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Sample records for bypass potential contribution

  1. Serum bile acids are higher in humans with prior gastric bypass: potential contribution to improved glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Houten, Sander M; Bianco, Antonio C;

    2009-01-01

    .02) and peak glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (r = 0.58, P lipid metabolism in patients......The multifactorial mechanisms promoting weight loss and improved metabolism following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GB) surgery remain incompletely understood. Recent rodent studies suggest that bile acids can mediate energy homeostasis by activating the G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 and the type 2...... thyroid hormone deiodinase. Altered gastrointestinal anatomy following GB could affect enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids. We assessed whether circulating bile acid concentrations differ in patients who previously underwent GB, which might then contribute to improved metabolic homeostasis. We...

  2. Rplp1 bypasses replicative senescence and contributes to transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artero-Castro, A. [Pathology Department, Fundacio Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Passeig Vall d' Hebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Kondoh, H. [Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Fernandez-Marcos, P.J.; Serrano, M. [Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), 3 Melchor Fernandez Almagro St, Madrid 28029 (Spain); Ramon y Cajal, S. [Pathology Department, Fundacio Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Passeig Vall d' Hebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona (Spain); LLeonart, M.E., E-mail: melleona@ir.vhebron.net [Pathology Department, Fundacio Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Passeig Vall d' Hebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-01

    To determine whether genes expressed by embryonic stem cells have a proliferative effect in primary cells, primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts were infected with an ES cell cDNA library. This led to identification of the ribosomal protein, Rplp1, a member of the P group of ribosomal proteins, whose putative role for bypassing replicative senescence in MEFs was investigated. Our results show that Rplp1 produces a two-fold increase in the expression of an E2F1 promoter and upregulation of cyclin E in MEFs. Therefore, this study is the first to show that overexpression of a single ribosomal protein, Rplp1, is a cause and not a consequence of cell proliferation. In addition, co-expression of Rplp1 with mutant ras{sup Val12} contributed to transformation in NIH3T3 cells, as was evidenced by colony production in soft-agar assays. Moreover, the Rplp1 protein was upregulated in MEFs and NIH3T3 cells upon expression of a p53 dominant negative mutant gene designated p53R175H. Hence, mutation of p53 may facilitate immortalization in vitro by upregulating Rplp1. Lastly, Rplp1 mRNA was found to be upregulated in 16 of 26 human colon cancer biopsy specimens, a finding that may be of relevance to cancer research.

  3. Repair of a bowel-containing, scrotal hernia with incarceration contributed by femorofemoral bypass graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Schouten, Jonathan A.; Itani, Kamal M. F.

    2017-01-01

    The rising use of endovascular techniques utilizing femoral artery access may increase the frequency with which surgeons face the challenge of hernia repair in reoperative groins—which may or may not include a vascular graft. We present a case where a vascular graft contributed to an acute presentation and complicated dissection, and review the literature. A 67-year-old man who had undergone prior endovascular aneurysm repair via open bilateral femoral artery access and concomitant prosthetic femorofemoral bypass, presented with an incarcerated, scrotal inguinal hernia. The graft with its associated fibrosis contributed to the incarceration by compressing the inguinal ring. Repair was undertaken via an open, anterior approach with tension-free, Lichtenstein herniorraphy after releasing graft-associated fibrosis. Repair of groin hernias in this complex setting requires careful surgical planning, preparation for potential vascular reconstruction and meticulous technique to avoid bowel injury in the face of a vascular conduit and mesh. PMID:28069880

  4. Geographic Variability in Potentially Discretionary Red Blood Cell Transfusions After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likosky, Donald S.; Al-Attar, Paul M.; Malenka, David J.; Furnary, Anthony P.; Lehr, Eric J.; Paone, Gaetano; Kommareddi, Mallika; Helm, Robert; Jin, Ruyun; Maynard, Chuck; Hanson, Eric C.; Olmstead, Elaine M.; Mackenzie, Todd A.; Ross, Cathy S.; Zhang, Min

    2016-01-01

    We assessed regional differences in potentially discretionary [coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery. Regional variation in overall RBC rates remained after risk adjustment, perhaps due to differences in regional practice environments. Objective A number of established regional quality improvement collaboratives have partnered to assess and improve care across their regions under the umbrella of the “Cardiac Surgery Quality IMPROVEment (IMPROVE) Network”. The first effort of the IMPROVE Network has been to assess regional differences in potentially discretionary [coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery across 56 medical centers in four IMPROVE Network regions between January 2008 and June 2012. Each center submitted the most recent 200 patients who received 0, 1, or 2 units of RBC transfusion during the index admission. Patient and disease characteristics, intra-operative practices, and percentage of cases receiving RBC transfusions were collected. Region-specific transfusion rates were calculated, after adjusting for pre- and intra-operative factors among region-specific centers. Results There were small, but significant, differences in patient case mix across regions. RBC transfusions of 1 or 2 units occurred among 25.2% (2,826/11,200) of CABG procedures. Significant variation in use and number of RBCs existed across regions [None: 74.8% (min:max 70.0%, 84.1%), 1 unit: 9.7% (5.1%, 11.8%), 2 units: 15.5% (9.1%, 18.2%)], p<0.001. Variation in overall transfusion rates remained after adjustment (9.1% – 31.7%, p<0.001). Conclusions Delivery of small volumes of RBC transfusions was common, yet varied across geographic regions. These data suggest that differences in regional practice environments, including transfusion triggers and anemia management, may contribute to variability in RBC transfusion rates. PMID:25227699

  5. Duodenal-jejunal bypass sleeve - a potential alternative to bariatric surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Ulrich; Gylvin, Silas; Vilmann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are risk factors for several co-morbidities reducing life expectancy. Conservative treatment of obesity is generally ineffective in the long-term. Bariatric surgery has proven effective, but is associated with potential complications. Duodenal-jejunal bypass sleeve is a novel...

