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Sample records for bystander chinese hamster

  1. Bystander effect induced by UVC radiation in Chinese hamster V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengwen; Jin, Cuihong; Lu, Xiaobo; Yang, Jinghua; Liu, Qiufang; Qi, Ming; Lu, Shuai; Zhang, Lifeng; Cai, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    In past decades, researches on radiation-induced bystander effect mainly focused on ionizing radiation such as α-particle, β-particle, X-ray and γ-ray. But few researches have been conducted on the ability of ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced bystander effect, and knowledge of UVC-induced bystander effect is far limited. Here, we adopted medium transfer experiment to detect whether UVC could cause bystander effect in Chinese hamster V79 cells. We determined the cell viability, apoptosis rate, chromosome aberration and ultrastructure changes, respectively. Our results showed that: (1) the viability of UVC-irradiated V79 cells declined significantly with the dosage of UVC; (2) similar to the irradiated cells, the main death type of bystander cells cultured in irradiation conditioned medium (ICMs) was also apoptosis; (3) soluble factors secreted by UVC-irradiated cells could induce bystander effect in V79 cells; (4) cells treated with 4 h ICM collected from 90 mJ cm(-2) UVC-irradiated cells displayed the strongest response. Our data revealed that UVC could cause bystander effect through the medium soluble factors excreted from irradiated cells and this bystander effect was a novel quantitative and kinetic response. These findings might provide a foundation to further explore the exact soluble bystander factors and detailed mechanism underlying UVC-induced bystander effect. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  2. Induction of the bystander effect in Chinese hamster V79 cells by actinomycin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cuihong; Wu, Shengwen; Lu, Xiaobo; Liu, Qiufang; Qi, Ming; Lu, Shuai; Xi, Qi; Cai, Yuan

    2011-05-10

    Bystander effect (BE) can be induced by ionizing radiation and chemicals, including alkylating agents. Ionizing radiation mostly induces the bystander effect by causing double-strand DNA breakage in the exposed cells. However, the chemical-induced bystander effect is poorly studied. Here we chose actinomycin D (ACTD), a genotoxic chemotherapeutic drug, to investigate whether it could cause bystander effect in Chinese hamster V79 cells. Results are that (1) ACTD induced apoptosis in V79 cells and an optimal apoptosis model in V79 cells was established with ACTD (4 mg/L, 1h); (2) using apoptosis rate, chromosome aberration, and ultrastructure changes as endpoints of bystander effect, ACTD could induce bystander effect in V79 cells; (3) as in the exposed cells, ACTD mainly induced apoptosis in bystander V79 cells cultured in different period conditioned medium; (4) the strongest bystander effect was induced by 4 h conditioned medium collected from cells treated with ACTD. It suggests that ACTD could cause BE through the medium soluble factors excreted from exposed cells during apoptosis and ACTD-induced BE was a novel quantitative and kinetic response. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination

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    Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

    2007-10-26

    We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L.; Chaerkady, Raghothama

    2012-01-01

    To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multidimens......To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis...

  5. Methods for modeling chinese hamster ovary (cho) cell metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention generally relate to the computational analysis and characterization biological networks at the cellular level in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Based on computational methods utilizing a hamster reference genome, the invention provides methods...

  6. Genotoxic activity of nitrilotriacetic acid in Chinese hamster cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesti, D; Tanzarella, C; Degrassi, F

    1995-05-01

    Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), a chelating agent, was tested for its ability to induce chromosomal damage in Chinese hamster cells. The chemical was shown to exert a weak genotoxic activity increasing the frequency of micronuclei after prolonged treatments. The analysis of kinetochore containing-micronuclei showed that NTA prevailingly induces chromosomal aberrations as compared to chromosome loss in hamster cells. Furthermore, immunostaining with an alpha-tubulin antibody showed clear alterations in the interphase microtubule network of cells treated for 24 h with 3 mM NTA. The microtubule effects of the chemical may be partly responsible for its cytotoxic effects.

  7. Influence of catechins on bystander responses in CHO cells induced by alpha-particle irradiation

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    Law, Y.L.; Wong, T.P.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, we studied alpha-particle induced and medium-mediated bystander effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells through micronucleus (MN) assay. We showed that signal transduction from irradiated cells to bystander cells occur within a short time after irradiation. We then studied the effects of ROS (reactive oxygen species)-scavenging catechins in the medium before irradiation. We observed decreases in the percentage of bystander cells with MN formation and thus proved the protection effect of catechins on bystander cells from radiation.

  8. Mitotic spindle proteomics in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

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    Mary Kate Bonner

    Full Text Available Mitosis is a fundamental process in the development of all organisms. The mitotic spindle guides the cell through mitosis as it mediates the segregation of chromosomes, the orientation of the cleavage furrow, and the progression of cell division. Birth defects and tissue-specific cancers often result from abnormalities in mitotic events. Here, we report a proteomic study of the mitotic spindle from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cells. Four different isolations of metaphase spindles were subjected to Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT analysis and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 1155 proteins and used Gene Ontology (GO analysis to categorize proteins into cellular component groups. We then compared our data to the previously published CHO midbody proteome and identified proteins that are unique to the CHO spindle. Our data represent the first mitotic spindle proteome in CHO cells, which augments the list of mitotic spindle components from mammalian cells.

  9. Genomic organization and expression of immunoglobulin genes in the Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, T; Zhu, H; Wang, D; Hao, H; Du, W

    2015-01-01

    In science, the hamsters are widely used as a model for studying the human diseases because they display many features like humans. The utility of the Chinese hamster as a biology model can be further enhanced by further characterization of the genes encoding components of the immune system. Here, we report the genomic organization and expression of the Chinese hamster immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes. The Chinese hamster IgH locus contains 268 VH segments (132 potentially functional genes, 12 ORFs and 124 pseudogenes), 4 DH segments, 6 JH segments, four constant region genes (μ, γ, ε and α) and one reverse δ remnant fragment. The Igκ locus contains only a single Cκ gene, 4 Jκ segments and 48 Vκ segments (15 potentially functional genes and 33 pseudogenes), whereas the Igλ locus contains 4 Cλ genes, but only Cλ 3 and Cλ 4 each preceded by a Jλ gene segment. A total of 49 Vλ segments (39 potentially functional genes, 3 ORFs and 7 pseudogenes) were identified. Analysis of junctions of the recombined V(D)J transcripts reveals complex diversity in both expressed H and κ sequences, but the microhomology-directed VJ recombination obviously results in very limited diversity in the Chinese hamster λ gene despite more potential germline-encoded combinatorial diversity. This is the first study to make a comprehensive analysis of the Ig genes in the Chinese hamster, which provides insights into the Ig genes in placental mammals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect induced by alpha-particle irradiation

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    Wong, T.P.W.; Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, the influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect in alpha-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined. The bystander effect was studied through medium transfer experiments. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was performed to quantify the chromosome damage induced by alpha-particle irradiation. Our results showed that the alpha-particle induced micronuclei (MN) frequencies were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol.

  11. [Cytotoxicity studies on T-3262 in cultured Chinese hamster cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, T; Nakamura, S; Nojima, Y; Nishio, Y

    1989-04-01

    T-3262 is an antibacterial drug which belongs to the group of pyridonecarboxylic acids. In this study, we investigated cytotoxicity of T-3262 for inhibition of cell growth and effects on viability of, and morphological changes in cultured Chinese hamster cells (V79 cells). The following results were obtained. 1. The 50% inhibition dose of T-3262 for cell growth (ID50, cultured for 48 hours) was 12 micrograms/ml, showing that the inhibitory effect of T-3262 on the cell growth was stronger than that of enoxacin (ENX: ID50 44 micrograms/ml), norfloxacin (NFLX: ID50 105 micrograms/ml) or ofloxacin (OFLX: ID50 145 micrograms/ml). 2. The number of cells increased and dead cells were scarcely seen at the highest concentration tested in culture medium (40 micrograms/ml of T-3262 for 48 hours). At this concentration, degeneration of cytoplasm (atrophy and round shape) and decrease of mitotic cells were observed. These morphological changes were similar to those of the cells treated 400 micrograms/ml of NFLX or OFLX for 48 hours. 3. After the removal of T-3262 from culture medium, the cells began to grow actively and recovered from the morphological changes. The similar phenomenon was observed with ENX treated cells but not with fluorouracil or mitomycin C treated cells.

  12. Are Chinese Students Willing to Learn and Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiao; Hu, Cuihuan; Mao, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can improve survival rate from cardiac arrest and students are potentially important bystander CPR providers. Our aim was to investigate the willingness among Chinese students to learn and perform bystander CPR. Questionnaires were distributed to 1407 students. The survey investigated the willingness to learn and perform bystander CPR and the barriers to performing CPR on family members and strangers, assuming that students had mastered CPR. Only 14.6% of respondents reported having ever attended CPR training classes, however, 88.3% expressed their willingness to learn. The main characteristics of the students who were willing to learn were the following: they considered the development of the local emergency system excellent (odds ratio [OR] = 3.15); cardiovascular diseases were present within their family (OR = 2.74); and they had previously heard about CPR (OR = 2.43). Almost all respondents (94.6%) reported that they would conduct bystander CPR on family members, while only 59.7% of respondents would do it for strangers. A lack of confidence was the principal barrier to doing CPR for family members (78.4%) and the leading barrier to stranger CPR was the fear of legal liability if their lifesaving attempts failed (90.8%). The complicated process of performing CPR was also a major barrier in both scenarios. When there is a great desire to learn CPR, the rate and effect of training can be significantly improved by providing students with regular CPR training, especially compression-only CPR training. Training classes should focus on enhancing the participants' confidence. In addition, legislation by the government is needed to protect the rescuers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genomic landscapes of Chinese hamster ovary cell lines as revealed by the Cricetulus griseus draft genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Nathan E; Liu, Xin; Li, Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, first isolated in 1957, are the preferred production host for many therapeutic proteins. Although genetic heterogeneity among CHO cell lines has been well documented, a systematic, nucleotide-resolution characterization of their genotypic differences has been...... of this genetic diversity highlight the value of the hamster genome as the reference upon which CHO cells can be studied and engineered for protein production....

  14. Genomic landscapes of Chinese hamster ovary cell lines as revealed by the Cricetulus griseus draft genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Nathan E; Liu, Xin; Li, Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, first isolated in 1957, are the preferred production host for many therapeutic proteins. Although genetic heterogeneity among CHO cell lines has been well documented, a systematic, nucleotide-resolution characterization of their genotypic differences has been...... stymied by the lack of a unifying genomic resource for CHO cells. Here we report a 2.4-Gb draft genome sequence of a female Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus, harboring 24,044 genes. We also resequenced and analyzed the genomes of six CHO cell lines from the CHO-K1, DG44 and CHO-S lineages....... This analysis identified hamster genes missing in different CHO cell lines, and detected >3.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 551,240 indels and 7,063 copy number variations. Many mutations are located in genes with functions relevant to bioprocessing, such as apoptosis. The details...

  15. Augmenting Chinese hamster genome assembly by identifying regions of high confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanathan, Nandita; Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Sharma, Mohit; Johnson, Kathryn C; Mudge, Joann; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Onsongo, Getiria; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Jacob, Nitya M; Le, Huong; Karypis, George; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2016-09-01

    Chinese hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines are the dominant industrial workhorses for therapeutic recombinant protein production. The availability of genome sequence of Chinese hamster and CHO cells will spur further genome and RNA sequencing of producing cell lines. However, the mammalian genomes assembled using shot-gun sequencing data still contain regions of uncertain quality due to assembly errors. Identifying high confidence regions in the assembled genome will facilitate its use for cell engineering and genome engineering. We assembled two independent drafts of Chinese hamster genome by de novo assembly from shotgun sequencing reads and by re-scaffolding and gap-filling the draft genome from NCBI for improved scaffold lengths and gap fractions. We then used the two independent assemblies to identify high confidence regions using two different approaches. First, the two independent assemblies were compared at the sequence level to identify their consensus regions as "high confidence regions" which accounts for at least 78 % of the assembled genome. Further, a genome wide comparison of the Chinese hamster scaffolds with mouse chromosomes revealed scaffolds with large blocks of collinearity, which were also compiled as high-quality scaffolds. Genome scale collinearity was complemented with EST based synteny which also revealed conserved gene order compared to mouse. As cell line sequencing becomes more commonly practiced, the approaches reported here are useful for assessing the quality of assembly and potentially facilitate the engineering of cell lines. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Glycoengineering of Chinese hamster ovary cells for enhanced erythropoietin N-glycan branching and sialylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Bojiao; Gao, Yuan; Chung, Cheng-yu

    2015-01-01

    -glycosylation of recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO), a human α2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6Gal1) was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. Sialylation increased on both EPO and CHO cellular proteins as observed by SNA lectin analysis, and HPLC profiling revealed that the sialic acid content of total glycans on EPO...

  17. Toward genome-scale models of the Chinese hamster ovary cells: incentives, status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Fan, Yuzhou; Weilguny, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Bioprocessing of the important Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines used for the production of biopharmaceuticals stands at the brink of several redefining events. In 2011, the field entered the genomics era, which has accelerated omics-based phenotyping of the cell lines. In this review we...

  18. The genomic sequence of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xun; Pan, Shengkai; Liu, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-derived cell lines are the preferred host cells for the production of therapeutic proteins. Here we present a draft genomic sequence of the CHO-K1 ancestral cell line. The assembly comprises 2.45 Gb of genomic sequence, with 24,383 predicted genes. We associate most...

  19. Trends and approaches in N-Glycosylation engineering in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have become the preferred expression system for the production of complex recombinantglycoproteins. It has been historically successful in industrial scale-up application and in generating human-like protein glycosylation.N-glycosylation of recombinant proteins...

  20. Versatile microscale screening platform for improving recombinant protein productivity in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Gram; Nilsson, Claes Nymand; Lund, Anne Mathilde

    2015-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used as cell factories for the production of biopharmaceuticals. In contrast to the highly optimized production processes for monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based biopharmaceuticals, improving productivity of non-mAb therapeutic glycoproteins is more likely...

  1. The genomic sequence of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xun; Pan, Shengkai; Liu, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-derived cell lines are the preferred host cells for the production of therapeutic proteins. Here we present a draft genomic sequence of the CHO-K1 ancestral cell line. The assembly comprises 2.45 Gb of genomic sequence, with 24,383 predicted genes. We associate most of...

  2. Model-based analysis of N-glycosylation in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krambeck, Frederick J.; Bennun, Sandra V; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell is the gold standard for manufacturing of glycosylated recombinant proteins for production of biotherapeutics. The similarity of its glycosylation patterns to the human versions enable the products of this cell line favorable pharmacokinetic properties and lower...

  3. Humanizing recombinant glycoproteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Holmgaard; Amann, Thomas; Kol, Stefan

    hamster ovary (CHO) cells are making a very heterogeneous mixture of NGlycans. We speculate that the CHO pattern of N-Glycans would affect half-life and/or efficacy of the glycoprotein in the bloodstream making it unsuitable for human intravenous use, whereas our humanized version would be identical...

  4. Characterization of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Producing Coagulation Factor VIII Using Multi-omics Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Christian Schrøder

    The first public draft of a genome from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was published in 2011, an entire decade after the first draft of the human genome. This publication of a relevant CHO reference genome, in combination with the fact that the cost for DNA sequencing has dropped more than 10...... hamster origin. The transcriptome of 14 clones producing a dynamic range of FVIII was analyzed using RNA sequencing revealing an unexpected degree of 5’ truncations of the transgene in 11 of the 14 clones. These truncations were validated using targeted genome sequencing, which also mapped the transgene...

  5. Assignment of genes encoding metallothioneins I and II to Chinese hamster chromosomes 3. Evidence for the role of chromosome rearrangement in gene amplification

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    Stallings, R.L.; Munk, A.C.; Longmire, J.L.; Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.

    1984-12-01

    Cadmium resistant (Cd/sup r/) variants with coordinately amplified metallothionein I and II (MTI and MTII) genes have been derived from both Chinese hamster ovary and near-euploid Chinese hamster cell lines. Cytogenetic analyses of Cd/sup r/ variants consistently revealed breakage and rearrangement involving chromosome 3p. In situ hybridization with Chinese hamster MT-encoding cDNA probe localized amplified MT gene sequences near the translocation breakpoint involving chromosome 3p. These observations suggested that both functionally related, isometallothionein loci are linked on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. Southern blot analyses of DNAs isolated from a panel of Chinese hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids which segregate hamster chromosomes confirmed that both MTI and MTII are located on chromosome 3. The authors speculate that rearrangement of chromosome 3p could be causally involved with the amplification of MT genes in Cd/sup r/ hamster cell lines. 34 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  6. Improving the secretory capacity of Chinese hamster ovary cells by ectopic expression of effector genes: Lessons learned and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Gram; Pristovsek, Nusa; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2017-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred cell factory for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins. Although efforts primarily within bioprocess optimization have led to increased product titers of recombinant proteins (r-proteins) expressed in CHO cells, post-transcriptional bottle......Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred cell factory for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins. Although efforts primarily within bioprocess optimization have led to increased product titers of recombinant proteins (r-proteins) expressed in CHO cells, post...

  7. Factors influencing Chinese university students' willingness to performing bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cui; Jin, Ying-Hui; Shi, Xiao-Tong; Ma, Wen-Jing; Wang, Yun-Yun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yao

    2017-05-01

    Low rates of bystander-initiated CPR are a major obstacle to improved survival rates, and the aim of this study is to elucidate the factors associated with university students' attitudes toward performing bystander CPR. Questionnaires were distributed to 18 universities across three metropolises in China. One question asking for respondents' attitudes toward performing bystander CPR was set as the dependent variable, and the logistic regression models were used to extract independent factors for respondents' attitudes toward performing bystander CPR. 2934 questionnaires were completed, with a response rate of 81.5%. Results suggested that predictors of willingness to perform bystander CPR were: previous experience of performing bystander CPR, higher self-perceived ability to perform bystander CPR properly after instruction, medicine and law discipline, male gender, not being the single child of their parents, higher participation in university societies, being used to taking decisive action immediately, less self-perceived life stress and higher self-perceived knowledge level of CPR. Persons having previous experience of performing bystander CPR and those who thought they would have the ability to perform bystander CPR properly are predominantly associated with willingness to perform bystander CPR. Psychological and cultural factors need further study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genomic landscapes of Chinese hamster ovary cell lines as revealed by the Cricetulus griseus draft genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan E; Liu, Xin; Li, Yuxiang; Nagarajan, Harish; Yerganian, George; O'Brien, Edward; Bordbar, Aarash; Roth, Anne M; Rosenbloom, Jeffrey; Bian, Chao; Xie, Min; Chen, Wenbin; Li, Ning; Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Latif, Haythem; Forster, Jochen; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Famili, Iman; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2013-08-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, first isolated in 1957, are the preferred production host for many therapeutic proteins. Although genetic heterogeneity among CHO cell lines has been well documented, a systematic, nucleotide-resolution characterization of their genotypic differences has been stymied by the lack of a unifying genomic resource for CHO cells. Here we report a 2.4-Gb draft genome sequence of a female Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus, harboring 24,044 genes. We also resequenced and analyzed the genomes of six CHO cell lines from the CHO-K1, DG44 and CHO-S lineages. This analysis identified hamster genes missing in different CHO cell lines, and detected >3.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 551,240 indels and 7,063 copy number variations. Many mutations are located in genes with functions relevant to bioprocessing, such as apoptosis. The details of this genetic diversity highlight the value of the hamster genome as the reference upon which CHO cells can be studied and engineered for protein production.

  9. Fetal calf serum-free suspension culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells employing fish serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masashi; Aizu, Yu; Shioya, Itaru; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2010-03-01

    The effects of heat treatment and concentration of fish serum (FS) on cell growth in a suspension culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) 1-15(500) (ATCC CRL-9606) cells were investigated. An increase in FS concentration from 1% to 4% markedly increased cell density. On the other hand, heat treatment of FS showed nearly no effect on cell density. Copyright 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Discovery of transcription start sites in the Chinese hamster genome by next-generation RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobi, Tobias; Brinkrolf, Karina; Tauch, Andreas; Noll, Thomas; Stoye, Jens; Pühler, Alfred; Goesmann, Alexander

    2014-11-20

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines are one of the major production tools for monoclonal antibodies, recombinant proteins, and therapeutics. Although many efforts have significantly improved the availability of sequence information for CHO cells in the last years, forthcoming draft genomes still lack the information depth known from the mouse or human genomes. Many genes annotated for CHO cells and the Chinese hamster reference genome still are in silico predictions, only insufficiently verified by biological experiments. The correct annotation of transcription start sites (TSSs) is of special interest for CHO cells, as these directly define the location of the eukaryotic core promoter. Our study aims to elucidate these largely unexplored regions, trying to shed light on promoter landscapes in the Chinese hamster genome. Based on a 5' enriched dual library RNA sequencing approach 6547 TSSs were identified, of which over 90% were assigned to known genes. These TSSs were used to perform extensive promoter studies using a novel, modular bioinformatics pipeline, incorporating analyses of important regulatory elements of the eukaryotic core promoter on per-gene level and on genomic scale. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of Adriamycin-resistant and radiation-sensitive Chinese hamster cell lines

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    Sognier, M.A.; Yin Zhang; Eberle, R.L.; Belli, J.A. (Texas Univ., Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch)

    1992-11-03

    A series of cell lines derived from Chinese hamster V79 cells by selection in increasing concentrations of Adriamycin (ADRM) was developed to study the mechanism of drug resistance and its relationship to radiation response. Survival studies revealed that selection in increasingly higher concentrations of ADRM positively correlated with increased cellular drug resistance. Increased cellular resistance correlated positively with amplification of the hamster multidrug-resistance gene (pgp 1) as detected with dot blot analysis using the pCHP1 probe. Southern blot analysis of restriction endonuclease digested DNA showed that (1) some fragments were preferentially amplified compared to others in the ADRM-resistant; and (2) no major gene rearrangement appeared to have occurred during the selection for greater ADRM resistance. (author).

  12. Fetal calf serum-free culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells employing fish serum

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    Fujiwara, M.; Tsukada, R.; Tsujinaga, Y.; Takagi, M

    2007-01-01

    The effects of fish serum on cell growth and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) production in an adhesion culture of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells DR1000L4N were investigated and compared with those of fetal calf serum (FCS). Although fish serum did not stimulate the initial adhesion of CHO cells to culture dishes, it prompted cell growth after cell adhesion with FCS for 24 h. The cell density in the fish serum medium reached 75% that in the FCS medium. Fish ...

  13. Cell killing and mutation induction on Chinese hamster cells by photoradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, C.K.C.

    1982-11-01

    Applying radiation directly on cells, far-uv is more effective than black light, and black light is more effective than white light in inducing proliferative death and in inducing resistance to 6-thioguanine (6-TG), ouabain and diptheria toxin (DT). Gold light has no killing and mutagenic effects on CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells. Use of filters showed that a small percentage of shorter wavelengths in the far-uv region is responsible for most of the killing and mutagenic effects in the unfiltered broad spectra of black and white light.

  14. Recent progress with the DNA repair mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells

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    Thompson, L.H.; Salazar, E.P.; Brookman, K.W.; Collins, C.C.; Stewart, S.A.; Busch, D.B.; Weber, C.A.

    1986-04-02

    Repair deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are being used to identify human genes that correct the repair defects and to study mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis. Five independent tertiary DNA transformants were obtained from the EM9 mutant. In these clones a human DNA sequence was identified that correlated with the resistance of the cells to CldUrd. After Eco RI digestion, Southern transfer, and hybridization of transformant DNAs with the BLUR-8 Alu family sequence, a common fragment of 25 to 30 kb was present. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Saccharin-induced sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster and human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, S.; Rodin, B.

    1978-05-05

    Since the induction of sister chromatid exchanges in cultured cells has been shown to be the most sensitive mammalian system to detect the effects of mutagenic carcinogens, Chinese hamster ovary cells and human lymphocytes were exposed to the sodium saccharin found to induce bladder cancer in rats. Both that saccharin and a highly purified extract of it increased the yield of sister chromatid exchanges in both types of cells. The results, which were repeatable and statistically highly significant, indicated that the weak carcinogen, saccharin, is also mutagenic in the sense that it induces cytogenetic changes.

  16. Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.h [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to the biological response found in cells (called bystander cells) which are not irradiated directly by ionizing radiation but are next to cells irradiated directly by ionizing radiation. In the present paper, the effects of Magnolol, an extract from the bark of Magnolia officinalis which is used as a traditional Chinese medicine, were studied on alpha-particle induced bystander effects. In our experiments, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in PADC-film based dishes and were irradiated with low fluences of alpha particles passing through the PADC films. The precise number of cells traversed or missed by alpha particles could be determined by studying the alpha-particle tracks developed on the PADC films upon subsequent chemical etching. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was employed to analyze the biological response of bystander cells in terms of DNA strand breaks. With the pretreatment of Magnolol, the DNA strand breaks in bystander cells were reduced, which showed that the alpha-particle induced bystander effects were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol. Since Magnolol is an antioxidant which can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), our results give support to that ROS play a role in the bystander signal transmission in our experiments.

  17. Glycosylation analysis of an aggregated antibody produced by Chinese hamster ovary cells in bioreactor culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Kawaguchi, Akira; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Honda, Kohsuke; Ohtake, Hisao; Omasa, Takeshi

    2014-05-01

    N-Glycosylation of therapeutic antibodies contributes not only to their biological function, but also to their stability and tendency to aggregate. Here, we investigated the impact of the glycosylation status of an aggregated antibody that accumulated during the bioreactor culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that there was no apparent difference in the glycosylation patterns of monomeric, dimeric, and large aggregated forms of the antibody. In contrast, lectin binding assays, which enable the total amounts of specific sugar residues to be detected, showed that both galactose and fucose residues in dimers and large aggregates were reduced to 70-80% of the amount in monomers. These results strongly suggest that the lack of N-linked oligosaccharides, a result of deglycosylation or aglycosylation, occurred in a proportion of the dimeric and large aggregated components. The present study demonstrates that glycosylation heterogeneities are a potential cause of antibody aggregation in cell culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells, and that the lack of N-glycosylation promotes the formation of dimers and finally results in large aggregates. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Study of influence of catechins on bystander responses in alpha-particle radiobiological experiments using thin PADC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.h [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    In this study, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in custom-made petri dishes with thin PADC films as substrates. Alpha particles with energies of 5 MeV were then irradiated from the bottom of PADC films. The DNA strand breaks in the bystander cells induced by irradiation were quantified with the use of terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. To study the influence of catechins on the bystander responses, catechins were added into the medium before alpha-particle irradiation of the cells. Fewer DNA strand breaks in the bystander cells were observed. As catechins are ROS (reactive oxygen species)-scavengers, the studied bystander cells might have been protected from radiation through scavenging of ROS by catechins.

  19. The influence of the wavelength of ultraviolet radiation on survival, mutation induction and DNA repair in irradiated Chinese hamster cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, B.; Reynolds, R.J.; Kottenhagen, M.J.; Schuite, A.; Lohman, P.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were used to compare the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of far-UV radiation emitted by a low-pressure mercury, germicidal lamp (wavelength predominantly 254 nm) with that of near-UV radiation emitted by a fluorescent lamp with a continuous spectrum (Westinghouse 'Sun

  20. Glycosylation profile of a recombinant urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, M; Rahbek-Nielsen, H; Nielsen, P F

    1998-01-01

    migration and tissue remodeling. The uPA receptor is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein belonging to the Ly-6/uPAR superfamily and is the only multidomain member identified so far. We have now purified the three individual domains of a recombinant soluble uPAR variant, expressed in Chinese hamster ovary...

  1. Improving the secretory capacity of Chinese hamster ovary cells by ectopic expression of effector genes: Lessons learned and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Gram; Pristovsek, Nusa; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2017-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred cell factory for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins. Although efforts primarily within bioprocess optimization have led to increased product titers of recombinant proteins (r-proteins) expressed in CHO cells, post-transcriptional bottle...

  2. Mechanism of protection of bystander cells by exogenous carbon monoxide: Impaired response to damage signal of radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wu, L.J. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Y.C. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Wang, H.Z. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2011-05-10

    A protective effect of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO), generated by CO releasing molecule ticarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2), on the bystander cells from the toxicity of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was revealed in our previous study. In the present work, a possible mechanism of this CO effect was investigated. The results from medium transfer experiments showed that {alpha}-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells would release nitric oxide (NO), which was detected with specific NO fluorescence probe, to induce p53 binding protein 1 (BP1) formation in the cell population receiving the medium, and the release peak was found to be at 1 h post irradiation. Treating the irradiated or bystander cells separately with CO (CORM-2) demonstrated that CO was effective in the bystander cells but not the irradiated cells. Measurements of NO production and release with a specific NO fluorescence probe also showed that CO treatment did not affect the production and release of NO by irradiated cells. Protection of CO on cells to peroxynitrite, an oxidizing free radical from NO, suggested that CO might protect bystander cells via impaired response of bystander cells to NO, a RIBE signal in our research system.

  3. Mechanism of protection of bystander cells by exogenous carbon monoxide: impaired response to damage signal of radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, W; Yu, K N; Wu, L J; Wu, Y C; Wang, H Z

    2011-05-10

    A protective effect of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO), generated by CO releasing molecule ticarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2), on the bystander cells from the toxicity of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was revealed in our previous study. In the present work, a possible mechanism of this CO effect was investigated. The results from medium transfer experiments showed that α-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells would release nitric oxide (NO), which was detected with specific NO fluorescence probe, to induce p53 binding protein 1 (BP1) formation in the cell population receiving the medium, and the release peak was found to be at 1h post irradiation. Treating the irradiated or bystander cells separately with CO (CORM-2) demonstrated that CO was effective in the bystander cells but not the irradiated cells. Measurements of NO production and release with a specific NO fluorescence probe also showed that CO treatment did not affect the production and release of NO by irradiated cells. Protection of CO on cells to peroxynitrite, an oxidizing free radical from NO, suggested that CO might protect bystander cells via impaired response of bystander cells to NO, a RIBE signal in our research system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cloning and Expression of Luteinizing Hormone Subunits in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Soleimanifar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Luteinizing hormone (LH was secreted by the stimulating cells of the testes and ovaries in the anterior pituitary gland. The application of this hormone is in the treatment of men and women with infertility and amenorrhea respectively.Materials and Methods: In the present study the alpha and beta subunits of human LH gene were cloned into the pEGFP-N1 expression vector and produced the recombinant LH hormone in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO eukaryotic system.Results: Alpha and beta subunits of LH hormone were cloned between NheI and BamHI cut sites of pEGFP_N1 expression plasmid and confirmed by PCR.  Hormone expression was evaluated in CHO cell line by Western blotting using the specific antibody.Conclusion: Alpha and beta subunits of LH hormone were expressed in CHO cell line perfectly.

  5. Filter-Aided Sample Preparation (FASP) for Improved Proteome Analysis of Recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Orla; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Meleady, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used mammalian host cell line for biopharmaceutical production because of their ability to correctly fold and posttranslationally modify recombinant proteins that are compatible with human use. Proteomics, along with other 'omic platforms, are being used to understand the biology of CHO cells with the ultimate aim of enhancing CHO cell factories for more efficient production of biopharmaceuticals. In this chapter, we will describe an efficient protocol called Filter Aided Sample Preparation (FASP) for the extraction of proteins from CHO cells for proteomic studies. FASP uses a common ultrafiltration device whereby the membrane pores are small enough to allow contaminating detergents to pass through, while proteins are too large and are retained and concentrated in the filter unit. This method of sample preparation and protein digestion is universally applicable and can be easily employed in any proteomics facilities as standard everyday laboratory reagents and equipment are used.

  6. A Consensus Genome-scale Reconstruction of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hefzi, Hooman; Ang, Kok Siong; Hanscho, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells dominate biotherapeutic protein production and are widely used in mammalian cell line engineering research. To elucidate metabolic bottlenecks in protein production and to guide cell engineering and bioprocess optimization, we reconstructed the metabolic pathways...... in CHO and associated them with >1,700 genes in the Cricetulus griseus genome. The genome-scale metabolic model based on this reconstruction, iCHO1766, and cell-line-specific models for CHO-K1, CHO-S, and CHO-DG44 cells provide the biochemical basis of growth and recombinant protein production....... The models accurately predict growth phenotypes and known auxotrophies in CHO cells. With the models, we quantify the protein synthesis capacity of CHO cells and demonstrate that common bioprocess treatments, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors, inefficiently increase product yield. However, our...

  7. Detachment variants of Chinese hamster cells. Hyaluronic acid as a modulator of cell detachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnhart, B.J.; Cox, S.H.; Kraemer, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    Variants of the Chinese hamster cell line CHO have been isolated and characterized with respect to attachment and trypsin- or EGTA-mediated detachment kinetics, cell morphologies, and the complex carbohydrates (labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine) of the cell surface. The variant which was more readily detached from the substratum exhibited a more rounded cell shape and had three times more label as hyaluronic acid on the cell surface than the parental cell. The slowly detaching variant had a morphology similar to the parental cell but only half the radioactivity ascribable to hyaluronic acid. Endogenous levels of cAMP were unaltered in the variants. Exogenous db-cAMP caused the cells to elongate and flatten but did not alter the characteristic detachment kinetics. The role of hyaluronic acid as a modulator of the cell substratum interface is discussed.

  8. Trends and approaches in N-Glycosylation engineering in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have become the preferred expression system for the production of complex recombinantglycoproteins. It has been historically successful in industrial scale-up application and in generating human-like protein glycosylation.N-glycosylation of recombinant proteins......, in particular, of those as drug substances, is extremely concerned in drug development andapproval, as it will largely affect their stability, efficacy, clearance rate and immunogenicity. Therefore to engineering N-glycosylationof CHO cell-derived recombinant proteins are extremely important. Here, we...... will summarize a group of recent strategies andapproaches and come up with case studies for N-glycosylation engineering in CHO cells and show several examples of relevantstudy cases from our research: 1) media and feed design, 2) culture process optimization, 3) substrate addition, 4) geneticengineering, 5...

  9. Unique biophysical studies with diatomic deuterium beams. [Survival studies with V79 Chinese hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrig, N.; Bird, R.P.; Colvett, R.D.; Rossi, H.H.; Marino, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    By irradiating cells attached to thin Mylar foils with diatomic deuteron beams, the role of interaction distance in radiobiology can be investigated in a unique manner. The molecule breaks up into two separate ions which diverge from each other because of the multiple scattering process in the foil and in the cellular material. A distribution of separation distances results whose characteristic separation depends on the Mylar foil thickness. An experimental facility to use diatomic beams is described. Cell survival results for V79 Chinese hamster cells synchronized in late S phase show that damage does result from tracks separated by as much as 250 nm. However, damage also results from interaction at nanometer dimensions.

  10. Phosphopeptide Enrichment and LC-MS/MS Analysis to Study the Phosphoproteome of Recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michael; Coleman, Orla; Prashant; Clynes, Martin; Meleady, Paula

    2017-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is one of the most important post-translational modifications that regulates many biological processes. The phosphoproteome has not been studied in any great detail in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to date despite phosphorylation playing a crucial role in regulating many molecular and cellular processes relevant to bioprocess phenotypes including, for example, transcription, translation, growth, apoptosis, and signal transduction. In this chapter, we provide a protocol for the phosphoproteomic analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells using phosphopeptide enrichment with metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC) and immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) techniques, followed by site-specific identification of phosphorylated residues using LC-MS (MS2 and MS3) strategies.

  11. Observation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells retained inside the non-woven fiber matrix of the CellTank bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    This data article shows how the recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are located in the interstices of the matrix fibers of a CellTank bioreactor after completion of a perfusion culture, supporting the article entitled "Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor" by Zhang et al. [1]. It provides a visualization of the cell distribution in the non-woven fiber matrix in a deeper view.

  12. Transfection of normal human and Chinese hamster DNA corrects diepoxybutane-induced chromosomal hypersensitivity of Fanconi anemia fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaham, M.; Adler, B.; Ganguly, S.; Chaganti, R.S.K.

    1987-08-01

    Cultured cells from individuals affected with Fanconi anemia (FA) exhibit spontaneous chromosome breakage and hypersensitivity to the cell killing and clastogenic effects of the difunctional alkylating agent diepoxybutane (DEB). The authors report here the correction of both of these DEB-hypersensitivity phenotypes of FA cells achieved by cotransfection of normal placental of Chinese hamster lung cell DNA and the plasmid pSV2-neo-SVgpt. Transfectants were selected for clonogenic survival after treatment with DEB at a dose of 5 ..mu..gml. At this dose of DEB, the clonogenicity of normal fibroblasts was reduced to 50% and that of FA fibroblasts was reduced to zero. DEB-resistant (DEB/sup r/) colonies selected in this system exhibited a normal response to DEB-induced chromosome breakage and resistance to repeated DEB treatment. The neo and gpt sequences were detected by Southern blot analysis of DNA from one of four DEB/sup r/ colonies independently derived from transfection of human DNA and one of three DEB/sup r/ colonies independently derived from transfection of Chinese hamster DNA. The results demonstrate that DNA sequences that complement the two hallmark cellular phenotypes (cellular and chromosomal hypersensitivity to alkylating agents) of FA are present in human as well as Chinese hamster DNA. The cloning of these genes using transfection strategies can be expected to enable molecular characterization of FA

  13. Model-based analysis of N-glycosylation in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krambeck, Frederick J; Bennun, Sandra V; Andersen, Mikael R; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell is the gold standard for manufacturing of glycosylated recombinant proteins for production of biotherapeutics. The similarity of its glycosylation patterns to the human versions enable the products of this cell line favorable pharmacokinetic properties and lower likelihood of causing immunogenic responses. Because glycan structures are the product of the concerted action of intracellular enzymes, it is difficult to predict a priori how the effects of genetic manipulations alter glycan structures of cells and therapeutic properties. For that reason, quantitative models able to predict glycosylation have emerged as promising tools to deal with the complexity of glycosylation processing. For example, an earlier version of the same model used in this study was used by others to successfully predict changes in enzyme activities that could produce a desired change in glycan structure. In this study we utilize an updated version of this model to provide a comprehensive analysis of N-glycosylation in ten Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines that include a wild type parent and nine mutants of CHO, through interpretation of previously published mass spectrometry data. The updated N-glycosylation mathematical model contains up to 50,605 glycan structures. Adjusting the enzyme activities in this model to match N-glycan mass spectra produces detailed predictions of the glycosylation process, enzyme activity profiles and complete glycosylation profiles of each of the cell lines. These profiles are consistent with biochemical and genetic data reported previously. The model-based results also predict glycosylation features of the cell lines not previously published, indicating more complex changes in glycosylation enzyme activities than just those resulting directly from gene mutations. The model predicts that the CHO cell lines possess regulatory mechanisms that allow them to adjust glycosylation enzyme activities to mitigate side effects of

  14. Characterization of recombinant human diamine oxidase (rhDAO) produced in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gludovacz, Elisabeth; Maresch, Daniel; Bonta, Maximilian; Szöllösi, Helen; Furtmüller, Paul G; Weik, Robert; Altmann, Friedrich; Limbeck, Andreas; Borth, Nicole; Jilma, Bernd; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-06-10

    Human diamine oxidase (hDAO) efficiently degrades polyamines and histamine. Reduced enzyme activities might cause complications during pregnancy and be involved in histamine intolerance. So far hDAO has been characterized after isolation from either native sources or the heterologous production in insect cells. Accessibility to human enzyme is limited and insect cells produce non-human glycosylation patterns that may alter its biochemical properties. We present the heterologous expression of hDAO in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and a three step purification protocol. Analysis of metal content using ICP-MS revealed that 93% of the active sites were occupied by copper. Topaquinone (TPQ) cofactor content was determined using phenylhydrazine titration. Ninety-four percent of DAO molecules contained TPQ and therefore the copper content at the active site was indirectly confirmed. Mass spectrometric analysis was conducted to verify sequence integrity of the protein and to assess the glycosylation profile. Electronic circular dichroism and UV-vis spectra data were used to characterize structural properties. The substrate preference and kinetic parameters were in accordance with previous publications. The establishment of a recombinant production system for hDAO enables us to generate decent amounts of protein with negligible impurities to address new scientific questions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Production of human mutant biologically active hepatocyte growth factor in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongsheng; Wan, Aini; Peng, Lin; Chen, Yun; He, Yang; Yang, Jianfeng; Jin, Jian

    2017-05-28

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent multifunctional cytokine that affects proliferation, migration, and morphogenesis of various cells. HGF is secreted as an inactive single-chain precursor protein and activated by the cleavage of serine proteases to form heterodimers. In our current study, the cleavage site of HGF was blocked by replaced Arg 494 of Glu (R494E) that resulted in the single-chain HGF (R494E) unable to be cleaved by serine proteases. We established Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells overexpressing HGF (R494E), the expression of HGF (R494E) achieved 12 mg/L and was similar to a previously reported study. The recombinant protein was then purified from culture medium using a two-step chromatographic procedure that resulted in about a 40% recovery rate. The purified HGF (R494E) was obtained as a single-chain active protein. It concluded that HGF (R494E) exhibited a biologically active protein and the overexpressing CHO cell line supplied sufficient material for future studies. The R494E replacement of the cleavage site would be beneficial to the utility of other similar therapeutic proteins.

  16. Culture temperature modulates monoclonal antibody charge variation distribution in Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xintao; Sun, Ya-Ting; Tang, Hongping; Fan, Li; Hu, Dongdong; Liu, Jintao; Liu, Xuping; Tan, Wen-Song

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effect of lowering culture temperature on monoclonal antibody charge variation distribution in Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures. In both batch and fed-batch cultures, lowering the culture temperature decreased the antibody acidic variant levels. The acidic variant levels (defined as variants eluting earlier than the main peak of an antibody during HPLC) at 32 °C were about 10 % lower than those at 37 °C at the end of both batch and fed-batch cultures. Additionally, lowering the culture temperature increased the lysine variant level, which further increased basic variant level. The lysine variant levels at 32 °C were about 8 % (batch culture) and 3 % (fed-batch culture) higher than those at 37 °C at the end of cultures. Real-time PCR results suggests that the decrease in carboxypeptidase B transcription level might be partially responsible for the increased lysine variant level at sub-physiological temperatures. Culture temperature exhibits noticeable impact on antibody charge variation distribution, especially the acidic variants and lysine variants.

  17. A Consensus Genome-scale Reconstruction of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Hefzi, Hooman

    2016-11-23

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells dominate biotherapeutic protein production and are widely used in mammalian cell line engineering research. To elucidate metabolic bottlenecks in protein production and to guide cell engineering and bioprocess optimization, we reconstructed the metabolic pathways in CHO and associated them with >1,700 genes in the Cricetulus griseus genome. The genome-scale metabolic model based on this reconstruction, iCHO1766, and cell-line-specific models for CHO-K1, CHO-S, and CHO-DG44 cells provide the biochemical basis of growth and recombinant protein production. The models accurately predict growth phenotypes and known auxotrophies in CHO cells. With the models, we quantify the protein synthesis capacity of CHO cells and demonstrate that common bioprocess treatments, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors, inefficiently increase product yield. However, our simulations show that the metabolic resources in CHO are more than three times more efficiently utilized for growth or recombinant protein synthesis following targeted efforts to engineer the CHO secretory pathway. This model will further accelerate CHO cell engineering and help optimize bioprocesses.

  18. Bacterial artificial chromosome library for genome-wide analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omasa, Takeshi; Cao, Yihua; Park, Joon Young; Takagi, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Shuichi; Yano, Hidenori; Honda, Kohsuke; Asakawa, Shuichi; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Ohtake, Hisao

    2009-12-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines are widely used for scientific research and biotechnology. A CHO genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed from a mouse dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene-amplified CHO DR1000L-4N cell line for genome-wide analysis of CHO cell lines. The CHO BAC library consisted of 122,281 clones and was expected to cover the entire CHO genome five times. A CHO chromosomal map was constructed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging using BAC clones as hybridization probes (BAC-FISH). Thirteen BAC-FISH marker clones were necessary to identify all the 20 individual chromosomes in a DHFR-deficient CHO DG44 cell line because of the aneuploidy of the cell line. To determine the genomic structure of the exogenous Dhfr amplicon, a 165-kb DNA region containing exogenous Dhfr was cloned from the BAC library using high-density replica (HDR) filters and Southern blot analysis. The nucleotide sequence analysis revealed a novel genomic structure in which the vector sequence containing Dhfr was sandwiched by long inverted sequences of the CHO genome.

  19. Genetic effects of the flavonols quercetin, kaempferol, and galangin on Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, J.H. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA); Carrano, A.V.; MacGregor, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    The genotoxicity of selected flavonols was evaluated by multiple endpoints in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Chromosomal aberrations, sister-chromatid exchange (SCE), and forward mutation at 4 gene loci were measured in a single population of cells exposed to quercetin, kaempferol, or galangin for 15 h with and without metabolic activation. The incidence of chromosomal aberrations was significantly increased by quercetin in the absence of activation and by kaempferol and galangin with and without activation. Flavanol treatment affected SCE and mutation at the hgprt, aprt, or Na/sup +//K/sup +/-ATPase loci only marginally, but significantly increased mutation frequencies at the tk locus. The response at the tk locus suggests that the CHO cells may behave similarly to L5178Y cells, in which the tk locus is thought to reflect chromosomal lesions in addition to point mutation. These results indicate that, at least under the conditions examined, flavonols induce chromosomal aberrations in CHO cells, but have little effect on point mutation or SCE.

  20. Effect of anolyte on growth and division of Chinese hamster cancerous cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saeed Mohammadzadeh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: At present, cancer can be controlled by chemotherapy, but unfortunately, this method has strong side effects and scientist try to reduce them using different substances. 2 kinds of activated water called anolyte and catholyte have electrochemical property and antibacterial and oxidative properties respectively. The aim of this research is to study the effect of anolyte on growth and division of cancerous cells. Materials and Methods: In this research, different concentration of anolyte, 1 . 7, 2, 5,8.3 and 10 percent of anolyte and control with 2 and 5 percent of serum physiologic were added on converted cell of Chinese hamster (line b11dii-FAF28 clone 237 in 12 plastic and 15 glass flasks. After adding, converted cell was counted with the help of hoemocytometer and microscope. Data of experiment analyzed and results compared by t test, as well as using Excell software their diagrams were drawn. Results: The results indicated that anolyte had significant effect on cancer cells. In concentration of 1.7% cell division was decreased but in concentration of 8.3 %, division of cancerous cells was blocked and cells were fixed. Conclusion: Considering the low amount of sodium chloride in anolyte, it seems that, this solution (Anolyte hasn’t side effects and advers effect on the cells body.

  1. Neutron-energy-dependent mutagenesis in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, L.X.; Hill, C.K. [USC School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    There has been a keen interest in the past decade in both elucidating the mutation frequency for different energy radiations and determining if mutation frequencies vary from one gene to another. This interest is driven in part by the strong link between mutational events and subsequent development of the carcinogenic state. Using fast neutrons produced by impinging protons on a beryllium target at the UCLA/VA cyclotron, we have examined the energy dependence of the induction of mutants at the hprt and tk loci. In this paper, we present studies using V79 Chinese hamster cells exposed to beams of neutrons produced from protons with 46, 30, 20 and 14 MeV energy. There is a gradually increasing cytotoxic effect of the neutrons as the energy decreases. In a similar fashion, the mutation frequency also shows a strong energy dependence with the frequency increasing as the energy decreases. The results also show that the frequency of induced mutants at the tk gene is higher than at the hprt gene. Calculations of RBE using {gamma} rays as the standard radiation showed a maximum for 14 MeV neutrons of 5.4 for the hprt locus and 36.6 for TK normal-growth mutants (TKng). Most of the curves for induction are best fitted with a linear function in the low-dose region with a few becoming curvilinear at higher doses. 28 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of glass ionomer cements on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Favero

    2006-06-01

    Glass ionomer cements are widely used in dentistry as restorative materials and adhesives for composite restorations. However, the results of genotoxicity studies using these materials are inconclusive in literature. The goal of this study was to examine the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of three different glass ionomer cements available commercially (Ketac Cem, Ketac Molar and Vitrebond) by the single cell gel (comet) assay and trypan blue exclusion test, respectively. For this, such materials were exposed to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in vitro for 1 h at 37( composite function)C. Data were assessed by Kruskall-Wallis nonparametric test. The results showed that the powder from Ketac Molar displayed genotoxicity only in the maximum concentration evaluated (100 microg/mL). In the same way, the liquid from Vitrebond at 0.1% dilution caused an increase of DNA injury. Significant differences (P<0.05) in cytotoxicity provoked by all powders tested of glass ionomer cements were observed for exposure at 1,000 microg/mL concentration. With respect to liquids of glass ionomer cements evaluated, the major toxic effect on cell viability was produced at 10%, beginning at the dilution of 0.5% for Vitrebond. Taken together, we conclude that some components of glass ionomer cements show both genotoxic and cytotoxic effects.

  3. Enhancing Protein Production Yield from Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells by CRISPR Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chih-Che; Sung, Li-Yu; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Lin, Mei-Wei; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2017-08-18

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are an important host for biopharmaceutical production. Generation of stable CHO cells typically requires cointegration of dhfr and a foreign gene into chromosomes and subsequent methotrexate (MTX) selection for coamplification of dhfr and foreign gene. CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) is an emerging system that effectively suppresses gene transcription through the coordination of dCas9 protein and guide RNA (gRNA). However, CRISPRi has yet to be exploited in CHO cells. Here we constructed vectors expressing the functional CRISPRi system and proved effective CRISPRi-mediated suppression of dhfr transcription in CHO cells. We next generated stable CHO cell clones coexpressing DHFR, the model protein (EGFP), dCas9 and gRNA targeting dhfr. Combined with MTX selection, CRISPRi-mediated repression of dhfr imparted extra selective pressure to force CHO cells to coamplify more copies of dhfr and egfp genes. Compared with the traditional method relying on MTX selection (up to 250 nM), the CRISPRi approach increased the dhfr copy number ∼3-fold, egfp copy number ∼3.6-fold and enhanced the EGFP expression ∼3.8-fold, without impeding the cell growth. Furthermore, we exploited the CRISPRi approach to enhance the productivity of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) ∼2.3-fold. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, the application of CRISPRi in CHO cells to enhance recombinant protein production and may pave a new avenue to CHO cell engineering.

  4. Metabolic analysis of antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary cell culture under different stresses conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badsha, Md Bahadur; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Oga, Takushi; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are commonly used as the host cell lines concerning their ability to produce therapeutic proteins with complex post-translational modifications. In this study, we have investigated the time course extra- and intracellular metabolome data of the CHO-K1 cell line, under a control and stress conditions. The addition of NaCl and trehalose greatly suppressed cell growth, where the maximum viable cell density of NaCl and trehalose cultures were 2.2-fold and 2.8-fold less than that of a control culture. Contrariwise, the antibody production of both the NaCl and trehalose cultures was sustained for a longer time to surpass that of the control culture. The NaCl and trehalose cultures showed relatively similar dynamics of cell growth, antibody production, and substrate/product concentrations, while they indicated different dynamics from the control culture. The principal component analysis of extra- and intracellular metabolome dynamics indicated that their dynamic behaviors were consistent with biological functions. The qualitative pattern matching classification and hierarchical clustering analyses for the intracellular metabolome identified the metabolite clusters whose dynamic behaviors depend on NaCl and trehalose. The volcano plot revealed several reporter metabolites whose dynamics greatly change between in the NaCl and trehalose cultures. The elastic net identified some critical, intracellular metabolites that are distinct between the NaCl and trehalose. While a relatively small number of intracellular metabolites related to the cell growth, glucose, glutamine, lactate and ammonium ion concentrations, the mechanism of antibody production was suggested to be very complicated or not to be explained by elastic net regression analysis. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of hydrolysates on monoclonal antibody productivity, purification and quality in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Steven C L; Nian, Rui; Woen, Susanto; Chng, Jake; Zhang, Peiqing; Yang, Yuansheng

    2016-10-01

    Plant and yeast derived hydrolysates are economical and efficient alternative medium supplements to improve mammalian cell culture performance. We supplemented two commercial Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) culture media with hydrolysates from four different sources, yeast, soybean, Ex-Cell CD (a chemically defined hydrolysate replacement) and wheat to improve the productivity of two cell lines expressing different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Yeast, soybean and Ex-Cell CD improved the final mAb titer by increasing the specific productivity (qP) and/or extension of the culture period. Wheat hydrolysates increased peak viable cell density but did not improve productivity. IgG recovery from protein A purification was not compromised for all cultures by adding yeast, soybean and Ex-Cell CD hydrolysates except for one sample from soybean supplemented culture. Adding these three hydrolysates neither increased the amount of host cell protein, DNA or aggregate impurity amounts nor affect their clearance after purification. Profiling of the glycan types revealed that yeast and soybean hydrolysates could affect the distribution of galactosylated glycans. Ex-Cell CD performed the best at maintaining glycan profile compared to the non-supplemented cultures. Overall, yeast performed the best at improving CHO culture growth and productivity without being detrimental to downstream protein A processes but could affect mAb product glycan distribution while Ex-Cell CD yielded lower titers but has less effect on glycosylation. The hydrolysate to use would thus depend on the requirements of each process and our results would provide a good reference for improving culture performance with hydrolysates or related studies. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diversity in host clone performance within a Chinese hamster ovary cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Peter M; Berthelot, Maud E; Young, Robert J; Graham, James W A; Racher, Andrew J; Aldana, Dulce

    2015-01-01

    Much effort has been expended to improve the capabilities of individual Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cell lines to synthesize recombinant therapeutic proteins (rPs). However, given the increasing variety in rP molecular types and formats it may be advantageous to employ a toolbox of CHO host cell lines in biomanufacturing. Such a toolbox would contain a panel of hosts with specific capabilities to synthesize certain molecular types at high volumetric concentrations and with the correct product quality (PQ). In this work, we examine a panel of clonally derived host cell lines isolated from CHOK1SV for the ability to manufacture two model proteins, an IgG4 monoclonal antibody (Mab) and an Fc-fusion protein (etanercept). We show that these host cell lines vary in their relative ability to synthesize these proteins in transient and stable pool production format. Furthermore, we examined the PQ attributes of the stable pool-produced Mab and etanercept (by N-glycan ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), respectively), and uncovered substantial variation between the host cell lines in Mab N-glycan micro-heterogeneity and etanercept N and O-linked macro-heterogeneity. To further investigate the capabilities of these hosts to act as cell factories, we examined the glycosylation pathway gene expression profiles as well as the levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in the untransfected hosts. We uncovered a moderate correlation between ER mass and the volumetric product concentration in transient and stable pool Mab production. This work demonstrates the utility of leveraging diversity within the CHOK1SV pool to identify new host cell lines with different performance characteristics. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  7. Interphase Death of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Exposed to Accelerated Heavy Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mehnati

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heavy ions are nucleus of elements of iron, argon, carbon and neon that all carry positive electrical charges. For these particles to be useful in radiotherapy they need to accelerated to high energy by more than thousand mega volts. Also the cosmic environment is considered to be a complicated mixture of highly energetic photons and heavy ions such as iron. Therefore, the health risks to astronauts during long mission should be considered.  Materials and Methods: The induction of interphase death was tested on Chinese hamster ovary cells by exposing them to accelerated heavy ions (carbon, neon, argon and iron of 10-2000 linear energy transfers (LETs. The fraction of cells that underwent interphase death was determined by observing individual cells with time-lapse photography (direct method as well as by the indirect method of counting cells undergoing interphase death made visible by the addition of caffeine (indirect method. Results: The interphase death due to the exposure to X- rays is increased linearly as the dose exceeds the threshold dose of 10 Gy. Whereas the interphase death increases at a higher rate due to the exposure to high LET heavy ions and no threshold dose was observed. The range of LET values corresponding to the maximum RBE for the interphase death is 120-230 keV/µm. The probability of inducing the interphase death by a single heavy ion traversing through the nucleus is about 0.04-0.08. Discussion and Conclusion: The relative biological effectiveness (RBE of heavy ions as compared to X- rays as determined at the 50% level of induction is increased with LET. It reached a maximum value at a LET of approximately 230 keV/µm and then decreased with further increase in LET. The range of LET values corresponding to the maximum RBE appears to be narrower for interphase death than for reproductive death.

  8. Phosphorylation of 3-deazaguanosine by nicotinamide riboside kinase in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, P P; Tan, M T; Spindler, C D; Robins, R K

    1989-12-01

    The growth inhibitory activity of 3-deazaguanosine toward a mutant line (TGR-3) of Chinese hamster ovary cells deficient in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) was substantially reversed by the simultaneous addition of nicotinamide riboside. The activities of most other ribonucleoside analogues tested were unaffected. The formation of cellular 3-deazaGMP and 3-deazaGTP from the ribonucleoside analogue, as measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography, was inhibited by the presence of nicotinamide riboside. The inhibition was dependent on concentration of 3-deazaguanosine and could also be demonstrated by following the metabolism of 3-deazaguanosine, labeled with 14C in the ribose moiety, to [14C]3-deazaGTP. In the presence of 100 microM nicotinamide riboside formation of the labeled triphosphate derivative of 3-deazaguanosine was undetectable. A 3-deazaguanosine phosphorylating activity was separated from other cellular kinases by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Contaminating purine nucleoside phosphorylase (EC 2.4.2.1) was subsequently removed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The resulting enzyme preparation demonstrated the greatest activities with nicotinamide riboside and 3-deazaguanosine and, in addition, could also phosphorylate tiazofurin and guanosine to lesser, but significant, degrees. These and other observations suggest that 3-deazaguanosine, and perhaps other agents such as tiazofurin, may, at least in part, be phosphorylated by a nicotinamide ribonucleoside kinase in these cells. If so, it is possible that the activity of this agent in other types of cells in vivo could be dependent upon the presence of this enzyme and that it could be influenced by cellular concentrations of the natural pyridine nucleoside.

  9. Characterization of a human monoclonal antibody against Shiga toxin 2 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyoshi, D E; Rich, C M; O'Sullivan-Murphy, S; Richard, L; Dilo, J; Donohue-Rolfe, A; Sheoran, A S; Chapman-Bonofiglio, S; Tzipori, S

    2005-07-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections can often lead to the development of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in a small percentage of infected humans. Patients with HUS receive only supportive treatment as the benefit of antibiotic therapy remains uncertain. We have previously reported the generation and preclinical evaluation of neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) against the Shiga toxins (Stx). In this paper, we describe the expression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells of 5C12 HuMAb, which is directed against the A subunit of Stx2. The cDNAs of the light and heavy chain immunoglobulin (Ig) variable regions of 5C12 HuMAb were isolated and cloned into an expression vector containing human IgG1 constant regions. The vector was transfected into CHO cells, and transfectants secreting Stx2-specific antibody were screened by an Stx2-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The CHO-produced recombinant 5C12 (r5C12) showed similar specificity and binding affinity to Stx2 as the parent hybridoma-produced 5C12. More significantly, the r5C12 displayed the same neutralizing activity as the parent 5C12 in vitro and in vivo. In the mouse toxicity model, both antibodies significantly and equally prolonged survival at a dose of 0.312 microg/mouse. The data showed that since r5C12, produced in CHO cells, was equally effective as the parent 5C12, it is our choice candidate as a potential prophylactic or therapeutic agent against hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant with altered regulation of phosphatidylserine biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, K.; Kuge, O.; Nishijima, M.; Akamatsu, Y. (National Institute of Health, Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-11-25

    We have screened approximately 10,000 colonies of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells immobilized on polyester cloth for mutants defective in (14C)ethanolamine incorporation into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable phospholipids. In mutant 29, discovered in this way, the activities of enzymes involved in the CDP-ethanolamine pathway were normal; however, the intracellular pool of phosphorylethanolamine was elevated, being more than 10-fold that in the parental CHO-K1 cells. These results suggested that the reduced incorporation of (14C)ethanolamine into phosphatidylethanolamine in mutant 29 was due to dilution of phosphoryl-(14C)ethanolamine with the increased amount of cellular phosphorylethanolamine. Interestingly, the rate of incorporation of serine into phosphatidylserine and the content of phosphatidylserine in mutant 29 cells were increased 3-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, compared with the parent cells. The overproduction of phosphorylethanolamine in mutant 29 cells was ascribed to the elevated level of phosphatidylserine biosynthesis, because ethanolamine is produced as a reaction product on the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine to phosphatidylserine, which is catalyzed by phospholipid-serine base-exchange enzymes. Using both intact cells and the particulate fraction of a cell extract, phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in CHO-K1 cells was shown to be inhibited by phosphatidylserine itself, whereas that in mutant 29 cells was greatly resistant to the inhibition, compared with the parental cells. As a conclusion, it may be assumed that mutant 29 cells have a lesion in the regulation of phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by serine-exchange enzyme activity, which results in the overproduction of phosphatidylserine and phosphorylethanolamine as well.

