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Sample records for byssinosis

  1. Byssinosis and other respiratory symptoms among factory workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Textile cotton workers are at risk for occupational lung disease, including Byssinosis and chronic Bronchitis. Byssinosis is primarily associated with exposure to cotton dust. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of and factors associated with byssinosis and respiratory symptoms among workers in cotton mills ...

  2. Byssinosis and COPD rates among factory workers manufacturing hemp and jute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Mukremin; Emri, Salih A; Demir, Ahmet U; Thorne, Peter S; Karakoca, Yalcin; Bilir, Nazmi; Baris, Izzettin Y

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have been performed on cotton textile plants throughout the world. This study was planned to identify the rate of byssinosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in hemp and jute workers and those who worked with both of them. The study was realized in a factory which consecutively processed hemp and jute. The study enrollment included 266 people, 164 of whom were active workers and 102 were retired. A questionnaire, plain chest X-rays, physical examination and pulmonary function tests were performed. Dust levels were measured in various sections of the factory during 8 h work shifts. Endotoxin levels of various quality hemp fibers and dusts were measured. The rate of byssinosis (28.2%) was higher among the workers that who exposed to both jute and hemp dust. The frequency of chronic bronchitis in retired workers who previously smoked was higher (20%) as compared to currently smoking workers (17%). High dust levels were measured in some parts of the factory (mean (M) = 2.69 mg/m3). Working in dense dust areas, active smoking, being older than 40 years of age, being an ex-smoker, and working in the factory for a period exceeding 15 years were significantly associated with bronchitis and emphysema development. High endotoxin levels were determined for fine hemp dust (605 EU/mg), coarse hemp dust (336 EU/mg) and poor quality hemp fibers (114 EU/mg), whereas in fresh hemp stalks the level of endotoxin was determined to be lower (0.27 EU/mg). Because of high exposures to jute and hemp dusts that are associated with high byssinosis rates, personal protection and environmental hygiene is crucial to prevention of byssinosis. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  3. Environmental and medical study of byssinosis and other respiratory conditions in the cotton textile industry in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noweir, M.H.; Noweir, K.H.; Osman, H.A.; Moselhi, M.

    1984-01-01

    This study was conducted in a typical Egyptian textile plant located in Alexandria. Male workers from all operations (N . 506) were examined and their dust exposures were assessed. Results showed that airborne dust concentrations were very high and that the plant fraction is mostly concentrated in respirable dust. Byssinosis prevailed in 21% of workers in opening and cleaning sections and in 13% in carding and combing rooms, but was found in none of the workers in drawing, twisting, and spinning operations, in only 1.1% in weaving, and in 3.1% of workers in other ''auxiliary'' occupations. The rare prevalence of byssinosis among the latter workers groups was attributed to the workers continuous exposure without fixed weekend interruption, the personal and family history of exposure to cotton, the low proportion of plant materials in dust evolved in related operations, the fine quality of Egyptian cotton, and/or the population characteristics of Egyptian workers. Reduction in FEV 1.0 at the end of the first work shift after absence from work occured more often than byssinosis, which indicates the importance of this test for the early detection of effects of cotton dust exposure. It is suggested that a nationwide study in the cotton textile industry is indicated.

  4. Byssinosis and other respiratory symptoms among factory workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    Introduction. Air pollution is a major occupational problem in various industries. Occupational lung disease is recorded in accounts of ancient history (1-3). Industries associated with the processing of cotton, specifically yarn, thread and fabric mills are most associated with worker exposure to cotton dust (4, 5). The earliest ...

  5. Byssinosis and other respiratory symptoms among factory workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 417 randomly selected factory workers. Information was collected through ... Area sampling for cotton dust concentration in the work environment was measured using Data RAM 4 real time measurement for 8 hours during a day shift. Results: The highest prevalence ...

  6. Role of histamine in the aetiology of byssinosis. II. Lung histamine concentrations in guinea pigs chronically exposed to cotton and flax dusts.

    OpenAIRE

    Noweir, M H; Abdel-Kader, H M; MAKAR, A.