  6. COMPOUNDING PHARMACIES' POTENTIAL TO CREATE Graft Storage Solutions for Bypass Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Michael A S

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have addressed the optimal storage conditions for vascular grafts during bypass surgery. These studies have repeatedly shown that placing vascular graft conduits in isotonic saline solutions, and to a lesser extent in heparinized autologous blood, leads to a profound decline in endothelial cell viability. Endothelial damage to vein grafts can occur at multiple points during a coronary artery bypass graft surgery procedure: graft harvesting, handling, flushing, storage, anastomosis, and arterialization (e.g., damage caused by exposure to arterial blood pressure). This damage to endothelial cells causes the release of pro-inflammatory chemical signals that trigger thrombosis, intimal hyperplasia, and accelerated graft atherosclerosis, all of which ultimately contribute to graft failure. Cardiothoracic surgeons performing coronary artery bypass graft surgery and vascular surgeons performing peripheral artery bypass graft surgery have attempted to overcome the damage to the vascular grafts by using buffers to maintain the physiological pH of the storage solution. However, the endothelial layers in the grafts would benefit from having proper oxygenation and antioxidants added to the storage solution. Compounding pharmacies can perform a vital role in ensuring the patency of the vascular grafts by creating compounded flushing and storage solutions that have an optimal mix of nitric oxide substrates, antioxidants, and other nutrients for the endothelium. Maintaining structural and functional viability of the endothelia in grafts by using an appropriate vessel storage medium would lead to improved long-term graft patency.

  7. Replication and recombination factors contributing to recombination-dependent bypass of DNA lesions by template switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Vanoli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Damage tolerance mechanisms mediating damage-bypass and gap-filling are crucial for genome integrity. A major damage tolerance pathway involves recombination and is referred to as template switch. Template switch intermediates were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis in the proximity of replication forks as X-shaped structures involving sister chromatid junctions. The homologous recombination factor Rad51 is required for the formation/stabilization of these intermediates, but its mode of action remains to be investigated. By using a combination of genetic and physical approaches, we show that the homologous recombination factors Rad55 and Rad57, but not Rad59, are required for the formation of template switch intermediates. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 mutant is normal in triggering a checkpoint response following DNA damage but is impaired in X-structure formation. The Exo1 nuclease also has stimulatory roles in this process. The checkpoint kinase, Rad53, is required for X-molecule formation and phosphorylates Rad55 robustly in response to DNA damage. Although Rad55 phosphorylation is thought to activate recombinational repair under conditions of genotoxic stress, we find that Rad55 phosphomutants do not affect the efficiency of X-molecule formation. We also examined the DNA polymerase implicated in the DNA synthesis step of template switch. Deficiencies in translesion synthesis polymerases do not affect X-molecule formation, whereas DNA polymerase δ, required also for bulk DNA synthesis, plays an important role. Our data indicate that a subset of homologous recombination factors, together with DNA polymerase δ, promote the formation of template switch intermediates that are then preferentially dissolved by the action of the Sgs1 helicase in association with the Top3 topoisomerase rather than resolved by Holliday Junction nucleases. Our results allow us to propose the choreography through which different

  8. Potential groundwater contribution to Amazon evapotranspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate and land ecosystem models simulate a dry-season vegetation stress in the Amazon forest, but observations do not support these results, indicating adequate water supply. Proposed mechanisms include larger soil water store and deeper roots in nature and the ability of roots to move water up and down (hydraulic redistribution, both absent in the models. Here we provide a first-order assessment of the potential importance of the upward soil water flux from the groundwater driven by capillarity. We present a map of equilibrium water table depth from available observations and a groundwater model simulation constrained by these observations. We then present a map of maximum capillary flux these water table depths, combined with the fine-textured soils in the Amazon, can potentially support. The maps show that the water table beneath the Amazon can be shallow in lowlands and river valleys (<5 m in 36% and <10 m in 60% of Amazonia. These water table depths can potentially accommodate a maximum capillary flux of 2.1 mm day−1 to the land surface averaged over Amazonia, but varies from 0.6 to 3.7 mm day−1 across nine study sites.

    We note that the results presented here are based on limited observations and simple equilibrium model calculations, and as such, have important limitations and must be interpreted accordingly. The potential capillary fluxes are not indicative of their contribution to the actual evapotranspiration, and they are only an assessment of the possible rate at which this flux can occur, to illustrate the power of soil capillary force acting on a shallow water table in fine textured soils. They may over-estimate the actual flux where the surface soils remain moist. Their contribution to the actual evapotranspiration can only be assessed through fully coupled model simulation of the dynamic feedbacks between soil water and groundwater with sub-daily climate forcing. The equilibrium water table

