific memory T cells. Therefore, an adoptive transfer study was performed. Our results indicate that macrophages are indeed involved in HCB-induced skin lesions, lung eosinophilia, and elevation of IgM against ssDNA. Kinetics showed that both skin and lung lesions appeared early after exposure. Moreover, immune effects could not be adaptively transferred. Thus, both macrophages and T cells are involved in HCB-induced immune effects but HCB exposure does not lead to specific T cell sensitization. Presumably, HCB exposure induces macrophage activation, thereby generating adjuvant signals that polyclonally stimulate T cells. Together, these events may lead to the observed immunopathology in BN rats

  10. Noncommutative geometry induced by spin effects

    CERN Document Server

    Colatto, L P; Santos, W C

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we study the nonlocal effects of noncommutative spacetime on simple physical systems. Our main point is the assumption that the noncommutative effects are consequences of a background field which generates a local spin structure. So, we reformulate some simple electrostatic models in the presence of a spin-deformation contribution to the geometry of the motion, and we obtain an interesting correlation amongst the deformed area vector, the 3D noncommutative effects and the usual spin vector given in quantum mechanics framework. Remarkably we can observe that a spin-orbit coupling term comes to light on the spatial sector of a potential wrote in terms of noncommutative coordinates what indicates that bound states are particular cases in this procedure. Concerning to confined or bounded particles in this noncommutative domain we verify that the kinetic energy is modified by a deformation factor. Finally, we discuss about perspectives.

  11. PAS-1, a protein affinity purified from Ascaris suum worms, maintains the ability to modulate the immune response to a bystander antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Telma M; Enobe, Cristina S; Araújo, Cláudia A; Macedo, Mahasti S; Macedo-Soares, Maria Fernanda

    2006-04-01

    Helminth infections and parasite components have potent immunomodulatory effects on a host's immune system. In the present study, we investigated the effect of PAS-1, a protein component of Ascaris suum adult worms recognized by a monoclonal antibody (MAIP-1), on humoral and cell-mediated responses to a bystander antigen (ovalbumin [OVA]). MAIP-1 recognized only one of the three polypeptide chains of PAS-1, but neutralized the suppressive effect of the whole worm extract on OVA-specific antibody production. PAS-1 inhibited antibody production against a T-cell-dependent, but not a T-cell-independent, antigen in a dose-dependent way. IgM, IgG1, IgG2b, and also IgE and anaphylactic IgG1 levels were downregulated. In addition, PAS-1 inhibited OVA-specific delayed type hypersensitivity reactions in the footpad of mice, showing a potent immunosuppressive activity on both Th1 and Th2 responses that seems to be mediated by the induction of large amounts of IL-10 and IL-4. Indeed, PAS-1-specific spleen cells secreted sevenfold more IL-10 and threefold more IL-4 than OVA-specific cells in response to in vitro restimulation with the respective antigens. In conclusion, we showed that PAS-1, a single protein component from A. suum, maintains all its immunosuppressive properties. PMID:16519731

  12. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.3E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  13. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.85E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  14. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 2E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  15. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.7E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  16. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 2.64E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  17. Radiation-induced genetic effects in germ cells of mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the project is to gain information on the effects of ionizing radiation on germ cells of rodents and primates as measured by induced chromosomal translocations. Different aspects of the very significant interspecies differences between the mouse and the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) for translocation induction in spermatogonial stem cells were studied. In addition, possible mechanisms for the well established reduced transmission of induced mouse translocations were investigated. (R.P.) 6 refs

  18. A computer model of the Bystander effect: Effects of individual behaviours on the population response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, M. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Fluids and Systems Research Centre, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.richard@surrey.ac.uk; Webb, R.P.; Kirkby, K.J. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Kirkby, N.F. [Fluids and Systems Research Centre, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    A computer program was written to test assumptions on the mechanisms of response of cells to radiation. Current assumptions were implemented in the model and simulations were run to predict the survival of the hamster cell line V79 to irradiation with focused C{sub K} X-rays, 250 keV X-rays or 3.2 MeV protons. The model could reproduce the different types of response and support the idea that the response at low doses is non-linear and may be independent of LET.

  19. Generic superweak chaos induced by Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Harush, Moti; Dana, Itzhack

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and study the "kicked Hall system" (KHS), i.e., charged particles periodically kicked in the presence of uniform magnetic (B ) and electric (E ) fields that are perpendicular to each other and to the kicking direction. We show that for resonant values of B and E and in the weak-chaos regime of sufficiently small nonintegrability parameter κ (the kicking strength), there exists a generic family of periodic kicking potentials for which the Hall effect from B and E significantly suppresses the weak chaos, replacing it by "superweak" chaos (SWC). This means that the system behaves as if the kicking strength were κ2 rather than κ . For E =0 , SWC is known to be a classical fingerprint of quantum antiresonance, but it occurs under much less generic conditions, in particular only for very special kicking potentials. Manifestations of SWC are a decrease in the instability of periodic orbits and a narrowing of the chaotic layers, relative to the ordinary weak-chaos case. Also, for global SWC, taking place on an infinite "stochastic web" in phase space, the chaotic diffusion on the web is much slower than the weak-chaos one. Thus, the Hall effect can be relatively stabilizing for small κ . In some special cases, the effect is shown to cause ballistic motion for almost all parameter values. The generic global SWC on stochastic webs in the KHS appears to be the two-dimensional closest analog to the Arnol'd web in higher dimensional systems.

  20. Vortex induced strain effects in anisotropic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain in a superconductor, produced by the normal vortex core, can affect both static and dynamic properties of vortices. It causes an additional vortex-vortex interaction which is long-ranged (∼ 1/r2) as compared with finite but much stronger London interaction in the fields far below Hc2. The energy of this magneto-elastic interaction is calculated within London model. The role of strain effects in forming vortex lattice structure is demonstrated for YBa2Cu3O7

  1. Acting in solidarity: Testing an extended dual pathway model of collective action by bystander group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing-Yee

    2015-09-01

    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one emotion-based path to collective action (Van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach, 2004). Based on two proposed functions of social identity performance (Klein, Spears, & Reicher, 2007), we distinguished between the efficacy of collective action at consolidating the identity of a protest movement and its efficacy at achieving social change (political efficacy). We expected identity consolidation efficacy to positively predict collective action tendencies directly and indirectly via political efficacy. We also expected collective action tendencies to be positively predicted by moral outrage and by sympathy in response to disadvantaged outgroup's suffering. These hypotheses were supported in two surveys examining intentions to protest for Palestine in Britain (Study 1), and intentions to attend the June 4th vigil in Hong Kong to commemorate the Tiananmen massacre among a sample of Hong Kong citizens (Study 2). The contributions of these findings to research on the dual pathway model of collective action and the different functions of collective action are discussed. PMID:25406712

  2. Protective Effect of Minocycline Against Cisplatin-induced Ototoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chi-Kyou; Shin, Jang-In; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, has serious side effects, including nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline that exerts anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the protective effect of minocycline against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in the auditory hair cell. Methods The House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1 (HEI-OC1) cell line and guinea pigs were used for in v...

  3. Prophylactic Effect of Ondansetron for Intrathecal Fentanyl-Induced Pruritus

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Fathi; S. Saeed Jahanbakhsh; Saha Bazyar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Using opioids along with local analgesic increase anesthesia duration and provide appropriate postoperative analgesia. However, intrathecal injection of opioids is associated with upsetting side effects including pruritus. Ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor agonist) has anti-pruritus effects. Therefore, we conducted a double blind randomized case-control study to evaluate prophylactic effects of ondansetron for preventing intrathecal fentanyl-induced pruritus. Materials and Methods: T...

  4. INFLUENCE OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON ARTIFICIAL ABORTION-INDUCED SIDE EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田丽颖

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of electroecupuncture (EA) of acupoints of Ren, Spleen and Stomach Meridians on artificial abortion-induced side effects was observed in 100 artificial abortion women. In comparison with 45 artificial abortion women in the control group (who had not accepted EA treatment), EA possessed significant effects in relieving abdominal pain, reducing vaginal bleeding duration, lowering infection rate and infertility rate after artificial abortion operation.

  5. Noise-induced effects in population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Bernardo; Cirone, Markus; La Barbera, Antonino; de Pasquale, Ferdinando

    2002-03-01

    We investigate the role of noise in the nonlinear relaxation of two ecosystems described by generalized Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of multiplicative noise. Specifically we study two cases: (i) an ecosystem with two interacting species in the presence of periodic driving; (ii) an ecosystem with a great number of interacting species with random interaction matrix. We analyse the interplay between noise and periodic modulation for case (i) and the role of the noise in the transient dynamics of the ecosystem in the presence of an absorbing barrier in case (ii). We find that the presence of noise is responsible for the generation of temporal oscillations and for the appearance of spatial patterns in the first case. In the other case we obtain the asymptotic behaviour of the time average of the ith population and discuss the effect of the noise on the probability distributions of the population and of the local field.

  6. Electromagnetic field induced biological effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba-Zwolińska, Jolanta; Gremba, Jerzy; Gałdzińska-Calik, Barbara; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has increased significantly in recent decades. Therefore, there is a growing scientific and social interest in its influence on health, even upon exposure significantly below the applicable standards. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation in human environment is increasing and currently reaches astronomical levels that had never before experienced on our planet. The most influential process of EMF impact on living organisms, is its direct tissue penetration. The current established standards of exposure to EMFs in Poland and in the rest of the world are based on the thermal effect. It is well known that weak EMF could cause all sorts of dramatic non-thermal effects in body cells, tissues and organs. The observed symptoms are hardly to assign to other environmental factors occurring simultaneously in the human environment. Although, there are still ongoing discussions on non-thermal effects of EMF influence, on May 31, 2011--International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)--Agenda of World Health Organization (WHO) has classified radio electromagnetic fields, to a category 2B as potentially carcinogenic. Electromagnetic fields can be dangerous not only because of the risk of cancer, but also other health problems, including electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is a phenomenon characterized by the appearance of symptoms after exposure of people to electromagnetic fields, generated by EHS is characterized as a syndrome with a broad spectrum of non-specific multiple organ symptoms including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes located mainly in the skin and nervous systems, as well as in respiratory, cardiovascular systems, and musculoskeletal system. WHO does not consider the EHS as a disease-- defined on the basis of medical diagnosis and symptoms associated with any known syndrome. The symptoms may be associated with a single source of EMF

  7. Superior neuroprotective effects of cerebrolysin in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of hyperthermia-induced brain pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, the incidence of heat stroke and associated brain pathology are increasing Worldwide. More than half of the world's population are living in areas associated with high environmental heat especially during the summer seasons. Thus, new research is needed using novel drug targets to achieve neuroprotection in heat-induced brain pathology. Previous research from our laboratory showed that the pathophysiology of brain injuries following heat stroke are exacerbated by chronic intoxication of engineered nanoparticles of small sizes (50-60 nm) following identical heat exposure in rats. Interestingly, in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals the known neuroprotective agents in standard doses failed to induce effective neuroprotection. This suggests that the dose-response of the drugs either requires modification or new therapeutic agents are needed to provide better neuroprotection in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals after heat stroke. This review is focused on the use of cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors and active peptide fragments, in relation to other neuroprotective agents normally used to treat ischemic stroke in clinics in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain damage in heat stroke. It appears that cerebrolysin exerts the most superior neuroprotective effects in heat stress as compared to other neuroprotective agents on brain pathology in normal rats. Interestingly, to induce effective neuroprotection in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology a double dose of cerebrolysin is needed. On the other hand, double doses of the other drugs were quite ineffective in reducing brain damage. These observations suggest that the drug type and doses are important factors in attenuating nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology in heat stroke. The functional significance and possible mechanisms of drug-induced neuroprotection in nanoparticle-treated, heat-stressed rats are discussed. PMID:22229316

  8. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  9. Effects of Dietary Induced Weight Loss on Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction in Overweight and Obese Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Janneke C.; Hoogstrate, Mira; Duiverman, Eric J.; Thio, Boony J.

    2014-01-01

    RationalePrevious studies showed that obesity in asthmatic children is associated with more severe exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), compared with non-obese asthmatic children. This study investigates the effect of weight loss on EIB in overweight and obese asthmatic children. MethodsIn th

  10. Competition effects in charged particle induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute cross sections have been measured for 14 reactions: 54Cr(p,γ)55Mn for 0.83 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 3.61 MeV, 54Cr(pn,)54Mn for 2.23 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 3.61 MeV, 51V(p,γ)52Cr for 0.93 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 4.47 MeV, 51V(p,n)51Cr for 1.58 MeV 68Zn(p,γ)69Ga for 1.67 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 4.97 MeV, 68Zn(p,n)68Ga for 3.77 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 5.03 MeV, 68Zn(p,γ)65Cu for 3.36 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 5.48 MeV, 48Ca(p,γ)49Sc for 0.58 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 2.67 MeV, 48Ca(p,n,)48Sc for 0.96 less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 2.67 MeV, 37Cl(α,γ)41K for 2.90 MeV less than or equal to E/sub α/ less than or equal to 5.23 MeV, 62Ni(α,γ)66Zn for 5.07 MeV less than or equal to E/sub α/ less than or equal to 8.64 MeV, 62Ni(α,n)65Zn for 6.95 MeV less than or equal to E/sub α/ less than or equal to 8.76 MeV, 64Ni(α,γ)68Zn for 4.50 MeV less than or equal to E/sub α/ less than or equal to 7.45 MeV, and 64Ni(α,n)67Zn for 5.29 less than or equal to E/sub α/ less than or equal to 7.44 MeV. Substantial drops in cross section were observed above the neutron thresholds for all the radiative capture reactions except 48Ca(p,γ). In the 48Ca(p,γ)and 68Zn(p,α) reactions significant though smaller neutron competition effects were observed. These cross sections were compared with cross sections calculated with global Hauser-Feshbach models. Criteria for isospin indexing, width fluctuation corrections, and black nuclues strength functions were established

  11. Effect of magnetic field on light-induced ion drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper is devoted to theoretical study of the force aspect of magnetic field effect on the light-induced ion drift. One studied three-component (electrons, single-charge positive ions and neutral atoms) slightly ionized gas in the constant homogeneous magnetic field. One derived formulae describing ion drift under the effect of mobile monochromatic light wave. It was determined that in slightly ionized gas at superposition of the external magnetic field a component of light-induced ion drift speed that was transverse to the radiation propagation direction might occur. One estimates the magnetic field value when the projection of ion drift speed on radiation direction should change its sign. In this case, one may observe anomalous light-induced ion drift

  12. A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornace, Jr, A J

    2007-03-03

    Abstract for final report for project entitled A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo which has been supported by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program for approximately 7 years. This project has encompassed two sequential awards, ER62683 and then ER63308, in the Gene Response Section in the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute. The project was temporarily suspended during the relocation of the Principal Investigators laboratory to the Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health at the end of 2004. Remaining support for the final year was transferred to this new site later in 2005 and was assigned the DOE Award Number ER64065. The major aims of this project have been 1) to characterize changes in gene expression in response to low-dose radiation responses; this includes responses in human cells lines, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and in vivo after human or murine exposures, as well as the effect of dose-rate on gene responses; 2) to characterize changes in gene expression that may be involved in bystander effects, such as may be mediated by cytokines and other intercellular signaling proteins; and 3) to characterize responses in transgenic mouse models with relevance to genomic stability. A variety of approaches have been used to study transcriptional events including microarray hybridization, quantitative single-probe hybridization which was developed in this laboratory, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter microarray analysis using genomic regulatory motifs. Considering the frequent responsiveness of genes encoding cytokines and related signaling proteins that can affect cellular metabolism, initial efforts were initiated to study radiation responses at the metabolomic level and to correlate with radiation-responsive gene expression. Productivity includes twenty-four published and in press manuscripts

  13. On the effectiveness of mangroves in attenuating cyclone induced waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narayan, S.; Suzuki, T.; Stive, M.J.F.; Verhagen, H.J.; Ursem, W.N.J.; Ranasinghe, R.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the effectiveness of mangroves in attenuating cyclone- induced waves was done using the SWAN 40.81 numerical model. Hydraulic parameters during extreme events and local mangrove vegetation parameters were estimated for the Kanika Sands mangrove island near the upcoming Dhamra Port in Oris

  14. Capecitabine induced hypertriglyceridaemia: An underreported and potentially severe side effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabchi S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 57 year-old-woman, with no previous history of dyslipedemia, developed severe hypertriglyceridemia while being treated with capecitabine for metastatic breast cancer. Capecitabine was not discontinued and serum triglyceride levels were normalized after 4 weeks of treatment with fenofibrate. Capecitabine induced hypertriglyceridemia, as a rare drug-related side effect, seems to be often overlooked by clinicians.

  15. Structure effects in 238U-induced dissipative collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high resolution kinematic coincidence set-up using position sensitive gas detectors was developed to study 238U - induced reactions on 110Pd and 124Sn targets between 5.70 and 6.02 MeV/u bombarding energies. Nuclear structure effects were observed in the distribution of binary reaction products possibly caused by enhanced multinucleon transfer matrix elements. (orig.)

  16. Reduction of the Misinformation Effect by Arousal Induced after Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Shaun M.; Nielson, Kristy A.

    2010-01-01

    Misinformation introduced after events have already occurred causes errors in later retrieval. Based on literature showing that arousal induced after learning enhances delayed retrieval, we investigated whether post-learning arousal can reduce the misinformation effect. 251 participants viewed four short film clips, each followed by a retention…

  17. Effective field theory approach to gravitationally induced decoherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencowe, M P

    2013-07-12

    Adopting the viewpoint that the standard perturbative quantization of general relativity provides an effective description of quantum gravity that is valid at ordinary energies, we show that gravity as an environment induces the rapid decoherence of stationary matter superposition states when the energy differences in the superposition exceed the Planck energy scale. PMID:23889383

  18. Effects of Sfermion Mixing induced by RGE in the CMSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, Mario E; Rehman, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Even within the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) it is possible to induce sfermion flavor mixing through the Renormalization Group Equations (RGE) when the full structure of the Yukawa couplings is considered. We analyse the impact of including those effects on the accurate computation of $B$-physics observables, electroweak precision observables (EWPO) and the Higgs boson mass predictions.