    1984-01-01

    Data presented in this study support the finding that cotton and flax dusts contain agents which potentiate the formation or accumulation of histamine or both in the lungs of guinea pigs exposed to dust, and that such agents are present at much higher levels in cotton dust than in flax dust. The potentiating effect may be through the recruitment of mast cells into the lung. Both cotton and flax dusts contain methylating enzyme inhibitory agents, whereas cotton dust also contains agents that i...

  7. Otras enfermedades obstructivas: bisinosis, bronquitis crónica y EPOC de origen laboral y bronquitis eosinofílica Other obstructive diseases: byssinosis, chronic bronchitis and occupational COPD and eosinophilic bronchitis

    OpenAIRE

    F. J. Michel de la Rosa; B. Fernández Infante

    2005-01-01

    Además del asma ocupacional y las enfermedades derivadas de la inhalación aguda, otras enfermedades obstructivas también reconocen un origen laboral. Aunque en la actualidad la bisinosis es una enfermedad rara en España, describimos las características de la misma por su interés histórico dentro de las enfermedades respiratorias de origen laboral y porque todavía sigue vigente en los países en vías de desarrollo. La bronquitis crónica también puede estar relacionada con la exposición laboral ...

  8. Proposed national strategies for the prevention of leading work-related diseases and injuries. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary strategies developed at the National Symposium on the Prevention of Leading Work Related Diseases and Injuries, held in Atlanta, Georgia on May 1 to 3, 1985 were revised, elaborated, and further developed. Strategies were developed for the prevention of occupational lung diseases, musculoskeletal injuries, occupational cancers, severe occupational traumatic injuries, and occupational cardiovascular diseases. Lung diseases considered included silicosis, asbestosis, lung cancer mesothelioma, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, asphyxiation, irritation, pulmonary edema, brucellosis, psitticosis, anthrax, mycobacterioses, histoplasmosis, aspergillosis, and coccidioidomycosis. Occupational cancers were discussed as they occur in the lung, pleura, peritoneum, bladder, kidneys, blood, nasal cavity, skin, nasal sinuses, and liver.

  9. Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens - focus on cotton dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Enterobacter agglomerans, Erwinia herbicola) is known both as an epiphytic microbe developing on the surface of plants and as an endophytic organism living inside the plants. The bacterium occurs also abundantly in plant and animal products, in the body of arthropods and other animals, in water, soil, dust and air, and occasionally in humans. From the human viewpoint, the role of this organism is ambiguous, both deleterious and beneficial: on one side it causes disorders in people exposed to inhalation of organic dusts and diseases of crops, and on the other side it produces substances effective in the treatment of cancer and other diseases of humans and animals, suppresses the development of various plant pathogens, promotes plant growth, and appears as a potentially efficient biofertilizer and bioremediator. P. agglomerans was identified as a predominant bacterium on cotton plant grown all over the world, usually as an epiphyte, rarely as pathogen. It is particularly numerous on cotton bract after senescence. During processing of cotton in mills, bacteria and their products are released with cotton dust into air and are inhaled by workers, causing respiratory and general disorders, usually defined as byssinosis. The most adverse substance is endotoxin, a heteropolymer macromolecule present in the outermost part of the cell wall, consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a major constituent, phospholipids and protein. The numerous experiments carried out in last quarter of XXth century on laboratory animals and human volunteers supported a convincing evidence that the inhaled endotoxin produced by P. agglomerans causes numerous pathologic effects similar to those elicited by cotton dust, such as influx of free lung cells into airways and activation of alveolar macrophages which secrete mediators (prostaglandins, platelet-activating factor, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor) that cause