  9. Bariatric bypasses contribute to loss of bone mineral density but reduce axial back pain in morbidly obese patients considering spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many spine surgeons recommend stringent weight loss, including bariatric bypass procedures, prior to “elective” spine surgery (should not be for axial back pain alone) in morbidly obese patients (defined by a body mass index (BMI) of >40 mg/kg2 or >35 mg/kg2 with two or more major comorbidities) to reduce their greater risk for major perioperative complications. Although bypasses typically lead to marked weight reduction and even reduced axial back pain, they also promote unrecognized and often insufficiently treated vitamin D deficiency and loss of bone mineral density. Methods: Morbidly obese patients who are under consideration for “elective” spine operations (other than for back pain alone) are often told to lose weight. Some choose to undergo bariatric bypass procedures, but are unaware of the potential risks/complications of these procedures. Results: Within the first 2 years following most bariatric bypass procedures, patients experience not only marked loss of weight and muscle mass, but also significant vitamin D deficiency and loss of bone mineral density, increasing their susceptibility to fractures. Nevertheless, some patients also experience a sufficient reduction of axial back pain to avoid spinal surgery. Conclusions: Morbidly obese patients under consideration for “elective” spine surgery may undergo bariatric bypass procedures that lead to a significant reduction of vitamin D levels and loss of bone mineral density. However, potential benefits may include a sufficient reduction of axial back pain to avoid surgery in a select subset of patients altogether. PMID:28217392

  10. Leptomeningeal contrast enhancement in moyamoya: its potential role in postoperative assessment of circulation through the bypass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yasui, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital (Japan); Kitano, S.; Sakamoto, H. [Dept. of Paediatric Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    Leptomeningeal contrast enhancement (LMCE) is one of the MRI features of moyamoya. Its clinical significance, however, is not elucidated. Our purpose was to characterise LMCE on MRI and to evaluate its role in the assessment of circulation through a surgically established bypass in moyamoya. We studied 16 patients with idiopathic moyamoya (seven males, nine females, includingt four children, aged 7 to 54 years, mean 24 years) who underwent T1-weighted MRI before and after intravenous contrast medium. The presence of LMCE, its intensity and anatomical distribution, catheter angiographic findings, and relation of LMCE to the bypass surgery were assessed. More LMCE was seen in the cerebrum in most patients with moyamoya than in normal controls. LMCE in the brain stem and cerebellum was minimal, similar to that seen in the controls. LMCE was less prominent following surgery than before operation or in patients who did not undergo surgery. In three patients examined both before and after operation LMCE became less prominent following bypass surgery. As LMCE becomes less prominent after ''effective'' bypass surgery, this may be used for evaluation of effectiveness of surgery in moyamoya. (orig.)

  11. Pressure and oxygen debt on bypass - potential quality markers of perfusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poullis, Mike; Palmer, K; Al-Rawi, O; Johnson, I; Ridgeway, T

    2012-05-01

    No markers of quality of perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), to complement rewarming rate, maximum temperature on rewarming, lowest haematocrit, and blood glucose, exist. Using the electronic acquisition of blood pressure on bypass (JOCAP system), the percentage of time perfusion pressure was below 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 mmHg, average deviance, confidence interval, median, mode, standard deviation, variance, and average, maximum and cumulative oxygen debt were calculated. Numerous different readouts of achievement of maintenance of constant pressure on bypass and oxygen debt are now easily achievable with perfusion electronic data management systems. Mean, median, and mode offer poor discrimination of pressure control during CPB. Percentage of time perfusion pressure was below 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 mmHg, average deviance, confidence interval, and standard deviation all have discriminatory power, but need clinical correlation for their significance. A composite score involving non-pressure readouts (e.g. oxygen delivery, arterial and venous saturations, and flow rates) may need to be integrated into any perfusion quality marker. Assessment of adequacy of constant perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery may allow the scientific evaluation of pressure and oxygen delivery on bypass for patients to be compared accurately. Currently, in studies involving CPB, blood pressure targets are stated with no quantitative assessment of adequacy of achievement of these targets. Electronic data monitoring during cardiopulmonary bypass, when correlated with clinical outcome, may help to provide a marker of quality of perfusion pressure during CPB and may, indeed, allow patient-specific perfusion pressure strategies to be developed.

  12. Potent Antioxidative Potential of Propofol during Cardiopulmonary Bypass in the Adult

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Shihai(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Stewart J R Blackwell W H Crute S L et al.Inhibitionof surgically induced ischemia/reperfusion injury by oxygen free radical scavengers.J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1983 86:262[2]Cavarocchi N C England M D Schaff H V et al.Oxygen free radical generation during cardiopulmonary bypass:correlation with complement activation.Circulation 1986 74 (suppl):Ⅲ 130[3]Nakaya H Tohse N Kanno M.Electrophysiological derangements induced by lipid peroxidation in cardiac tissue.Am J Physiol 1987 253:H1089[4]Hess M L Manson N H.Molecular oxygen:Friend and foe.The role of the oxygen free radical system in the cal cium paradox the oxygen paradox and ischemia/reperfusion injury.J Mol Cell Cardiol 1984 16:969[5]Josephson R A Silverman H S Lakatta E G et al.Study of the mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl free radical-induced cellular injury and calcium overload in cardiac myocytes.J Biol Chem 1991 266:2354[6]Webster N R Nunn J F.Molecular structure of free radicals and their importance in biological reactions.Br J Anaesth 1988 60:98[7]Navapurkar V U Skepper J N Jones J G et al.Propofol preserves the viability of isolated rat hepatocyte suspensions under an oxidant stress.Anesth Analg 1998 87:1152[8]Hryson H M Fulton B R Faulds D.Propofol:an update of its use in anaesthesia and conscious sedation.Drugs 1995 50:513[9]Murphy P G Myers D S Davies M J et al.The antioxidant potential of propofol (2 6-diisopropylphenol).Br J Anaesth 1992 68:613[10]Murphy P G Davies M J Columb M O et al.Effect of propofol and thiopentone on free radical mediated oxidative stress of the erythrocyte.Br J Anaesth 1996 76:536[11]Lohr G W Waller H D.Glucose-6-phosphoate dehydrogenase.In:Bergmeyer H U eds.Methods of Enzymatic Analysis.Vol.3 2end ed.New York:Academic 1974.636-643[12]Bergmeyer H U Gawehn K Grassl M.Enzymes as biochemical reagents.In:Bergmeyer H U.eds.Methods of Enzymatic Analysis.Vol.1 2end ed.New York:Academic 1974.424-522[13]Barbagallo M