  19. Protective effect of crocin on liver toxicity induced by morphine

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Salahshoor; Mojtaba khashiadeh; Shiva Roshankhah; Seyran Kakabaraei; Cyrus Jalili

    2016-01-01

    Crocin, a bioactive molecule of saffron can be purely isolated from the saffron extract. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. Morphine is an opioid analgesic drug. It is mainly metabolized in liver and causes devastating effects. It can increase the generation of free radicals. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of crocin against morphine-induced toxicity in the mouse liver. In this study, various doses of crocin (12.5, 2...

  20. Aharonov-Bohm effect induced by circularly polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, H.; Kibis, O. V.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrated theoretically that the strong electron interaction with circularly polarized photons in ring-like nanostructures changes the phase of electron wave. This optically-induced effect is caused by the breaking of time-reversal symmetry and is similar to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. As a consequence of this phenomenon, the conductance of mesoscopic rings irradiated by a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave behaves as an oscillating function of the intensity and frequency of the wave.

  1. Protective effect of Curcumin on chemotherapy-induced intestinal dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Qinghua; Ye, Xiaozheng; Wang, Lu; Gu, Jianzhong; Fu, Ting; Wang, Yun; LAI, YUEBIAO; Wang, Yuqi; Wang, Xian; Jin, Hongchuan; Guo, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Chemotherapy is one of most important treatments for human cancers. However, side effects such as intestine dysfunction significantly impaired its clinical efficacy. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of Curcumin on chemotherapy-induced intestinal dysfunction in rats. Methods: Sixty healthy Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group (normal saline), 5-FU group and 5-FU+Curcumin group. The weight, serum level of endotoxin, DAO and D-lactate were determin...

  2. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Schmied; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Robert Winkler; Rack, Phillip D; Harald Plank

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity r...

  3. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleg V Belyakov; Heli Mononen; Marjo Peraelae [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  4. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  5. Evaluation of protective effect of amifostine on dacarbazine induced genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etebari, M; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A; Lame, V

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer therapy with alkylating agents has been used for many years. Dacarbazine (DTIC) as an alkylating agent is used alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. In order to inhibit the formation of secondary cancers resulting from chemotherapy with DTIC, preventional strategies is necessary. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genoprotective effect of amifostine on the genotoxic effects of DTIC in cell culture condition. To determine the optimum genotoxic concentration of DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with various DTIC concentrations including 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml for 2 h and the genotoxic effects were evaluated by the comet assay. The result of this part of the study showed that incubation of HepG2 cells with DTIC at 5 μg/ml was sufficient to produce genotoxic effect. In order to determine the protective effects of amifostine on genotoxicity induced by DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with different concentrations of amifostine (2, 3 and 5 mg/ml) for 1 h which was followed by incubation with DTIC at 5 μg/ml for 2 h. One hour incubation of cells with different concentrations of amifostine before incubation with DITC indicated that at least 5 mg/ml concentration of amifostine can prevent genotoxic effects induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells under described condition. In conclusion amifostine could prevent DNA damage induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells. PMID:26430459

  6. Bystander suppression to unrelated allergen sensitization through intranasal administration of tolerogenic exosomes in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Noela; Cañamero, Marta; Villalba, Mayte; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Batanero, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Exosomes represent a new family of bioactive nanovesicles (30-100 nm in diameter) secreted by different cell types whose appealing features can be exploited for designing vaccines in the context of several human diseases. We previously reported the potential of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF)-derived tolerogenic exosomes (Exo(Tol)) to be used as a nasal allergy vaccine in a mouse model of sensitization to Ole e 1, the main allergen of olive pollen. The aim of the study was to investigate whether such nanovesicles specific to Ole e 1 can also prevent the sensitization to other unrelated allergen, as Bet v 1 from birch pollen. Exo(Tol) were isolated from BALF of mice tolerized against Ole e 1 and used in a prophylactic approach. BALB/c mice were intranasally pretreated with Exo(Tol) one week before sensitization/challenge with Bet v 1, and the magnitude of allergen-specific response was analyzed. Intranasal pretreatment with Exo(Tol) resulted in significant inhibition of both specific IgE and IgG1 antibodies levels. Moreover, T cells from mice pretreated with Exo(Tol) showed a reduction in IL-5 and IL-13 (Th2 cytokines) production. Lung inflammatory response triggered by unrelated allergen-challenge was also significantly reduced after pretreatment: perivascular/peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration, eosinophilia and mucus secretion. In conclusion, Exo(Tol) specific to Ole e 1, in addition to inhibit specific immune response to this allergen, blocked the allergic response to a second unrelated allergen such as Bet v 1. The in vivo "bystander suppression" that we herein describe for Exo(Tol) may have implications for the treatment of allergy based on mucosal tolerance induction. PMID:20478618

  7. PD-1 Restrains Radiotherapy-Induced Abscopal Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sean S.; Dong, Haidong; Liu, Xin; Harrington, Susan M.; Krco, Christopher J.; Grams, Michael P.; Aaron S. Mansfield; Furutani, Keith M.; Olivier, Kenneth R; Kwon, Eugene D

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of PD-1 expression on the systemic antitumor response (abscopal effect) induced by stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in preclinical melanoma and renal cell carcinoma models. We compared the SABR-induced antitumor response in PD-1-expressing wild-type (WT) and PD-1-deficient knockout (KO) mice, and found that PD-1 expression compromises the survival of tumor-bearing mice treated with SABR. None of the PD-1 WT mice survived beyond 25 days, whereas 20% of th...

  8. PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF TINOSPORA CORDIFOLIA AGAINST RESERPINE INDUCED ULCER MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur Dilpreet; Kumar Sunil; Sharma Ramica; Rana A C

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Tinospora cordifolia (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg) against gastric damage induced by reserpine in adult Sprague Dawley rats. Ulceration was induced in rats by administering 10mg/kg reserpine intraperitoneally (i.p.). The plant was evaluated for its anti-oxidative profile by estimating MDA, GSH, nitrite/nitrate and SOD in rat’s stomach. Pre-treatment with aqueous extract of AETC significantly increased level of endogenous antioxidan...

  9. Nearshore bar migration and sediment-induced buoyancy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchetti, Silvia; Conley, Daniel C.; Brocchini, Maurizio; Elgar, Steve

    2010-02-01

    A 1-D General Ocean Turbulence Model that includes the effects of sediment-induced stratification is shown to simulate the observed onshore and offshore migration of a nearshore sandbar. The only two free parameters of the model, the bed reference concentration and the sediment diffusivity, are taken from the literature, rather than tuned to the data used here. The model results suggest that predictions of onshore bar migration, in which wave-induced sediment transport confined to within a few centimeters of the bottom dominates, are not greatly affected by accounting for buoyancy effects. The model results also suggest that both mean flows and waves transport sediment during offshore bar migration, with different components of transport dominating at different cross-shore locations across the bar-trough bathymetry. Neglecting the effects of sediment-induced stratification results in higher model skill during the largest waves, likely because the excess turbulence production simulated by the non-stratified model is counterbalanced by neglected breaking-wave-generated turbulence. Considering both onshore and offshore migration, the model that includes sediment-induced stratification has higher skill than the model without stratification.

  10. Quantifying induced effects of subsurface renewable energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Beyer, Christof; Pfeiffer, Tilmann; Boockmeyer, Anke; Popp, Steffi; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Wang, Bo; Li, Dedong; Dethlefsen, Frank; Dahmke, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    New methods and technologies for energy storage are required for the transition to renewable energy sources. Subsurface energy storage systems such as salt caverns or porous formations offer the possibility of hosting large amounts of energy or substance. When employing these systems, an adequate system and process understanding is required in order to assess the feasibility of the individual storage option at the respective site and to predict the complex and interacting effects induced. This understanding is the basis for assessing the potential as well as the risks connected with a sustainable usage of these storage options, especially when considering possible mutual influences. For achieving this aim, in this work synthetic scenarios for the use of the geological underground as an energy storage system are developed and parameterized. The scenarios are designed to represent typical conditions in North Germany. The types of subsurface use investigated here include gas storage and heat storage in porous formations. The scenarios are numerically simulated and interpreted with regard to risk analysis and effect forecasting. For this, the numerical simulators Eclipse and OpenGeoSys are used. The latter is enhanced to include the required coupled hydraulic, thermal, geomechanical and geochemical processes. Using the simulated and interpreted scenarios, the induced effects are quantified individually and monitoring concepts for observing these effects are derived. This presentation will detail the general investigation concept used and analyze the parameter availability for this type of model applications. Then the process implementation and numerical methods required and applied for simulating the induced effects of subsurface storage are detailed and explained. Application examples show the developed methods and quantify induced effects and storage sizes for the typical settings parameterized. This work is part of the ANGUS+ project, funded by the German Ministry

  11. Rolling induced size effects in elastic–viscoplastic sheet metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2015-01-01

    presented revolves around the rolling induced effect of visco-plasticity (ranging hot and cold rolling) in combination with strain gradient hardening – including both dissipative and energetic contributions. To bring out first order effects on rolling at small scale, the modeling efforts are limited to flat...... energetic length parameter has negligible effect on the rolling quantities of interest, while the contribution coming from the dissipative length parameter can be dominant. Considering a slow and a fast moving sheet, respectively, convergence towards the rate independent limit is demonstrated, and a...

  12. Spin Hall Magnetoresistance Induced by a Nonequilibrium Proximity Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, H.; Althammer, M.; Chen, Y. T.; Uchida, K.; Kajiwara, Y.; Kikuchi, D.; Ohtani, T.; Geprägs, S.; Opel, M.; Takahashi, S.; Gross, R.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Saitoh, E.

    2013-01-01

    We report anisotropic magnetoresistance in Pt|Y3Fe5O12 bilayers. In spite of Y3Fe5O12 being a very good electrical insulator, the resistance of the Pt layer reflects its magnetization direction. The effect persists even when a Cu layer is inserted between Pt and Y3Fe5O12, excluding the contribution of induced equilibrium magnetization at the interface. Instead, we show that the effect originates from concerted actions of the direct and inverse spin Hall effects and therefore call it “spin Hal...

  13. Spin Hall magnetoresistance induced by a nonequilibrium proximity effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, H; Althammer, M; Chen, Y-T; Uchida, K; Kajiwara, Y; Kikuchi, D; Ohtani, T; Geprägs, S; Opel, M; Takahashi, S; Gross, R; Bauer, G E W; Goennenwein, S T B; Saitoh, E

    2013-05-17

    We report anisotropic magnetoresistance in Pt|Y(3)Fe(5)O(12) bilayers. In spite of Y(3)Fe(5)O(12) being a very good electrical insulator, the resistance of the Pt layer reflects its magnetization direction. The effect persists even when a Cu layer is inserted between Pt and Y(3)Fe(5)O(12), excluding the contribution of induced equilibrium magnetization at the interface. Instead, we show that the effect originates from concerted actions of the direct and inverse spin Hall effects and therefore call it "spin Hall magnetoresistance." PMID:25167435

  14. AMELIORATIVE EFFECTS OF TINOSPORA CORDIFOLIA IN SCIATICA PAIN INDUCED RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaakur Santhrani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at investigating the ameliorative effect of Tinospora cordifolia in sciatic nerve root Ligation -induced sciatica pain in rats. Adult male albino rats weighing 130-150gm were used for the study, and were divided into seven groups and ligation was performed on left sciatic nerve in group II to group VII. Tail cold-hyperalgesia, motor co-ordination tests, foot deformity, and total calcium levels were estimated to assess the extent of sciatica. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and lipid peroxide (LPO levels were estimated to evaluate the extent of oxidative stress. The alcoholic and aqueous extract of Tinospora cordifolia was administered at a dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg/p.o for 15 days. Tinospora cordifolia attenuated sciatic nerve root Ligation-induced motor in-coordination, foot deformity, tail cold hyperalgesia, reversed ligation-induced alterations in lipid peroxides, total calcium, superoxide dismutase, catalase levels in a dose-dependent manner. Ameliorative effects of Tinospora cordifolia in ligation-induced sciatica may be due to its foot deformity, antioxidant, and calcium attenuating actions.

  15. Hormetic effect induced by depleted uranium in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C Y P; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2016-06-01

    The present work studied the hormetic effect induced by uranium (U) in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) using apoptosis as the biological endpoint. Hormetic effect is characterized by biphasic dose-response relationships showing a low-dose stimulation and a high-dose inhibition. Embryos were dechorionated at 4h post fertilization (hpf), and were then exposed to 10 or 100μg/l depleted uranium (DU) in uranyl acetate solutions from 5 to 6 hpf. For exposures to 10μg/l DU, the amounts of apoptotic signals in the embryos were significantly increased at 20 hpf but were significantly decreased at 24 hpf, which demonstrated the presence of U-induced hormesis. For exposures to 100μg/l DU, the amounts of apoptotic signals in the embryos were significantly increased at 20, 24 and 30 hpf. Hormetic effect was not shown but its occurrence between 30 and 48 hpf could not be ruled out. In conclusion, hormetic effect could be induced in zebrafish embryos in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. PMID:27060238

  16. Effect of baclofen on morphine-induced conditioned place preference, extinction, and stress-induced reinstatement in chronically stressed mice

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Shanshan; Quan, Wuxing; Xu QI; Su, Zhiqiang; Yang, Shanshan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and Objective A stress-induced increase in excitability can result from a reduction in inhibitory neurotransmission. Modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic transmission is an effective treatment for drug seeking and relapse. This study investigated whether baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, had an impact on morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), extinction, and stress-induced relapse in chronically stressed mice. Methods Chronic stress was induced by restra...

  17. Bystander immunotherapy as a strategy to control allergen-driven airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, S; Lazzari, A; Kanda, A; Fleury, S; Dombrowicz, D; Glaichenhaus, N; Julia, V

    2015-07-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung infiltration of Th2 cells, and high levels of IgE. To date, allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment that effectively alleviates clinical symptoms and has a long-term effect after termination. Unfortunately, SIT is unsuitable for plurisensitized patients, and highly immunogenic allergens cannot be used. To overcome these hurdles, we sought to induce regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Treg) specific to an exogenous antigen that could be later activated as needed in vivo to control allergic responses. We have established an experimental approach in which mice tolerized to ovalbumin (OVA) were sensitized to the Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated c kinase (LACK) antigen, and subsequently challenged with aerosols of LACK alone or LACK and OVA together. Upon OVA administration, AHR and allergic airway responses were strongly reduced. OVA-induced suppression was mediated by CD25(+) Treg, required CTLA-4 and ICOS signaling and resulted in decreased numbers of migrating airway dendritic cells leading to a strong impairment in the proliferation of allergen-specific Th2 cells. Therefore, inducing Treg specific to a therapeutic antigen that could be further activated in vivo may represent a safe and novel curative approach for allergic asthma. PMID:25425267

  18. Birefringence effects of short probe pulses of electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshkov, Oleg M.; Kochetkova, Anastasia E.; Budyak, Victoria V.

    2016-04-01

    The numerical simulation results of radiations evolution in the presence of electromagnetically induced transparency for J=0-->J=1-->J=2 scheme of degenerate quantum transitions are presented. The pulse regime of wave interaction with Doppler broadening spectral lines was investigated. It was indicated that when the control field is linear polarized, the input circular polarized probe pulse breaks up in the medium into pulses with mutually perpendicular linear polarizations. Polarization direction of one of these pulses coincides with the polarization direction of control fields. The distance, which probe pulse passes in the medium to its full separation, decreases, when input probe pulse duration or control field intensity decreases. The input probe pulse intensity variation almost does not influence separation distance and speed of the linear polarized probe pulses in the medium. The effects, described above, may be interpreted as the birefringence effects of electromagnetically induced transparency in the case of short probe pulse.

  19. Effective mass sensing using optomechanically induced transparency in microresonator system

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yong-Pan; Cao, Cong; Mi, Si-Chen; Yang, Daquan; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and weighing the individual nanoparticles is an important approach to study the behavior and properties of single particles. Here we illustrate an effective mass sensing scheme using optomechanical resonator system. Based on the optomechanically induced transparency phenomenon, a Stokes field reference approach is used to sense the mass of the particle on the microresonator. The field intensity of the transmission field will be changed by the effect of the particle which avoids the limits of decay induced spectral width in the resonance shift detection. Exploiting the perturbation method, we theoretically evaluated the dynamical behavior of the system, and achieved the femtogram level mass sensing without the need for high cavity Q-value, and strong coupling strength in the optomechanically system.

  20. Some Consequences of Gravitationally Induced Electromagnetic Effects in Microphysics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosquist, Kjell

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the relation between the gravitational and electromagnetic fields as governed by the Einstein-Maxwell field equations. It is emphasized that the tendency of the gravitational field to induce electromagnetic effects increases as the size of the system goes down. In particular, the gravitational field, according to general relativity, tends to become dominated by the spin at distances of the order of the Compton wavelength. The relevant quantity which governs this behavior is the ratio S/M^2 where S is the (spin) angular momentum. For an electron, S/M^2 ~ 10^44. Therefore, gravitomagnetic effects will play a significant role in the subatomic domain. To analyze this situation we use the asymptotic structure in the form of the multipole fields. Some important consequences for the electromagnetic fields of charged particles with spin are pointed out. In particular, the gravitational field may induce corrections to the Coulomb field which can be tested experimentally.

  1. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF GREEN TEA FROM PAF-INDUCED NEUROTOXITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Enji; Hah Xuefei; Joseph Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    Objective The protective effect of chinese green tea from PAF-induced neurotoxity was investigated Method LaN1 ( neuroblastoma cell line) was used as neuron. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) -release was an indicator of cell death. Cytoplasmic calcium was measured with Aequouin-loaded method. Results When applied to LaN1 cells, green tea in concentration 2mg/ml or stronger obviously damaged cells. If lower concentration (0. 5mg/ml and l.Omg/ml) of green tea were applied, green tea inhibited the elevation of intracellular calcium and reduced the cytotoxity induced by PAF in neurons. Conclusion PAF plays an important role in brain injury and stroke, the protective effect of green tea could be a basis to explore weather green tea or its derivative may have preventive and therapeutic potential for neuronal injury.

  2. EFFECT OF EDTA ON GASTRIC MUCOSAL LESION INDUCED BY ASPIRIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A FESHARAKI M.A

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastric ulcer is a multifactorial disease, which its pathophysioligy has not been clear yet. The aim of this study was to obtain the prophylactic effects of EDTA on Aspirin induced gastric mucosal lesions. Methods. In fasted male rats the effect of a single oral dose of the EDTA was evaluated in the following test systems: combination of 1 ml EDTA 1.5% + 300 mg/kg aspirin and 1 ml EDTA 1.5%, 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% 30 minutes before 300 mg/kg aspirin. Then the gastric mucosal lesions were assessed microscopically and marcroscopically. Results. EDTA at different doses reduced macroscopic and microscpic gastric mucosal lesion induced by aspirin. Discussion. Combination therapy of EDTA and aspirin has distinct advantages regard to both low gastrointestinal toxicity and restored therapeutic activity.