  11. Effects of heat treatment and concentration of fish serum on cell growth in adhesion culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, Masashi; Tsukada, Ryohei; Shioya, Itaru; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2009-01-01

    The effects of heat treatment and concentration of fish serum (FS) on cell growth and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) production in an adhesion culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, DR1000L4N, were investigated. The addition of heat treated FS instead of non-heat-treated FS improved cell growth in terms of cell density, which reached 60% that in 10% fetal calf serum (FCS)-containing medium (FCS medium). A decrease in FS concentration from 1...

  12. Multi-omic profiling of EPO-producing Chinese hamster ovary cell panel reveals metabolic adaptation to heterologous protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Daniel; Kazemi Seresht, Ali; Engmark, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred production host for many therapeutic proteins. The production of heterologous proteins in CHO cells imposes a burden on the host cell metabolism and impact cellular physiology on a global scale. In this work, a multi-omics approach was applied...... to 5 pg/cell/day. Time-course analysis of high- and low-producing clones in chemostat culture revealed rapid adaptation of transcription levels of amino acid catabolic genes in favor of EPO production within nine generations. Interestingly, the adaptation was followed by an increase in specific EPO...

  13. Observation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells retained inside the non-woven fiber matrix of the CellTank bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article shows how the recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cells are located in the interstices of the matrix fibers of a CellTank bioreactor after completion of a perfusion culture, supporting the article entitled “Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor” by Zhang et al. [1]. It provides a visualization of the cell distribution in the non-woven fiber matrix in a deeper view.

  14. Bystander deixis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to discuss non-standard speech forms of Romani and other languages in the larger context of bystander deixis, a subcategory of social deixis. First I will propose a three-way classification of instances of bystander deixis and illustrate them with examples from...... Romani and several other languages across the globe. The second part is concerned with the contextual factors that must have a place in a discourse model that wants to be able to handle linguistic manifestations of bystander deixis. Due the fact that Romani has typically been used for in-group...

  15. Impact of graphene oxide on viability of Chinese hamster ovary and mouse hepatoma MH-22A cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiuskaite, Danute; Grinceviciute, Nora; Snitka, Valentinas

    2015-08-01

    The evaluation of the cyto- and bio-compatibility is a critical step in the development of graphene oxide (GO) as a new promising material for in vivo biomedical applications. In this study, we report the impact of GO, with and without the addition of bovine serum albumin, on healthy (Chinese hamster ovary) and a cancer (mouse hepatoma MH-22A) cells viability and the estimation of the intracellular distribution of GO inside the cells in vitro. The viability tests were performed using a colony formation assay. The intracellular distribution of GO was estimated using Raman spectroscopy and imaging. The viability of both cell lines decreased with increasing concentration of graphene oxide (12.5-50.0 μg/ml): in the case of Chinese hamster ovary cells viability decreased from 44% to 11%, in the case of mouse hepatoma MH-22A cells--from 22% to 3%. These cell lines significantly differed in their response to GO and GO-BSA formulations. The results of viability tests correlate with results of atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy and imaging findings. The GO influence on cell morphology changes, cell structure, cells colony growth dynamics and GO accumulation inside the cells was higher in the case of mouse hepatoma MH-22A cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding Transcriptional Enhancement in Monoclonal Antibody-Producing Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Sarah E.

    With the demand for monoclonal antibody (mAB) therapeutics continually increasing, the need to better understand what makes a high productivity clone has gained substantial interest. Monoclonal antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with different productivities were provided by a biopharmaceutical company for investigation. Gene copy numbers, mRNA levels, and mAb productivities were previously determined for two low producing clones and their amplified progeny. These results showed an increase in mRNA copy number in amplified clones, which correlated to the observed increases in specific productivity of these clones. The presence of multiple copies of mRNA per one copy of DNA in the higher productivity clones has been coined as transcriptional enhancement. The methylation status of the CMV promoter as well as transcription factor/promoter interactions were evaluated to determine the cause of transcriptional enhancement. Methylation analysis via bisulfite sequencing revealed no significant difference in overall methylation status of the CMV promoter. These data did, however, reveal the possibility of differential interactions of transcription factors between the high and low productivity cell clones. This finding was further supported by chromatin immunoprecipitations previously performed in the lab, as well as literature studies. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) binding proteins were constructed and utilized to selectively immunoprecipitate the CMV promoter along with its associated transcription factors in the different CHO cell clones. Cells were transfected with the TALE proteins, harvested and subjected to a ChIP-like procedure. Results obtained from the TALE ChIP demonstrated the lack of binding of the protein to the promoter and the need to redesign the TALE. Overall, results obtained from this study were unable to give a clear indication as to the causes of transcriptional enhancement in the amplified CHO cell clones. Further

  17. Using titer and titer normalized to confluence are complementary strategies for obtaining Chinese hamster ovary cell lines with high volumetric productivity of etanercept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristovšek, Nuša; Hansen, Henning Gram; Sergeeva, Daria

    2018-01-01

    The selection of clonally-derived Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines with the highest production rate of recombinant glycoproteins remains a big challenge during early stages of cell line development. Different strategies using either product titer or product titer normalized to cell number...

  18. V-79 Chinese Hamster Cells irradiated with antiprotons, a study of peripheral damage due to medium and long range components of the annihilation radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacevic, Sandra; Bassler, Niels; Hartley, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    produce a significant background dose and reverse any benefits of higher biological dose in the target area. Materials and methods: Using the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN (Conseil Europeen pour la Recherche Nucleaire) we irradiated V-79 Chinese Hamster cells embedded in gelatine using an antiproton...

  19. Coordinate amplification of metallothionein I and II genes in cadmium-resistant Chinese hamster cells: implications for mechanisms regulating metallothionein gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, B.D.; Enger, M.D.; Griffith, B.B.; Griffith, J.K.; Hanners, J.L.; Longmire, J.L.; Munk, A.C.; Stallings, R.L.; Tesmer, J.G.; Walters, R.A.; Hildebrand, C.E.

    1985-02-01

    The authors describe here the derivation, characterization, and use of clonal cadmium-resistance (Cd/sup r) strains of the Chinese hamster cell line CHO which differ in their metallothionein (MT) induction capacity. By nondenaturing polyacrylaminde gel electrophoresis, the authors showed that the stable Cd/sup r/ phenotype is correlated with the augmented expression of both isometallothioneins (MTI and MTII). In cells resistant to concentrations of CdCl2 exceeding 20 M, coordinate amplifications of genes encoding both isometallothioneins was demonstrated by using cDNA MT-coding sequence probes and probes specific for 3'-noncoding regions of Chinese hamster MTI and MTII genes. Molecular and in situ hybridization analyses supported close linkage of Chinese hamster MTI and MTII genes, which the authors have mapped previously to Chinese hamster chromosome 3. This suggests the existence of a functionally related MT gene cluster in this species. Amplified Cd/sup r/ variants expressing abundant MT and their corresponding Cd/sup s/ parental CHO cells should be useful for future studies directed toward elucidating the mechanisms that regulate expressions of the isometallothioneins. 59 references, 8 figures.

  20. Accelerated Homology-Directed Targeted Integration of Transgenes in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Via CRISPR/Cas9 and Fluorescent Enrichment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jae Seong; Grav, Lise Marie; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup

    2016-01-01

    Targeted gene integration into site-specific loci can be achieved in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells via CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology and the homology-directed repair (HDR) pathway. The low efficiency of HDR often requires antibiotic selection, which limits targeted integration...

  1. Recurrent G-to-A substitution in a single codon of SREBP cleavage-activating protein causes sterol resistance in three mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Nohturfft, Axel; Hua, Xianxin; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1996-01-01

    Oxygenated sterols such as 25-hydroxycholesterol kill Chinese hamster ovary cells because they inhibit the proteolytic processing of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), a pair of membrane-bound transcription factors that activate genes controlling cholesterol synthesis and uptake from lipoproteins. The unprocessed SREBPs remain membrane-bound, they cannot activate the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, and the cells die of cholesterol deprivation. S...

  2. Isolation and structure determination of the intact sialylated N-linked carbohydrate chains of recombinant human follitropin expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Hård, K.; Mekking, A.; Damm, J.B.L.; Kamerling, J.P.; Boer, W. de; Wijnands, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Biologically active recombinant human follitropin has been expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The carbohydrate chains of the recombinant glycoprotein hormone were enzymatically released by peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase F. The oligosaccharides were separated from

  3. Primary structure of N-linked carbohydrate chains of a human chimeric plasminogen activator K2tu-PA expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Bergwerff, A.A.; Oostrum, J. van; Asselbergs, F.A.M.; Bürgi, R.; Hokke, C.H.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    A recombinant human plasminogen activator hybrid variant K2tu-PA, expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, is partially glycosylated at Asn12 (A chain, kringle-2 domain) and completely glycosylated at Asn247 (B chain, protease domain). After release of the N-linked carbohydrate chains by

  4. Mutations in Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit C Increase Radiosensitivity and Bystander Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongning; Hei, Tom K.

    Although radiation-induced bystander effect is well studied in the past decade, the precise mech-anisms are still unclear. It is likely that a combination of pathways involving both primary and secondary signaling processes is involved in producing a bystander effect. There is recent evidence that mitochondria play a critical role in bystander responses. Recently studies found that a mutation in succinate dehydrogenese subunit C (SDHC), an integral membrane protein in complex II of the electron transport chain, resulted in increased superoxide, oxidative stress, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and genomic instability, indicating that SDHC play a critical role in maintaining mitochondrial function. In the present study, using Chinese hamster fibroblasts (B1 cells) and the mutants (B9 cells) containing a single base substitution that produced a premature stop codon resulting in a 33-amino acid COOH-terminal truncation of the SDHC protein, we found that B9 cells had an increase in intracellular superoxide content, nitric oxide species, and mitochondrial membrane potential when compared with wild type cells. After irradiated with a grade of doses of gamma rays, B9 cells show an increased radiosensitivity, especially at high doses. The HPRT- mutant yield after gamma-ray irradiation in B9 cells was significantly higher than that of B1 cells. A single, 3Gy dose of gamma-rays increased the background mutant level by more than 4 fold. In contrast, the mutant induction was less than 2 fold in B1 cells. In addition, B9 cells produced a higher bystander mutagenesis after alpha particle irradiation than the B1 cells. Furthermore, pretreated with carboxy-2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO), a nitric oxide scavenger, significantly decreased the bystander effect. Our findings demonstrate that a mutation in SDHC increases radiosensitivity in both directly irradiated cells and in neighboring bystander cells, and mito-chondrial function play an essential role in

  5. Improving the secretory capacity of Chinese hamster ovary cells by ectopic expression of effector genes: Lessons learned and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Henning Gram; Pristovšek, Nuša; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Lee, Gyun Min

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred cell factory for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins. Although efforts primarily within bioprocess optimization have led to increased product titers of recombinant proteins (r-proteins) expressed in CHO cells, post-transcriptional bottlenecks in the biosynthetic pathway of r-proteins remain to be solved. To this end, the ectopic expression of transgenes (effector genes) offers great engineering potential. However, studies on effector genes have in some cases led to inconsistent results. Whereas this can in part be attributed to product specificity, other experimental and cellular factors are likely important contributors to these conflicting results. Here, these factors are reviewed and discussed with the objective of guiding future studies on effector genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of DMSO on Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays induced chromosome aberrations in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Adayapalam T., E-mail: natarajan@live.nl [University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Palitti, Fabrizio [University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Hill, Mark A. [CRUK/MRC Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Stevens, David L. [MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Ahnstroem, Gunnar [Department of Microbiology and Genetic Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-09-10

    Ultrasoft X-rays have been shown to be very efficient in inducing chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. The present study was aimed to evaluate the modifying effects of DMSO (a potent scavenger of free radicals) on the frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by soft X-rays. Confluent held G1 Chinese hamster cells (V79) were irradiated with Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays in the presence and absence of 1 M DMSO and frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the first division cells were determined. DMSO reduced the frequencies of exchange types of aberrations (dicentrics and centric rings) by a factor of 2.1-3.5. The results indicate that free radicals induced by ultrasoft X-rays contribute to a great extent to the induction of chromosome aberrations. The possible implications of these results in interpreting the mechanisms involved in the high efficiency of ultrasoft X-rays in the induction of chromosome aberrations are discussed.

  7. Analysis of cytogenetic effects of the secondary radiation resulting from 70 GeV protons of chinese hamster cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmadieva, A. Kh.; Aptikaeva, G. Ph.; Livanova, I. A.; Antipov, A. V.; Akoev, I. G.; Ganassi, E. E.

    The cell culture of a Chinese hamster was irradiated on a Serpuchov proton synchrotron at a dose of 0.5-4 Gy and a dose rate of 1 Gy/min and by gamma-irradiation at dose 1-5 Gy and dose rate 1.2-1.4 Gy/min. The effect of radiation on the cell culture was judged from chromosomal aberrations in G2-stage of cell cycle and micronuclear test. The relative biological efficience of the secondary radiation was approximately 3. Modifying effect of caffeine on the cells irradiated by secondary radiation of synchrotron was not observed. In the presence of caffeine the effect of γ-irradiation practically is increased up to the level observed upon secondary irradiation. This suggests that secondary radiation inhibits the repair of the cytogenetic damage.

  8. Effect of a combined modality treatment with cisplatinum and irradiation upon the survival of Chinese hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, W.; Trott, K.R.

    1985-05-01

    During combined treatment of Chinese hamster cells with cisplatinum and irradiation under aerobic conditions, there appear interactions between the two treatment modalities depending on the treatment sequence and the time intervals. Treatment with cisplatinum followed by irradiation leads to a reduction of the shoulder of the survival curve with increasing time interval. Simultaneous treatment with cisplatinum and irradiation under aerobic or hypoxic conditions does not change the survival curve. Treatment with cisplatinum under aerobic conditions followed by irradiation in hypoxia does not lead to any interaction of both modalities independent of the time interval in contrast to subsequent irradiation under aerobic conditions. The specific sensitization of hypoxic cells by cisplatinum towards irradiation described in the literature could not be demonstrated with our cell line.

  9. Aligned, isotropic and patterned carbon nanotube substrates that control the growth and alignment of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Che Azurahanim Che; Asanithi, Piyapong; Brunner, Eric W; Jurewicz, Izabela; Bo, Chiara; Sear, Richard P; Dalton, Alan B [Department of Physics and Surrey Materials Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Azad, Chihye Lewis; Ovalle-Robles, Raquel; Fang Shaoli; Lima, Marcio D; Lepro, Xavier; Collins, Steve; Baughman, Ray H, E-mail: r.sear@surrey.ac.uk [Alan G MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080-3021 (United States)

    2011-05-20

    Here we culture Chinese hamster ovary cells on isotropic, aligned and patterned substrates based on multiwall carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes provide the substrate with nanoscale topography. The cells adhere to and grow on all substrates, and on the aligned substrate, the cells align strongly with the axis of the bundles of the multiwall nanotubes. This control over cell alignment is required for tissue engineering; almost all tissues consist of oriented cells. The aligned substrates are made using straightforward physical chemistry techniques from forests of multiwall nanotubes; no lithography is required to make inexpensive large-scale substrates with highly aligned nanoscale grooves. Interestingly, although the cells strongly align with the nanoscale grooves, only a few also elongate along this axis: alignment of the cells does not require a pronounced change in morphology of the cell. We also pattern the nanotube bundles over length scales comparable to the cell size and show that the cells follow this pattern.

  10. Ca2+-dependent down-regulation of human histamine H1receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Komazaki, Hiroshi; Tsukamoto, Hayato; Hatahara, Hirokazu; Fukui, Hiroyuki; Shoji, Masaru

    2018-01-01

    G q/11 protein-coupled human histamine H 1 receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells stimulated with histamine undergo clathrin-dependent endocytosis followed by proteasome/lysosome-mediated down-regulation. In this study, we evaluated the effects of a sustained increase in intracellular Ca 2+ concentrations induced by a receptor-bypassed stimulation with ionomycin, a Ca 2+ ionophore, on the endocytosis and down-regulation of H 1 receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells. All cellular and cell-surface H 1 receptors were detected by the binding of [ 3 H]mepyramine to intact cells sensitive to the hydrophobic and hydrophilic H 1 receptor ligands, mepyramine and pirdonium, respectively. The pretreatment of cells with ionomycin markedly reduced the mepyramine- and pirdonium-sensitive binding sites of [ 3 H]mepyramine, which were completely abrogated by the deprivation of extracellular Ca 2+ and partially by a ubiquitin-activating enzyme inhibitor (UBEI-41), but were not affected by inhibitors of calmodulin (W-7 or calmidazolium) and protein kinase C (chelerythrine or GF109203X). These ionomycin-induced changes were also not affected by inhibitors of receptor endocytosis via clathrin (hypertonic sucrose) and caveolae/lipid rafts (filipin or nystatin) or by inhibitors of lysosomes (E-64, leupeptin, chloroquine, or NH 4 Cl), proteasomes (lactacystin or MG-132), and a Ca 2+ -dependent non-lysosomal cysteine protease (calpain) (MDL28170). Since H 1 receptors were normally detected by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy with an antibody against H 1 receptors, even after the ionomycin treatment, H 1 receptors appeared to exist in a form to which [ 3 H]mepyramine was unable to bind. These results suggest that H 1 receptors are apparently down-regulated by a sustained increase in intracellular Ca 2+ concentrations with no process of endocytosis and lysosomal/proteasomal degradation of receptors. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Cell growth stimulating effect of Ganoderma lucidum spores and their potential application for Chinese hamster ovary K1 cell cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ding; Zhong, Qi; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Jufang

    2016-06-01

    In this work, water-soluble extracts of Ganoderma lucidum spores (Gls), a Chinese medicinal herb that possesses cell growth stimulating function, were found to be an effective growth factor for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultivation. The Gls extract was prepared and supplemented to CHO K1 cell culture media with various serum levels. Our results obtained from both the static culture and the spinner-flask suspension culture showed that use of small-amount Gls extract effectively promoted cell growth and suppressed cell apoptosis induced by serum deprivation with normal cell cycle maintained in a low-serum medium. The low-serum medium containing 1 % (v/v) fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 0.01 % (w/v) Gls extract showed a comparable performance on both cell growth and fusion protein productivity with the conventional CHO culture medium containing 10 % (v/v) FBS and a commercial serum-free medium. This is the first study of the potential of Gls extracts for use as an alternative cell growth factor and nutrient for CHO cells. The findings have presented a new approach to economic cultivation of CHO cells for therapeutic protein production.

  12. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cell engineering to increase sialylation of recombinant therapeutic proteins by modulating sialyltransferase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nan; Mascarenhas, Joaquina; Sealover, Natalie R; George, Henry J; Brooks, Jeanne; Kayser, Kevin J; Gau, Brian; Yasa, Isil; Azadi, Parastoo; Archer-Hartmann, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycans of human proteins possess both α2,6- and α2,3-linked terminal sialic acid (SA). Recombinant glycoproteins produced in Chinese hamster overy (CHO) only have α2,3-linkage due to the absence of α2,6-sialyltransferase (St6gal1) expression. The Chinese hamster ST6GAL1 was successfully overexpressed using a plasmid expression vector in three recombinant immunoglobulin G (IgG)-producing CHO cell lines. The stably transfected cell lines were enriched for ST6GAL1 overexpression using FITC-Sambucus nigra (SNA) lectin that preferentially binds α2,6-linked SA. The presence of α2,6-linked SA was confirmed using a novel LTQ Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (LTQ MS) method including MSn fragmentation in the enriched ST6GAL1 Clone 27. Furthermore, the total SA (mol/mol) in IgG produced by the enriched ST6GAL1 Clone 27 increased by 2-fold compared to the control. For host cell engineering, the CHOZN(®) GS host cell line was transfected and enriched for ST6GAL1 overexpression. Single-cell clones were derived from the enriched population and selected based on FITC-SNA staining and St6gal1 expression. Two clones ("ST6GAL1 OE Clone 31 and 32") were confirmed for the presence of α2,6-linked SA in total host cell protein extracts. ST6GAL1 OE Clone 32 was subsequently used to express SAFC human IgG1. The recombinant IgG expressed in this host cell line was confirmed to have α2,6-linked SA and increased total SA content. In conclusion, overexpression of St6gal1 is sufficient to produce recombinant proteins with increased sialylation and more human-like glycoprofiles without combinatorial engineering of other sialylation pathway genes. This work represents our ongoing effort of glycoengineering in CHO host cell lines for the development of "bio-better" protein therapeutics and cell culture vaccine production. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  13. Quantitative feature extraction from the Chinese hamster ovary bioprocess bibliome using a novel meta-analysis workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabgir, Aydin; Gutierrez, Jahir M; Hefzi, Hooman; Li, Shangzhong; Palsson, Bernhard O; Herwig, Christoph; Lewis, Nathan E

    2016-01-01

    The scientific literature concerning Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grows annually due to the importance of CHO cells in industrial bioprocessing of therapeutics. In an effort to start to catalogue the breadth of CHO phenotypes, or phenome, we present the CHO bibliome. This bibliographic compilation covers all published CHO cell studies from 1995 to 2015, and each study is classified by the types of phenotypic and bioprocess data contained therein. Using data from selected studies, we also present a quantitative meta-analysis of bioprocess characteristics across diverse culture conditions, yielding novel insights and addressing the validity of long held assumptions. Specifically, we show that bioprocess titers can be predicted using indicator variables derived from viable cell density, viability, and culture duration. We further identified a positive correlation between the cumulative viable cell density (VCD) and final titer, irrespective of cell line, media, and other bioprocess parameters. In addition, growth rate was negatively correlated with performance attributes, such as VCD and titer. In summary, despite assumptions that technical diversity among studies and opaque publication practices can limit research re-use in this field, we show that the statistical analysis of diverse legacy bioprocess data can provide insight into bioprocessing capabilities of CHO cell lines used in industry. The CHO bibliome can be accessed at http://lewislab.ucsd.edu/cho-bibliome/. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. New cell line development for antibody-producing Chinese hamster ovary cells using split green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Yeon-Gu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The establishment of high producer is an important issue in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell culture considering increased heterogeneity by the random integration of a transfected foreign gene and the altered position of the integrated gene. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS-based cell line development is an efficient strategy for the selection of CHO cells in high therapeutic protein production. Results An internal ribosome entry site (IRES was introduced for using two green fluorescence protein (GFP fragments as a reporter to both antibody chains, the heavy chain and the light chain. The cells co-transfected with two GFP fragments showed the emission of green fluorescence by the reconstitution of split GFP. The FACS-sorted pool with GFP expression had a higher specific antibody productivity (qAb than that of the unsorted pool. The qAb was highly correlated with the fluorescence intensity with a high correlation coefficient, evidenced from the analysis of median GFP and qAb in individual selected clones. Conclusions This study proved that the fragment complementation for split GFP could be an efficient indication for antibody production on the basis of high correlation of qAb with reconstitution of GFP. Taken together, we developed an efficient FACS-based screening method for high antibody-producing CHO cells with the benefits of the split GFP system.

  15. Suppressive action of near-ultraviolet light on ouabain resistance induced by far-ultraviolet light in Chinese hamster cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, F; Han, A; Hill, C K; Elkind, M M

    1983-03-01

    The interaction between ultraviolet light (UV-C) from germicidal lamps (254 nm) and near-ultraviolet light (UV-B) from Westinghouse Sun Lamps (290-345 nm) was studied in Chinese hamster V79 cells by measuring the effectiveness of combined exposures to induce the resistance to 6-thioguanine or to ouabain. Exposure of cells to a conditioning dose of UV-B (approximately 70% survival) results in significant inhibition of the induction by UV-C of cells resistant to ouabain. The inhibition is lost, however, if cells are incubated for 12 h at 37 degrees C between exposures. Inhibition is also observed when cells are preirradiated with a dose of UV-B filtered with polystyrene (300-345 nm) which, in itself, has no effect on cell killing. Conditioning exposures of unfiltered or filtered UV-B light do not inhibit the induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant cells by UV-C light, and the effects of UV-B and UV-C light are largely independent.

  16. Size distribution of fullerenol nanoparticles in cell culture medium and their influence on antioxidative enzymes in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srđenović Branislava U.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fullerenol (C60(OH24 nanoparticles (FNP have a significant role in biomedical research due to their numerous biological activities, some of which are cytoprotective and antioxidative properties. The aim of this study was to measure distribution of fullerenol nanoparticles and zeta potential in cell medium RPMI 1640 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS and to investigate the influence of FNP on Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 survival, as well as to determine the activity of three antioxidative enzymes: superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-reductase and glutathione-S-transferase in mitomycin C-treated cell line. Our investigation implies that FNP, as a strong antioxidant, influence the cellular redox state and enzyme activities and thus may reduce cell proliferation, which confirms that FNP could be exploited for its use as a cytoprotective agent.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45005 i Pokrajinski Sekretarijat za nauku i tehnološki razvoj Vojvodine, grant number 114-451-2056/2011-01

  17. Interaction between the effects of pepleomycin with lidocaine and radiation on cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Yuji

    1989-02-01

    The interaction of the cytotoxicities in combination use of lidocaine (LID), pepleomycin (PEP) and radiation in combined treatment was studied using Chinese hamster V79 cells by colony forming assay. LID showed no cytotoxic effect up to 12 mM when it was employed alone. However selective enhancement of the PEP cytotoxic effect appeared when the drugs were used simultaneously. The mechanism of this enhancing effect was thought to involve inhibition by LID of the repair of the cells from PEP potentially lethal damage. LID showed no enhancing effect on the radiation cytotoxicity when the agents were used simultaneously. Only an additive effect appeared when PEP and radiation were employed simultaneously. An interactive effect appeared when LID, PEP and radiation were used simultaneously, although this effect was not so significant. The enhancement ratio of PEP with LID on radiation was 1.58. The fundamental mechanism of enhancement of cytotoxic effect of LID on PEP and the interactive relationship among LID, PEP and radiation are analyzed and discussed. (author).

  18. Interaction of leukotriene C4 and Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79A03 cells). 1. Characterization of binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitz, T.A.; Contois, D.F.; Liu, Y.X.; Watt, D.S.; Walden, T.L.

    1990-10-01

    A novel, specific, and potent biological action of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) was demonstrated in the Chinese Hamster lung fibroblast cell line V79A03 (V79 cells), namely the conferment of protection against subsequent irradiation. Consequently, studies were conducted to determine whether LTC4-conferred radioprotection could be attributed to a receptor-mediated phenomenon. Specific binding sites for leukotriene C4 (LTC4) were identified and characterized using intact V79 cells incubated at 4 C in the presence of serine-borate, during which time conversion of LTC4 to LTD4 or LTE4 was undetectable. Binding was maximal in a broad region between pH 6.2 and 8.8. Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+ were not required for binding, and binding was not altered by GTP, ATP, cAMP, by leukotrienes B4, D4, or E4, or by the leukotriene end point antagonists LY 171883, FPL 55712, or Revlon 5901-5.

  19. Characteristic element of matrix attachment region mediates vector attachment and enhances nerve growth factor expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X Y; Zhang, J H; Sun, Q L; Yao, Z Y; Deng, B G; Guo, W Y; Wang, L; Dong, W H; Wang, F; Zhao, C P; Wang, T Y

    2015-08-07

    Preliminary studies have suggested that a characteristic element of the matrix attachment region (MAR) in human interferon-β mediates the adhesion of vectors to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In this study, we investigated if vector adhesion increased nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in CHO cells. The MAR characteristic element sequence of human interferon-β was inserted into the multiple-cloning site of the pEGFP-C1 vector. The target NGF gene was inserted upstream of the MAR characteristic element sequence to construct the MAR/NGF expression vector. The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CHO cells and stable monoclonal cells were selected using G418. NGF mRNA and protein expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Plasmid reduction experiments were used to determine the state of transfected plasmid in mammalian cells. The insertion of MAR into the vector increased NGF expression levels in CHO cells (1.93- fold) compared to the control. The recombinant plasmid expressing the MAR sequence was digested into a linear space vector. The inserted MAR and NGF sequences were consistent with those inserted into the plasmid before recombination. Therefore, we concluded that the MAR characteristic element mediates vector adhesion to CHO cells and enhances the stability and efficiency of the target gene expression.

  20. Effects of turmeric and its active principle, curcumin, on bleomycin-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina P. Araújo

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring antioxidants have been extensively studied for their capacity to protect organisms and cells from oxidative damage. Many plant constituents including turmeric and curcumin appear to be potent antimutagens and antioxidants. The effects of turmeric and curcumin on chromosomal aberration frequencies induced by the radiomimetic agent bleomycin (BLM were investigated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. Three concentrations of each drug, turmeric (100, 250 and 500 mg/ml and curcumin (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/ml, were combined with BLM (10 mg/ml in CHO cells treated during the G1/S, S or G2/S phases of the cell cycle. Neither turmeric nor curcumin prevented BLM-induced chromosomal damage in any phases of the cell cycle. Conversely, a potentiation of the clastogenicity of BLM by curcumin was clearly observed in cells treated during the S and G2/S phases. Curcumin was also clastogenic by itself at 10 µg/ml in two protocols used. However, the exact mechanism by which curcumin produced clastogenic and potentiating effects remains unknown.Antioxidantes de ocorrência natural têm sido exaustivamente estudados quanto a sua capacidade de proteger organimos e células contra danos oxidativos. Muitos constituintes das plantas, incluindo cúrcuma e curcumina, parecem ser potentes antimutágenos e antioxidantes. Os efeitos de cúrcuma e curcumina na freqüência de aberrações cromossômicas induzidas pelo agente radiomimético bleomicina (BLM foram investigados em células do ovário de hamster chinês (CHO. Três concentrações de cada droga, cúrcuma (100, 250 e 500 mg/ml e curcumina (2,5, 5,0 e 10 mg/ml, foram combinadas com BLM (10 mg/ml em células CHO tratadas durante as fases G1/S, S ou G2/S do ciclo celular. Nem cúrcuma nem curcumina evitaram o dano cromossômico induzido pela BLM em fase alguma do ciclo celular. Ao contrário, a potenciação da clastogenicidade da BLM pelo curcumina foi nitidamente observada em células tratadas

  1. Efficient enrichment of high-producing recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells for monoclonal antibody by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Takeshi; Masuda, Kenji; Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Miyadai, Kenji; Nonaka, Koichi; Yabuta, Masayuki; Omasa, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    To screen a high-producing recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell from transfected cells is generally laborious and time-consuming. We developed an efficient enrichment strategy for high-producing cell screening using flow cytometry (FCM). A stable pool that had possibly shown a huge variety of monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression levels was prepared by transfection of an expression vector for mAb production to a CHO cell. To enrich high-producing cells derived from a stable pool stained with a fluorescent-labeled antibody that binds to mAb presented on the cell surface, we set the cell size and intracellular density gates based on forward scatter (FSC) and side scatter (SSC), and collected the brightest 5% of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-positive cells from each group by FCM. The final product concentration in a fed-batch culture of cells sorted without FSC and SSC gates was 1.2-1.3-times higher than that of unsorted cells, whereas that of cells gated by FSC and SSC was 3.4-4.7-fold higher than unsorted cells. Surprisingly, the fraction with the highest final product concentration indicated the smallest value of FSC and SSC, and the middle value of fluorescence intensity among all fractionated cells. Our results showed that our new screening strategy by FCM based on FSC and SSC gates could achieve an efficient enrichment of high-producing cells with the smallest value of FSC and SSC. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased recombinant protein production owing to expanded opportunities for vector integration in high chromosome number Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Noriko; Takahashi, Mai; Ali Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Kumamoto, Toshitaka; Frank, Jana; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal instability is a characteristic of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Cultures of these cells gradually develop heterogeneity even if established from a single cell clone. We isolated cells containing different numbers of chromosomes from a CHO-DG44-based human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF)-producing cell line and found that high chromosome number cells showed higher hGM-CSF productivity. Therefore, we focused on the relationship between chromosome aneuploidy of CHO cells and high recombinant protein-producing cell lines. Distribution and stability of chromosomes were examined in CHO-DG44 cells, and two cell lines expressing different numbers of chromosomes were isolated from the original CHO-DG44 cell line to investigate the effect of aneuploid cells on recombinant protein production. Both cell lines were stably transfected with a vector that expresses immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3), and specific antibody production rates were compared. Cells containing more than 30 chromosomes had higher specific antibody production rates than those with normal chromosome number. Single cell analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (Egfp)-gene transfected cells revealed that increased GFP expression was relative to the number of gene integration sites rather than the difference in chromosome numbers or vector locations. Our results suggest that CHO cells with high numbers of chromosomes contain more sites for vector integration, a characteristic that could be advantageous in biopharmaceutical production. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulation of cell growth and apoptosis through lactate dehydrogenase C over-expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tuo; Zhang, Cunchao; Jing, Yu; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Shengyu; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Dapeng; Hou, Sheng; Dai, Jianxin; Kou, Geng; Wang, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Lactate has long been credited as a by-product, which jeopardizes cell growth and productivity when accumulated over a certain concentration during the manufacturing process of therapeutic recombinant proteins by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. A number of efforts to decrease the lactate concentration have been developed; however, the accumulation of lactate is still a critical issue by the late stage of fed-batch culture. Therefore, a lactate-tolerant cell line was developed through over-expression of lactate dehydrogenase C (LDH-C). In fed-batch culture, sodium lactate or sodium pyruvate was supplemented into the culture medium to simulate the environment of lactate accumulation, and LDH-C over-expression increased the highest viable cell density by over 30 and 50 %, respectively, on day 5, meanwhile the viability was also improved significantly since day 5 compared with that of the control. The percentages of cells suffering early and late apoptosis decreased by 3.2 to 12.5 and 2.0 to 4.3 %, respectively, from day 6 onwards in the fed-batch culture when 40 mM sodium pyruvate was added compared to the control. The results were confirmed by mitochondrial membrane potential assay. In addition, the expression of cleaved caspases 3 and 7 decreased in cells over-expressing LDH-C, suggesting the mitochondrial pathway was involved in the LDH-C regulated anti-apoptosis. In conclusion, a novel cell line with higher lactate tolerance, lowered lactate production, and alleviated apoptosis response was developed by over-expression of LDH-C, which may potentially represent an efficient and labor-saving approach in generating recombinant proteins.

  4. Protective effect of propolis on radiation-induced chromosomal damage on Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spigoti, Geyza; Bartolini, Paolo; Okazaki, Kayo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: kokazaki@ipen.br; Tsutsumi, Shiguetoshi [Amazon Food Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)], e-mail: fwip5138@mb.infoweb.ne.jp

    2009-07-01

    In the last years, particular interest has been given to investigations concerning natural, effective and nontoxic compounds with radioprotective capacity in concert with increasing utilization of different types of ionizing radiation for various applications. Among them, propolis, a resinous mixture of substances collected by honey bees (Apis mellifera) has been considered promising since it presents several advantageous characteristics, i.e., antiinflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antimicrobial and free radical scavenging action. It is, therefore, a direct antioxidant that protects cells and organisms from the adverse effects of ionizing radiation. These relevant biological activities are mainly mediated by the flavonoids, present at relatively high concentrations in the propolis. Considering that the chemical composition and, consequently, the biological activity of propolis is variable according to the environmental plant ecology, the present study was conducted in order to evaluate the radioprotective capacity of Brazilian propolis, collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, against genotoxic damages induced by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiation in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). for this purpose, micronucleus induction was analyzed concerning irreparable damage, specifically related to DNA double-strand breaks, that are potentially carcinogenic. CHO-K1 cells were submitted to different concentrations of propolis (3 - 33 {mu}g/ml), 1 h before irradiation, with 1 Gy of {gamma} radiation (0.722 Gy/min). The data obtained showed a decreasing tendency in the quantity of radioinduced damage on cells previously treated with propolis. The radioprotective effect was more prominent at higher propolis concentration. The treatment with propolis alone did not induce genotoxic effects on CHO-K1 cells. Beside that, the treatment with propolis, associated or not with radiation, did not influence the kinetics of cellular proliferation. (author)

  5. Antioxidant, anticlastogenic and radioprotective effect of Coleus aromaticus on Chinese hamster fibroblast cells (V79) exposed to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B S Satish; Shanbhoge, R; Upadhya, D; Jagetia, G C; Adiga, S K; Kumar, P; Guruprasad, K; Gayathri, P

    2006-07-01

    Coleus aromaticus (Benth, Family: Laminaceae), Indian Oregano native to India and Mediterranean, is well known for its medicinal properties. A preliminary study was undertaken to elucidate in vitro free radical scavenging potential and inhibition of lipid peroxidation by C.aromaticus hydroalcoholic extract (CAE). Anti-clastogenic and radioprotective potential of CAE were studied using micronucleus assay after irradiating Chinese hamster fibroblast (V79) cells. CAE at 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 mug/ml resulted in a dose-dependent increase in radical scavenging ability against various free radicals viz., 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), superoxide anion (O(2)(*-)), hydroxyl (OH(*)) and nitric oxide (NO(*)) generated in vitro. A maximum scavenging potential was noticed at 100 mug/ml and a saturation point was reached thereafter with the increasing doses of CAE. The free radical scavenging potential of the extract was in the order of DPPH > ABTS > Superoxide > Hydroxyl > Nitric oxide. CAE also exhibited a moderate inhibition of lipid peroxidation in vitro, with a maximum inhibition at 60 mug/ml (33%), attaining saturation at higher doses. The extract also rendered protection against radiation induced DNA damage, as evidenced by the significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the percentage of radiation-induced micronucleated cells (MN) and frequency of micronuclei (total). A maximum anticlastogneic effect/ radioprotection was noticed at a very low concentration i.e., 5 mug/ml of CAE, treated 1 h prior to 2 Gy of gamma radiation. A significant (P < 0.0001) anticlastogenic/radioprotective effect was also observed when the cells were treated with an optimum dose of CAE (5 mug/ml) 1 h prior to 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 Gy of gamma radiation compared with the respective radiation control groups. Overall, our results established an efficient antioxidant, anticlastogenic and radioprotective potential of CAE, which may be of

  6. Unveiling gene trait relationship by cross-platform meta-analysis on Chinese hamster ovary cell transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Raju, Ravali; Vishwanathan, Nandita; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2017-07-01

    In the past few years, transcriptome analysis has been increasingly employed to better understand the physiology of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells at a global level. As more transcriptome data accumulated, meta-analysis on data sets collected from various sources can potentially provide better insights on common properties of those cells. Here, we performed meta-analysis on transcriptome data of different CHO cell lines obtained using NimbleGen or Affymetrix microarray platforms. Hierarchical clustering, non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) analysis, and principal component analysis (PCA) accordantly showed the samples were clustered into two groups: one consists of adherent cells in serum-containing medium, and the other suspension cells in serum-free medium. Genes that were differentially expressed between the two clusters were enriched in a few functional classes by Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) of which many were common with the enriched gene sets identified by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), including extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and lipid related metabolism pathways. Despite the heterogeneous sources of the cell samples, the adherent and suspension growth characteristics and serum-supplementation appear to be a dominant feature in the transcriptome. The results demonstrated that meta-analysis of transcriptome could uncover features in combined data sets that individual data set might not reveal. As transcriptome data sets accumulate over time, meta-analysis will become even more revealing. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1583-1592. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Interaction of leukotriene C4 and Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79A03 cells). 1. Characterization of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, T A; Contois, D F; Liu, Y X; Watt, D S; Walden, T L

    1990-10-01

    A novel, specific, and potent biological action of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) was demonstrated in the Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line V79A03 (V79 cells), namely the confirment of protection against subsequent gamma-irradiation. Consequently, studies were conducted to determine whether LTC4-conferred radioprotection could be attributed to a receptor-mediated phenomenon. Specific binding sites for leukotriene C4 (LTC4) were identified and characterized using intact V79 cells incubated at 4 degrees C in the presence of serine-borate, during which time conversion of LTC4 to LTD4 or LTE4 was undetectable. Binding was maximal in a broad region between pH 6.2 and 8.8. Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+ were not required for binding, and binding was not altered by GTP, ATP, or cAMP, by leukotrienes B4, D4, or E4, or by the leukotriene end point antagonists LY 171883, FPL 55712, or Revlon 5901-5. Scatchard analyses and kinetic experiments indicated the presence of high-affinity [Kd = 2.5 +/- 0.63 nM, approximately 9.9 x 10(5) sites/cell] and low-affinity [Kd = 350 +/- 211 nM, approximately 2.7 x 10(6) sites/cell] binding sites. The observed binding characteristics of LTC4 to V79 cells are consistent with a receptor-mediated phenomenon. In a companion communication which follows this report, we report the subcellular distribution of LTC4 binding to V79 cells and demonstrate that this binding is unlikely to be attributed principally to interaction with glutathione-S-transferase.

  8. Differences in temporal aspects of mutagenesis and cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster cells treated with methylating agents and thymidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, A R; Peterson, H

    1982-01-01

    Equitoxic concentrations of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and methyl methanesulfonate (MeMes) produced different frequencies of 8-azaguanine-resistant mutants and different amounts of N7-methylguanine, O6-methylguanine (m6G), and N3-methyladenine in the DNA of V79 Chinese hamster cells. Thus, neither the cytotoxicities nor the mutagenicities of these methylating agents could be attributed solely to nitrogen or to oxygen methylations in the DNA. However, MNNG produced 12-fold more m6G and 5-fold more mutants than did MeMes, indicating that a substantial part of the MNNG-induced mutations resulted from m6G--thymine mispairing during DNA replication. The expression as mutants of mutagenic oxygen methylations in the DNA of cells treated with MNNG was enhanced by thymidine (dThd) and deoxycytidine (dCyd), but these nucleosides did not significantly enhance MeMes-induced mutagenesis. The cytotoxicities of MNNG and MeMes were also increased by 10 microM dThd in proportion to the amount of m6G in the DNA. These increases in cytotoxicity were abolished by dCyd, which did not greatly reduce the dThd-induced enhancements of mutagenesis. Moreover, when dThd was present only during the 2-hr treatment with MNNG, maximal cytotoxicity occurred, but MNNG-induced mutagenesis was not increased. Maximal mutagenesis occurred when the dThd was present throughout the first doubling time of the MNNG-treated cells. Thus, the expression of the cytotoxicity and the mutagenicity associated with m6G in the DNA of V79 cells occurred by quite different mechanisms. PMID:6951203

  9. Folk medicine Terminalia catappa and its major tannin component, punicalagin, are effective against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P S; Li, J H; Liu, T Y; Lin, T C

    2000-05-01

    Terminalia catappa L. is a popular folk medicine for preventing hepatoma and treating hepatitis in Taiwan. In this paper, we examined the protective effects of T. catappa leaf water extract (TCE) and its major tannin component, punicalagin, on bleomycin-induced genotoxicity in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. Pre-treatment with TCE or punicalagin prevented bleomycin-induced hgprt gene mutations and DNA strand breaks. TCE and punicalagin suppressed the generation of bleomycin-induced intracellular free radicals, identified as superoxides and hydrogen peroxides. The effectiveness of TCE and punicalagin against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity could be, at least in part, due to their antioxidative potentials.

  10. Effect of shanzha, a Chinese herbal product, on obesity and dyslipidemia in hamsters receiving high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Daih-Huang; Yeh, Ching-Hua; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Chen, Fu-An; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2009-07-30

    The present study is designed to investigate the effect of shanzha (Crataegus pinnatifida) on obesity or dyslipidemia induced by high-fat diet in hamsters and characterize the role of PPARalpha in this action of shanzha. We induced dyslipidemia and obesity in hamsters using high-fat diet and treated hamsters with shanzha or vehicle for 7 days. We measured the body weight, adipose tissue weights, and food intake of hamsters. Plasma total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) were determined at the beginning and end of this treatment. Effect of shanzha on adipogenesis was examined in vitro and change of PPARalpha was analyzed using Western blot. The food intake, body weights, and weights of both brown and white adipose tissues were markedly reduced in hamsters receiving shanzha as compared with the vehicle-treated control. Plasma levels of TC, TG and LDL-C were decreased by this shanzha treatment while HDL-C was elevated. The effects of shanzha were reversed by the combined treatment with PPARalpha antagonist, MK886. Shanzha inhibited the fat droplet accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was abolished by MK886. Western blot results showed activation of PPARalpha by shanzha in hamster adipose tissue. We suggest that shanzha could activate PPARalpha to improve dyslipidemia or obesity.

  11. Next-generation sequencing of the Chinese hamster ovary microRNA transcriptome: Identification, annotation and profiling of microRNAs as targets for cellular engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Matthias; Jakobi, Tobias; Blom, Jochen; Doppmeier, Daniel; Brinkrolf, Karina; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Bernhart, Stephan H; Höner Zu Siederdissen, Christian; Bort, Juan A Hernandez; Wieser, Matthias; Kunert, Renate; Jeffs, Simon; Hofacker, Ivo L; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred; Borth, Nicole; Grillari, Johannes

    2011-04-20

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the predominant cell factory for the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins. Nevertheless, the lack in publicly available sequence information is severely limiting advances in CHO cell biology, including the exploration of microRNAs (miRNA) as tools for CHO cell characterization and engineering. In an effort to identify and annotate both conserved and novel CHO miRNAs in the absence of a Chinese hamster genome, we deep-sequenced small RNA fractions of 6 biotechnologically relevant cell lines and mapped the resulting reads to an artificial reference sequence consisting of all known miRNA hairpins. Read alignment patterns and read count ratios of 5' and 3' mature miRNAs were obtained and used for an independent classification into miR/miR* and 5p/3p miRNA pairs and discrimination of miRNAs from other non-coding RNAs, resulting in the annotation of 387 mature CHO miRNAs. The quantitative content of next-generation sequencing data was analyzed and confirmed using qPCR, to find that miRNAs are markers of cell status. Finally, cDNA sequencing of 26 validated targets of miR-17-92 suggests conserved functions for miRNAs in CHO cells, which together with the now publicly available sequence information sets the stage for developing novel RNAi tools for CHO cell engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Next-generation sequencing of the Chinese hamster ovary microRNA transcriptome: Identification, annotation and profiling of microRNAs as targets for cellular engineering☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Matthias; Jakobi, Tobias; Blom, Jochen; Doppmeier, Daniel; Brinkrolf, Karina; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Siederdissen, Christian Höner zu; Bort, Juan A. Hernandez; Wieser, Matthias; Kunert, Renate; Jeffs, Simon; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred; Borth, Nicole; Grillari, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the predominant cell factory for the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins. Nevertheless, the lack in publicly available sequence information is severely limiting advances in CHO cell biology, including the exploration of microRNAs (miRNA) as tools for CHO cell characterization and engineering. In an effort to identify and annotate both conserved and novel CHO miRNAs in the absence of a Chinese hamster genome, we deep-sequenced small RNA fractions of 6 biotechnologically relevant cell lines and mapped the resulting reads to an artificial reference sequence consisting of all known miRNA hairpins. Read alignment patterns and read count ratios of 5′ and 3′ mature miRNAs were obtained and used for an independent classification into miR/miR* and 5p/3p miRNA pairs and discrimination of miRNAs from other non-coding RNAs, resulting in the annotation of 387 mature CHO miRNAs. The quantitative content of next-generation sequencing data was analyzed and confirmed using qPCR, to find that miRNAs are markers of cell status. Finally, cDNA sequencing of 26 validated targets of miR-17-92 suggests conserved functions for miRNAs in CHO cells, which together with the now publicly available sequence information sets the stage for developing novel RNAi tools for CHO cell engineering. PMID:21392545

  13. Establishment and Identification of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Lines with Stable Expression of Soluble CD40 Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Hua-wei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines with stable expression of soluble CD40 ligands (sCD40L. Methods: Recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-sCD40L, enzyme digestion and sequencing identification were obtained by cloning sCD40L coding sequences into eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP from carrier pDC316-sCD40 containing sCD40L. CHO cells were transfected by electroporation, followed by screening of resistant clones with G418, after which monoclones were obtained by limited dilution assay and multiply cultured. Flow cytometer and reverted fluorescence microscope were applied to observe the expression of green fluorescent protein, while sCD40L expression was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA from aspects of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA and protein, respectively. CHO-sCD40L was cultured together with MDA-MB-231 cells to compare the expression changes of surface molecule fatty acid synthase (Fas by flow cytometer and observe the apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells after Fas activated antibodies (CH-11 were added 24 h later. Results: Plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-sCD40L was successfully established, and cell lines with stable expression of sCD40L were obtained with cloned culture after CHO cell transfection, which was named as B11. Flow cytometer and reverted fluorescence microscope showed >90% expression of green fluorescent protein, while PCR, RT-PCR and ELISA suggested integration of sCD40L genes into cell genome DNA, transcription of sCD40L mRNA and sCD40L protein expression being (4.5±2.1 ng/mL in the supernatant of cell culture, respectively. After co-culture of B11 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the surface Fas expression of MDA-MB-231 cells was increased from (3±1.02 % to (34.8±8.75%, while the apoptosis rate 24 h after addition of CH11 from (5.4±1.32% to (20.7±5.24%, and the differences

  14. Single-molecule motions of oligoarginine transporter conjugates on the plasma membrane of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H-L; Dubikovskaya, E A; Hwang, H; Semyonov, A N; Wang, H; Jones, L R; Twieg, R J; Moerner, W E; Wender, P A

    2008-07-23

    To explore the real-time dynamic behavior of molecular transporters of the cell-penetrating-peptide (CPP) type on a biological membrane, single fluorescently labeled oligoarginine conjugates were imaged interacting with the plasma membrane of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The diffusional motion on the membrane, characterized by single-molecule diffusion coefficient and residence time (tau R), defined as the time from the initial appearance of a single-molecule spot on the membrane (from the solution) to the time the single molecule disappears from the imaging focal plane, was observed for a fluorophore-labeled octaarginine (a model guanidinium-rich CPP) and compared with the corresponding values observed for a tetraarginine conjugate (negative control), a lipid analogue, and a fluorescently labeled protein conjugate (transferrin-Alexa594) known to enter the cell through endocytosis. Imaging of the oligoarginine conjugates was enabled by the use of a new high-contrast fluorophore in the dicyanomethylenedihydrofuran family, which brightens upon interaction with the membrane at normal oxygen concentrations. Taken as a whole, the motions of the octaarginine conjugate single molecules are highly heterogeneous and cannot be described as Brownian motion with a single diffusion coefficient. The observed behavior is also different from that of lipids, known to penetrate cellular membranes through passive diffusion, conventionally involving lateral diffusion followed by membrane bilayer flip-flop. Furthermore, while the octaarginine conjugate behavior shares some common features with transferrin uptake (endocytotic) processes, the two systems also exhibit dissimilar traits when diffusional motions and residence times of single constructs are compared. Additionally, pretreatment of cells with cytochalasin D, a known actin filament disruptor, produces no significant effect, which further rules out unimodal endocytosis as the mechanism of uptake. Also, the involvement of

  15. Protective Effect of Boric Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage In Chinese Hamster Lung Fibroblast V79 Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Sezen; Ustundag, Aylin; Cemiloglu Ulker, Ozge; Duydu, Yalcın

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many studies have been published on the antioxidative effects of boric acid (BA) and sodium borates in in vitro studies. However, the boron (B) concentrations tested in these in vitro studies have not been selected by taking into account the realistic blood B concentrations in humans due to the lack of comprehensive epidemiological studies. The recently published epidemiological studies on B exposure conducted in China and Turkey provided blood B concentrations for both humans in daily life and workers under extreme exposure conditions in occupational setting. The results of these studies have made it possible to test antioxidative effects of BA in in vitro studies within the concentra- tion range relevant to humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective ef- fects of BA against oxidative DNA damage in V79 (Chinese hamster lung fibroblast) cells. The concentrations of BA tested for its protective effect was selected by taking the blood B concentrations into account reported in previously published epidemiological studies. Therefore, the concentrations of BA tested in this study represent the exposure levels for humans in both daily life and occupational settings. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, comet assay and neutral red uptake (NRU) assay methods were used to determinacy to toxicity and genotoxicity of BA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Results The results of the NRU assay showed that BA was not cytotoxic within the tested concentrations (3, 10, 30, 100 and 200 µM). These non-cytotoxic concentrations were used for comet assay. BA pre-treatment significantly reduced (P<0.05, one-way ANOVA) the DNA damaging capacity of H2O2 at each tested BA concentrations in V79 cells. Conclusion Consequently, pre-incubation of V79 cells with BA has significantly reduced the H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage in V79 cells. The protective effect of BA against oxidative DNA damage in V79 cells at 5, 10, 50, 100 and 200 μM (54, 108, 540

  16. The Use of Transcription Terminators to Generate Transgenic Lines of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells (CHO) with Stable and High Level of Reporter Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, N B; Toshchakov, S V; Georgiev, P G; Maksimenko, O G

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cell lines are widely used to produce recombinant proteins. Stable transgenic cell lines usually contain many insertions of the expression vector in one genomic region. Transcription through transgene can be one of the reasons for target gene repression after prolonged cultivation of cell lines. In the present work, we used the known transcription terminators from the SV40 virus, as well as the human β- and γ-globin genes, to prevent transcription through transgene. The transcription terminators were shown to increase and stabilize the expression of the EGFP reporter gene in transgenic lines of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Hence, transcription terminators can be used to create stable mammalian cells with a high and stable level of recombinant protein production.

  17. Protective effect of enzymatic hydrolysates from highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senevirathne, Mahinda; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jeon, You-Jin

    2010-06-01

    Blueberry was enzymatically hydrolyzed using selected commercial food grade carbohydrases (AMG, Celluclast, Termamyl, Ultraflo and Viscozyme) and proteases (Alcalase, Flavourzyme, Kojizyme, Neutrase and Protamex) to obtain water soluble compounds, and their protective effect was investigated against H(2)O(2)-induced damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line (V79-4) via various published methods. Both AMG and Alcalase hydrolysates showed higher total phenolic content as well as higher cell viability and ROS scavenging activities, and hence, selected for further antioxidant assays. Both AMG and Alcalase hydrolysates also showed higher protective effects against lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptotic body formation in a dose-dependent fashion. Thus, the results indicated that water soluble compounds obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of blueberry possess good antioxidant activity against H(2)O(2)-induced cell damage in vitro.

  18. Monitoring utilizations of amino acids and vitamins in culture media and Chinese hamster ovary cells by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jinshu; Chan, Pik Kay; Bondarenko, Pavel V

    2016-01-05

    Monitoring amino acids and vitamins is important for understanding human health, food nutrition and the culture of mammalian cells used to produce therapeutic proteins in biotechnology. A method including ion pairing reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed and optimized to quantify 21 amino acids and 9 water-soluble vitamins in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and culture media. By optimizing the chromatographic separation, scan time, monitoring time window, and sample preparation procedure, and using isotopically labeled (13)C, (15)N and (2)H internal standards, low limits of quantitation (≤0.054 mg/L), good precision (vitamins accumulated continuously during the culture period, suggesting that they were fed in access. The method serves as an effective tool for the development and optimization of mammalian cell cultures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Increased mitochondrial mass in cells with functionally compromised mitochondria after exposure to both direct gamma radiation and bystander factors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Sharon M E

    2007-07-01

    The bystander effect describes radiation-like damage in unirradiated cells either in the vicinity of irradiated cells or exposed to medium from irradiated cells. This study aimed to further characterize the poorly understood mitochondrial response to both direct irradiation and bystander factor(s) in human keratinocytes (HPV-G) and Chinese hamster ovarian cells (CHO-K1). Oxygen consumption rates were determined during periods of state 4, state 3 and uncoupled respiration. Mitochondrial mass was determined using MitoTracker FM. CHO-K1 cells showed significantly reduced oxygen consumption rates 4 h after exposure to 5 Gy direct radiation and irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and an apparent recovery 12-24 h later. The apparent recovery was likely due to the substantial increase in mitochondrial mass observed in these cells as soon as 4 h after exposure. HPV-G cells, on the other hand, showed a sustained increase in oxygen consumption rates after ICCM exposure and a transient increase 4 h after exposure to 5 Gy direct radiation. A significant increase in mitochondrial mass per HPV-G cell was observed after exposure to both direct radiation and ICCM. These findings are indicative of a stress response to mitochondrial dysfunction that increases the number of mitochondria per cell.

  20. A novel regulatory element (E77) isolated from CHO-K1 genomic DNA enhances stable gene expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shin-Young; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Kang, Seunghee; Lee, Hong Weon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2016-05-01

    Vectors flanked by regulatory DNA elements have been used to generate stable cell lines with high productivity and transgene stability; however, regulatory elements in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, which are the most widely used mammalian cells in biopharmaceutical production, are still poorly understood. We isolated a novel gene regulatory element from CHO-K1 cells, designated E77, which was found to enhance the stable expression of a transgene. A genomic library was constructed by combining CHO-K1 genomic DNA fragments with a CMV promoter-driven GFP expression vector, and the E77 element was isolated by screening. The incorporation of the E77 regulatory element resulted in the generation of an increased number of clones with high expression, thereby enhancing the expression level of the transgene in the stable transfectant cell pool. Interestingly, the E77 element was found to consist of two distinct fragments derived from different locations in the CHO genome shotgun sequence. High and stable transgene expression was obtained in transfected CHO cells by combining these fragments. Additionally, the function of E77 was found to be dependent on its site of insertion and specific orientation in the vector construct. Our findings demonstrate that stable gene expression mediated by the CMV promoter in CHO cells may be improved by the isolated novel gene regulatory element E77 identified in the present study. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Enhanced production of recombinant proteins by a small molecule protein synthesis enhancer in combination with an antioxidant in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camire, Joseph; Kim, Dongjoo; Kwon, Soonjo

    2017-07-01

    The improvement in the production of recombinant proteins has been linked in a number of small molecules such as carboxylic acids to the inhibition of histone deacetylase, leading to increased transcription of genes. However, carboxylic acids such as pentanoic acid and butanoic acid have been shown to promote an apoptotic response in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture. Supplementation of cultures with antioxidants has shown the ability to reduce the apoptotic response of carboxylic acid supplementation, leading to increased therapeutic protein production. In this study, we showed that pentanoic acid reduced the number of cells entering early apoptosis relative to butanoic acid by 15.4%. Additionally, supplementation of butanoic acid- and pentanoic acid-treated cultures with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) reduced the population of cells entering early apoptosis by 5.3 and 10.0%, respectively, while increasing productivity by 19.5% in the presence of pentanoic acid and NAC. Conversely, a decrease of 5.7% in production was observed in response to combined butanoic acid and N-acetyl cysteine treatment. The results presented herein provide evidence that a culture supplementation method is critical for optimization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes.