  13. Down-Regulation of Renal Gluconeogenesis in Type II Diabetic Rats Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Potential Mechanism in Hypoglycemic Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was initiated to evaluate the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on renal gluconeogenesis in type 2 diabetic rats and its relationship with hormonal parameters. Methods: Diabetic rats were induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 35 mg/kg combined with a high-fat diet. They were then randomly divided into three groups: diabetes model group (DM group, n = 8, sham Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group (SRYGB group, n = 8, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group (RYGB group, n = 14. Another 8 normal rats comprised the normal control group (NC group, n = 8. Body weight, glucose, serum lipid, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, leptin, and adiponectin were measured pre- and postoperatively. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, insulin receptor-α (IR-α, insulin receptor-β (IR-β, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (Gsk3b were measured in renal cortex by using RT-PCR and Western immune-blot analyses on the 4th week after operation. Results: Following RYGB surgery, surgery-treated rats showed significantly improved oral glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance as well as increased post-gavage insulin levels and serum circulating levels of GLP-1 and adiponectin. RT-PCR and Western immune-blot analyses showed PEPCK and G6Pase protein and mRNA to be significantly decreased in the renal cortex in the RYGB group (p Conclusion: Down-regulation of renal gluconeogenic enzymes might be a potential mechanism in hypoglycemia. An improved insulin signal pathway in the renal cortex and increased circulating adiponectin concentrations may contribute to the decline of renal gluconeogenesis following RYGB surgery.

  14. Potential groundwater contribution to Amazon evapotranspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate and land ecosystem models simulate a dry-season vegetation stress in the Amazon forest, but observations show enhanced growth in response to higher radiation under less cloudy skies, indicating an adequate water supply. Proposed mechanisms include larger soil water store and deeper roots in nature and the ability of roots to move water up and down (hydraulic redistribution. Here we assess the importance of the upward soil water flux from the groundwater driven by capillarity. We present a map of water table depth from observations and groundwater modeling, and a map of potential capillary flux these water table depths can sustain. The maps show that the water table beneath the Amazon can be quite shallow in lowlands and river valleys (<5 m in 36% and <10 m in 60% of Amazonia. The water table can potentially sustain a capillary flux of >2.1 mm day−1 to the land surface averaged over Amazonia, but varies from 0.6 to 3.7 mm day−1 across nine study sites. Current models simulate a large-scale reduction in dry-season photosynthesis under today's climate and a possible dieback under projected future climate with a longer dry season, converting the Amazon from a net carbon sink to a source and accelerating warming. The inclusion of groundwater and capillary flux may modify the model results.

  15. The potential contribution of sinks to meeting Kyoto Protocol commitments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missfeldt, F.; Haites, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol to the climate convention makes provision for sink enhancement activities to contribute to meeting the greenhouse gas emissions limitation commitments of industrialised countries. This paper analyses the potential contribution of sink enhancement activities to meeting commitments...

  16. Potential Mechanisms Mediating Sustained Weight Loss Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaronidis, Janine M; Batterham, Rachel L

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for severe obesity. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG), the most commonly performed procedures, lead to sustained weight loss, improvements in obesity-related comorbidities and reduced mortality. In humans, the main driver for weight loss following RYGB and SG is reduced energy intake. Reduced appetite, changes in subjective taste and food preference, and altered neural response to food cues are thought to drive altered eating behavior. The biological mediators underlying these changes remain incompletely understood but changes in gut-derived signals, as a consequence of altered nutrient and/or biliary flow, are key candidates.

  17. Bypassing damaged nervous tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Shneider, M N

    2016-01-01

    We show the principal ability of bypassing damaged demyelinated portions of nervous tissue, thereby restoring its normal function for the passage of action potentials. We carry out a theoretical analysis on the basis of the synchronization mechanism of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons, proposed recently in [1]. And we discuss the feasibility of implement a bypass to restore damaged nervous tissue and creating an artificial neuron network.

  18. Taming the Goldstone contributions to the effective potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Stephen P. [Fermilab

    2014-07-28

    The standard perturbative effective potential suffers from two related problems of principle involving the field-dependent Goldstone boson squared mass, G. First, in general G can be negative, and it actually is negative in the Standard Model; this leads to imaginary contributions to the effective potential that are not associated with a physical instability, and therefore spurious. Second, in the limit that G approaches zero, the effective potential minimization condition is logarithmically divergent already at two-loop order, and has increasingly severe power-law singularities at higher loop orders. I resolve both issues by resumming the Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential. For the resulting resummed effective potential, the minimum value and the minimization condition that gives the vacuum expectation value are obtained in forms that do not involve G at all.