  3. Biochemical Effects of Plumbagin on Fibrosarcoma Induced Rats

    OpenAIRE

    P.Jayamathi,; Vishnupriya V; Surapaneni Krishna Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Natural products from plants are used for treating a number of diseases. Many of the pharmacological principles of the currently used anticancer agents have been initially isolated from plants. Plumbagin, a napthaquinone derivative from Plumbago zeylanica and has been claimed to possess antitumor effect. The tumor weight was found to be reduced in methylcholanthrene induced fibrosarcoma rats after plumbagin treatment. Elevated levels of proteins, lipid profile and also in the activities of pa...

  4. AMELIORATIVE EFFECTS OF TINOSPORA CORDIFOLIA IN SCIATICA PAIN INDUCED RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Thaakur Santhrani; Yaidikar Lavanya

    2012-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the ameliorative effect of Tinospora cordifolia in sciatic nerve root Ligation -induced sciatica pain in rats. Adult male albino rats weighing 130-150gm were used for the study, and were divided into seven groups and ligation was performed on left sciatic nerve in group II to group VII. Tail cold-hyperalgesia, motor co-ordination tests, foot deformity, and total calcium levels were estimated to assess the extent of sciatica. Superoxide dismutase ...

  5. Nonlinear effect induced in thermally poled glass waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yi-tao

    2006-01-01

    Thermally poled germanium-doped channel waveguides are presented. Multilayer waveguides containing a silicon oxynitride layer were used as charge trapper in this investigation on the effect of the internal field inside the waveguide. Compared to waveguides without the trapping layer, experimental results showed that the induced linear electro-optic (EO) coefficient increases about 20% after poling, suggesting strongly that the internal field is relatively enhanced, and showed it is a promising means for improving nonlinearity by poling in waveguides.

  6. Modelling the light induced metastable effects in amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Munyeme, G.; Chinyama, G.K.; Zeman, M.; R. E. I. Schropp; Weg, W

    2008-01-01

    We present results of computer simulations of the light induced degradation of amorphous silicon solar cells. It is now well established that when amorphous silicon is illuminated the density of dangling bond states increases. Dangling bond states produce amphoteric electronic mid-gap states which act as efficient charge trapping and recombination centres. The increase in dangling bond states causes a decrease in the performance of amorphous silicon solar cells. To show this effect, a modelli...

  7. Effects of thermal motion on electromagnetically induced absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Tilchin, E.; Firstenberg, O.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the effect of thermal motion and buffer-gas collisions on a four-level closed N system interacting with strong pump(s) and a weak probe. This is the simplest system that experiences electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) due to transfer of coherence via spontaneous emission from the excited to ground state. We investigate the influence of Doppler broadening, velocity-changing collisions (VCC), and phase-changing collisions (PCC) with a buffer gas on the EIA spectrum of optic...

  8. Emotion and Time Perception: Effects of Film-Induced Mood

    OpenAIRE

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Fayolle, Sophie L.; Gil, Sandrine

    2011-01-01

    Previous research into emotion and time perception has been designed to study the time perception of emotional events themselves (e.g., facial expression). Our aim was to investigate the effect of emotions per se on the subsequent time judgment of a neutral, non-affective event. In the present study, the participants were presented with films inducing a specific mood and were subsequently given a temporal bisection task. More precisely, the participants were given two temporal bisection tasks...

  9. HIV-1 Nef Inhibits Ruffles, Induces Filopodia, and Modulates Migration of Infected Lymphocytes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Cinzia; Rudnicka, Dominika; Hasan, Milena; Aulner, Nathalie; Porrot, Françoise; Machu, Christophe; Renaud, Olivier; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Hivroz, Claire; Schwartz, Olivier; Sol-Foulon, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 Nef protein is a pathogenic factor modulating the behavior of infected cells. Nef induces actin cytoskeleton changes and impairs cell migration toward chemokines. We further characterized the morphology, cytoskeleton dynamics, and motility of HIV-1-infected lymphocytes. By using scanning electron microscopy, confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, and ImageStream technology, which combines flow cytometry and automated imaging, we report that HIV-1 induces a characteristic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. In infected lymphocytes, ruffle formation is inhibited, whereas long, thin filopodium-like protrusions are induced. Cells infected with HIV with nef deleted display a normal phenotype, and Nef expression alone, in the absence of other viral proteins, induces morphological changes. We also used an innovative imaging system to immobilize and visualize living individual cells in suspension. When combined with confocal “axial tomography,” this technique greatly enhances three-dimensional optical resolution. With this technique, we confirmed the induction of long filopodium-like structures in unfixed Nef-expressing lymphocytes. The cytoskeleton reorganization induced by Nef is associated with an important impairment of cell movements. The adhesion and spreading of infected cells to fibronectin, their spontaneous motility, and their migration toward chemokines (CXCL12, CCL3, and CCL19) were all significantly decreased. Therefore, Nef induces complex effects on the lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton and cellular morphology, which likely impacts the capacity of infected cells to circulate and to encounter and communicate with bystander cells. PMID:20015995

  10. Modulatory effect of semelil (ANGIPARS™) on isoproterenol induced cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joukar, Siyavash; Najafipour, Hamid; Mirzaeipour, Fateme; Nasri, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Mahboubeh Yeganeh Haj; Badinloo, Marziyeh

    2013-01-01

    Administration of semelil (ANGIPARS™) has been successful in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer. Considering the improvement of blood flow and anti-inflammatory effect that are attributed to this drug, we investigated its effect on cardiovascular performance in rabbits with isoproterenol (ISO) induced myocardial injury. Animal groups included: control group; ISO group, received ISO 50 mg/kg s.c. for two consecutive days; S1+ISO, S5+ISO and S10+ISO groups, received semelil 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day i.p. respectively, 30 min before ISO. On the 3(rd) day, electrocardiogram (ECG) and hemodynamic parameters were recorded; blood samples were taken and hearts were removed for lab investigations. ISO induced heart injury, ECG disturbance, raise of cardiac troponin I and significant decrease in LVSP (p<0.05), +dp/dt max (p<0.01), -dp/dt max (p<0.05) along with increase of LVEDP (p<0.01). Semelil had no significant effects on ECG and plasma cardiac troponin I. Impairment of +dp/dt max and -dp/dt max was significantly improved in S5+ISO and S10+ISO groups (P<0.05 versus ISO). In addition, LVSP and LVEDP was somewhat recovered in these groups, although semelil (1 mg/kg/day) to some extent exacerbated the myocardial lesions induced by ISO (P<0.05). Therefore, in stressful conditions, semelil may improve myocardial contractility; however, it may aggravate the severity of injury. PMID:26417221

  11. Influence of Psychological and Social Factors on Bystanders' Roles in School Bullying among Korean-American Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sumi; Cho, Young Il

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the associations of psychological and social variables with the likelihood of exhibiting three different behaviors as a bystander in a bullying situation. The sample comprised 238 Korean-American and Korean students, from the 3rd to 12th grades, studying in the USA. Students receiving classmate support showed a lower…

  12. Prevention of dipyrone (metamizole) induced inhibition of aspirin antiplatelet effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Amin; Richter, Stefan; Schrör, Karsten; Rassaf, Tienush; Merx, Marc W; Kelm, Malte; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We have recently shown that dipyrone (metamizole), a non-opioid analgesic, can nullify aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) antiplatelet effects in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we analysed the aspirin and dipyrone drug-drug interaction in order to identify strategies to prevent the dipyrone induced inhibition of asprin antiplatelet effects. Platelet function was measured by arachidonic acid-induced light-transmission aggregometry, thromboxane (TX) B2- formation by immunoassay. Dipyrone metabolite plasma levels were determined by high-performance-liquid-chromatography (HPLC). In seven healthy individuals, in vitro ASA (30 µM/ 100 µM/ 300 µM/ 1,000 µM) and dipyrone (10 µM) coincubation revealed, that the aspirin and dipyrone interaction can be overcome by increasing doses of aspirin. In 36 aspirin and dipyrone comedicated CAD patients, addition of ASA (30 µM/ 100 µM) in vitro inhibited, but did not completely overcome the dipyrone induced reduction of aspirin antiplatelet effects. Notably, the inhibition of thromboxane formation in aspirin and dipyrone comedicated CAD patients coincided with dipyrone plasma levels. In a cross-over designed study in four healthy individuals, we were able to prove that inhibition of aspirin (100 mg/ day) effects by dipyrone (750 mg/ day) was reversible. Furthermore, aspirin (100 mg/ day) medication prior to dipyrone (750 mg/ day) intake prevented the inhibition of antiplatelet effects by dipyrone in 12 healthy individuals. In conclusion, aspirin medication prior to dipyrone intake preserves antiplatelet effects, circumventing the pharmacodynamic drug-drug interaction at the level of cyclooxygenase-1. PMID:25789542

  13. Modulatory effect of semelil (ANGIPARS™) on isoproterenol induced cardiac injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Mahboubeh Yeganeh Haj; Badinloo, Marziyeh; Joukar, Siyavash; Mirzaeipour, Fateme; Najafipour, Hamid; Nasri, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    Administration of semelil (ANGIPARS™) has been successful in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer. Considering the improvement of blood flow and anti-inflammatory effect that are attributed to this drug, we investigated its effect on cardiovascular performance in rabbits with isoproterenol (ISO) induced myocardial injury. Animal groups included: control group; ISO group, received ISO 50 mg/kg s.c. for two consecutive days; S1+ISO, S5+ISO and S10+ISO groups, received semelil 1, 5, and 10 mg...

  14. EFFECT OF EDTA ON GASTRIC MUCOSAL LESION INDUCED BY ASPIRIN

    OpenAIRE

    M.A FESHARAKI M.A; A SHARAITI KAMALABADI; R MOKHTARI

    2002-01-01

    Introduction. Gastric ulcer is a multifactorial disease, which its pathophysioligy has not been clear yet. The aim of this study was to obtain the prophylactic effects of EDTA on Aspirin induced gastric mucosal lesions. Methods. In fasted male rats the effect of a single oral dose of the EDTA was evaluated in the following test systems: combination of 1 ml EDTA 1.5% + 300 mg/kg aspirin and 1 ml EDTA 1.5%, 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% 30 minutes before 300 mg/kg aspirin. Then the gastric mucosal les...

  15. Effect of Fiber Length on Carbon Nanotube-Induced Fibrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruta Manke

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Given their extremely small size and light weight, carbon nanotubes (CNTs can be readily inhaled by human lungs resulting in increased rates of pulmonary disorders, particularly fibrosis. Although the fibrogenic potential of CNTs is well established, there is a lack of consensus regarding the contribution of physicochemical attributes of CNTs on the underlying fibrotic outcome. We designed an experimentally validated in vitro fibroblast culture model aimed at investigating the effect of fiber length on single-walled CNT (SWCNT-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The fibrogenic response to short and long SWCNTs was assessed via oxidative stress generation, collagen expression and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β production as potential fibrosis biomarkers. Long SWCNTs were significantly more potent than short SWCNTs in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS response, collagen production and TGF-β release. Furthermore, our finding on the length-dependent in vitro fibrogenic response was validated by the in vivo lung fibrosis outcome, thus supporting the predictive value of the in vitro model. Our results also demonstrated the key role of ROS in SWCNT-induced collagen expression and TGF-β activation, indicating the potential mechanisms of length-dependent SWCNT-induced fibrosis. Together, our study provides new evidence for the role of fiber length in SWCNT-induced lung fibrosis and offers a rapid cell-based assay for fibrogenicity testing of nanomaterials with the ability to predict pulmonary fibrogenic response in vivo.

  16. Effects of lysophosphatidylcholine on β-amyloid-induced neuronal apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-xia QIN; Hui-yan ZHU; Ying-he HU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: We have investigated the effects of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), a product of lipid peroxidation, on Aβ1-42-induced SH-SY5Y cell apoptosis.Methods: The viability of cultured SH-SY5Y cells was measured using a CCK-8 kit. Apoptosis was determined by Chip-based flow cytometric assay. The mRNA transcription of Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 were detected by using reverse transcrip-tion and real-time quantitative PCR and the protein levels of Bax and caspase-3 were analyzed by Western blotting. Thecytosolic calcium concentration of SH-SY5Y cells was tested by calcium influx assay. GZA expression in SH-SYSY cells wassilenced by small interfering RNA.Results: Long-term exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to LPC augmented the neurotoxicity of Aβ1-42. Furthermore, after LPC treatment, the Bax/Bcl-XL ratio and the expression levels, as well as the activity of caspase-3 were, elevated, whereas the expression level of TRAF1 was reduced. Because LPC was reported to be a specific ligand for the orphan G-protein coupled receptor, G2A, we investigated LPC-mediated changes in calcium levels in SH-SY5Y cells. Our results demonstrated that LPC can enhance the Aβ1-42-induced elevation of intracellular calcium. Interestingly, Aβ1-42 significantly increased the expression of G2A in SH-SY5Y cells, whereas knockdown of G2A using siRNA reduced the effects of LPC on Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity.Conclusion: The effects of LPC on Aβ1-42-induced apoptosis may occur through the signal pathways of the orphan G-protein coupled receptor.

  17. The protective effects of trace elements against side effects induced by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jaial [Dept. of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Trace elements play crucial role in the maintenance of genome stability in the cells. Many endogenous defense enzymes are containing trace elements such as superoxide dismutase and metalloproteins. These enzymes are contributing in the detoxification of reactive oxidative species (ROS) induced by ionizing radiation in the cells. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium are main trace elements that have protective roles against radiation-induced DNA damages. Trace elements in the free salt forms have protective effect against cell toxicity induced by oxidative stress, metal-complex are more active in the attenuation of ROS particularly through superoxide dismutase mimetic activity. Manganese-complexes in protection of normal cell against radiation without any protective effect on cancer cells are more interesting compounds in this topic. The aim of this paper to review the role of trace elements in protection cells against genotoxicity and side effects induced by ionizing radiation.

  18. Effect of induced mutagenesis in rice tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of chemical mutagens and ionising radiation on growth, regenerative capacity of rice callus culture and the effect o9f mutagens on frequency and spectrum of mutant regenerants, derived from calli and determination of approximate semi-lethal dose of each mutagen on rice calli was studied. Intact mature de-husked grains and pieces of primordial particles of four varieties were used as explants in the experiment. Organogenesis was induced using MS media supplemented with agar. After thirty days calluses were subjected to varying concentrations/dosage of mutagens. The effect of mutagens on growth of callus was stimulative in low concentration/doses at short exposure, but in higher concentration/doses at longer exposure it was oppressive. In x-radiation treatment all the studied doses showed only stimulative effect on growth. The effect of mutagenic treatment on regenerative capacity was negative. No specificity was found even between two chemical mutagens of their action on studied characters

  19. Effects of Nonlinearities on Induced Voltages across Lumped Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Mazloom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been many studies on induced currents and voltages along overhead conductors due to lightning flashes. In most of these studies lumped loads and components are connected only as line terminations [1]-[4]. In studies where series and shunt connected components are connected along the lines the effects of nonlinear components and effects are disregarded [5]-[8]. This is not always correct as nonlinear effects will introduce high frequencies in the system and affect the current and voltage wave distribution. In this paper the effects of series and shunt components and nonlinear phenomenon on a system representative of the Swedish electrified railway system will be investigated. It is seen how introduction of different linear and nonlinear components affect the propagating voltage wave forms.

  20. David against Goliath? Group size and bystander effects in virtual knowledge sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Voelpel; R.A. Eckhoff; J. Förster

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge management has been identified as a key factor for sustaining a competitive advantage in today’s corporate world. A fundamental aspect of knowledge management in a global economy is the sharing of information in online groups. Most researchers and practitioners have so far assumed that a l

  1. Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses About the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuchao; Conolly, Rory B; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2006-11-21

    This report describes the development of a computational systems biology approach to evaluate the hypotheses of molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaptive response to low dose ionizing radiation. Our concept is that computational models of signaling pathways can be developed and linked to biologically based dose response models to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms which lead to adaptive response. For development of quantitatively accurate, predictive models, it will be necessary to describe tissues consisting of multiple cell types where the different types each contribute in their own way to the overall function of the tissue. Such a model will probably need to incorporate not only cell type-specific data but also spatial information on the architecture of the tissue and on intercellular signaling. The scope of the current model was more limited. Data obtained in a number of different biological systems were synthesized to describe a chimeric, “average” population cell. Biochemical signaling pathways involved in sensing of DNA damage and in the activation of cell cycle checkpoint controls and the apoptotic path were also included. As with any computational modeling effort, it was necessary to develop these simplified initial descriptions (models) that can be iteratively refined. This preliminary model is a starting point which, with time, can evolve to a level of refinement where large amounts of detailed biological information are synthesized and a capability for robust predictions of dose- and time-response behaviors is obtained.

  2. The Bystander Effect of Trekking Tourism: Proposing a Typology of Environmental Ideal Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    2011-01-01

    Tourism impacts in fragile nature-based environments have repeatedly been investigated from a wide array of academic viewpoints. However, in order to improve future researches that aim at measuring and/or elaborating on the pro-environmental awareness and behavioral patterns of trekking tourists...

  3. DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Urushibara, A.; Akamatsu, K.; Watanabe, R.

    2008-10-01

    We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation. The yields of single- (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB), base lesions and clustered damage were measured using the agarose gel electrophoresis method after exposing to various kinds of radiations to a simple model DNA molecule, fully hydrated closed-circular plasmid DNA (pUC18). The yield of SSB does not show significant dependence on linear energy transfer (LET) values. On the other hand, the yields of base lesions revealed by enzymatic probes, endonuclease III (Nth) and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg), which excise base lesions and leave a nick at the damage site, strongly depend on LET values. Soft X-ray photon (150 kVp) irradiation gives a maximum yield of the base lesions detected by the enzymatic probes as SSB and clustered damage, which is composed of one base lesion and proximate other base lesions or SSBs. The clustered damage is visualized as an enzymatically induced DSB. The yields of the enzymatically additional damages strikingly decrease with increasing levels of LET. These results suggest that in higher LET regions, the repair enzymes used as probes are compromised because of the dense damage clustering. The studies using simple plasmid DNA as a irradiation sample, however, have a technical difficulty to detect multiple SSBs in a plasmid DNA. To detect the additional SSBs induced in opposite strand of the first SSB, we have also developed a novel technique of DNA-denaturation assay. This allows us to detect multiply induced SSBs in both strand of DNA, but not induced DSB.