  2. Efficient expression of stable recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-1 fusion with human serum albumin in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Aini; Xu, Dongsheng; Liu, Kedong; Peng, Lin; Cai, Yanfei; Chen, Yun; He, Yang; Yang, Jianfeng; Jin, Jian; Li, Huazhong

    2017-08-09

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) plays a crucial role in cell development, differentiation, and metabolism, and has been a potential therapeutic agent for many diseases. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used for production of recombinant therapeutic proteins, but the expression level of IGF-1 in CHO cells is very low (1,500 µg/L) and the half-life of IGF-1 in blood circulation is only 4.5 min according to previous studies. Therefore, IGF-1 was fused to long-circulating serum protein human serum albumin (HSA) and expressed in CHO cells. After 8-day fed-batch culture, the expression level of HSA-IGF-1 reached 100 mg/L. The fusion protein HSA-IGF-1 was purified with a recovery of 35% using a two-step chromatographic procedure. According to bioactivity assay, the purified HSA-IGF-1 could stimulate the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent fashion and promote the cell-cycle progression. Besides this, HSA-IGF-1 could bind to IGF-1 receptor on cell membrane and activate the intracellular PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Our study suggested that HSA fusion technology carried out in CHO cells not only provided bioactivity in HSA-IGF-1 for further research but also offered a beneficial strategy to produce other similar cytokines in CHO cells.

  3. A fucan from the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi inhibits Chinese hamster ovary cell adhesion to several extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha H.A.O.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Fucans, a family of sulfated polysaccharides present in brown seaweed, have several biological activities. Their use as drugs would offer the advantage of no potential risk of contamination with viruses or particles such as prions. A fucan prepared from Spatoglossum schröederi was tested as a possible inhibitor of cell-matrix interactions using wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 and the mutant type deficient in xylosyltransferase (CHO-745. The effect of this polymer on adhesion properties with specific extracellular matrix components was studied using several matrix proteins as substrates for cell attachment. Treatment with the polymer inhibited the adhesion of fibronectin to both CHO-K1 (2 x 10(5(and CHO-745 (2 x 10(5 and 5 x 10(5 cells. No effect was detected with laminin, using the two cell types. On the other hand, adhesion to vitronectin was inhibited in CHO-K1 cells and adhesion to type I collagen was inhibited in CHO-745 cells. In spite of this inhibition, the fucan did not affect either cell proliferation or cell cycle. These results demonstrate that this polymer is a new anti-adhesive compound with potential pharmacological applications.

  4. Down-regulation of lactate dehydrogenase-A by siRNAs for reduced lactic acid formation of Chinese hamster ovary cells producing thrombopoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Gyun Min

    2007-02-01

    Lactate, one of the major waste products in mammalian cell culture, can inhibit cell growth and affect cellular metabolism at high concentrations. To reduce lactate formation, lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A), an enzyme catalyzing the conversion of glucose-derived pyruvate to lactate, was down-regulated by an expression vector of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells producing human thrombopoietin (hTPO). Three clones expressing low levels of LDH-A, determined by reverse transcription-PCR and an enzyme activity test, were established in addition to a negative control cell line. LDH-A activities in the three clones were decreased by 75-89%, compared with that of the control CHO cell line, demonstrating that the effect of siRNA is more significant than that of other traditional methods such as homologous recombination (30%) and antisense mRNA (29%). The specific glucose consumption rates of the three clones were reduced to 54-87% when compared to the control cell line. Similarly, the specific lactate production rates were reduced to 45-79% of the control cell line level. In addition, reduction of LDH-A did not impair either cell proliferation or hTPO productivity. Taken together, these results show that the lactate formation rate in rCHO cell culture can be efficiently reduced through the down-regulation of LDH via siRNA.

  5. Sustained productivity in recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines: proteome analysis of the molecular basis for a process-related phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammell Patrick

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of mammalian cell lines to sustain cell specific productivity (Qp over the full duration of bioprocess culture is a highly desirable phenotype, but the molecular basis for sustainable productivity has not been previously investigated in detail. In order to identify proteins that may be associated with a sustained productivity phenotype, we have conducted a proteomic profiling analysis of two matched pairs of monoclonal antibody-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell lines that differ in their ability to sustain productivity over a 10 day fed-batch culture. Results Proteomic profiling of inherent differences between the two sets of comparators using 2D-DIGE (Difference Gel Electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS resulted in the identification of 89 distinct differentially expressed proteins. Overlap comparisons between the two sets of cell line pairs identified 12 proteins (AKRIB8, ANXA1, ANXA4, EIF3I, G6PD, HSPA8, HSP90B1, HSPD1, NUDC, PGAM1, RUVBL1 and CNN3 that were differentially expressed in the same direction. Conclusion These proteins may have an important role in sustaining high productivity of recombinant protein over the duration of a fed-batch bioprocess culture. It is possible that many of these proteins could be useful for future approaches to successfully manipulate or engineer CHO cells in order to sustain productivity of recombinant protein.

  6. Optimization of a pH-shift control strategy for producing monoclonal antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures using a pH-dependent dynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogiri, Tomoharu; Tamashima, Hiroshi; Nishizawa, Akitoshi; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2017-09-27

    To optimize monoclonal antibody (mAb) production in Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures, culture pH should be temporally controlled with high resolution. In this study, we propose a new pH-dependent dynamic model represented by simultaneous differential equations including a minimum of six system component, depending on pH value. All kinetic parameters in the dynamic model were estimated using an evolutionary numerical optimization (real-coded genetic algorithm) method based on experimental time-course data obtained at different pH values ranging from 6.6 to 7.2. We determined an optimal pH-shift schedule theoretically. We validated this optimal pH-shift schedule experimentally and mAb production increased by approximately 40% with this schedule. Throughout this study, it was suggested that the culture pH-shift optimization strategy using a pH-dependent dynamic model is suitable to optimize any pH-shift schedule for CHO cell lines used in mAb production projects. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of agonist efficacy on desensitization of phosphoinositide hydrolysis mediated by m1 and m3 muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, J.; Wang, S.Z.; el-Fakahany, E.E. (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor agonist-induced desensitization of phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and loss of receptors were studied in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with the m1 and m3 muscarinic receptor genes. Long-term exposure to the full agonist carbamylcholine (CBC) resulted in a time-dependent attenuation of the maximal PI response and a decrease in agonist potency. This desensitization was accompanied by a parallel loss of maximal ligand binding without an alteration of the binding affinity. The time course of both receptor desensitization and down-regulation was similar in m1 and m3 CHO cells. The PI response to the partial agonist McN-A-343 (McN) in m1 cells was more sensitive to desensitization by CBC than the response to the latter agonist, and this desensitization was faster than receptor down-regulation. Desensitization of the PI response to McN was reflected as a decrease in the maximal response without a marked change in potency. McN induced slow desensitization of the PI response to CBC but a much faster desensitization of its own response. Our data provide evidence that although muscarinic agonist-induced desensitization of PI hydrolysis in CHO cells is due mainly to loss of receptors, there are other important factors which play a role in this process, e.g., receptor-effector uncoupling. The relative contribution of these different mechanisms depends on the efficacy of the agonists used for the receptor desensitization and activation steps.

  8. Screening for estrogen and androgen receptor activities in 200 pesticides by in vitro reporter gene assays using Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Katsura, Eiji; Takeuchi, Shinji; Niiyama, Kazuhito; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2004-01-01

    We tested 200 pesticides, including some of their isomers and metabolites, for agonism and antagonism to two human estrogen receptor (hER) subtypes, hERalpha and hERbeta, and a human androgen receptor (hAR) by highly sensitive transactivation assays using Chinese hamster ovary cells. The test compounds were classified into nine groups: organochlorines, diphenyl ethers, organophosphorus pesticides, pyrethroids, carbamates, acid amides, triazines, ureas, and others. These pesticides were tested at concentrations methiocarb were predominantly hERbeta rather than hERalpha agonistic. Weak antagonistic effects toward hERalpha and hERbeta were shown in five and two pesticides, respectively. On the other hand, none of tested pesticides showed hAR-mediated androgenic activity, but 66 of 200 pesticides exhibited inhibitory activity against the transcriptional activity induced by 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. In particular, the antiandrogenic activities of two diphenyl ether herbicides, chlornitrofen and chlomethoxyfen, were higher than those of vinclozolin and p,p -dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene, known AR antagonists. The results of our ER and AR assays show that 34 pesticides possessed both estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, indicating pleiotropic effects on hER and hAR. We also discussed chemical structures related to these activities. Taken together, our findings suggest that a variety of pesticides have estrogenic and/or antiandrogenic potential via ER and/or AR, and that numerous other manmade chemicals may also possess such estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities. PMID:15064155

  9. Elevated levels of asparagine synthetase activity in physiologically and genetically derepressed Chinese hamster ovary cells are due to increased rates of enzyme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, J S; Arfin, S M

    1981-07-25

    The activity of asparagine synthetase in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is increased in response to asparagine deprivation or decreased aminoacylation of several tRNAs (Andrulis, I. L., Hatfield, G. W., and Arfin, S. M. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 10629-10633). CHO cells resistant to beta-aspartylhydroxamate have up to 5-fold higher levels of asparagine synthetase than the parental line (Gantt, J. S., Chiang, C. S., Hatfield, G. W., and Arfin, S. M. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 4808-4813). We have investigated the basis for these differences in enzyme activity by combined radiochemical and immunological techniques. The asparagine synthetase of beef pancreas was purified to apparent homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the purified protein cross-react with the asparagine synthetase of CHO cells. Immunotitrations show that the amount of enzyme protein in physiologically or genetically derepressed CHO strains is proportional to the level of enzyme activity. Measurement of the relative rates of asparagine synthetase synthesis by pulse-labeling experiments demonstrate that the difference in the number of asparagine synthetase molecules is closely correlated with the rate of enzyme synthesis. In contrast, the half-life of asparagine synthetase in wild type cells and in physiologically or genetically derepressed cells is very similar. It appears that the increased levels of asparagine synthetase can be attributed solely to an increased rate of enzyme synthesis.

  10. Sustained productivity in recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines: proteome analysis of the molecular basis for a process-related phenotype

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meleady, Paula

    2011-07-24

    Abstract Background The ability of mammalian cell lines to sustain cell specific productivity (Qp) over the full duration of bioprocess culture is a highly desirable phenotype, but the molecular basis for sustainable productivity has not been previously investigated in detail. In order to identify proteins that may be associated with a sustained productivity phenotype, we have conducted a proteomic profiling analysis of two matched pairs of monoclonal antibody-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines that differ in their ability to sustain productivity over a 10 day fed-batch culture. Results Proteomic profiling of inherent differences between the two sets of comparators using 2D-DIGE (Difference Gel Electrophoresis) and LC-MS\\/MS resulted in the identification of 89 distinct differentially expressed proteins. Overlap comparisons between the two sets of cell line pairs identified 12 proteins (AKRIB8, ANXA1, ANXA4, EIF3I, G6PD, HSPA8, HSP90B1, HSPD1, NUDC, PGAM1, RUVBL1 and CNN3) that were differentially expressed in the same direction. Conclusion These proteins may have an important role in sustaining high productivity of recombinant protein over the duration of a fed-batch bioprocess culture. It is possible that many of these proteins could be useful for future approaches to successfully manipulate or engineer CHO cells in order to sustain productivity of recombinant protein.

  11. Distribution of gamma-tubulin in multipolar spindles and multinucleated cells induced by dimethylarsinic acid, a methylated derivative of inorganic arsenics, in Chinese hamster V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, T; Nakajima, F; Nasui, M

    1999-08-31

    Localization of gamma-tubulin, a well-characterized component of microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs), was investigated because of interest in the mechanism of the induction of aberrant mitotic spindles in Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA). In control cultures, gamma-tubulin in interphase cells was located as a perinuclear dot on which the microtubules were nucleated. In metaphase cells, the location of gamma-tubulin coincided with that of the mitotic spindle poles. DMAA caused mitotic delay and aberrant spindles, such as tripolar- and quadripolar spindles, in the mitotic cells. Gamma-tubulin was co-localized with the aberrant spindles induced by DMAA. The incidence of gamma-tubulin in the mitotic cells coincided with that of the aberrant spindles and rose with an increasing concentration of DMAA. By contrast, DMAA did not influence the number and location of gamma-tubulin signals in interphase cells. These results suggest that multiple microtubule nucleation sites were induced by DMAA during transition from interphase to mitotic phase. DMAA-induced multiple signals of gamma-tubulin were integrated into one signal at the center of multinucleated cells, surrounded by multiple nuclei as the cell cycle progressed to the next interphase, suggesting the presence of a self-integration mechanism of centrosomal MTOCs during the cell cycle.

  12. Cloning of a Recombinant Plasmid Encoding Thiol-Specific Antioxidant Antigen (TSA) Gene of Leishmania majorand Expression in the Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemeh, Ghaffarifar; Fatemeh, Tabatabaie; Zohreh, Sharifi; Abdolhosein, Dalimiasl; Mohammad Zahir, Hassan; Mehdi, Mahdavi

    2012-01-01

    TSA (thiol-specific antioxidant antigen) is the immune-dominant antigen of Leishmania major and is considered to be the most promising candidate molecule for a recombinant or DNA vaccine against leishmaniasis. The aim of the present work was to express a plasmid containing the TSA gene in eukaryotic cells. Genomic DNA was extracted, and the TSA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR product was cloned into the pTZ57R/T vector, followed by subcloning into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3 (EcoRI and HindIII sites). The recombinant plasmid was characterised by restriction digest and PCR. Eukaryotic Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected with the plasmid containing the TSA gene. Expression of the L. major TSA gene was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. The plasmid containing the TSA gene was successfully expressed, as demonstrated by a band of 22.1 kDa on Western blots. The plasmid containing the TSA gene can be expressed in a eukaryotic cell line. Thus, the recombinant plasmid may potentially be used as a DNA vaccine in animal models.

  13. Expression of Streptococcus mutans wall-associated protein A gene in Chinese hamster ovary cells: prospect for a dental caries DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, T K; Yoder, S; Cao, C; Ugen, K E; Dao, M L

    2001-09-01

    The Streptococcus mutans strain GS-5 wall-associated protein A (Wap-A) is a precursor to the extracellular antigen A (AgA), a recognized candidate dental caries vaccine. The full-length wapA gene (wapA-E) and a C-terminal truncated version (wapA-G) encoding the AgA were cloned into the mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1/V5/His-TOPO. The resulting constructs were propagated in the Escherichia coli Top10. To investigate the expression of the S. mutans genes in mammalian cells, the above constructs were used to transfect Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in the presence of the cationic lipid pfx-8. Transient expression of the wapA-E and wapA-G genes was observed at 24 h post-transfection, as shown by Western immunoblot analysis using a rabbit antiserum to S. mutans cell wall. Immunochemical staining of the transfected CHO cells showed expression of WapA mainly in the cells and budding vesicles, whereas AgA was found mainly in the transfected cells and extracellular medium. The expression of S. mutans proteins in CHO cells, in either vesicles or soluble form, suggested an antibody response to the above DNA constructs. Work is under way to test the efficacy of these as DNA vaccines against S. mutans.

  14. Engineering the cellular protein secretory pathway for enhancement of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells: effects of CERT and XBP1s genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Azam; Vaziri, Behrouz; Moazzami, Reza; Nematollahi, Leila; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Kokabee, Leila; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2013-08-01

    Cell line development is the most critical and also the most time-consuming step in the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins. In this regard, a variety of vector and cell engineering strategies have been developed for generating high-producing mammalian cells; however, the cell line engineering approach seems to show various results on different recombinant protein producer cells. In order to improve the secretory capacity of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, we developed cell line engineering approaches based on the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) genes. For this purpose, CERT S132A, a mutant form of CERT that is resistant to phosphorylation, and XBP1s were overexpressed in a recombinant t-PA-producing CHO cell line. Overexpression of CERT S132A increased the specific productivity of t-PA-producing CHO cells up to 35%. In contrast, the heterologous expression of XBP1s did not affect the t-PA expression rate. Our results suggest that CERTS132A- based secretion engineering could be an effective strategy for enhancing recombinant t- PA production in CHO cells.

  15. Arsenic[III] and heavy metal ions induce intrachromosomal homologous recombination in the hprt gene of V79 Chinese hamster cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helleday, T; Nilsson, R; Jenssen, D

    2000-01-01

    In the present study the carcinogenic metal ions Cd[II], Co[II], Cr[VI], Ni[II], and Pb[II], as well as As[III], were examined for their ability to induce intrachromosomal homologous and nonhomologous recombination in the hprt gene of two V79 Chinese hamster cell lines, SPD8 and Sp5, respectively. With the exception of Pb[II], all of these ions enhanced homologous recombination, the order of potency being Cr>Cd>As>Co>Ni. In contrast, Cr[VI] was the only ion to enhance recombination of the nonhomologous type. In order to obtain additional information on the mechanism of recombination in the SPD8 cell line, individual clones exhibiting metal-induced recombination were isolated, and the sequence of their hprt gene determined. These findings confirmed that all recombinogenic events in this cell line were of the homologous type, involving predominantly a chromatid exchange mechanism. The mechanisms underlying the recombination induced by these ions are discussed in relationship to their genotoxicity, as well as to DNA repair and replication. Induced recombination may constitute a novel mechanism for induction of neoplastic disease. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Development, qualification, validation and application of the neutral red uptake assay in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells using a VITROCELL® VC10® smoke exposure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Wanda; Fowler, Kathy; Hargreaves, Victoria; Reeve, Lesley; Bombick, Betsy

    2017-04-01

    Cytotoxicity assessment of combustible tobacco products by neutral red uptake (NRU) has historically used total particulate matter (TPM) or solvent captured gas vapor phase (GVP), rather than fresh whole smoke. Here, the development, validation and application of the NRU assay in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, following exposure to fresh whole smoke generated with the VITROCELL® VC10® system is described. Whole smoke exposure is particularly important as both particulate and vapor phases of tobacco smoke show cytotoxicity in vitro. The VITROCELL® VC10® system provides exposure at the air liquid interface (ALI) to mimic in vivo conditions for assessing the toxicological impact of smoke in vitro. Instrument and assay validations are crucial for comparative analyses. 1) demonstrate functionality of the VITROCELL® VC10® system by installation, operational and performance qualification, 2) develop and validate a cellular system for assessing cytotoxicity following whole smoke exposure and 3) assess the whole smoke NRU assay sensitivity for statistical differentiation between a reference combustible cigarette (3R4F) and a primarily "heat-not-burn" cigarette (Eclipse). The VITROCELL® VC10® provided consistent generation and delivery of whole smoke; exposure-related changes in in vitro cytotoxicity were observed with reproducible IC50 values; comparative analysis showed that the heat-not-burn cigarette was significantly (P<0.001) less cytotoxic than the 3R4F combustible cigarette, consistent with the lower levels of chemical constituents liberated by primarily-heating the cigarette versus burning. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  18. Up-regulation of ROS by mitochondria-dependent bystander signaling contributes to genotoxicity of bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shaopeng [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Zhao Ye; Zhao Guoping [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Bao Lingzhi [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun, E-mail: ljw@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2009-06-18

    Genomic instability can be observed in bystander cells. However, the underlying mechanism(s) is still relatively unclear. In a previous study, we found that irradiated cells released mitochondria-dependent intracellular factor(s) which could lead to bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction. In this paper, we used normal ({rho}{sup +}) and mtDNA-depleted ({rho}{sup 0}) human-hamster hybrid cells to investigate mitochondrial effects on the genotoxicity in bystander effect through medium transfer experiments. Through the detection of DNA double-strand breaks with {gamma}-H2AX, we found that the fraction of {gamma}-H2AX positive cells changed with time when irradiation conditioned cell medium (ICCM) were harvested. ICCM harvested from irradiated {rho}{sup +} cells at 10 min post-irradiation ({rho}{sup +} ICCM{sub 10min}) caused larger increases of bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction comparing to {rho}{sup 0} ICCM{sub 10min}, which only caused a slight increase of bystander {gamma}-H2AX induction. The {rho}{sup +} ICCM{sub 10min} could also result in the up-regulation of ROS production (increased by 35% at 10 min), while there was no significant increase in cells treated with {rho}{sup 0} ICCM{sub 10min}. We treated cells with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the scavenger of ROS, and quenched {gamma}-H2AX induction by {rho}{sup +} ICCM. Furthermore, after the medium had been transferred and the cells were continuously cultured for 7 days, we found significantly increased CD59{sup -} gene loci mutation (increased by 45.9%) and delayed cell death in the progeny of {rho}{sup +} ICCM-treated bystander cells. In conclusion, the work presented here suggested that up-regulation of the mitochondria-dependent ROS might be very important in mediating genotoxicity of bystander effects.

  19. Changes in the Number of Double-Strand DNA Breaks in Chinese Hamster V79 Cells Exposed to γ-Radiation with Different Dose Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreyan N. Osipov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A comparative investigation of the induction of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs in the Chinese hamster V79 cells by γ-radiation at dose rates of 1, 10 and 400 mGy/min (doses ranged from 0.36 to 4.32 Gy was performed. The acute radiation exposure at a dose rate of 400 mGy/min resulted in the linear dose-dependent increase of the γ-H2AX foci formation. The dose-response curve for the acute exposure was well described by a linear function y = 1.22 + 19.7x, where “y” is an average number of γ-H2AX foci per a cell and “x” is the absorbed dose (Gy. The dose rate reduction down to 10 mGy/min lead to a decreased number of γ-H2AX foci, as well as to a change of the dose-response relationship. Thus, the foci number up to 1.44 Gy increased and reached the “plateau” area between 1.44 and 4.32 Gy. There was only a slight increase of the γ-H2AX foci number (up to 7 in cells after the protracted exposure (up to 72 h to ionizing radiation at a dose rate of 1 mGy/min. Similar effects of the varying dose rates were obtained when DNA damage was assessed using the comet assay. In general, our results show that the reduction of the radiation dose rate resulted in a significant decrease of DSBs per cell per an absorbed dose.

  20. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Joyce, Kellie [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Xie, Hong [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Falank, Carolyne [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • The role of homologous recombination repair in DU-induced toxicity was examined. • Loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. • XRCC3 protects cell from DU-induced chromosome breaks and fusions. • XRCC3 plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation of the X chromosome. - Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is extensively used in both industry and military applications. The potential for civilian and military personnel exposure to DU is rising, but there are limited data on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. Previous laboratory research indicates DU is a potential carcinogen, but epidemiological studies remain inconclusive. DU is genotoxic, inducing DNA double strand breaks, chromosome damage and mutations, but the mechanisms of genotoxicity or repair pathways involved in protecting cells against DU-induced damage remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of homologous recombination repair deficiency on DU-induced genotoxicity using RAD51D and XRCC3-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Cells deficient in XRCC3 (irs1SF) exhibited similar cytotoxicity after DU exposure compared to wild-type (AA8) and XRCC3-complemented (1SFwt8) cells, but DU induced more break-type and fusion-type lesions in XRCC3-deficient cells compared to wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Surprisingly, loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. DU induced selective X-chromosome fragmentation irrespective of RAD51D status, but loss of XRCC3 nearly eliminated fragmentation observed after DU exposure in wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Thus, XRCC3, but not RAD51D, protects cells from DU-induced breaks and fusions and also plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation.

  1. Lengthening of high-yield production levels of monoclonal antibody-producing Chinese hamster ovary cells by downregulation of breast cancer 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Rima; Yamano, Noriko; Kawamura, Namiko; Omasa, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    The establishment process of high-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for therapeutic protein production is usually laborious and time consuming because of the low probability of obtaining stable, high-producing clones over a long term. Thus, development of an efficient approach is required to establish stable, high-producing cells. This study presents a novel method that can efficiently establish sustainably high-producing cell lines by acceleration of transgene amplification and suppression of transgene silencing. The effects of breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) downregulation on gene amplification efficiency and long-term productivity were investigated in CHO cells. Small interfering RNA expression vectors against BRCA1 were transfected into the CHO DG44-derived antibody-producing cell clone. Individual cell clones were obtained after induction of gene amplification in the presence of 400 nM methotrexate, which were cultured until passage 20. BRCA1-downregulated cell clones CHO B1Sa and B1Sb displayed 2.2- and 1.6-fold higher specific production rates than the S-Mock clone. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that transgene amplification occurred at a high frequency in B1Sa and B1Sb clones. Moreover, B1Sa and B1Sb clones at 20 passages had approximately 3.5- and 5.3-fold higher productivity than the S-Mock clone. Histone modification analysis revealed a decrease in an active mark for transcription, trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4), in the transgene locus of the S-Mock clone. However, H3K4 trimethylation levels were not decreased in B1Sa and B1Sb clones during long term culture. Our results suggest that high-producing cells, which maintain their productivity long-term, were efficiently established by BRCA1 downregulation. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative study of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of titanium oxide and aluminium oxide nanoparticles in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Virgilio, A.L. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Diag. 113 y 64, Correo 16, Suc. 4, La Plata (1900) (Argentina); Reigosa, M. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular (IMBICE), Calle 526 y Camino Gral. Belgrano (entre 10 y 11), La Plata 1900 (Argentina); Arnal, P.M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Diag. 113 y 64, Correo 16, Suc. 4, La Plata 1900 (Argentina); Fernandez Lorenzo de Mele, M., E-mail: mmele@inifta.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Diag. 113 y 64, Correo 16, Suc. 4, La Plata 1900 (Argentina)

    2010-05-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) and aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles (NPs) on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells using neutral red (NR), mitochondrial activity (by MTT assay), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), micronucleus (MN) formation, and cell cycle kinetics techniques. Results showed a dose-related cytotoxic effect evidenced after 24 h by changes in lysosomal and mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. Interestingly, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of perinuclear vesicles in CHO-K1 cells after treatment with both NPs during 24 h but no NP was detected in the nuclei. Genotoxic effects were shown by MN frequencies which significantly increased at 0.5 and 1 {mu}g/mL TiO{sub 2} and 0.5-10 {mu}g/mL Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. SCE frequencies were higher for cells treated with 1-5 {mu}g/mL TiO{sub 2}. The absence of metaphases evidenced cytotoxicity for higher concentrations of TiO{sub 2}. No SCE induction was achieved after treatment with 1-25 {mu}g/mL Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In conclusion, findings showed cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs on CHO-K1 cells. Possible causes of controversial reports are discussed further on.

  3. Identification of functional elements of the GDP-fucose transporter SLC35C1 using a novel Chinese hamster ovary mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peiqing; Haryadi, Ryan; Chan, Kah Fai; Teo, Gavin; Goh, John; Pereira, Natasha Ann; Feng, Huatao; Song, Zhiwei

    2012-07-01

    The GDP-fucose transporter SLC35C1 critically regulates the fucosylation of glycans. Elucidation of its structure-function relationships remains a challenge due to the lack of an appropriate mutant cell line. Here we report a novel Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant, CHO-gmt5, generated by the zinc-finger nuclease technology, in which the Slc35c1 gene was knocked out from a previously reported CHO mutant that has a dysfunctional CMP-sialic acid transporter (CST) gene (Slc35a1). Consequently, CHO-gmt5 harbors double genetic defects in Slc35a1 and Slc35c1 and produces N-glycans deficient in both sialic acid and fucose. The structure-function relationships of SLC35C1 were studied using CHO-gmt5 cells. In contrast to the CST and UDP-galactose transporter, the C-terminal tail of SLC35C1 is not required for its Golgi localization but is essential for generating glycans that are recognized by a fucose-binding lectin, Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), suggesting an important role in the transport activity of SLC35C1. Furthermore, we found that this impact can be independently contributed by a cluster of three lysine residues and a Glu-Met (EM) sequence within the C terminus. We also showed that the conserved glycine residues at positions 180 and 277 of SLC35C1 have significant impacts on AAL binding to CHO-gmt5 cells, suggesting that these conserved glycine residues are required for the transport activity of Slc35 proteins. The absence of sialic acid and fucose on Fc N-glycan has been independently shown to enhance the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) effect. By combining these features into one cell line, we postulate that CHO-gmt5 may represent a more advantageous cell line for the production of recombinant antibodies with enhanced ADCC effect.

  4. Fed-batch bioreactor performance and cell line stability evaluation of the artificial chromosome expression technology expressing an IgG1 in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Rodney G; Yu, Erwin; Roe, Susanna; Piatchek, Michele Bailey; Jones, Heather L; Mott, John; Kennard, Malcolm L; Goosney, Danika L; Monteith, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The artificial chromosome expression (ACE) technology system uses an engineered artificial chromosome containing multiple site-specific recombination acceptor sites for the rapid and efficient construction of stable cell lines. The construction of Chinese hamster ovary(CHO) cell lines expressing an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) using the ACE system has been previously described (Kennard et al., Biotechnol Bioeng. 2009;104:540-553). To further demonstrate the manufacturing feasibility of the ACE system, four CHO cell lines expressing the human IgG1 MAb 4A1 were evaluated in batch and fed-batch shake flasks and in a 2-L fed-batch bioreactor. The batch shake flasks achieved titers between 0.7 and 1.1 g/L, whereas the fed-batch shake flask process improved titers to 2.5–3.0 g/L. The lead 4A1 ACE cell line achieved titers of 4.0 g/L with an average specific productivity of 40 pg/(cell day) when cultured in a non optimized 2-L fed-batch bioreactor using a completely chemically defined process. Generational stability characterization of the lead 4A1-expressing cell line demonstrated that the cell line was stable for up to 75 days in culture. Product quality attributes of the 4A1 MAb produced by the ACE system during the stability evaluation period were unchanged and also comparable to existing expression technologies such as the CHO-dhfr system. The results of this evaluation demonstrate that a clonal, stable MAb-expressing CHO cell line can be produced using ACE technology that performs competitively using a chemically defined fed-batch bioreactor process with comparable product quality attributes to cell lines generated by existing technologies.

  5. Cell-cycle-dependent repair of potentially lethal damage in the XR-1 gamma-ray-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamato, T D; Dipatri, A; Giaccia, A

    1988-08-01

    Repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) was investigated in a gamma-ray-sensitive Chinese hamster cell mutant, XR-1, and its parent by comparing survival of plateau-phase cells plated immediately after irradiation with cells plated after a delay. Previous work indicated that XR-1 cells are deficient in repair of double-strand DNA breaks and are gamma-ray sensitive in G1 but have near normal sensitivity and repair capacity in late S phase. At irradiation doses from 0 to 1.0 Gy (100 to 10% survival), the delayed- and immediate-plating survival curves of XR-1 cells were identical; however, at doses greater than 1.0 Gy a significant increase in survival was observed when plating was delayed (PLD repair), approaching a 20-fold increase at 8 Gy. Elimination of S-phase cells by [3H]thymidine suicide dramatically increased gamma-ray sensitivity of plateau-phase XR-1 mutant cells and reduced by 600-fold the number of cells capable of PLD repair after a 6-Gy dose. In contrast, elimination of S-phase cells in plateau-phase parental cells did not alter PLD repair. These results suggest that the majority of PLD repair observed in plateau-phase XR-1 cells occurs in S-phase cells while G1 cells perform little PLD repair. In contrast, G1 cells account for the majority of PLD repair in plateau-phase parental cells. Thus, in the XR-1 mutant, a cell's ability to repair PLD seems to depend upon the stage of the cell cycle at which the irradiation is delivered. A possible explanation for these findings is discussed.

  6. Optimization of gene delivery methods in Xenopus laevis kidney (A6) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines for heterologous expression of Xenopus inner ear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Gordillo, Daniel; Trujillo-Provencio, Casilda; Knight, V Bleu; Serrano, Elba E

    2011-10-01

    The Xenopus inner ear provides a useful model for studies of hearing and balance because it shares features with the mammalian inner ear, and because amphibians are capable of regenerating damaged mechanosensory hair cells. The structure and function of many proteins necessary for inner ear function have yet to be elucidated and require methods for analysis. To this end, we seek to characterize Xenopus inner ear genes outside of the animal model through heterologous expression in cell lines. As part of this effort, we aimed to optimize physical (electroporation), chemical (lipid-mediated; Lipofectamine™ 2000, Metafectene® Pro), and biological (viral-mediated; BacMam virus Cellular Lights™ Tubulin-RFP) gene delivery methods in amphibian (Xenopus; A6) cells and mammalian (Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)) cells. We successfully introduced the commercially available pEGFP-N3, pmCherry-N1, pEYFP-Tubulin, and Cellular Lights™ Tubulin-RFP fluorescent constructs to cells and evaluated their transfection or transduction efficiencies using the three gene delivery methods. In addition, we analyzed the transfection efficiency of a novel construct synthesized in our laboratory by cloning the Xenopus inner ear calcium-activated potassium channel β1 subunit, then subcloning the subunit into the pmCherry-N1 vector. Every gene delivery method was significantly more effective in CHO cells. Although results for the A6 cell line were not statistically significant, both cell lines illustrate a trend towards more efficient gene delivery using viral-mediated methods; however the cost of viral transduction is also much higher. Our findings demonstrate the need to improve gene delivery methods for amphibian cells and underscore the necessity for a greater understanding of amphibian cell biology.

  7. Analysis of restriction enzyme-induced DNA double-strand breaks in Chinese hamster ovary cells by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: implications for chromosome damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, D D; Phillips, J W; Columna, E A; Winegar, R A; Morgan, W F

    1991-11-01

    Restriction enzymes can be electroporated into mammalian cells, and the induced DNA double-strand breaks can lead to aberrations in metaphase chromosomes. Chinese hamster ovary cells were electroporated with PstI, which generates 3' cohesive-end breaks, PvuII, which generates blunt-end breaks, or XbaI, which generates 5' cohesive-end breaks. Although all three restriction enzymes induced similar numbers of aberrant metaphase cells, PvuII was dramatically more effective at inducing both exchange-type and deletion-type chromosome aberrations. Our cytogenetic studies also indicated that enzymes are active within cells for only a short time. We used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to investigate (i) how long it takes for enzymes to cleave DNA after electroporation into cells, (ii) how long enzymes are active in the cells, and (iii) how the DNA double-strand breaks induced are related to the aberrations observed in metaphase chromosomes. At the same concentrations used in the cytogenetic studies, all enzymes were active within 10 min of electroporation. PstI and PvuII showed a distinct peak in break formation at 20 min, whereas XbaI showed a gradual increase in break frequency over time. Another increase in the number of breaks observed with all three enzymes at 2 and 3 h after electroporation was probably due to nonspecific DNA degradation in a subpopulation of enzyme-damaged cells that lysed after enzyme exposure. Break frequency and chromosome aberration frequency were inversely related: The blunt-end cutter PvuII gave rise to the most aberrations but the fewest breaks, suggesting that it is the type of break rather than the break frequency that is important for chromosome aberration formation.

  8. Effect of Temperature Downshift on the Transcriptomic Responses of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Using Recombinant Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator Production Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bedoya-López

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins are widely used as biopharmaceuticals, but their production by mammalian cell culture is expensive. Hence, improvement of bioprocess productivity is greatly needed. A temperature downshift (TDS from 37°C to 28-34°C is an effective strategy to expand the productive life period of cells and increase their productivity (qp. Here, TDS in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell cultures, initially grown at 37°C and switched to 30°C during the exponential growth phase, resulted in a 1.6-fold increase in the qp of recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator (rh-tPA. The transcriptomic response using next-generation sequencing (NGS was assessed to characterize the cellular behavior associated with TDS. A total of 416 (q > 0.8 and 3,472 (q > 0.9 differentially expressed transcripts, with more than a 1.6-fold change at 24 and 48 h post TDS, respectively, were observed in cultures with TDS compared to those at constant 37°C. In agreement with the extended cell survival resulting from TDS, transcripts related to cell growth arrest that controlled cell proliferation without the activation of the DNA damage response, were differentially expressed. Most upregulated genes were related to energy metabolism in mitochondria, mitochondrial biogenesis, central metabolism, and avoidance of apoptotic cell death. The gene coding for rh-tPA was not differentially expressed, but fluctuations were detected in the transcripts encoding proteins involved in the secretory machinery, particularly in glycosylation. Through NGS the dynamic processes caused by TDS were assessed in this biological system.

  9. Lack of Bystander Effects From High LET Radiation For Early Cytogenetic Endpoints.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groesser, Torsten; Cooper, Brian; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2008-05-07

    The aim of this work was to study radiation-induced bystander effects for early cytogenetic end points in various cell lines using the medium transfer technique after exposure to high- and low-LET radiation. Cells were exposed to 20 MeV/ nucleon nitrogen ions, 968 MeV/nucleon iron ions, or 575 MeV/nucleon iron ions followed by transfer of the conditioned medium from the irradiated cells to unirradiated test cells. The effects studied included DNA double-strand break induction, {gamma}-H2AX focus formation, induction of chromatid breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes, and micronucleus formation using DNA repair-proficient and -deficient hamster and human cell lines (xrs6, V79, SW48, MO59K and MO59J). Cell survival was also measured in SW48 bystander cells using X rays. Although it was occasionally possible to detect an increase in chromatid break levels using nitrogen ions and to see a higher number of {gamma}-H2AX foci using nitrogen and iron ions in xrs6 bystander cells in single experiments, the results were not reproducible. After we pooled all the data, we could not verify a significant bystander effect for any of these end points. Also, we did not detect a significant bystander effect for DSB induction or micronucleus formation in these cell lines or for clonogenic survival in SW48 cells. The data suggest that DNA damage and cytogenetic changes are not induced in bystander cells. In contrast, data in the literature show pronounced bystander effects in a variety of cell lines, including clonogenic survival in SW48 cells and induction of chromatid breaks and micronuclei in hamster cells. To reconcile these conflicting data, it is possible that the epigenetic status of the specific cell line or the precise culture conditions and medium supplements, such as serum, may be critical for inducing bystander effects.

  10. Radiation Bystander Effects Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokohzaman Soleymanifard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiation Induced Bystander Effect (RIBE which cause radiation effects in non-irradiated cells, has challenged the principle according to which radiation traversal through the nucleus of a cell is necessary for producing biological responses. What is the mechanism of this phenomenon? To have a better understanding of this rather ambiguous concept substantial number of original and reviewed article were carefully examined. Results: Irradiated cells release molecules which can propagate in cell environment and/or transmit through gap junction intercellular communication. These molecules can reach to non-irradiated cells and transmit bystander signals. In many investigations, it has been confirmed that these molecules are growth factors, cytokines, nitric oxide and free radicals like reactive oxygen species (ROS. Transmission of by stander signal to neighboring cells persuades them to produce secondary growth factors which in their turn cause further cell injuries. Some investigators suggest, organelles other than nucleus (mitochondria and cell membrane are the origin of these signals.  There is another opinion which suggests double strand breaks (DSB are not directly generated in bystander cells, rather they are due to smaller damage like single strand breaks which accumulate and end up to DSB. Although bystander mechanisms have not been exactly known, it can be confirmed that multiple mechanisms and various pathways are responsible for this effect. Cell type, radiation type, experimental conditions and end points identify the dominant mechanism. Conclusion: Molecules and pathways which are responsible for RIBE, also cause systemic responses to other non-irradiation stresses. So RIBE is a kind of systemic stress or innate immune responses, which are performed by cell microenvironment. Irradiated cells and their signals are components of microenvironment for creating bystander effects.

  11. Fluid shear stress induction of the transcriptional activator c-fos in human and bovine endothelial cells, HeLa, and Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, V; Waterbury, R; Xiao, Z; Diamond, S L

    1996-02-20

    The c-fos protein belongs to a family of transcriptional cofactors that can complex with proteins of the Jun family and activate mRNA transcription from gene promoters containing an activator protein 1 (AP-1) binding element. The shear stress inducibility of the c-fos protein was studied in human and animal cell lines of vastly different origins. Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC, passage 2-14), HeLa cells, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were subjected to steady laminar shear stress using a parallel plate flow apparatus. After 1 h of flow exposure at 25 dyn/cm(2), the c-fos levels in nuclei of shear stress HUVEC, BAEC, HeLa, and CHO were 5.4 +/- 2.0 (n = 3), 2.25 +/- 1.38 (n = 6), 2.14 +/- 0.07 (n = 8), 1.92 +/- 0.58 (n = 2) times higher, respectively, than in matched stationary controls. Flow exposure at 4 dyn/cm(2) caused no enhancement of c-fos levels in any of the cell lines tested, but caused significant reduction in c-fos expression in the HeLa cells. The c-fos induction by shear stress could be blocked by pharmacological agents. For example, the flow induction of the c-fos protein levels was blocked by 50% with the preincubation of HUVEC with a protein kinase C inhibitor, H7 (10 muM) and blocked completely in HeLa cells preincubated with the phospholipase C inhibitor, neomycin (5 mM). The minimum time of shear stress exposure required to induce the c-fos protein expression in HeLa cells was found to be as low as 1 min. By Northern analysis, the c-fos mRNA levels were found to be elevated in BAEC, CHO, and HeLa cells exposed to 25 dyn/cm(2) for 30 min. These studies indicate that c-fos induction is a consistent genetic response in a variety of mammalian cells that may alter cellular phenotype in mechanical environments. (c) 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Activation of transfected M1 or M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors induces cell-cell adhesion of Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing endogenous cadherins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, S H; Puhl, H L; Phelps, S H; Williams, C L

    1999-04-10

    Expression of endogenous cadherins by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has not been previously reported. However, we observed that CHO cells adhere to one another upon activation of transfected muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR), suggesting that the cells express endogenous cadherins. A 160-base pair RT-PCR product with 100% homology to the cytoplasmic domain of human E-cadherin was amplified from CHO cells. A second RT-PCR product amplified from these cells has 92% homology to the cytoplasmic domain of human cadherin-9 and 86% homology to the cytoplasmic domain of human cadherin-6. Western blotting indicates that CHO cells express a 165-kDa protein recognized by E-cadherin antibodies and a 120-kDa protein recognized by an antibody to the cadherin C-terminus sequence. The ability of transfected mAChR subtypes to regulate cadherin-mediated adhesion of CHO cells was tested by measuring the permeation of horseradish peroxidase across confluent CHO cell monolayers, by microscopic examination of the cells, and by aggregation assays. Cell-cell adhesion is induced within 15 min of activating transfected M1 or M3 mAChR which functionally couple to protein kinase C (PKC). In contrast, CHO cell adhesion is not affected by activating transfected M2 mAChR which functionally couple to other effectors. Activation of PKC with phorbol esters also induces cell-cell adhesion of all CHO sublines tested. Immunofluorescence assays reveal that endogenous cadherins redistribute on the plasma membrane of CHO cells following mAChR or PKC activation. Inactivation of cadherins by removal of extracellular Ca2+ abrogates adhesion induced by mAChR or PKC activation. Our demonstration that activation of only odd-numbered mAChR subtypes induces cadherin-mediated adhesion suggests that the unique responses of cells to M1 or M3 mAChR stimulation may involve cadherin activation. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. In vitro genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ivermectin and its formulation ivomec on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO{sub K1}) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinari, G.; Soloneski, S.; Reigosa, M.A. [Catedra de Citologia, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina); Larramendy, M.L., E-mail: m_larramendy@hotmail.com [Catedra de Citologia, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina)

    2009-06-15

    The effects of ivermectin (IVM) and its commercial formulation ivomec (IVM 1.0%) were studied on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO{sub K1}) cells by several genotoxicity [sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)] and cytotoxicity [cell-cycle progression (CCP), mitotic index (MI), proliferative replication index (PRI), 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and neutral red (NR)] bioassays within the 1.0-250 {mu}g/ml concentration-range. While IVM and ivomec did not modified SCE frequencies, they induced DNA-strand breaks revealed by SCGE. An enhancement of slightly damaged cells and a decrease in undamaged cells were observed in IVM-treated cultures with 5.0-50.0 {mu}g/ml. In ivomec-treated cells, while an increase in slightly damaged cells was induced with 5.0-50.0 {mu}g/ml, the damaged and undamaged cells increased and decreased only with 50.0 {mu}g/ml. Both compounds exerted a delay in CCP and a reduction in PRI when 25.0 {mu}g/ml was employed whereas cytotoxicity was observed at higher concentration than 50.0 {mu}g/ml. No MI alteration was observed with 1.0-10.0 and 1.0-5.0 {mu}g/ml of IVM and ivomec, respectively. A concentration-related trend to an increase in MI was achieved within 1.0-10.0 {mu}g/ml. An increase in the MI was induced in 10.0 {mu}g/ml ivomec-treated cultures. A marked reduction of about 89% and 62% in regard to controls was observed with 25.0 {mu}g/ml of IVM and ivomec, respectively. NR and MTT assays revealed a cell growth inhibition when 0.25-250.0 {mu}g/ml of both compounds was employed. The results highlighted that IVM and ivomec exert both genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in mammalian cells in vitro, at least in CHO{sub K1} cells.

  14. Comparison of five different in vitro assays for assessment of sodium metavanadate cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 line).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Iwona

    2015-08-01

    This investigation was undertaken to compare five different in vitro cytotoxicity assays for their power in revealing vanadium-mediated toxicity in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells. The cells were exposed to sodium metavanadate (NaVO(3)) in the range of 10-1000 µM for 24 h and thereafter the cytotoxic effects of NaVO(3) were measured by colorimetric in vitro assays: the neutral red (NR) test, the 2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide inner salt (XTT) assay, the resazurin assay, the sulforhodamine B (SR-B) assay, and by microscopic assessment of cell viability using the trypan blue (TB) staining method. Among the assays used, the NR test was the most sensitive, since it revealed metavanadate cytotoxicity at the lowest NaVO(3) dose (=50 µM). Also, NaVO(3) cytotoxicity expressed as inhibitory concentration (IC) showed the lowest values for the NR test. Three other tests XTT, resazurin, and SR-B assays showed intermediate sensitivity revealing the cytotoxicity of NaVO(3) at 100 µM. The corresponding IC10 and IC50 values calculated for the XTT, resazurin, and SR-B tests were similar. The TB staining method was the least sensitive, since it recorded metavanadate cytotoxicity at the highest NaVO(3) concentration tested (=600 µM). Based on the cytotoxicity end points measured with the above assays, it can be concluded that lysosomal/Golgi apparatus damage (measured by NR assay) may be the primary effect of NaVO(3) on CHO-K1 cells. The disintegration of mitochondria (assessed with the XTT and resazurin assays) probably follows lysosomal impairment. Plasma membrane permeability (staining with TB) occurs at a late stage of NaVO(3)-induced cytotoxicity on CHO-K1 cells. The results obtained in this research work show that the NR test can be recommended as a very sensitive assay for the assessment of NaVO(3) cytotoxicity in the CHO-K1 cell culture model. Considering the convenience of assay performance along with adequate sensitivity

  15. The β4subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel (Cacnb4) regulates the rate of cell proliferation in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rima, Mohamad; Daghsni, Marwa; De Waard, Stephan; Gaborit, Nathalie; Fajloun, Ziad; Ronjat, Michel; Mori, Yasuo; Brusés, Juan L; De Waard, Michel

    2017-08-01

    The β subunits of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel (VGCC) are cytosolic proteins that interact with the VGCC pore -forming subunit and participate in the trafficking of the channel to the cell membrane and in ion influx regulation. β subunits also exert functions independently of their binding to VGCC by translocation to the cell nucleus including the control of gene expression. Mutations of the neuronal Cacnb4 (β 4 ) subunit are linked to human neuropsychiatric disorders including epilepsy and intellectual disabilities. It is believed that the pathogenic phenotype induced by these mutations is associated with channel-independent functions of the β 4 subunit. In this report, we investigated the role of β 4 subunit in cell proliferation and cell cycle progression and examined whether these functions could be altered by a pathogenic mutation. To this end, stably transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO-K1) cells expressing either rat full-length β 4 or the rat C-terminally truncated epileptic mutant variant β 1-481 were generated. The subcellular localization of both proteins differed significantly. Full-length β 4 localizes almost exclusively in the cell nucleus and concentrates into the nucleolar compartment, while the C-terminal-truncated β 1-481 subunit was less concentrated within the nucleus and absent from the nucleoli. Cell proliferation was found to be reduced by the expression of β 4 , while it was unaffected by the epileptic mutant. Also, full-length β 4 interfered with cell cycle progression by presumably preventing cells from entering the S-phase via a mechanism that partially involves endogenous B56δ, a regulatory subunit of the phosphatase 2A (PP2A) that binds β 4 but not β 1-481 . Analysis of β 4 subcellular distribution during the cell cycle revealed that the protein is highly expressed in the nucleus at the G1/S transition phase and that it is translocated out of the nucleus during chromatin condensation and cell division. These results

  16. Bystander effect-induced mutagenicity in HPRT locus of CHO cells following BNCT neutron irradiation: Characteristics of point mutations by sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinashi, Yuko [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: kinashi@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    To investigate bystander mutagenic effects induced by alpha particles during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), we mixed cells that were electroporated with borocaptate sodium (BSH), which led to the accumulation of {sup 10}B inside the cells, with cells that did not contain the boron compound. BSH-containing cells were irradiated with {alpha} particles produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction, whereas cells without boron were only affected by the {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H and {sup 14}N(n,{rho}){sup 14}C reactions. The frequency of mutations induced in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus was examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells irradiated with neutrons (Kyoto University Research Reactor: 5 MW). Neutron irradiation of 1:1 mixtures of cells with and without BSH resulted in a survival fraction of 0.1, and the cells that did not contain BSH made up 99.4% of the surviving cell population. Using multiplex polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), molecular structural analysis indicated that most of the mutations induced by the bystander effect were point mutations and that the frequencies of total and partial deletions induced by the bystander effect were lower than those resulting from the {alpha} particles produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction or the neutron beam from the {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H and {sup 14}N(n,{rho}){sup 14}C reactions. The types of point mutations induced by the BNCT bystander effect were analyzed by cloning and sequencing methods. These mutations were comprised of 65.5% base substitutions, 27.5% deletions, and 7.0% insertions. Sequence analysis of base substitutions showed that transversions and transitions occurred in 64.7% and 35.3% of cases, respectively. G:C{yields}T:A transversion induced by 8-oxo-guanine in DNA occurred in 5.9% of base substitution mutants in the BNCT bystander group. The characteristic mutations seen in this group, induced by BNCT {alpha} particles

  17. Bystanders Are the Key to Stopping Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Sharon; Notar, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Bullying is the dominance over another. Bullying occurs when there is an audience. Peer bystanders provide an audience 85% of instances of bullying. If you remove the audience bullying should stop. The article is a review of literature (2002-2013) on the role of bystanders; importance of bystanders; why bystanders behave as they do; resources to…

  18. MRC5 and QU-DB bystander cells can produce bystander factors and induce radiation bystander effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni Toossi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation damages initiated by radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE are not limited to the first or immediate neighbors of the irradiated cells, but the effects have been observed in the cells far from the irradiation site. It has been postulated that bystander cells, by producing bystander factors, are actively involved in the propagation of bystander effect in the regions beyond the initial irradiated site. Current study was planned to test the hypothesis. MRC5 and QU-DB cell lines were irradiated, and successive medium transfer technique was performed to induce bystander effects in two bystander cell groups. Conditioned medium extracted from the target cells was transferred to the bystander cells (first bystander cells. After one hour, conditioned medium was substituted by fresh medium. Two hours later, the fresh medium was transferred to a second group of non-irradiated cells (second bystander cells. Micronucleated cells (MC were counted to quantify damages induced in the first and second bystander cell groups. Radiation effect was observed in the second bystander cells as well as in the first ones. Statistical analyses revealed that the number of MC in second bystander subgroups was significantly more than the corresponding value observed in control groups, but in most cases it was equal to the number of MC observed in the first bystander cells. MRC5 and QU-DB bystander cells can produce and release bystander signals in the culture medium and affect non-irradiated cells. Therefore, they may contribute to the RIBE propagation.

  19. MRC5 and QU-DB bystander cells can produce bystander factors and induce radiation bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Mohebbi, Shokoufeh; Samani, Roghayeh Kamran; Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman

    2014-07-01

    Radiation damages initiated by radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) are not limited to the first or immediate neighbors of the irradiated cells, but the effects have been observed in the cells far from the irradiation site. It has been postulated that bystander cells, by producing bystander factors, are actively involved in the propagation of bystander effect in the regions beyond the initial irradiated site. Current study was planned to test the hypothesis. MRC5 and QU-DB cell lines were irradiated, and successive medium transfer technique was performed to induce bystander effects in two bystander cell groups. Conditioned medium extracted from the target cells was transferred to the bystander cells (first bystander cells). After one hour, conditioned medium was substituted by fresh medium. Two hours later, the fresh medium was transferred to a second group of non-irradiated cells (second bystander cells). Micronucleated cells (MC) were counted to quantify damages induced in the first and second bystander cell groups. Radiation effect was observed in the second bystander cells as well as in the first ones. Statistical analyses revealed that the number of MC in second bystander subgroups was significantly more than the corresponding value observed in control groups, but in most cases it was equal to the number of MC observed in the first bystander cells. MRC5 and QU-DB bystander cells can produce and release bystander signals in the culture medium and affect non-irradiated cells. Therefore, they may contribute to the RIBE propagation.

  20. Overleeft de hamster?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apeldoorn, van R.C.; Klein Douwel, C.; Thomas, P.

    1999-01-01

    Een analyse van de achteruitgang van de hamster (Cricetus cricetus) in Europa en Limburg, de oorzaken (veranderingen in de landbouw; versnippering van leefgebieden), en oplossingsrichtingen voor een duurzaam overleven van de hamster in Limburg (kernpopulaties in duurzame populatienetwerken)

  1. First genotoxicity study of Paraná river water from Argentina using cells from the clam Corbicula fluminea (Veneroida Corbiculidae and Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus Rodentia, Cricetidae K1 cells in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline D. Caffetti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High concentrations of xenobiotics from urban and industrial wastes have contributed to the contamination of many aquatic environments. We used the comet assay to evaluate the genotoxic potential of water collected from the River Paraná, which receives a great deal of waste, at three points (Puerto Piray, Eldorado and Montecarlo in the Misiones Province of Argentina. The in vivo comet assay used 40 freshwater clams (Corbicula fluminea while the in vitro comet assay used Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus K1 cell (CHO-K1 cultures with the mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS as the positive control and phosphate buffered saline (PBS as the negative control. Both assays showed statistically significant differences between the three sampling sites in relation to the negative control, the results of this preliminary study indicating that at these three sites water from the Paraná River presents genotoxic potential.

  2. Bystander or No Bystander for Gene Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam V. Patterson

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT of cancer aims to improve the selectivity of chemotherapy by gene transfer, thus enabling target cells to convert nontoxic prodrugs to cytotoxic drugs. A zone of cell kill around gene-modified cells due to transfer of toxic metabolites, known as the bystander effect, leads to tumour regression. Here we discuss the implications of either striving for a strong bystander effect to overcome poor gene transfer, or avoiding the bystander effect to reduce potential systemic effects, with the aid of three successful GDEPT systems. This review concentrates on bystander effects and drug development with regard to these enzyme prodrug combinations, namely herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK with ganciclovir (GCV, cytosine deaminase (CD from bacteria or yeast with 5-fluorocytodine (5-FC, and bacterial nitroreductase (NfsB with 5-(azaridin-1-yl-2,4-dinitrobenzamide (CB1954, and their respective derivatives.

  3. MRC5 and QU-DB bystander cells can produce bystander factors and induce radiation bystander effect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammad Taghi Toossi; Shokoufeh Mohebbi; Roghayeh Samani; Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2014-01-01

    .... Current study was planned to test the hypothesis. MRC5 and QU-DB cell lines were irradiated, and successive medium transfer technique was performed to induce bystander effects in two bystander cell groups...

  4. MRC5 and QU-DB bystander cells can produce bystander factors and induce radiation bystander effect

    OpenAIRE

    Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Mohebbi, Shokoufeh; Samani, Roghayeh Kamran; Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman

    2014-01-01

    Radiation damages initiated by radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) are not limited to the first or immediate neighbors of the irradiated cells, but the effects have been observed in the cells far from the irradiation site. It has been postulated that bystander cells, by producing bystander factors, are actively involved in the propagation of bystander effect in the regions beyond the initial irradiated site. Current study was planned to test the hypothesis. MRC5 and QU-DB cell lines wer...

  5. Bystander signaling via oxidative metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawal HA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Humaira Aziz Sawal,1 Kashif Asghar,2 Matthias Bureik,3 Nasir Jalal4 1Healthcare Biotechnology Department, Atta-ur-Rahman School of Applied Biosciences, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad, 2Basic Sciences Research, Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan; 3Health Science Platform, School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; 4Health Science Platform, Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China Abstract: The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE is the initiation of biological end points in cells (bystander cells that are not directly traversed by an incident-radiation track, but are in close proximity to cells that are receiving the radiation. RIBE has been indicted of causing DNA damage via oxidative stress, besides causing direct damage, inducing tumorigenesis, producing micronuclei, and causing apoptosis. RIBE is regulated by signaling proteins that are either endogenous or secreted by cells as a means of communication between cells, and can activate intracellular or intercellular oxidative metabolism that can further trigger signaling pathways of inflammation. Bystander signals can pass through gap junctions in attached cell lines, while the suspended cell lines transmit these signals via hormones and soluble proteins. This review provides the background information on how reactive oxygen species (ROS act as bystander signals. Although ROS have a very short half-life and have a nanometer-scale sphere of influence, the wide variety of ROS produced via various sources can exert a cumulative effect, not only in forming DNA adducts but also setting up signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, aging, and even tumorigenesis. This review outlines the sources of the bystander effect linked to ROS in a cell, and provides methods of investigation for researchers who would like to

  6. On the Actual Risk of Bystander Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebst, Lasse Suonperä; Heinskou, Marie Bruvik; Ejbye-Ernst, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Bystander studies have rarely considered the victimization risk associated with intervention into violent, dangerous emergencies. To address this gap, we aim to identify factors that influence bystanders’ risk of being physically victimized. Methods: We observed bystander behavior fro...

  7. On the Actual Risk of Bystander Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebst, Lasse Suonperä; Heinskou, Marie Bruvik; Ejbye Ernst, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Bystander studies have rarely considered the victimization risk associated with intervention into violent, dangerous emergencies. To address this gap, we aim to identify factors that influence bystanders’ risk of being physically victimized. Method: We observed bystander behavior from video surve...

  8. Bystander signaling via oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawal, Humaira Aziz; Asghar, Kashif; Bureik, Matthias; Jalal, Nasir

    2017-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is the initiation of biological end points in cells (bystander cells) that are not directly traversed by an incident-radiation track, but are in close proximity to cells that are receiving the radiation. RIBE has been indicted of causing DNA damage via oxidative stress, besides causing direct damage, inducing tumorigenesis, producing micronuclei, and causing apoptosis. RIBE is regulated by signaling proteins that are either endogenous or secreted by cells as a means of communication between cells, and can activate intracellular or intercellular oxidative metabolism that can further trigger signaling pathways of inflammation. Bystander signals can pass through gap junctions in attached cell lines, while the suspended cell lines transmit these signals via hormones and soluble proteins. This review provides the background information on how reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as bystander signals. Although ROS have a very short half-life and have a nanometer-scale sphere of influence, the wide variety of ROS produced via various sources can exert a cumulative effect, not only in forming DNA adducts but also setting up signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, aging, and even tumorigenesis. This review outlines the sources of the bystander effect linked to ROS in a cell, and provides methods of investigation for researchers who would like to pursue this field of science.