  19. Neuraminidase-1 contributes significantly to the degradation of neuronal B-series gangliosides but not to the bypass of the catabolic block in Tay–Sachs mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.K. Timur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tay–Sachs disease is a severe lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene coding for α subunit of lysosomal β-Hexosaminidase A enzyme, which converts GM2 to GM3 ganglioside. HexA−/− mice, depleted of the β-Hexosaminidase A iso-enzyme, remain asymptomatic up to 1 year of age because of a metabolic bypass by neuraminidase(s. These enzymes remove a sialic acid residue converting GM2 to GA2, which is further degraded by the still intact β-Hexosaminidase B iso-enzyme into lactosylceramide. A previously identified ganglioside metabolizing neuraminidase, Neu4, is abundantly expressed in the mouse brain and has activity against gangliosides like GM2 in vitro. Neu4−/− mice showed increased GD1a and decreased GM1 ganglioside in the brain suggesting the importance of the Neu4 in ganglioside catabolism. Mice with targeted disruption of both HexA and Neu4 genes showed accumulating GM2 ganglioside and epileptic seizures with 40% penetrance, indicating that the neuraminidase Neu4 is a modulatory gene, but may not be the only neuraminidase contributing to the metabolic bypass in HexA−/− mice. Therefore, we elucidated the biological role of neuraminidase-1 in ganglioside degradation in mouse. Analysis of HexA−/−Neu1−/− and HexA−/−Neu4−/−Neu1−/− mice models showed significant contribution of neuraminidase-1 on B-series ganglioside degradation in the brain. Therefore, we speculate that other neuraminidase/neuraminidases such as Neu2 and/or Neu3 might be also involved in the ganglioside degradation pathway in HexA−/− mice.

  20. Neuraminidase-1 contributes significantly to the degradation of neuronal B-series gangliosides but not to the bypass of the catabolic block in Tay-Sachs mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timur, Z K; Akyildiz Demir, S; Marsching, C; Sandhoff, R; Seyrantepe, V

    2015-09-01

    Tay–Sachs disease is a severe lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene coding for α subunit of lysosomal β-Hexosaminidase A enzyme, which converts GM2 to GM3 ganglioside. HexA(−/−) mice, depleted of the β-Hexosaminidase A iso-enzyme, remain asymptomatic up to 1 year of age because of a metabolic bypass by neuraminidase(s). These enzymes remove a sialic acid residue converting GM2 to GA2, which is further degraded by the still intact β-Hexosaminidase B iso-enzyme into lactosylceramide. A previously identified ganglioside metabolizing neuraminidase, Neu4, is abundantly expressed in the mouse brain and has activity against gangliosides like GM2in vitro. Neu4(−/−) mice showed increased GD1a and decreased GM1 ganglioside in the brain suggesting the importance of the Neu4 in ganglioside catabolism. Mice with targeted disruption of both HexA and Neu4 genes showed accumulating GM2 ganglioside and epileptic seizures with 40% penetrance, indicating that the neuraminidase Neu4 is a modulatory gene, but may not be the only neuraminidase contributing to the metabolic bypass in HexA(−/−) mice. Therefore, we elucidated the biological role of neuraminidase-1 in ganglioside degradation in mouse. Analysis of HexA(−/−) Neu1(−/−) and HexA(−/−) Neu4(−/−) Neu1(−/−) mice models showed significant contribution of neuraminidase-1 on B-series ganglioside degradation in the brain. Therefore, we speculate that other neuraminidase/neuraminidases such as Neu2 and/or Neu3 might be also involved in the ganglioside degradation pathway in HexA(−/−) mice.

  1. Potential contribution of genomics and biotechnology in animal production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall objective of the book chapter is to define the potential contribution of genomics in livestock production in Latin American countries. A brief description on what is genomics, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection (GS) is provided. Genomics has been rapidly adopte...

  2. Nucleus-nucleus potential with shell-correction contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, V Yu

    2015-01-01

    The full relaxed-density potential between spherical nuclei is considered as a sum of the macroscopic and shell-correction contributions. The macroscopic part of the potential is related to a nucleus-nucleus potential obtained in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi approach with the Skyrme and Coulomb forces and the relaxed-density ansatz for evaluation of proton and neutron densities of interacting nuclei. A simple prescription for the shell-correction part of the total potential is discussed. The parameters of the shell-correction and macroscopic parts of the relaxed-density potential are found by fitting the empirical barrier heights of the 89 nucleus-nucleus systems as well as macroscopic potentials evaluated for 1485 nucleus-nucleus systems at 12 distances around touching points.

  3. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Neil P M; Paillard, Aurore C; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin.

  4. Resummation of Goldstone boson contributions to the MSSM effective potential

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Nilanjana

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the resummation of the Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). This eliminates the formal problems of spurious imaginary parts and logarithmic singularities in the minimization conditions when the tree-level Goldstone boson squared masses are negative or approach zero. The numerical impact of the resummation is shown to be almost always very small. We also show how to write the two-loop minimization conditions so that Goldstone boson squared masses do not appear at all, and so that they can be solved without iteration.

  5. Resummation of Goldstone boson contributions to the MSSM effective potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nilanjana; Martin, Stephen P.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the resummation of the Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. This eliminates the formal problems of spurious imaginary parts and logarithmic singularities in the minimization conditions when the tree-level Goldstone boson squared masses are negative or approach zero. The numerical impact of the resummation is shown to be almost always very small. We also show how to write the two-loop minimization conditions so that Goldstone boson squared masses do not appear at all, and so that they can be solved without iteration.

  6. Peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 contribute to decreased food intake after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, M S; Jørgensen, N B; Bojsen-Møller, K N;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Exaggerated postprandial secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) may explain appetite reduction and weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), but causality has not been established. We hypothesized that food intake decreases after surgery...

  7. Potential follow-up increases private contributions to public goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Todd; Ternovski, John; Yoeli, Erez

    2016-05-10

    People contribute more to public goods when their contributions are made more observable to others. We report an intervention that subtly increases the observability of public goods contributions when people are solicited privately and impersonally (e.g., mail, email, social media). This intervention is tested in a large-scale field experiment (n = 770,946) in which people are encouraged to vote through get-out-the-vote letters. We vary whether the letters include the message, "We may call you after the election to ask about your voting experience." Increasing the perceived observability of whether people vote by including that message increased the impact of the get-out-the-vote letters by more than the entire effect of a typical get-out-the-vote letter. This technique for increasing perceived observability can be replicated whenever public goods solicitations are made in private.