  4. Biochemical Effects of Plumbagin on Fibrosarcoma Induced Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Jayamathi,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural products from plants are used for treating a number of diseases. Many of the pharmacological principles of the currently used anticancer agents have been initially isolated from plants. Plumbagin, a napthaquinone derivative from Plumbago zeylanica and has been claimed to possess antitumor effect. The tumor weight was found to be reduced in methylcholanthrene induced fibrosarcoma rats after plumbagin treatment. Elevated levels of proteins, lipid profile and also in the activities of pathophysiological enzymes such as gammaglutamyl trans peptidase (GGT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, lutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT, glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT, in plasma, liver and kidney extracts of fibrosarcoma rats decreased significantly after Plumbagin treatment. These observations clearly suggested the antitumor potency of plumbagin in experimentally induced fibrosarcoma in rats.

  5. Space charge effects and induced signals in resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Lippmann, Christian; Schnizer, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Using special integral representations of the solution for the static electric field of a point charge in a three layer geometry with different permittivities, we calculate the effect of the space charge on the avalanche in the gas gap of an RPC. A detailed Monte Carlo simulation was developed which allows calculation of the actual charge spectrum. Results of this simulation are presented, using the example of a trigger-RPC with 2 mm gas gap, similar to the ones used by ATLAS (ATLAS TDR 10, CERN-LHCC-97-22), and a timing RPC with 300 mum gas gap (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 449 (2000) 295). Finally, we also present analytic solutions for the weighting field of an RPC readout strip, which allow to calculate the directly induced crosstalk and induced signals.

  6. Reduction effects in rutile induced by neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction effect in rutile induced by neutron irradiation and its post-annealing experiment has been investigated. Rutile TiO2 (1 1 0) specimens were cut from the same crystal, and irradiated with high-fluence (1x1019 cm-2) neutron irradiation, then annealed in vacuum and oxidizing atmosphere at different temperatures, respectively. After irradiation, rutile shows deep dark-blue color. After oxidization, it becomes transparent again. But annealed in vacuum, the color of irradiated sample keeps invariable. By means of UV-VIS-IR, XPS, XRD and AFM, samples were investigated before and after irradiation, as well as after annealing. The results show that neutron irradiation induces O2- ions sputtering and Ti4+ ions reduce to Ti3+, Ti2+, even Ti+, and leads to metallization tendency, and the reduction of Ti4+ presents depth-distribution. Especially surface morphology shows step pattern and polycrystalline structure because of insufficiency of O2- ions

  7. Strain induced Chiral Magnetic Effect in Weyl semimetals

    CERN Document Server

    Cortijo, Alberto; Landsteiner, Karl; Vozmediano, María A H

    2016-01-01

    We argue that strain applied to a time-reversal and inversion breaking Weyl semi-metal in a magnetic field can induce an electric current via the chiral magnetic effect. A tight binding model is used to show that strain generically changes the locations in the Brillouin zone but also the energies of the band touching points (tips of the Weyl cones). Since axial charge in a Weyl semi-metal can relax via inter-valley scattering processes the induced current will decay with a timescale given by the lifetime of a chiral quasiparticle. We estimate the strength and lifetime of the current for typical material parameters and find that it should be experimentally observable.

  8. Chiral pumping effect induced by rotating electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Shu; Fukushima, Kenji; Oka, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    We propose an experimental setup using 3D Dirac semimetals to access a novel phenomenon induced by the chiral anomaly. We show that the combination of a magnetic field and a circularly polarized laser induces a finite charge density with an accompanying axial current. This is because the circularly polarized laser breaks time-reversal symmetry and the Dirac point splits into two Weyl points, which results in an axial-vector field. We elucidate the appearance of the axial-vector field with the help of the Floquet theory by deriving an effective Hamiltonian for high-frequency electric fields. This anomalous charge density, i.e., the chiral pumping effect, is a phenomenon reminiscent of the chiral magnetic effect with a chiral chemical potential. We explicitly compute the pumped density and the axial-current expectation value. We also take account of coupling to the chiral magnetic effect to calculate a balanced distribution of charge and chirality in a material that behaves as a chiral battery.

  9. Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  10. Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis Possibly Induced by Atorvastatin and Rosuvastatin. Is Statin Induced Pancreatitis a Class Effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolan JG

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Few data exist about the incidence of drug-induced pancreatitis in the general population. Drugs are related to the etiology of pancreatitis in about 1.4-2% of cases. While statins are generally well tolerated they have been known to be associated with pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis has been reported in a few cases treated with atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 77-year-old patient who developed acute pancreatitis after treatment with rosuvastatin, which resolved on withdrawal of the medication. She had a similar episode of pancreatitis a year ago precipitated by atorvastatin, which resolved on withdrawal. Extensive workup on both occasions failed to reveal any other etiology for the pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge this is the first report of rosuvastatin-induced pancreatitis. The occurrence of pancreatitis with two different statins in our patient argues that statins induced pancreatitis may be a class-effect of statins. With statin prescriptions on the rise clinicians need to be aware of this complication of statin treatment and remember that the newest statin, rosuvastatin is not dissimilar to the other statins in causing pancreatitis.

  11. Effective cosmological equations of induced f(R) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolopoulos, Pantelis S.; Tetradis, Nikolaos [Department of Physics, University of Athens, University Campus, Zographou 157 84 (Greece); Brouzakis, Nikolaos, E-mail: papost@phys.uoa.gr, E-mail: nbruzak@ifae.es, E-mail: ntetrad@phys.uoa.gr [Departament de Física, Univeristat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-08-01

    We expand the study of generalized brane cosmologies by allowing for an f( R-tilde ) gravity term on the brane, with R-tilde the curvature scalar derived from the induced metric. We also include arbitrary matter components on the brane and in the five-dimensional bulk. At low energies, the effect of the bulk on the brane evolution can be described through a mirage component, termed generalized dark radiation, in the effective four-dimensional field equations. Using the covariant formalism, we derive the exact form of these equations. We also derive an effective conservation equation involving the brane matter and the generalized dark radiation. At low energies the coupled brane-bulk system has a purely four-dimensional description. The applications of the formalism include generalizations of the Starobinsky model and the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati cosmology.

  12. Modeling of strain-induced Pockels effect in Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Manganelli, Costanza Luisa; Bonati, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We propose and validate a theoretical model to describe the strain-induced linear electro-optic (Pockels) effect in centro-symmetric crystals. The general formulation is presented and the specific case of the strained silicon is investigated in detail because of its attractive properties for integrated optics. The outcome of this analysis is a linear relation between the second order susceptibility tensor and the strain gradient tensor, depending on fifteen coefficients. By studying the case of two Mach-Zehnder interferometers present in the literature, we identify five of these coefficients as the most relevant ones and we estimate them by comparing with experimental data. The proposed model greatly simplifies the description of the electro-optic effect in strained silicon waveguides, providing a powerful and effective tool for design and optimization of optical devices.

  13. Focused Ion Beam Induced Effects on MOS Transistor Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramo, Marsha T.; Antoniou, Nicholas; Campbell, Ann N.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Hembree, Charles E.; Jessing, Jeffrey R.; Soden, Jerry M.; Swanson, Scot E.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Vanderlinde, William E.

    1999-07-28

    We report on recent studies of the effects of 50 keV focused ion beam (FIB) exposure on MOS transistors. We demonstrate that the changes in value of transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, V{sub t}) are essentially the same for exposure to a Ga+ ion beam at 30 and 50 keV under the same exposure conditions. We characterize the effects of FIB exposure on test transistors fabricated in both 0.5 {micro}m and 0.225 {micro}m technologies from two different vendors. We report on the effectiveness of overlying metal layers in screening MOS transistors from FIB-induced damage and examine the importance of ion dose rate and the physical dimensions of the exposed area.

  14. Irradiation spectrum and ionization-induced diffusion effects in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    There are two main components to the irradiation spectrum which need to be considered in radiation effects studies on nonmetals, namely the primary knock-on atom energy spectrum and ionizing radiation. The published low-temperature studies on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO suggest that the defect production is nearly independent of the average primary knock-on atom energy, in sharp contrast to the situation for metals. On the other hand, ionizing radiation has been shown to exert a pronounced influence on the microstructural evolution of both semiconductors and insulators under certain conditions. Recent work on the microstructure of ion-irradiated ceramics is summarized, which provides evidence for significant ionization-induced diffusion. Polycrystalline samples of MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} were irradiated with various ions ranging from 1 MeV H{sup +} to 4 MeV Zr{sup +} ions at temperatures between 25 and 650{degrees}C. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the depth-dependent microstructural of the irradiated specimens. Dislocation loop nucleation was effectively suppressed in specimens irradiated with light ions, whereas the growth rate of dislocation loops was enhanced. The sensitivity to irradiation spectrum is attributed to ionization-induced diffusion. The interstitial migration energies in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are estimated to be {le}0.4 eV and {le}0.8 eV, respectively for irradiation conditions where ionization-induced diffusion effects are expected to be negligible.

  15. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paro, Rita [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy); Tiboni, Gian Mario [Department of Medicine and Aging, Section of Reproductive Sciences, University “G. D' Annunzio”, Chieti-Pescara (Italy); Buccione, Roberto [Tumor Cell Invasion Laboratory, Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Chieti (Italy); Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy); Canipari, Rita [Department of Anatomy, Histology, Forensic Medicine and Orthopedics, Section of Histology and Embryology, School of Pharmacy and Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Cecconi, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.cecconi@cc.univaq.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. Highlights: ► The fungicide mancozeb affects oocyte spindle morphology and fertilization rate. ► We investigated the toxic effects of mancozeb on mouse and human granulosa cells. ► Granulosa cells modify their morphology and expression level of p53. ► Mancozeb induces a premalignant-like status in exposed cells.

  16. Proceedings of photo-induced space charge effects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume consists of the proceedings of the Symposium on Photo-Induced Space Charge Effects in Semiconductors: Photoconductivity, Spectroscopy and Electro-Optics. The symposium was held at the Spring Meeting of the Materials Research Society in San Francisco from April 29 to May 1. Our motivation for organizing this symposium was fueled by a persistent feeling that several independent research communities were following much of the same physics. However, the lines of communication among the communities were relatively tenuous. These communities include the electrooptic, photodetector, photorefractive and defect spectroscopy communities. In each of these disciplines, one of the primary concerns is the presence of photo-induced space charge. Although there are problems that are specific to each group, there are many effects that they all have in common, with identical underlying physics. Despite the strong similarities, separate approaches and nomenclature have built up in the individual communities. Jargon form one community may be meaningless to another, although the physical effects themselves are easily recognizable

  17. Effect of dopant on metal induced lateral crystallization rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we examined the effects of dopants, the quality of the Si thin film, and annealing conditions on the metal-induced lateral crystallization (MILC) phenomenon. When amorphous Si was doped with phosphorus, MILC barely occurred. Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition boron doped Si crystallized without Ni at 550 °C. Under other conditions, MILC rate of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) boron doped Si was higher than that of PECVD intrinsic Si. And MILC rate of samples annealed in vacuum was higher than that of samples annealed in H2 ambient. When PECVD intrinsic Si was doped with boron only under the Ni-deposited area, the MILC rate was lower than that of PECVD intrinsic Si. However, when PECVD intrinsic Si was doped with phosphorus only under the Ni-deposited area, the MILC rate was almost the same as that of PECVD intrinsic Si. To explain these phenomena, we suggested an appropriate model. - Highlights: • We examined effects of dopant on metal-induced lateral crystallization (MILC) rate. • When amorphous silicon (a-Si) was doped with boron, MILC rate was increased. • When a-Si was doped with phosphorus, MILC barely occurred. • We suggested an appropriate model to explain effects of dopant on MILC rate

  18. Protective Effect of HSP25 on Radiation Induced Tissue Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control of cancer by irradiation therapy alone or in conjunction with combination chemotherapy is often limited by organ specific toxicity. Ionizing irradiation toxicity is initiated by damage to normal tissue near the tumor target and within the transit volume of radiotherapy beams. Irradiation-induced cellular, tissue, and organ damage is mediated by acute effects, which can be dose limiting. A latent period follows recovery from the acute reaction, then chronic irradiation fibrosis (late effects) pose a second cause of organ failure. HSP25/27 has been suggested to protect cells against apoptotic cell death triggered by hyperthermia, ionizing radiation, oxidative stress, Fas ligand, and cytotoxic drugs. And several mechanisms have been proposed to account for HSP27-mediated apoptotic protection. However radioprotective effect of HSP25/27 in vivo system has not yet been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of exogenous HSP25 expression, as delivered by adenoviral vectors, to protect animal from radiation induced tissue damage

  19. Protective effect of crocin on liver toxicity induced by morphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza; khashiadeh, Mojtaba; Roshankhah, Shiva; Kakabaraei, Seyran; Jalili, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Crocin, a bioactive molecule of saffron can be purely isolated from the saffron extract. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. Morphine is an opioid analgesic drug. It is mainly metabolized in liver and causes devastating effects. It can increase the generation of free radicals. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of crocin against morphine-induced toxicity in the mouse liver. In this study, various doses of crocin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) and crocin plus morphine were administered interaperitoneally once daily to 48 male mice for 20 consecutive days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups of 6 each. The liver weight and histology, aspartate amino transferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum nitric oxide levels were studied. The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased liver weight and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein diameters, liver enzyme levels, and blood serum nitric oxide level compared to saline group (P<0.05). However, crocin administration significantly boosted liver weight and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes and nitric oxide levels in all groups compared to the group received morphine alone (P<0.05). It seems that crocin administration could protect the liver damage induced by morphine. The antioxidant effect of crocin may be a major reason for its positive impact on liver parameters. PMID:27168751

  20. Protective effect of crocin on liver toxicity induced by morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza; Khashiadeh, Mojtaba; Roshankhah, Shiva; Kakabaraei, Seyran; Jalili, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Crocin, a bioactive molecule of saffron can be purely isolated from the saffron extract. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. Morphine is an opioid analgesic drug. It is mainly metabolized in liver and causes devastating effects. It can increase the generation of free radicals. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of crocin against morphine-induced toxicity in the mouse liver. In this study, various doses of crocin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) and crocin plus morphine were administered interaperitoneally once daily to 48 male mice for 20 consecutive days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups of 6 each. The liver weight and histology, aspartate amino transferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum nitric oxide levels were studied. The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased liver weight and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein diameters, liver enzyme levels, and blood serum nitric oxide level compared to saline group (P<0.05). However, crocin administration significantly boosted liver weight and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes and nitric oxide levels in all groups compared to the group received morphine alone (P<0.05). It seems that crocin administration could protect the liver damage induced by morphine. The antioxidant effect of crocin may be a major reason for its positive impact on liver parameters. PMID:27168751

  1. Effect of surrounding gases and water vapor on the induced electric current associated with a laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuta, Hideyuki

    2016-04-01

    The effect of surrounding gases and water vapor on the laser-induced electric current was investigated. Laser-induced plasma was generated on an aluminum alloy target. The laser-induced plasma was optically examined to estimate the excitation temperature and electron density in room air. There was a linear relationship between the maximum amplitude of the laser-induced current and the electron density. As the electron mean free path of the surrounding gas increased, the observed amplitude of the current increased. The amplitude of the induced current signal in dry air became maximum upon mixing with the optimum amount of water vapor. This enhancement of the induced current signal might be due to the large relative permittivity of water vapor. The laser-induced plasma as a whole seems to be a low-temperature plasma consisting of electrons, a large amount of cold surrounding gas, injected hot atoms, hot ions, and hot particles.

  2. ANTIOXIDANT EFFECT OF ALOE VERA IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Sethi et al

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate antidiabetic and antioxidant potential of Aloe vera (AV in alloxan induced diabetes in albino rabbits. Experimental Diabetes was induced in rabbits with alloxan(80mg/Kg body weightand animals showing fasting blood glucose levels more than 250mg/dl were considered as diabetics and divided into four groups of six each (n=6. Group I: Normal control rabbits, Group II: Alloxan induced diabetic rabbits, Group III: Diabetic rabbits received AV gel extract (300 mg/Kg in aqueous solution for 21 days, Group IV: diabetic rabbits given glibenclamide (600ug/kg in aqueous solution. All the drugs were administered orally (using an intra gastric tube in a single dose in the morning for 21 days. Blood samples were collected from the marginal vein of pinna of overnight fasted rabbits (Blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, Malondialdehyde (MDA, reduced glutathione (GSH, total thiols (PSH and Superoxide dismutase (SOD. Oral administration of AV showed potent antihyperglycemic and anti-lipidperoxidative effect in diabetic animals. Simultaneously, the levels of protective antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GSH and PSH were significantly increased with AV supplementation. The results suggest potent antidiabetic and antioxidant potential of AV in experimental diabetes, and thus Aloe vera can be used as an alternative remedy for treatment of diabetes mellitus and its complications.

  3. Effects of vitamins on chromium(VI)-induced damage.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1991-01-01

    The effects of vitamin E and vitamin B2 on DNA damage and cellular reduction of chromium(VI) were investigated using Chinese hamster V-79 cells. Pretreatment with alpha-tocopherol succinate (vitamin E) resulted in a decrease of DNA single-strand breaks produced by Na2CrO4, while similar treatment with riboflavin (vitamin B2) enhanced levels of DNA breaks. In contrast, levels of DNA-protein crosslinks induced by Na2CrO4 were unaffected by these vitamins. Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies s...

  4. Effects of Cadmium on BMP Induced Bone Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秋生; 徐顺清

    2003-01-01

    To demonstrate the direct effects of cadmium on activities of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), a complex containing BMP and cadmium chloride (CdCl2) was implanted beneath the abdominal skin of young male Wistar rats. The activity of BMP was studied by observing the histological changes, and measuring the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and acid phosphatase (ACP) and calcium content of the implants at different time points. Our results showed that during bone formation induced by BMP, cadmium inhibited the activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and slowed the deposition of calcium. It is concluded that cadmium can directly affect biological activities of BMP directly.