  10. Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens – focus on cotton dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Enterobacter agglomerans, Erwinia herbicola is known both as an epiphytic microbe developing on the surface of plants and as an endophytic organism living inside the plants. The bacterium occurs also abundantly in plant and animal products, in the body of arthropods and other animals, in water, soil, dust and air, and occasionally in humans. From the human viewpoint, the role of this organism is ambiguous, both deleterious and beneficial: on one side it causes disorders in people exposed to inhalation of organic dusts and diseases of crops, and on the other side it produces substances effective in the treatment of cancer and other diseases of humans and animals, suppresses the development of various plant pathogens, promotes plant growth, and appears as a potentially efficient biofertilizer and bioremediator. P. agglomerans was identified as a predominant bacterium on cotton plant grown all over the world, usually as an epiphyte, rarely as pathogen. It is particularly numerous on cotton bract after senescence. During processing of cotton in mills, bacteria and their products are released with cotton dust into air and are inhaled by workers, causing respiratory and general disorders, usually defined as byssinosis. The most adverse substance is endotoxin, a heteropolymer macromolecule present in the outermost part of the cell wall, consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a major constituent, phospholipids and protein. The numerous experiments carried out in last quarter of XXth century on laboratory animals and human volunteers supported a convincing evidence that the inhaled endotoxin produced by P. agglomerans causes numerous pathologic effects similar to those elicited by cotton dust, such as influx of free lung cells into airways and activation of alveolar macrophages which secrete mediators (prostaglandins, platelet-activating factor, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor

  11. Gene-environment interaction from international cohorts: impact on development and evolution of occupational and environmental lung and airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Adam; Christiani, David C

    2015-06-01

    Environmental and occupational pulmonary diseases impose a substantial burden of morbidity and mortality on the global population. However, it has been long observed that only some of those who are exposed to pulmonary toxicants go on to develop disease; increasingly, it is being recognized that genetic differences may underlie some of this person-to-person variability. Studies performed throughout the globe are demonstrating important gene-environment interactions for diseases as diverse as chronic beryllium disease, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, and pollution-associated asthma. These findings have, in many instances, elucidated the pathogenesis of these highly complex diseases. At the same time, however, translation of this research into clinical practice has, for good reasons, proceeded slowly. No genetic test has yet emerged with sufficiently robust operating characteristics to be clearly useful or practicable in an occupational or environmental setting. In addition, occupational genetic testing raises serious ethical and policy concerns. Therefore, the primary objective must remain ensuring that the workplace and the environment are safe for all. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Long term respiratory health effects in textile workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Peggy S.; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Over 60 million people worldwide work in the textile or clothing industry. Recent studies have recognized the contribution of workplace exposures to chronic lung diseases, in particular chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Early studies in textile workers have focused on the relationship between hemp or cotton dust exposure and the development of a syndrome termed Byssinosis. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effect of long term exposure to organic dust in textile workers on chronic respiratory disease in the broader context of disease classifications such as reversible or irreversible obstructive lung disease (i.e. asthma or COPD), and restrictive lung disease. Recent findings Cessation of exposure to cotton dusts leads to improvement in lung function. Recent animal models have suggested a shift in the lung macrophage:dendritic cell population as a potential mechanistic explanation for persistent inflammation in the lung due to repeated cotton-dust related endotoxin exposure. Other types of textile dust, such as silk, may contribute to COPD in textile workers. Summary Textile dust related obstructive lung disease has characteristics of both asthma and COPD. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of chronic lung disease due to organic dust exposure in textile workers. PMID:23361196

  13. Interaction of plant polyphenols with salivary proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennick, Anders

    2002-01-01

    Tannins are polyphenols that occur widespread in plant-based food. They are considered to be part of the plant defense system against environmental stressors. Tannins have a number of effects on animals, including growth-rate depression and inhibition of digestive enzymes. Tannins also have an effect on humans: They are, for example, the cause of byssinosis, a condition that is due to exposure to airborne tannin. Their biological effect is related to the great efficiency by which tannins precipitate proteins, an interaction that occurs by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonding. Two groups of salivary proteins, proline-rich proteins and histatins, are highly effective precipitators of tannin, and there is evidence that at least proline-rich proteins act as a first line of defense against tannins, perhaps by precipitating tannins in food and preventing their absorption from the alimentary canal. Proline plays an important role in the interaction of proline-rich proteins with tannins. In contrast, it is primarily basic residues that are responsible for the binding of histatins to tannin. The high concentration of tannin-binding proteins in human saliva may be related to the fruit and vegetable diet of human ancestors.