  8. Extremophilic micro-algae and their potential contribution in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Prachi; Mikulic, Paulina; Vonshak, Avigad; Beardall, John; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2015-05-01

    Micro-algae have potential as sustainable sources of energy and products and alternative mode of agriculture. However, their mass cultivation is challenging due to low survival under harsh outdoor conditions and competition from other, undesired, species. Extremophilic micro-algae have a role to play by virtue of their ability to grow under acidic or alkaline pH, high temperature, light, CO2 level and metal concentration. In this review, we provide several examples of potential biotechnological applications of extremophilic micro-algae and the ranges of tolerated extremes. We also discuss the adaptive mechanisms of tolerance to these extremes. Analysis of phylogenetic relationship of the reported extremophiles suggests certain groups of the Kingdom Protista to be more tolerant to extremophilic conditions than other taxa. While extremophilic microalgae are beginning to be explored, much needs to be done in terms of the physiology, molecular biology, metabolic engineering and outdoor cultivation trials before their true potential is realized.

  9. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Vertical Banded Gastroplasty Induce Long-Term Changes on the Human Gut Microbiome Contributing to Fat Mass Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tremaroli, Valentina; Karlsson, Fredrik; Werling, Malin

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective procedure for the treatment of obesity. Given the role of the gut microbiota in regulating host metabolism and adiposity, we investigated the long-term effects of bariatric surgery on the microbiome of patients randomized to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass...... or vertical banded gastroplasty and matched for weight and fat mass loss. The two surgical procedures induced similar and durable changes on the gut microbiome that were not dependent on body mass index and resulted in altered levels of fecal and circulating metabolites compared with obese controls...

  10. Potential Contributions of Music Education to Peacebuilding: Curricular Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the potential role of music education in peacebuilding, specifically concentrating on issues of structural, indirect violence often unwittingly perpetuated through Eurocentric music curricula. I point out that such violence occurs not only in curricula that represent only European classical traditions, but moreover in…

  11. Potential Effect of L-Carnitine on the Prevention of Myocardial Injury after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Dastan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: L-carnitine has been demonstrated to confer cardiac protection against ischemia reperfusion injury in animals. This study evaluates the effects of L-carnitine administration on cardiac biomarkers after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery.Methods: One hundred thirty-four patients undergoing elective CABG surgery, without a history of myocardial ischemia or previous L-carnitine treatment, were enrolled and randomly assigned to an L-carnitine group ([n = 67], 3000 mg/d, started 2 days preoperatively and continued for 2 days after surgery or a control group (n = 67. CK-MB (creatine kinase, muscle- brain subunits and troponin T (TnT levels were assessed in all the patients before surgery as baseline levels and at 8 and 24 hours postoperatively.Results: Our study included 134 patients (99 [73.8%] males at a mean ± SD age of 59.94 ± 8.61 years who were candidates for CABG and randomized them into control or L-carnitine groups. The baseline demographic characteristics, including age (60.01 ± 9.23 in the L-carnitine group vs. 59.88 ± 7.98 in the control group and sex (54 [80.6%] in the L-carnitine group vs. 45 [67.2%] in the control group did not show any significant differences (p value=0.93 and 0.08, respectively. Patients in the L-carnitine group had lower levels of CK-MB (mean ± SD, 25.06 ± 20.29 in the L-carnitine group vs. 24.26 ± 14.61 in the control group, but the difference was not significant (p value = 0.28. TnT levels also showed no significant differences between the two groups (399.50 ± 378.91 in the L-carnitine group vs. 391.48 ± 222.02 in the control group; p value = 0.34. Conclusion: In this population of intermediate- to high-risk patients undergoing CABG surgery, L-carnitine did not reduce CK-MB and TnT levels.

  12. Coronary Artery Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 3 days in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Life After Bypass After bypass surgery, your doctor will recommend that you join a cardiac rehabilitation program. These programs help you make lifestyle changes ...

  13. Gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Roux-en-Y; Weight-loss surgery - gastric bypass; Obesity surgery - gastric bypass ... bypass surgery is not a quick fix for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. After this surgery, you must eat healthy foods, control portion sizes of ...

  14. Peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 contribute to decreased food intake after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svane, M S; Jørgensen, N B; Bojsen-Møller, K N; Dirksen, C; Nielsen, S; Kristiansen, V B; Toräng, S; Wewer Albrechtsen, N J; Rehfeld, J F; Hartmann, B; Madsbad, S; Holst, J J

    2016-11-01

    Exaggerated postprandial secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) may explain appetite reduction and weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), but causality has not been established. We hypothesized that food intake decreases after surgery through combined actions from GLP-1 and PYY. GLP-1 actions can be blocked using the GLP-1 receptor antagonist Exendin 9-39 (Ex-9), whereas PYY actions can be inhibited by the administration of a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor preventing the formation of PYY3-36. Appetite-regulating gut hormones and appetite ratings during a standard mixed-meal test and effects on subsequent ad libitum food intake were evaluated in two studies: in study 1, nine patients with type 2 diabetes were examined prospectively before and 3 months after RYGB with and without Ex-9. In study 2, 12 RYGB-operated patients were examined in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design on four experimental days with: (1) placebo, (2) Ex-9, (3) the DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin, to reduce formation of PYY3-36 and (4) Ex-9/sitagliptin combined. In study 1, food intake decreased by 35% following RYGB compared with before surgery. Before surgery, GLP-1 receptor blockage increased food intake but no effect was seen postoperatively, whereas PYY secretion was markedly increased. In study 2, combined GLP-1 receptor blockage and DPP-4 inhibitor mediated lowering of PYY3-36 increased food intake by ~20% in RYGB patients, whereas neither GLP-1 receptor blockage nor DPP-4 inhibition alone affected food intake, perhaps because of concomitant marked increases in the unblocked hormone. Blockade of actions from only one of the two L-cell hormones, GLP-1 and PYY3-36, resulted in concomitant increased secretion of the other, probably explaining the absent effect on food intake on these experimental days. Combined blockade of GLP-1 and PYY actions increased food intake after RYGB, supporting that these hormones have a role in