  9. Comparison of protein patterns of xrs-5, a radiosensitive Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and CHO-K1, its radioresistant parent, using two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, J.M. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (USA). Dept. of Zoology)

    1991-01-01

    X-ray sensitive strains of Chinese hamster ovary cell lines have been used to analyze radiation repair mechanisms. One cell line, xrs-5, has been shown to be very sensitive to ionizing radiation and radical forming chemical mutagens. This sensitivity is thought to be a result a mutation in the DNA double strand break (DSB) repair mechanism, and its characterization has been a goal of several repair mechanism studies. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we have detected a protein (MW approximately 55KD) in the DNA/Nuclear Matrix (nucleoid) cell fraction of CHO-Kl cells that is absent in the nucleoid fraction of xrs-5. This protein is present, however, in both CHO-Kl and xrs-5 whole cell protein maps. To determine whether the 55KD protein is responsible for the radiosensitive and defective DSB repair phenotype of xrs-5 cells, studies are now underway to analyze revertants of xrs-5 that are proficient in DSB repair. Furthermore, an effort to sequence the protein in question is planned. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Induction of multinucleated cells in V79 Chinese hamster cells exposed to dimethylarsinic acid, a methylated derivative of inorganic arsenics: mechanism associated with the formation of aberrant mitotic spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, T; Nakajima, F; Shimizu, A; Harada, M

    1999-02-01

    Induction of multinucleated cells in V79 Chinese hamster cells exposed to dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), a methylated derivative of inorganic arsenics, and the mechanism of induction were investigated in terms of cytoskeletal changes. DMAA caused mitotic arrest and concomitant induction of multinucleated cells. Arsenite was less effective than DMAA in causing mitotic arrest and in inducing multinucleated cells. Analysis by videograph and a study of post-mitotic incubation of cells arrested in metaphase by DMAA demonstrated that the cells escaped from metaphase with ameboid behaviour and pseudopodia, but they did not divide into daughter cells, thereby resulting in multinucleated cells. During the post-mitotic incubation in the presence of DMAA, the cells did not proliferate but retained their capacity to synthesize DNA. DMAA caused disappearance of the microtubule network in interphase cells, but did not influence the organization of actin stress fibres. Furthermore, DMAA caused aberrations of mitotic microtubules, such as tripolar or quadripolar spindles and aster-like spindles, in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that DMAA specifically acted on the microtubules and that multinucleated cells appeared when cells with aberrant spindles escaped from metaphase to advance the cell cycle and the nuclear membranes were regenerated.

  11. An XBP-1 dependent bottle-neck in production of IgG subtype antibodies in chemically defined serum-free Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fed-batch processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Eric; Florin, Lore; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Kaufmann, Hitto

    2008-06-01

    The optimization of production processes for therapeutic antibodies is a continuing challenge in pharmaceutical biotechnology. Although it could be demonstrated that vector design and host cell engineering can improve transcriptional and translational efficiency and thereby result in generation of high producer cell lines, it is not clear whether introduction of transgenes that regulate protein transport or affect post-translational modifications could further improve such industrial processes. Here, we show that heterologous expression of the transcription factor X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) can lead to an increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) content and specific therapeutic antibody productivity of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-DG44 cells in inoculum suspension cultures. This effect translates into 40% increased overall antibody titers in a fed-batch format where cells are grown in chemically defined serum-free media. Protein-A purified antibody products from mock-transfected cells and XBP-1 transfected cells were found to be of comparable quality with regard to glycosylation pattern and physicochemical characteristics. The data demonstrate the potential of XBP-1 engineering to improve mammalian cell culture production processes to yield high amounts of a therapeutic protein product of desired quality.

  12. Fluoride does not induce DNA breakage in Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro Flúor não induz danos ao DNA em células de ovário de hamster chinês in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Araki Ribeiro

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride has been widely used in dentistry because it is a specific and effective caries prophylactic agent. However, excess fluoride may represent a hazard to human health, especially by causing injury to genetic material. Genotoxicity tests represent an important part of cancer research to assess the risk of potential carcinogens. In the current study, the potential DNA damage associated with exposure to fluoride was assessed by the single cell gel (comet assay in vitro. Chinese hamster ovary cells were exposed to sodium fluoride (NaF at final concentration ranging from 7 to 100 µg/ml for 3 h, at 37°C. The results pointed out that NaF in all concentrations tested did not contribute to DNA damage as depicted by the mean tail moment and tail intensity. These findings are clinically important since they represent an important contribution to a correct evaluation of the potential health risk associated with the exposure to dental agents.O flúor tem sido amplamente usado na Odontologia, pois é um agente profilático efetivo e específico contra a cárie dentária. Entretanto, o flúor em excesso pode representar perigos à saúde humana, especialmente por causar agressão ao material genético. Testes de genotoxicidade representam uma importante parte da pesquisa do câncer para a avaliação de risco de possíveis carcinógenos. Neste presente estudo, danos ao DNA associados à exposição ao flúor foram avaliados pelo teste de células individualizadas em gel de agarose (teste do cometa in vitro. Células de ovário de hamster chinês foram expostas ao fluoreto de sódio (NaF nas concentrações finais de 7 a 100 µg/ml, durante 3 h, a 37°C. Os resultados mostraram que o NaF não contribuiu para os danos no DNA em todas as concentrações testadas, conforme demonstrado pelas médias do momento da cauda e da intensidade da cauda dos cometas. Esses achados são clinicamente importantes, uma vez que representam uma importante contribui

  13. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B. [Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases

    2017-01-17

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  14. Bystander effects in unicellular organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVeaux, Linda C. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Campus Box 8263, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States) and Department of Biological Sciences, Campus Box 8007, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)]. E-mail: develind@isu.edu; Durtschi, Lynn S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Campus Box 8007, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Case, Jonathan G. [Department of Physics, Campus Box 8106, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Wells, Douglas P. [Department of Physics, Campus Box 8106, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

    2006-05-11

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been seen in mammalian cells from diverse origins. These effects can be transmitted through the medium to cells not present at the time of irradiation. We have developed an assay for detecting bystander effects in the unicellular eukaryote, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This assay allows maximal exposure of unirradiated cells to cells that have received electron beam irradiation. S. pombe cells were irradiated with 16-18 MeV electrons from a pulsed electron LINAC. When survival of the irradiated cells decreased to approximately 50%, forward-mutation to 2-deoxy-D-glucose resistance increased in the unirradiated bystander cells. Further increase in dose had no additional effect on this increase. In order to detect this response, it was necessary for the irradiated cell/unirradiated cell ratio to be high. Other cellular stresses, such as heat treatment, UV irradiation, and bleomycin exposure, also caused a detectable response in untreated cells grown with the treated cells. We discuss evolutionary implications of these results.

  15. High glucose enhances cAMP level and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in Chinese hamster ovary cell: Usage of Br-cAMP in foreign protein β-galactosidase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Hsien; Lee, Tsung-Yih; Liu, Ting-Wei; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2017-07-01

    Glucose is a carbon source for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell growth, while low growth rate is considered to enhance the production of recombinant proteins. The present study reveals that glucose concentrations higher than 1 g/L reduce the growth rate and substantially increase in cAMP (∼300%) at a high glucose concentration (10 g/L). High glucose also enhances the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p27 kip by Western blot analysis. To determine whether the phosphorylation of ERK is involved in the mechanism, a cyclic-AMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (H-8) or MEK (MAPKK) inhibitor (PD98059) was added to block ERK phosphorylation. We show that both the high glucose-induced ERK phosphorylation and growth rate return to baseline levels. These results suggest that the cAMP/PKA and MAP signaling pathways are involved in the abovementioned mechanism. Interestingly, the direct addition of 8-bromo-cAMP (Br-cAMP), a membrane-permeable cAMP analog, can mimic the similar effects produced by high glucose. Subsequently Br-cAMP could induce β-galactosidase (β-Gal) recombinant protein expression by 1.6-fold. Furthermore, Br-cAMP can additionally enhance the β-Gal production (from 2.8- to 4.5-fold) when CHO cells were stimulated with glycerol, thymidine, dimethyl sulfoxide, pentanoic acid, or sodium butyrate. Thus, Br-cAMP may be used as an alternative agent in promoting foreign protein expression for CHO cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Characterisation of recombinant serotonin 5-HT1A receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells: the agonist [3H]lisuride labels free receptor and receptor coupled to G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, H; Turner, J D; Strange, P G

    1995-11-01

    Serotonin 5-HT1A receptors expressed stably in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells have been studied using radioligand binding with the radiolabelled agonist [3H]lisuride. Competition studies with a range of antagonists versus [3H]lisuride confirmed that all of the specific [3H]lisuride binding was to 5-HT1A receptors on the cells. Competition studies with the antagonist spiperone and several agonists gave data that fitted best to two-binding-site models. The affinities of these competing ligands at the two classes of sites were generally in agreement with their corresponding affinities determined in previous work with either 8-[3H]hydroxydipropylaminotetralin ([3H]8-OH-DPAT; labels receptor coupled to G protein) or [3H]spiperone (labels free receptor). Saturation analyses with [3H]lisuride showed that this radioligand labels a single class of binding sites, but the level of radioligand binding was approximately twice that seen when either [3H]8-OH-DPAT or [3H]spiperone was used. [3H]Lisuride binding was partially inhibited by addition of guanine nucleotides, and the extent of inhibition decreased as the [3H]lisuride concentration was increased. This inhibition was due to the effect of guanine nucleotide to decrease slightly the affinity of [3H]lisuride for binding to the 5-HT1A receptors on the cells. It is concluded that [3H]lisuride can label both the free receptor and the receptor coupled to G proteins but with slightly different affinities and that these two states of the receptor exist in roughly equal amounts in the cells. Agonists generally have a higher affinity for the receptor coupled to G protein, whereas antagonists, with the exception of spiperone (which has a higher affinity for the free receptor), have roughly equal affinities for the free receptor and the receptor coupled to G proteins.

  17. Arsenic compound-induced increases in glutathione levels in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells and mechanisms associated with changes in {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity, cystine uptake and utilization of cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochi, Takafumi [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Teikyo University, Sagamiko, Kanagawa 199-01 (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    Increases in the glutathione (GSH) level in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells incubated with arsenic compounds were investigated in terms of changes in the activity of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS), rate of cystine uptake, and utilization of cysteine. Arsenite at subtoxic concentrations caused a marked increase of the GSH level at 8 h after addition and then declined. Increase in the GSH level caused by arsenite was associated with an increase in the rate of cystine uptake, but not in {gamma}-GCS activity. Increase in the rate of uptake of cystine was attributed mainly to an increase in the utilization of cysteine in the synthesis of GSH. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA) also caused an increase in the GSH level in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Increase in the GSH level was accompanied by increases in {gamma}-GCS activity and in the uptake of cystine. DMAA caused a reduction in the rate of utilization of cysteine for protein synthesis while enhancing the rate of cysteine utilization for GSH synthesis. Cycloheximide inhibited increases in {gamma}-GCS activity caused by DMAA and in the rate of cystine uptake caused by arsenite and DMAA. The cystine transport system is suggested to be induced by arsenite and DMAA with {gamma}-GCS induced in cells incubated with DMAA. Among the arsenic compounds, methylarsonic acid (MAA) was not effective in causing an increase in the GSH level. Accordingly, increases in the GSH level caused by arsenite and DMAA may be specific phenomena in which the cells responded to the arsenicals by increasing the GSH level. (orig.) With 13 figs., 1 tab., 47 refs.

  18. Moral Disengagement Among Bystanders to School Bullying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obermann, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the use of moral disengagement among children indirectly involved in bullying (bystanders). A sample of Danish adolescents (N = 660, M age 12.6 years) were divided into four groups depending on their bystander status: (a) outsiders, who did not experience bullying among their ...

  19. Beschermingsplan hamster 2005-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haye, la M.J.J.; Jansman, H.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Alterra-Concept van het beschermingsplan hamster 2005-2010. De hamster is in het meest westelijke deel van het Europese verspreidingsgebied bedreigd. De kennis die in de afgelopen periode is opgedaan van de hamster en de maatregelen die in het veld zijn uitgevoerd vormen de basis voor dit tweede

  20. Evaluation of the radio modifier effect of propolis on chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with 60-CO; Avaliacao do efeito radiomodificador da propolis em celulas de ovario de hamster chines (CHO-K1) e em celulas tumorais de prostata (PC3), irradiadas com CO-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Geyza Spigoti

    2011-07-01

    In the last decades, it has been given a great interest to investigations concerning natural, effective, nontoxic compounds with radioprotective potential together with the increasing utilization of different types of ionizing radiation for various applications. Among them propolis, a resinous compound produced by honeybees (Apis mellifera), has been considered quite promising, since it presents several advantageous biological characteristics, i. e., anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic, antioxidant and also free radical scavenging action. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Brazilian propolis, collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} radiation. For this purpose, three interlinked parameters were analyzed: micronucleus induction, cell viability and clonogenic death. The choice of these parameters was justified by their biological significance, in addition to the fact that they are readily observable and measurable in irradiated cells. The cytogenetic data obtained showed a radioprotective effect of propolis (5-100 {mu}g/ml) in the induction of DNA damage for both cell lines, irradiated with doses of 1 - 4 Gy. The cytotoxicity assay, however, showed a prominent antiproliferative effect of propolis (50 - 400{mu}/ml) in PC3 cells irradiated with 5 G{gamma}. The survival curves obtained were adequately fitted by a linear-quadratic model, where the {alpha} coefficient was higher in CHO-K1 cells. Concerning the clonogenic capacity, PC3 cells were more radiosensitive than CHO-K1 cells at the higher doses of the survival curve. Propolis at the concentrations of 30 - 100 {mu}g/ml, did not influence the clonogenic potential of PC3 cells, since the survival curves, associated or not with propolis, were found similar, although the combined treatment in CHO-K1 cells exhibited a stimulating proliferative effect. The data

  1. Understanding of decreased sialylation of Fc-fusion protein in hyperosmotic recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cell culture: N-glycosylation gene expression and N-linked glycan antennary profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Jeong, Yeong Ran; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Gyun Min

    2017-08-01

    To understand the effects of hyperosmolality on protein glycosylation, recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells producing the Fc-fusion protein were cultivated in hyperosmolar medium resulting from adding NaCl (415 mOsm/kg). The hyperosmotic culture showed increased specific Fc-fusion protein productivity (q Fc ) but a decreased proportion of acidic isoforms and sialic acid content of the Fc-fusion protein. The intracellular and extracellular sialidase activities in the hyperosmotic cultures were similar to those in the control culture (314 mOsm/kg), indicating that reduced sialylation of Fc-fusion protein at hyperosmolality was not due to elevated sialidase activity. Expression of 52 N-glycosylation-related genes was assessed by the NanoString nCounter system, which provides a direct digital readout using custom-designed color-coded probes. After 3 days of hyperosmotic culture, nine genes (ugp, slc35a3, slc35d2, gcs1, manea, mgat2, mgat5b, b4galt3, and b4galt4) were differentially expressed over 1.5-fold of the control, and all these genes were down-regulated. N-linked glycan analysis by anion exchange and hydrophilic interaction HPLC showed that the proportion of highly sialylated (di-, tri-, tetra-) and tetra-antennary N-linked glycans was significantly decreased upon hyperosmotic culture. Addition of betaine, an osmoprotectant, to the hyperosmotic culture significantly increased the proportion of highly sialylated and tetra-antennary N-linked glycans (P ≤ 0.05), while it increased the expression of the N-glycan branching/antennary genes (mgat2 and mgat4b). Thus, decreased expression of the genes with roles in the N-glycan biosynthesis pathway correlated with reduced sialic acid content of Fc-fusion protein caused by hyperosmolar conditions. Taken together, the results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the detrimental effects of hyperosmolality on N-glycosylation, especially sialylation, in rCHO cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng

  2. Radioiodinated 4-iodo-L-meta-tyrosine, a system L selective artificial amino acid: molecular design and transport characterization in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 cells)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikano, Naoto, E-mail: sikano@ipu.ac.j [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Kotani, Takashi; Nakajima, Syuichi; Ogura, Masato; Nakazawa, Shinya [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Sagara, Jun-ichi [Center for Humanities and Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masato [Division of Health Science, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 9200-942 (Japan); Baba, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Naoto [Center for Medical Science, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Kubota, Nobuo [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Kawai, Keiichi [Division of Health Science, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 9200-942 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Introduction: High expression of the system L amino acid transporter has been observed in clinically important tissues including tumors and the blood-brain barrier. We examined amino acid transport system L selectivity of {sup 14}C(U)-L-tyrosine ({sup 14}C-Tyr), {sup 125}I-4-iodo-L-meta-tyrosine (4-{sup 125}I-mTyr), {sup 125}I-6-iodo-L-meta-tyrosine (6-{sup 125}I-mTyr), {sup 125}I-3-iodo-{alpha}-methyl-L-tyrosine ({sup 125}I-IMT) and {sup 125}I-3-iodo-L-tyrosine (3-{sup 125}I-Tyr) using Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). Methods: Cells in the exponential growth phase were incubated with 18.5 kBq of labeled amino acid in 2 mL of phosphate-buffered saline-based uptake solution and an uptake solution with/without Na{sup +} at 37{sup o}C or 4{sup o}C. We examined the effects of the following compounds (1.0 mM) on transport: 2-(methylamino)isobutyric acid (a specific inhibitor of system A, in Na{sup +}-containing uptake solution); 2-amino-bicyclo[2,2,1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid (a specific inhibitor of system L, in Na{sup +}-free uptake solution); sodium azide and 2,4-dinitrophenol (NaN{sub 3} and DNP, inhibitors of the generation of adenosine triphosphate); p-aminohippurate and tetraethylammonium (PAH and TEA, inhibitors of organic anion and cation transporters); and L- and D-isomers of natural amino acids. Results: {sup 14}C-Tyr exhibited affinity for systems L, A and ASC. 4-{sup 125}I-mTyr and 3-{sup 125}I-Tyr exhibited high specificity for system L, whereas 6-{sup 125}I-mTyr and {sup 125}I-IMT exhibited affinity for both systems L and ASC. Uptake of 4-{sup 125}I-mTyr was markedly reduced by incubation at 4 {sup o}C, and was not significantly inhibited by NaN{sub 3}, DNP, PAH or TEA. The inhibition profiles of the L- and D-isomers of natural amino acids indicated that system L mediates the transport of 4-{sup 125}I-mTyr. Conclusions: 4-{sup 125}I-mTyr exhibited the greatest system L specificity (93.46{+-}0.13%) of all of the tested amino acids.

  3. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  4. Gait Disturbances in Dystrophic Hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Hampton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The delta-sarcoglycan-deficient hamster is an excellent model to study muscular dystrophy. Gait disturbances, important clinically, have not been described in this animal model. We applied ventral plane videography (DigiGait to analyze gait in BIO TO-2 dystrophic and BIO F1B control hamsters walking on a transparent treadmill belt. Stride length was ~13% shorter (<.05 in TO-2 hamsters at 9 months of age compared to F1B hamsters. Hindlimb propulsion duration, an indicator of muscle strength, was shorter in 9-month-old TO-2 (247±8 ms compared to F1B hamsters (272±11 ms; <.05. Braking duration, reflecting generation of ground reaction forces, was delayed in 9-month-old TO-2 (147±6 ms compared to F1B hamsters (126±8 ms; <.05. Hindpaw eversion, evidence of muscle weakness, was greater in 9-month-old TO-2 than in F1B hamsters (17.7±1.2∘ versus 8.7±1.6∘; <.05. Incline and decline walking aggravated gait disturbances in TO-2 hamsters at 3 months of age. Several gait deficits were apparent in TO-2 hamsters at 1 month of age. Quantitative gait analysis demonstrates that dystrophic TO-2 hamsters recapitulate functional aspects of human muscular dystrophy. Early detection of gait abnormalities in a convenient animal model may accelerate the development of therapies for muscular dystrophy.

  5. Radiation Induced Bystander Effect in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Yunfei; Hei K. Tom

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of biological effects in cells that are not directly traversed by radiation, but merely in the presence of cells that are. Although radiation induced bystander effects have been well defined in a variety of in vitro models using a range of endpoints including clonogenic survival, mutations, neoplastic transformation, apoptosis, micronucleus, chromosomal aberrations and DNA double strand breaks, the mechanism(s) as well as the pres...

  6. Are Victims Truly Worse Off in the Presence of Bystanders? Revisiting the Bystander Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fromell, Hanna; Nosenzo, Daniele; Owens, Trudy; Tufano, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that individuals are less likely to help a person in need when there are “bystanders” present who can also offer help. We designed an experiment to re-examine this “bystander effect” using modified dictator games. We find lower giving rates in the presence of bystanders,

  7. Sequencing, annotation and analysis of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchitchek, Nicolas; Safronetz, David; Rasmussen, Angela L; Martens, Craig; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Porcella, Stephen F; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki; Katze, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The Syrian hamster (golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus) is gaining importance as a new experimental animal model for multiple pathogens, including emerging zoonotic diseases such as Ebola. Nevertheless there are currently no publicly available transcriptome reference sequences or genome for this species. A cDNA library derived from mRNA and snRNA isolated and pooled from the brains, lungs, spleens, kidneys, livers, and hearts of three adult female Syrian hamsters was sequenced. Sequence reads were assembled into 62,482 contigs and 111,796 reads remained unassembled (singletons). This combined contig/singleton dataset, designated as the Syrian hamster transcriptome, represents a total of 60,117,204 nucleotides. Our Mesocricetus auratus Syrian hamster transcriptome mapped to 11,648 mouse transcripts representing 9,562 distinct genes, and mapped to a similar number of transcripts and genes in the rat. We identified 214 quasi-complete transcripts based on mouse annotations. Canonical pathways involved in a broad spectrum of fundamental biological processes were significantly represented in the library. The Syrian hamster transcriptome was aligned to the current release of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell transcriptome and genome to improve the genomic annotation of this species. Finally, our Syrian hamster transcriptome was aligned against 14 other rodents, primate and laurasiatheria species to gain insights about the genetic relatedness and placement of this species. This Syrian hamster transcriptome dataset significantly improves our knowledge of the Syrian hamster's transcriptome, especially towards its future use in infectious disease research. Moreover, this library is an important resource for the wider scientific community to help improve genome annotation of the Syrian hamster and other closely related species. Furthermore, these data provide the basis for development of expression microarrays that can be used in functional genomics studies.

  8. Bystander CPR Helps Save Brain Function After Near-Drowning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_165984.html Bystander CPR Helps Save Brain Function After Near-Drowning Heart compressions were even more ... victims are more likely to recover with good brain function if bystanders immediately begin chest compressions rather than ...

  9. Bystander Programs: Accommodating or Derailing Sexism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Reid

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bystander programs implemented to meet federal requirements to reduce sexual assaults on college campuses in the United States must include primary prevention. Survey data (n = 280 and interview data (n = 20 presented in this paper explore students’ hypothetical and actual willingness to intervene as bystanders. Although most students surveyed (57% claim they would be very likely to intervene, fewer than half would be very suspicious of someone leading away an intoxicated individual at a party (45% of women and 28% of men: p < 0.01. Interview data reveal how students perceive risk factors at college parties and what types of bystander measures they attempt, including “distractions”, a nonconfrontational tactic in which bystanders avoid more direct but socially risky interventions. Subsumed in many current bystander programs is an invisible element of valorizing harmony. Condoning bystanders’ unwillingness to directly confront seemingly predatory individuals could make change seem out of reach and could also embolden offenders whose behavior is observed and only temporarily thwarted.

  10. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G. (Department of Molecular and Tumour Radiobiology, National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary))

    2008-12-15

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  11. Cellular bystander effects and radiation hormesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana MARCU

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Bystander effects describe the effects of extracellular mediators from irradiated cells on neighbouring non-irradiated cells resulting in radiation-induced effects in unirradiated cells. Although the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, it is widely recognised that two types of cellular communication (i.e. via gap junctions and/or release of molecular messengers into the extracellular environment play an essential role. Additionally, the effects can be significantly modulated by parameters such as cell type, cell-cycle stage and cell density. Some of the common bystander effects or biological end points which are evidenced after low-dose irradiation are: chromosomal instability, cell killing and delayed cell death, mutagenesis, micronucleus formation, gene and protein expression changes. Through these end points it is likely that bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial. By increasing mutation levels of cells bystander effects increase the likelihood of genetic defects and in turn cancer. On the other hand by removing damaged cells from the population and preventing the growth of cancer cells, bystander effects are beneficial.Radiation hormesis is a term used to relate the beneficial effects of small doses of radiation on living cells, whether plant, animal or human. Experiments on bacteria, plants and animals have demonstrated that several biological mechanisms are stimulated by low dose radiation, such as: protein synthesis, gene activation, detoxication of free radicals and stimulation of the immune system. These mechanisms were also observed in humans.The present review paper is a compilation of the most recent data on bystander effects and the possible implications of cellular response to radiation on cell growth and development.

  12. Brief report: The bystander effect in cyberbullying incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machackova, Hana; Dedkova, Lenka; Mezulanikova, Katerina

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the bystander effect in cyberbullying. Using self-reported data from 257 Czech respondents who had witnessed a cyberbullying attack, we tested whether provided help decreased with increased number of other bystanders. We controlled for several individual and contextual factors, including empathy, social self-efficacy, empathic response to victimization, and relationship to the victim. Results showed that participants tend to help the victims more in incidents with only one or two other bystanders. We also found that, as in the "offline" realm, bystander effect is not linear: no significant differences were found between incidents with a moderate number (3-10) and a larger number of total bystanders. Our findings, thus, provide support for the presence of the bystander effect in cyberbullying. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Bystander Effect on Teamwork Dysfunctioning

    OpenAIRE

    ERBAŞ, Emre; ŞAHİN PERÇİN, Nilüfer

    2014-01-01

    AbstractIn this study, it is aimed to cover a conceptual background of the bystander effect which is limited in Turkish literature and to investigate whether the bystander effect plays a role on the dysfunctioning of teams in organizations. To realize the purpose of the study, a research is conducted on the food-beverage industry employee in Kayseri. According to results of the analysis, it is determined that (i) bystander effect is significantly and negatively correlated with all dimensions ...

  14. RCT Testing Bystander Effectiveness to Reduce Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Ann L; Bush, Heather M; Cook-Craig, Patricia G; DeGue, Sarah A; Clear, Emily R; Brancato, Candace J; Fisher, Bonnie S; Recktenwald, Eileen A

    2017-05-01

    Bystander-based programs have shown promise to reduce interpersonal violence at colleges, yet limited rigorous evaluations have addressed bystander intervention effectiveness in high schools. This study evaluated the Green Dot bystander intervention to reduce sexual violence and related forms of interpersonal violence in 26 high schools over 5 years. A cluster RCT was conducted. Kentucky high schools were randomized to intervention or control (wait list) conditions. Green Dot-trained educators conducted schoolwide presentations and recruited student popular opinion leaders to receive bystander training in intervention schools beginning in Year 1. The primary outcome was sexual violence perpetration, and related forms of interpersonal violence victimization and perpetration were also measured using anonymous student surveys collected at baseline and annually from 2010 to 2014. Because the school was the unit of analysis, violence measures were aggregated by school and year and school-level counts were provided. A total of 89,707 students completed surveys. The primary, as randomized, analyses conducted in 2014-2016 included linear mixed models and generalized estimating equations to examine the condition-time interaction on violence outcomes. Slopes of school-level totals of sexual violence perpetration (condition-time, pviolence perpetration in the intervention relative to control schools were 0.83 (95% CI=0.70, 0.99) in Year 3 and 0.79 (95% CI=0.67, 0.94) in Year 4. Similar patterns were observed for sexual violence victimization, sexual harassment, stalking, and dating violence perpetration and victimization. Implementation of Green Dot in Kentucky high schools significantly decreased not only sexual violence perpetration but also other forms of interpersonal violence perpetration and victimization. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  16. Exosomes are released by bystander cells exposed to radiation-induced biophoton signals: Reconciling the mechanisms mediating the bystander effect

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Michelle; Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; McNeill, Fiona E.; Seymour, Colin B.; Rainbow, Andrew J.; Mothersill, Carmel E.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to explore a possible molecular mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) biophotons could elicit bystander responses in reporter cells and resolve the problem of seemingly mutually exclusive mechanisms of a physical UV signal & a soluble factor-mediated bystander signal. METHODS: The human colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116 p53 +/+, was directly irradiated with 0.5 Gy tritium beta particles to induce ultraviolet biophoton emission. Bystander cells...

  17. Exosomes are released by bystander cells exposed to radiation-induced biophoton signals: Reconciling the mechanisms mediating the bystander effect

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Michelle; Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; McNeill, Fiona E.; Seymour, Colin B.; Rainbow, Andrew J.; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of our study was to explore a possible molecular mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) biophotons could elicit bystander responses in reporter cells and resolve the problem of seemingly mutually exclusive mechanisms of a physical UV signal & a soluble factor-mediated bystander signal. Methods The human colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116 p53 +/+, was directly irradiated with 0.5 Gy tritium beta particles to induce ultraviolet biophoton emission. Bystander cells were not di...

  18. Elk3 from hamster--a ternary complex factor with strong transcriptional repressor activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, Gertrud Malene; Weilguny, Dietmar; Willumsen, Berthe Marie

    2005-01-01

    the transcription of genes that are activated during entry into G1. We have isolated the Cricetulus griseus Elk3 gene from the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line and investigated the transcriptional potential of this factor. Transient transfections revealed that, in addition to its regulation of the c......-fos promoter, Elk3 from CHO cells seems to inhibit other promoters controlling expression of proteins involved in G1/S phase progression; Cyclin D1 and DHFR. As has been described for the Elk3 homologs Net (Mouse) and Sap-2 (Human), the results of the present study further indicate that hamster Elk3...

  19. Exosomes are released by bystander cells exposed to radiation-induced biophoton signals: Reconciling the mechanisms mediating the bystander effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Le

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to explore a possible molecular mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV biophotons could elicit bystander responses in reporter cells and resolve the problem of seemingly mutually exclusive mechanisms of a physical UV signal & a soluble factor-mediated bystander signal.The human colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116 p53 +/+, was directly irradiated with 0.5 Gy tritium beta particles to induce ultraviolet biophoton emission. Bystander cells were not directly irradiated but were exposed to the emitted UV biophotons. Medium was subsequently harvested from UV-exposed bystander cells. The exosomes extracted from this medium were incubated with reporter cell populations. These reporter cells were then assayed for clonogenic survival and mitochondrial membrane potential with and without prior treatment of the exosomes with RNase.Clonogenic cell survival was significantly reduced in reporter cells incubated with exosomes extracted from cells exposed to secondarily-emitted UV. These exosomes also induced significant mitochondrial membrane depolarization in receiving reporter cells. Conversely, exosomes extracted from non-UV-exposed cells did not produce bystander effects in reporter cells. The treatment of exosomes with RNase prior to their incubation with reporter cells effectively abolished bystander effects in reporter cells and this suggests a role for RNA in mediating the bystander response elicited by UV biophotons and their produced exosomes.This study supports a role for exosomes released from UV biophoton-exposed bystander cells in eliciting bystander responses and also indicates a reconciliation between the UV-mediated bystander effect and the bystander effect which has been suggested in the literature to be mediated by soluble factors.

  20. The bystander-effect: a meta-analytic review on bystander intervention in dangerous and non-dangerous emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Krueger, Joachim I; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Vogrincic, Claudia; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Frey, Dieter; Heene, Moritz; Wicher, Magdalena; Kainbacher, Martina

    2011-07-01

    Research on bystander intervention has produced a great number of studies showing that the presence of other people in a critical situation reduces the likelihood that an individual will help. As the last systematic review of bystander research was published in 1981 and was not a quantitative meta-analysis in the modern sense, the present meta-analysis updates the knowledge about the bystander effect and its potential moderators. The present work (a) integrates the bystander literature from the 1960s to 2010, (b) provides statistical tests of potential moderators, and (c) presents new theoretical and empirical perspectives on the novel finding of non-negative bystander effects in certain dangerous emergencies as well as situations where bystanders are a source of physical support for the potentially intervening individual. In a fixed effects model, data from over 7,700 participants and 105 independent effect sizes revealed an overall effect size of g = -0.35. The bystander effect was attenuated when situations were perceived as dangerous (compared with non-dangerous), perpetrators were present (compared with non-present), and the costs of intervention were physical (compared with non-physical). This pattern of findings is consistent with the arousal-cost-reward model, which proposes that dangerous emergencies are recognized faster and more clearly as real emergencies, thereby inducing higher levels of arousal and hence more helping. We also identified situations where bystanders provide welcome physical support for the potentially intervening individual and thus reduce the bystander effect, such as when the bystanders were exclusively male, when they were naive rather than passive confederates or only virtually present persons, and when the bystanders were not strangers.

  1. Exosomes are released by bystander cells exposed to radiation-induced biophoton signals: Reconciling the mechanisms mediating the bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Michelle; Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; McNeill, Fiona E; Seymour, Colin B; Rainbow, Andrew J; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2017-01-01

    The objective of our study was to explore a possible molecular mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) biophotons could elicit bystander responses in reporter cells and resolve the problem of seemingly mutually exclusive mechanisms of a physical UV signal & a soluble factor-mediated bystander signal. The human colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116 p53 +/+, was directly irradiated with 0.5 Gy tritium beta particles to induce ultraviolet biophoton emission. Bystander cells were not directly irradiated but were exposed to the emitted UV biophotons. Medium was subsequently harvested from UV-exposed bystander cells. The exosomes extracted from this medium were incubated with reporter cell populations. These reporter cells were then assayed for clonogenic survival and mitochondrial membrane potential with and without prior treatment of the exosomes with RNase. Clonogenic cell survival was significantly reduced in reporter cells incubated with exosomes extracted from cells exposed to secondarily-emitted UV. These exosomes also induced significant mitochondrial membrane depolarization in receiving reporter cells. Conversely, exosomes extracted from non-UV-exposed cells did not produce bystander effects in reporter cells. The treatment of exosomes with RNase prior to their incubation with reporter cells effectively abolished bystander effects in reporter cells and this suggests a role for RNA in mediating the bystander response elicited by UV biophotons and their produced exosomes. This study supports a role for exosomes released from UV biophoton-exposed bystander cells in eliciting bystander responses and also indicates a reconciliation between the UV-mediated bystander effect and the bystander effect which has been suggested in the literature to be mediated by soluble factors.

  2. Measuring Bystander Attitudes and Behavior to Prevent Sexual Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Allen, Christopher T.; Postmus, Judy L.; McMahon, Sheila M.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Lowe Hoffman, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to further investigate the factor structure and strength of the Bystander Attitude Scale-Revised and Bystander Behavior Scale-Revised (BAS-R and BBS-R). Participants: First-year students (N = 4,054) at a large public university in the Northeast completed a survey in 2010 as part of a larger longitudinal…

  3. The Bystander in Commercial Life : Obliged by Beneficence or Rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbink, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Liberalist thinking argues that moral agents have a right (or duty) to pursue an ordinary life. It also insists that moral agent can be bystanders. A bystander is involved with morally bad states of affairs in the sense that they are bound by moral duty, but for a non-blameworthy reason. A common

  4. Rape Myth Beliefs and Bystander Attitudes among Incoming College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The bystander approach to rape prevention is gaining popularity on college campuses, although research is limited. This study explored bystander attitudes and their relationship with rape myths in a sample of college students. Participants: Surveys from 2,338 incoming undergraduate students at a large, northeastern university were…

  5. The bystander effect in an N-person dictator game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panchanathan, K.; Frankenhuis, W.E.; Silk, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Dozens of studies show that bystanders are less likely to help victims as bystander number increases. However, these studies model one particular situation, in which victims need only one helper. Using a multi-player dictator game, we study a different but common situation, in which a recipient’s

  6. The bystander effect in an N-person dictator game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panchanathan, K.; Frankenhuis, W.E.; Silk, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Dozens of studies show that bystanders are less likely to help victims as bystander number increases. However, these studies model one particular situation, in which victims need only one helper. Using a multi-player dictator game, we study a different but common situation, in which a recipient's

  7. The lonely bystander: ostracism leads to less helping in virtual bystander situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, Marco; van Prooijen, Jan-Willem; Elffers, Henk; van Lange, Paul A.M.

    2016-01-01

    People are less likely to help when they have been ostracized, or when they are in the presence of bystanders. In the current manuscript we test both these influences simultaneously. We postulated two opposing hypotheses: first, helping decreases after ostracism, even when intervention is already

  8. When bystanders become bothersome : the negative consequences of bystander conflict and the moderating role of resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, Kim; Rispens, Sonja; Gevers, Josette M.P.; Demerouti, Evangelia

    2014-01-01

    Bystander conflict is a situation in which employees are hindered in their work by parties not involved in the primary process. Public service employees and emergency care workers, such as ambulance employees and firefighters, often encounter this kind of conflict with potentially far-reaching

  9. The Bystander-Effect: A Meta-Analytic Review on Bystander Intervention in Dangerous and Non-Dangerous Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Krueger, Joachim I.; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Vogrincic, Claudia; Kastenmuller, Andreas; Frey, Dieter; Heene, Moritz; Wicher, Magdalena; Kainbacher, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Research on bystander intervention has produced a great number of studies showing that the presence of other people in a critical situation reduces the likelihood that an individual will help. As the last systematic review of bystander research was published in 1981 and was not a quantitative meta-analysis in the modern sense, the present…

  10. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  11. Diaphragm Structure and Function in Emphysematous Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Reid WD; RK Wilton

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if muscle fibre injury, reduced force output and fatigue of the diaphragm accompanied hyperinflation induced by experimental emphysema.DESIGN: Controlled and randomized.ANIMALS: Adult male golden Syrian hamsters: seven control and seven experimental emphysema hamsters were studied.INTERVENTIONS: Following anesthesia, experimental emphysema hamsters received a transtracheal injection of elastase. They also received injections of β-aminopropionitrile every other day for ...

  12. We need to include bystander first aid in trauma research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Håkon Kvåle; Wisborg, Torben

    2017-03-23

    The chain of trauma survival is a concept that originated in the area of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and was adapted to the treatment of trauma. In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest research into bystander first aid has resulted in improved outcome. Whereas, in trauma research the first link of the chain of survival is almost ignored. In OHCA, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) from bystanders has been subject of a vast amount of research, as well as measures and programs to raise the rate of bystander CPR to cardiac arrest victims. These efforts have resulted in improved survival. The research effort has been well grounded in the research community, as demonstrated by its natural inclusion in the uniform reporting template (Utstein) for the treatment of OHCA. In trauma the bystander may contribute by providing an open airway, staunch bleedings, or prevent hypothermia. In trauma however, while the chain of survival has been adopted along with it distinct links, including bystander first aid, the consensus-based uniform reporting template for trauma (the Utstein template) does not include the bystander first aid efforts. There is extremely little research on what first aid measures bystanders provide to trauma victims, and on what impact such measures have on outcome. An important step to improve research on bystander first aid in trauma would be to include this as part of the uniform reporting template for trauma CONCLUSION: The lack of research on bystander first aid makes the first link in the trauma chain of survival the weakest link. We, the trauma research community, should either improve our research and knowledge in this area, or remove the link from the chain of survival.

  13. Genetic Signatures of HIV-1 Envelope-mediated Bystander Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anjali; Lee, Raphael T. C.; Mohl, Jonathan; Sedano, Melina; Khong, Wei Xin; Ng, Oon Tek; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Garg, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    The envelope (Env) glycoprotein of HIV is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence support the role of HIV-1 Env in inducing bystander apoptosis that may be a contributing factor in CD4+ T cell loss. However, most of the studies testing this phenomenon have been conducted with laboratory-adapted HIV-1 isolates. This raises the question of whether primary Envs derived from HIV-infected patients are capable of inducing bystander apoptosis and whether specific Env signatures are associated with this phenomenon. We developed a high throughput assay to determine the bystander apoptosis inducing activity of a panel of primary Envs. We tested 38 different Envs for bystander apoptosis, virion infectivity, neutralizing antibody sensitivity, and putative N-linked glycosylation sites along with a comprehensive sequence analysis to determine if specific sequence signatures within the viral Env are associated with bystander apoptosis. Our studies show that primary Envs vary considerably in their bystander apoptosis-inducing potential, a phenomenon that correlates inversely with putative N-linked glycosylation sites and positively with virion infectivity. By use of a novel phylogenetic analysis that avoids subtype bias coupled with structural considerations, we found specific residues like Arg-476 and Asn-425 that were associated with differences in bystander apoptosis induction. A specific role of these residues was also confirmed experimentally. These data demonstrate for the first time the potential of primary R5 Envs to mediate bystander apoptosis in CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we identify specific genetic signatures within the Env that may be associated with the bystander apoptosis-inducing phenotype. PMID:24265318

  14. Effects of short photoperiod on energy intake, thermogenesis, and reproduction in desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueying; Zhao, Zhijun; Vasilieva, Nina; Khrushchova, Anastasia; Wang, Dehua

    2015-03-01

    Desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii) are the least known species in the genus Phodopus with respect to ecology and physiology, and deserve scientific attention, particularly because of their small body size. Here, the responses of energy metabolism and reproductive function to short photoperiods in desert hamsters were investigated. Male and female desert hamsters were acclimated to either long day (LD) (L:D 16:8 h) or short day (SD) photoperiods (L:D 8:16 h) for three months, and then the females were transferred back to an LD photoperiod for a further five months, while at the end of the SD acclimation the males were killed and measurements were taken for serum leptin as well as molecular markers for thermogenesis. We found that like the other two species from the genus Phodopus, the desert hamsters under SD decreased body mass, increased adaptive thermogenesis as indicated by elevated mitochondrial protein content and uncoupling protein-1 content in brown adipose tissue, and suppressed reproduction compared to those under LD. However, different from the other two species, desert hamsters did not show any differences in energy intake or serum leptin concentration between LD and SD. These data suggest that different species from the same genus respond in different ways to the environmental signals, and the desert adapted species are not as sensitive to change in photoperiod as the other two species. © 2014 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Marketing defibrillation training programs and bystander intervention support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneath, Julie Z; Lacey, Russell

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study identifies perceptions of and participation in resuscitation training programs, and bystanders' willingness to resuscitate cardiac arrest victims. While most of the study's participants greatly appreciate the importance of saving someone's life, many indicated that they did not feel comfortable assuming this role. The findings also demonstrate there is a relationship between type of victim and bystanders' willingness to intervene. Yet, bystander intervention discomfort can be overcome with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation training, particularly when the victim is a coworker or stranger. Further implications of these findings are discussed and modifications to public access defibrillation (PAD) training programs' strategy and communications are proposed.

  16. Young children show the bystander effect in helping situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötner, Maria; Over, Harriet; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Much research in social psychology has shown that otherwise helpful people often fail to help when bystanders are present. Research in developmental psychology has shown that even very young children help and that the presence of others can actually increase helping in some cases. In the current study, in contrast, 5-year-old children helped an experimenter at very high levels when they were alone but helped significantly less often in the presence of bystanders who were potentially available to help. In another condition designed to elucidate the mechanism underlying the effect, children's helping was not reduced when bystanders were present but confined behind a barrier and thus unable to help (a condition that has not been run in previous studies with adults). Young children thus show the bystander effect, and it is due not to social referencing or shyness to act in front of others but, rather, to a sense of a diffusion of responsibility. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy α-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose α-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  18. Guidelines for Bystander First Aid 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Jen Heng

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac life support is a form of first aid for cardiac emergencies. However, research and evidence in this field is lacking compared with other forms of first aid. Having identified the common emergencies that are encountered in the hospital, based on the available evidence, we have put together what could be an evidence-based approach to the first aid management of some of these common emergencies, viz. breathlessness, chest pain, allergies, stroke, heat injury, poisoning, unconsciousness, seizures, and trauma situations such as bleeding, wounds, contusions, head injury, burns and fractures. Educating the public is the key to developing a first responder bystander. These guidelines could become the basis for training of the public. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  19. Bystander Effects Induced by Diffusing Mediators after Photodynamic Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Asima; Held, Kathryn D.; Prise, Kevin M.; Liber, Howard L.; Redmond, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    The bystander effect, whereby cells that are not traversed by ionizing radiation exhibit various responses when in proximity to irradiated cells, is well documented in the field of radiation biology, Here we demonstrate that considerable bystander responses are also observed after photodynamic stress using the membrane-localizing dye deuteroporphyrin (DP). Using cells of a WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cell line in suspension and a transwell insert system that precludes contact between targeted a...

  20. Significance and nature of bystander responses induced by various agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neha; Tiku, Ashu Bhan

    2017-07-01

    Bystander effects in a biological system are the responses shown by non-targeted neighbouring cells/tissues/organisms. These responses are triggered by factors released from targeted cells when exposed to a stress inducing agent. The biological response to stress inducing agents is complex, owing to the diversity of mechanisms and pathways activated in directly targeted and bystander cells. These responses are highly variable and can be either beneficial or hazardous depending on the cell lines tested, dose of agent used, experimental end points and time course selected. Recently non-targeted cells have even been reported to rescue the directly exposed cells by releasing protective signals that might be induced by non-targeted bystander responses. The nature of bystander signal/s is not yet clear. However, there are evidences suggesting involvement of ROS, RNS, protein factors and even DNA molecules leading to the activation of a number of signaling pathways. These can act independently or in a cascade, to induce events leading to changes in gene expression patterns that could elicit detrimental or beneficial effects. Many review articles on radiation induced bystander responses have been published. However, to the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive review on bystander responses induced by other genotoxic chemicals and stress inducing agents has not been published so far. Therefore, the aim of the present review is to give an overview of the literature on different aspects of bystander responses: agents that induce these responses, factors that can modulate bystander responses and the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Directed Student Inquiry: Modeling in Roborovsky Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwess, Nancy L.; Bouchard, Adam

    2007-01-01

    In this inquiry-based activity, Roborovsky hamsters are used to provide students with an opportunity to develop their skills of analysis, inquiry, and design. These hamsters are easy to maintain, yet offer students a means to use conventional techniques and those of their own design to make further observations through measuring, assessing, and…

  2. Tanshinone IIA increases the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir gene therapy via enhanced gap junctional intercellular communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Xiao

    Full Text Available The bystander effect is an intriguing phenomenon by which adjacent cells become sensitized to drug treatment during gene therapy with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV. This effect is reported to be mediated by gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC, and therefore, we postulated that upregulation of genes that facilitate GJIC may enhance the HSV-tk/GCV bystander effect. Previous findings have shown Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA, a chemical substance derived from a Chinese medicine herb, promotes the upregulation of the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in B16 cells. Because gap junctions are formed by connexins, we hypothesized that Tan IIA might increase GJIC. Our results show that Tan IIA increased GJIC in B16 melanoma cells, leading to more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in cells stably expressing HSV-tk. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that tumors in mice with 10% HSV-tk positive B16 cells and 90% wild-type B16 cells became smaller following treatment with the combination of GCV and Tan IIA as compared to GCV or Tan IIA alone. These data demonstrate that Tan IIA can augment the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system through increased gap junction coupling, which adds strength to the promising strategy that develops connexins inducer to potentiate the effects of suicide gene therapy.

  3. Tanshinone IIA increases the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir gene therapy via enhanced gap junctional intercellular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianyong; Zhang, Guangxian; Qiu, Pengxiang; Liu, Xijuan; Wu, Yingya; Du, Biaoyan; Li, Jiefen; Zhou, Jing; Li, Jingjing; Tan, Yuhui

    2013-01-01

    The bystander effect is an intriguing phenomenon by which adjacent cells become sensitized to drug treatment during gene therapy with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV). This effect is reported to be mediated by gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), and therefore, we postulated that upregulation of genes that facilitate GJIC may enhance the HSV-tk/GCV bystander effect. Previous findings have shown Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), a chemical substance derived from a Chinese medicine herb, promotes the upregulation of the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in B16 cells. Because gap junctions are formed by connexins, we hypothesized that Tan IIA might increase GJIC. Our results show that Tan IIA increased GJIC in B16 melanoma cells, leading to more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in cells stably expressing HSV-tk. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that tumors in mice with 10% HSV-tk positive B16 cells and 90% wild-type B16 cells became smaller following treatment with the combination of GCV and Tan IIA as compared to GCV or Tan IIA alone. These data demonstrate that Tan IIA can augment the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system through increased gap junction coupling, which adds strength to the promising strategy that develops connexins inducer to potentiate the effects of suicide gene therapy.

  4. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  5. Protection of hamsters from amebic liver abscess formation by immunization with the 150- and 170-kDa surface antigens of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X J; Tachibana, H

    2001-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody, EH3015, prevents in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to mammalian cells and inhibits amebic liver abscess formation in hamsters. By immunoaffinity chromatography with the monoclonal antibody, purified E. histolytica antigens with molecular masses of 150 and 170 kDa under non-reduced conditions were obtained. Hamsters were immunized with these antigens (group I) or with fractions further purified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (group II). Pooled immune sera from the two groups inhibited in vitro amebic adherence to Chinese hamster ovary cells by 98% at 1:10 dilutions. The immunized hamsters were challenged by the intrahepatic injection of E. histolytica trophozoites. Complete protection from abscess formation was observed in 38% of hamsters in group I and 67% in group II, whereas all control hamsters inoculated only with adjuvant developed amebic liver abscesses. In the immunized hamsters, the abscesses in the two groups were significantly smaller than in the controls. These results demonstrate that the E. histolytica antigens are possible vaccine candidates for amebiasis.

  6. Radioprotection of targeted and bystander cells by methylproamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom); Oxford University Hospitals, Cellular Pathology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Smith, Andrea; Lobachevsky, Pavel; Martin, Roger [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Prise, Kevin M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-23

    Radioprotective agents are of interest for application in radiotherapy for cancer and in public health medicine in the context of accidental radiation exposure. Methylproamine is the lead compound of a class of radioprotectors which act as DNA binding anti-oxidants, enabling the repair of transient radiation-induced oxidative DNA lesions. This study tested methylproamine for the radioprotection of both directly targeted and bystander cells. T98G glioma cells were treated with 15 μM methylproamine and exposed to {sup 137}Cs γ-ray/X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} microbeam irradiation. Radioprotection of directly targeted cells and bystander cells was measured by clonogenic survival or γH2AX assay. Radioprotection of directly targeted T98G cells by methylproamine was observed for {sup 137}Cs γ-rays and X-rays but not for He{sup 2+} charged particle irradiation. The effect of methylproamine on the bystander cell population was tested for both X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} ion microbeam irradiation. The X-ray bystander experiments were carried out by medium transfer from irradiated to non-irradiated cultures and three experimental designs were tested. Radioprotection was only observed when recipient cells were pretreated with the drug prior to exposure to the conditioned medium. In microbeam bystander experiments targeted and nontargeted cells were co-cultured with continuous methylproamine treatment during irradiation and postradiation incubation; radioprotection of bystander cells was observed. Methylproamine protected targeted cells from DNA damage caused by γ-ray or X-ray radiation but not He{sup 2+} ion radiation. Protection of bystander cells was independent of the type of radiation which the donor population received. (orig.) [German] Radioprotektive Agenzien sind sowohl in der Strahlentherapie von Krebserkrankungen als auch im Strahlenschutz im Zusammenhang mit akzidenteller Exposition von Bedeutung. Methylproamine ist die Leitsubstanz einer Klasse von

  7. Bystander injury evaluation of children from midwestern agricultural operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Quintin L; Alexander, Bruce H; Gerberich, Susan G; Nachreiner, Nancy M; Church, Timothy R; Ryan, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    With more than a million youth living on agricultural operations, it is important for parents to understand the consequences of bystander injuries that children experience in these environments. We identified the childhood injuries for bystander status and compared the severity of these injuries to the working children in the Regional Rural Injury Study-II (RRIS-II). RRIS-II followed 16,546 children ( approximately 85% of eligible) from rural communities in the Midwest for two six-month recall periods in 1999 and 2001. Demographic, injury, and exposure data were collected through comprehensive computer-assisted telephone interviews. Child injuries were cataloged using narrative scenarios into four categories: (a) directly work-related; (b) indirectly work-related; (c) non-working accomplice; and (d) non-working attendant; the latter three all being bystander categories. Poisson regression modeling was used to calculate rates of bystander injuries. Frequencies were used for comparison of severity measures. Among the 463 child injuries (aged accomplice (passengers/tag-alongs), and 60 as non-working attendant (playing on the operation). The overall rate of bystander injuries was 6.4 per 1,000 people, 95% CI (5.0, 8.1). Males, compared with females, had more than twice the injury rate (8.7; 95% CI 6.4-11.8, and 3.9; 95% CI 2.7-5.7, per 1,000 people, respectively). Bystanders in this population had more severe injuries with 4% having life-threatening circumstances; of these, 4% of the accomplices and 2% of the attendants subsequently died. Children who live or work on agricultural operations are vulnerable to many hazards. Therefore, this study examined child injuries and found a clear difference in the consequences of these injuries between working-related and bystanding-related injuries. Unlike occupations such as construction and mining, where laws and organizations have been created for the protection of bystanders, agricultural bystanders have remained unprotected

  8. Bullying participant roles and gender as predictors of bystander intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Lyndsay N; Nickerson, Amanda B

    2017-05-01

    Although the importance of peer bystanders in bullying has been recognized, there are few studies that examine the phenomenon in relation to Latané and Darley's (1970) classic Bystander Intervention Model, which states that there are five stages of bystander intervention: (i) notice the event; (ii) interpret the event as an emergency that requires assistance; (iii) accept responsibility for intervening; (iv) know how to intervene or provide help; and (v) implement intervention decisions. This study examined preliminary evidence of reliability and validity of the Bystander Intervention Model in Bullying (Nickerson, Aloe, Livingston, & Feeley, 2014), and the extent to which bullying role behavior (bullying, assisting, victimization, defending, and outsider behavior) and gender predicted each step of the model with a sample of 299 middle school students. Results of a Confirmatory Factor Analysis supported a five-factor structure of the measure corresponding to the steps of the model. There was evidence of convergent validity and Cronbach alpha for each subscale exceeded .75. In addition, students who reported defending their peers were more likely to also engage in all five steps of the bystander intervention model, while victims were more likely to notice events, and outsiders were less likely to intervene. Gender differences and gender interactions were also found. Aggr. Behav. 43:281-290, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Recursive mentalizing and common knowledge in the bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kyle A; De Freitas, Julian; DeScioli, Peter; Pinker, Steven

    2016-05-01

    The more potential helpers there are, the less likely any individual is to help. A traditional explanation for this bystander effect is that responsibility diffuses across the multiple bystanders, diluting the responsibility of each. We investigate an alternative, which combines the volunteer's dilemma (each bystander is best off if another responds) with recursive theory of mind (each infers what the others know about what he knows) to predict that actors will strategically shirk when they think others feel compelled to help. In 3 experiments, participants responded to a (fictional) person who needed help from at least 1 volunteer. Participants were in groups of 2 or 5 and had varying information about whether other group members knew that help was needed. As predicted, people's decision to help zigzagged with the depth of their asymmetric, recursive knowledge (e.g., "John knows that Michael knows that John knows help is needed"), and replicated the classic bystander effect when they had common knowledge (everyone knowing what everyone knows). The results demonstrate that the bystander effect may result not from a mere diffusion of responsibility but specifically from actors' strategic computations. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. LGBT Discrimination on Campus and Heterosexual Bystanders: Understanding Intentions to Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessel, Adrienne B.; Goodman, Kevin D.; Woodford, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Discrimination targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students on college campuses occurs. Bystander intervention is important in supporting targeted students and improving campus climate for LGBT students. Peer-familiarity context (i.e., who the bystander knows in the situation) can play a role in bystander intervention, but…

  11. Be Aware to Care: Public Self-Awareness Leads to a Reversal of the Bystander Effect.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, M.; van Prooijen, J.W.; Elffers, H.; van Lange, P.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The classic bystander effect stipulates that people help others more when they are alone than when other bystanders are present. We reason that, sometimes, the presence of bystanders can increase helping, notably in situations where public self-awareness is increased through the use of

  12. Promoting Prosocial Behaviors to Prevent Dating Violence among College Students: Evaluation of a Bystander Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsky, Amanda E.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation was to evaluate a bystander behavior program at the Jefferson College of Health Sciences (JCHS) in Roanoke, Virginia. Specifically, this dissertation examined the: (1) preliminary measurement properties of a newly developed bystander behavior intention scale; (2) impact of the bystander intervention at JCHS; and…

  13. Adolescent Bystander Behavior in the School and Online Environments and the Implications for Interventions Targeting Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Lisa J.; Allan, Alfred; Cross, Donna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to add to the emerging knowledge about the role of bystanders in cyberbullying. To differentiate online versus offline bystander behaviors, 292 Australian children (mean age = 15.2; female = 54.4%) reviewed hypothetical scenarios experimentally manipulated by bystander sex, relationship to target and perpetrator, and…

  14. Polymyopathy in a Syrian golden hamster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, M.V.W.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    A Syrian golden hamster suffered from general swelling of skeletal muscles. At microscopical observation the muscle tissue exhibited degeneration and necrosis, as well as regenerative features. The inflammatory response was very slight. The histopathological lesions were diagnosed as polymyopathy.

  15. Association of bystander interventions and hospital length of stay and admission to intensive care unit in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riddersholm, Signe; Kragholm, Kristian; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

    2017-01-01

    categories: 1. No bystander interventions; 2.Bystander CPR only; 3. Bystander defibrillation with or without bystander CPR. RESULTS: For patients surviving to hospital discharge, hospital length of stay was 20days for patients without bystander interventions, compared to 16 for bystander CPR, and 13...... for bystander defibrillation. 82% of patients without bystander interventions were admitted to ICU compared to 77.2% for bystander CPR, and 61.2% for bystander defibrillation. In-hospital mortality was 60% in the first category compared to 40.5% and 21.7% in the two latter categories. In regression models......, bystander CPR and bystander defibrillation were associated with a reduction of length of hospital stay of 21% (Estimate: 0.79 [95% CI: 0.72-0.86]) and 32% (Estimate: 0.68 [95% CI: 0.59-0.78]), respectively. Both bystander CPR (OR: 0.94 [95% CI: 0.91-0.97]) and bystander defibrillation (OR: 0.81 [0...

  16. Bystander reactions to a violent theft: crime in Jerusalem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, S H; Gottlieb, A

    1976-12-01

    Seventy-two male Israeli students were exposed to a violent crime in the course of a bogus discussion. Their awareness of other bystanders' lack of reaction to the emergency (social influence) and others' awareness of their actions (evaluation apprehension) were crossed in a 2 X 2 factorial design. An "alone" condition in which the subject was the only bystander controlled for the effects of others' mere presence (diffusion of responsibility). Helping was reduced by diffusion of responsibility and slowed by negative social influence but was increased by evaluation apprehension. Differences traceable to social influence appeared prior to those from the other processes. Implications of these findings for the measurement of helping and the interpretation of bystander decision making are discussed.