  14. [The role of the "Clinica del Lavoro Luigi Devoto" in international research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzi, P A; Forni, Alessandra M

    2003-01-01

    During its long history, the Clinica del Lavoro Luigi Devoto has produced numerous internationally recognized scientific contributions in the specific field of occupational medicine and health, and in other broader areas as, for example, immunology, toxicology, cytogenetics. Pivotal in this activity was the figure of Enrico C. Vigliani, director of the Clinica for over 35 years. We mention here, in particular, the results of the study of "early" markers of lead intoxication; the research on the carcinogenicity of benzene and aromatic amines; the study of the pathogenesis of silicosis and byssinosis; the study of cytogenetic damage after exposure to industrial toxic chemicals; the technical research for dust abatement in mines. Such research also played a major role in the development of pulmonary medicine, toxicology and immunology in Italy, and conferred scientific dignity on the newborn "industrial hygiene" discipline thanks to the work of Nicola Zurlo. Today, the Clinica's research is maintained at international standards especially by the work of thematic Research Centers recently established within the Clinica, covering fields such as occupational and environmental toxicology, occupational oncology, ergonomics, respiratory disease and allergy, psycho-social risk factors. These Centers are also devoted to the development of innovative methods in epidemiology, toxicology, psychology, molecular biology, and ergonomic measurement for the identification and evaluation of health risks at work.

  15. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY OF RESP I RATORY CONDITION IN NON TEXTILE AND TEXTILE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash P.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among cotton - ginning workers. Byssinosis is a respiratory disease caused by inhalation of cotton dust for prolonged period of time. This is most frequently occurs in the cotton mill workers. The Aim of the study is 1. Determining the proportion of workers experiencing difficulty in breathing, chest tightness, chest pain, coughing, wheezing and phlegm. 2. To evaluate the pulmonary function test variation in textile workers with non - textile workers. The present study was conducted on three groups (I, II, III of male subjects of age ranging 30 to 40 yrs, 41 to 50 yrs & 51 to 60 yrs. And each of the group is divided again into textile workers & non - textile workers. A structured questionnaire enquiring about the respiratory health was administered to the employees. And our result shows the Byssinotic symptoms were too high in cotton mill workers than control group. The pulmonary function test shows a significant reduction in lung capacity, and the mean values of FVC, FEV1, FEV1%, FEF 50%, were on negative side among cotton mill workers compared to control group and which is statistically significant.

  16. Effects in man and rabbits of inhalation of cotton dust or extracts and purified endotoxins1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, G.; Foá, V.; Vigliani, E. C.

    1969-01-01

    Cavagna, G., Foá V., and Vigliani, E. C. (1969).Brit. J. industr. Med.,26, 314-321. Effects in man and rabbits of inhalation of cotton dust or extracts and purified endotoxins. The incidence of byssinosis in workers in a cotton card-room, where the airborne concentration of bacterial endotoxins was 7·2 μg./m.3, was 32%; and 47% in a hemp card-room where the endotoxin concentration was 8·7 μg./m.3; no cases were observed among workers exposed to only traces of endotoxins. The effect of the inhalation by aerosol of purified Escherichia coli endotoxin on F.E.V.1·0 and F.V.C. was studied in normal subjects and in patients with chronic bronchitis. A significant reduction in F.E.V.1·0 lasting more than 6 hours was observed in two out of eight normal subjects, in one out of three subjects with chronic bronchitis inhaling 80 μg. endotoxin, and in one out of four subjects with chronic bronchitis inhaling 40 μg. endotoxin. These results show that the inhalation of bacterial endotoxin can produce, in some individuals, changes in F.E.V.1·0 similar to those experienced on Mondays by some card-room workers. A study of the mechanism of pathogenesis of inhaled bacterial endotoxins was carried out on rabbits subjected for 20 weeks to aerosols of purified E. coli endotoxin (20 μg./day) and cotton extract (2 mg./day). This treatment produced patterns of bronchitis: i.e., a increase in the respiratory tract fluid with increased protein content and characteristic histopathological changes. The bronchitis occurred after the appearance of cross-reacting circulating antibodies against E. coli endotoxin and cotton extract. These antibodies were detected with the haemagglutination tests after the first three weeks of treatment, and in subsequent weeks reached progressively higher titres, up to a maximum of 1:512. A challenging aerosol of 0·1 mg. E. coli endotoxin in two rabbits and 10 mg. cotton extract in another two of the rabbits treated as above produced a marked increase in