  15. Do Chinese and American contributions in top journals have an equal citation potential?

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Jielan; Rousseau, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose: We want to contribute to the evaluation of Chinese research, focusing on contributions in top journals. Design/methodology/approach: Using a Mann-Whitney test we investigate if contributions in Nature, Science or the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) by Chinese or American authors only, i.e. articles for which all authors have a Chinese or an American address, have a different citation potential. Findings: There is no rea...

  16. Flood Bypass Capacity Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siclari, A.; Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Large river flows can damage adjacent flood-prone areas, by exceeding river channel and levee capacities. Particularly large floods are difficult to contain in leveed river banks alone. Flood bypasses often can efficiently reduce flood risks, where excess river flow is diverted over a weir to bypasses, that incur much less damage and cost. Additional benefits of bypasses include ecosystem protection, agriculture, groundwater recharge and recreation. Constructing or expanding an existing bypass costs in land purchase easements, and levee setbacks. Accounting for such benefits and costs, this study develops a simple mathematical model for optimizing flood bypass capacity using benefit-cost and risk analysis. Application to the Yolo Bypass, an existing bypass along the Sacramento River in California, estimates optimal capacity that economically reduces flood damage and increases various benefits, especially for agriculture. Land availability is likely to limit bypass expansion. Compensation for landowners could relax such limitations. Other economic values could affect the optimal results, which are shown by sensitivity analysis on major parameters. By including land geography into the model, location of promising capacity expansions can be identified.

  17. Natural headland sand bypassing; towards identifying and modelling the mechanisms and processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bin Ab Razak, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural headland sand bypassing: Towards identifying and modelling the mechanisms and processes contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms and processes of sand bypassing in artificial and non-artificial coastal environments through a numerical modelling study. Sand bypassing processes in ge

  18. The potential contribution to climate change mitigation from temporary carbon storage in biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Susanne Vedel; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Nielsen, Per H.

    2015-01-01

    of biomaterials.The recently developed approach for quantifying the climate tipping potential (CTP) of emissions is used, with some adaption, to account for the value of temporary carbon storage. CTP values for short-, medium- and long-term carbon storage in chosen biomaterials are calculated for two possible...... future atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentration development scenarios. The potential magnitude of the temporary carbon storage in biomaterials is estimated by considering the global polymer production being biobased in the future.Both sets of CTP values show the same trend; storage which releases...... contributes with negative CTP values, which means mitigation. The longer the duration of the storage, the larger the mitigation potential.Temporary carbon storage in biomaterials has a potential for contributing to avoid or postpone the crossing of a climatic target level of 450 ppm CO2e, depending on GHG...

  19. The potential contribution to climate change mitigation from temporary carbon storage in biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Susanne Vedel; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Nielsen, Per H.

    2015-01-01

    contributes with negative CTP values, which means mitigation. The longer the duration of the storage, the larger the mitigation potential.Temporary carbon storage in biomaterials has a potential for contributing to avoid or postpone the crossing of a climatic target level of 450 ppm CO2e, depending on GHG...... concentration development scenario. The potential mitigation value depends on the timing of sequestration and re-emission of CO2. The suggested CTP approach enables inclusion of the potential benefit from temporary carbon storage in the environmental profile of biomaterials. This should be seen as supplement...... value of temporary carbon storage in terms of climate change mitigation has been widely discussed, this has not yet been directly coupled to avoiding climatic target levels representing predicted climatic tipping points. This paper provides recommendations on how to model temporary carbon storage...

  20. Early formula feeding practices and their potential contribution to later obesity risk

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tarrant, R C

    2013-01-02

    Background and Aims: Early feeding practices, including early introduction to solid foods and overfeeding, are known risk factors for childhood obesity. This study aimed to assess maternal formula feeding practices and infant formula feeding patterns, factors that are known to potentially contribute to later obesity risk. \\r\

  1. Contribution to activity: a lens for understanding students' potential and agency in physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhangi, Sanaz

    2017-03-01

    In this paper I argue for using the concept of contribution to activity to understand student engagement with science education and its transformational potential in formal settings. Drawing on transformative activist stance, I explain contribution as how individuals take part in and transform collective practices according to their own life agendas and get transformed themselves. As contribution to science education is a concept based on transformation, not adaptation, it can be especially informative when examining how underrepresented students in science can be more engaged in science education and eventually science. Using survey, interview and group conversations, and field observations in an undergraduate physics course, I put forward Zoey's case to illustrate my argument and show how her contribution to the activities in the course initiated change in the activity among her peers.

  2. Microscopic formulation of medium contributions to the first-order optical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, C. R.; Elster, Ch.; Thaler, R. M.