  5. Pharmacological modulation of late radio-induced side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After normal tissue exposure to radiation therapy, late side effects can occur and may reduce patients' quality of life due to their progressive nature. Late toxicities occurrence is the main limiting factor of radiotherapy. Various biological disorders related to irradiation are involved in the development of late toxicities including fibrosis. The present review will focus on the recent physiopathological and molecular mechanisms described to be involved in the development of late radio-induced toxicities, that provide therapeutic perspective for pharmaco-modulation. (authors)

  6. EFFECT OF ANTHOCYANIN FRACTION ON CISPLATIN-INDUCED NEPHROTOXICITY

    OpenAIRE

    Adikay Sreedevi; Belide Pavani

    2012-01-01

    Present study was designed to evaluate the effect of anthocyanin fraction of Syzygium cumini on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in male Albino rats. Anthocyanin fraction was administered by gastric intubation at two dose levels. Animals were divided into 5 groups. Group I animals received vehicle. On day 1, Group II animals received cisplatin (6 mg/kg, i,p., single dose). Group III (7.5mg/kg) and IV (15mg/kg) received anthocyanin fraction respectively at 1 hr before, 24 hr and 48 hr after ci...

  7. Barocaloric effect and the pressure induced solid state refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current refrigerators are based on the heating and cooling of fluids under external pressure variation. The great inconvenience of this refrigeration technology is the damage caused to the environment by the refrigerant fluids. In this paper, we discuss the magnetic barocaloric effect, i.e., the heating or cooling of magnetic materials under pressure variation and its application in the construction of refrigerators using solid magnetic compounds as refrigerant materials and pressure as the external agent. The discussion presented in this paper points out that such a pressure induced solid state refrigerator can be very interesting because it is not harmful to the environment and can exhibit a good performance.

  8. Effect of Vitamin C on Styrene Induced Respiratory Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Tayebeh Pol; Massumeh Ahmadizadeh; Mohamad Boazar

    2011-01-01

    Styrene (ethylbenzene) is widely used as a solvent in many industrial setting. Occupational exposure to ST can result in pulmonary toxicity. For better understanding of the mechanism by which styrene caused lung injury, this study was undertaken to investigate the effect of styrene on rat respiratory epithelial cells. The role of vitamin C (Vit C) on styrene induced toxicity was also investigated. Adult male rats were given ST (ip) at doses of 0, 200, 400 or 600 mg/kg. Another series of rats ...

  9. Force-induced stretched state: effects of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Mishra, Garima

    2008-07-01

    A model of self-avoiding walks with suitable constraint has been developed to study the effect of temperature on a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the constant force ensemble. Our exact calculations for small chains show that the extension (reaction coordinate) may increase or decrease with the temperature depending on the applied force. The simple model developed here, which incorporates semimicroscopic details of base direction, provides an explanation of the force-induced transitions in ssDNA as observed in experiments. PMID:18763982

  10. Chlorambucil effectively induces deletion mutations in mouse germ cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Cacheiro, N L; Bangham, J W; Russell, W. L.; Shelby, M D

    1989-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil was found to be more effective than x-rays or any chemical investigated to date in inducing high yields of mouse germ-line mutations that appear to be deletions or other structural changes. Induction of mutations involving seven specific loci was studied after exposures of various male germ-cell stages to chlorambucil at 10-25 mg/kg. A total of 60,750 offspring was scored. Mutation rates in spermatogonial stem cells were not significantly increased over...

  11. Effects of endostatin on C6 glioma-induced edema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li-juan; LIN Zhi-xiong; KANG De-zhi; WENG Shen-mei; LIN Jian-hua; HUANG Qiang; ZHANG Peng-fei

    2011-01-01

    Background Glioma-induced edema is considered as one of the most pathological characteristics of glioma and a significant source of morbidity and mortality.New strategies are needed for the treatment of peritumoral edema in glioma.Endostatin has been proven to be beneficial as an anti-angiogenic agent in experimental gliomas,but the effects are unclear.This study aimed to investigate the effects of endostatin on C6 glioma-induced edema.Methods Tumorigenic mice were established by subcutaneous injection of three glioma cell lines,C6-null cells and stable transfected-C6 cells overexpressing mock vector (C6-mock cells) and endostatin (C6-endo cells).Endostatin expression in xenograft C6 glioma was determined by immunostaining and Western blotting.Glioma-induced edema and tumor vessel permeability were assayed.The effect of endostatin on vascular enodothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vivo was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).The number of vesiculo-vascuolar organelles (VVOs) formed in tumor endothelia was calculated using electron microscopy.Data were analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Dunnett's post hoc test for multiple comparisons to the control groups.Results Overexpression of endostatin (C6-endo cells) significantly suppressed tumor growth and reduced tumor edema and vessel permeability.ELISA analysis showed that the level of VEGF protein was markedly decreased in tumor from C6-endo cells compared with tumor from C6-null cells and C6-mock cells.Similar results were obtained by Q-PCR.Furthermore,the number of VVOs observed in tumor from C6-endo mice was significantly reduced compared with tumor from C6-null cells or C6-mock cells.Conclusions Our data provide primary evidence that endostatin reduces glioma-induced edema and vascular permeability.Using endostatin may be an effective strategy for treating glioma edema.

  12. Effect of atorvastatin on preventing contrast-induced nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effects of atorvastatin on contrast-induced renal function and urinary protein change in patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic coronary intervention. Methods: Two hundred and forty-six patients who underwent coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomized to receive atorvastatin (40 mg, qn, n=123) or no atorvastatin (n=123) treatment 3 days before coronary angiography. All patients received hydrated therapy. Serum creatinine (Scr), urinary αl-microglobulin (αl-MG), and urinary albumin (mALB) were checked for evidence of tubular or glomerular damage at start, and 36 to 48 hours after the administration of a radiocontrast agent. High-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels, urinary αl-MG/ urinary creatinine(Ucr) and mALB/ Ucr were also assessed at the same time. Creatinine clearance(Ccr) was calculated according to Cockcroft-Gault formulas basing on serum creatinine. Results: (1) In the control group and atorvastatin-treated group, comparison with the value before coronary angiography or PCI, urinary αl-MG/ Ucr, mALB/ Ucr, Scr and hsCRP significantly increased from 36 to 48 hours after angiography or PCI (Pl-MG/ Ucr significantly increased at the 2nd day after angiography or PCI in the control group (P<0.05), incidence of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) significantly increased too (8.13% vs 0.81%, P<0.05). Conclusions: Contrast media induces light renal function damage. Pretreatment with atorvastatin 40 mg/qn for 3 days could significantly reduce procedural inflammatory reaction and prevent contrast-induced nephropathy. (authors)

  13. Antioxidant Effect of Curcumin Extracts in Induced Diabetic Wister Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.K. Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the protective effect of curcumin on streptozotocin (STZ-induced oxidative stress in various tissues of albino Wister rats. Adult male rats (8 weeks, weighing 195 to 225 g was made diabetic by injecting STZ (65 mg kg-1 body weight intraperitoneally. During the whole experimental period, animals were fed with a balanced commercial chow and water ad libitum. Diabetic rats given either water or ethanolic curcumin extracts (80 mg kg-1 body weight in aqueous suspension daily for a period of seven weeks. The levels of oxidative stress parameters and activity of antioxidant enzymes were determined in various tissues. STZ-induced hyperglycemia resulted in increased glucose level, glycosylated haemoglobin in red blood cells and other tissues and altered antioxidant enzyme activities such as AST and ALT. These elevated blood parameters and enzymatic activities induced by hyperglycemia were significantly restored to near normal by oral administration of curcumin once daily for 7 weeks, as compared to untreated rats. There was a significant elevation in the level of liver and kidney malondialdhyde (MDA, while the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase (SOD and CAT were significantly decreased in STZ rats which also restored to normal after curcumin treatment. The results obtained indicated that ethanolic extract has more potent protective action than water extract against all hyperglycemic parameters. Biochemical observations were supplemented by histopathological examination of liver and kidney sections. Interestingly, feeding curcumin to the diabetic rats controlled oxidative stress by inhibiting the increase in TBARS and protein carbonyls and reversing altered antioxidant enzyme activities without altering the hyperglycemic state in most of the tissues. So, curcumin appear to be beneficial in preventing diabetes-induced oxidative stress in rats despite unaltered hyperglycemic status.

  14. Radioprotective effects of melatonin on radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the mechanisms proposed to explain lens opacification is the oxidation of crystallins, either by radiation or reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been shown that melatonin has both an anti-peroxidative effect on several tissues and a scavenger effect on ROS. The purpose of this study was to determine the antioxidant role of melatonin (5 mg/kg/day) against radiation-induced cataract in the lens after total-cranium irradiation of rats with a single dose of 5 Gy. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Control group received neither melatonin nor irradiation. Irradiated rats (IR) and melatonin+irradiated rats (IR+Mel) groups were exposed to total cranium irradiation of 5 Gy in a single dose by using a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. IR+Mel and melatonin (Mel) groups were administered 5 mg/kg melatonin daily by intraperitoneal injections during ten days. Chylack's cataract classification was used in this study. At the end of the 10th day, the rats were killed and their eyes were enucleated to measure the antioxidant enzymes i.e. the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and lipid peroxidation level (malondialdehyde (MDA)). Irradiation significantly increased the MDA level, as an end product of lipid peroxidation, and also significantly decreased SOD and GSH-Px activity, emphasizing the generation of increased oxidative stress. Rats injected with melatonin only did not cause cataract formation. Melatonin supplementation with irradiation significantly increased the activity of SOD and GSH-Px enzymes and significantly decreased the MDA level. Total cranium irradiation of 5 Gy in a single dose enhanced cataract formation, and melatonin supplementation protected the lenses from radiation-induced cataract formation. Our results suggest that supplementing cancer patients with adjuvant therapy of melatonin may reduce patients suffering from toxic therapeutic regimens such as chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and may provide

  15. NLRP3 inflammasome activation drives bystander cone photoreceptor cell death in a P23H rhodopsin model of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A; Metcalfe, Andrew L; Bashar, Abu E; Sivak, Olena; Yanai, Anat; Mohammadi, Zeinabsadat; Moritz, Orson L; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2016-04-15

    The molecular signaling leading to cell death in hereditary neurological diseases such as retinal degeneration is incompletely understood. Previous neuroprotective studies have focused on apoptotic pathways; however, incomplete suppression of cell death with apoptosis inhibitors suggests that other mechanisms are at play. Here, we report that different signaling pathways are activated in rod and cone photoreceptors in the P23H rhodopsin mutant rat, a model representing one of the commonest forms of retinal degeneration. Up-regulation of the RIP1/RIP3/DRP1 axis and markedly improved survival with necrostatin-1 treatment highlighted necroptosis as a major cell-death pathway in degenerating rod photoreceptors. Conversely, up-regulation of NLRP3 and caspase-1, expression of mature IL-1β and IL-18 and improved cell survival with N-acetylcysteine treatment suggested that inflammasome activation and pyroptosis was the major cause of cone cell death. This was confirmed by generation of the P23H mutation on an Nlrp3-deficient background, which preserved cone viability. Furthermore, Brilliant Blue G treatment inhibited inflammasome activation, indicating that the 'bystander cell death' phenomenon was mediated through the P2RX7 cell-surface receptor. Here, we identify a new pathway in cones for bystander cell death, a phenomenon important in development and disease in many biological systems. In other retinal degeneration models different cell-death pathways are activated, which suggests that the particular pathways that are triggered are to some extent genotype-specific. This also implies that neuroprotective strategies to limit retinal degeneration need to be customized; thus, different combinations of inhibitors will be needed to target the specific pathways in any given disease. PMID:27008885

  16. Game Analysis of Bystanders Phenomenon%“旁观者”现象的博弈分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建先

    2014-01-01

    From the perspective of Game analysis,hitchhiking psychological,unsuited rules and moral failure are the three deep-seated causes of bystanders phenomenon.We can find three paths to improve bystanders phenomenon.That is changing Game payoffs from Game model,adjusting Game strategy form Game rules and constraining the Game paradigm from Game moral.On the contrast path of Game strategy between hitchhiking psychological and Game model,between China Peng Yu case and Belgium robbery case,between those who will suffer with humility and self-comparison moral re-straint,the thesis proposes the behavior patterns of Game model,behavior adaptation of Game rules and ethical behavior of Game paradigm.%从博弈视角,分析旁观者现象存在的深层原因:搭车心理、规则不适和道德缺失;从博弈思维,寻找旁观者现象的路径改善:博弈模型---改变博弈支付,博弈规则---策略博弈调适,博弈道德---约束博弈范式;从博弈策略,运用两两对比方式:“搭车心理”与“博弈模型”,中国“彭宇案”与比利时“抢劫案”,“谁让谁吃亏”与“自我道德约束”等对比,提出博弈模型的行为方式、博弈规则的行为调适和博弈道德的行为范式。

  17. Radiation induced effects in the developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The embryo and the human foetus are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation and this sensitivity presents various qualitative and quantitative functional changes during intra-uterine development. Apart from radiation induced carcinogenesis, the most serious consequence of prenatal exposure in human beings is severe mental retardation. The principal data on radiation effects on human beings in the development of the central nervous system come form epidemiological studies carried out in individuals exposed in utero during the atomic explosion at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These observations demonstrate the existence of a time of maximum radiosensitivity between the weeks 8 and 15 of the gestational period, a period in which the proliferation and neuronal migration takes place. Determination of the characteristics of dose-response relationship and the possible existence of a threshold dose of radiation effects on the development of the central nervous system is relevant to radiation protection against low dose radiation and the establishment of dose limits for occupational exposure and the public. Studies were conducted on the generation of nitrous-oxide and its relation with the production of active species of oxygen in brains of exposed rats in utero exposed to doses of up to 1 Gy during their maximum radiosensitivity. The possible role of the mechanism of radiation induced damage in the development of the central nervous system is discussed

  18. Effect of Radiation-Induced Amorphization on Smectite Dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of radiation-induced amorphization of smectite were investigated using artificial irradiation. Beams of 925 MeV Xenon ions with radiation dose reaching 73 MGy were used to simulate the effects generated by alpha recoil nuclei or fission products in the context of high level nuclear waste repository. Amorphization was controlled by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. An important coalescence of the smectite sheets was observed which lead to a loss of interparticle porosity. The amorphization is revealed by a loss of long-range structure and accompanied by dehydroxylation. The dissolution rate far-from-equilibrium shows that the amount of silica in solution is two times larger in the amorphous sample than in the reference clay, a value which may be enhanced by orders of magnitude when considering the relative surface area of the samples. Irradiation-induced amorphization thus facilitates dissolution of the clay-derived material. This has to be taken into account for the safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repository, particularly in a scenario of leakage of the waste package which would deliver alpha emitters able to amorphize smectite after a limited period of time. (authors)

  19. The Effect of Ranitidine on Olanzapine-Induced Weight Gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ranjbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced weight gain is a disturbing side effect of Olanzapine that affects the quality of life in psychotic patients. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Ranitidine in attenuating or preventing Olanzapine-induced weight gain. A parallel 2-arm clinical trial was done on 52 patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective and schizophreniform disorders who received Olanzapine for the first time. All these were first-episode admitted patients. They were randomly allocated to receive either Ranitidine or placebo. The trend of body mass index (BMI was compared between groups over 16-week course of treatment. Mean weight was 62.3 (SD: 9.6 kg at baseline. Thirty-three subjects (63.5% had positive family history of obesity. The average BMI increment was 1.1 for Ranitidine group and 2.4 for the placebo group. The multivariate analysis showed this effect to be independent of sex, family history of obesity, and baseline BMI value. The longitudinal modeling after controlling for baseline values failed to show the whole trend slope to be different. Although the slight change in trend’s slope puts forward a hypothesis that combined use of Ranitidine and Olanzapine may attenuate the weight gain long run, this needs to be retested in future larger scale long-term studies. This trial is registered with IRCT.ir 201009112181N5.

  20. The protective effect of ketotifen in exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, M V; Fernández, M; de la Cuesta, C G; Oehling, A

    1988-01-01

    The present study evaluates the protective action of ketotifen on exercise-induced bronchospasm in patients diagnosed with bronchial asthma of different aetiologies. The patients were classified in 2 groups. The first group with seasonal asthma was made up of patients with pollen hypersensitivity, while the second group with perennial asthma was made up of patients with bacterial aetiology or sensitivity to the Dermatophagoides mite. Spirometry and airway resistance measurements (in basal conditions, 5 to 10 minutes after a resistance test which consisted of 6 minutes' free running on a treadmill) was performed on each patient. Those patients in which significant spirometry or Raw alterations were detected received a 15-day treatment of ketotifen (a dose of 1 mg every 12 hours); after this time, the tests mentioned before were repeated. We found that in the seasonal asthma group, ketotifen was effective in protecting against exercise. However, we did not observe the same effect in the perennial asthma group. In the light of these results, we propose the possible existence of different mechanisms in triggering off exercise-induced bronchospasm, according to their aetiologies. PMID:3394595

  1. The Chiral Magnetic Effect and Anomaly-Induced Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E

    2013-01-01

    The Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is the phenomenon of electric charge separation along the external magnetic field that is induced by the chirality imbalance. The CME is a macroscopic quantum effect - it is a manifestation of the chiral anomaly creating a collective motion in Dirac sea. Because the chirality imbalance is related to the global topology of gauge fields, the CME current is topologically protected and hence non-dissipative even in the presence of strong interactions. As a result, the CME and related quantum phenomena affect the hydrodynamical and transport behavior of systems possessing chiral fermions, from the quark-gluon plasma to chiral materials. The goal of the present review is to provide an elementary introduction into the main ideas underlying the physics of CME, a historical perspective, and a guide to the rapidly growing literature on this topic.

  2. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-06-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (subjective reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli.

  3. Microscopic effective reaction theory for deuteron-induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Neoh, Yuen Sim; Minomo, Kosho; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic effective reaction theory is applied to deuteron-induced reactions. A reaction model-space characterized by a $p+n+{\\rm A}$ three-body model is adopted, where A is the target nucleus, and the nucleon-target potential is described by a microscopic folding model based on an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear medium and a one-body nuclear density of A. The three-body scattering wave function in the model space is obtained with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC), and the eikonal reaction theory (ERT), an extension of CDCC, is applied to the calculation of neutron removal cross sections. Elastic scattering cross sections of deuteron on $^{58}$Ni and $^{208}$Pb target nuclei at several energies are compared with experimental data. The total reaction cross sections and the neutron removal cross sections at 56 MeV on 14 target nuclei are calculated and compared with experimental values.