  17. Stipatosis or hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by esparto (Stipa tenacissima) fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, M

    2001-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis or extrinsic allergic alveolitis may be defined as an immunological pulmonary disease caused by a variety of antigens reaching the lungs through inhaled organic and inorganic dusts derived from different sources, although they are usually occupational. Farmer's lung and pigeon breeder's lung are probably the most well-known types of hypersensitivity pneumonitis worldwide. Esparto grass (Stipa tenacissima), which is a grammineous plant which is commonly found in the Mediterranean countries, has a wide variety of uses. Esparto fiber is used for the manufacturing of ropes, hemp sandals, rush mats and parkets; for decorative stucco plates, used on walls and ceilings. Esparto supports a large industry in Spain. The first reports referring to esparto dust as a cause of respiratory disease did not appear until the 1960s, and it was first described as a byssinosis-like disorder. The first cases reported, in which immunologic and challenge tests were used to confirm this association, were described 14 years ago and referred as hypersensitivity pneumonitis nominated as stipatosis. Later, a large number of cases of esparto dust-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis were reported by different authors, so that esparto may be nowadays considered as the main substance causing extrinsic allergic alveolitis in Spain. Afumigatus has been revealed to be the main inducing cause of stipatosis but probably is not the only one since other microorganisms could be implicated. On the other hand esparto fibers may also cause occupational asthma. In this article the prominent clinical findings of this disease as well as the results of serologic, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and specific inhalation tests are shown. A complete historical review of esparto-induced allergic respiratory disease is also described.

  18. Physicians take to the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfield, W

    1992-10-01

    A joint project on the Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa University, the Jimma Institute of Health Services, the Gondar College of Health Sciences, and McGill University in Montreal, Canada is involved with working to improve the health care system in Ethiopia. The Ethiopian government has established postgraduate degrees in public health for district health managers, and overseas fellowships for students in order to train health professionals to work in 359 districts (awrajas). The emphasis is on district managers because of their link to the people, to stimulating community participation, and to coordinating activities. Training programs are available for physicians who have worked in rural areas for 2 years; completion of the program usually means placement as district health managers. One student was able to reduce respiratory illness among textile mill workers because of the success of his research thesis on byssinosis. 40% of Ethiopia has district health centers which provide primary health care and coordinate health resources. A 1st priority is convincing local leaders to construct latrines and provide safe sources of drinking water. The example of the functioning of the Suluta health district is provided. Of the 129,000 inhabitants, the health personnel and facilities provide for only 25% of the villages in the district. The district director is completing his thesis on field trials of oral rehydration therapy. Student research is supervised by physicians based at Addis Ababa University. An example is given of one such visit to a student studying adolescent sexual behavior and illegal abortion increases. Student work involved research, an action plan which identifies priorities for the area, and a health profile. Students learn how to compile data and plot graphs in a country where rural birth and death records are not kept. Record keeping, reference books and materials were also needed for the organization; technical resources were provided to this end

  19. Variação anual dos débitos expiratórios em trabalhadores da indústria têxtil. Relação com a exposição a endotoxinas bacterianas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Torres da Costa

    1998-05-01

    .05. In the weaving area byssinoses was not reported. In the weaving area byssinoses was not reported. In the textile workers theFEV1 variation seems to be the best parameter to evaluate the presence of respiratory disease. In the individual evaluation, the determination on the variations of expiratory levels throughout the shift and BHR seem to be the best evidence of respiratory disease. In the work place, the endotoxine level seems more important to be evaluated than the dust leves as an environment risk factor for respiratory disease.REV PORT PNEUMOL 1998; IV (3: 243-269 Polavras-chave: Bissinose, Asma Ocupacional, Endo-toxinas Bacterianas, Key-words: Byssinosis, Occupational Asthma, Bacterial Endotoxines