  17. Workplace mobbing: How the victim's coping behavior influences bystander responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Roelie; Bos, Arjan E R; Pouwelse, Mieneke; van Dam, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Victims of workplace mobbing show diverse coping behavior. We investigated the impact of this behavior on bystander cognitions, emotions, and helping toward the victim, integrating coping literature with attribution theory. Adult part-time university students (N = 161) working at various organizations participated in a study with a 3(Coping: approach/avoidance/neutral) × 2(Gender Victim: male/female) × 2(Gender Bystander: male/female) design. Victims showing approach (vs. avoidance) coping were considered to be more self-reliant and less responsible for the continuation of the mobbing, and they elicited less anger. Continuation responsibility and self-reliance mediated the relationship between the victim's coping behavior and bystanders' helping intentions. Female (vs. male) participants reported more sympathy for the victim and greater willingness to help, and female (vs. male) victims elicited less anger. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  18. Novel features of radiation-induced bystander signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrated using root micro-grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Li, Fanghua; Xu, Wei; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been well demonstrated in whole organisms, as well as in single-cell culture models in vitro and multi-cellular tissues models in vitro, however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, including the temporal and spatial course of bystander signaling. The RIBE in vivo has been shown to exist in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana). Importantly, the unique plant grafting provides a delicate approach for studying the temporal and spatial course of bystander signaling in the context of whole plants. In our previous study, the time course of bystander signaling in plants has been well demonstrated using the root micro-grafting technique. In this study, we further investigated the temporal cooperation pattern of multiple bystander signals, the directionality of bystander signaling, and the effect of bystander tissues on the bystander signaling. The results showed that the bystander response could also be induced efficiently when the asynchronously generated bystander signals reached the bystander tissues in the same period, but not when they entered into the bystander tissues in an inversed sequence. The absence of bystander response in root-inversed grafting indicated that the bystander signaling along roots might be of directionality. The bystander signaling was shown to be independent of the bystander tissues. PMID:23072991

  19. Bystander Effects During Synchrotron Imaging Procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schültke, Elisabeth; Bewer, Brian; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean; Nikkhah, Guido

    2010-07-01

    Using monochromatic beam and synchrotron phase-contrast technique at the biomedical beamline of the Italian synchrotron facility Elettra (SYRMEP), we have shown in a small animal model of malignant brain tumor that it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of very small tumors when they have developed from implanted tumor cells loaded with colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNP). All previous experiments were conducted in post-mortem samples. We have now designed a cell culture experiment to investigate the effects of synchrotron radiation with an energy and dose profile similar to that expected in our first in vivo imaging studies according to the protocol developed at SYRMEP. Materials and Methods: Culture flasks containing either gold-loaded or naïve C6 glioma cells were exposed to a dose of 0.5 Gy at 24 keV. The irradiated medium was aspirated and replaced with fresh growth medium. Twenty-four hours later this non-irradiated medium exposed to irradiated cells was aspirated, then added to non-irradiated C6 cells in order to investigate whether bystander effects are seen under the conditions of our image acquisition protocol. The irradiated medium was added to a number of other non-irradiated cell cultures. Cell counts were followed until 72 hrs after irradiation. Western blots were conducted with H2AX antibodies. This experiment was one of the first biomedical experiments conducted at BMIT, the new biomedical imaging and therapy beamline of the Canadian Light Source. Results: No significant differences in proliferation were seen between cells that were directly irradiated, exposed to irradiated medium or exposed to the non-irradiated 24-hr-medium from the irradiated cells. However, there was a tendency towards a higher number of double strand breaks in previously irradiated cells when they were exposed to non-irradiated medium that had been in contact with irradiated cells for 24 hrs.

  20. Seasonal differential expression of KiSS-1/GPR54 in the striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) among different tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Laixiang; Xue, Huiliang; Li, Shenning; Xu, Jinhui; Chen, Lei

    2017-05-01

    Kisspeptins and G protein coupled receptor (GPR54) play significant roles in regulating reproductive activity among seasonally reproductive animals; however, the mechanisms of KiSS-1 and GPR54 gene affecting the seasonal reproduction in striped hamster are still unknown. In this study, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was employed to examine the expression profiles of KiSS-1 and GPR54 in the hypothalamus, ovaries, testes, uterus and epididymis of striped hamsters across 4 different seasons. Our results showed that, across different seasons, the KiSS-1 expression mode of male striped hamsters and the GPR54 expression mode of female striped hamsters were consistent with the seasonal photoperiod in the hypothalamus. Meanwhile, across different seasons, the expression profile of KiSS-1 in the testes and the GPR54 expression profile of male striped hamsters in the hypothalamus were consistent with the intensity of their seasonal reproductive activity. Among different tissues, the expression trend for GPR54 is consistent across 4 seasons, while that for KiSS-1 is tissue-dependent. The expression trend for GPR54 across 4 seasons is the same regardless of gender, while that for KiSS-1 is dramatically different and sex-dependent across different seasons. These results suggest that the expressions of KiSS-1 and GPR54 in the striped hamsters were regulated by complicated mechanisms, and the regulatory mechanisms in the striped hamsters are seasonal-dependent and sex-dependent. This research will provide a theoretical basis for studying how KiSS-1 and GPR54 affect seasonal reproduction and the mechanisms behind their influence. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Comparing the level of bystander effect in a couple of tumor and normal cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Bahreyni, Mohammad T. Toossi

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to radiation responses which occur in non-irradiated cells. The purpose of this study was to compare the level of bystander effect in a couple of tumor and normal cell lines (QU-DB and MRC5). To induce bystander effect, cells were irradiated with 0.5, 2, and 4 Gy of 60Co gamma rays and their media were transferred to non-irradiated (bystander) cells of the same type. Cells containing micronuclei were counted in bystander subgroups, non-irradiated, and...

  2. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M; Redmond, Robert W.; Liber, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naïve recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to one hour to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least one hour of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12–24 hours to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent γ-ray exposures. PMID:19695271

  3. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ying; Zhou Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Redmond, Robert W. [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Liber, Howard L., E-mail: howard.liber@colostate.edu [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Denver, CO (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naive recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to 1 h to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least 1 h of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12-24 h to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent {gamma}-ray exposures.

  4. Predicting Improvement After a Bystander Program for the Prevention of Sexual and Dating Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Denise A; Palm Reed, Kathleen M

    2015-07-01

    Although evidence suggests that bystander prevention programs are promising interventions for decreasing sexual violence and dating violence on college campuses, there have been no studies to date evaluating moderators of bystander program effectiveness. The current study evaluates whether different demographic characteristics, attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors at pretest predict change over a 6-month follow-up for students who participated in a bystander prevention program. Participants in the three assessments (pretest, posttest, 6-month follow-up) included 296 college students who were mandated to attend a bystander program during their first year orientation. Analyses showed that with few exceptions, the bystander program worked best for students who were most at risk given their pretest demographics and levels of attitudes condoning dating violence and sexual violence, bystander efficacy, and bystander behaviors. Results are discussed in terms of suggestions for future research. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  5. Bullying victimization and the social and emotional maladjustment of bystanders: A propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Jilynn M; Nickerson, Amanda B; Aloe, Ariel M; Swearer, Susan M

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated how bystanders, who have and have not been bullied, perceive their social and emotional maladjustment depending on the form of bullying (physical or verbal) they witness. Using propensity score matching, equivalent groups of 270 victimized and 270 non-victimized bystander groups were created based on middle school students' responses on the Bully Survey-Student Version (BYS-S; Swearer, 2001). Victimized bystanders experienced higher social maladjustment than non-victimized bystanders. Path analysis results suggest that social and emotional maladjustment as a bystander is related not only to social-emotional maladjustment as victim, but to gender and the form of bullying witnessed. The way in which bystanders are influenced by their personal victimization may be a critical factor in predicting, understanding, and increasing active bystander intervention. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanism of bystander-blaming: defensive attribution, counterfactual thinking, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Inna; Ben-David, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary victimology recognizes that an understanding of the mechanism of blaming requires a comprehensive approach that includes the victim, the offender, and the bystander. However, most of the existing research on blaming focuses on the victim and the offender, ignoring the issue of bystander-blaming. This study highlights the bystander and investigates bystander-blaming by exploring some theoretical explanations, including counterfactual thinking, defensive attribution, and gender differences. The study included 363 young male and female participants, who read vignettes describing the behavior of the victim and the bystander in a rape scenario and answered questions regarding bystander-blaming. The results show that both counterfactual thinking and defensive attribution play a role in bystander-blaming. This article addresses the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. Bystander defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Public vs Residential Locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Bystander-delivered defibrillation (hereinafter referred to as bystander defibrillation) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains limited despite the widespread dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). Objective: To examine calendar changes...... in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationwide study......, 2016. Exposures: Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher...

  8. SV40 DNA amplification and reintegration in surviving hamster cells after 60Co gamma-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücke-Huhle, C; Pech, M; Herrlich, P

    1990-10-01

    SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cells were exposed to 60Co gamma-irradiation and the fate of the integrated SV40 sequences was pursued over a period of 20 days following radiation exposure. As shown by colony hybridization, integrated SV40 sequences were amplified in surviving and non-surviving cells. At later times, however, clonal sublines of surviving cells grown for 20-30 cell generations after irradiation had lost most of their amplified SV40 copies but showed altered restriction fragment patterns indicating reintegration of SV40 sequences at new sites of the hamster genome. This suggests that 60Co gamma-irradiation can generate mutations by inducing over-replication of chromosome segments that are then substrates of enzymatic rearrangements.

  9. The defect in the AT-like hamster cell mutants is complemented by mouse chromosome 9 but not by any of the human chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Jongmans; G. Verhaegh (Gerald); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); P. Demant (Peter); A.T. Natarajan; Y. Shiloh (Yosef); M. Oshimura (Mitsuo); E.J. Stanbridge (Eric); R.S. Athwal (Raghbir); A.P. Cuthbert (Andrew); R.F. Newbold (Robert); P.H.M. Lohmann (Paul); M.Z. Zdzienicka (Malgorzata)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractX-ray-sensitive Chinese hamster V79 cells mutants, V-C4, V-E5 and V-G8, show an abnormal response to X-ray-induced DNA damage. Like ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells, they display increased cell killing, chromosomal instability and a diminished inhibition of DNA synthesis following

  10. Enteritis caused by Pasteurella pneumotropica infection in hamsters.

    OpenAIRE

    Lesher, R J; Jeszenka, E V; Swan, M E

    1985-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica was isolated in essentially pure cultures from the bowels of hamsters with enteritis 7 days after parturition. Newly received hamsters showed presence of P. pneumotropica in their nasal cavities but not in their uteri, lungs, spleens, or bowels.

  11. Incoming College Students' Bystander Behaviors to Prevent Sexual Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Banyard, Victoria L.; McMahon, Sheila M.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluations of bystander intervention education programs demonstrate that this approach results in students' increased willingness to intervene in prosocial ways to prevent sexual violence (e.g., Moynihan, Banyard, Arnold, Eckstein, & Stapleton, 2010). These programs often focus on first-year college students, though theories and research on…

  12. Variations in Involvement: Motivating Bystanders to Care for Senior Citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sarah N; Wilkinson, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a senior service advertising campaign designed to increase volunteerism and financial donations among bystanders. A cross-sectional mail survey was administered to 2,500 adults; 384 usable responses were obtained. Survey responses were analyzed by level of exposure and involvement in senior care. High involvement individuals viewed the ads more favorably and exhibited stronger senior caretaking intentions. Low-involvement consumers were less likely to see their own potential contributions to senior care services as effective. It is argued that nonparticipants in prosocial helping may fail to notice the need (low awareness), fail to view the cause as urgent (low perceived susceptibility), or have low prior experience with the issue. A typology of involvement could be developed that can be used for audience segmentation in marketing health behaviors to bystanders. With limited theoretical and practical guidance on how to motivate bystanders to engage in prosocial behaviors, health communicators and marketers are challenged to tap into the vital resource that bystanders potentially could provide. The research reviewed and presented here indicates hope for engaging the public to become active players in making the nation a safer and healthier place.

  13. A Qualitative Exploration of Cyber-Bystanders and Moral Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Deborah; Green, Deborah; Spears, Barbara; Scrimgeour, Margaret; Barnes, Alan; Geer, Ruth; Johnson, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Studies have found that moral disengagement plays a significant role in the continuation of bullying situations (Bonanno, 2005); however, the moral stance of cyber-bystanders--those who witness online bullying--is not yet clear. While research into traditional face-to-face bullying reported that peers would probably or certainly intervene to…

  14. Microvesicles Contribute to the Bystander Effect of DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Wei, Fengxiang; Major, Pierre; Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Al Saleh, Hassan A; Tang, Damu

    2017-04-07

    Genotoxic treatments elicit DNA damage response (DDR) not only in cells that are directly exposed but also in cells that are not in the field of treatment (bystander cells), a phenomenon that is commonly referred to as the bystander effect (BE). However, mechanisms underlying the BE remain elusive. We report here that etoposide and ultraviolet (UV) exposure stimulate the production of microvesicles (MVs) in DU145 prostate cancer cells. MVs isolated from UV-treated DU145 and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells as well as etoposide-treated DU145 cells induced phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) at serine 1981 (indicative of ATM activation) and phosphorylation of histone H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX) in naïve DU145 cells. Importantly, neutralization of MVs derived from UV-treated cells with annexin V significantly reduced the MV-associated BE activities. Etoposide and UV are known to induce DDR primarily through the ATM and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) pathways, respectively. In this regard, MV is likely a common source for the DNA damage-induced bystander effect. However, pre-treatment of DU145 naïve cells with an ATM (KU55933) inhibitor does not affect the BE elicited by MVs isolated from etoposide-treated cells, indicating that the BE is induced upstream of ATM actions. Taken together, we provide evidence supporting that MVs are a source of the DNA damage-induced bystander effect.

  15. Strain-Specific Barriers against Bovine Prions in Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Nicot, Simon; Baron, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the susceptibilities of Syrian golden hamsters to transmissible spongiform encephalopathy agents from cattle. We report efficient transmission of the L-type atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent into hamsters. Importantly, hamsters were also susceptible to the transmissible mink encephalopathy agent from cattle, which has molecular features similar to those of the L-type BSE agent, as also shown in bovinized transgenic mice. In sharp contrast, hamsters could no...

  16. Multi–College Bystander Intervention Evaluationon for Violence Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Ann L.; Bush, Heather M.; Fisher, Bonnie S.; Swan, Suzanne C.; Williams, Corrine M.; Clear, Emily R.; DeGue, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The 2013 Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act requires U.S. colleges to provide bystander-based training to reduce sexual violence, but little is known about the efficacy of such programs for preventing violent behavior. This study provides the first multiyear evaluation of a bystander intervention’s campus-level impact on reducing interpersonal violence victimization and perpetration behavior on college campuses. Methods First-year students attending three similarly sized public university campuses were randomly selected and invited to complete online surveys in the spring terms of 2010–2013. On one campus, the Green Dot bystander intervention had been implemented since 2008 (Intervention, n=2,979) and two Comparison campuses had no bystander programming at baseline (Comparison, n=4,132). Data analyses conducted in 2014–2015 compared violence rates by condition over the four survey periods. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate violence risk on Intervention relative to Comparison campuses adjusting for demographic factors and time (2010–2013). Results Interpersonal violence victimization rates (measured in the past academic year) were 17% lower among students attending the Intervention (46.4%) relative to Comparison (55.7%) campuses (adjusted rate ratio, 0.83; 95% CI=0.79, 0.88); a similar pattern held for interpersonal violence perpetration (25.5% in Intervention; 32.2% in Comparison; adjusted rate ratio, 0.79; 95% CI=0.71, 0.86). Violence rates were lower on Intervention versus Comparison campuses for unwanted sexual victimization, sexual harassment, stalking, and psychological dating violence victimization and perpetration (pviolence at the community-level and meet Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act bystander training requirements. PMID:26541099

  17. Multi-College Bystander Intervention Evaluation for Violence Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Ann L; Bush, Heather M; Fisher, Bonnie S; Swan, Suzanne C; Williams, Corrine M; Clear, Emily R; DeGue, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    The 2013 Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act requires U.S. colleges to provide bystander-based training to reduce sexual violence, but little is known about the efficacy of such programs for preventing violent behavior. This study provides the first multiyear evaluation of a bystander intervention's campus-level impact on reducing interpersonal violence victimization and perpetration behavior on college campuses. First-year students attending three similarly sized public university campuses were randomly selected and invited to complete online surveys in the spring terms of 2010-2013. On one campus, the Green Dot bystander intervention was implemented in 2008 (Intervention, n=2,979) and two comparison campuses had no bystander programming at baseline (Comparison, n=4,132). Data analyses conducted in 2014-2015 compared violence rates by condition over the four survey periods. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate violence risk on Intervention relative to Comparison campuses, adjusting for demographic factors and time (2010-2013). Interpersonal violence victimization rates (measured in the past academic year) were 17% lower among students attending the Intervention (46.4%) relative to Comparison (55.7%) campuses (adjusted rate ratio=0.83; 95% CI=0.79, 0.88); a similar pattern held for interpersonal violence perpetration (25.5% in Intervention; 32.2% in Comparison; adjusted rate ratio=0.79; 95% CI=0.71, 0.86). Violence rates were lower on Intervention versus Comparison campuses for unwanted sexual victimization, sexual harassment, stalking, and psychological dating violence victimization and perpetration (pSexual Violence Elimination Act bystander training requirements. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. Bystander Interventions for Sexual Assault and Dating Violence on College Campuses: Are We Putting Bystanders in Harm's Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Tricia H.; Casper, Deborah M.; Hackman, Christine L.; Mulla, Mazheruddin M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The present study investigated the well-being of bystanders who witness and intervene in sexual assault and dating violence situations on campus. Participants: Participants were 321 young men and women from a large university in the southeastern United States. Methods: Participants completed a survey at the end of the Spring semester of…

  19. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  20. Comparing the level of bystander effect in a couple of tumor and normal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Bahreyni, Mohammad T Toossi

    2012-04-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to radiation responses which occur in non-irradiated cells. The purpose of this study was to compare the level of bystander effect in a couple of tumor and normal cell lines (QU-DB and MRC5). To induce bystander effect, cells were irradiated with 0.5, 2, and 4 Gy of (60)Co gamma rays and their media were transferred to non-irradiated (bystander) cells of the same type. Cells containing micronuclei were counted in bystander subgroups, non-irradiated, and 0.5 Gy irradiated cells. Frequencies of cells containing micronuclei in QU-DB bystander subgroups were higher than in bystander subgroups of MRC5 cells (P MRC5 cells (P MRC5 bystander cells was constant. It is concluded that QU-DB cells are more susceptible than MRC5 cells to be affected by bystander effect, and in the two cell lines there is a positive correlation between DNA damages induced directly and those induced due to bystander effect.

  1. Role of ROS-mediated autophagy in radiation-induced bystander effect of hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jianghong; Fu, Jiamei; Wang, Juan; Ye, Shuang; Liu, Weili; Shao, Chunlin

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy plays a crucial role in cellular response to ionizing radiation, but it is unclear whether autophagy can modulate radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Here, we investigated the relationship between bystander damage and autophagy in human hepatoma cells of HepG2. HepG2 cells were treated with conditioned medium (CM) collected from 3 Gy γ-rays irradiated hepatoma HepG2 cells for 4, 12, or 24 h, followed by the measurement of micronuclei (MN), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and protein expressions of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) and Beclin-1 in the bystander HepG2 cells. In some experiments, the bystander HepG2 cells were respectively transfected with LC3 small interfering RNA (siRNA), Beclin-1 siRNA or treated with 1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Additional MN and mitochondrial dysfunction coupled with ROS were induced in the bystander cells. The expressions of protein markers of autophagy, LC3-II/LC3-I and Beclin-1, increased in the bystander cells. The inductions of bystander MN and overexpressions of LC3 and Beclin-1 were significantly diminished by DMSO. However, when the bystander cells were transfected with LC3 siRNA or Beclin-1 siRNA, the yield of bystander MN was significantly enhanced. The elevated ROS have bi-functions in balancing the bystander effects. One is to cause MN and the other is to induce protective autophagy.

  2. Bystander T cells in human immune responses to dengue antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwannasaen Duangchan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of T cell activation in dengue infection have focused on restriction of specific T cell receptors (TCRs and classical MHC molecules. However, bystander T cell activation, which is TCR independent, occurs via cytokines in other viral infections, both in vitro and in vivo, and enables T cells to bypass certain control checkpoints. Moreover, clinical and pathological evidence has pointed to cytokines as the mediators of dengue disease severity. Therefore, we investigated bystander T cell induction by dengue viral antigen. Results Whole blood samples from 55 Thai schoolchildren aged 13-14 years were assayed for in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-γ induction in response to inactivated dengue serotype 2 antigen (Den2. The contribution of TCR-dependent and independent pathways was tested by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA, which inhibits TCR-dependent activation of T cells. ELISA results revealed that approximately 72% of IFN-γ production occurred via the TCR-dependent pathway. The major IFN-γ sources were natural killer (NK (mean ± SE = 55.2 ± 3.3, CD4+T (24.5 ± 3.3 and CD8+T cells (17.9 ± 1.5, respectively, as demonstrated by four-color flow cytometry. Interestingly, in addition to these cells, we found CsA-resistant IFN-γ producing T cells (CD4+T = 26.9 ± 3.6% and CD8+T = 20.3 ± 2.1% implying the existence of activated bystander T cells in response to dengue antigen in vitro. These bystander CD4+ and CD8+T cells had similar kinetics to NK cells, appeared after 12 h and were inhibited by anti-IL-12 neutralization indicating cytokine involvement. Conclusions This study described immune cell profiles and highlighted bystander T cell activation in response to dengue viral antigens of healthy people in an endemic area. Further studies on bystander T cell activation in dengue viral infection may reveal the immune mechanisms that protect or enhance pathogenesis of secondary dengue infection.

  3. Congenital Transmission of Experimental Leishmaniasis in a Hamster Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Yaneth; Rodriguez, Luz D.; Bonilla, Diana L.; Peniche, Alex G.; Henao, Hector; Saldarriaga, Omar; Travi, Bruno L.

    2012-01-01

    Little information is available on transplacental transmission of Leishmania spp. We determined the frequency and impact of congenital infection caused by Leishmania panamensis or L. donovani in experimentally infected hamsters. A polymerase chain reaction showed that congenital transmission occurred in 25.8% (24 of 93) of offspring born to L. panamensis-infected hamsters and 14.6% (11 of 75) offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters. Mortality during lactation was higher in offspring born to L. panamensis-infected hamsters and offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters than controls, and lymphoproliferation to Leishmania was more frequent in offspring born to L. panamensis-infected hamsters (17.4%, 11 of 63) than in offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters (8.5%, 3 of 35). After weaning, only offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters had lower weight gain (P < 0.001) and hematocrit levels (P = 0.0045) than controls. Challenge of offspring born to L. panamensis-infected hamsters with L. panamensis showed no differences in lesion evolution, and offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters were more susceptible to L. donovani challenge than controls. Consequently, prenatal exposure of hamsters to L. donovani significantly increased the mortality risk and susceptibility to secondary homologous infection. PMID:22556079

  4. Bystander education training for campus sexual assault prevention: an initial meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jennifer; Moore, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The present meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of bystander education programs for preventing sexual assault in college communities. Undergraduates trained in bystander education for sexual assault were expected to report more favorable attitudes, behavioral proclivities, and actual behaviors relative to untrained controls. Data from 12 studies of college students (N = 2,926) were used to calculate 32 effect sizes. Results suggested moderate effects of bystander education on both bystander efficacy and intentions to help others at risk. Smaller but significant effects were observed regarding self-reported bystander helping behaviors, (lower) rape-supportive attitudes, and (lower) rape proclivity, but not perpetration. These results provide initial support for the effectiveness of in-person bystander education training. Nonetheless, future longitudinal research evaluating behavioral outcomes and sexual assault incidence is needed.

  5. Self-protective function of post-conflict bystander affiliation in mandrills.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Schino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Affiliative interactions exchanged between victims of aggression and individuals not involved in the original aggression (bystanders have been observed in various species. Three hypothetical functions have been proposed for these interactions: consolation, self-protection and substitute reconciliation, but data to test them are scanty. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted post-conflict and matched control observations on a captive group of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx. We found that victims often redirected aggression to bystanders, that they received most affiliation from those bystanders that were frequently the target of redirection, and that bystander affiliation reduced the likelihood of redirection. Bystander affiliation did not reduce the victim's distress (as measured by its scratching rates and was not received primarily from kin/friends. Finally, bystander affiliation did not reduce the likelihood of renewed aggression from the original aggressor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide support for the self-protection hypothesis but not for the consolation and substitute reconciliation hypotheses.

  6. Effects of group status and victim sex on female bystanders' responses to a potential party rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jennifer; Colbert, Samuel; Colangelo, Liane

    2015-01-01

    This research examined bystander responses to 1 of 4 potential party rape scenarios. Undergraduate women (N = 249) imagined attending a party either alone or with three friends where a sober man led an intoxicated potential victim (either male or female) into a bedroom. After random assignment to conditions, participants reported on intent to help and barriers to helping the potential victim. In contrast to the classic bystander effect, bystanders in groups intended to offer more help than lone bystanders. Bystanders also intended to offer more help to potential female than male victims and experienced more barriers to helping male victims. Two of these barriers (lack of personal responsibility to help and identifying risk) explained the lower intentions to help potential male victims. Potential male victims were more likely than female victims to be perceived as gay, and bystanders reported the least intentions to help presumably gay men at risk.

  7. Self-efficacy and moral disengagement in Mexican secondary school bullying bystanders

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Maria Lopez; Kyriacou, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The role of bystander involvement in bullying has been widely researched and documented. Nevertheless, bystanders who stop the bullying and/or aid the victim are still the exception rather than the norm. Two factors that seem to be closely related with the decision by bystanders regarding whether to support the victim, are their levels of self-efficacy and moral disengagement. This study seeks to explore students’ perception of their own power to make a difference in bullying situations and t...

  8. Preventing Interpersonal Violence on College Campuses: The Effect of One Act Training on Bystander Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría-Flores, Kei; Raker, Kelli; Pleasants, Robert K; Weaver, Mark A; Weinberger, Morris

    2015-05-22

    Sexual assault, stalking, dating violence, and intimate partner violence, herein collectively termed interpersonal violence (IV), are public health problems affecting 20% to 25% of female college students. Currently, One Act is one of the few IV prevention training programs at universities that teach students bystander skills to intervene in low- and high-risk IV situations. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate One Act's effects on date rape attitudes and behaviors, and bystanders' confidence, willingness to help, and behavior, and 2) to compare the effects on bystander skills between One Act and Helping Advocates for Violence Ending Now (HAVEN), an IV response training program with similar participants. Data were collected over 2 years, before and after One Act and HAVEN trainings. We measured outcomes with four scales: College Date Rape Attitudes and Behaviors, Bystander Confidence, Willingness to Help, and Bystander Behavior. The analysis compared within- and between-group mean differences in scale scores pre- and post-trainings using linear mixed models. One Act showed improvements for date rape attitudes and behaviors (p bystander's confidence (p bystander confidence improved more (p = .006), on average, than HAVEN's. The differences in the two trainings' effects on bystander willingness to help and behavior had similar patterns but were not statistically significant. We found a larger positive impact on bystander confidence among students who participated in the bystander prevention training compared with the response training. Further research is needed to improve the measures for bystander behavior and measure the bystander trainings' larger impact on the community. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Role of ATM in bystander signaling between human monocytes and lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Ghosh, Anu; Krishna, Malini

    2015-12-01

    The response of a cell or tissue to ionizing radiation is mediated by direct damage to cellular components and indirect damage mediated by radiolysis of water. Radiation affects both irradiated cells and the surrounding cells and tissues. The radiation-induced bystander effect is defined by the presence of biological effects in cells that were not themselves in the field of irradiation. To establish the contribution of the bystander effect in the survival of the neighboring cells, lung carcinoma A549 cells were exposed to gamma-irradiation, 2Gy. The medium from the irradiated cells was transferred to non-irradiated A549 cells. Irradiated A549 cells as well as non-irradiated A549 cells cultured in the presence of medium from irradiated cells showed decrease in survival and increase in γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci, indicating a bystander effect. Bystander signaling was also observed between different cell types. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated and gamma-irradiated U937 (human monocyte) cells induced a bystander response in non-irradiated A549 (lung carcinoma) cells as shown by decreased survival and increased γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci. Non-stimulated and/or irradiated U937 cells did not induce such effects in non-irradiated A549 cells. Since ATM protein was activated in irradiated cells as well as bystander cells, it was of interest to understand its role in bystander effect. Suppression of ATM with siRNA in A549 cells completely inhibited bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. On the other hand suppression of ATM with siRNA in PMA stimulated U937 cells caused only a partial inhibition of bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. These results indicate that apart from ATM, some additional factor may be involved in bystander effect between different cell types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ahne hamster lõikuskuul/ Tambet Kaugema

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaugema, Tambet

    2010-01-01

    Eesti Nuku- ja Noorsoteatri jõululavastusest "Ahne hamster ja värvilised jäälilled", autor Miloš Macourek, tõlkija Leo Metsar, lavastaja ja muusikaline kujundaja Virko Annus, mängib Tarmo Männard. Esietendus 21. novembril Köismäe tornis

  11. Disparities in activity levels and learning ability between Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) and Roborovskii hamster (Phodopus roborovskii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiromi; Nagasawa, Mao; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Minaminaka, Kimie; Goda, Ryosei; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2017-03-01

    The Djungarian hamster and the Roborovskii hamster belong to the same genus of Phodopus. However, the Djungarian hamster is tame and shows sedative behavior, while Roborovskii hamster is not tame and shows high levels of locomotor activity. Hyperactivity occurs in animals with tameless behavior. Tameness or tamelessness behavior is very important because tameness helps for breeding and controlling as well as it enables a strong human-animal bond. In the present study, we examined the relationships between activity levels and cognitive function in Djungarian and Roborovskii hamsters. Three types of behavioral tests were performed to analyze their activity levels, memory and leaning ability. The levels of L- and D-amino acids and monoamines in the brain were then determined. Roborovskii hamsters showed significantly higher locomotor activity than Djungarian hamsters. Memory ability was not significantly different between the two hamsters, but Roborovskii hamsters showed lower learning ability. Brain levels of D-serine which is related to enhancement in memory and learning ability, were significantly higher in Djungarian hamsters, but the reverse was true for brain dopamine and serotonin levels. These results suggest that these differences in brain metabolism may be related to the behavioral differences between the two hamsters. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Collective helping and bystander effects in coevolving helping networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Keun; Park, Hyunggyu

    2010-06-01

    We study collective helping behavior and bystander effects in a coevolving helping network model. A node and a link of the network represents an agent who renders or receives help and a friendly relation between agents, respectively. A helping trial of an agent depends on relations with other involved agents and its result (success or failure) updates the relation between the helper and the recipient. We study the network link dynamics and its steady states analytically and numerically. The full phase diagram is presented with various kinds of active and inactive phases and the nature of phase transitions are explored. We find various interesting bystander effects, consistent with the field study results, of which the underlying mechanism is proposed.

  13. An “Intention-Focused” paradigm for improving bystander CPR performance□

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Ashish R.; Fishman, Jessica; Camp-Rogers, Teresa; Starodub, Roksolana; Merchant, Raina M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite public education campaigns and a chest compression-only initiative, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is provided in approximately 30–40% of out of hospital cardiac arrests in the United States. Bystander CPR rates may not improve without addressing factors influencing bystanders’ probability of performing CPR. We propose an “intention-focused” model for the bystander CPR performance utilizing validated behavioral theory. This model describes a framework that may predict CPR performance, with intention as the key determinant of this behavior. This model may provide specific targets for strengthening the intention to perform CPR, which could lead to increased bystander rates. PMID:25534077

  14. MiR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Ding, Nan; Pei, Hailong; Hu, Wentao; Wei, Wenjun; Zhang, Xurui; Zhou, Guangming; Wang, Jufang

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are well-established phenomena, in which DNA damage responses are induced not only in the directly irradiated cells but also in the non-irradiated bystander cells through intercellular signal transmission. Recent studies hint that bystander effects are possibly mediated via small non-coding RNAs, especially microRNAs. Thus, more details about the roles of microRNA in bystander effects are urgently needed to be elucidated. Here we demonstrated that bystander effects were induced in human fetal lung MRC-5 fibroblasts through medium-mediated way by different types of radiation. We identified a set of differentially expressed microRNAs in the cell culture medium after irradiation, among which the up-regulation of miR-21 was further verified with qRT-PCR. In addition, we found significant upregulation of miR-21 in both directly irradiated cells and bystander cells, which was confirmed by the expression of miR-21 precursor and its target genes. Transfection of miR-21 mimics into non-irradiated MRC-5 cells caused bystander-like effects. Taken together, our data reveals that miR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects. Elucidation of such a miRNA-mediated bystander effect is of utmost importance in understanding the biological processes related to ionizing radiation and cell-to-cell communication. PMID:25483031

  15. Young children show the bystander effect in helping situations

    OpenAIRE

    Ploetner, Maria; Over, Harriet; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The authors thank the ESRC for supporting Harriet Over (grant number ES/K006702/1). Much research in social psychology has shown that otherwise helpful people often fail to help when bystanders are present. Research in developmental psychology has shown that even very young children help, and that others’ presence can actually increase helping in some cases. In the current study, in contrast, 5-year-old children helped an experimenter at very high levels when they were alone, but significa...

  16. Can a flowchart improve the quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, B; Ziegler, M; Hüpfl, M; Fleischhackl, R; Krychtiuk, K A; Schebesta, K

    2013-07-01

    Since the introduction of basic life support in the 1950s, on-going efforts have been made to improve the quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Even though bystander-CPR can increase the chance of survival almost fourfold, the rates of bystander initiated CPR have remained low and rarely exceed 20%. Lack of confidence and fear of committing mistakes are reasons why helpers refrain from initiating CPR. The authors tested the hypothesis that quality and confidence of bystander-CPR can be increased by supplying lay helpers with a basic life support flowchart when commencing CPR, in a simulated resuscitation model. After giving written informed consent, 83 medically untrained laypersons were randomised to perform basic life support for 300s with or without a supportive flowchart. The primary outcome parameter was hands-off time (HOT). Furthermore, the participants' confidence in their actions on a 10-point Likert-like scale and time-to-chest compressions were assessed. Overall HOT was 147±30 s (flowchart) vs. 169±55 s (non-flowchart), p=0.024. Time to chest compressions was significantly longer in the flowchart group (60±24 s vs. 23±18 s, p<0.0001). Participants in the flowchart group were significantly more confident when performing BLS than the non-flowchart counterparts (7±2 vs. 5±2, p=0.0009). A chart provided at the beginning of resuscitation attempts improves quality of CPR significantly by decreasing HOT and increasing the participants' confidence when performing CPR. As reducing HOT is associated with improved outcome and positively impacting the helpers' confidence is one of the main obstacles to initiate CPR for lay helpers, charts could be utilised as simple measure to improve outcome in cardiopulmonary arrest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identifiable images of bystanders extracted from corneal reflections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Jenkins

    Full Text Available Criminal investigations often use photographic evidence to identify suspects. Here we combined robust face perception and high-resolution photography to mine face photographs for hidden information. By zooming in on high-resolution face photographs, we were able to recover images of unseen bystanders from reflections in the subjects' eyes. To establish whether these bystanders could be identified from the reflection images, we presented them as stimuli in a face matching task (Experiment 1. Accuracy in the face matching task was well above chance (50%, despite the unpromising source of the stimuli. Participants who were unfamiliar with the bystanders' faces (n = 16 performed at 71% accuracy [t(15 = 7.64, p<.0001, d = 1.91], and participants who were familiar with the faces (n = 16 performed at 84% accuracy [t(15 = 11.15, p<.0001, d = 2.79]. In a test of spontaneous recognition (Experiment 2, observers could reliably name a familiar face from an eye reflection image. For crimes in which the victims are photographed (e.g., hostage taking, child sex abuse, reflections in the eyes of the photographic subject could help to identify perpetrators.

  18. Who intervenes against homophobic behavior? Attributes that distinguish active bystanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V Paul; Vecho, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Research on homophobic behavior has focused on students engaging in this behavior or students toward whom this behavior is directed. There has been little attention to the large segment of students who observe this behavior, including active bystanders who defend or support students when homophobic behavior occurs. Among 722 high school students (55% female, 87% white, 86% heterosexual), 66.8% had observed at least one instance of homophobic behavior in the past 30 days. Gender (in this case, girls more so than boys), leadership, courage, altruism, justice sensitivity, and number of LGBT friends were associated with engagement in more active bystander behavior in response to observing homophobic behavior. Further, gender, courage, altruism, and number of LGBT friends each made unique contributions in accounting for variability in students' defending behavior in a comprehensive regression model. Findings highlight qualities that interventionists should cultivate in students that could lead to more active bystander engagement against homophobic behavior. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bystander interventions for sexual assault and dating violence on college campuses: Are we putting bystanders in harm's way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Tricia H; Casper, Deborah M; Hackman, Christine L; Mulla, Mazheruddin M

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the well-being of bystanders who witness and intervene in sexual assault and dating violence situations on campus. Participants were 321 young men and women from a large university in the southeastern United States. Participants completed a survey at the end of the Spring semester of 2015 about risky situations they had witnessed, with follow-up questions about their responses to the situations (eg, whether they intervened or not) and feelings about their responses. Participants also completed standardized measures of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. Over 90% of the participants reported witnessing at least 1 of the risky events presented to them, and approximately 50% reported intervening in events. Intervening was associated with positive feelings, but traumatic stress symptoms were related to witnessing events and intervening. Results have direct implications for developing appropriate training programs for bystander intervention programs on college campuses.

  20. Strategies of behavior, energetic and thermogenesis of striped hamsters in response to food deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Tan, Song; Qiao, Qinggang; Shi, Lulu; Huang, Yixin; Zhao, Zhijun

    2018-01-01

    The life history of many animals includes periods of food shortage. Two behavioral strategies are involved in small mammals in response to food shortage: an increase in activity behavior, representing the increased foraging or migratory behavior, and a decrease in activity level, serving as a mechanism for conserving energy. However, it is uncertain whether animals adopt both strategies in response to food shortage, and whether hormone and neuroendocrine mechanisms are involved in both strategies. In the present study, changes in behavior and metabolic rate were examined in food-deprived striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis). The effects of leptin supplement on activity behavior, metabolic rate and hypothalamic neuropeptide gene expression were also examined. The behavior of food-deprived hamsters significantly changed with photoperiod phases: with increasing activity during the dark phase compared to those fed ad libitum, whereas decreasing activity and simultaneously increasing resting behavior during the light phase. Resting metabolic rate, body mass, and masses of fat depots and digestive tracts significantly decreased in food-deprived hamsters compared with ad libitum controls. Leptin supplement tended to attenuate the increased activity in the dark phase. Gene expression of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) was significantly upregulated in food-deprived hamsters, while was significantly attenuated by exogenous leptin. These findings suggest that both behavior strategies are important behavioral adjustments in free-living animals to cope with food shortage. Leptin and hypothalamic NPY gene expression may be involved in the adjustments of physiology and behavior in animals demonstrating a hyperactivity strategy in response to food shortage. © 2017 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Auditory risk to unprotected bystanders exposed to firearm noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamme, Gregory A; Stewart, Michael; Meinke, Deanna; Lankford, James; Rasmussen, Per

    2011-02-01

    What is the risk of hearing loss for someone standing next to a shooter? Friends, spouses, children, and other shooters are often present during hunting and recreational shooting activities, and these bystanders seem likely to underestimate the hazard posed by noise from someone else's firearm. Hunters use hearing protection inconsistently, and there is little reason to expect higher use rates among bystanders. Acoustic characteristics and estimates of auditory risk from gunfire noise next to the shooter were assessed in this study. This was a descriptive study of auditory risk at the position of a bystander near a recreational firearm shooter. Recordings of impulses from 15 recreational firearms were obtained 1 m to the left of the shooter outdoors away from reflective surfaces. Recordings were made using a pressure-calibrated 1/4 inch measurement microphone and digitally sampled at 195 kHz (24 bit depth). The acoustic characteristics of these impulses were examined, and auditory risk estimates were obtained using three contemporary damage-risk criteria (DRCs) for unprotected listeners. Instantaneous peak levels at the bystander location ranged between 149 and 167 dB SPL, and 8 hr equivalent continuous levels (LeqA8) ranged between 64 and 83 dB SPL. Poor agreement was obtained across the three DRCs, and the DRC that was most conservative varied with the firearm. The most conservative DRC for each firearm permitted no unprotected exposures to most rifle impulses and fewer than 10 exposures to impulses from most shotguns and the single handgun included in this study. More unprotected exposures were permitted for the guns with smaller cartridges and longer barrel length. None of the recreational firearms included in this study produced sound levels that would be considered safe for all unprotected listeners. The DRCs revealed that only a few of the small-caliber rifles and the smaller-gauge shotguns permitted more than a few shots for the average unprotected listener

  2. Radiation-induced bystander effects in cultured human stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykyta V Sokolov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The radiation-induced "bystander effect" (RIBE was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR. RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed.Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC and embryonic stem cells (hESC were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05. A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05.These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative-based therapies.

  3. Vincristine-induced bystander effect in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testi, Serena; Azzarà, Alessia; Giovannini, Caterina; Lombardi, Sara [Unità di Genetica, Dipartimento di Biologia, Pisa University, Via Derna 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Piaggi, Simona [Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, Pisa University, Via Savi 10, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Facioni, Maria Sole [Unità di Genetica, Dipartimento di Biologia, Pisa University, Via Derna 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Scarpato, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.scarpato@unipi.it [Unità di Genetica, Dipartimento di Biologia, Pisa University, Via Derna 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Research Center of Nutraceuticals and Food for Health, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • We studied whether or not vincristine induced a bystander response in human lymphocytes. • Vincristine significantly increased MN frequencies in mononucleated recipient cells. • ROS or soluble proteins (IL-32 and TGF-β) may account for the observed response. - Abstract: Bystander effect is a known radiobiological effect, widely described using ionizing radiations and which, more recently, has also been related to chemical mutagens. In this study, we aimed to assess whether or not a bystander response can be induced in cultured human peripheral lymphocytes by vincristine, a chemotherapeutic mutagen acting as spindle poison, and by mitomycin-C, an alkylating agent already known to induce this response in human lymphoblastoid cells. Designing a modified ad hoc protocol for the cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) assay, we detected the presence of a dose-dependent bystander response in untreated cultures receiving the conditioned medium (CM) from mitomycin-C (MMC) or vincristine (VCR) treated cultures. In the case of MMC, MN frequencies, expressed as micronucleated binucleates, were: 13.5 ± 1.41 at 6 μM, 22 ± 2.12 at 12 μM or 28.25 ± 5.13 at 15 μM vs. a control value of 4.75 ± 1.59. MN levels for VCR, expressed as micronucleated mononucleates were: 2.75 ± 0.88 at 0.0 μM, 27.25 ± 2.30 at 0.4 μM, 46.25 ± 1.94 at 0.8 μM, 98.25 ± 7.25 at 1.6 μM. To verify that no mutagen residual was transferred to recipient cultures together with the CM, we evaluated MN levels in cultures receiving the medium immediately after three washings following the chemical treatment (unconditioned medium). We further confirmed these results using a cell-mixing approach where untreated lymphocytes were co-cultured with donor cells treated with an effect-inducing dose of MMC or VCR. A distinct production pattern of both reactive oxygen species and soluble mediator proteins by treated cells may account for the differences observed in the manifestation of the

  4. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in Cultured Human Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta V.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The radiation-induced “bystander effect” (RIBE) was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC) are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed. Methodology/Principal Findings Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and embryonic stem cells (hESC) were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05). A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05). Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative

  5. Do Sexual Assault Bystander Interventions Change Men's Intentions? Applying the Theory of Normative Social Behavior to Predicting Bystander Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Amanda; Turner, Monique Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of sexual assault on college campuses has led to the implementation of health communication programs to prevent sexual assault. A few novel programs focus on primary prevention by targeting social norms related to gender and masculinity among men through bystander intervention. Guided by the theory of normative social behavior, this study sought to examine the relative effect of campaigns communicating positive versus negative injunctive norms and the interaction between exposure to such campaign messages and perceived descriptive norms and relevant cognitive moderators (e.g., outcome expectations, injunctive norms, group identity, ego involvement) among men. A 2 (high/low descriptive norms) × 2 (high/low moderator) × 3 (public service announcement) independent groups quasi-experimental design (N = 332) was used. Results indicated that messages communicating positive injunctive norms were most effective among men who were least likely to engage in bystander intervention. Furthermore, descriptive norms played a significant role in behavioral intentions, such that those with stronger norms were more likely to report intentions to engage in bystander behaviors in the future. Similarly, the moderators of aspiration, injunctive norms, social approval, and ego involvement had a significant positive effect on behavioral intentions. These findings have important implications for future message design strategy and audience segmentation.

  6. Student Voices: What Can Bystanders Do to Prevent Bullying of Students Who Are Different (or Perceived as Different) from Others?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordseth, Anna; Vepachedu, Vikas; Shipman, Grant; Alayachew, David

    2012-01-01

    In this article, four students share their ideas on what bystanders can do to prevent bullying of students who are different or perceived as different from others. Anna Nordseth says what bystanders need to realize is how to recognize bullying and what a lasting effect it can have on the individuals involved. One bold, compassionate bystander can…

  7. Congenital Transmission of Experimental Leishmaniasis in a Hamster Model

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio, Yaneth; Rodriguez, Luz D.; Diana L Bonilla; Peniche, Alex G.; Henao, Hector; Saldarriaga, Omar; Bruno L. Travi

    2012-01-01

    Little information is available on transplacental transmission of Leishmania spp. We determined the frequency and impact of congenital infection caused by Leishmania panamensis or L. donovani in experimentally infected hamsters. A polymerase chain reaction showed that congenital transmission occurred in 25.8% (24 of 93) of offspring born to L. panamensis-infected hamsters and 14.6% (11 of 75) offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters. Mortality during lactation was higher in offspring b...

  8. Passive immunization prevents induction of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, J L; Schell, R F; Hejka, A G; England, D M

    1990-01-01

    We determined that sera obtained from hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi could prevent the induction of Lyme arthritis. When irradiated hamsters were administered immune serum and subsequently challenged with B. burgdorferi, no evidence of infection was detected. Recipients failed to develop swelling of the hind paws, and no histopathologic changes were detected. In addition, B. burgdorferi was not recovered from tissues of hamsters that were passively immunized. By contrast, irradia...

  9. Conceptualizing the Engaging Bystander Approach to Sexual Violence Prevention on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Postmus, Judy L.; Koenick, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    Bystander intervention offers promise as a sexual violence prevention tool for student affairs administrators on college campuses, but the conceptualization and definition of the approach is in its infancy and needs further development. In an effort to emphasize the potential role of bystanders in the primary prevention of sexual violence, we put…

  10. Individual Motivations and Characteristics Associated with Bystander Intervention during Bullying Episodes among Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Pepler, Debra; Cummings, Joanne G.; Craig, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore bystander experiences during bullying episodes among children and youth attending a residential summer camp by investigating rates of witnessing and intervention, as well as individual motivations and characteristics associated with bystander intervention. The majority of children had witnessed bullying…

  11. Sorority Women's and Fraternity Men's Rape Myth Acceptance and Bystander Intervention Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, R. Sean; Brosi, Matthew W.; Foubert, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Sorority women and fraternity men are more likely than other students to be survivors and perpetrators of sexual assault, respectively. The present study examined sorority and fraternity members' rape myth acceptance, bystander efficacy, and bystander willingness to help in potential sexual assault situations. Sorority women were more rejecting of…

  12. On Standby? A Comparison of Online and Offline Witnesses to Bullying and Their Bystander Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Roslynn; Campbell, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Given their ubiquitous presence as witnesses to school-yard bullying, the role of the "bystander" has been studied extensively. The prevalence and behaviour of bystanders to "cyberbullying," however, is less understood. In an anonymous, school-based questionnaire, 716 secondary school students from South-East Queensland…

  13. Effects of a Rape Awareness Program on College Women: Increasing Bystander Efficacy and Willingness to Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, John D.; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Brasfield, Hope; Hill, Brent

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study evaluated the efficacy of a sexual assault risk-reduction program on 279 college women that focused on learning characteristics of male perpetrators and teaching bystander intervention techniques. After seeing The Women's Program, participants reported significantly greater bystander efficacy and significantly greater…

  14. Action Research Evaluation of Bystander Intervention Training Created by Munche, Stern, and O'Brien

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiflet, Jacqueline H.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, appreciative inquiry study was an examination of bystander intervention as related to sexual assault in the military. The purpose of the study was to examine how military personnel and Department of Defense civilian employees reflecting diverse backgrounds perceived the effectiveness of bystander intervention training and sexual…

  15. Booze, Bars, and Bystander Behavior: People Who Consumed Alcohol Help Faster in the Presence of Others

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, Marco; van Prooijen, Jan-Willem; Elffers, Henk; van Lange, Paul A.M.

    2016-01-01

    People help each other less often and less quickly when bystanders are present. In this paper, we propose that alcohol consumption could attenuate or reverse this so-called bystander effect. Alcohol impairs people cognitively and perceptually, leading them to think less about the presence of others

  16. Contributions of Personal and Situational Factors to Bystanders' Reactions to School Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Insoo; Hazler, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    The intent of this study was to explore bystanders' personal and situational variables predicting their behavioural reactions to school bullying by investigating a sample of 298 college students who had witnessed bullying during middle or high school. Results indicated that the bystander personal variables, gender and past experience as a bully or…

  17. Susceptibility to bystander DNA damage is influenced by replication and transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jennifer S.; Baird, Brandon J.; Redon, Christophe E.; Avdoshina, Valeriya; Palchik, Guillermo; Wu, Junfang; Kondratyev, Alexei; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Olga A.

    2012-01-01

    Direct cellular DNA damage may lead to genome destabilization in unexposed, bystander, cells sharing the same milieu with directly damaged cells by means of the bystander effect. One proposed mechanism involves double strand break (DSB) formation in S phase cells at sites of single strand lesions in the DNA of replication complexes, which has a more open structure compared with neighboring DNA. The DNA in transcription complexes also has a more open structure, and hence may be susceptible to bystander DSB formation from single strand lesions. To examine whether transcription predisposes non-replicating cells to bystander effect-induced DNA DSBs, we examined two types of primary cells that exhibit high levels of transcription in the absence of replication, rat neurons and human lymphocytes. We found that non-replicating bystander cells with high transcription rates exhibited substantial levels of DNA DSBs, as monitored by γ-H2AX foci formation. Additionally, as reported in proliferating cells, TGF-β and NO were found to mimic bystander effects in cell populations lacking DNA synthesis. These results indicate that cell vulnerability to bystander DSB damage may result from transcription as well as replication. The findings offer insights into which tissues may be vulnerable to bystander genomic destabilization in vivo. PMID:22941641

  18. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. AIM: To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OHCA...

  19. Investigation of the Bystander Effect in School Bullying: Comparison of Experiential, Psychological and Situational Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiyeon; Oh, Insoo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the "bystander effect" known to occur in emergency situations is effective in bullying situations through examination of the individual experiences of 467 middle- and high-school students. While the bystander effect was not found to be valid in bullying situations, there were…

  20. Roles of Fatalism and Parental Support in the Relationship between Bullying Victimization and Bystander Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiqiong; Chen, Peter Y.; Chen, Fu-Li; Wu, Wen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how past bullied victims engage two types of bystander behaviors (defender and outsider) when they witness bullying situations.We also investigate if fatalism mediates the relationship between past victimization and two bystander behaviors. Finally, we test if parental support moderates the relationship between fatalism and…

  1. Debriefing bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is valuable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Fjordholt, Martin; Pedersen, Birgitte Dahl; Østergaard, Doris; Lippert, Freddy K

    2014-11-01

    To explore the concept of debriefing bystanders after participating in an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation attempt including (1) bystanders' most commonly addressed reactions after participating in a resuscitation attempt when receiving debriefing from medical dispatchers; (2) their perception of effects of receiving debriefing and (3) bystanders' recommendations for a systematic debriefing concept. Qualitative study based on telephone debriefing to bystanders and interviews with bystanders who received debriefing. Data was analyzed using the phenomenological approach. Six themes emerged from analysis of debriefing audio files: (1) identification of OHCA; (2) emotional and perceptual experience with OHCA; (3) collaboration with healthcare professionals; (4) patients outcome; (5) coping with the experience and (6) general reflections. When evaluating the concept, bystanders expressed positive short term effect of receiving debriefing and a retention of this effect after two months. Recommendations for a future debriefing concept were given. Debriefing by emergency medical dispatchers to OHCA bystanders stimulates reflection, positively influencing the ability to cope with the emotional reactions and the cognitive perception of own performance and motivates improvement of CPR skills. Importantly, it increases confidence to provide CPR in the future. Implementation of telephone debriefing to bystanders at Emergency Medical Dispatch Centres is a low complexity and a low cost intervention though the logistic challenges have to be considered. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. ABSCESSO TESTICULAR EM HAMSTER: RELATO DE CASO

    OpenAIRE

    R.M. Santos; G. D. A. Araguchi; G. R. S. Sluizas; M. C. Menezes; Lega, E.; B. Paludeto; V. Fardin

    2012-01-01

    The Hamster, rodent originating from the Middle East, is a species studied along with other laboratory animals as experimental models in scientific papers and currently is also created as a pet, by virtue of being docile, easy to handle and require little space for survival. The suppurative processes in domestic animals are relatively frequent. Due to infectious diseases or purulent course of aggressiveness of the environment in which they live. The habit of storing food in the cheeks with sh...

  3. Effect of mebendazole on fibrosarcoma in hamsters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research Article. Effect of mebendazole on fibrosarcoma in hamsters. Dušica J Popović1*, Dušan Lalošević1, Kosta J Popović2, Ivan Čapo1, Jovan K. Popović3 and Dejan Miljković1. 1Department of Histology and Embryology, 2Department of Pharmacy, 3Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Clinical.

  4. Getting angry matters: Going beyond perspective taking and empathic concern to understand bystanders' behavior in bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Tiziana; Gini, Gianluca; Thornberg, Robert

    2017-12-01

    The present study examined the relations between different empathic dimensions and bystanders' behavior in bullying. Specifically, the indirect effects of empathic concern and perspective taking via empathic anger on defending and passive bystanding were tested in a sample of Italian young adolescents (N = 398; M age  = 12 years, 3 months, 47.2% girls). Path analysis confirmed the direct and indirect effects, via empathic anger, of empathic concern and perspective taking on bystanders' behavior, with the exception of the direct association between perspective taking and passive bystanding that was not significant. Our findings suggest that considering empathic anger together with empathic concern and perspective taking could help researchers to better understand the links between empathic dispositions and bystanders' behavior in bullying. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Liver irradiation causes distal bystander effects in the rat brain and affects animal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Slava; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kolb, Bryan

    2016-01-26

    Radiation therapy can not only produce effects on targeted organs, but can also influence shielded bystander organs, such as the brain in targeted liver irradiation. The brain is sensitive to radiation exposure, and irradiation causes significant neuro-cognitive deficits, including deficits in attention, concentration, memory, and executive and visuospatial functions. The mechanisms of their occurrence are not understood, although they may be related to the bystander effects.We analyzed the induction, mechanisms, and behavioural repercussions of bystander effects in the brain upon liver irradiation in a well-established rat model.Here, we show for the first time that bystander effects occur in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus regions upon liver irradiation, where they manifest as altered gene expression and somewhat increased levels of γH2AX. We also report that bystander effects in the brain are associated with neuroanatomical and behavioural changes, and are more pronounced in females than in males.

  6. Molecular and immunological characterization of the first allergenic lipocalin in hamster: the major allergen from Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, José Alberto; de Las Heras, Manuel; Maroto, Aroa Sanz; Vivanco, Fernando; Sastre, Joaquín; Pastor-Vargas, Carlos

    2014-08-22

    The most frequent pet allergy is to cat and dog, but in recent years, it has become increasingly popular to have other pets, and the risk of exposure to new allergens is more prevalent. The list of new pets includes hamsters, and one of the most popular hamsters is the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). The aim of this study was the characterization and cloning of the major allergen from this hamster. The study of its allergenicity and cross-reactivity could improve the specific diagnosis and treatment for hamster-allergic patients. Thirteen Siberian hamster-allergic patients were recruited at the outpatient clinic. Protein extracts were prepared from the hair, urine, and salivary glands of four hamster species (European, golden, Siberian, and Roborovski). IgE-binding proteins were detected by immunoblotting and identified by mass spectrometry. The recombinant protein was produced in Escherichia coli and then purified by metal chelate affinity chromatography. The allergenic properties of the recombinant protein were tested by ELISA and immunoblotting, and biological activity was tested according to capacity for basophil activation. Three IgE-binding proteins were identified in extracts obtained from Siberian hamster hair, urine, and salivary glands. All proteins corresponded to the same protein, which was identified as a lipocalin. This lipocalin had no cross-reactivity with common and golden hamsters. The recombinant allergen was cloned and purified, showing similar IgE reactivity in vitro to Siberian hamster protein extracts. Also, the recombinant allergen was capable of producing biological activation in vivo. The major Siberian hamster allergen was cloned, and allergenic properties were characterized, providing a new tool for specific diagnosis of allergy to Siberian hamster. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The Role of Target and Bystander Cells in Dose-Response Relationship of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in Two Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Mohebbi, Shokoufe

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Radiation effect induced in nonirradiated cells which are adjacent or far from irradiated cells is termed radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Published data on dose-response relationship of RIBE is controversial. In the present study the role of targeted and bystander cells in RIBE dose-response relationship of two cell lines have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Two cell lines (QU-DB and MRC5) which had previously exhibited different dose-response relationship were selected. In the previous study the two cell lines received medium from autologous irradiated cells and the results showed that the magnitude of damages induced in QU-DB cells was dependent on dose unlike MRC5 cells. In the present study, the same cells irradiated with 0.5, 2 and 4 Gy gamma rays and their conditioned media were transferred to nonautologous bystander cells; such that the bystander effects due to cross-interaction between them were studied. Micronucleus assay was performed to measure the magnitude of damages induced in bystander cells (RIBE level). Results: QU-DB cells exhibited a dose-dependent response. RIBE level in MRC5 cells which received medium from 0.5 and 2 Gy QU-DB irradiated cells was not statistically different, but surprisingly when they received medium from 4Gy irradiated QU-DB cells, RIBE was abrogated. Conclusion: Results pertaining to QU-DB and MRC5 cells indicated that both target and bystander cells determined the outcome. Triggering the bystander effect depended on the radiation dose and the target cell-type, but when RIBE was triggered, dose-response relationship was predominantly determined by the bystander cell type. PMID:24298387

  8. The role of target and bystander cells in dose-response relationship of radiation-induced bystander effects in two cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Mohebbi, Shokoufe

    2013-02-01

    Radiation effect induced in nonirradiated cells which are adjacent or far from irradiated cells is termed radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Published data on dose-response relationship of RIBE is controversial. In the present study the role of targeted and bystander cells in RIBE dose-response relationship of two cell lines have been investigated. Two cell lines (QU-DB and MRC5) which had previously exhibited different dose-response relationship were selected. In the previous study the two cell lines received medium from autologous irradiated cells and the results showed that the magnitude of damages induced in QU-DB cells was dependent on dose unlike MRC5 cells. In the present study, the same cells irradiated with 0.5, 2 and 4 Gy gamma rays and their conditioned media were transferred to nonautologous bystander cells; such that the bystander effects due to cross-interaction between them were studied. Micronucleus assay was performed to measure the magnitude of damages induced in bystander cells (RIBE level). QU-DB cells exhibited a dose-dependent response. RIBE level in MRC5 cells which received medium from 0.5 and 2 Gy QU-DB irradiated cells was not statistically different, but surprisingly when they received medium from 4Gy irradiated QU-DB cells, RIBE was abrogated. RESULTS pertaining to QU-DB and MRC5 cells indicated that both target and bystander cells determined the outcome. Triggering the bystander effect depended on the radiation dose and the target cell-type, but when RIBE was triggered, dose-response relationship was predominantly determined by the bystander cell type.