  4. EFFECT OF OZONE ON DRUG-INDUCED SLEEPING TIME IN MICE PRETREATED WITH MIXED-FUNCTION OXIDASE INDUCERS AND INHIBITORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to investigate the effect of ozone in prolonging pentobarbital (PEN)-induced sleeping time (S.T.). Since ozone is a common air pollutant, an ozone-induced alteration of mechanisms of drug action could have public health implications. It was shown that a 5-h...

  5. Non-targeted effects as a paradigm breaking evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The finding that mammalian cells and tissues and whole organisms react differently at high than at low doses of ionizing radiation questions the scientific validity of the linear no-threshold concept for low-dose exposures. Indeed, the classical paradigm of radiobiology was based on the concept that all radiation effects on living matter are due to the direct action of radiation. Meanwhile, the discovery of non-targeted and delayed radiation effects has challenged this concept, and one might ask whether a new paradigm has to be developed to provide more realistic protection against low radiation doses. The present overview summarizes recent findings on the low-dose radiation-induced bystander effect, genomic instability, radiation hypersensitivity, hormesis, radioadaptive and transgenerational responses. For these, some common features can be recognized. Most of these phenomena include (1) intra- and intercellular signaling, involving reactive oxygen species (ROS). This signaling may be transient or persistent, and may involve the release of cytokines (bystander effect, genomic instability) or epigenetic changes (translesional responses), (2) a large variability of responses depending on the type of radiation, genotype (DNA repair capacity) and physiological state of the cells and tissues. Many more parameters are involved in responses at low doses than at high doses, and different pathways are activated. At low doses, non-linear responses are obtained that are not compatible with the LNT concept. At present, more work is needed to identify the essential parameters involved and to provide a basis for proper modelling of low-dose radiation health effects for radiation protection purposes.

  6. Non-targeted effects as a paradigm breaking evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, Dietrich, E-mail: dietrich.averbeck@curie.u-psud.fr [Institut Curie-Section de Recherche, UMR 2027 CNRS/I.C., Bat. 110, Centre Universitaire, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-05-01

    The finding that mammalian cells and tissues and whole organisms react differently at high than at low doses of ionizing radiation questions the scientific validity of the linear no-threshold concept for low-dose exposures. Indeed, the classical paradigm of radiobiology was based on the concept that all radiation effects on living matter are due to the direct action of radiation. Meanwhile, the discovery of non-targeted and delayed radiation effects has challenged this concept, and one might ask whether a new paradigm has to be developed to provide more realistic protection against low radiation doses. The present overview summarizes recent findings on the low-dose radiation-induced bystander effect, genomic instability, radiation hypersensitivity, hormesis, radioadaptive and transgenerational responses. For these, some common features can be recognized. Most of these phenomena include (1) intra- and intercellular signaling, involving reactive oxygen species (ROS). This signaling may be transient or persistent, and may involve the release of cytokines (bystander effect, genomic instability) or epigenetic changes (translesional responses), (2) a large variability of responses depending on the type of radiation, genotype (DNA repair capacity) and physiological state of the cells and tissues. Many more parameters are involved in responses at low doses than at high doses, and different pathways are activated. At low doses, non-linear responses are obtained that are not compatible with the LNT concept. At present, more work is needed to identify the essential parameters involved and to provide a basis for proper modelling of low-dose radiation health effects for radiation protection purposes.

  7. Herbal Medicines for the Treatment of Cancer Chemotherapy-Induced Side Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Shunsuke eOhnishi; Hiroshi eTakeda

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Japanese herbal medicines, called Kampo, have beneficial effects on cancer chemotherapy-induced side effects. Rikkunshito ameliorates cisplatin-induced anorexia through an antagonistic effect on the 5-HT receptors and by increasing the serum ghrelin levels. Hangeshashinto improves irinotecan-induced diarrhea and chemotherapy-induced mucositis by inhibiting the activity of β-glucuronidase as well as the synthesis of prostaglandin E2. Goshajinkigan prevents o...

  8. Herbal medicines for the treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced side effects

    OpenAIRE

    Ohnishi, Shunsuke; TAKEDA, HIROSHI

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Japanese herbal medicines, called Kampo, have beneficial effects on cancer chemotherapy-induced side effects. Rikkunshito ameliorates cisplatin-induced anorexia through an antagonistic effect on the 5-HT receptors and by increasing the serum ghrelin levels. Hangeshashinto improves irinotecan-induced diarrhea and chemotherapy-induced mucositis by inhibiting the activity of β-glucuronidase as well as the synthesis of prostaglandin E2. Goshajinkigan prevents o...

  9. Alleviating effects of morin against experimentally-induced diabetic osteopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuohashish Hatem M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant flavonoids are emerging as potent therapeutic drugs effective against a wide range of aging diseases particularly bone metabolic disorders. Morin (3,5,7,20,40-pentahydroxyflavone, a member of flavonols, is an important bioactive compound by interacting with nucleic acids, enzymes and protein. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of morin on diabetic osteopenia in rats. Methods Streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic model was used by considering 300 mg/dl fasting glucose level as diabetic. Morin (15 and 30 mg/kg was treated for five consecutive weeks to diabetic rats. Serum levels of glucose, insulin, deoxypyridinoline cross links (DPD, osteocalcin (OC, bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP, telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β, interleukin 6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS and reduced glutathione (GSH were estimated. Femoral bones were taken for micro CT scan to measure trabecular bone mineral density (BMD and other morphometric parameters. Results Significant bone loss was documented as the level of bone turnover parameters including DPD, OC, BALP and CTX were increased in serum of diabetic rats. Morin treatment significantly attenuated these elevated levels. Bone micro-CT scan of diabetic rats showed a significant impairment in trabecular bone microarchitecture, density and other morphometric parameters. These impairments were significantly ameliorated by morin administration. Serum levels of glucose, TBARS, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly elevated, while the level of insulin and GSH was decreased in diabetic rats. These serum changes in diabetic rats were bring back to normal values after 5 weeks morin treatment. Conclusion These findings revealed the protective effect of morin against diabetic induced osteopenia. We believed that this effect is through its both the anti

  10. Effect of pH on radiation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The effect of environmental pH on the radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cells in vitro was investigated. Materials and Methods: SCK mammary adenocarcinoma cells of A/J mice were irradiated with γ-rays using a 137Cs irradiator and incubated in media of different pHs. After incubation at 37 degree sign C for 24-120 hrs., the extent of apoptosis was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA, in situ TUNEL staining, flow cytometry, and release of 3H from 3H-thymidine labeled cells. The membrane integrity, using the trypan blue exclusion method, and the clonogenicity of the cells were also determined. Results: Irradiation with 2-12 Gy of γ-rays induced apoptosis in pH 7.5 medium within 48 hrs. The radiation-induced apoptosis progressively declined as the medium pH was lowered so that little apoptosis occurred in 48 hrs. after irradiation with 12 Gy in pH 6.6 medium. However, when the cells were irradiated and incubated for 48 hrs. in pH 6.6 medium and then medium was replaced with pH 7.5 medium, apoptosis promptly occurred. Apoptosis also occurred even in pH 6.6 medium when the cells were irradiated and maintained in pH 7.5 medium for 8 hrs. or longer post-irradiation before incubation in pH 6.6 medium. Conclusion: An acidic environment markedly suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis probably by suppressing the expression of initial signals responsible for irradiation-induced apoptosis. Indications are that the signals persist in an acidic environment and trigger apoptosis when the environmental acidity is eased. Our results suggest that the acidic environment in human tumors may inhibit the apoptosis after irradiation. However, apoptosis may be triggered when reoxygenation occurs after irradiation, and thus, the intratumor environment becomes less acidic after irradiation. Not only the change in pO2 but the change in pH during the course of fractionated radiotherapy may greatly influence the outcome of the treatment

  11. Effects of stereoscopic presentation on visually induced motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujike, Hiroyasu; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    The present study investigates whether VIMS, which can be induced in 2D images, is affected by stereoscopic presentation. To do this, we conducted an experiment to measure the effects psychologically and physiologically. Visual stimulus was computer graphics that simulates traveling along streets with additional pitch and roll motion for 10 minutes. The stimulus were presented as either stereoscopic, "3D", images or "2D" images. Before/after and during each trial, psychological and physiological measurements for biomedical effects were conducted. As results, psychological measurements indicate effects of stereoscopic presentations on VIMS. First, subjective score of comfort level measured every one minute significantly decreased to uncomfortable level in the 3D than in the 2D condition. Second, subscore of "Nausea" of Simulator Sickness Questionnaire significantly higher in the 3D than in the 2D condition, while the other subscores and the total score also showed the similar tendency. Moreover, physiological measurements also indicate effects of 3D presentations on VIMS. The LF/HF ratio, which is the index of sympathetic nerve activity, clearly increased more in the 3D than in the 2D condition. We conclude that stereoscopic presentation enhances biomedical effects of VIMS. We speculate that stereoscopic images can be efficient reference of spatial orientation.

  12. Galvano-rotational effect induced by electroweak interactions in pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvornikov, Maxim [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN), 142190 Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Physics Faculty, National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-21

    We study electroweakly interacting particles in rotating matter. The existence of the electric current along the axis of the matter rotation is predicted in this system. This new galvano-rotational effect is caused by the parity violating interaction between massless charged particles in the rotating matter. We start with the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a fermion involved in the electroweak interaction in the rotating frame. This equation includes the noninertial effects. Then, using the obtained solution, we derive the induced electric current which turns out to flow along the rotation axis. We study the possibility of the appearance of the galvano-rotational effect in dense matter of compact astrophysical objects. The particular example of neutron and hypothetical quark stars is discussed. It is shown that, using this effect, one can expect the generation of toroidal magnetic fields comparable with poloidal ones in old millisecond pulsars. We also briefly discuss the generation of the magnetic helicity in these stars. Finally we analyze the possibility to apply the galvano-rotational effect for the description of the asymmetric neutrino emission from a neutron star to explain pulsars kicks.

  13. Is there a role for comparative radiobiology in the development of a policy to protect the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation? Comparative radiobiology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last few years has seen what people are now referring to as a 'shifting paradigm' in our way of thinking about radiation effects on biological systems. The concept of the central role of DNA damage due to double strand breaks induced by a radiation 'hit' has been itself hit by many studies showing persistent effects in the distant progeny of radiation exposed cells. This phenomenon is known as radiation induced genomic instability. More recently evidence has been accumulating that not even the parent cell need be exposed to radiation (the bystander effect), and that the bystander cells can demonstrate genomic instability and effects at low doses which are inconsistent with a mechanism based on DNA hits as important targets at low doses. The new paradigm suggests that cellular stress responses or damage signalling through a range of signal transduction pathways are involved. Cell-cell contact or secretion of damage signalling molecules can induce responses in undamaged and unirradiated cells. Are these new effects relevant to risk assessment, or does it matter how radiation affects cells if we have good epidemiological evidence on which to base our risk estimates? If DNA based dose responses are not so important at environmentally relevant doses, then it is not logical to base our environmental protection system on consideration of radiation dose as if this is in some way unique and not affected by the presence of other environmental stressors. The aim of this paper is to review the new concepts and to consider reasons why they might alter our methods of risk estimation. In particular the paper considers the impact of the new concepts on environmental protection and discusses the need for research in the field of comparative radiobiology if we are to develop policies which can adequately protect biodiversity. (author)

  14. The effect of music-induced mood on attentional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Scolaro, Ashley J; Bailey, Kira; Chen, Antao

    2011-06-01

    Attention network theory suggests that there are three separate neural networks that execute the discrete functions of alerting, orienting, and executive attention. Previous research on the influence of mood on attention has shown subtle and inconsistent results. The attention network theory may aid in clarifying the influence of mood on attention. The present study investigated the influence of mood on attentional networks in a normal population. Participants performed the Attention Network Test (ANT), which provides functional measures of alerting, orienting, and executive attention. Positive or negative mood was induced by listening to music with a positive or negative valence, respectively; neutral mood was induced by reading a collection of basic facts about China. The results revealed that negative mood led to a significantly higher alerting efficiency relative to other moods, while there were no significant mood effects on orienting or executive attention efficiency. According to the algorithm underlying the ANT, the higher alerting efficiency in the negative mood condition can be attributed to relatively greater benefits of cueing effects. The findings are discussed in the context of the noradrenergic system and of evolutionary significance. Specifically, the increase in the alerting function during negative mood states may be due to the modulation effect of negative mood on the noradrenergic system, and/or to the survival benefit resulting from an increase in automatic vigilance towards negative information. The current results suggest that as the influence of negative mood on attention appears to specifically consist in an enhanced alerting function, it may not be found in studies where the three attentional networks are not dissociated. PMID:22044234

  15. Generalized training effects induced by athletic preparation. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issurin, V B

    2009-12-01

    The present review deals with training effects produced by training pieces of different duration. Athletes' responses to training workloads can be considered hierarchically, where the most intimate level encompasses changes produced at the cellular and molecular levels, while the generalized level summarizes the most integrative training outcomes, which characterize athletes' adaptability, preparedness and readiness for forthcoming workloads. These training outcomes, called generalized training effects (GTE) are considered to be closely linked with duration and mode of training workloads. Summarizing earlier and more recent publications, GTEs are categorized as acute, immediate, cumulative, delayed and residual training effects, which encompass changes induced by 1) a single exercise; 2) a single workout or training day; 3) a series of workouts; or 4) obtained over a given time interval after a program completion ; or (5) changes retained after cessation of training beyond a give time period. Each one these GTEs has a three-fold characterization:1) variables of executed workloads; 2) athletes' responses to workloads and training-induced changes in their state; 3) changes in athletic performance as described by sport specific indicators. Although the concept of GTE is far from complete in terms of an understanding of the physiological mechanisms underlying the short-, medium-, and long-term changes caused by athletic training, a number of fundamental theories and statements contribute to its scientific background. They are Cannon's theory of homeostasis; Salye's theory of stress adaptation; Weigert's law of supercompensation; and Lamarck's classic theory of evolution regarding the "use" and "disuse" of any organ or function. PMID:20087292

  16. Quantitative Traits of Ion Beam Induced Mutagenesis in Triticum aestivum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan FANG; Zhen JIAO

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of this study was to elucidate the quantitative traits of plants mutagenized by ion beam. [Method] The particular variation phenotypes, a- gronomic traits, and protein and wet gluten contents of progenies derived from the same ion beam induced mutant were investigated. [Result] Morphological polymor- phism existed in some individuals. Plant height, spike length and protein content were significantly influenced by ion beam, and effective tiller number and wet gluten content were moderately influenced. Multiple comparisons of all the indices within groups indicated genomic instability among these groups. Coefficient of variation im- plied the differences within group were very low. [Conclusion] Ion beam irradiation displayed characteristics of multi-directivity and non-directiveness. It aroused multiple variations in the same mutant. Instability among progeny indicates cells had different fate even in the same irradiated tissue. It may take several generations for mutants to stabilize particular phenotypes. The effects of ion beam irradiation may be the in- terrelated direct irradiation damage, indirect irradiation damage and late effect, such as bystander effect and adaptive response.

  17. Biological effects of laser-induced stress waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced stress waves can be generated by one of the following mechanisms: Optical breakdown, ablation or rapid heating of an absorbing medium. These three modes of laser interaction with matter allow the investigation of cellular and tissue responses to stress waves with different characteristics and under different conditions. The most widely studied phenomena are those of the collateral damage seen in photodisruption in the eye and in 193 run ablation of cornea and skin. On the other hand, the therapeutic application of laser-induced stress waves has been limited to the disruption of noncellular material such as renal stones, atheromatous plaque and vitreous strands. The effects of stress waves to cells and tissues can be quite disparate. Stress waves can fracture tissue, damage cells, and increase the permeability of the plasma membrane. The viability of cell cultures exposed to stress waves increases with the peak stress and the number of pulses applied. The rise time of the stress wave also influences the degree of cell injury. In fact, cell viability, as measured by thymidine incorporation, correlates better with the stress gradient than peak stress. Recent studies have also established that stress waves induce a transient increase of the permeability of the plasma membrane in vitro. In addition, if the stress gradient is below the damage threshhold, the cells remain viable. Thus, stress waves can be useful as a means of drug delivery, increasing the intracellular drug concentration and allowing the use of drugs which are impermeable to the cell membrane. The present studies show that it is important to create controllable stress waves. The wavelength tunability and the micropulse structure of the free electron laser is ideal for generating stress waves with independently adjustable parameters, such as rise time, duration and peak stress

  18. Effect of Nifedipine on Dichlorvos-Induced Seizure in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayatnouri Mirhadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Dichlorvos a synthetic organophosphate poisons is the property of insecticide. These toxins as insecticides in agriculture and medicine for animals and the destruction of ectoparasites can be used. Studies have shown that Dichlorvos creation seizure effects in different animals. Nifedipine, dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, widely used for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Studies have shown that the calcium channel blockers are anticonvulsant effects in different animal models. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of nifedipine on Dichlorvosinduced seizures in mice. Approach: In this experiment, the animals were received different doses of nifedipine (2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally 30 min before intraperitoneal injection of Dichlorvos (50 mg kg-1. After Dichlorvos injection, clonic and tonic seizures and death was investigated. Results: Results showed that nifedipine dose dependently reduced the severity of Dichlorvos-induced seizures, so that nifedipine dose 10 and 40 mg kg-1, respectively, the lowest (pConclusion: The anticonvulsant activity of nifedipine suggests that possibly due to antagonistic effect on voltage-dependent calcium channel.