  9. Personal distress and the influence of bystanders on responding to an emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortensius, Ruud; Schutter, Dennis J L G; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneous helping behavior during an emergency is influenced by the personality of the onlooker and by social situational factors such as the presence of bystanders. Here, we sought to determine the influences of sympathy, an other-oriented response, and personal distress, a self-oriented response, on the effect of bystanders during an emergency. In four experiments, we investigated whether trait levels of sympathy and personal distress predicted responses to an emergency in the presence of bystanders by using behavioral measures and single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. Sympathy and personal distress were expected to be associated with faster responses to an emergency without bystanders present, but only personal distress would predict slower responses to an emergency with bystanders present. The results of a cued reaction time task showed that people who reported higher levels of personal distress and sympathy responded faster to an emergency without bystanders (Exp. 1). In contrast to our predictions, perspective taking but not personal distress was associated with slower reaction times as the number of bystanders increased during an emergency (Exp. 2). However, the decrease in motor corticospinal excitability, a direct physiological measure of action preparation, with the increase in the number of bystanders was solely predicted by personal distress (Exp. 3). Incorporating cognitive load manipulations during the observation of an emergency suggested that personal distress is linked to an effect of bystanders on reflexive responding to an emergency (Exp. 4). Taken together, these results indicate that the presence of bystanders during an emergency reduces action preparation in people with a disposition to experience personal distress.

  10. Radiation exposure from depleted uranium: The radiation bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexandra C; Rivas, Rafael; Tesoro, Leonard; Kovalenko, Gregor; Kovaric, Nikola; Pavlovic, Peter; Brenner, David

    2017-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a radioactive heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Published data from our laboratory have demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalized human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically transforming and genotoxic. In vivo studies have also demonstrated that DU is leukemogenic and genotoxic. DU possesses both a radiological (alpha particle) and chemical (metal) component but is generally considered a chemical biohazard. Studies have shown that alpha particle radiation does play a role in DU's toxic effects. Evidence has accumulated that non-irradiated cells in the vicinity of irradiated cells can have a response to ionization events. The purpose of this study was to determine if these "bystander effects" play a role in DU's toxic and neoplastic effects using HOS cells. We investigated the bystander responses between DU-exposed cells and non-exposed cells by co-culturing the two equal populations. Decreased cell survival and increased neoplastic transformation were observed in the non-DU exposed cells following 4 or 24h co-culture. In contrast Ni (II)- or Cr(VI)- exposed cells were unable to alter those biological effects in non-Ni(II) or non-Cr(VI) exposed co-cultured cells. Transfer experiments using medium from the DU-exposed and non-exposed co-cultured cells was able to cause adverse biological responses in cells; these results demonstrated that a factor (s) is secreted into the co-culture medium which is involved in this DU-associated bystander effect. This novel effect of DU exposure could have implications for radiation risk and for health risk assessment associated with DU exposure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Clinical bystander effect exerted by allergen immunotherapy: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprandi, G

    2015-03-01

    Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) is able to restore a physiological Th1 response and Tregs function. This effect is allergen-specific, even though it has been reported that it may also be non-specific, such as also extended to allergens not used in AIT. This immunological phenomenon may also be of clinical nature. This case report shows that a poly-allergic patient, successfully treated with Parietaria extract, also achieved a clinical tolerance towards other causal allergens, such as mites and cat. Of course, this was an anecdote, but it is reasonable to prospect the hypothesis that a bystander clinical effect may be observed during AIT in poly-allergic patients.

  12. Vincristine-induced bystander effect in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, Serena; Azzarà, Alessia; Giovannini, Caterina; Lombardi, Sara; Piaggi, Simona; Facioni, Maria Sole; Scarpato, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Bystander effect is a known radiobiological effect, widely described using ionizing radiations and which, more recently, has also been related to chemical mutagens. In this study, we aimed to assess whether or not a bystander response can be induced in cultured human peripheral lymphocytes by vincristine, a chemotherapeutic mutagen acting as spindle poison, and by mitomycin-C, an alkylating agent already known to induce this response in human lymphoblastoid cells. Designing a modified ad hoc protocol for the cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) assay, we detected the presence of a dose-dependent bystander response in untreated cultures receiving the conditioned medium (CM) from mitomycin-C (MMC) or vincristine (VCR) treated cultures. In the case of MMC, MN frequencies, expressed as micronucleated binucleates, were: 13.5±1.41 at 6μM, 22±2.12 at 12μM or 28.25±5.13 at 15μM vs. a control value of 4.75±1.59. MN levels for VCR, expressed as micronucleated mononucleates were: 2.75±0.88 at 0.0μM, 27.25±2.30 at 0.4μM, 46.25±1.94 at 0.8μM, 98.25±7.25 at 1.6μM. To verify that no mutagen residual was transferred to recipient cultures together with the CM, we evaluated MN levels in cultures receiving the medium immediately after three washings following the chemical treatment (unconditioned medium). We further confirmed these results using a cell-mixing approach where untreated lymphocytes were co-cultured with donor cells treated with an effect-inducing dose of MMC or VCR. A distinct production pattern of both reactive oxygen species and soluble mediator proteins by treated cells may account for the differences observed in the manifestation of the bystander effect induced by VCR. In fact, we observed an increased level of ROS, IL-32 and TGF-β in the CM from VCR treated cultures, not present in MMC treated cultures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Asymmetric learning to avoid heterospecific males in Mesocricetus hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Johnston, Robert E

    2012-08-01

    If a female mates with a male of a closely related species, her fitness is likely to decline. Consequently, females may develop behavioral mechanisms to avoid mating with heterospecific males. In some species, one such mechanism is for adult females to learn to discriminate against heterospecific males after exposure to such males. We have previously shown that adult, female Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) learn to discriminate against male Turkish hamsters (Mesocricetus brandti) after exposure to a single heterospecific male during 8 days across a wire-mesh barrier. Here we repeated that experiment but this time we exposed female Turkish hamsters to a male Syrian hamster for 8 days and then measured sexual and aggressive behaviors towards that heterospecific male and towards a conspecific male. In contrast to female Syrian hamsters, female Turkish hamsters did not differ in their latency to go into lordosis or in any measure of aggression towards either type of male. Female Turkish hamsters spent less time in lordosis with the heterospecific male, but the percentage of trials in which females copulated with conspecific and heterospecific males did not differ. When comparing females from both species that had been exposed to a heterospecific male for 8days, female Syrian hamsters copulated less and were more aggressive towards the heterospecific male compared to the behavior of female Turkish hamsters. We discuss how this asymmetric response between females of the two species may be due to the much larger geographical range of Turkish hamsters compared to Syrian hamsters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermostability of sperm nuclei assessed by microinjection into hamster oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclei isolated from spermatozoa of various species (golden hamster, mouse, human, rooster, and the fish tilapia) were heated at 60 degrees-125 degrees C for 20-120 min and then microinjected into hamster oocytes to determine whether they could decondense and develop into pronucl...

  15. Production and purification of polyclonal anti-hamster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyclonal antibodies are mixtures of monoclonal antibodies that were produced against different epitops. The goal of this project is to know the production, purification and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugation of polyclonal antibodies against hamster immunoglobulins in rabbits. 300 ìg/300 ìl of ten hamster ...

  16. ARE EPIGENETIC MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN RADIATION-INDUCED BYSTANDER EFFECTS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel eMothersill

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation including bystander effects and genomic instability are unique in that no classic mutagenic event occurs in the cell showing the effect. In the case of bystander effects, cells which were not in the field affected by the radiation show high levels of mutations, chromosome aberrations and membrane signaling changes leading to what is termed horizontal transmission of mutations and information which may be damaging while in the case of genomic instability, generations of cells derived from an irradiated progenitor appear normal but then lethal and non-lethal mutations appear in distant progeny. This is known as vertical transmission. In both situations high yields of non-clonal mutations leading to distant occurrence of mutation events both in space and time. This precludes a mutator phenotype or other conventional explanation and appear to indicate a generalized form of stress induced mutatgenesis which is well documented in bacteria. This review will discuss the phenomenology of what we term non-targeted effects, and will consider to what extent they challenge conventional ideas in genetics and epigenetics.

  17. Rescue Effects: Irradiated Cells Helped by Unirradiated Bystander Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R. K. K.; Fung, Y. K.; Han, W.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    The rescue effect describes the phenomenon where irradiated cells or organisms derive benefits from the feedback signals sent from the bystander unirradiated cells or organisms. An example of the benefit is the mitigation of radiation-induced DNA damages in the irradiated cells. The rescue effect can compromise the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) (and actually all radiotherapy). In this paper, the discovery and subsequent confirmation studies on the rescue effect were reviewed. The mechanisms and the chemical messengers responsible for the rescue effect studied to date were summarized. The rescue effect between irradiated and bystander unirradiated zebrafish embryos in vivo sharing the same medium was also described. In the discussion section, the mechanism proposed for the rescue effect involving activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway was scrutinized. This mechanism could explain the promotion of cellular survival and correct repair of DNA damage, dependence on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and modulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in irradiated cells. Exploitation of the NF-κB pathway to improve the effectiveness of RIT was proposed. Finally, the possibility of using zebrafish embryos as the model to study the efficacy of RIT in treating solid tumors was also discussed. PMID:25625514

  18. Effects of pepper grenade explosions on non-combatant bystanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Mir, Hyder; Shah, Tajamul H; Bagdadi, Farhana; Khan, Umar Hafiz

    2014-11-01

    Pepper gas is used for riot control in many parts of the world. Yet, its effects on bystanders are largely unreported. We fielded a questionnaire-based survey of 500 bystanders exposed to gas when police used pepper grenades against belligerent 'stone-pelters' in the northern Indian state of Jammu & Kashmir. Of 294 non-combatants who consented to participate in our survey, 97 per cent developed cough and irritation of the throat within few seconds of breathing the pungent smelling gas. They reported respiratory problems, dermatologic symptoms, sleep disturbances, and mood changes with varying frequency. Sixteen reported exacerbations of underlying respiratory disorders, with one temporally related to death. Symptoms led 51 to get medical attention. Nearly all respondents reported that symptoms recurred on re-exposure. We conclude that use of pepper grenades can cause serious acute symptoms in non-combatants accidentally exposed. We recommend alternate methods of riot control - water cannons, baton charges, tasers, plastic or rubber bullets, and so on - that have no collateral side effects on non-combatants be considered for routine use.

  19. Is external defibrillation an electric threat for bystanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Robert Sebastian; Heinroth, Konstantin; Trappe, Hans-Joachim; Werdan, Karl

    2009-04-01

    Safety precautions during defibrillation and cardioversion are generally taken very seriously. The actual hazard for bystanders and rescuers, however, has rarely been investigated. Recently, continuing chest compressions during defibrillation has been suggested to improve outcome from cardiac arrest. This article is to review reports on electric shocks to persons other than patients and to discuss the pertinent biomedical principles. Systematic search in medical literature databases and consecutive hand-search of reference lists. A total of 29 adverse events are reported in the medical literature; seven due to accidental or intentional defibrillator misuse, three due to device malfunction, four during training/maintenance procedures, and 15 during regular resuscitation efforts. Tingling sensations and minor burns are frequently reported consequences of inadvertent shocks. There are no accounts on immediate life-threatening conditions or long-term disability in rescuers/bystanders inflicted by defibrillation/cardioversion of a patient. Discharging a defibrillator directly to a healthy person's chest can be lethal. External electric therapy is likely to be safer than traditionally assumed, especially with self-adhesive thoracic electrodes. Sound clinical experiments are urgently needed before safety measures are revised.

  20. Prosocial Bystander Behavior in Bullying Dynamics: Assessing the Impact of Social Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Caroline B R; Smokowski, Paul R

    2015-12-01

    Individuals who observe a bullying event, but are not directly involved as a bully or victim, are referred to as bystanders. Prosocial bystanders are those individuals who actively intervene in bullying dynamics to support the victim and this prosocial behavior often ends the bullying. The current study examines how social capital in the form of social support, community engagement, mental health functioning, and positive school experiences and characteristics is associated with the likelihood of engaging in prosocial bystander behavior in a large sample (N = 5752; 51.03% female) of racially/ethnically diverse rural youth. It was hypothesized that social capital would be associated with an increased likelihood of engaging in prosocial bystander behavior. Following multiple imputation, an ordered logistic regression with robust standard errors was run. The hypothesis was partially supported and results indicated that social capital in the form of friend and teacher support, ethnic identity, religious orientation, and future optimism were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of engaging in prosocial bystander behavior. Contrary to the hypothesis, a decreased rate of self-esteem was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of engaging in prosocial bystander behavior. The findings highlight the importance of positive social relationships and community engagement in increasing prosocial bystander behavior and ultimately decreasing school bullying. Implications were discussed.

  1. Bystander Effect Induced by UV Radiation; why should we be interested? 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Widel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The bystander effect, whose essence is an interaction of cells directly subjected to radiation with adjacent non-subjected cells, via molecular signals, is an important component of ionizing radiation action. However, knowledge of the bystander effect in the case of ultraviolet (UV radiation is quite limited. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by UV in exposed cells induce bystander effects in non-exposed cells, such as reduction in clonogenic cell survival and delayed cell death, oxidative DNA damage and gene mutations, induction of micronuclei, lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Although the bystander effect after UV radiation has been recognized in cell culture systems, its occurrence in vivo has not been studied. However, solar UV radiation, which is the main source of UV in the environment, may induce in human dermal tissue an inflammatory response and immune suppression, events which can be considered as bystander effects of UV radiation. The oxidative damage to DNA, genomic instability and the inflammatory response may lead to carcinogenesis. UV radiation is considered one of the important etiologic factors for skin cancers, basal- and squamous-cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. Based on the mechanisms of actions it seems that the UV-induced bystander effect can have some impact on skin damage (carcinogenesis?, and probably on cells of other tissues. The paper reviews the existing data about the UV-induced bystander effect and discusses a possible implication of this phenomenon for health risk. 

  2. Risk Factors Associated with Peer Victimization and Bystander Behaviors among Adolescent Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zepeng; Liu, Zhenni; Liu, Xiangxiang; Lv, Laiwen; Zhang, Yan; Ou, Limin; Li, Liping

    2016-07-27

    Despite the prevalence of the phenomena of peer victimization and bystander behaviors, little data has generated to describe their relationships and risk factors. In this paper, a self-administered survey using a cross-sectional cluster-random sampling method in a sample of 5450 participants (2734 girls and 2716 boys) between 4th and 11th grades was conducted at six schools (two primary schools and four middle schools) located in Shantou, China. Self-reported peer victimization, bystander behaviors and information regarding parents' risky behaviors and individual behavioral factors were collected. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was applied to evaluate risk factors affecting peer victimization and bystander behaviors. The results indicated that urban participants were more likely to become bullying victims but less likely to become passive bystanders. Contrarily, bullying victimization was related to the increasing of passive bystander behaviors. Father drinking and mother smoking as independent factors were risk factors for peer victimization. Participants who were smoking or drinking had a tendency to be involved in both peer victimization and passive bystander behaviors. This study suggested that bystander behaviors, victims' and parents' educations play a more important role in peer victimization than previously thought.

  3. The development of bystander intentions and social-moral reasoning about intergroup verbal aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sally B; Rutland, Adam; Cameron, Lindsey

    2015-11-01

    A developmental intergroup approach was taken to examine the development of prosocial bystander intentions among children and adolescents. Participants as bystanders (N = 260) aged 8-10 and 13-15 years were presented with scenarios of direct aggression between individuals from different social groups (i.e., intergroup verbal aggression). These situations involved either an ingroup aggressor and an outgroup victim or an outgroup aggressor and an ingroup victim. This study focussed on the role of intergroup factors (group membership, ingroup identification, group norms, and social-moral reasoning) in the development of prosocial bystander intentions. Findings showed that prosocial bystander intentions declined with age. This effect was partially mediated by the ingroup norm to intervene and perceived severity of the verbal aggression. However, a moderated mediation analysis showed that only when the victim was an ingroup member and the aggressor an outgroup member did participants become more likely with age to report prosocial bystander intentions due to increased ingroup identification. Results also showed that younger children focussed on moral concerns and adolescents focussed more on psychological concerns when reasoning about their bystander intention. These novel findings help explain the developmental decline in prosocial bystander intentions from middle childhood into early adolescence when observing direct intergroup aggression. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  4. The effect of melanin on the bystander effect in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosse, I. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology of the National Academy of Sciences, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk (Belarus)]. E-mail: i.mosse@igc.bas-net.by; Marozik, P. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology of the National Academy of Sciences, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk (Belarus); Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, DIT, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Seymour, C. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. (Canada); Mothersill, C. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. (Canada)

    2006-05-11

    The influence of melanin on radiation-induced bystander effects has been studied. Melanin is known to be a natural substance with proved radioprotective properties in different organisms and cell lines. It is non-toxic and is effective against acute and chronic irradiation. The lower the radiation dose, the higher the relative impact of melanin protection. In this study influence of melanin on human keratinocytes (HPV-G cells) has been studied using the colony-forming assay. We have shown that bystander donor medium from 0.5 Gy irradiated cells when transferred to unirradiated cells, caused almost the same effect as direct irradiation. Melanin increased the colony-forming ability of bystander recipient cells when it was added into culture medium before irradiation. The effect of melanin added after irradiation was to produce less protection in both the directly irradiated and bystander medium treated groups. The absorption spectrum of the filtered medium is identical to one of the intact culture medium showing that melanin was not present in filtered medium. Thus, it cannot protect recipient cells but reduces the amount of the bystander effect. It is concluded that melanin added before irradiation effectively decreased the radiation dose. The reduction of the impact of the bystander signal on recipient cells when melanin was added to the donor medium after harvest but before filtration, may mean that the bystander signal has a physical component as melanin can absorb all types of physical energy.

  5. Connexins and cyclooxygenase-2 crosstalk in the expression of radiation-induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; de Toledo, S M; Hu, G; Hei, T K; Azzam, E I

    2014-01-01

    Background: Signalling events mediated by connexins and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) have important roles in bystander effects induced by ionising radiation. However, whether these proteins mediate bystander effects independently or cooperatively has not been investigated. Methods: Bystander normal human fibroblasts were cocultured with irradiated adenocarcinoma HeLa cells in which specific connexins (Cx) are expressed in the absence of endogenous Cx, before and after COX-2 knockdown, to investigate DNA damage in bystander cells and their progeny. Results: Inducible expression of gap junctions composed of connexin26 (Cx26) in irradiated HeLa cells enhanced the induction of micronuclei in bystander cells (Peffect. In contrast, expression of connexin32 (Cx32) conferred protective effects. COX-2 knockdown in irradiated HeLa Cx26 cells attenuated the bystander response due to connexin expression. However, COX-2 knockdown resulted in enhanced micronucleus formation in the progeny of the bystander cells (Peffects. Characterising the mediating events affected by both mechanisms may lead to new approaches that mitigate secondary debilitating effects of cancer radiotherapy. PMID:24867691

  6. Bystander effect induced by UV radiation; why should we be interested?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, Maria

    2012-11-14

    The bystander effect, whose essence is an interaction of cells directly subjected to radiation with adjacent non-subjected cells, via molecular signals, is an important component of ionizing radiation action. However, knowledge of the bystander effect in the case of ultraviolet (UV) radiation is quite limited. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by UV in exposed cells induce bystander effects in non-exposed cells, such as reduction in clonogenic cell survival and delayed cell death, oxidative DNA damage and gene mutations, induction of micronuclei, lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Although the bystander effect after UV radiation has been recognized in cell culture systems, its occurrence in vivo has not been studied. However, solar UV radiation, which is the main source of UV in the environment, may induce in human dermal tissue an inflammatory response and immune suppression, events which can be considered as bystander effects of UV radiation. The oxidative damage to DNA, genomic instability and the inflammatory response may lead to carcinogenesis. UV radiation is considered one of the important etiologic factors for skin cancers, basal- and squamous-cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. Based on the mechanisms of actions it seems that the UV-induced bystander effect can have some impact on skin damage (carcinogenesis?), and probably on cells of other tissues. The paper reviews the existing data about the UV-induced bystander effect and discusses a possible implication of this phenomenon for health risk. 

  7. Exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays a role in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Wang, Jufang; Ding, Nan; Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Xurui; Wang, Bing; Hua, Junrui; Wei, Wenjun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Bystander effects can be induced through cellular communication between irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells. The signals that mediate this cellular communication, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and even microRNAs, can be transferred between cells via gap junctions or extracellular medium. We have previously reported that miR-21, a well described DDR (DNA damage response) microRNA, is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects through a medium-mediated way. However, the mechanisms of the microRNA transfer have not been elucidated in details. In the present study, it was found that exosomes isolated from irradiated conditioned medium could induce bystander effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated plenty of evidences that miR-21, which is up-regulated as a result of mimic transfection or irradiation, can be transferred from donor or irradiated cells into extracellular medium and subsequently get access to the recipient or bystander cells through exosomes to induce bystander effects. Inhibiting the miR-21 expression in advance can offset the bystander effects to some extent. From all of these results, it can be concluded that the exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effects. These findings provide new insights into the functions of microRNAs and the cellular communication between the directly irradiated cells and the non-irradiated cells.

  8. The role of protein kinase C alpha translocation in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zihui; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun; Hei, Tom K; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-11

    Ionizing radiation is a well known human carcinogen. Evidence accumulated over the past decade suggested that extranuclear/extracellular targets and events may also play a critical role in modulating biological responses to ionizing radiation. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of radiation-induced bystander effect is still unclear. In the current study, AL cells were irradiated with alpha particles and responses of bystander cells were investigated. We found out that in bystander AL cells, protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) translocated from cytosol to membrane fraction. Pre-treatment of cells with PKC translocation inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed the induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activity and the increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression as well as the mutagenic effect in bystander cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was elevated in directly irradiated but not bystander cells; while TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) increased in the membrane fraction of bystander cells. Further analysis revealed that PKC activation caused accelerated internalization and recycling of TNFR1. Our data suggested that PKCα translocation may occur as an early event in radiation-induced bystander responses and mediate TNFα-induced signaling pathways that lead to the activation of ERK and up-regulation of COX-2.

  9. Characteristics of 263K Scrapie Agent in Multiple Hamster Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbian, Kent D.; Race, Brent; Favara, Cynthia; Gardner, Don; Taubner, Lara; Porcella, Stephen; Race, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are known to cross species barriers, but the pathologic and biochemical changes that occur during transmission are not well understood. To better understand these changes, we infected 6 hamster species with 263K hamster scrapie strain and, after each of 3 successive passages in the new species, analyzed abnormal proteinase K (PK)–resistant prion protein (PrPres) glycoform ratios, PrPres PK sensitivity, incubation periods, and lesion profiles. Unique 263K molecular and biochemical profiles evolved in each of the infected hamster species. Characteristics of 263K in the new hamster species seemed to correlate best with host factors rather than agent strain. Furthermore, 2 polymorphic regions of the prion protein amino acid sequence correlated with profile differences in these TSE-infected hamster species. PMID:19193264

  10. Mitomycin C induces bystander killing in homogeneous and heterogeneous hepatoma cellular models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Amrendra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common cancers worldwide that is particularly refractory to chemotherapy. Several studies have proposed combination chemotherapy regimen for HCC treatment. However, these therapies are not effective in regressing tumor and prolonging survival of patient's suffering from HCC. Therefore, the development of more effective therapeutic tools and new strategies for the treatment of HCC are urgently needed. Over the last decade much attention has been focused on "bystander effect" as a possible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of certain human tumors. Interest in this therapeutic approach originated from numerous reports describing the radiation induced bystander effect. However, the knowledge about chemotherapy induced bystander effect is still limited. Hence, chemotherapy induced bystander phenomenon in hepatoma cells was explored by utilizing Mitomycin C (MMC. Results MMC induced bystander killing was observed only in hepatoma cells and it did not occur in cervical cancer cells. MMC induced bystander killing was transferable via medium. It occurred in co-cultured cells indicating the involvement of secreted as well as membrane bound factors. FasL and TRAIL were detected in the conditioned medium from treated cells. In medium transfer experiment, pre-treatment with EDTA (a broad range protease inhibitor diminished MMC induced bystander killing. Following drug exposure, expression of Fas and TRAIL receptors increased and treatment with neutralizing antibodies against FasL and TRAIL inhibited bystander killing. Conclusion Our results highlight the therapeutic importance of MMC in the treatment of HCC and implicate role of membrane bound and secreted forms of FasL and TRAIL in MMC induced bystander killing.

  11. X-ray-induced bystander responses reduce spontaneous mutations in V79 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Matsumoto, Hideki; Usami, Noriko; Tomita, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    The potential for carcinogenic risks is increased by radiation-induced bystander responses; these responses are the biological effects in unirradiated cells that receive signals from the neighboring irradiated cells. Bystander responses have attracted attention in modern radiobiology because they are characterized by non-linear responses to low-dose radiation. We used a synchrotron X-ray microbeam irradiation system developed at the Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, and showed that nitric oxide (NO)-mediated bystander cell death increased biphasically in a dose-dependent manner. Here, we irradiated five cell nuclei using 10 × 10 µm2 5.35 keV X-ray beams and then measured the mutation frequency at the hypoxanthine-guanosine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in bystander cells. The mutation frequency with the null radiation dose was 2.6 × 10–5 (background level), and the frequency decreased to 5.3 × 10–6 with a dose of approximately 1 Gy (absorbed dose in the nucleus of irradiated cells). At high doses, the mutation frequency returned to the background level. A similar biphasic dose-response effect was observed for bystander cell death. Furthermore, we found that incubation with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO), a specific scavenger of NO, suppressed not only the biphasic increase in bystander cell death but also the biphasic reduction in mutation frequency of bystander cells. These results indicate that the increase in bystander cell death involves mechanisms that suppress mutagenesis. This study has thus shown that radiation-induced bystander responses could affect processes that protect the cell against naturally occurring alterations such as mutations. PMID:23660275

  12. Challenges of Bystander Intervention in Male-Dominated Professional Sport: Lessons From the Australian Football League.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corboz, Julienne; Flood, Michael; Dyson, Sue

    2016-03-01

    Programs aimed at preventing violence against women have increasingly adopted bystander approaches, yet large gaps remain in our knowledge about what drives bystanders to act or not, particularly in settings where there is an increased risk of violence against women occurring. This article contributes to this gap by examining data from research with professional male athletes from the Australian Football League. Drawing from a mixed methods approach, including a survey and interviews with football players, we outline some of the challenges to bystander intervention faced by professional athletes and discuss some of the possible similarities and differences between these and other groups of men. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  14. Investigation of possible oncogenic action of zinc polycarboxylate cement by implantation in mice and hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, J H; Mock, D; Beagrie, G S; Smith, D C

    1975-01-01

    Powdered, sterilized zinc polycarboxylate was implanted subcutaneously in 56 young hamsters and 54 mice, using equal numbers of each sex, with 24 sham operated hamsters and 26 mice as controls. The hamsters were sacrificed after 15 months and the mice after 12. Implant material was recovered from one of 42 surviving mice and from 16 of 43 surviving hamsters. Benign adenomas of the gut, thyroid, sebaceous glands and ovary were found in 3 experimental mice and in one control. Benign adrenal adenomas were found in 3 experimental hamsters and in one control. One control hamster developed a rhabdomyosarcoma in a limb. One experimental hamster developed a leiomysarcoma in close relation to an implant.

  15. Bystanders' Behavior in Cyberbullying Episodes: Active and Passive Patterns in the Context of Personal-Socio-Emotional Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenik-Shemesh, Dorit; Heiman, Tali; Eden, Sigal

    2017-01-01

    The present study explored bystanders' behavior in cyberbullying (CB) episodes among children and youth, focusing on active and passive behavior patterns. The study examined prevalence and characteristics of bystanders' behavior following CB episodes, and their active-passive intervention patterns in relation to personal (age, gender) and socio-emotional (self-efficacy, social support, sense of loneliness) factors. Of the 1,094 participants (ages 9-18), 497 (46.4%) reported they were bystanders to CB episodes. Of the bystanders, 55.4% were identified as having a passive pattern of behavior-they did not provide any help to cyber-victims, whereas 44.6% were identified as having an active pattern-helping the cyber-victim. In line with the "bystanders' effect," only 35.6% of the bystanders offered direct help to cyber-victims after witnessing CB. When studying the personal-socio-emotional differences between active and passive bystanders, it was found that the "active bystanders" are more often girls, older, have more social support from significant others, and have lower levels of emotional loneliness than bystanders in the passive group. Differences within the passive and active patterns were studied as well. A logistic regression revealed the unique contribution of each predictor to the probability of being an active bystander. It was found that gender and age predicted the probability of being an active bystander: Girls are more likely than boys, and older bystanders are more likely than younger ones, to choose an active pattern and provide help to cyber-victims. In addition, implications for CB prevention and intervention involvement programs to encourage bystanders to help cyber-victims are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Hamster and Human Pancreatic Neoplasia1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip-Schneider, Michele T; Savage, Jesse J; Hertzler, Dean A; Cummings, William O

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been implicated in the development of gastrointestinal malignancies. The aim of the present study was to determine COX-2 expression/activity throughout stages of experimental and human pancreatic neoplasia. COX-2 immunohistochemistry was performed in pancreata of hamsters subjected to the carcinogen N-nitrosobis-(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) and in human pancreatic tumors. COX-2 activity was determined by prostaglandin E2 assay in tumor versus matched normal pancreatic tissues. The activity of the COX inhibitor sulindac was tested in the PC-1 hamster pancreatic cancer model. COX-2 expression was elevated in all pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs) and adenocarcinomas. In BOP-treated hamsters, there were significant progressive elevations in COX-2 expression throughout pancreatic tumorigenesis. In human samples, peak COX-2 expression occurred in PanIN2 lesions and remained moderately elevated in PanIN3 and adenocarcinoma tissues. COX-2 activity was significantly elevated in hamster and human pancreatic cancers compared to pair-matched normal pancreas. Furthermore, hamster pancreatic tumor engraftment/formation in the PC-1 hamster pancreatic cancer model was reduced 4.9-fold by oral administration of sulindac. Increased COX-2 expression is an early event in pancreatic carcinogeneses. The BOP-induced hamster carcinogenesis model is a representative model used to study the role of COX-2 in well-differentiated pancreatic tumorigenesis. COX inhibitors may have a role in preventing tumor engraftment/formation. PMID:16820089

  17. Circadian rhythms accelerate wound healing in female Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Erin J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Prendergast, Brian J

    2017-03-15

    Circadian rhythms (CRs) provide temporal regulation and coordination of numerous physiological traits, including immune function. CRs in multiple aspects of immune function are impaired in rodents that have been rendered circadian-arrhythmic through various methods. In Siberian hamsters, circadian arrhythmia can be induced by disruptive light treatments (DPS). Here we examined CRs in wound healing, and the effects of circadian disruption on wound healing in DPS-arrhythmic hamsters. Circadian entrained/rhythmic (RHYTH) and behaviorally-arrhythmic (ARR) female hamsters were administered a cutaneous wound either 3h after light onset (ZT03) or 2h after dark onset (ZT18); wound size was quantified daily using image analyses. Among RHYTH hamsters, ZT03 wounds healed faster than ZT18 wounds, whereas in ARR hamsters, circadian phase did not affect wound healing. In addition, wounds healed slower in ARR hamsters. The results document a clear CR in wound healing, and indicate that the mere presence of organismal circadian organization enhances this aspect of immune function. Faster wound healing in CR-competent hamsters may be mediated by CR-driven coordination of the temporal order of mechanisms (inflammation, leukocyte trafficking, tissue remodeling) underlying cutaneous wound healing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of oxidative DNA damage in radiation induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaki, Sophia; Kotsinas, Athanassios; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Kletsas, Dimitris; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has been described as a double-edged sword, since it is used for diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, and at the same time it is a well known human mutagen and carcinogen, causing wide-ranging chromosomal aberrations. It is nowadays accepted that the detrimental effects of IR are not restricted only in the irradiated cells, but also to non-irradiated bystander or even distant cells manifesting various biological effects. This review presents the role of oxidative stress in the induction of bystander effects referring to the types of the implicated oxidative DNA lesions, the contributing intercellular and intracellular stress mediators, the way they are transmitted from irradiated to bystander cells and finally, the complex role of the bystander effect in the therapeutic efficacy of radiation treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lipids, atherosclerosis and CVD risk: is CRP an innocent bystander?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Zacho, J

    2009-01-01

    are consistently associated with CVD risk. A recent study showed that aggressive statin treatment caused reductions of 50% in LDL cholesterol, 37% in CRP, 44% in CVD events, and 20% in total mortality, and that the highest treatment benefits were obtained in those with the lowest achieved levels of both LDL......AIM: To evaluate recent human studies with respect to the interpretation of whether elevated plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) cause cardiovascular disease (CVD), or whether elevated CRP levels more likely is an innocent bystander. DATA SYNTHESIS: Elevated CRP concentrations...... cholesterol and CRP. However, a reduction in CRP levels after statin treatment could be secondary to the reduced LDL cholesterol levels, and thereby less inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques. We recently performed 4 large Mendelian randomization studies, studies that demonstrated that elevated CRP...

  20. Quantitative characterization of in vitro bystander effect of antibody-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aman P; Sharma, Sharad; Shah, Dhaval K

    2016-12-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are designed to target antigen expressing (Ag+) cells in a tumor. Once processed by the Ag+ cells, ADCs can release cytotoxic drug molecules that can diffuse out of Ag+ cells into the neighboring antigen-negative (Ag-) cells to induce their cytotoxicity. This additional efficacy of ADCs on Ag- cells in the presence of Ag+ cells is known as the 'bystander effect'. Although the importance of this phenomena is widely acknowledged for effective killing of a heterogeneous tumor, the rate and extent of the bystander killing in a heterogeneous system is not quantitatively understood yet. Thus, the objectives of this manuscript were to: (1) synthesize and characterize a tool ADC Trastuzumab-vc-MMAE that is capable of exhibiting bystander effect, (2) quantify the time course of the bystander effect for the tool ADC using in vitro co-culture systems created using mixture of various HER2-expressing cell lines, and (3) develop a pharmacodynamic (PD) model that is capable of characterizing the bystander effect of ADCs. Co-culture studies conducted using GFP labelled MCF7 cells as Ag- cells and N87, BT474, and SKBR3 as Ag+ cells revealed that the bystander effect of ADC increases with increasing fraction of Ag+ cells in a co-culture system, and with increased expression level of target on Ag+ cells. A notable lag time after ADC incubation was also observed prior to significant bystander killing of Ag- cells. Based on our results we hypothesize that there may be other determinants apart from the antigen expression level that can also influence the ability of Ag+ cells to demonstrate the bystander effect in a co-culture system. The co-culture analysis also suggested that the bystander effect of the ADC can dissipate over the period of time as the population of Ag+ cells declines. A novel PD model was developed to mathematically characterize the bystander effect of ADCs by combining two different cell distribution models to represent the

  1. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  2. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  3. Bystander motivation in bullying incidents : To intervene or not to intervene?

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Thornberg; Laura Tenenbaum; Kris Varjas; Joel Meyers; Tomas Jungert; Gina Vanegas

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This research sought to extend knowledge about bystanders in bullying situations with a focus on the motivations that lead them to different responses. The 2 primary goals of this study were to investigate the reasons for children’s decisions to help or not to help a victim when witnessing bullying, and to generate a grounded theory (or conceptual framework) of bystander motivation in bullying situations. Methods: Thirty students ranging in age from 9 to 15 years (M=11....

  4. Der Bystander-Effekt in alltäglichen Hilfesituationen : ein nicht-reaktives Feldexperiment

    OpenAIRE

    Alle, Katrin; Mayerl, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Der These der Verantwortungsdiffusion zufolge sinkt die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Hilfeleistung, wenn mehrere Zeugen eine Hilfesituation beobachten, da sich aufgrund der Anwesenheit mehrerer potentieller Helfer die individuell wahrgenommene Verantwortung reduziert (sog. Bystander-Effekt). Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt Ergebnisse eines nicht-reaktiven Feldexperiments mit verdeckter Beobachtung zur Untersuchung des Bystander-Effekts in einer ungefährlichen alltäglichen Hilfesituation mit 80 Vers...

  5. Der Bystander-Effekt in alltäglichen Hilfesituationen : ein nicht-reaktives Feldexperiment

    OpenAIRE

    Alle, Katrin; Mayerl, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    "Der These der Verantwortungsdiffusion zufolge sinkt die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Hilfeleistung, wenn mehrere Zeugen eine Hilfesituation beobachten, da sich aufgrund der Anwesenheit mehrerer potentieller Helfer die individuell wahrgenommene Verantwortung reduziert (sog. Bystander-Effekt). Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt Ergebnisse eines nicht-reaktiven Feldexperiments mit verdeckter Beobachtung zur Untersuchung des Bystander-Effekts in einer ungefährlichen alltäglichen Hilfesituation mit 80 Ver...

  6. Susceptibility to bystander DNA damage is influenced by replication and transcriptional activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dickey, Jennifer S.; Baird, Brandon J.; Redon, Christophe E.; Avdoshina, Valeriya; Palchik, Guillermo; Wu, Junfang; Kondratyev, Alexei; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Olga A.

    2012-01-01

    Direct cellular DNA damage may lead to genome destabilization in unexposed, bystander, cells sharing the same milieu with directly damaged cells by means of the bystander effect. One proposed mechanism involves double strand break (DSB) formation in S phase cells at sites of single strand lesions in the DNA of replication complexes, which has a more open structure compared with neighboring DNA. The DNA in transcription complexes also has a more open structure, and hence may be susceptible to ...

  7. A Role for Bioelectric Effects in the Induction of Bystander Signals by Ionizing Radiation?

    OpenAIRE

    Mothersill, C.; Moran, G.; McNeill, F.; Gow, M.D.; Denbeigh, J.; Prestwich, W.; Seymour, C.B.

    2007-01-01

    The induction of “bystander effects” i.e. effects in cells which have not received an ionizing radiation track, is now accepted but the mechanisms are not completely clear. Bystander effects following high and low LET radiation exposure are accepted but mechanisms are still not understood. There is some evidence for a physical component to the signal. This paper tests the hypothesis that bioelectric or biomagnetic phenomena are involved. Human immortalized skin keratinocytes and primary expla...

  8. Bystander effect between zebrafish embryos in vivo induced by high-dose X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, V W Y; Ng, C Y P; Kobayashi, A; Konishi, T; Suya, N; Ishikawa, T; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2013-06-18

    We employed embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, for our studies on the in vivo bystander effect between embryos irradiated with high-dose X-rays and naive unirradiated embryos. The effects on the naive whole embryos were studied through quantification of apoptotic signals at 25 h post fertilization (hpf) through the terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay followed by counting the stained cells under a microscope. We report data showing that embryos at 5 hpf subjected to a 4-Gy X-ray irradiation could release a stress signal into the medium, which could induce a bystander effect in partnered naive embryos sharing the same medium. We further demonstrated that this bystander effect (induced through partnering) could be successfully suppressed through the addition of the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) into the medium but not through the addition of the CO liberator tricarbonylchloro(glycinato)ruthenium(II) (CORM-3). This shows that NO was involved in the bystander response between zebrafish embryos induced through X-ray irradiation. We also report data showing that the bystander effect could be successfully induced in naive embryos by introducing them into the irradiated embryo conditioned medium (IECM) alone, i.e., without partnering with the irradiated embryos. The IECM was harvested from the medium that had conditioned the zebrafish embryos irradiated at 5 hpf with 4-Gy X-ray until the irradiated embryos developed into 29 hpf. NO released from the irradiated embryos was unlikely to be involved in the bystander effect induced through the IECM because of the short life of NO. We further revealed that this bystander effect (induced through IECM) was rapidly abolished through diluting the IECM by a factor of 2× or greater, which agreed with the proposal that the bystander effect was an on/off response with a threshold.

  9. In vivo hypolipidemic effects and safety of low dosage Monascus powder in a hamster model of hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Yu; Wang, Jyh-Jye; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2006-05-01

    Monascus or more commonly known as red mold rice is fermented rice on which Monascus purpureus has been grown. It has been a traditional Chinese food additive for thousands of years in China. Secondary metabolite product of Monascus, monacolin K, has been proven that it could be used as an antihypercholesterolemic agent. In this study, M. purpureus NTU568 mutated and selected from a monacolin K productivity strain-M. purpureus HM105 produced high quantities of monacolin K at a level of 9,500 mg kg(-1). This research focused on the effect of adding red mold rice powder of M. purpureus NTU568 to a hamster diet on total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). In the results, the oral administration of Monascus powder in hyperlipidemia hamster was indeed proven to decrease TC, TG, and LDL-C levels. Plasma TC levels in hamster fed with Monascus powder at one-fold dosage [10.78 mg (day 100 g bw)(-1)] for 4 and 8 weeks were significantly lower (31.2 and 22.0%, respectively) than that in hyperlipidemia hamster. Plasma TG (30.1 and 17.9%) and LDL-C levels (36.0 and 20.7%) were also significantly lowered by feeding Monascus powder at one-fold dosage for 4 and 8 weeks compared to hyperlipidemia hamster. In addition, examinations of liver TC and TG levels of hyperlipidemia hamster were also performed and showed similar effects on lipid-lowering action by oral administration of Monascus powder. Since citrinin is a mycotoxin that possesses nephrotoxic and hepatoxic effects, it has a negative impact on the safety of red mold rice for people. This study examined the liver somatic index [plasma glutamyl oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamyl pyruvic transaminase (GPT) levels] and liver biopsy to investigate whether Monascus powder induced damage in liver. It was found that the plasma GOT and GPT levels were not significantly increased by feeding Monascus powder. There was no difference in the

  10. Determinants of self-reported bystander behavior in cyberbullying incidents amongst adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmet, Ann; Veldeman, Charlene; Poels, Karolien; Bastiaensens, Sara; Van Cleemput, Katrien; Vandebosch, Heidi; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2014-04-01

    This study explores behavioral determinants of self-reported cyberbullying bystander behavior from a behavioral change theoretical perspective, to provide levers for interventions. Nine focus groups were conducted with 61 young adolescents (aged 12-16 years, 52% girls). Assertive defending, reporting to others, providing advice, and seeking support were the most mentioned behaviors. Self-reported bystander behavior heavily depended on contextual factors, and should not be considered a fixed participant role. Bystanders preferred to handle cyberbullying offline and in person, and comforting the victim was considered more feasible than facing the bully. Most prevailing behavioral determinants to defend or support the victim were low moral disengagement, that the victim is an ingroup member, and that the bystander is popular. Youngsters felt they received little encouragement from their environment to perform positive bystanding behavior, since peers have a high acceptance for not defending and perceived parental support for defending behavior is largely lacking. These results suggest multilevel models for cyberbullying research, and interventions are needed. With much previous research into cyberbullying insufficiently founded in theoretical models, the employed framework of the Integrative Model and Social Cognitive Theory may inspire future studies into bystander behavior.

  11. Radiation-induced bystander effects. Mechanisms, biological implications, and current investigations at the Leipzig LIPSION facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesterreicher, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Dept. of Radiobiology and Immunology, Purkyne Military Medical Academy, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Prise, K.M.; Michael, B.D. [Gray Cancer Inst., Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Vogt, J.; Butz, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Tanner, J.M. [Clinic and Polyclinic of Radiation Oncology, Martin Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Background: The bystander effect is a relatively new area of radiobiological research, which is aimed at studying post-radiation changes in neighboring non-hit cells or tissues. The bystander effect of ionizing irradiation is important after low-dose irradiation in the range of up to 0.2 Gy, where a higher incidence of stochastic damage was observed than was expected from a linear-quadratic model. It is also important when the irradiation of a cell population is highly non-uniform. Objective: This review summarizes most of the important results and proposed bystander effect mechanisms as well as their impact on theory and clinical practice. The literature, in parts contradictory, is collected, the main topics are outlined, and some basic papers are described in more detail. In order to illustrate the microbeam technique, which is considered relevant for the bystander effect research, the state of the Leipzig LIPSION nanoprobe facility is described. Results: The existence of a radiation-induced bystander effect is now generally accepted. The current state of knowledge on it is summarized here. Several groups worldwide are working on understanding its different aspects and its impact on radiobiology and radiation protection. Conclusion: The observation of a bystander effect has posed many questions, and answering them is a challenging topic for radiobiology in the future. (orig.)

  12. The bystander effect is a novel mechanism of UVA-induced melanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, Hideki; Kumagai, Jun; Kashino, Genro; Okada, Takuya; Tano, Keizo; Watanabe, Masami

    2012-01-01

    We successfully identified the bystander effect in B16 murine melanoma cells exposed to UVA irradiation. The effect was identified based on melanogenesis following the medium transfer of the B16 cells, which had been cultured for 24 h after being exposed to UVA irradiation, to nonirradiated cells (bystander cells). Our confirmation study of the functional mechanism of bystander cells confirmed the reduced levels of mitochondrial membrane potential 1-4 h after the medium transfer. In addition, we observed increased levels of intracellular oxidation after 9-12 h, and the generation of melanin radicals, including long-lived radicals, 24 h after medium transfer. Further analysis of bystander factors revealed that the administration of EGTA treatment at the time of medium transfer led to an inhibition of melanogenesis and to neutralization of the mitochondrial membrane potential level, as well as to the restoration of intracellular oxidation levels to those of controls. The results demonstrated that the UVA irradiation bystander effect in B16 cells, as indicated by melanogenesis, was induced by the increase in intracellular oxidation due to the mitochondrial activity of calcium ions, which were among the bystander factors involved in the increase. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2011 The American Society of Photobiology.

  13. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated with byst......BACKGROUND: Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated...... with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. METHODS: We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from...... the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. RESULTS: We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised...

  14. Bystanders' responses to offline bullying and cyberbullying: The role of empathy and normative beliefs about aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machackova, Hana; Pfetsch, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Cyberbullying often takes place with the virtual presence or knowledge of bystanders. While we have some evidence about the determinants of bystanders' responses to offline bullying, we lack empirical studies concerning the variables that influence bystanders' responses to cyberbullying. The current study examines bystanders' responses to offline bullying and cyberbullying incidents. Two types of responses were captured: support toward the victims and the reinforcement of bullies' actions. Using data from 321 German adolescents (ages 12-18; M = 14.99; 44% girls), the association between bystanders' responses and normative beliefs about verbal aggression and cyberaggression, and affective and cognitive empathy, were tested in a path model. Both types of normative beliefs positively predicted the reinforcement of bullies, and normative belief about verbal aggression also predicted support for the victims of offline bullying. Both types of empathy predicted support in offline bullying, but only affective empathy predicted support in cyberbullying. There was no link between affective or cognitive empathy to the reinforcement of bullies. Moreover, bystanders' tendencies to respond supportively to the victim or to reinforce the bully were rather consistent in both cyber- and offline bullying, but there was no link between support and reinforcement. The findings are discussed with regard to implications for prevention and intervention efforts. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor inhibitors on the radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzari, Jennifer; Mersov, Anna; Smith, Richard; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2012-10-01

    To test the importance of serotonin as a signaling molecule involved in the production and response of radiation-induced bystander effects. HPV-G human keratinocyte cultures were spiked with various concentrations of Granisetron or Ketanserin and subject to either 0 Gy or 0.5 Gy X-irradiation to observe the inhibitor's effects on bystander signal production. Medium from these cultures was harvested and introduced to non- irradiated cultures of the same cell line to determine the clonogenic bystander response. Separate HPV-G cultures were set up for subsequent calcium measurements in response to irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) in the presence or absence of Granisetron in an attempt to block bystander signal response. Granisetron and Ketanserin produced a dose-dependent propagation of the bystander effect in recipient cultures. Granisetron completely abolished the characteristic calcium pulse observed when non-irradiated cultures are exposed to irradiated cell medium in the presence of this drug. Serotonin-dependent mechanisms appear to be involved in bystander signal production and response to radiation in this system.

  16. Bystander effect in glioma suicide gene therapy using bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaoyi; Gu, Chunyu; Gao, Yun; Amano, Shinji; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    An established rat intracranial glioma was successfully treated through the tumoricidal bystander effect generated by intratumoral injection of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transduced with the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene (BMSCtk cells) followed by systemic ganciclovir administration. In the present study, we tested the bystander effect of this treatment strategy when using human BMSCs as the vector cells. Human BMSCtk cells were mixed with various kinds of brain tumor cell lines (human and rat glioma cells) and examined in vitro and in vivo tumoricidal bystander effects, by co-culture study and co-implantation study in the nude mouse, respectively. A significant in vitro bystander effect was observed between human BMSCtk cells and any of the tumor cells examined in the ganciclovir-containing medium. A potent in vivo bystander effect against human and rat glioma cells was also demonstrated when ganciclovir was administered. Migratory activity of the human BMSCs toward the tumor cells was enhanced by the conditioned media obtained from both human and rat glioma cells compared to the fresh media. The results of this study have demonstrated that the bystander effect generated by BMSCtk cells and ganciclovir is not cell type-specific, suggesting that the strategy would be quite feasible for clinical use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Critical role of gap junction communication, calcium and nitric oxide signaling in bystander responses to focal photodynamic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Bianca; Ceolin, Stefano; Ceriani, Federico; Bortolozzi, Mario; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Zorzi, Veronica; Predonzani, Andrea; Bronte, Vincenzo; Molon, Barbara; Mammano, Fabio

    2015-04-30

    Ionizing and nonionizing radiation affect not only directly targeted cells but also surrounding "bystander" cells. The underlying mechanisms and therapeutic role of bystander responses remain incompletely defined. Here we show that photosentizer activation in a single cell triggers apoptosis in bystander cancer cells, which are electrically coupled by gap junction channels and support the propagation of a Ca2+ wave initiated in the irradiated cell. The latter also acts as source of nitric oxide (NO) that diffuses to bystander cells, in which NO levels are further increased by a mechanism compatible with Ca(2+)-dependent enzymatic production. We detected similar signals in tumors grown in dorsal skinfold chambers applied to live mice. Pharmacological blockade of connexin channels significantly reduced the extent of apoptosis in bystander cells, consistent with a critical role played by intercellular communication, Ca2+ and NO in the bystander effects triggered by photodynamic therapy.

  18. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Sejal [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu [Radiation System and Engineering Section, Department of Technical Support and Development, Research, Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: badrinarain@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy.

  19. Regions With Low Rates of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Have Lower Rates of CPR Training in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Janet E; Straney, Lahn; Smith, Karen; Cartledge, Susie; Case, Rosalind; Bernard, Stephen; Finn, Judith

    2017-06-05

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) more than doubles the chance of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Recent data have shown considerable regional variation in bystander CPR rates across the Australian state of Victoria. This study aims to determine whether there is associated regional variation in rates of CPR training and willingness to perform CPR in these communities. We categorized each Victorian postcode as either a low or high bystander CPR region using data on adult, bystander-witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of presumed cardiac etiology (n=7175) from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. We then surveyed adult Victorians (n=404) and compared CPR training data of the respondents from low and high bystander CPR regions. Of the 404 adults surveyed, 223 (55%) resided in regions with low bystander CPR. Compared with respondents from high bystander CPR regions, respondents residing in regions with low bystander CPR had lower rates of CPR training (62% versus 75%, P=0.009) and lower self-ratings for their overall knowledge of CPR (76% versus 84%, P=0.04). There were no differences between the regions in their reasons for not having undergone CPR training or in their willingness to perform CPR. Rates of survival for bystander-witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests were significantly lower in low bystander CPR regions (15.7% versus 17.0%, PCPR training and lower survival in regions with lower rates of bystander CPR in Victoria, Australia. Targeting these regions with CPR training programs may improve bystander CPR rates and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  20. Regions With Low Rates of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Have Lower Rates of CPR Training in Victoria, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Bray, Janet E.; Straney, Lahn; Smith, Karen; Cartledge, Susie; Case, Rosalind; Bernard, Stephen; Finn, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Background Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) more than doubles the chance of surviving an out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest. Recent data have shown considerable regional variation in bystander CPR rates across the Australian state of Victoria. This study aims to determine whether there is associated regional variation in rates of CPR training and willingness to perform CPR in these communities. Methods and Results We categorized each Victorian postcode as either a low or high bystand...

  1. A role for glucose in hypothermic hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1976-01-01

    Hypothermic hamsters at a rectal temperature of 7 C showed a fivefold increase in survival times from 20 to 100.5 hr when infused with glucose which maintained a blood level at about 45 mg/100 ml. A potential role for osmotic effects of the infusion was tested and eliminated. There was no improvement in survival of 3-O-methylglucose or dextran 40-infused animals. The fact that death eventually occurs even in the glucose-infused animal after about 4 days and that oxygen consumption undergoes a slow decrement in that period suggests that hypothermic survival is not wholly substrate limited. Radioactive tracer showed that localization of the C-14 was greatest in brain tissue and diaphragm, intermediate in heart and kidney, and lowest in skeletal muscle and liver. The significance of the label at sites important to respiration and circulation was presented.

  2. Mutation induction in synchronous hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aebersold, P.M.

    1975-11-01

    Mutagenesis of synchronous Mutahinese hamster cells by 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) shows pronounced cell cycle dependency. Resistance to 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and ouabain are induced maximally by BUdR at different times early in the DNA synthesis period, suggesting that the genes coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and the (Na/sup +/K/sup +/)-associated ATPase of the plasma membrane are replicated early in the DNA synthesis period. Although BUdR induces mutations in specific genes only when present during their replication, the rate of mutation induction is not linearly related to the amount of BUdR incorporated into DNA. The data show a BUdR concentration threshold for mutation induction, suggesting that BUdR exerts some deterimental allosteric effect on DNA synthesis enzymes.

  3. Evaluation of the Green Dot Bystander Intervention to Reduce Interpersonal Violence Among College Students Across Three Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Ann L; Fisher, Bonnie S; Bush, Heather M; Swan, Suzanne C; Williams, Corrine M; Clear, Emily R; DeGue, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that interventions to engage bystanders in violence prevention increase bystander intentions and efficacy to intervene, yet the impact of such programs on violence remains unknown. This study compared rates of violence by type among undergraduate students attending a college campus with the Green Dot bystander intervention (n = 2,768) with students at two colleges without bystander programs (n = 4,258). Violent victimization rates were significantly (p < .01) lower among students attending the campus with Green Dot relative to the two comparison campuses. Violence perpetration rates were lower among males attending the intervention campus. Implications of these results for research and practice are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Bystander Efforts and 1-Year Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N; Hansen, Steen M; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Rajan, Shahzleen; Lippert, Freddy; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Fonager, Kirsten; Jensen, Svend E; Gerds, Thomas A; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2017-05-04

    The effect of bystander interventions on long-term functional outcomes among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has not been extensively studied. We linked nationwide data on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Denmark to functional outcome data and reported the 1-year risks of anoxic brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause among patients who survived to day 30 after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed risks according to whether bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation was performed and evaluated temporal changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period. During the study period, among the 2084 patients who had cardiac arrests that were not witnessed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, the rate of bystander CPR increased from 66.7% to 80.6% (Pthe rate of bystander defibrillation increased from 2.1% to 16.8% (Pthe rate of brain damage or nursing home admission decreased from 10.0% to 7.6% (Pbystander CPR was associated with a risk of brain damage or nursing home admission that was significantly lower than that associated with no bystander resuscitation (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 0.82), as well as a lower risk of death from any cause (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.99) and a lower risk of the composite end point of brain damage, nursing home admission, or death (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.84). The risks of these outcomes were even lower among patients who received bystander defibrillation as compared with no bystander resuscitation. In our study, we found that bystander CPR and defibrillation were associated with risks of brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause that were

  5. Fasting-induced daily torpor in desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Qing-Sheng; Wan, Xin-Rong; Geiser, Fritz; Wang, De-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Daily torpor is frequently expressed in small rodents when facing energetically unfavorable ambient conditions. Desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii, ~20g) appear to be an exception as they have been described as homeothermic. However, we hypothesized that they can use torpor because we observed reversible decreases of body temperature (Tb) in fasted hamsters. To test this hypothesis we (i) randomly exposed fasted summer-acclimated hamsters to ambient temperatures (Tas) ranging from 5 to 30°C or (ii) supplied them with different rations of food at Ta 23°C. All desert hamsters showed heterothermy with the lowest mean Tb of 31.4±1.9°C (minimum, 29.0°C) and 31.8±2.0°C (minimum, 29.0°C) when fasted at Ta of 23°C and 19°C, respectively. Below Ta 19°C, the lowest Tb and metabolic rate increased and the proportion of hamsters using heterothermy declined. At Ta 5°C, nearly all hamsters remained normothermic by increasing heat production, suggesting that the heterothermy only occurs in moderately cold conditions, perhaps to avoid freezing at extremely low Tas. During heterothermy, Tbs below 31°C with metabolic rates below 25% of those during normothermia were detected in four individuals at Ta of 19°C and 23°C. Consequently, by definition, our observations confirm that fasted desert hamsters are capable of shallow daily torpor. The negative correlation between the lowest Tbs and amount of food supply shows that heterothermy was mainly triggered by food shortage. Our data indicate that summer-acclimated desert hamsters can express fasting-induced shallow daily torpor, which may be of significance for energy conservation and survival in the wild. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence for a metabolic limitation of survival in hypothermic hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt, R. L.; Anderson, G. L.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1972-01-01

    The underlying factors limiting survival in the hypothermic state are studied. Hamsters of both sexes, clipped and unclipped, were inducted into profound hypothermia by the helium cold method until they reached a temperature between 7 and 10 C. It appears that the primary cause of death is failure of respiration due to the depletion of carbohydrate energy supplies and may explain why survival time in hypothermia is shorter than the normal hibernation time of the hamster.

  7. Ocular pathological changes in hamsters experimentally infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, H I H; Ashour, D S; Abou Rayia, D M; Ali, A L

    2016-11-01

    Ocular lesions have been reported in patients with schistosomiasis; however, the problem with studying schistosomal infection of the human eye is that biopsies are almost impossible to take, and histopathological examination of suspicious lesions can only be undertaken post-mortem or after enucleation. This work aimed to study the possible effects and pathogenesis of schistosomiasis on the eye. This study involved 55 hamsters; five hamsters remained non-infected and the remaining 50 hamsters were infected with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. Infected hamsters were sacrificed on weeks 8, 12, 16 and 20 post-infection (pi). Eye sections were prepared and stained for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Histopathological changes detected in hamsters infected after 16 and 20 weeks included looseness and oedema of the innermost retinal layers together with hyperplastic polypoid growth. Neither eggs nor granulomata were detected in eye sections throughout the experimental period. Deposition of S. mansoni antigen was revealed in 35% of infected hamsters. Later, on weeks 16 and 20 pi, moderate subepithelial conjuctival deposits and marked subchoroidal and scleral deposition were detected. In conclusion, the deposition of schistosomal antigen and immune complexes may play a pivotal role in the ocular changes that occur in schistosomiasis, even in the absence of detectable Schistosoma eggs. Schistosomiasis should be suspected in cases with unexplained ophthalmological findings, especially in endemic areas.

  8. Regulation of tonic gonadotropin release in prepubertal female hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.G.; Matt, K.S.; Prestowitz, W.F.; Stetson, M.H.

    1982-04-01

    Basal serum gonadotropin levels were monitored weekly in female hamsters from birth to 10 weeks of age. Hamsters raised on three different photoperiods presented uniform pre- and postpubertal patterns of serum LH and FSH, suggesting that gonadotropin release in the young hamster occurs independently of ambient photoperiod. In all groups, serum LH levels increased gradually in animals up to 4 weeks of age, after which levels plateaued at 50--100 ng/ml. Serum FSH was markedly elevated in 2- and 3-week-old hamsters (800--1200 ng/ml), but remained at 200--400 ng/ml in all other groups. We next examined the change in the responsiveness of the pituitary to exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge. Female hamsters 2 days of age failed to respond to any dose (0.025--1000 ng) of GnRH, while 10-day old females responded in typical dose-dependent fashion. GnRH-stimulated LH release first occurred in 6-day-old hamsters and was maximal by day 9, whereas FSH release first occurred on day 8 and was maximal by day 9. The prepubertal pattern of gonadotropin release can, in part, be explained on the basis of the development of pituitary GnRH sensitivity, which occurs independently of photoperiod.

  9. Bystander first aid in trauma - prevalence and quality: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, H K; Steinvik, T; Eidissen, S-I; Gilbert, M; Wisborg, T

    2015-10-01

    Bystander first aid and basic life support can likely improve victim survival in trauma. In contrast to bystander first aid and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, little is known about the role of bystanders in trauma response. Our aim was to determine how frequently first aid is given to trauma victims by bystanders, the quality of this aid, the professional background of first-aid providers, and whether previous first-aid training affects aid quality. We conducted a prospective 18-month study in two mixed urban-rural Norwegian counties. The personnel on the first ambulance responding to trauma calls assessed and documented first aid performed by bystanders using a standard form. A total of 330 trauma calls were included, with bystanders present in 97% of cases. Securing an open airway was correctly performed for 76% of the 43 patients in need of this first-aid measure. Bleeding control was provided correctly for 81% of 63 patients for whom this measure was indicated, and prevention of hypothermia for 62% of 204 patients. Among the first-aid providers studied, 35% had some training in first aid. Bystanders with documented first-aid training gave better first aid than those where first-aid training status was unknown. A majority of the trauma patients studied received correct pre-hospital first aid, but still there is need for considerable improvement, particularly hypothermia prevention. Previous first-aid training seems to improve the quality of first aid provided. The effect on patient survival needs to be investigated. © 2015 The Authors. The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Safety of fully automatic external defibrillation by untrained lay rescuers in the presence of a bystander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmans, Tony Ph; Maquoi, Isabelle; Vogels, Catherine; Courtois, Anne-Catherine; Micheels, Jean; Lamy, Maurice; Monsieurs, Koenraad G

    2008-05-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are becoming increasingly available in public places to be used by citizens in case of cardiac arrest. Most AEDs are semi-automatic (SAEDs), but some are fully automatic (FAEDs) and there is ongoing debate and concern that they may lead to inadvertent shocks to rescuers or bystanders because the timing of the shock is not controlled by the rescuer. We therefore compared the behaviour of untrained citizens using an FAED or an SAED in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. One hundred and seventy-six laypeople were randomised to use an FAED or an SAED (Lifepak CR+, Medtronic, Redmond, USA) in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario on a manikin (Ambu, Denmark) where a bystander was touching the victim's upper arm. Each rescuer's performance was recorded on video and analysed afterwards using a modified Cardiff Score. The rescuer or the bystander was considered unsafe if either of them touched the victim during shock delivery. Eleven cases could not be analysed because of technical problems. Fifteen participants violated the protocol making further analysis impossible. Of the remaining 150 participants, 68 used the FAED and 82 used the SAED. The rescuers were safe in 97/150 (65%) cases, without a difference between FAED and SAED. The bystander was safe in 25/68 (37%) cases in the FAED group versus 19/82 (23%) in the SAED group (p=0.07). Combined safety of both rescuer and bystander was observed in 23/68 (34%) cases in the FAED group versus 15/82 (18%) in the SAED group (p=0.03). Safety was not compromised when untrained lay rescuers used an FAED compared with an SAED. The observation of overall safer behaviour by FAED users in the presence of bystanders may be related to the additional instructions provided by the FAED, and the reduced interaction of the rescuer with the bystander when using the SAED.

  11. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kobayashi, Alisa [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Maeda, Takeshi [Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Fu, Qibin [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Oikawa, Masakazu [Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yang, Gen, E-mail: gen.yang@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Konishi, Teruaki, E-mail: tkonishi@nirs.go.jp [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Uchihori, Yukio [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); and others

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Existence of radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) between cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. • Existence of significant difference in generation and response of bystander signals between CSCs and NSCCs. • CSCs are significantly less sensitive to NO scavenger than that of NSCCs in terms of DNA double strand breaks induced by RIBE. - Abstract: Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy.

  12. An extracellular DNA mediated bystander effect produced from low dose irradiated endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Malinovskaya, Elena M.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    The human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture was exposed to X-ray radiation in a low dose of 10 cGy. The fragments of extracellular genomic DNA (ecDNA{sup R}) were isolated from the culture medium after the short-term incubation. A culture medium of unirradiated endothelial cells was then supplemented with ecDNA{sup R}, followed by analysing the cells along the series of parameters (bystander effect). The exposed cells and bystander endotheliocytes showed similar response to low doses: approximation of the 1q12 loci of chromosome 1 and their transposition into the cellular nucleus, change in shape of the endotheliocytic nucleus, activation of the nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), actin polymerization, and an elevated level of DNA double-stranded breaks. Following blockade of TLR9 receptors with oligonucleotide-inhibitor or chloroquine in the bystander cells these effects - except of activation of NORs - on exposure to ecDNA{sup R} disappeared, with no bystander response thus observed. The presence of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the bystander effect being studied suggests a possibility for radiation-modified ecDNA fragments (i.e., stress signaling factors) to be released into the culture medium, whereas inhibition of TLR9 suggests the binding these ligands to the recipient cells. A similar DNA-signaling pathway in the bystander effect we previously described for human lymphocytes. Integrity of data makes it possible to suppose that a similar signaling mechanism which we demonstrated for lymphocytes (humoral system) might also be mediated in a monolayer culture of cells (cellular tissue) after the development of the bystander effect in them and transfer of stress signaling factors (ecDNA{sup R}) through the culture medium.

  13. Neutron Exposures in Human Cells: Bystander Effect and Relative Biological Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Stewart, Robert D.; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pneutrons do not induce a bystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0±0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8±2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety. PMID:24896095

  14. An extracellular DNA mediated bystander effect produced from low dose irradiated endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V; Konkova, Marina S; Kostyuk, Svetlana V; Smirnova, Tatiana D; Malinovskaya, Elena M; Efremova, Liudmila V; Veiko, Natalya N

    2011-07-01

    The human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture was exposed to X-ray radiation in a low dose of 10cGy. The fragments of extracellular genomic DNA (ecDNA(R)) were isolated from the culture medium after the short-term incubation. A culture medium of unirradiated endothelial cells was then supplemented with ecDNA(R), followed by analysing the cells along the series of parameters (bystander effect). The exposed cells and bystander endotheliocytes showed similar response to low doses: approximation of the 1q12 loci of chromosome 1 and their transposition into the cellular nucleus, change in shape of the endotheliocytic nucleus, activation of the nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), actin polymerization, and an elevated level of DNA double-stranded breaks. Following blockade of TLR9 receptors with oligonucleotide-inhibitor or chloroquine in the bystander cells these effects - except of activation of NORs - on exposure to ecDNA(R) disappeared, with no bystander response thus observed. The presence of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the bystander effect being studied suggests a possibility for radiation-modified ecDNA fragments (i.e., stress signaling factors) to be released into the culture medium, whereas inhibition of TLR9 suggests the binding these ligands to the recipient cells. A similar DNA-signaling pathway in the bystander effect we previously described for human lymphocytes. Integrity of data makes it possible to suppose that a similar signaling mechanism which we demonstrated for lymphocytes (humoral system) might also be mediated in a monolayer culture of cells (cellular tissue) after the development of the bystander effect in them and transfer of stress signaling factors (ecDNA(R)) through the culture medium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Child bystanding: A risk factor for injury and identifying its' determinants on midwestern agricultural operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Quintin L; Alexander, Bruce H; Gerberich, Susan G; Nachreiner, Nancy M; Church, Timothy R; Ryan, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture is considered among the most dangerous occupations and has consistently ranked among the top three. Production processes, associated with this occupation, place at risk not only workers but also others who live on the operations. We evaluated the incidence and determinants of associated bystander injuries in the Regional Rural Injury Study-II (RRIS-II). The RRIS-II followed 32,601 people ( approximately 85% of eligible) from rural communities in the Midwest for 1999 and 2001, using six-month recall periods, and identified their injury events. Demographic, injury, and exposure data were collected through comprehensive and case-control computer-assisted telephone interviews. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the risk of child bystanding and agricultural injury, while controlling for potentially confounding variables. Nearly 60% of all 425-child injury cases (parental beliefs, such as: child age (1.4; 1.0, 2.0) near stored equipment. Parental levels of strictness were also evaluated and showed decreased odds of bystanding when the parents were not strict about the child's wearing a seatbelt near used equipment (0.5; 0.3, 1.0). Households with only one child had decreased odds of bystanding for five of the exposures while there was an increased odds of bystanding near animals for households with five or more children. Although parents cannot child-proof their operations, it is important for them to understand the apparent odds of and risks associated with bystanding. Children can have injury odds similar to adults in this environment; therefore, it is necessary to examine parental factors that may be associated with children's likelihood of bystanding in high-risk work environments.

  16. The role of target and bystander cells in dose-response relationship of radiation-induced bystander effects in two cell lines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Mohebbi, Shokoufe

    2013-01-01

    ...). Published data on dose-response relationship of RIBE is controversial. In the present study the role of targeted and bystander cells in RIBE dose-response relationship of two cell lines have been investigated. Two cell lines (QU-DB and MRC5...

  17. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru, E-mail: wa@mbe.nifty.com [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  18. The development, measurement and implementation of a bystander intervention strategy: A field study on workplace verbal bullying in a large UK organisation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lansbury, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    This thesis addressed the bystander intervention gap in the workplace bullying literature. Bystanders are employees, other than the bully or target, who are present when bullying occurs. They are well placed to intervene but often they do not. Previous research suggested that increased bystander intervention may lead to a reduction in workplace bullying. Although suggestions for bystander intervention in workplace bullying were found in the literature none had been implemented or measured. ...

  19. Hybrid model of the radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Viviane V.B.; Faria, Fernando Pereira de; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: vitoriabraga06@gmail.com, E-mail: fernandopereirabh@gmail.com, E-mail: seg@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) refer to biological alterations in non-irradiated cells that occupy the same medium (culture or tissue) of irradiated cells. The biochemical mechanisms of the RIBE are not completely elucidated. However, several experiments indicate its existence. The objective of this work is to quantify the effect via stochastic and deterministic approaches. The hypotheses of the model are: a) one non-irradiated healthy cell interacts with signals that propagate through the medium. These signals are released by irradiated cells. At the time of interaction cell-signal, the cell can become damaged and signaling or damage and not signaling; b) Both types of damage cells repair with certain rate becoming health cells; c) The diffusion of signals obey the discrete diffusion equation with decay in two dimensions. d) The signal concentration released by irradiated cells depends on the dose in the low dose range (< 0.3 Gy) and saturates for higher dose values. As expected, the temporal analysis of the model as a function of the repair rate shows that the survival fraction decreases as the repair rate is reduced. The analysis of the extent of damage triggered by a signal concentration released by a single irradiated cell at time zero show that the damage grows with the maximum simulation time. The results show good agreement with the experimental data. The stochastic and deterministic methods used are in qualitative agreement, as expected. (author)

  20. Fungi in the cystic fibrosis lung: bystanders or pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-07-01

    Improvement to the life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) brings about novel challenges including the need for evaluation of the role of fungi in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. To determine if such organisms represent bystanders or pathogens affecting clinical outcomes we review the existing knowledge from a clinical, biochemical, inflammatory and immunological perspective. The prevalence and importance of fungi in the CF airway has likely been underestimated with the most frequently isolated filamentous fungi being Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum and the major yeast Candida albicans. Developing non-culture based microbiological methods for fungal detection has improved both our classification and understanding of their clinical consequences including localized, allergic and systemic infections. Cross-kingdom interaction between bacteria and fungi are discussed as is the role of biofilms further affecting clinical outcome. A combination of host and pathogen-derived factors determines if a particular fungus represents a commensal, colonizer or pathogen in the setting of CF. The underlying immune state, disease severity and treatment burden represent key host variables whilst fungal type, form, chronicity and virulence including the ability to evade immune recognition determines the pathogenic potential of a specific fungus at a particular point in time. Further research in this emerging field is warranted to fully elucidate the spectrum of disease conferred by the presence of fungi in the CF airway and the indications for therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Male-specific submaxillary gland protein, a lipocalin allergen of the golden hamster, differs from the lipocalin allergens of Siberian and Roborovski dwarf hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Christiane; Dubey, Ved P; Lentz, Delphine; Davril, Caroline; Revets, Dominique; Muller, Claude P; Diederich, Claire; De La Barrière, Hélène; Codreanu-Morel, Françoise; Morisset, Martine; Lehners, Christiane; De, Prabir K; Hentges, François

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of asthma cases upon exposure to hamsters and anaphylactic reactions following hamster bites are being reported, but the allergens responsible are still poorly characterized. In the Golden hamster, male-specific submaxillary gland protein (MSP), a lipocalin expressed in a sex- and tissue-specific manner in the submaxillary and lacrimal glands, is secreted in the saliva, tears and urine. The purpose of this study was to determine if MSP is an allergen, to identify IgE-reactive proteins of different hamster species and to analyse potential cross-reactivities. Fur extracts were prepared from four hamster species. Hamster-allergic patients were selected based on a history of positive IgE-test to hamster epithelium. The IgE-reactivity of patients' sera was investigated by means of immunoblot and ELISA. IgE-reactive proteins in fur extracts and the submaxillary gland were identified using anti-MSP antibodies, Edman sequencing or mass spectrometry. MSP was purified from Golden hamster and recombinant MSP was expressed in E. coli. Four patients had IgE-antibodies against 20.5-kDa and 24-kDa proteins of Golden hamster fur extract, which were identified as MSP. IgE-reactive MSP-like proteins were detected in European hamster fur extract. Three patient sera showed IgE-reactive bands at 17-21 kDa in Siberian and Roborovski hamster fur extracts. These proteins were identified as two closely related lipocalins. Immunoblot inhibition experiments showed that they are cross-reactive and are different from MSP. MSP lipocalin of the Golden hamster was identified as an allergen, and it is different from the cross-reactive lipocalin allergens of Siberian and Roborovski hamsters. Our findings highlight the need for specific tools for the in vitro and in vivo diagnosis of allergy to different hamster species. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Measurement of the bystander intervention model for bullying and sexual harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Amanda B; Aloe, Ariel M; Livingston, Jennifer A; Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2014-06-01

    Although peer bystanders can exacerbate or prevent bullying and sexual harassment, research has been hindered by the absence of a validated assessment tool to measure the process and sequential steps of the bystander intervention model. A measure was developed based on the five steps of Latané and Darley's (1970) bystander intervention model applied to bullying and sexual harassment. Confirmatory factor analysis with a sample of 562 secondary school students confirmed the five-factor structure of the measure. Structural equation modeling revealed that all the steps were influenced by the previous step in the model, as the theory proposed. In addition, the bystander intervention measure was positively correlated with empathy, attitudes toward bullying and sexual harassment, and awareness of bullying and sexual harassment facts. This measure can be used for future research and to inform intervention efforts related to the process of bystander intervention for bullying and sexual harassment. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Booze, Bars, and Bystander Behavior: People who Consumed Alcohol Help Faster in the Presence of Others.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eVan Bommel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available People help each other less often and less quickly when bystanders are present. In this paper, we propose that alcohol consumption could attenuate or reverse this so-called bystander effect. Alcohol impairs people cognitively and perceptually, leading them to think less about the presence of others and behave less inhibited. Moreover, alcohol makes people more prone to see the benefits of helping and not the costs. To provide an initial test of these lines of reasoning, we invited visitors of bars in Amsterdam to join our study at a secluded spot at the bar. We manipulated bystander presence, and at the end of the study, we measured alcohol consumption. When participants took their seats, the experimenter dropped some items. We measured how many items were picked up and how quickly participants engaged in helping. Results revealed that alcohol did not influence the bystander effect in terms of the amount of help given. But importantly, it did influence the bystander effect in terms of response times: People who consumed alcohol actually came to aid faster in the presence of others.

  4. Rescue effects in radiobiology: Unirradiated bystander cells assist irradiated cells through intercellular signal feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhao, Y. [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han, W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chiu, S.K. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Zhu, L. [Office of Admission and Careers Advisory Service, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Wu, L. [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2011-01-10

    Mammalian cells respond to ionization radiation by sending out extracellular signals to affect non-irradiated neighboring cells, which is referred to as radiation induced bystander effect. In the present paper, we described a phenomenon entitled the 'rescue effects', where the bystander cells rescued the irradiated cells through intercellular signal feedback. The effect was observed in both human primary fibroblast (NHLF) and cancer cells (HeLa) using two-cell co-culture systems. After co-culturing irradiated cells with unirradiated bystander cells for 24 h, the numbers of 53BP1 foci, corresponding to the number of DNA double-strand breaks in the irradiated cells were less than those in the irradiated cells that were not co-cultured with the bystander cells (0.78 {+-} 0.04 foci/cell vs. 0.90 {+-} 0.04 foci/cell) at a statistically significant level. Similarly, both micronucleus formation and extent of apoptosis in the irradiated cells were different at statistically significant levels if they were co-cultured with the bystander cells. Furthermore, it was found that unirradiated normal cells would also reduce the micronucleus formation in irradiated cancer cells. These results suggested that the rescue effects could participate in repairing the radiation-induced DNA damages through a media-mediated signaling feedback, thereby mitigating the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of ionizing radiation.

  5. Disparities in Survival with Bystander CPR following Cardiopulmonary Arrest Based on Neighborhood Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Thakkar Rivera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Heart Association reports the annual incidence of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests (OHCA is greater than 300,000 with a survival rate of 9.5%. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR saves one life for every 30, with a 10% decrease in survival associated with every minute of delay in CPR initiation. Bystander CPR and training vary widely by region. We conducted a retrospective study of 320 persons who suffered OHCA in South Florida over 25 months. Increased survival, overall and with bystander CPR, was seen with increasing income (p=0.05, with a stronger disparity between low- and high-income neighborhoods (p=0.01 and p=0.03, resp.. Survival with bystander CPR was statistically greater in white- versus black-predominant neighborhoods (p=0.04. Increased survival, overall and with bystander CPR, was seen with high- versus low-education neighborhoods (p=0.03. Neighborhoods with more high school age persons displayed the lowest survival. We discovered a significant disparity in OHCA survival within neighborhoods of low-income, black-predominance, and low-education. Reduced survival was seen in neighborhoods with larger populations of high school students. This group is a potential target for training, and instruction can conceivably change survival outcomes in these neighborhoods, closing the gap, thus improving survival for all.

  6. Caspase-3-independent pathways proceeding in bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Juqiang; Ma, Yan; Zeng, Shaoqun; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-02-01

    HSV-tk/GCV system, which is the virus-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy of herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (tk) gene / the anti-viral reagent ganciclovir (GCV), is one of the promising approaches in the rapidly growing area of gene therapy. As gene therapy of cancer such as suicide gene therapy has entered the clinic, another therapy effect which is called 'bystander effect' was reported. Bystander effect can lead to killing of non-transduced tumor cells in the immediate vicinity of GCV-treated HSV-TK-positive cells. Now the magnitude of 'bystander effect' is an essential factor for this anti-tumor approach in vivo. However, the mechanism which HSV-tk/ACV brings "bystander effect" is poorly understood. In this study, we monitor the activation of caspase-3 in HSV-tk/GCV system by a FRET probe CD3, a FRET-based indicator for activity of caspase3, which is composed of an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein, a caspase-sensitive linker, and a red fluorescent protein from Discosoma with efficient maturation property. Through application of CD3 we have visualized the activation of caspase-3 in tk gene positive human adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC-M) cells but not in bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system induced by GCV. This finding provides needed information for understanding the mechanisms by which suicide gene approaches actually kill cancer cells, and may prove to be helpful for the clinical treatment of cancers.

  7. Bystander-initiated CPR in an Asian metropolitan: Does the socioeconomic status matter?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Chu; Ko, Patrick Chow-In; Chang, Anna Marie; Chen, Wei-Ting; Liu, Sot Shih-Hung; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Shey-Ying; Lin, Chien-Hao; Cheng, Ming-Tai; Chong, Kah-Meng; Wang, Hui-Chih; Yang, Chih-Wei; Liao, Mao-Wei; Wang, Chen-Hsiung; Chien, Yu-Chun; Lin, Chi-Hung; Liu, Yueh-Ping; Lee, Bin-Chou; Chien, Kuo-Long; Lai, Mei-Shu; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) with bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and patient outcomes of out of hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) in an Asian metropolitan area. Methods We performed a retrospective study in a prospectively collected cohort from the Utstein registry of adult non-traumatic OHCAs in Taipei, Taiwan. Average real estate value was assessed as the first proxy of SES. Twelve administrative districts in Taipei City were categorized into low versus high SES areas to test the association. The primary outcome was bystander-initiated CPR, and the secondary outcome was patient survival status. Factors associated with bystander-initiated CPR were adjusted for in multivariate analysis. The mean household income was assessed as the second proxy of SES to validate the association. Results From January 1, 2008 to December 30, 2009, 3573 OHCAs received prehospital resuscitation in the community. Among these, 617 (17.3%) cases received bystander CPR. The proportion of bystander CPR in low-SES vs. high-SES areas was 14.5% vs. 19.6% (p CPR in low-SES areas was 0.72 (95% confidence interval: [0.60–0.88]) after adjusting for age, gender, witnessed status, public collapse, and OHCA unrecognized by the online dispatcher. Survival to discharge rate was significantly lower in low-SES areas vs. high-SES areas (4.3% vs. 6.8%; p CPR, and demonstrated worse survival outcomes. PMID:24056397

  8. Investigation of modification X-ray induced bystander effect in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetun, O V; Talan, O O

    2014-09-01

    Objective - to investigate the modification of bystander effect induced by X-irradiation of human peripheral blood in vitro by application of antioxidant vitamin medication. Material and methods. Modeling of radiation-induced bystander effect in vitro in mixed lymphocyte cultures exposed to dose of 1 Gy and non-irradiated blood lymphocytes of persons of different sexes, GTG-staining of metaphase chromosomes and their cytogenetic analysis; application of antioxidant preparation (soluble forms of vitamins E, C and A) in concentration 40 μg/ml. Results. Under the introduction of antioxidant preparation into mixed culture before lymphocytes cultivation frequency of chromosomal aberrations in bystander cells did not significantly different from the control (p > 0.05). application of antioxidant preparation modifies the radiation-induced bystander effect in unirradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes under their joint cultivation with lymphocytes irradiated in dose of 1 Gy. Antioxidant prevents the development of secondary oxidative stress in unirradiated cells, eliminates the development in them of radiation-induced bystander effect and ensures the preservation of stability of their chromosome apparatus. O. V. Shemetun, O. O. Talan.

  9. Bystander effects and compartmental stress response to X-ray irradiation in L929 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temelie, Mihaela; Stroe, Daniela; Petcu, Ileana; Mustaciosu, Cosmin; Moisoi, Nicoleta; Savu, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Bystander effects are indirect consequences of radiation and many other stress factors. They occur in cells that are not directly exposed to these factors, but receive signals from affected cells either by gap junctions or by molecules released in the medium. Characterizing these effects and deciphering the underlying mechanisms involved in radiation-induced bystander effects are relevant for cancer radiotherapy and radioprotection. At doses of X-ray radiation 0.5 and 1 Gy, we detected bystander effects as increased numbers of micronuclei shortly after the treatment, through medium transfer and by co-cultures. Interestingly, bystander cells did not exhibit long-term adverse changes in viability. Evaluation of several compartmental stress markers (CHOP, BiP, mtHsp60, cytHsp70) by qRT-PCR did not reveal expression changes at transcriptional level. We investigated the involvement of ROS and NO in this process by addition of specific scavengers of these molecules, DMSO or c-PTIO in the transferred medium. This approach proved that ROS but not NO is involved in the induction of lesions in the acceptor cells. These results indicate that L929 cells are susceptible to stress effects of radiation-induced bystander signaling.

  10. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Kobayashi, Alisa; Maeda, Takeshi; Fu, Qibin; Oikawa, Masakazu; Yang, Gen; Konishi, Teruaki; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K; Wang, Yugang

    2015-03-01

    Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of nitric oxide in the radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Vasily A

    2015-12-01

    Cells that are not irradiated but are affected by "stress signal factors" released from irradiated cells are called bystander cells. These cells, as well as directly irradiated ones, express DNA damage-related proteins and display excess DNA damage, chromosome aberrations, mutations, and malignant transformation. This phenomenon has been studied widely in the past 20 years, since its first description by Nagasawa and Little in 1992, and is known as the radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Several factors have been identified as playing a role in the bystander response. This review will focus on one of them, nitric oxide (NO), and its role in the stimulation and propagation of RIBE. The hydrophobic properties of NO, which permit its diffusion through the cytoplasm and plasma membranes, allow this signaling molecule to easily spread from irradiated cells to bystander cells without the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication. NO produced in irradiated tissues mediates cellular regulation through posttranslational modification of a number of regulatory proteins. The best studied of these modifications are S-nitrosylation (reversible oxidation of cysteine) and tyrosine nitration. These modifications can up- or down-regulate the functions of many proteins modulating different NO-dependent effects. These NO-dependent effects include the stimulation of genomic instability (GI) and the accumulation of DNA errors in bystander cells without direct DNA damage. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Extracellular vesicles released following heat stress induce bystander effect in unstressed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewicke-Copley, Findlay; Mulcahy, Laura Ann; Jacobs, Laura Ann; Samuel, Priya; Akbar, Naveed; Pink, Ryan Charles; Carter, David Raul Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Cells naïve to stress can display the effects of stress, such as DNA damage and apoptosis, when they are exposed to signals from stressed cells; this phenomenon is known as the bystander effect. We previously showed that bystander effect induced by ionising radiation are mediated by extracellular vesicles (EVs). Bystander effect can also be induced by other types of stress, including heat shock, but it is unclear whether EVs are involved. Here we show that EVs released from heat shocked cells are also able to induce bystander damage in unstressed populations. Naïve cells treated with media conditioned by heat shocked cells showed higher levels of DNA damage and apoptosis than cells treated with media from control cells. Treating naïve cells with EVs derived from media conditioned by heat shocked cells also induced a bystander effect when compared to control, with DNA damage and apoptosis increasing whilst the level of cell viability was reduced. We demonstrate that treatment of naïve cells with heat shocked cell-derived EVs leads to greater invasiveness in a trans-well Matrigel assay. Finally, we show that naïve cells treated with EVs from heat-shocked cells are more likely to survive a subsequent heat shock, suggesting that these EVs mediate an adaptive response. We propose that EVs released following stress mediate an intercellular response that leads to apparent stress in neighbouring cells but also greater robustness in the face of a subsequent insult.

  13. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE®) antibody constructs can mediate bystander tumor cell killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sandra L.; Sherman, Marika; McElroy, Patricia L.; Lofgren, Julie A.; Moody, Gordon; Baeuerle, Patrick A.; Coxon, Angela

    2017-01-01

    For targets that are homogenously expressed, such as CD19 on cells of the B lymphocyte lineage, immunotherapies can be highly effective. Targeting CD19 with blinatumomab, a CD19/CD3 bispecific antibody construct (BiTE®), or with chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T) has shown great promise for treating certain CD19-positive hematological malignancies. In contrast, solid tumors with heterogeneous expression of the tumor-associated antigen (TAA) may present a challenge for targeted therapies. To prevent escape of TAA-negative cancer cells, immunotherapies with a local bystander effect would be beneficial. As a model to investigate BiTE®-mediated bystander killing in the solid tumor setting, we used epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a target. We measured lysis of EGFR-negative populations in vitro and in vivo when co-cultured with EGFR-positive cells, human T cells and an EGFR/CD3 BiTE® antibody construct. Bystander EGFR-negative cells were efficiently lysed by BiTE®-activated T cells only when proximal to EGFR-positive cells. Our mechanistic analysis suggests that cytokines released by BiTE®-activated T-cells induced upregulation of ICAM-1 and FAS on EGFR-negative bystander cells, contributing to T cell-induced bystander cell lysis. PMID:28837681

  14. A reaction-diffusion model for radiation-induced bystander effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olobatuyi, Oluwole; de Vries, Gerda; Hillen, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We develop and analyze a reaction-diffusion model to investigate the dynamics of the lifespan of a bystander signal emitted when cells are exposed to radiation. Experimental studies by Mothersill and Seymour 1997, using malignant epithelial cell lines, found that an emitted bystander signal can still cause bystander effects in cells even 60 h after its emission. Several other experiments have also shown that the signal can persist for months and even years. Also, bystander effects have been hypothesized as one of the factors responsible for the phenomenon of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and increased radioresistance (HRS/IRR). Here, we confirm this hypothesis with a mathematical model, which we fit to Joiner's data on HRS/IRR in a T98G glioma cell line. Furthermore, we use phase plane analysis to understand the full dynamics of the signal's lifespan. We find that both single and multiple radiation exposure can lead to bystander signals that either persist temporarily or permanently. We also found that, in an heterogeneous environment, the size of the domain exposed to radiation and the number of radiation exposures can determine whether a signal will persist temporarily or permanently. Finally, we use sensitivity analysis to identify those cell parameters that affect the signal's lifespan and the signal-induced cell death the most.

  15. Copulatory and agonistic behavior in Syrian hamsters following social defeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffress, Elizabeth C; Huhman, Kim L

    2013-01-01

    Syrian hamsters are highly aggressive animals that reliably defend their home territory. After social defeat, however, hamsters no longer defend their home cage but instead display submissive and defensive behavior toward an intruder, a response that we have termed conditioned defeat. Plasma testosterone is significantly reduced in Syrian hamsters following repeated defeat suggesting that social defeat might also impair copulatory behavior. The present study aimed to determine whether copulatory behavior in male Syrian hamsters is suppressed following repeated social defeats and additionally whether exposure to a hormone-primed stimulus female after social defeat reduces the behavioral response to defeat. Hamsters were paired with an aggressive opponent for one or nine defeats using a resident-intruder model, while controls were placed into the empty cage of a resident aggressor. On the day after the last treatment, half of the hamsters were paired with a receptive female for 10 min. There were no significant differences in the copulatory behavior of defeated versus non-defeated hamsters, and the opportunity to copulate had no effect on subsequent conditioned defeat testing, as defeated animals displayed significantly more submissive behavior than did non-defeated animals. The current data suggest that conditioned defeat is not necessarily a maladaptive response to social stress, at least in terms of reproductive behavior, but may instead represent a viable behavioral strategy adopted by losing animals following social defeat. Further, these data indicate that conditioned defeat is relatively persistent and stable, as the opportunity to copulate does not reduce the subsequent display of submissive behavior. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dietary fiber improves lipid homeostasis and modulates adipocytokines in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shao-Ching; Bartley, Glenn; Young, Scott Andrew; Albers, David Robert; Dielman, Demetrius Richard; Anderson, William Henry Kerr; Yokoyama, Wallace

    2009-09-01

    The hypocholesterolemic and hypoglycemic effects of various natural and semisynthetic dietary fibers have been studied for their potential use in the prevention and improvement of metabolic syndrome. Of these dietary fibers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) has been shown to lower plasma cholesterol and reduce weight gain. However, the underlying mechanisms are not known. In the present study, we examined associations between plasma adipocytokine levels and both lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity after HPMC intake in golden Syrian hamsters. In addition, endogenous adiponectin from hamster plasma was purified and characterized. Hamsters were treated with HPMC (2% and 4% in a high-fat diet) or 2% or 4% microcrystalline cellulose (MCC; control diet) for 8 weeks. Plasma glucose, insulin, lipids, adiponectin, leptin, and hepatic lipid levels were assessed using standard techniques. After 8 weeks of feeding, plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride levels in hamsters fed the 4% HPMC-supplemented diet were significantly lower than in hamsters fed the control diet. Moreover, a significant increase in adiponectin levels and a decrease in leptin levels were observed in hamsters fed the 4% HPMC-supplemented diet. Hamster adiponectin was found to be comprised of 244 amino acid residues with an apparent molecular weight of 30 kDa, consistent with the adiponectin reported in other species. Reductions in plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels were correlated with a decrease in plasma leptin and an increase in adiponectin. These results suggest that adipocytokines are regulated by HPMC and may play a pivotal role in the hypocholesterolemic effect. © 2009 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. A Longitudinal Study of the Associations between Moral Disengagement and Active Defending versus Passive Bystanding during Bullying Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doramajian, Caroline; Bukowski, William M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective association between moral disengagement and bystander behaviors in bullying situations, including both defending and passive bystanding. A diverse sample of Canadian school children (N = 130; 68 boys and 62 girls; mean age = 11.36 years) participated in a three-wave longitudinal study over a 4-month period.…

  18. Bystander Effect Induced by Electroporation is Possibly Mediated by Microvesicles and Dependent on Pulse Amplitude, Repetition Frequency and Cell Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevc, Ajda; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Cemazar, Maja; Kloboves-Prevodnik, Veronika; Stimac, Monika; Todorovic, Vesna; Strojan, Primoz; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-10-01

    Bystander effect, a known phenomenon in radiation biology, where irradiated cells release signals which cause damage to nearby, unirradiated cells, has not been explored in electroporated cells yet. Therefore, our aim was to determine whether bystander effect is present in electroporated melanoma cells in vitro, by determining viability of non-electroporated cells exposed to medium from electroporated cells and by the release of microvesicles as potential indicators of the bystander effect. Here, we demonstrated that electroporation of cells induces bystander effect: Cells exposed to electric pulses mediated their damage to the non-electroporated cells, thus decreasing cell viability. We have shown that shedding microvesicles may be one of the ways used by the cells to mediate the death signals to the neighboring cells. The murine melanoma B16F1 cell line was found to be more electrosensitive and thus more prone to bystander effect than the canine melanoma CMeC-1 cell line. In B16F1 cell line, bystander effect was present above the level of electropermeabilization of the cells, with the threshold at 800 V/cm. Furthermore, with increasing electric field intensities and the number of pulses, the bystander effect also increased. In conclusion, electroporation can induce bystander effect which may be mediated by microvesicles, and depends on pulse amplitude, repetition frequency and cell type.

  19. Impact of Co-Culturing with Fractionated Carbon-Ion-Irradiated Cancer Cells on Bystander Normal Cells and Their Progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; Liu, Cuihua; Konishi, Teruaki

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biological effects of fractionated doses versus a single dose of high-LET carbon ions in bystander normal cells, and determine the effect on their progeny using the layered tissue co-culture system. Briefly, confluent human glioblastoma (T98G) cells received a single dose of 6 Gy or three daily doses of 2 Gy carbon ions, which were then seeded on top of an insert with bystander normal skin fibroblasts (NB1RGB) growing underneath. Cells were co-cultured for 6 h or allowed to grow for 20 population doublings, then harvested and assayed for different end points. A single dose of carbon ions resulted in less damage in bystander normal NB1RGB cells than the fractionated doses. In contrast, the progeny of bystander NB1RGB cells co-cultured with T98G cells exposed to fractionated doses showed less damage than progeny from bystander cells co-cultured with single dose glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, inhibition of gap junction communication demonstrated its involvement in the stressful effects in bystander cells and their progeny. These results indicate that dose fractionation reduced the late effect of carbon-ion exposure in the progeny of bystander cells compared to the effect in the initial bystander cells.

  20. Efficient Gene Targeting in Golden Syrian Hamsters by the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiqiang Fan; Wei Li; Sang R Lee; Qinggang Meng; Bi Shi; Bunch, Thomas D.; Kenneth L White; Il-Keun Kong; Zhongde Wang

    2014-01-01

    The golden Syrian hamster is the model of choice or the only rodent model for studying many human diseases. However, the lack of gene targeting tools in hamsters severely limits their use in biomedical research. Here, we report the first successful application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to efficiently conduct gene targeting in hamsters. We designed five synthetic single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs)--three for targeting the coding sequences for different functional domains of the hamster STAT2 protein, ...

  1. Role of caloric homeostasis and reward in alcohol intake in Syrian golden hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Gulick, Danielle; Green, Alan I.

    2010-01-01

    The Syrian golden hamster drinks alcohol readily, but only achieves moderate blood alcohol levels, and does not go through withdrawal from alcohol. Because the hamster is a model of caloric homeostasis, both caloric content and reward value may contribute to the hamster’s alcohol consumption. The current study examines alcohol consumption in the hamster when a caloric or non-caloric sweet solution is concurrently available and caloric intake in the hamster before, during, and after exposure t...

  2. The Syrian hamster model of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronetz, David; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz; Hooper, Jay W.

    2012-01-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a relatively rare, but frequently fatal disease associated with New World hantaviruses, most commonly Sin Nombre and Andes viruses in North and South America, respectively. It is characterized by fever and the sudden, rapid onset of severe respiratory distress and cardiogenic shock, which can be fatal in up to 50% of cases. Currently there are no approved antiviral therapies or vaccines for the treatment or prevention of HPS. A major obstacle in the development of effective medical countermeasures against highly pathogenic agents like the hantaviruses is recapitulating the human disease as closely as possible in an appropriate and reliable animal model. To date, the only animal model that resembles HPS in humans is the Syrian hamster model. Following infection with Andes virus, hamsters develop HPS-like disease which faithfully mimics the human condition with respect to incubation period and pathophysiology of disease. Perhaps most importantly, the sudden and rapid onset of severe respiratory distress observed in humans also occurs in hamsters. The last several years has seen an increase in studies utilizing the Andes virus hamster model which have provided unique insight into HPS pathogenesis as well as potential therapeutic and vaccine strategies to treat and prevent HPS. The purpose of this article is to review the current understanding of HPS disease progression in Syrian hamsters and discuss the suitability of utilizing this model to evaluate potential medical countermeasures against HPS. PMID:22705798

  3. Social context modulates food hoarding in Syrian hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana Montoya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the presence of a con-specific in the temporal organization of food hoarding was studied in two varieties of Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus: golden and long-haired. Four male hamsters of each variety were used. Their foraging behavior was observed during four individual and four shared trials in which animals were not competing for the same food source or territory. During individual trials, long-haired hamsters consumed food items directly from the food source, transporting and hoarding only remaining pieces. During shared trials, the long-haired variety hoarded food items before consumption, and increased the duration of hoarding trips, food handling in the storage, and cache size. Golden hamsters maintained the same temporal organization of hoarding behavior (i.e., hoarding food items before consumption throughout both individual and shared trials. However, the golden variety increased handling time at the food source and decreased the duration of hoarding trips, the latency of hoarding and storing size throughout the shared trials. In Syrian hamsters, the presence of a con-specific may signal high probability of food source depletion suggesting that social pressures over food availability might facilitate hoarding behavior. Further studies are required to evaluate cost-benefit balance of food hoarding and the role of cache pilferage in this species.

  4. Regulation of lipid metabolism by obeticholic acid in hyperlipidemic hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bin; Young, Mark; Liu, Xueqing; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2017-02-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays critical roles in plasma cholesterol metabolism, in particular HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) homeostasis. Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a FXR agonist being developed for treating various chronic liver diseases. Previous studies reported inconsistent effects of OCA on regulating plasma cholesterol levels in different animal models and in different patient populations. The mechanisms underlying its divergent effects have not yet been thoroughly investigated. The scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) is a FXR-modulated gene and the major receptor for HDL-C. We investigated the effects of OCA on hepatic SR-BI expression and correlated such effects with plasma HDL-C levels and hepatic cholesterol efflux in hyperlipidemic hamsters. We demonstrated that OCA induced a time-dependent reduction in serum HDL-C levels after 14 days of treatment, which was accompanied by a significant reduction of liver cholesterol content and increases in fecal cholesterol in OCA-treated hamsters. Importantly, hepatic SR-BI mRNA and protein levels in hamsters were increased to 1.9- and 1.8-fold of control by OCA treatment. Further investigations in normolipidemic hamsters did not reveal OCA-induced changes in serum HDL-C levels or hepatic SR-BI expression. We conclude that OCA reduces plasma HDL-C levels and promotes transhepatic cholesterol efflux in hyperlipidemic hamsters via a mechanism involving upregulation of hepatic SR-BI.

  5. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Munson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ- deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology.

  6. Pineal melatonin synthesis in Syrian hamsters: A summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollag, M. D.

    1982-12-01

    During the past decade there has been ample documentation of the proposition that the pineal gland mediates photoperiodic influences upon reproductive behavior of hamsters. It is commonly hypothesized that the pineal gland expresses its activity by transformation of photoperiodic information into an hormonal output, that hormone being melatonin. If this hypothesis is correct, there must be some essential diffrence in melatonin's output when hamsters are exposed to different photoperiodic environments. The experiments summarized in this communication analyze pineal melatonin contents in Syrian hamsters maintained in a variety of photoperiodic conditions during different physiological states. The results demonstrate that adult hamsters have a daily surge in pineal melatonin content throughout their lifetime when exposed to simulated annual photoperiodic cycles. There is some fluctuation in the amount of pineal melatonin produced during different physiological states and photoperiodic environments, but these fluctuations seem small when compared to those normally found for other regulatory hormones. When hamsters are exposed to different photoperiodic regimens, the daily melatonin surge maintains a relatively constant phase relationship with respect to the onset of daily activity. There is a concomitant change in its phase relationship with respect to light-dark transitions.

  7. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  8. Mobilizing bystanders of cyberbullying: an exploratory study into behavioural determinants of defending the victim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Ann; Bastiaensens, Sara; Van Cleemput, Katrien; Poels, Karolien; Vandebosch, Heidi; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2012-01-01

    This study explores behavioural determinants of defending behaviour in cyberbullying incidents. Three focus groups were conducted with youngsters aged 12-16 y. Major themes that were found as important behavioural determinants to defend the victim were a low moral disengagement, that the victim is an in-group member and that the bystander is popular. Bystanders preferred to handle cyberbullying offline and in person, and comforting the victim was considered more feasible than facing the bully. With a high peer acceptance of passive bystanding and lack of parental support for defending behaviour, youngsters do not receive much encouragement from their environment to exhibit defending behaviour towards victims. These preliminary results suggest befriending and peer support interventions hold promise, as well as environmental interventions with parents and teachers. These first results will need to be confirmed in more in-depth analyses and in quantitative research.

  9. Using Role-Taking and Behavioral Mimicking in Games to Increase Awareness on the Bystander Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard Andersen, Josephine; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a concept on how a serious game might raise awareness of the bystander effect by using elements of game theory as well as a few psychological terms. The paper summarizes the theories and concludes with the description of a concept, which is a third person role playing game...... with behavioral mimicking. The game concept should include a relatable (preferably player modifiable) avatar, so the player can relate and adhere to the empathy and intent to help. Since the bystander effect takes place in groups where deindividuation also is common, this should require a behavioral change...... of this particular group’s norms. However, groups (especially of friends) can aid as support in case there is need for intervention as opposed to being passive bystanders....

  10. Effect of bystander CPR initiation prior to the emergency call on ROSC and 30day survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Palsgaard Møller, Thea; Kjær Ersbøll, Annette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed at evaluating if time for initiation of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) - prior to the emergency call (CPRprior) versus during the emergency call following dispatcher-assisted CPR (CPRduring) - was associated with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC...... and corresponding emergency calls were evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to evaluate the association between time for initiation of bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of CPRprior. RESULTS: The study...... included 548 emergency calls for OHCA patients receiving bystander CPR, 34.9% (n=191) in the CPRprior group and 65.1% (n=357) in the CPRduring group. Multivariable analyses showed no difference in ROSC (OR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.56-1.38) or 30-day survival (OR=1.14, 95% CI: 0.68-1.92) between CPRprior...

  11. Modeling of radiation-induced bystander effect using Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Junchao; Liu, Liteng; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-03-01

    Experiments showed that the radiation-induced bystander effect exists in cells, or tissues, or even biological organisms when irradiated with energetic ions or X-rays. In this paper, a Monte Carlo model is developed to study the mechanisms of bystander effect under the cells sparsely populated conditions. This model, based on our previous experiment which made the cells sparsely located in a round dish, focuses mainly on the spatial characteristics. The simulation results successfully reach the agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, other bystander effect experiment is also computed by this model and finally the model succeeds in predicting the results. The comparison of simulations with the experimental results indicates the feasibility of the model and the validity of some vital mechanisms assumed.

  12. Bystander Efforts and 1-Year Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of bystander interventions on long-term functional outcomes among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has not been extensively studied. METHODS: We linked nationwide data on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Denmark to functional outcome data and reported the 1-year...... risks of anoxic brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause among patients who survived to day 30 after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed risks according to whether bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation was performed and evaluated temporal...... changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. RESULTS: Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period...

  13. Bystander Automated External Defibrillator Use and Clinical Outcomes after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Mathias J; Vognsen, Mikael; Andersen, Mikkel S

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review studies comparing bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use to no AED use in regard to clinical outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and to provide a descriptive summary of studies on the cost-effectiveness of bystander AED use. METHODS: We.......79]) and favorable neurological outcome (all rhythms OR: 2.12 [95%CI: 1.36, 3.29], shockable rhythms OR: 2.37 [95%CI: 1.58, 3.57]). There was no association between bystander AED use and neurological outcome for non-shockable rhythms (OR: 0.76 [95%CI: 0.10, 5.87]). The Public-Access Defibrillation trial found higher...

  14. 9 CFR 3.36 - Primary enclosures used to transport live guinea pigs and hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... live guinea pigs and hamsters. 3.36 Section 3.36 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH..., Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Guinea Pigs and Hamsters Transportation Standards § 3.36 Primary enclosures used to transport live guinea pigs and hamsters. No person subject to the Animal Welfare...

  15. "Please. Don't. Die.": A Grounded Theory Study of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausz, Justin; Snobelen, Paul; Tavares, Walter

    2018-02-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important determinant of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet rates of bystander CPR are highly variable. In an effort to promote bystander CPR, the procedure has been streamlined, and ultrashort teaching modalities have been introduced. CPR has been increasingly reconceptualized as simple, safe, and easy to perform; however, current methods of CPR instruction may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the various logistical, conceptual, and emotional challenges of resuscitating a victim of cardiac arrest. We adopted a constructivist grounded theory methodology to qualitatively explore bystander CPR and invited lay rescuers who had recently (ie, within 1 week) intervened in an OHCA to participate in semistructured interviews and focus groups. We used constant comparative analysis until theoretical saturation to derive a midrange explanatory theory of bystander CPR. We constructed a 3-stage theoretical model describing a common experiential process for lay rescuer intervention in OHCA: Being called to act is disturbing, causing panic, shock, and disbelief that must ultimately be overcome. Taking action to save the victim is complicated by several misconceptions about cardiac arrest, where victims are mistakenly believed to be choking, and agonal respirations are misinterpreted to mean the victim is alive. Making sense of the experience is challenging, at least in the short term, where lay rescuers have to contend with self-doubt, unanswered questions, and uncomfortable emotional reactions to a traumatic event. Our study suggests that current CPR training programs may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the reality of an OHCA and identifies several key knowledge gaps that should be addressed. The long-term psychological consequences of bystander intervention in OHCA remain poorly understood and warrant further study. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Neutrons do not produce a bystander effect in zebrafish irradiated in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu; Smith, Richard W; Duhig, John; Prestwich, William V; Byun, Soo H; McNeill, Fiona E; Seymour, Colin B; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2011-09-01

    Neutron irradiations at the McMaster Tandetron Accelerator were performed to study direct and bystander effects of neutrons in a live organism. The neutrons were produced through (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction. Although the gamma contamination of the neutron beam cannot be completely eliminated, it was designed to be as low as possible and remain below a threshold already established for bystander effects. Microdosimetric methods using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter have been used to measure the neutron and gamma doses for the cell irradiation. Previous data for a cell line exposed in vitro suggested that neutrons did not produce bystander effects at doses below 300 mGy. The current experiments sought to confirm this using a live whole organism (zebrafish) where tissue samples harvested 2 h after exposure were examined for direct evidence of apoptosis and tested for secretion of bystander factors using an established bioassay. Fish were either exposed directly to the beam or were allowed to swim with or in water previously occupied by irradiated fish. Using the zebrafish model it was found that there was significant direct cell death seen both by apoptosis scores and clonogenic assay when the neutron dose was approximately 100 mGy. An equivalent dose of gamma rays produced a more toxic effect. It was further found that neutrons did not induce a bystander effect in fish receiving signals from irradiated fish. The results confirm in vitro experiments which suggest neutrons do not induce bystander signaling. In fact they may suppress gamma induced signaling suggesting a possible intriguing new and as yet unclear mechanism.

  17. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Stewart, Robert D; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  18. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  19. Damage of chromosoms under irradiation of human blood lymphocytes and development of bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetun, O V

    2016-12-01

    the research the distribution of radiation induced damages among chromosomes and their bands in irra diated in vitro human blood lymphocytes and in unirradiated bystander cells.Material and methods of research: cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by semi micromethod D.A. Hungerford, modeling of radiation induced bystander effect in mixed cultures consisting of irradiated in vitro and non irradiated blood lymphocytes from persons of different gender, GTG staining of metaphase chromosomes and their cytogenetic analysis. Break points in chromosomes under the formation of aberrations were identified in exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes in doses 0.25 Gy (95 breaks in 1248 cells) and 1.0 Gy (227 breaks in 726 cells) and in non irradiated bystander cells under their joint cultivation with irradiated in vitro human lymphocytes (51 breaks in 1137 cells at irradiation of adjacent populations of lymphocytes in dose 0.25 Gy and 75 breaks in 1321 cells at irradiation of adjacent population of lymphocytes in a dose 1.0 Gy). The distribution of injuries among the chromo somes and their bands was investigated. in radiation exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in bystander cells the fre quency of damaged bands and number of breaks which localized in them exceeded the control value (p bystander effect, chromosomes were damaged according to their relative length. Location of bands with increasing number of breaks coincided with the «hot spots» of chromosome damage following irradiation and fragile sites. More sensitive to damage were G negative euchromatin chromosome bands, in which were localized 82 88 % breaks. Damageability of telomeric regions in the irradiated cells had no significant difference from the control, while in bystander cells was lower than control value (p < 0.05). O. V. Shemetun.

  20. TGF beta secreted by B16 melanoma antagonizes cancer gene immunotherapy bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penafuerte, Claudia; Galipeau, Jacques

    2008-08-01

    Tumor-targeted delivery of immune stimulatory genes, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and suicide genes, has shown to cure mouse models of cancer. Total tumor eradication was also found to occur despite subtotal tumor engineering; a phenomenon coined the "bystander effect". The bystander effect in immune competent animals arises mostly from recruitment of a cancer lytic cell-mediated immune response to local and distant tumor cells which escaped gene modification. We have previously described a Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and Interleukin 2 (IL2) fusokine (aka GIFT2) which serves as a potent anticancer cytokine and it here served as a means to understand the mechanistic underpinnings to the immune bystander effect in an immune competent model of B16 melanoma. As expected, we observed that GIFT2 secreted by genetically engineered B16 tumor cells induces a bystander effect on non modified B16 cells, when admixed in a 1:1 ratio. However, despite keeping the 1:1 ratio constant, the immune bystander effect was completely lost as the total B16 cell number was increased from 10(4) to 10(6) which correlated with a sharp reduction in the number of tumor-infiltrating NK cells. We found that B16 secrete biologically active TGFbeta which in turn inhibited GIFT2 dependent immune cell proliferation in vitro and downregulated IL-2R beta expression and IFN gamma secretion by NK cells. In vivo blockade of B16 originating TGFbeta significantly improved the immune bystander effect arising from GIFT2. We propose that cancer gene immunotherapy of pre-established tumors will be enhanced by blockade of tumor-derived TGFbeta.

  1. Bystander Host Cell Killing Effects of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Shrestha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE binds to claudin receptors, e.g., claudin-4, and then forms a pore that triggers cell death. Pure cultures of host cells that do not express claudin receptors, e.g., fibroblasts, are unaffected by pathophysiologically relevant CPE concentrations in vitro. However, both CPE-insensitive and CPE-sensitive host cells are present in vivo. Therefore, this study tested whether CPE treatment might affect fibroblasts when cocultured with CPE-sensitive claudin-4 fibroblast transfectants or Caco-2 cells. Under these conditions, immunofluorescence microscopy detected increased death of fibroblasts. This cytotoxic effect involved release of a toxic factor from the dying CPE-sensitive cells, since it could be reproduced using culture supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells, particularly Caco-2 cells, were found to contain high levels of membrane vesicles, often containing a CPE species. However, most cytotoxic activity remained in those supernatants even after membrane vesicle depletion, and CPE was not detected in fibroblasts treated with supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Instead, characterization studies suggest that a major cytotoxic factor present in supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells may be a 10- to 30-kDa host serine protease or require the action of that host serine protease. Induction of caspase-3-mediated apoptosis was found to be important for triggering release of the cytotoxic factor(s from CPE-treated sensitive host cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxic factor(s in these supernatants was shown to induce a caspase-3-mediated killing of fibroblasts. This bystander killing effect due to release of cytotoxic factors from CPE-treated sensitive cells could contribute to CPE-mediated disease.

  2. Genomic instability and bystander effects: a paradigm shift in radiation biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2002-01-01

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, following exposure to ionizing radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the principal target, are responsible for the radiation's deleterious biological effects. Findings in two rapidly expanding fields of research--radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects--have caused us to reevaluate these central tenets. In this article, the potential influence of induced genomic instability and bystander effects on cellular injury after exposure to low-level radiation will be reviewed.

  3. Modifiers of Neighbors' Bystander Intervention in Intimate Partner Violence: A Concept Mapping Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Sara; Todd, Mary-Justine; Oshiro, Michael; Greene, Emily; Frye, Victoria

    2016-03-01

    Encouraging bystander intervention in intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is potentially an important method of reducing the prevalence of such violence in urban communities. Most existing research has been conducted on campuses and in relation to sexual violence among teens or young adults. Our understanding of which bystander behaviors are feasible is nascent, and our knowledge of which situational factors influence neighbors' self-reported willingness to intervene is underdeveloped. We conducted a concept mapping study to identify potential bystander intervention behaviors in IPV among neighbors in urban settings; we also assessed whether perceived feasibility and effectiveness of those behaviors varied by situational characteristics. Using data collected from 41 residents of a low-income New York City neighborhood in late 2011, concept mapping was used to create a conceptual map of the 74 behaviors identified by participants. We examined participant differences in mean feasibility (i.e., that the participants "could" or "would" enact a behavior), feasibility given two situational characteristics (if the couple was perceived to have a history of IPV, and if children were believed to be involved or present), and perceived effectiveness of bystander behaviors. Differences across select sociodemographic factors of participants were also analyzed. A 13-cluster solution emerged, with clusters of bystander behaviors grouped into four larger cluster areas: victim focused, parenting/education focused, perpetrator focused, and community involvement focused. Bivariate analyses revealed that participants rated the four cluster areas as more feasible when a child was believed to be involved. Male participants rated intervention as less feasible when the couple was believed to have a history of IPV. Participants who reported a history of IPV victimization rated all four cluster areas as less effective on average, as compared with participants without a history of

  4. Debriefing bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is valuable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Fjordholt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: To explore the concept of debriefing bystanders after participating in an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation attempt including (1) bystanders' most commonly addressed reactions after participating in a resuscitation attempt when receiving debriefing from medical dispat...... Dispatch Centres is a low complexity and a low cost intervention though the logistic challenges have to be considered....... the phenomenological approach. RESULTS: Six themes emerged from analysis of debriefing audio files: (1) identification of OHCA; (2) emotional and perceptual experience with OHCA; (3) collaboration with healthcare professionals; (4) patients outcome; (5) coping with the experience and (6) general reflections. When...

  5. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard; Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni Toossi; Roghayeh Kamran Samani; Shokoufeh Mohebbi

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5), and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB) were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single a...

  6. Potential implications of the bystander effect on TCP and EUD when considering target volume dose heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael J; Kirkby, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In light of in vitro evidence suggesting that radiation-induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing, there is potential for impact on radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms such as the goal of delivering a uniform dose throughout the clinical target volume (CTV). This work applies a bystander effect model to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) for external beam prostate treatment and compares the results with a more common model where local response is dictated exclusively by local absorbed dose. The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. EUD and TCP of a prostate cancer target volume under conditions of increasing dose heterogeneity were calculated using two models: One incorporating bystander effects derived from previously published in vitro bystander data ( McMahon et al. 2012 , 2013a); and one using a common linear-quadratic (LQ) response that relies exclusively on local absorbed dose. Dose through the CTV was modelled as a normal distribution, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). Also, a representative clinical dose distribution was examined as cold (low dose) sub-volumes were systematically introduced. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity throughout a target volume will yield as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. For a typical intermediate risk prostate prescription of 78 Gy over 39 fractions maxima in EUD and TCP as a function of increasing SD occurred at SD ∼ 5 Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. Small, but potentially significant differences in the outcome metrics between the models were identified in the clinically-derived dose distribution as cold sub-volumes were introduced. In terms of

  7. Effect of bismuth subsalicylate on Clostridium difficile colitis in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T W; Dong, M Y; Gorbach, S L

    1990-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of bismuth subsalicylate (BSS, Pepto-Bismol) in Clostridium difficile colitis was studied in golden Syrian hamsters. C. difficile was fed to the hamsters by orogastric intubation 2-3 days after their arrival. Clindamycin (1.5 mg per animal) was given intraperitoneally 4 days later. Twenty-four hours after challenge with clindamycin, animals were given BSS at dosages of 5, 10, and 15 mg twice daily for 5 days by orogastric intubation. Controls included untreated animals and those given 5 mg of vancomycin once daily by intubation. Delay in the time of death was observed in all BSS-treated animals and was statistically significant on days 4-6 in those receiving 15 mg twice daily. Vancomycin produced a greater delay in death than did BSS. Our study suggests that BSS at a dosage of 15 mg twice daily has some therapeutic effect on C. difficile colitis in hamsters.