  19. Biphasic cardiovascular and respiratory effects induced by β-citronellol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Helder Veras; de Souza Silva, Camila Meirelles; de Siqueira, Rodrigo JoséBezerra; Lahlou, Saad; Dos Santos, Armênio Aguiar; Magalhães, Pedro Jorge Caldas

    2016-03-15

    β-Citronellol is a monoterpene found in the essential oil of various plants with antihypertensive properties. In fact, β-citronellol possesses hypotensive actions due to its vasodilator abilities. Here we aimed to show that β-citronellol recruits airway sensory neural circuitry to evoke cardiorespiratory effects. In anesthetized rats, intravenous injection of β-citronellol caused biphasic hypotension, bradycardia and apnea. Bilateral vagotomy, perivagal capsaicin treatment or injection into the left ventricle abolished first rapid phase (named P1) but not delayed phase P2 of the β-citronellol effects. P1 persisted after pretreatment with capsazepine, ondansetron, HC-030031 or suramin. Suramin abolished P2 of apnea. In awake rats, β-citronellol induced biphasic hypotension and bradycardia being P1 abolished by methylatropine. In vitro, β-citronellol inhibited spontaneous or electrically-evoked contractions of rat isolated right or left atrium, respectively, and fully relaxed sustained contractions of phenylephrine in mesenteric artery rings. In conclusion, chemosensitive pulmonary vagal afferent fibers appear to mediate the cardiovascular and respiratory effects of β-citronellol. The transduction mechanism in P1 seems not to involve the activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin subtype 1 (TRPA1), purinergic (P2X) or 5-HT3 receptors located on airways sensory nerves. P2 of hypotension and bradycardia seems resulting from a cardioinhibitory and vasodilatory effect of β-citronellol and the apnea from a purinergic signaling. PMID:26872991

  20. Productivity effects of technology diffusion induced by an energy tax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the political discussion, the economy-wide effects of an energy tax have gained considerable attention. So far, macroeconomic analyses have focused on either (positive or negative) costs triggered by an energy tax, or on the efficiency gains resulting from new energy taxes combined with lower distortionary taxes. By contrast, the innovative effects of climate protection measures have not yet been thoroughly analysed. This paper explores the productivity effects of a 50 per cent energy tax in the German industry sector employing a technology-based, three-step bottom-up approach. In the first step, the extensive IKARUS database is used to identify the technological adjustments arising from an energy tax. In the second step, the technologies are classified into different clusters. In the third step, the productivity effects generated by the technological adjustments are examined. The results imply that an energy tax induces mainly sector-specific and process-integrated technologies rather than add-on and cross-cutting technologies. Further, it is shown that the energy-saving technologies tend to increase productivity. This is particularly the case for process-integrated, sector specific technologies. (author)

  1. Radiation induced effects and annealing methods in fiberoptics and glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced effects in glass-rods and fiberoptics have been studied to determine parameters affecting the application of these materials in nuclear technology, i.e. as fiberscopes for visual inspection in severe radiation environments. Different glass and fibertypes have been exposed to fission product gamma radiation. The radiation induced transmission loss was measured with a spectrophotometer and then different annealing methods were examined to improve the transmission properties again. Especially the changes in glass and fiber recovery vs. time as a function of radiation dose and annealing temperature were investigated. Annealing experiments were performed exposing the samples either to temperature treatment or to various light sources such as quartz lamp, arc lamp or UV-laser for optical annealing. The transmission recovery was then investigated either as a function of annealing temperature or of exposure time to the light sources. The results allow conclusions on the design and composition of optical fiber endoscopes to be used in severe radiation environment where image transmission is required in the presence of high level nuclear radiation. (author)

  2. Effect of influenza-induced fever on human bioimpedance values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Marini

    Full Text Available Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA is a widely used technique to assess body composition and nutritional status. While bioelectrical values are affected by diverse variables, there has been little research on validation of BIA in acute illness, especially to understand prognostic significance. Here we report the use of BIA in acute febrile states induced by influenza.Bioimpedance studies were conducted during an H1N1 influenza A outbreak in Venezuelan Amerindian villages from the Amazonas. Measurements were performed on 52 subjects between 1 and 40 years of age, and 7 children were re-examined after starting Oseltamivir treatment. Bioelectrical Impedance Vector Analysis (BIVA and permutation tests were applied.For the entire sample, febrile individuals showed a tendency toward greater reactance (p=0.058 and phase angle (p=0.037 than afebrile individuals, while resistance and impedance were similar in the two groups. Individuals with repeated measurements showed significant differences in bioimpedance values associated with fever, including increased reactance (p<0.001 and phase angle (p=0.007, and decreased resistance (p=0.007 and impedance (p<0.001.There are bioelectrical variations induced by influenza that can be related to dehydration, with lower extracellular to intracellular water ratio in febrile individuals, or a direct thermal effect. Caution is recommended when interpreting bioimpedance results in febrile states.

  3. Lifshitz Effects on Vector Condensate Induced by a Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Liu, Mo-Lin; Lu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Cheng-Yuan; Yang, Zhuo-Qun

    2014-01-01

    By numerical and analytical methods, we study in detail the effects of the Lifshitz dynamical exponent $z$ on the vector condensate induced by an applied magnetic field in the probe limit. Concretely, in the presence of the magnetic field, we obtain the Landau level independent of $z$, and also find the critical value by coupling a Maxwell complex vector field and SU(2) field into a (3+1)-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, respectively. The research results show that for both two models with the lowest Landau level, the increasing $z$ improves the response of the critical temperature to the applied magnetic field even without the charge density, and the analytical results uphold the numerical results. In addition, we find even in the Lifshitz black hole, the Maxwell complex vector model is still a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model. Furthermore, we construct the square vortex lattice and discuss the implications of these results.

  4. Lensing effect of electromagnetically induced transparency involving a Rydberg state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingshan; Vogt, Thibault; Manjappa, Manukumara; Guo, Ruixiang; Kiffner, Martin; Li, Wenhui

    2015-12-01

    We study the lensing effect experienced by a weak probe field under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) involving a Rydberg state. A Gaussian coupling beam tightly focused on a laser-cooled atomic cloud produces an inhomogeneity in the coupling Rabi frequency along the transverse direction and makes the EIT area acting like a gradient-index medium. We image the probe beam at the position where it exits the atomic cloud and observe that a red-detuned probe light is strongly focused with a greatly enhanced intensity whereas a blue-detuned one is defocused with a reduced intensity. Our experimental results agree very well with the numerical solutions of Maxwell-Bloch equations.

  5. Lensing effect of electromagnetically induced transparency involving a Rydberg state

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jingshan; Manjappa, Manukumara; Guo, Ruixiang; Kiffner, Martin; Li, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    We study the lensing effect experienced by a weak probe field under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) involving a Rydberg state. A Gaussian coupling beam tightly focused on a laser-cooled atomic cloud produces an inhomogeneity in the coupling Rabi frequency along the transverse direction and makes the EIT area acting like a gradient-index medium. We image the probe beam at the position where it exits the atomic cloud, and observe that a red-detuned probe light is strongly focused with a greatly enhanced intensity whereas a blue-detuned one is de-focused with a reduced intensity. Our experimental results agree very well with the numerical solutions of Maxwell-Bloch equations.

  6. Steric-electronic effects in malarial peptides inducing sterile immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Vranich, Armando [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@mail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Is it evident that the residues position are relevant regarding of {phi} angular value. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The geometry considered for detailing the alterations undergone by HABPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inter planar interactions ruled by clashes between the atoms making them up. -- Abstract: Conserved Plasmodium falciparum high activity binding peptides' (HABPs) most relevant proteins involved in malaria parasite invasion are immunologically silent; critical binding residues must therefore be specifically replaced to render them highly immunogenic and protection-inducing. Such changes have a tremendous impact on these peptides' steric-electronic effects, such as modifications to peptide length peptide bonds and electronic orbitals' disposition, to allow a better fit into immune system MHCII molecules and better interaction with the TCR which might account for the final immunological outcome.

  7. Weak ergodicity breaking induced by global memory effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budini, Adrián A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the phenomenon of weak ergodicity breaking for a class of globally correlated random walk dynamics defined over a finite set of states. The persistence in a given state or the transition to another one depends on the whole previous temporal history of the system. A set of waiting time distributions, associated to each state, sets the random times between consecutive steps. Their mean value is finite for all states. The probability density of time-averaged observables is obtained for different memory mechanisms. This statistical object explicitly shows departures between time and ensemble averages. While the residence time in each state may have a divergent mean value, we demonstrate that this condition is in general not necessary for breaking ergodicity. Hence, we conclude that global memory effects are an alternative mechanism able to induce ergodicity breaking without involving power-law statistics. Analytical and numerical calculations support these results.

  8. Fermionic Schwinger effect and induced current in de Sitter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashinaka, Takahiro; Fujita, Tomohiro; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2016-07-01

    We explore Schwinger effect of spin 1/2 charged particles with static electric field in 1+3 dimensional de Sitter spacetime. We analytically calculate the vacuum expectation value of the spinor current which is induced by the produced particles in the electric field. The renormalization is performed with the adiabatic subtraction scheme. We find that the current becomes negative, namely it flows in the direction opposite to the electric field, if the electric field is weaker than a certain threshold value depending on the fermion mass, which is also known to happen in the case of scalar charged particles in 1+3 de Sitter spacetime. Contrary to the scalar case, however, the IR hyperconductivity is absent in the spinor case.

  9. Fermionic Schwinger effect and induced current in de Sitter space

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashinaka, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    We explore Schwinger effect of spin 1/2 charged particles with static electric field in 1+3 dimensional de Sitter spacetime. We analytically calculate the vacuum expectation value of the spinor current which is induced by the produced particles in the electric field. The renormalization is performed with the adiabatic subtraction scheme. We find that the current becomes negative, namely it flows in the direction opposite to the electric field, if the electric field is weaker than a certain threshold value depending on the fermion mass, which is also known to happen in the case of scalar charged particles in 1+3 de Sitter spacetime. Contrary to the scalar case, however, the IR hyperconductivity is absent in the spinor case.

  10. Artificial sweeteners produce the counterintuitive effect of inducing metabolic derangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swithers, Susan E

    2013-09-01

    The negative impact of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages on weight and other health outcomes has been increasingly recognized; therefore, many people have turned to high-intensity sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, and saccharin as a way to reduce the risk of these consequences. However, accumulating evidence suggests that frequent consumers of these sugar substitutes may also be at increased risk of excessive weight gain, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. This paper discusses these findings and considers the hypothesis that consuming sweet-tasting but noncaloric or reduced-calorie food and beverages interferes with learned responses that normally contribute to glucose and energy homeostasis. Because of this interference, frequent consumption of high-intensity sweeteners may have the counterintuitive effect of inducing metabolic derangements. PMID:23850261

  11. Effect of irradiation-induced defects on fusion reactor ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural, thermal, and electrical properties critical to performance of ceramics in a fusion environment can be profoundly altered by irradiation effects. Neutron damage may cause swelling, reduction of thermal conductivity, increase in dielectric loss, and either reduction or enhancement of strength depending on the crystal structure and defect content of the material. Absorption of ionizing energy inevitably leads to degradation of insulating properties, but these changes can be reduced by alterations in structural or compositional makeup. Assessment of the irradiation response of candidate ceramics Al2O3, MgAl2O4, SiC and Si3N4 shows that each may find use in advanced fusion devices. The present understanding of irradiation-induced defects in ceramics, while far from complete, nevertheless points the way to methods for developing improved materials for fusion applications

  12. Experimental study of superconductivity induced by proximity effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of the proximity effects between a superconductor (InBi or PbBi alloys) and a 'normal' metal (Zn or Sn respectively, above their critical temperature) using essentially the tunneling techniques. On the N side, some specific properties of such an induced superconductivity are described: linear variation of the pair potential near the critical temperature of the binary layer, TCNS; reduced energy scale at TCNS; evidence of a thermodynamic critical field (called breakdown field) presented by N above its critical temperature. On the S side, we study crossing from a gapless to a quasi gapless regime. This gives a proof of a finite coherence length at TCNS. Experimental details (in particular about the preparation and measurement of tunneling junctions) are given in annexe. Possible applications are suggested. (author)

  13. Photoxidative effect on lysozyme activity induced by duroquinone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is effective for treating various tumors and to induce apoptosis in many tumor cells . To apply theoretical reference for choosing appropriate a photosensitizer, many approaches have been employed. We studied the photooxidative reaction between duroquinone (DQ) and lysozyme (Lyso). The DQ was excited by 315-375 nm UVA light at an irradiance of 34.3 mW·cm-2. The solutions of Lyso (5 x 10-4 mol·L-1) and a mixed solutions of DQ (1.5 x 10-3 mol·L-1) and Lyso (5 x 10-4 mol·L-1) were irradiated for 60 min while bubbling the sample solutions continuously with nitrogen, air and oxygen, respectively. The irradiated solutions were analyzed with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to check structural changes of Lyso. Lytic activity of the Lyso against micrococcus lysodeikticus was turbidimetrically determined. The result of SDS-PAGE showed a new band at 28-29 kDa under all the three ambiences, and this was the dimer of Lyso (14.6 kDa). Both the results of structural and activity changes demonstrated that DQ can induce photooxidation damage of Lyso. Interestingly, the degree of Lyso damage was the greatest when the solution was bubbled with air, and the damage was the smallest with nitrogen bubbling. The degree of damage increased with the DQ concentration. The effect of irradiation time on Lyso damage was also investigated. It indicated that Lyso damage was strengthened at higher DQ concentrations or longer irradiation. (authors)

  14. Theory of Defect-Induced Kondo Effect in Graphene: Effect of Zeeman Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the Zeeman field on the defect-induced Kondo effect in graphene is investigated. The effective model of the Kondo effect is derived, and is analyzed on the basis of the numerical renormalization group method. It is found that, under the Zeeman field, at the border of the spin polarized state and the Kondo-Yosida singlet state, there is an unusual fixed point where the entropy of the defect is kB ln 2 and the expectation value of S2z is 1/8

  15. Effect of Epicatechin against Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Yoo Seob; Shin, Hyang Ae; Kang, Sung Un; Kim, Jang Hee; Oh, Young-Taek; Park, Keun Hyung; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced oral mucositis limits the delivery of high-dose radiation to head and neck cancer. This study investigated the effectiveness of epicatechin (EC), a component of green tea extracts, on radiation-induced oral mucositis in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design The effect of EC on radiation-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed in the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Radiation-induced apoptosis, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) g...

  16. Effect of irradiation on analgesia induced by morphine and endorphin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Byoung Hun; Hyun, Soung Hee; Chung, Ki Myung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Morphine and endorphin administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) produce analgesia by activating different descending pain inhibitory systems. Gamma irradiation attenuates the acute analgesic action of i.c.v. injected morphine in mice. This study was done to investigate the effect of-irradiation on the analgesia produced by i.c.v. injected morphine and endorphin in male ICR mice. In one group, mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at a dose of 5 Gy from a {sup 60}Co source and the analgesic effects were tested 5, 30, 60, 90 and 180 min after irradiation using the acetic acid-induced writhing test. The analgesic effect was produced time-dependently and reached its maximum at 90 min after irradiation. Thus, time was fixed in the following studies. In another group, mice were irradiated with 5 Gy and tested 90 minutes later for analgesia produced by i.c.v. administration of morphine or endorphin. Irradiation significantly potentiated the analgesia produced by endorphin. However, the antinociception produced by morphine was not affected by irradiation. These results support the hypothesis that morphine and endorphin administered supraspinally produce antinocieception by different neuronal mechanisms.

  17. Effect of irradiation on analgesia induced by morphine and endorphin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphine and endorphin administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) produce analgesia by activating different descending pain inhibitory systems. Gamma irradiation attenuates the acute analgesic action of i.c.v. injected morphine in mice. This study was done to investigate the effect of-irradiation on the analgesia produced by i.c.v. injected morphine and endorphin in male ICR mice. In one group, mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at a dose of 5 Gy from a 60Co source and the analgesic effects were tested 5, 30, 60, 90 and 180 min after irradiation using the acetic acid-induced writhing test. The analgesic effect was produced time-dependently and reached its maximum at 90 min after irradiation. Thus, time was fixed in the following studies. In another group, mice were irradiated with 5 Gy and tested 90 minutes later for analgesia produced by i.c.v. administration of morphine or endorphin. Irradiation significantly potentiated the analgesia produced by endorphin. However, the antinociception produced by morphine was not affected by irradiation. These results support the hypothesis that morphine and endorphin administered supraspinally produce antinocieception by different neuronal mechanisms

  18. Effect of attention control on sustained attention during induced anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillon, Christian; Robinson, Oliver J; Mathur, Ambika; Ernst, Monique

    2016-06-01

    Anxiety has wide-reaching and complex effects on cognitive performance. Although it can intrude on cognition and interfere with performance, it can also facilitate information processing and behavioural responses. In a previous study, we showed that anxiety induced by threat of shock facilitates performance on the Sustained Attention to Response Task, a vigilance test, which probes response inhibition to infrequent nogo stimuli. The present study sought to identify factors that may have contributed to such improved performance, including on- and off-task thinking (assessed with thought probes) and individual differences in attention control, as measured with the Attention Control Scale. Replicating our prior finding, we showed that shock threat significantly reduced errors of commission on the nogo trials. However, we extended this finding in demonstrating that this effect was driven by subjects with low attention control. We therefore confirm that anxiety increases inhibitory control of prepotent responses-a mechanism which is adaptive under threat-and show that this effect is greater in those who rely more upon such prepotent responding, i.e., those with low attentional control. PMID:25899613

  19. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics.

  20. NASA Models of Space Radiation Induced Cancer, Circulatory Disease, and Central Nervous System Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    The risks of late effects from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are potentially a limitation to long-term space travel. The late effects of highest concern have significant lethality including cancer, effects to the central nervous system (CNS), and circulatory diseases (CD). For cancer and CD the use of age and gender specific models with uncertainty assessments based on human epidemiology data for low LET radiation combined with relative biological effectiveness factors (RBEs) and dose- and dose-rate reduction effectiveness factors (DDREF) to extrapolate these results to space radiation exposures is considered the current "state-of-the-art". The revised NASA Space Risk Model (NSRM-2014) is based on recent radio-epidemiology data for cancer and CD, however a key feature of the NSRM-2014 is the formulation of particle fluence and track structure based radiation quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates, which are distinct from the ICRP quality factors, and shown to lead to smaller uncertainties in risk estimates. Many persons exposed to radiation on earth as well as astronauts are life-time never-smokers, which is estimated to significantly modify radiation cancer and CD risk estimates. A key feature of the NASA radiation protection model is the classification of radiation workers by smoking history in setting dose limits. Possible qualitative differences between GCR and low LET radiation increase uncertainties and are not included in previous risk estimates. Two important qualitative differences are emerging from research studies. The first is the increased lethality of tumors observed in animal models compared to low LET radiation or background tumors. The second are Non- Targeted Effects (NTE), which include bystander effects and genomic instability, which has been observed in cell and animal models of cancer risks. NTE's could lead to significant changes in RBE and DDREF estimates for GCR particles, and the potential

  1. Ginger effects on control of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Meisam Ebrahimi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background : Chemotherapy-induced nausea (CIN in the anticipatory and acute phase is the most common side effect in cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ginger capsules on the alleviation of this problem. Methods : This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 80 women with breast cancer between August till December 2009 in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran. These patients underwent one-day chemotherapy regime and suffering from chemotherapy-induced nausea. After obtaining written consent, samples were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. Two groups were matched based on the age and emetic effects of chemotherapy drugs used. The intervention group received ginger capsules (250 mg, orally four times a day (1 gr/d and the same samples from the placebo group received starch capsules (250 mg, orally for three days before to three days after chemotherapy. To measure the effect of capsules a three-part questionnaire was used, so the samples filled every night out these tools. After collecting the information, the gathered data were analyzed by statistical tests like Fisher’s exact, Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square using version 8 of STATA software. Results : The mean ± SD of age in the intervention and placebo groups were 41.8 ± 8.4 and 45.1 ± 10 years, respectively. Results indicated that the severity and number of nausea in the anticipatory phase were significantly lower in the ginger group compared with placebo group (P=0.0008, P=0.0007, respectively. Also, the intensity (P=0.0001 and number (P=0.0001 of nausea in the acute phase were significantly lower in the ginger group. On the other hand, taking ginger capsules compared with placebo did not result in any major complications. Conclusion: Consuming ginger root powder capsules (1 gr/d from three days before chemotherapy till three days after it in combination with the standard anti-emetic regimen can

  2. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  3. Helping behavior in a virtual crisis situation: effects of safety awareness and crisis communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbé, H.E.; Emmerik, M.L. van; Kerstholt, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Incident evaluations show that bystanders tend to help: they do not wait for professionals to arrive, but act as required by the situation at hand. In the present study, we investigated how safety awareness (induced before an accident happened) and providing a course of action by emergency services

  4. Light-induced pyroelectric effect as an effective approach for ultrafast ultraviolet nanosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaona; Yu, Ruomeng; Pan, Caofeng; Li, Zhaoling; Yang, Jin; Yi, Fang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-09-01

    Zinc oxide is potentially a useful material for ultraviolet detectors; however, a relatively long response time hinders practical implementation. Here by designing and fabricating a self-powered ZnO/perovskite-heterostructured ultraviolet photodetector, the pyroelectric effect, induced in wurtzite ZnO nanowires on ultraviolet illumination, has been utilized as an effective approach for high-performance photon sensing. The response time is improved from 5.4 s to 53 μs at the rising edge, and 8.9 s to 63 μs at the falling edge, with an enhancement of five orders in magnitudes. The specific detectivity and the responsivity are both enhanced by 322%. This work provides a novel design to achieve ultrafast ultraviolet sensing at room temperature via light-self-induced pyroelectric effect. The newly designed ultrafast self-powered ultraviolet nanosensors may find promising applications in ultrafast optics, nonlinear optics, optothermal detections, computational memories and biocompatible optoelectronic probes.

  5. Synergic Effect of Genistein and Daidzein on UVB-Induced DNA Damage: An Effective Photoprotective Combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Iovine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activities of individual isoflavones are well established although little is known about the photoprotective effect of their combination. The aim of this study was to investigate the photoprotective effects of different concentrations of genistein and daidzein individually or combined. We measured the expression levels of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2 and growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible (Gadd45 genes, which are involved in inflammation and DNA repair, respectively, in BJ-5ta human skin fibroblasts irradiated with 60 mJ/cm2 UVB. We also determined the cellular response to UVB-induced DNA damage by Comet assay. We report that genistein and daidzein when administered combined, and at a specific concentration and ratio, exerted a synergistic photoprotective effect that was greater than the effect obtained with each isoflavone alone. The results reported herein suggest that low concentrations of genistein and daidzein combined may be good candidate ingredients for protective agents against UV-induced photodamage.

  6. Synergic Effect of Genistein and Daidzein on UVB-Induced DNA Damage: An Effective Photoprotective Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovine, Barbara; Iannella, Maria Luigia; Gasparri, Franco; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2011-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activities of individual isoflavones are well established although little is known about the photoprotective effect of their combination. The aim of this study was to investigate the photoprotective effects of different concentrations of genistein and daidzein individually or combined. We measured the expression levels of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible (Gadd45) genes, which are involved in inflammation and DNA repair, respectively, in BJ-5ta human skin fibroblasts irradiated with 60 mJ/cm(2) UVB. We also determined the cellular response to UVB-induced DNA damage by Comet assay. We report that genistein and daidzein when administered combined, and at a specific concentration and ratio, exerted a synergistic photoprotective effect that was greater than the effect obtained with each isoflavone alone. The results reported herein suggest that low concentrations of genistein and daidzein combined may be good candidate ingredients for protective agents against UV-induced photodamage. PMID:21785564

  7. Effects of melatonin on wortmannin-induced tau hyperphosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-qiu DENG; Guo-gang XU; Ping DUAN; Qi ZHANG; Jian-zhi WANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To explore the underlying mechanism of tau hyperphosphorylation in an Alzheimer's-affected brain and the possible arresting strategies. Methods: MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide), crystal violet assay,phase-contrast, dead end colorimetric apoptosis detection system (TUNEL) and electron microscopy were used to detect cell viability, morphology and apoptosis.Western blot, 32p-labeling and the detection of malondialdehyde level and superoxide dismutase activity were used respectively for the phosphorylation level of tau, the activity of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3), and oxidative stress measurement. Results: Exposure of the cells to wortmannin resulted in an obvious lipid peroxidation, reduction of cell viability, cell process retraction, and plasma vacuolation, but with no obvious cell apoptosis. We also found that preincubation of the cells with melatonin or vitamin E attenuated differentially wortmannininduced oxidative stress as well as GSK-3 overactivation and tau hyperphosphorylation. Conclusion: Wortmannin is an effective tool for reproducing Alzheimer-like tau hyperphosphorylation cell model and melatonin/vitamin E can effectively protect the cells from wortmannin-induced impairments.

  8. Evaluation of blast-induced vibration effects on structures 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Rim; Jeon, Gyu Shick; Lee, Dae Soo; Joo, Kwang Ho; Lee, Woong Keon [Korea Electrotechnology Research Inst., Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chang Ha; Chung, So Keul; Lee, Kyung Won; Shin, Hee Soon; Chun, Sun Woo; Park, Yeon Jun; Synn, Joong Ho; Choi, Byung Hee [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-31

    Due to the difficulties of obtaining construction site for new plants, following ones are inevitably being built in the site adjacent to existing power plants. Therefore considerable thought has been recently given to the dynamic loading generated by blasting works near the plants to maintain the safety of structures and facilities in power plants. Our own standard for safety level of blast vibration is not prepared yet, and foreign standards have been generally employed without theoretical and experimental verification. Safety-related structures of power plants and facilities have to be protected against the effects of possible hazards due to blast vibration. Earthquakes have been considered a major dynamic design loading as a requirement of plant design, but the effects of blast-induced vibration are not. In order to ensure the safety, rational safe criterion should be established and blast design should be satisfy it, which requires the development of a model for prediction of vibration level through more systematic measurement and analysis. The main objectives of the study are : to provide background data for establishing the rational safe vibration limits, to develop models for prediction of blast vibration level, to establish safe blast design criterion, and to accumulate techniques for field measurements, data acquisition and analysis (author). 80 refs., 347 figs.

  9. Effect of Oral Administration of Magnesium on Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Normal and Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Soltani, Nepton; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir; Ashrafi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin (CP) therapy as the most common potent chemotherapeutic process is accompanied by nephrotoxicity. The diabetic state may protect rat kidney against this toxicity, and magnesium (Mg) on the other hand may reduce the glucose level in diabetic animals. Objectives Current study was planned to investigate the effect of oral administration of magnesium supplementation on CP-induced nephrotoxicity in normal and Streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods Male...

  10. The Effect of Opsteoporotic Model Rats Induced by Retinoic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Peng; Yao Jianfeng; Jin Weizhang; Cai Qiankun; Guo Xiong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of retinoic acid on inducing osteoporosis in female rat. Methods: 48SD female rats were divided randomly into experiment group and control group. Retinoic acid was administered orally to experiment group with 80mg.kg-1d-1 for 15 days. Then the rats were sacrificed on the 0th, 30th, 60th days after last administration. The serum concentration of Ca, P, BGP, E2, AKP and TRAP were detected. Components of collagen and proteoglycan in the bones and BMD were also assayed .The femoral morphometric change and epiphyseal plate cartilage histological changes were observed. Results: After a 15-day period treatment with retinoic acid, charateristics of experiment group were compared with control, it is shown that the concentration of serum E2 and BGP declined, the activity of AKP and TRAP increased while BMP decreased, the bone mass of both spongy bone and cortical bone reduced, the number of spongy bone osteoclasts and their activity increased, number of epiphyseal plate chondrocyte reduced, cartilage hypertrophic zone displayed dyscalcification, and no difference of other markers was found in the two groups. On the 30th day after the last administration, the experiment group appeared a declined number of cancellous bone osteoclast and level of serum AKP yet they were still higher than control. Number of epiphyseal chondrocyte, serum BGP and tibial BMD, though higher than before, were still lower than control. Other markers were no difference. On the 60th day after treatment, although the femoral cancellous bone mass was still less and cancellous osteoblast was more than control, the cortical bone mass, cancellous osteoclast number and level of serum Ca and P were all remained no different between two groups.Conclusion: Retinoic acid possessed a better short-term effect than long-term effect. Cancellous bone loss lasted much longer than cortical bone and more obviously; the bone matrix in this osteoporosis model was able to repair itself

  11. Biological effects of space-induced mutation on robinia pseudoacacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry seeds of Robinia pseudoacacia were carried by Shijian No.8 breeding satellite for mutagenesis and the biological effect of space-induced mutation was studied. The parameters of Robinia pseudoacacia such as plant height, stem base, branch number, knot spacing, length of thorn and chlorophyll content were analyzed, and, at the same time, the genetic diversity was tested by SSR marker. The results showed that the plant height and stem base of 2-year-old seedlings which derived from space mutagenesis were 22.0% and 24.1% lower than those of control, and 3-year-old seedlings were 13.1% and 22.4% lower than those of control, respectively. While the inhibiting effect of plant height became undermined in the following growth years. However, the inhibiting effect in stem base existed all the time,the length of thorn of branch and stem were 15.6% and 28.6% shorter than the control,respectively. Compared with the control,the variation of the length of thorn from stem was extremely significant. The variation of chlorophyll a content from space mutagenesis compared with control was not remarkable, while the total chlorophyll and chlorophyll b contents were 18.7% and 9.7% lower than those of control, respectively, and the difference between space mutagenesis and control was significant. While the chlorophyll a/b was 25.6% higher than that of control, but the difference was not significant. The coefficient of variation of the relative traits was increased by the space mutagenesis. The extensively population genome mutation after space-induction were not detected by SSR (Simple Sequence Repeats). (authors)

  12. EXTRAPULMONARY EFFECTS OF NO2 AS REFLECTED BY PENTOBARBITAL-INDUCED SLEEPING TIME IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on pentobarbital(PEN)-induced sleeping time (S.T.) was investigated in mice. Acute exposure to concentrations as low as 470 micrograms NO2/cu m (0.25 ppm) caused a significant increase in PEN-induced S.T. No significant effects on PEN-induc...

  13. ING1 induces apoptosis through direct effects at the mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bose, P; Thakur, S; Thalappilly, S;

    2013-01-01

    translocates to the mitochondria of primary fibroblasts and established epithelial cell lines in response to apoptosis inducing stimuli, independent of the cellular p53 status. The ability of ING1 to induce apoptosis in various breast cancer cell lines correlates well with its degree of translocation to the...... mitochondria after UV treatment. Endogenous ING1 protein specifically interacts with the pro-apoptotic BCL2 family member BAX, and colocalizes with BAX in a UV-inducible manner. Ectopic expression of a mitochondria-targeted ING1 construct is more proficient in inducing apoptosis than the wild type ING1 protein...

  14. Braneworld Inflation with Induced Gravity and Curvature Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kourosh Nozari; S.Shafizadeh

    2011-01-01

    We construct a general braneworld inflation scenario where the inflaton field evolves on the DGP brahe and curvature effects are taken into account via incorporation of the Gauss-Bonnet term in the bulk action. While induced gravity on the DGP brahe modifies the IR limit of general relativity, the Gauss-Bonnet term in the bulk action modifies the UV sector of the theory. In this setup, the dynamics of perturbations on the brahe are studied with details and some confrontation with recent observations are discussed. While the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet inflation scenario favors only a red spectrum of the scalar perturbation, pure DGP and GBIG inflation models have the capacity to realize the blue spectrum too. In addition, the GBIG inflation scenario in the large field limit requires a smaller number of e-folds than other proposed scenarios in the same situation. For the tensor-to-scalar ratio, the GBIG inflation scenario gives a better 1fit with observationally supported value of R≈ 0.24.

  15. Effects of induced charge in the kinestatic charge detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, D J; Terwilliger, R A

    1995-05-01

    The principle of the kinestatic charge detector (KCD) for digital radiography depends on the synchronization of the scan velocity of a parallel plate drift chamber with the cation drift velocity. Compared with line-beam scanners, this motion-compensated imaging technique makes better use of the x-ray tube output. A Frisch grid traditionally has been used within the KCD to minimize unwanted signal contributions from both cations and negative charge carriers during irradiation. In this work the charge induction process in a parallel plate geometry was investigated for the special case of the KCD. In the limit of infinite plates, the cathode charge density due to both cations and negative charge carriers increases quadratically in time for a kinestatically scanned narrow slit. In the KCD the cathode is segmented into an array of narrow electrodes, each aligned with the incident x-ray beam. Our conformal mapping computation determined that the shape of the induced charge signal depends critically on delta x/w, the ratio of electrode width to drift gap. Our conclusion introduces the possibility of eliminating the Frisch grid from the KCD design because the value of delta x/w required for transverse sampling in the KCD is sufficiently low as to allow "self-gridding" to take effect. PMID:7643803

  16. The effect of deuterated water on induced apoptotic mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water is a dominant component of the biological organisms as well as of the environmental medium in which these exist and evolve. Replacing usual water by heavy water in the biological systems (deuteration process) induces changes of their properties, functions and behaviour due to the differences in the physico-chemical properties of usual water and deuterated water. Exposing cells to a high concentration of the heavy water (over 50 %) entails important changes in cell biochemical reactions and functions, finally ending by death of the cell. This latter effect may be either necrosis or apoptosis, each of them presenting different mechanisms of initiation and activation. Apoptosis or programmed cell death takes places by combined action of the caspase family, responsible for cracking structural substrates and key enzymes, a systematic and ordered cell destruction resulting. In the present work a relationship between the cytotoxicity mediated by D2O and caspase 3 activation, one of the enzymes critical for the entire process was followed up. Activation of the enzyme has been analyzed in tumoral cells cultivated in media with 20%, 65%, 90% D2O for 12, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 h. The results showed a significant increase of the activity of the enzyme cultivated for 72 h in a 65% deuterated medium while in case of a 90% D2O medium the peak value was reached after a 12 h exposure time. The medium with 20% heavy water showed no activation of this enzyme

  17. The motional stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, E L; Levinton, F M, E-mail: foley@novaphotonics.co [Nova Photonics, Inc. 200 Forrestal Road Princeton NJ 08540 (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is the worldwide standard technique for internal magnetic field pitch angle measurements in magnetized plasmas. Traditionally, it is based on using polarimetry to measure the polarization direction of light emitted from a hydrogenic species in a neutral beam. As the beam passes through the magnetized plasma at a high velocity, in its rest frame it perceives a Lorentz electric field. This field causes the H-alpha emission to be split and polarized. A new technique under development adds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for an MSE measurement that will enable radially resolved magnetic field magnitude as well as pitch angle measurements in even low-field (<1 T) experiments. An MSE-LIF system will be installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It will enable reconstructions of the plasma pressure, q-profile and current as well as, in conjunction with the existing MSE system, measurements of radial electric fields.

  18. Temperature induced effects on the durability of MR fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although commercial MR fluids exist for quite some time now and the feasibility as well as the advantages of the MR technology have been demonstrated for several applications by a variety of MR actuator prototypes, a sustainable market break-through of brake and clutch applications utilizing the shear mode is still missing. Essential impediments are the marginal knowledge about the durability of the MR technology. To overcome this situation, a long-term measurement system was developed for the durability analysis of MR fluid formulations within a technical relevant scale with respect to the volume of MR fluid and the transmitted torque. The focus of the presented series of measurements is given to the analysis of temperature induced effects on the durability. In this context four different failure indicators can be distinguished, namely an apparent negative viscosity, deviations in torque data obtained from different measurements as well as a pressure increase and a drop in the on-state torque. The measurement data of the present durability experiments indicate a significant dependency of the attainable energy intake density on the temperature. The aim of such durability tests is to establish a reliable data base for the industry to estimate the life-time of MR devices.

  19. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  20. Olive Oil effectively mitigates ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Hanan A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis, a reduction in bone mineral density, represents the most common metabolic bone disease. Postmenopausal women are particularly susceptible to osteoporosis when their production of estrogen declines. For these women, fracture is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of olive oil supplementation against osteoporosis in ovariectomized (OVX rats. Methods We studied adult female Wistar rats aged 12-14 months, divided into three groups: sham-operated control (SHAM, ovariectomized (OVX, and ovariectomized rats supplemented with extravirgin olive oil (Olive-OVX orally for 12 weeks; 4 weeks before ovariectomy and 8 weeks after. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were collected. Plasma levels of calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, malondialdehyde (MDA, and nitrates were assayed. Specimens from both the tibia and the liver were processed for light microscopic examination. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia was also performed. Results The OVX-rats showed a significant decrease in plasma calcium levels, and a significant increase in plasma ALP, MDA, and nitrates levels. These changes were attenuated by olive oil supplementation in the Olive-OVX rats. Light microscopic examination of the tibia of the OVX rats revealed a significant decrease in the cortical bone thickness (CBT and the trabecular bone thickness (TBT. In addition, there was a significant increase in the osteoclast number denoting bone resorption. In the Olive-OVX rats these parameters were markedly improved as compared to the OVX group. Examination of the liver specimens revealed mononuclear cellular infiltration in the portal areas in the OVX-rats which was not detected in the Olive-OVX rats. Conclusions Olive oil effectively mitigated ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rats, and is a promising candidate for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.