  8. Foodborne transmission of nipah virus in Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Emmie; Prescott, Joseph; Falzarano, Darryl; Bushmaker, Trenton; Scott, Dana; Feldmann, Heinz; Munster, Vincent J

    2014-03-01

    Since 2001, outbreaks of Nipah virus have occurred almost every year in Bangladesh with high case-fatality rates. Epidemiological data suggest that in Bangladesh, Nipah virus is transmitted from the natural reservoir, fruit bats, to humans via consumption of date palm sap contaminated by bats, with subsequent human-to-human transmission. To experimentally investigate this epidemiological association between drinking of date palm sap and human cases of Nipah virus infection, we determined the viability of Nipah virus (strain Bangladesh/200401066) in artificial palm sap. At 22°C virus titers remained stable for at least 7 days, thus potentially allowing food-borne transmission. Next, we modeled food-borne Nipah virus infection by supplying Syrian hamsters with artificial palm sap containing Nipah virus. Drinking of 5×10⁸ TCID₅₀ of Nipah virus resulted in neurological disease in 5 out of 8 hamsters, indicating that food-borne transmission of Nipah virus can indeed occur. In comparison, intranasal (i.n.) inoculation with the same dose of Nipah virus resulted in lethal respiratory disease in all animals. In animals infected with Nipah virus via drinking, virus was detected in respiratory tissues rather than in the intestinal tract. Using fluorescently labeled Nipah virus particles, we showed that during drinking, a substantial amount of virus is deposited in the lungs, explaining the replication of Nipah virus in the respiratory tract of these hamsters. Besides the ability of Nipah virus to infect hamsters via the drinking route, Syrian hamsters infected via that route transmitted the virus through direct contact with naïve hamsters in 2 out of 24 transmission pairs. Although these findings do not directly prove that date palm sap contaminated with Nipah virus by bats is the origin of Nipah virus outbreaks in Bangladesh, they provide the first experimental support for this hypothesis. Understanding the Nipah virus transmission cycle is essential for preventing

  9. Diet-induced dyslipidemia impairs reverse cholesterol transport in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tréguier, Morgan; Briand, François; Boubacar, Adamou; André, Agnès; Magot, Thierry; Nguyen, Patrick; Krempf, Michel; Sulpice, Thierry; Ouguerram, Khadija

    2011-09-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is an anti-atherogenic process by which cholesterol is effluxed from peripheral tissues by high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and returned to the liver for excretion into the bile and faeces. Dyslipidemia is thought to impair RCT through higher triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL), low HDL-cholesterol and higher activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which transfers cholesteryl esters from HDL to TRL for further hepatic uptake. As CETP pathway would represent a major route in human RCT, we therefore investigated whether diet-induced dyslipidemia impairs RCT in hamster, a CETP-expressing species. Golden Syrian hamsters were fed a chow or chow+0·3% cholesterol diet over 4 weeks. Biochemical parameters and in vivo VLDL-triglycerides secretion (Triton WR-1339 injection) were then measured. In vitro macrophage cholesterol efflux was measured, and in vivo macrophage-to-faeces RCT was also assessed after an intraperitoneal injection of (3) H-cholesterol-labelled hamster primary macrophages. Cholesterol-enriched diet increased plasma total cholesterol (144%), triglycerides (101%), VLDL-triglycerides secretion (175%), CETP activity (44%) and reduced HDL-cholesterol/total cholesterol ratio by 20% (P diet significantly increased hepatic total cholesterol and triglycerides by 459 and 118% and increased aortic total cholesterol content by 304%. In vitro cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma was significantly reduced by 25% with plasma from cholesterol-fed hamsters. In vivo RCT experiments showed a significant 75% reduction of macrophage-derived cholesterol faecal excretion in cholesterol-fed hamsters. Overall, these data demonstrate that diet-induced dyslipidemia severely impairs in vivo RCT in hamsters. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  10. The thalamic intergeniculate leaflet modulates photoperiod responsiveness in Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, David A; Dhandapani, Krishnan M; Goldman, Bruce D

    2004-11-26

    Siberian hamsters are seasonal breeders that use changes in day length to synchronize their reproductive effort with those times of the year most favorable for successful reproduction. The ability of Siberian hamsters to measure and respond to changes in day length depends upon accurate photoentrainment of the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Two pathways have been characterized through which entraining stimuli reach the SCN: the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT), which transmits light information from the retinae, and the geniculohypothalamic tract (GHT) from the intergeniculate leaflet of the thalamus (IGL), which is involved in transmitting both photic and nonphotic cues. Ablating the IGL/GHT results in only modest alterations in entrainment to static day lengths and fails to interfere with seasonal responses induced by transfer from static long day to static short day lengths. Because several studies suggest that the IGL may be involved in tracking the time of dusk and dawn, we sought to determine whether an intact IGL is necessary for hamsters to respond to a simulated natural photoperiod (SNP) in which the time of dusk and dawn gradually changes in a pattern approximating the rate of change in day length that occurs during autumn at the latitude this species inhabits in nature. The results indicate that neurochemical lesions of the IGL alter both the pattern of circadian entrainment and photoperiodic responsiveness of Siberian hamsters to an SNP. Both intact and IGL-lesioned hamsters exhibited testicular regression in shortening day lengths, but only IGL-intact hamsters exhibited seasonal pelage molt.

  11. The different radiation response and radiation-induced bystander effects in colorectal carcinoma cells differing in p53 status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widel, Maria, E-mail: maria.widel@polsl.pl [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Lalik, Anna; Krzywon, Aleksandra [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Poleszczuk, Jan [College of Inter-faculty Individual Studies in Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Warsaw, 93 Zwirki i Wigury Street, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Integrated Mathematical Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We tested radiation response and bystander effect on HCT116p53+/+ and p53−/− cells. • The p53+/+ cells developed premature senescence in exposed and bystander neighbors. • Directly exposed and bystander p53−/− cells died profoundly through apoptosis. • Interleukins 6 and 8 were differently generated by both cell lines. • NFκB path was activated mainly in p53+/+ hit cells, in p53 −/− in bystanders only. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect, appearing as different biological changes in cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation but are under the influence of molecular signals secreted by irradiated neighbors, have recently attracted considerable interest due to their possible implication for radiotherapy. However, various cells present diverse radiosensitivity and bystander responses that depend, inter alia, on genetic status including TP53, the gene controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. Here we compared the ionizing radiation and bystander responses of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with wild type or knockout TP53 using a transwell co-culture system. The viability of exposed to X-rays (0–8 Gy) and bystander cells of both lines showed a roughly comparable decline with increasing dose. The frequency of micronuclei was also comparable at lower doses but at higher increased considerably, especially in bystander TP53-/- cells. Moreover, the TP53-/- cells showed a significantly elevated frequency of apoptosis, while TP53+/+ counterparts expressed high level of senescence. The cross-matched experiments where irradiated cells of one line were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of opposite line show that both cell lines were also able to induce bystander effects in their counterparts, however different endpoints revealed with different strength. Potential mediators of bystander effects, IL-6 and IL-8, were also generated differently in both lines. The knockout cells secreted IL-6 at

  12. Genomic instability induced in distant progeny of bystander cells depends on the connexins expressed in the irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toledo, Sonia M; Buonanno, Manuela; Harris, Andrew L; Azzam, Edouard I

    2017-10-01

    To examine the time window during which intercellular signaling though gap junctions mediates non-targeted (bystander) effects induced by moderate doses of ionizing radiation; and to investigate the impact of gap junction communication on genomic instability in distant progeny of bystander cells. A layered cell culture system was developed to investigate the propagation of harmful effects from irradiated normal or tumor cells that express specific connexins to contiguous bystander normal human fibroblasts. Irradiated cells were exposed to moderate mean absorbed doses from 3.7 MeV α particle, 1000 MeV/u iron ions, 600 MeV/u silicon ions, or 137Cs γ rays. Following 5 h of co-culture, pure populations of bystander cells, unexposed to secondary radiation, were isolated and DNA damage and oxidative stress was assessed in them and in their distant progeny (20-25 population doublings). Increased frequency of micronucleus formation and enhanced oxidative changes were observed in bystander cells co-cultured with confluent cells exposed to either sparsely ionizing (137Cs γ rays) or densely ionizing (α particles, energetic iron or silicon ions) radiations. The irradiated cells propagated signals leading to biological changes in bystander cells within 1 h of irradiation, and the effect required cellular coupling by gap junctions. Notably, the distant progeny of isolated bystander cells also exhibited increased levels of spontaneous micronuclei. This effect was dependent on the type of junctional channels that coupled the irradiated donor cells with the bystander cells. Previous work showed that gap junctions composed of connexin26 (Cx26) or connexin43 (Cx43) mediate toxic bystander effects within 5 h of co-culture, whereas gap junctions composed of connexin32 (Cx32) mediate protective effects. In contrast, the long-term progeny of bystander cells expressing Cx26 or Cx43 did not display elevated DNA damage, whereas those coupled by Cx32 had enhanced DNA damage

  13. The Hamster Buccal Pouch Model of Oral Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagini, Siddavaram; Kowshik, Jaganathan

    2016-01-01

    The hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model is one of the most well-characterized animal tumor models used as a prelude to investigate multistage oral carcinogenesis and to assess the efficacy of chemointervention. Hamster buccal pouch carcinomas induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) show extensive similarities to human oral squamous cell carcinomas. The HBP model offers a number of advantages including a simple and predictable tumor induction procedure, easy accessibility for examination and follow-up of lesions, and reproducibility. This model can be used to test both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  14. Through the Eyes of a Bystander: Understanding VR and Video Effectiveness on Bystander Empathy, Presence, Behavior, and Attitude in Bullying Situations

    OpenAIRE

    McEvoy, Kelly Anne

    2015-01-01

    Peer bullying is a widespread and longstanding problem in school settings. Teachers, students, administrators, government, and researchers alike have all tried to combat bullying through bullying prevention campaigns. One strategy used in bullying prevention campaigns is to call on bystanders in bullying situations to take responsible action. While many different forms of campaigns, including print and media campaigns, have aimed at trying to reduce the presence of bullying in schools by info...

  15. Unraveling Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrick, Robert; McIntosh, Iweeta

    1979-01-01

    Presents a brief discussion of the Chinese language, its relevance to social studies students in the United States, methods of teaching and learning Chinese, romanization systems developed to help westerners pronounce and read phonetically, picture writing, and a directory of resource agencies and materials. (Author/DB)

  16. Chinese Cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Tony

    This unit, intended for secondary level students, is a general introduction to Chinese cooking. It is meant to inform students about the origins of Chinese cooking styles in their various regional manifestations, and it can be used to discuss how and why different cultures develop different styles of cooking. The first part of the unit, adapted…

  17. Immunogenicity of a polyvalent HIV-1 candidate vaccine based on fourteen wild type gp120 proteins in golden hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Ali; Anderson, David E; Ghorbani, Masoud; Gee, Katrina; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    Background One of the major obstacles in the design of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 is the hypervariability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. Most HIV-1 vaccine candidates have utilized envelope glycoprotein from a single virus isolate, but to date, none of them elicited broadly reactive humoral immunity. Herein, we hypothesised that a cocktail of HIV-1 gp120 proteins containing multiple epitopes may increase the breadth of immune responses against HIV-1. We compared and evaluated the immunogenicity of HIV-1 vaccines containing either gp120 protein alone or in combinations of four or fourteen gp120s from different primary HIV-1 isolates in immunized hamsters. Results We amplified and characterized 14 different gp120s from primary subtype B isolates with both syncytium and non-syncytium inducing properties, and expressed the proteins in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines. Purified proteins were used either alone or in combinations of four or fourteen different gp120s to vaccinate golden hamsters. The polyvalent vaccine showed higher antibody titers to HIV-1 subtype B isolates MN and SF162 compared to the groups that received one or four gp120 proteins. However, the polyvalent vaccine was not able to show higher neutralizing antibody responses against HIV-1 primary isolates. Interestingly, the polyvalent vaccine group had the highest proliferative immune responses and showed a substantial proportion of cross-subtype CD4 reactivity to HIV-1 subtypes B, C, and A/E Conclusion Although the polyvalent approach achieved only a modest increase in the breadth of humoral and cellular immunity, the qualitative change in the vaccine (14 vs. 1 gp120) resulted in a quantitative improvement in vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:17076905

  18. Immunogenicity of a polyvalent HIV-1 candidate vaccine based on fourteen wild type gp120 proteins in golden hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbani Masoud

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major obstacles in the design of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 is the hypervariability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. Most HIV-1 vaccine candidates have utilized envelope glycoprotein from a single virus isolate, but to date, none of them elicited broadly reactive humoral immunity. Herein, we hypothesised that a cocktail of HIV-1 gp120 proteins containing multiple epitopes may increase the breadth of immune responses against HIV-1. We compared and evaluated the immunogenicity of HIV-1 vaccines containing either gp120 protein alone or in combinations of four or fourteen gp120s from different primary HIV-1 isolates in immunized hamsters. Results We amplified and characterized 14 different gp120s from primary subtype B isolates with both syncytium and non-syncytium inducing properties, and expressed the proteins in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines. Purified proteins were used either alone or in combinations of four or fourteen different gp120s to vaccinate golden hamsters. The polyvalent vaccine showed higher antibody titers to HIV-1 subtype B isolates MN and SF162 compared to the groups that received one or four gp120 proteins. However, the polyvalent vaccine was not able to show higher neutralizing antibody responses against HIV-1 primary isolates. Interestingly, the polyvalent vaccine group had the highest proliferative immune responses and showed a substantial proportion of cross-subtype CD4 reactivity to HIV-1 subtypes B, C, and A/E Conclusion Although the polyvalent approach achieved only a modest increase in the breadth of humoral and cellular immunity, the qualitative change in the vaccine (14 vs. 1 gp120 resulted in a quantitative improvement in vaccine-induced immunity.

  19. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after {alpha}-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chen Shaopeng [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-02-03

    Low-dose {alpha}-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose {alpha}-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-{beta}1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  20. A High School-Based Evaluation of TakeCARE, a Video Bystander Program to Prevent Adolescent Relationship Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Kelli S; Jouriles, Ernest N; Rosenfield, David; McDonald, Renee

    2017-03-01

    Although bystander programs to prevent relationship and sexual violence have been evaluated with college students, few evaluations have been conducted with high school students. This study evaluated the effectiveness of TakeCARE, a brief video bystander program designed to promote helpful bystander behavior in situations involving relationship violence among high school students. Students (N = 1295; 52.5% female; 72.3% Hispanic) reported their bystander behavior at a baseline assessment. Classrooms (N = 66) were randomized to view TakeCARE or to a control condition, and high school counselors administered the video in the classrooms assigned to view TakeCARE. Students again reported their bystander behavior at a follow-up assessment approximately 3 months afterward. Results indicate that students who viewed TakeCARE reported more helpful bystander behavior at the follow-up assessment than students in the control condition. Results of exploratory analyses of the likelihood of encountering and intervening upon specific situations calling for bystander behavior are also reported. TakeCARE is efficacious when implemented in an urban high school by high school counselors.

  1. The induction of a radiation-induced bystander effect in fish transcends taxonomic group and trophic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W; Seymour, Colin B; Moccia, Richard D; Hinton, Thomas G; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2013-04-01

    To extend the investigations of bystander effect induction in fish of the same species as the irradiated fish, to bystander effect induction between fish species and between trophic levels. To investigate interspecies bystander effect induction, zebrafish and medaka were irradiated with a 0.5 Gy X-ray dose and then swum with non-irradiated fish of the same and opposite species. To investigate trophic level bystander effect induction, California blackworms were irradiated with the same X-ray dose and then fed to non-irradiated rainbow trout. Reductions in clonogenic survival of the HPV-G (non-transformed human keratinocytes, immortalized with the human papilloma virus) reporter cell line, treated with tissue explant media, revealed that zebrafish and medaka induced a pro-apoptotic bystander effect in the other species and that, in trout, the normally anti-apoptotic effect caused by the consumption of non-irradiated blackworms was significantly reduced or lost if the blackworms had been irradiated. These results are the first to show that a radiation- induced bystander effect can transcend taxonomic group and trophic level in fish. This provides further evidence that bystander signals are widespread and conserved and may be transmitted through an ecosystem, as well as between individuals of the same species.

  2. Efficient gene targeting in golden Syrian hamsters by the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Fan

    Full Text Available The golden Syrian hamster is the model of choice or the only rodent model for studying many human diseases. However, the lack of gene targeting tools in hamsters severely limits their use in biomedical research. Here, we report the first successful application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to efficiently conduct gene targeting in hamsters. We designed five synthetic single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs--three for targeting the coding sequences for different functional domains of the hamster STAT2 protein, one for KCNQ1, and one for PPP1R12C--and demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is highly efficient in introducing site-specific mutations in hamster somatic cells. We then developed unique pronuclear (PN and cytoplasmic injection protocols in hamsters and produced STAT2 knockout (KO hamsters by injecting the sgRNA/Cas9, either in the form of plasmid or mRNA, targeting exon 4 of hamster STAT2. Among the produced hamsters, 14.3% and 88.9% harbored germline-transmitted STAT2 mutations from plasmid and mRNA injection, respectively. Notably, 10.4% of the animals produced from mRNA injection were biallelically targeted. This is the first success in conducting site-specific gene targeting in hamsters and can serve as the foundation for developing other genetically engineered hamster models for human disease.

  3. Efficient gene targeting in golden Syrian hamsters by the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhiqiang; Li, Wei; Lee, Sang R; Meng, Qinggang; Shi, Bi; Bunch, Thomas D; White, Kenneth L; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde

    2014-01-01

    The golden Syrian hamster is the model of choice or the only rodent model for studying many human diseases. However, the lack of gene targeting tools in hamsters severely limits their use in biomedical research. Here, we report the first successful application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to efficiently conduct gene targeting in hamsters. We designed five synthetic single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs)--three for targeting the coding sequences for different functional domains of the hamster STAT2 protein, one for KCNQ1, and one for PPP1R12C--and demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is highly efficient in introducing site-specific mutations in hamster somatic cells. We then developed unique pronuclear (PN) and cytoplasmic injection protocols in hamsters and produced STAT2 knockout (KO) hamsters by injecting the sgRNA/Cas9, either in the form of plasmid or mRNA, targeting exon 4 of hamster STAT2. Among the produced hamsters, 14.3% and 88.9% harbored germline-transmitted STAT2 mutations from plasmid and mRNA injection, respectively. Notably, 10.4% of the animals produced from mRNA injection were biallelically targeted. This is the first success in conducting site-specific gene targeting in hamsters and can serve as the foundation for developing other genetically engineered hamster models for human disease.

  4. Cloning of a hamster anti-mouse CD79B antibody sequences and identification of a new hamster immunoglobulin lambda constant IGLC gene region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggart, Ryan; Perera, Jason; Huang, Haochu

    2013-06-01

    Anti-CD79 antibodies have been effective at targeting B cell lymphoma cells and depleting B cells in animal models. In order to engineer recombinant antibodies with additional effector functions in mice, we cloned and sequenced the full-length cDNAs of the heavy and light chain of a hamster anti-mouse CD79B antibody. Although hamster antibodies represent a unique source of monoclonal antibodies against mouse, rat, and human antigens, sequence information of hamster immunoglobulins (IG) is sparse. Here, we report a new hamster (Cricetulus migratorius) IG lambda constant (IGLC) gene region that is most homologous to mouse IGLC2 and IGLC3.

  5. Raising a Red Flag on Dating Violence: Evaluation of a Low-Resource, College-Based Bystander Behavior Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsky, Amanda E; McDonnell, Karen; Turner, Monique Mitchell; Rimal, Rajiv

    2016-03-09

    Encouraging bystanders to intervene safely and effectively in situations that could escalate to violence-known as bystander behavior programs-is a growing yet largely untested strategy to prevent dating violence. Using a quasi-experimental design, we evaluate a low-resource, low-intensity intervention aimed at preventing dating violence among college students. The integrated behavioral model (IBM) was used to guide the evaluation. We also assess which IBM variables were most strongly associated with bystander behaviors. Participants were drawn from two Virginia colleges that predominantly train females in the health profession sciences. The intervention group (n = 329) participated in a university-wide bystander behavior intervention consisting of a 30-min presentation on dating violence at new-student orientation and a week-long "red flag" social marketing campaign on campus to raise awareness of dating violence. Controlling for changes at the comparison university, results showed an increase in bystander behaviors, such as encouraging a friend who may be in an abusive relationship to get help, after the intervention and adjusting for potential confounders (increase of 1.41 bystander behaviors, p = .04). However, no significant changes were found for bystander intentions, self-efficacy, social norms, or attitudes related to dating violence from pre- to post-intervention. Self-efficacy had a direct relationship with bystander behaviors. Results suggest that low-resource interventions have a modest effect on increasing bystander behaviors. However, higher resource interventions likely are needed for a larger impact, especially among students who already demonstrate strong baseline intentions to intervene and prevent dating violence. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Low doses of gamma-irradiation induce an early bystander effect in zebrafish cells which is sufficient to radioprotect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sandrine; Malard, Véronique; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Davin, Anne-Hélène; Armengaud, Jean; Foray, Nicolas; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    The term "bystander effect" is used to describe an effect in which cells that have not been exposed to radiation are affected by irradiated cells though various intracellular signaling mechanisms. In this study we analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of bystander effect and radioadaptation in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to chronic low dose of gamma rays. ZF4 cells were irradiated for 4 hours with total doses of gamma irradiation ranging from 0.01-0.1 Gy. In two experimental conditions, the transfer of irradiated cells or culture medium from irradiated cells results in the occurrence of DNA double strand breaks in non-irradiated cells (assessed by the number of γ-H2AX foci) that are repaired at 24 hours post-irradiation whatever the dose. At low total irradiation doses the bystander effect observed does not affect DNA repair mechanisms in targeted and bystander cells. An increase in global methylation of ZF4 cells was observed in irradiated cells and bystander cells compared to control cells. We observed that pre-irradiated cells which are then irradiated for a second time with the same doses contained significantly less γ-H2AX foci than in 24 h gamma-irradiated control cells. We also showed that bystander cells that have been in contact with the pre-irradiated cells and then irradiated alone present less γ-H2AX foci compared to the control cells. This radioadaptation effect is significantly more pronounced at the highest doses. To determine the factors involved in the early events of the bystander effect, we performed an extensive comparative proteomic study of the ZF4 secretomes upon irradiation. In the experimental conditions assayed here, we showed that the early events of bystander effect are probably not due to the secretion of specific proteins neither the oxidation of these secreted proteins. These results suggest that early bystander effect may be due probably to a combination of multiple factors.

  7. The different radiation response and radiation-induced bystander effects in colorectal carcinoma cells differing in p53 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, Maria; Lalik, Anna; Krzywon, Aleksandra; Poleszczuk, Jan; Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect, appearing as different biological changes in cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation but are under the influence of molecular signals secreted by irradiated neighbors, have recently attracted considerable interest due to their possible implication for radiotherapy. However, various cells present diverse radiosensitivity and bystander responses that depend, inter alia, on genetic status including TP53, the gene controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. Here we compared the ionizing radiation and bystander responses of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with wild type or knockout TP53 using a transwell co-culture system. The viability of exposed to X-rays (0-8 Gy) and bystander cells of both lines showed a roughly comparable decline with increasing dose. The frequency of micronuclei was also comparable at lower doses but at higher increased considerably, especially in bystander TP53-/- cells. Moreover, the TP53-/- cells showed a significantly elevated frequency of apoptosis, while TP53+/+ counterparts expressed high level of senescence. The cross-matched experiments where irradiated cells of one line were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of opposite line show that both cell lines were also able to induce bystander effects in their counterparts, however different endpoints revealed with different strength. Potential mediators of bystander effects, IL-6 and IL-8, were also generated differently in both lines. The knockout cells secreted IL-6 at lower doses whereas wild type cells only at higher doses. Secretion of IL-8 by TP53-/- control cells was many times lower than that by TP53+/+ but increased significantly after irradiation. Transcription of the NFκBIA was induced in irradiated TP53+/+ mainly, but in bystanders a higher level was observed in TP53-/- cells, suggesting that TP53 is required for induction of NFκB pathway after irradiation but another mechanism of activation must operate in

  8. Acting in solidarity : Testing an extended dual pathway model of collective action by bystander group members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing-Yee

    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one emotion-based path to collective action (Van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach,

  9. Sticks, Stones, and Stigma: Student Bystander Behavior in Response to Hearing the Word "Retard"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Avery B.; Jacobs, Holly E.; Siperstein, Gary N.

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored the prevalence of the r-word in schools and students' bystander behavior in response to hearing the word. In total, 2,297 students from 12 high schools across the country participated in this study. Results revealed the r-word was used frequently among high school students, most often toward individuals without…

  10. Reducing Sexual Violence on Campus: The Role of Student Leaders as Empowered Bystanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Victoria L.; Moynihan, Mary M.; Crossman, Maria T.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual violence is a widespread problem for college communities. Students, faculty, and staff are increasingly involved in prevention efforts. To date, however, evaluation of sexual violence prevention programs has shown mixed results. One promising new practice teaches segments of college communities to be engaged, positive bystanders. It aims to…

  11. Aggressive Attitudes and Prevalence of Bullying Bystander Behavior in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pooja; Cornell, Dewey; Huang, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Separate lines of research find that proaggressive attitudes promote peer aggression and that bystanders play a pivotal role in deterring or facilitating bullying behavior. The current study hypothesized that proaggressive attitudes in middle school would deter students from standing up to bullying and encourage them to reinforce bullying…

  12. Bystander Behavior in Bullying Situations: Basic Moral Sensitivity, Moral Disengagement and Defender Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert; Jungert, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different…

  13. Bystander Intervention, Bullying, and Victimization: A Multilevel Analysis of New Zealand High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Simon; Peterson, Elizabeth R.; Stuart, Jaimee; Utter, Jennifer; Bullen, Pat; Fleming, Theresa; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Clark, Terryann; Milfont, Taciano

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the association between schools and student bullying behaviors and victimization among a nationally representative sample (N = 9,107) of New Zealand high school students. In particular, the study sought to explore the role of characteristics of schools and school culture with respect to bystander behavior, while controlling for…

  14. Participation in High School Sports and Bystander Intentions, Efficacy to Intervene, and Rape Myth Beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Debate exists as to whether male athletes are more prone to commit acts of sexual violence and maintain problematic attitudes about sexual assault. To contribute to the literature on this relationship, this study posed the following research questions: (1) Do those students who participated in high school sports and those who did not differ significantly in their attitudes about sexual violence and willingness to intervene as a bystander? Do these differ among types of rape myths and bystander intervention situations? (2) Within a group of athletes, are there significant differences by gender or type of sport (contact sport vs. non-contact?) To answer these questions, surveys were analyzed with a sample of recent high school graduates the summer before entering college (N = 3,588). Results indicate that there were only minor differences between those students who participated in high school varsity sports and those who did not. Students who participated in sports had greater acceptance of three out of five types of rape myths, and less willingness to intervene with perpetrators after an assault; however, the effect sizes were small. There were no significant differences for bystander efficacy. The interaction between sport and gender was significant, but contact sport was not. The findings suggest that there may be aspects of male athletic participation in sports that needs to be addressed, yet there also exists the potential for engaging athletes as leaders who can act as prosocial bystanders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Intervene to be seen: The power of a camera in attenuating the bystander effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, M.; van Prooijen, J.W.; Elffers, H.; van Lange, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Security cameras became such a part of everyday life that their presence may escape from our conscious attention. The present research examines the impact of cameras on intervening in crime, a situation in which the classic bystander effect has been uncovered. In our experimental set up,

  16. Role of extracellular DNA oxidative modification in radiation induced bystander effects in human endotheliocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyuk, Svetlana V. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alekseeva, Anna Yu.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Glebova, Kristina V.; Efremova, Liudmila V. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baranova, Ancha [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); School of System Biology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-03

    The development of the bystander effect induced by low doses of irradiation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) depends on extracellular DNA (ecDNA) signaling pathway. We found that the changes in the levels of ROS and NO production by human endothelial cells are components of the radiation induced bystander effect that can be registered at a low dose. We exposed HUVECs to X-ray radiation and studied effects of ecDNA{sup R} isolated from the culture media conditioned by the short-term incubation of irradiated cells on intact HUVECs. Effects of ecDNA{sup R} produced by irradiated cells on ROS and NO production in non-irradiated HUVECs are similar to bystander effect. These effects at least partially depend on TLR9 signaling. We compared the production of the nitric oxide and the ROS in human endothelial cells that were (1) irradiated at a low dose; (2) exposed to the ecDNA{sup R} extracted from the media conditioned by irradiated cells; and (3) exposed to human DNA oxidized in vitro. We found that the cellular responses to all three stimuli described above are essentially similar. We conclude that irradiation-related oxidation of the ecDNA is an important component of the ecDNA-mediated bystander effect.

  17. Vulnerable Children in Varying Classroom Contexts: Bystanders' Behaviors Moderate the Effects of Risk Factors on Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Antti; Voeten, Marinus; Poskiparta, Elisa; Salmivalli, Christina

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether the bystanders' behaviors in bullying situations influence vulnerable students' risk for victimization. The sample consisted of 6,980 primary school children from Grades 3-5, who were nested within 378 classrooms in 77 schools. These students filled out Internet-based questionnaires in their schools' computer labs. The results…

  18. A Meta-Analysis of School-Based Bullying Prevention Programs' Effects on Bystander Intervention Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanin, Joshua R.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Pigott, Therese D.

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized bullying prevention programs' effectiveness at increasing bystander intervention in bullying situations. Evidence from 12 school-based programs, involving 12,874 students, indicated that overall the programs were successful (Hedges's g = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11 to 0.29, p = 0.001), with larger…

  19. Development of a mathematical model to study the radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Living organisms are composed of millions of cells that together perform tasks of great complexity. Although every cell has an internal structure that obeys the laws of chemistry and biochemistry, it is the interactions between cells that generate a range of different phenomena. Until the 1990s it was believed that the DNA was the single molecule affected by radiation, the so-called theory of the single target. But some observations began to challenge this theory; in 1992 the bystander effect was described by Nagasawa and Little. This effect is responsible for a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. Understanding the bystander effect may have important consequences for therapy and studies of low-dose risk. In this work, we have developed a computational model to study the bystander effect. This computational model is a two-dimensional cellular automata, consisting of two overlapping networks, where the first represents the cell culture, and the second one, the medium in which cells are embedded. The computational model allows the establishment of curves to describe the behavior of the effect for different levels of signals released in the irradiated medium by the irradiated cells or by the bystander cells when a second order effect is considered. The percentage of cell survival obtained from the mathematical model showed to be in good agreement with experimental data available in the literature. (author)

  20. It's Your Place: Development and Evaluation of an Evidence-Based Bystander Intervention Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrom, Beth; Ferrara, Merissa; DeMaria, Andrea L; Gabel, Colby; Booth, Kathleen; Cabot, Jeri

    2017-06-28

    Preventing sexual assault on college campuses is a national priority. Bystander intervention offers a promising approach to change social norms and prevent sexual misconduct. This study presents the implementation and evaluation of a theory-based campaign to promote active bystander intervention. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) served as a conceptual framework throughout campaign development and evaluation. Formative research published elsewhere was used to develop campaign strategies, communication channels, and messages, including "It is your place to prevent sexual assault: You're not ruining a good time." The It's Your Place multi-media campaign fosters a culture of bystander intervention through peer-to-peer facilitation and training, as well as traditional and new media platforms. A cross-sectional post-test only web-based survey was designed to evaluate the campaign and test the TPB's ability to accurately predict intention to intervene. Survey data were collected from 1,505 currently enrolled students. The TPB model predicted intention to intervene. There was a significant effect of campaign exposure on attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral intention. This theory-based communication campaign offers implications for promoting active bystander intervention and reducing sexual assault.

  1. Factors associated with bystander behaviors of Korean youth in school bullying situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung Ae; Kim, Dong Hee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The behaviors of bystanders can have important effects on their peers. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial and contextual factors associated with 3 types of bystander behavior (bully followers, outsiders, and defenders of victims) among Korean youth. A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted among 416 7th and 8th-grade students from 1 middle school in Korea. The Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the Korean version of the Social Problem-Solving Inventory, and measurements of relationships with friends and teachers, empathy, concerns about being bullied, attitudes toward bullying, and bystander behaviors were all used in the assessment. Empathy, relationship of teachers, attitudes toward bullying, and concerns about being bullied were significantly associated with all 3 types of bystanders’ behaviors. Although, self-esteem, social problem solving ability were significantly associated with just defender of victim behaviors. These results suggest that several significant factors to cultivate constructive bystander behaviors should be considered to develop effective antibullying intervention. PMID:28796067

  2. A Randomized Controlled Study Evaluating a Brief, Bystander Bullying Intervention with Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgett, Aida; Doumas, Diana; Trull, Rhiannon; Johnston, April D.

    2017-01-01

    A randomized controlled study evaluated a brief, bystander bullying intervention for junior high school students. Students in both groups reported an increase in knowledge and confidence to act as defenders and to utilize strategies to intervene on behalf of victims of bullying. Findings suggest possible carry-over effects from the intervention…

  3. See Something, Do Something: Predicting Sexual Assault Bystander Intentions in the U.S. Military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Kathryn J; Rabelo, Verónica Caridad; Cortina, Lilia

    2016-09-01

    Sexual assault is a pervasive problem in the U.S. military, especially against women. Bystander intervention is increasingly promoted as important for reducing sexual violence, and it may be particularly helpful in contexts with high rates of sexual violence. Bystander training encourages and enables people to intervene safely and stop sexual violence. In this study, we drew from an ecological model to investigate intrapersonal, microsystem, and exosystem factors that predicted Service members' assumption of personal responsibility to intervene in an alcohol-involved sexual assault. Moreover, we examined how these predictors played a role in decisions about how to intervene: confronting the perpetrator, assisting the victim, or finding someone to help. We analyzed data from 24,610 active duty personnel collected by the Department of Defense. Several factors significantly related to Service members' bystander intentions: gender, rank, morale, attitudes about sexual assault, training, and trust in the military sexual assault system predicted the likelihood and method of bystander intervention. These findings help identify how and why people intervene (or fail to intervene) when they witness situations that could develop into sexual violence. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  4. Effects of manipulated aggressive 'interactions' on bystanding male fighting fish, Betta splendens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peake, Thomas More; Matos, Ricardo Jorge; McGregor, Peter Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    occurring differences between observed interactants and have therefore lacked this degree of control. We allowed bystanding male fighting fish to observe two male conspecifics that appeared to be interacting, but in reality the two males were displaying to mirrors. The apparent interactions were manipulated...

  5. Vulnerable Children in Varying Classroom Contexts Bystanders' Behaviors Moderate the Effects of Risk Factors on Victimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kärnä, A.; Voeten, M.J.M.; Poskiparta, E.H.; Salmivalli, C.

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether the bystanders' behaviors in bullying situations influence vulnerable students' risk for victimization. The sample consisted of 6,980 primary school children from Grades 3-5, who were nested within 378 classrooms in 77 schools. These students filled out Internet-based

  6. Bystander Involvement in Peer Victimization: The Value of Looking beyond Aggressors and Victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Brenda A.; Dempsey, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Peer victimization has been a focus of both research and prevention program development. This construct is typically measured from the victim and aggressor perspectives. However, prevention programming often includes an additional bystander perspective. The present study evaluated whether questions regarding witnessing peer victimization…

  7. Using a Multimedia Social Marketing Campaign to Increase Active Bystanders on the College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the campus-wide administration of the Know Your Power bystander-oriented social marketing campaign. Participants: Undergraduate students at a public college were invited to participate in a public awareness survey before and after the 6-week campaign administration in February and March 2009. Methods: Pretest and posttests…

  8. Protective effect of mild endoplasmic reticulum stress on radiation-induced bystander effects in hepatocyte cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuexia; Ye, Shuang; Zhang, Jianghong; He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Tu, Wenzhi; Liu, Peifeng; Shao, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has important implications for secondary cancer risk assessment during cancer radiotherapy, but the defense and self-protective mechanisms of bystander normal cells are still largely unclear. The present study found that micronuclei (MN) formation could be induced in the non-irradiated HL-7702 hepatocyte cells after being treated with the conditioned medium from irradiated hepatoma HepG2 cells under either normoxia or hypoxia, where the ratio of the yield of bystander MN induction to the yield of radiation-induced MN formation under hypoxia was much higher than that of normoxia. Nonetheless, thapsigargin induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and dramatically suppressed this bystander response manifested as the decrease of MN and apoptosis inductions. Meanwhile, the interference of BiP gene, a major ER chaperone, amplified the detrimental RIBE. More precisely, thapsigargin provoked ER sensor of PERK to initiate an instantaneous and moderate ER stress thus defensed the hazard form RIBE, while BiP depletion lead to persistently destroyed homeostasis of ER and exacerbated cell injury. These findings provide new insights that the mild ER stress through BiP-PERK-p-eIF2α signaling pathway has a profound role in protecting cellular damage from RIBE and hence may decrease the potential secondary cancer risk after cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27958308

  9. The senescent bystander effect is caused by ROS-activated NF-κB signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Glyn; Kucheryavenko, Olena; Wordsworth, James; von Zglinicki, Thomas

    2017-08-25

    Cell senescence is an important driver of the ageing process. The accumulation of senescent cells in tissues is accelerated by stress signals from senescent cells that induce DNA damage and ultimately senescence in bystander cells. We examine here the interplay of senescence-associated mitochondrial dysfunction (SAMD)-driven production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in causing the bystander effect. We show that in various modes of fibroblast senescence ROS are necessary and sufficient to activate the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), which facilitates a large part of the SASP. This ROS-NF-κB axis causes the DNA damage response in bystander cells. Cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 are major components of the pro-inflammatory SASP in senescent fibroblasts. However, their activation in senescence is only partially controlled by NF-κB, and they are thus not strong candidates as intercellular mediators of the bystander effect as mediated by the ROS-NF-κB axis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. What Can Student Bystanders Do to Prevent School Violence?: Perceptions of Students and School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Simmons, Renee; Dash, Kimberly; Tehranifar, Parisa; O'Donnell, Lydia; Stueve, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Incidents of school violence have prompted calls for school communities to create environments that encourage student bystanders to act responsibly and proactively when they confront a range of violent incidents, from bullying and fights to weapon carrying and other serious threats to school safety. It is not always clear, however, what bystanders…

  11. Participant Roles in Bullying: How Can Peer Bystanders Be Utilized in Interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmivalli, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a view of school bullying as a group phenomenon and practical implications stemming from this approach. The motivation for bullying perpetration often relates to one's social standing in the group. Peer bystanders are typically present when bullying takes place, often providing the perpetrators with social rewards. The…

  12. Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

    Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of

  13. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Xue, Bei; Wang, Xinwen; Wang, Jiawen

    2016-07-01

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to bystander effect in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced bystander effect in distant organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in bystander effect. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were cranial exposed to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of carbon heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. The γH2AX foci as the DNA damage biomarker in directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 0, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplifcation polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that cranial irradiated mice could induce the γH2AX foci and genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate were highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation in ear. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. We also found that the numbers of γH2AX foci and the genomic methylation changes of heavy-ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Bystander effect; DNA methylation; γH2

  14. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isheeta Seth

    Full Text Available Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy, and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (p<0.0001. These data indicate that neutrons do not induce a bystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  15. The Price of a Helping Hand: Modeling the Outcomes and Costs of Bystander CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouland, Andrew J; Risko, Nicholas; Lawner, Benjamin J; Seaman, Kevin G; Godar, Cassandra M; Levy, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Early, high-quality, minimally interrupted bystander cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (BCPR) is essential for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival. However, rates of bystander intervention remain low in many geographic areas. Community CPR programs have been initiated to combat these low numbers by teaching compression-only CPR to laypersons. This study examined bystander CPR and the cost-effectiveness of a countywide CPR program to improve out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival. A 2-year retrospective review of emergency medical services (EMS) run reports for adult nontraumatic cardiac arrests was performed using existing prehospital EMS quality assurance data. The incidence and success of bystander CPR to produce prehospital return of spontaneous circulation and favorable neurologic outcomes at hospital discharge were analyzed. The outcomes were paired with cost data for the jurisdiction's community CPR program to develop a cost-effectiveness model. During the 23-month study period, a total of 371 nontraumatic adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurred, with a 33.4% incidence of bystander CPR. Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis for the community CPR program demonstrated a total cost of $22,539 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). A significantly increased proportion of those who received BCPR also had an automated external defibrillator (AED) applied. There was no correlation between witnessed arrest and performance of BCPR. A significantly increased proportion of those who received BCPR were found to be in a shockable rhythm when the initial ECG was performed. In the home setting, the chances of receiving BCPR were significantly smaller, whereas in the public setting a nearly equal number of people received and did not receive BCPR. Witnessed arrest, AED application, public location, and shockable rhythm on initial ECG were all significantly associated with positive ROSC and neurologic outcomes. A home arrest was significantly associated with worse

  16. Bystander Motivation in Bullying Incidents: To Intervene or Not to Intervene?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Thornberg

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This research sought to extend knowledge about bystanders in bullying situations with a focus on the motivations that lead them to different responses. The 2 primary goals of this study were to investigate the reasons for children’s decisions to help or not to help a victim when witnessing bullying, and to generate a grounded theory (or conceptual framework of bystander motivation in bullying situations.Methods: Thirty students ranging in age from 9 to 15 years (M=11.9; SD=1.7 from an elementary and middle school in the southeastern United States participated in this study. Open- ended, semistructured interviews were used, and sessions ranged from 30 to 45 minutes. We conducted qualitative methodology and analyses to gain an in-depth understanding of children’s perspectives and concerns when witnessing bullying.Results: A key finding was a conceptual framework of bystander motivation to intervene in bullying situations suggesting that deciding whether to help or not help the victim in a bullying situation depends on how bystanders define and evaluate the situation, the social context, and their own agency. Qualitative analysis revealed 5 themes related to bystander motives and included: interpretation of harm in the bullying situation, emotional reactions, social evaluating, moral evaluating, and intervention self-efficacy.Conclusion: Given the themes that emerged surrounding bystanders’ motives to intervene or abstain from intervening, respondents reported 3 key elements that need to be confirmed in future research and that may have implications for future work on bullying prevention. These included: first, the potential importance of clear communication to children that adults expect bystanders to intervene when witnessing bullying; second, the potential of direct education about how bystanders can interveneto increase children’s self-efficacy as defenders of those who are victims of bullying; and third, the assumption

  17. Radiation quality dependence of signal transmission and bystander induced cell killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Bertolotti, Alessia; Facoetti, Angelica; Grande, Sveva; Mariotti, Luca; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Ranza, Elena; Simone, Giustina; Sorrentino, Eugenio; Antonella Tabocchini, Maria

    Low dose radiobiological studies have shown effects, observable in cells that are in the vicinity of irradiated cells, which are due to the release by irradiated cells of several cellular mediators among which Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS, NRS), and cytokines are likely to play a key role. Despite the large number in the literature of studies on bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation the results are still conflicting, and further studies are therefore needed on the possible underlying mechanisms. The dependence on radiation quality deserve particular attention because bystander mechanisms are probably more important with high-LET irradi-ations, where many cells are not hit (bystander). Moreover, due to the different patterns of energy deposition, the cellular response to low LET and high LET radiation can be different. Understanding whether these cells can contribute to the adverse effects of low radiation doses in a radiation quality-dependent fashion might have important implications in risk estimates for both cancer induction and non-cancer diseases. In this context, we addressed to the study of the bystander induced cell killing after incubation with "conditioned medium" from primary human fibroblasts irradiated with 0.1 and 0.5 Gy of α-particles or γ-rays. Medium transfer was performed after 1h incubation from irradiation. The results have confirmed a reduction in clonogenic survival after incubation with medium from α-irradiated cells, independently of the dose; similar results were obtained after γ-irradiation, although in this case a slight dose depen-dence could be envisaged. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels were measured in the conditioned medium collected up to 20 hours after irradiation with α-particles and γ-rays in the dose-range of 0.1-1.0 Gy, in parallel with evaluation of their receptor expression in irradi-ated and bystander cells. Concerning IL-6, we observed the strongest modulation of its release

  18. Cystolithiasis in a Syrian hamster: a different outcome | Petrini ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 14-month-old intact male Syrian hamster was admitted for lethargy and hematuria. A total body radiographic image and abdominal ultrasonography showed the presence of a vesical calculus. During cystotomy, a sterile urine sample was obtained and sent to the diagnostic laboratory along with the urolith for analysis.

  19. Characterisation of monoclonal antibodies specific for hamster leukocyte differentiation molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jennifer; Haig, David; Mack, Victoria; Davis, William C

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to identify mAbs that recognize conserved epitopes on hamster leukocyte differentiation molecules (hLDM) and also to characterize mAbs developed against hLDM. Initial screening of mAbs developed against LDMs in other species yielded mAbs specific for the major histocompatibility (MHC) II molecule, CD4 and CD18. Screening of sets of mAbs developed against hLDM yielded 22 new mAbs, including additional mAbs to MHC II molecules and mAbs that recognize LDMs expressed on all leukocytes, granulocytes, all lymphocytes, all T cells, a subset of T cells, or on all B cells. Based on comparison of the pattern of expression of LDMs expressed on all hamster leukocytes with the patterns of expression of known LDMs in other species, as detected by flow cytometry (FC), four mAbs are predicted to recognize CD11a, CD44, and CD45. Cross comparison of mAbs specific for a subset of hamster T cells with a cross reactive mAb known to recognize CD4 in mice and one recognising CD8 revealed they recognize CD4. The characterization of these mAbs expands opportunities to use hamsters as an additional model species to investigate the mechanisms of immunopathogenesis of infectious diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biodynamics of cholesterol and bile acids in the lithiasic hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallou, J; Riottot, M; Parquet, M; Verneau, C; Lutton, C

    1991-11-01

    By using the isotopic equilibrium method in the young male Syrian hamster, the rates of cholesterol turnover processes, i.e. dietary cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis, cholesterol excretion in the faeces and urine and cholesterol transformation into bile acids, were determined in the hamster receiving a control (C) or a lithogenic diet (L) for 7 weeks. At the end of this period the gall bladder of all animals in group L contained cholesterol gallstones. The coefficient of dietary cholesterol absorption was reduced by 26%, cholesterol synthesis and cholesterol faecal excretion were twofold higher in group L than in group C. Bile acid content in the small intestine was diminished in group L, but bile acid composition was similar in the two groups. The increase in cholesterogenesis in lithiasic animals essentially took place in the liver. Bile acid biosynthesis did not significantly differ in the two groups, but represented only 35% of total cholesterol input (dietary absorption + internal secretion) in group L v. 52% in group C. Thus, in the lithiasic hamster, hepatic synthesis of cholesterol and bile acids are not coupled. The molar percentage of cholesterol in bile was twofold higher in group L than in group C but those of bile acids and of phospholipids were not modified. In the lithiasic hamster the specific activity of biliary cholesterol was similar to that in plasma and liver. Consequently, biliary cholesterol does not derive directly from cholesterol newly synthesized in the liver but from hepatic cholesterol rapidly exchangeable with plasma cholesterol.

  1. Enhanced longevity in tau mutant Syrian hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oklejewicz, Malgorzata; Daan, Serge

    The single-gene mutation tau in the Syrian hamster shortens the circadian period by about 20% in the homozygous mutant and simultaneously increases the mass-specific metabolic rate by about 20%. Both effects might be expected to lead to a change in longevity. To test such expectations, the life span

  2. Het effect van hamsterbeheer op de overwintering bij hamsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van der M.; Ligtenberg, H.; Haye, la M.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    De afgelopen decennia is het aantal hamsters (Cricetus cricetus) in Nederland sterk afgenomen. Door onderzoek te verrichten naar de levenscyclus en naar de effecten van agrarisch beheer is getracht de afname te verklaren en oplossingen aan te dragen. In voorjaar 2006 is een verkennend onderzoek

  3. Early Postnatal Development of the South African Hamster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Hamster Mystromys albicaudatus has been bred in the laboratory of the Medical Ecology Centre since 1941. It is of interest taxonomically in that it is the sole representative left in Africa of the subfamily Cricetinae (Davis 1962). It has been used in Medical Research on poliomyelitis, benign histoplasmosis, ...

  4. Bioavailability and disposition of solanine in rats and hamsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen K; Pereboom-de Fauw DPKH; Besamusca P; Beekhof PK; Speijers GJA; Derks HJGM

    1992-01-01

    The toxicokinetics of [3H]-alpha-solanine after oral (po) and intravenous (iv) administration in rats and hamsters were studied, in order to decide which is the most appropriate model in risk assessment studies. The iv dose was 54 mug/kg; the oral dose was 170 mug/kg. After iv administration, the

  5. Rudimentary coronary artery in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, A C; Arqué, J M; Fernández, B; Fernández, M C; Fernández-Gallego, T; Rodríguez, C; Sans-Coma, V

    2009-08-01

    Congenital underdevelopment of one or more main branches of the coronary arteries has been reported in man, but not in non-human mammals. In man, this defective coronary artery arrangement may cause myocardial ischaemia and even sudden death. The main goal of this study was to describe the coronary artery distribution patterns associated with the presence of a markedly underdeveloped (rudimentary) coronary artery in Syrian hamsters. Moreover, an attempt was made to explain the morphogenesis of these patterns, according to current knowledge on coronary artery development. Eleven affected hamsters belonging to a laboratory inbred family were examined by means of internal casts of the heart, great arterial trunks and coronary arteries. The aortic valve was tricuspid (normal) in seven hamsters and bicuspid in the other four. A rudimentary coronary artery arose from the right side of the aortic valve in four specimens, from the left side of the aortic valve in a further three, and from the dorsal aortic sinus in the remaining four. In all cases, a second, well-developed coronary artery provided for all the coronary blood flow. Except for the existence of a rudimentary coronary artery, the present anomalous coronary artery distribution patterns are similar to coronary artery patterns reported in Syrian hamsters, dogs and humans in association with a solitary coronary ostium in aorta. We suggest that an unusual prolonged time interval in the development of the embryonic coronary stems might be a key factor in the formation of coronary arteries displaying significantly dissimilar developmental degrees.

  6. Development of Taenia pisiformis in golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maravilla Pablo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The life cycle of Taenia pisiformis includes canines as definitive hosts and rabbits as intermediate hosts. Golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus is a rodent that has been successfully used as experimental model of Taenia solium taeniosis. In the present study we describe the course of T. pisiformis infection in experimentally infected golden hamsters. Ten females, treated with methyl-prednisolone acetate were infected with three T. pisiformis cysticerci each one excised from one rabbit. Proglottids released in faeces and adults recovered during necropsy showed that all animals were infected. Eggs obtained from the hamsters' tapeworms, were assessed for viability using trypan blue or propidium iodide stains. Afterwards, some rabbits were inoculated with eggs, necropsy was performed after seven weeks and viable cysticerci were obtained. Our results demonstrate that the experimental model of adult Taenia pisiformis in golden hamster can replace the use of canines in order to study this parasite and to provide eggs and adult tapeworms to be used in different types of experiments.

  7. Inhibition of GSH synthesis potentiates temozolomide-induced bystander effect in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsaka, Shinji; Takahashi, Kenta; Wang, Lei; Tanino, Mishie; Kimura, Taichi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shinya

    2013-04-30

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most aggressive human tumors with poor prognosis. Current standard treatment includes chemotherapy using DNA alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) concomitant with surgical resection and/or irradiation. However, GBM patients exhibit various levels of the elevated expression of DNA repair enzyme, due to MGMT causing resistance to TMZ. Determination of the MGMT-positive population of primary tumor is important to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of TMZ. Here we generated TMZ-resistant GBM cells by introducing MGMT into TMZ-sensitive GBM cell line KMG4, and established a model to assess the TMZ-induced bystander effect on TMZ-resistant cells. By mixing TMZ-resistant and -sensitive cells, GBM tumors with MGMT positivity as 50%, 10%, and 1% were generated in vivo. We could not observe any bystander effect of TMZ-induced cell death in tumor with 50% MGMT positivity. Although the bystander effect was observed within 20 days in the case of tumor with 1% MGMT positivity, final tumor size at day 28 was the same as control without sensitive cells. This bystander effect was observed in vitro using conditioned medium of TMZ-damaged GBM cells, and PCR array analysis indicated that the conditioned medium stimulated stress and toxicity pathway and upregulated anti-oxidants genes expression such as catalase and SOD2 in TMZ-resistant cells. In addition, the reduction of the activity of anti-stress mechanism by using inhibitor of GSH synthesis potentiated TMZ-induced bystander effect. These results suggest that GSH inhibitor might be one of the candidates for combination therapy with TMZ for TMZ-resistant GBM patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy; Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OHCA and compare it with the European Resuscitation Council 2010 and 2015 Guidelines. We included OHCA cases from the Capital Region, Denmark, (2012-2016) where a Zoll AED was used before ambulance arrival. For cases with at least one minute of continuous data, the initial 10min of CPR data were analysed for compression rate, depth, fraction and compressions delivered for each minute of CPR. Data are presented as median [25th;75th percentile]. We included 136 cases. Bystander median compression rate was 101min(-1) [94;113], compression depth was 4.8cm [3.9;5.8] and compressions per minute were 62 [48;73]. Of all cases, the median compression rate was 100-120min(-1) in 42%, compression depth was 5-6cm in 26%, compression fraction≥60% in 51% and compressions delivered per minute exceeded 60 in 54%. In a minute-to-minute analysis, we found no evidence of deterioration in CPR quality over time. The median peri-shock pause was 27s [23;31] and the pre-shock pause was 19s [17;22]. The median CPR performed by bystanders using AEDs with audio-feedback in OHCA was within guideline recommendations without deterioration over time. Compression depth had poorer quality compared with other parameters. To improve bystander CPR quality, focus should be on proper compression depth and minimizing pauses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Induction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannais, D.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of X-rays was made by Rontgen more than a hundred years ago, it has always been accepted that the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation such as mutation and carcinogenesis are attributable mainly to direct damage to DNA. Although evidence based on microdosimetric estimation in support of a bystander effect appears to be consistent, direct proof of such extranuclear/extracellular effects are limited. Using a precision charged particle microbeam, we show here that irradiation of 20% of randomly selected A(L) cells with 20 alpha particles each results in a mutant fraction that is 3-fold higher than expected, assuming no bystander modulation effect. Furthermore, analysis by multiplex PCR shows that the types of mutants induced are significantly different from those of spontaneous origin. Pretreatment of cells with the radical scavenger DMSO had no effect on the mutagenic incidence. In contrast, cells pretreated with a 40 microM dose of lindane, which inhibits cell-cell communication, significantly decreased the mutant yield. The doses of DMSO and lindane used in these experiments are nontoxic and nonmutagenic. We further examined the mutagenic yield when 5-10% of randomly selected cells were irradiated with 20 alpha particles each. Results showed, likewise, a higher mutant yield than expected assuming no bystander effects. Our studies provide clear evidence that irradiated cells can induce a bystander mutagenic response in neighboring cells not directly traversed by alpha particles and that cell-cell communication process play a critical role in mediating the bystander phenomenon.

  10. The potential impact of bystander effects on radiation risks in a Mars mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, D. J.; Elliston, C. D.; Hall, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Densely ionizing (high-LET) galactic cosmic rays (GCR) contribute a significant component of the radiation risk in free space. Over a period of a few months-sufficient for the early stages of radiation carcinogenesis to occur-a significant proportion of cell nuclei will not be traversed. There is convincing evidence, at least in vitro, that irradiated cells can send out signals that can result in damage to nearby unirradiated cells. This observation can hold even when the unirradiated cells have been exposed to low doses of low-LET radiation. We discuss here a quantitative model based on the a formalism, an approach that incorporates radiobiological damage both from a bystander response to signals emitted by irradiated cells, and also from direct traversal of high-LET radiations through cell nuclei. The model produces results that are consistent with those of a series of studies of the bystander phenomenon using a high-LET microbeam, with the end point of in vitro oncogenic transformation. According to this picture, for exposure to high-LET particles such as galactic cosmic rays other than protons, the bystander effect is significant primarily at low fluences, i.e., exposures where there are significant numbers of untraversed cells. If the mechanisms postulated here were applicable in vivo, using a linear extrapolation of risks derived from studies using intermediate doses of high-LET radiation (where the contribution of the bystander effect may be negligible) to estimate risks at very low doses (where the bystander effect may be dominant) could underestimate the true risk from low doses of high-LET radiation. It would be highly premature simply to abandon current risk projections for high-LET, low-dose radiation; however, these considerations would suggest caution in applying results derived from experiments using high-LET radiation at fluences above approximately 1 particle per nucleus to risk estimation for a Mars mission.

  11. The role of serotonin and p53 status in the radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanxhi, Erta; Dahle, Jostein

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of serotonin and protein 53 (p53) status of the cells in the radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). The radiation-induced bystander response was investigated in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells employing medium-transfer experiments and micronuclei (MN) induction as an end-point. Irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) from cells exposed to α-particle or γ-radiation was filtered and transferred to unirradiated cells 2 h following irradiation. MCF-7 cells were irradiated with 0.5 Gy α-particles, while HCT116 p53(+/+) and HCT116 p53(-/-) cells were irradiated with 0.5 Gy γ-radiation. Bystander MCF-7 cells, recipient of ICCM from 0.5 Gy α-particle irradiated MCF-7 cells grown in high serotonin conditions showed a modest but significant increase in MN, while MCF-7 cells receiving ICCM with low serotonin levels did not show any bystander effect. Added serotonin (100 ng/ml) led to a bystander effectin HCT116 p53(-/-) cells recipient of ICCM from 0.5 Gy γ-irradiated HCT116 p53(+/+) cells, but had no effect when the ICCM was from γ-irradiated HCT116 P53(-/-) cells. The results indicate that serotonin levels in the medium play a role in the RIBE and that there may be an interaction between the role of serotonin and the p53 status of the irradiated cells.

  12. Studies of Bystander Effects in 3-D Tissue Systems Using a Low-LET Microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-17

    It is now accepted that biological effects may occur in cells that were not themselves traversed by ionizing radiation but are close to those that were. Little is known about the mechanism underlying such a bystander effect, although cell-to-cell communication is thought to be important. Previous work demonstrated a significant bystander effect for clonogenic survival and oncogenic transformation in C3H 10T(1/2) cells. Additional studies were undertaken to assess the importance of the degree of cell-to-cell contact at the time of irradiation on the magnitude of this bystander effect by varying the cell density. When 10% of cells were exposed to a range of 2-12 alpha particles, a significantly greater number of cells were inactivated when cells were irradiated at high density than at low density. In addition, the oncogenic transformation frequency was significantly higher in high-density cultures. These results suggest that when a cell is hit by radiation, the transmission of the bystander signal through cell-to-cell contact is an important mediator of the effect, implicating the involvement of intracellular communication through gap junctions. Additional studies to address the relationship between the bystander effect and the adaptive response were undertaken. A novel apparatus, where targeted and non-targeted cells were grown in close proximity, was used to investigate these. It was further examined whether a bystander effect or an adaptive response could be induced by a factor(s) present in the supernatants of cells exposed to a high or low dose of X-rays, respectively. When non-hit cells were co-cultured for 24 h with cells irradiated with 5 Gy alpha-particles, a significant increase in both cell killing and oncogenic transformation frequency was observed. If these cells were treated with 2 cGy X-rays 5 h before co-culture with irradiated cells, approximately 95% of the bystander effect was cancelled out. A 2.5-fold decrease in the oncogenic transformation

  13. Seasonal aspects of sleep in the Djungarian hamster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deboer Tom

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature trigger seasonal adaptations in the physiology and behaviour of many species, including the Djungarian hamster. Exposure of the hamsters to a short photoperiod and low ambient temperature leads to a reduction of the polyphasic distribution of sleep and waking over the light and dark period. In contrast, a long photoperiod enhances the daily sleep-wake amplitude leading to a decline of slow-wave activity in NREM sleep within the light period. It is unknown whether these changes can be attributed specifically to photoperiod and/or ambient temperature, or whether endogenous components are contributing factors. The influence of endogenous factors was investigated by recording sleep in Djungarian hamsters invariably maintained at a low ambient temperature and fully adapted to a short photoperiod. The second recording was performed when they had returned to summer physiology, despite the maintenance of the 'winter' conditions. Results Clear winter-summer differences were seen in sleep distribution, while total sleep time was unchanged. A significantly higher light-dark cycle modulation in NREM sleep, REM sleep and waking was observed in hamsters in the summer physiological state compared to those in the winter state. Moreover, only in summer, REM sleep episodes were longer and waking bouts were shorter during the light period compared to the dark period. EEG power in the slow-wave range (0.75–4.0 Hz in both NREM sleep and REM sleep was higher in animals in the summer physiological state than in those in the 'winter' state. In winter SWA in NREM sleep was evenly distributed over the 24 h, while in summer it decreased during the light period and increased during the dark period. Conclusion Endogenous changes in the organism underlie the differences in sleep-wake redistribution we have observed previously in hamsters recorded in a short and long photoperiod.

  14. Seasonal aspects of sleep in the Djungarian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchykova, Svitlana; Deboer, Tom; Tobler, Irene

    2003-05-19

    Changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature trigger seasonal adaptations in the physiology and behaviour of many species, including the Djungarian hamster. Exposure of the hamsters to a short photoperiod and low ambient temperature leads to a reduction of the polyphasic distribution of