    1993-12-01

    A refinement of the first-order optical potential is introduced, consistent with multiple scattering theory and the spectator expansion. A systematic formalism is presented to treat medium contributions associated with the difference between the effective NN t matrix as required by multiple scattering theory and the free NN t matrix. A mean field potential is used to represent the action of the residual (A-1) nucleus upon the struck target nucleon (medium effects). We calculate elastic proton and neutron scattering from 40Ca, using the full Bonn interaction and two different mean field potentials taken from realistic and proven nuclear structure models. Results indicate that the medium contributions are insignificant at energies above 300 MeV and provide a significant improvement of the theoretical predictions for laboratory energies between 48 and 200 MeV.

  3. Microscopic formulation of medium contributions to the first-order optical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, C.R. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States) Center for Computationally Intensive Physics, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)); Elster, C. (Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)); Thaler, R.M. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States) Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States))

    1993-12-01

    A refinement of the first-order optical potential is introduced, consistent with multiple scattering theory and the spectator expansion. A systematic formalism is presented to treat medium contributions associated with the difference between the effective [ital NN] [ital t] matrix as required by multiple scattering theory and the free [ital NN] [ital t] matrix. A mean field potential is used to represent the action of the residual ([ital A][minus]1) nucleus upon the struck target nucleon (medium effects). We calculate elastic proton and neutron scattering from [sup 40]Ca, using the full Bonn interaction and two different mean field potentials taken from realistic and proven nuclear structure models. Results indicate that the medium contributions are insignificant at energies above 300 MeV and provide a significant improvement of the theoretical predictions for laboratory energies between 48 and 200 MeV.

  4. Your diet after gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric bypass surgery - your diet; Obesity - diet after bypass; Weight loss - diet after bypass ... You had gastric bypass surgery. This surgery made your stomach smaller by closing off most of your stomach with staples. It changed the way your ...

  5. Concentrating solar power. Its potential contribution to a sustainable energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    This report summarises the findings and recommendations of a study of concentrating solar power (CSP). The study has examined the potential contribution of CSP in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa (the MENA region) over the period to 2050, and the scientific and technical developments that will be required to realise that potential. This study critically reviews existing work and describes the scientific consensus on the status and prospects of this technology. It also identifies key outstanding issues and where knowledge gaps need to be filled for CSP to fulfil its potential contribution in Europe and the MENA region. Based on these findings, the study makes recommendations on how to improve national and European support programmes for CSP development and deployment. Specific aims of the study have been the following: (1) to review the current status of CSP technologies and identify the technological developments and research and development (R and D) needed to achieve reliable operation and cost competitiveness with fossil fuelled electricity generation; (2) to consider how issues associated with the intermittent nature of CSP for electricity generation due to the daily pattern of insolation and the potential for cloudy days can best be addressed; (3) to identify the environmental impacts and infrastructure requirements of CSP, and comment on the significance of these in relation to other options for electricity supply; and, consequently, (4) to develop a view of the potential contribution that CSP located in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa could make to the energy mix in those regions by 2020 and 2050. This report focuses primarily on the generation of electricity from CSP, but it is recognised that there are other potentially significant 'products' from CSP such as process steam for industry, water desalination, alternative energy carriers such as hydrogen and syngas, and decontamination of water supplies. Although not discussed in

  6. Radiative contribution to the effective potential in a composite Higgs model

    CERN Document Server

    DeGrand, T A; Jay, W I; Neil, E T; Shamir, Y; Svetitsky, B

    2016-01-01

    The SU(4) gauge theory with two flavors of Dirac fermions in the sextet representation shares features of a candidate for a composite Higgs model. The analogue of the Higgs multiplet of the Standard Model lives in the Goldstone manifold resulting from spontaneous breaking of the global symmetry SU(4) to SO(4). The Higgs potential arises from interaction with the particles of the Standard Model. We have computed the gauge boson contribution to the Higgs potential, using valence overlap fermions on a Wilson-clover sea. The calculation is similar to that of the electromagnetic mass splitting of the pion multiplet in QCD.

  7. The Potential Contribution of Phytoestrogens and Organochlorine Pesticides in an Experimental Fish Diet to Estrogenic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Munekazu; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Ushijima, Marie; Inudo, Makiko; Honda, Eiko; IWAHARA, Masayoshi; Cho, Hyeon-Seo; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Arizono, Koji

    2005-01-01

    Phytoestrogens and organochlorine pesticides in the diet of laboratory animals are a possible source of interference in bioassays that assess estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the levels of dietary phytoestrogens, organochlorine pesticides and the estrogenic activity of various diets for an experimental fish and discuss the potential contribution of these substances to estrogenic activity, in comparison with those used in previous studies. After hydrolysis with β-gluc...

  8. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: Contribution of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Harris, P. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Hijiazi, H.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Sputtering of lunar regolith by protons as well as solar-wind heavy ions is considered. From preliminary measurements of H+, Ar+1, Ar+6 and Ar+9 ion sputtering of JSC-1A AGGL lunar regolith simulant at solar wind velocities, and TRIM simulations of kinetic sputtering yields, the relative contributions of kinetic and potential sputtering contributions are estimated. An 80-fold enhancement of oxygen sputtering by Ar+ over same-velocity H+, and an additional x2 increase for Ar+9 over same-velocity Ar+ was measured. This enhancement persisted to the maximum fluences investigated is approximately 1016/cm (exp2). Modeling studies including the enhanced oxygen ejection by potential sputtering due to the minority heavy ion multicharged ion solar wind component, and the kinetic sputtering contribution of all solar wind constituents, as determined from TRIM sputtering simulations, indicate an overall 35% reduction of near-surface oxygen abundance. XPS analyses of simulant samples exposed to singly and multicharged Ar ions show the characteristic signature of reduced (metallic) Fe, consistent with the preferential ejection of oxygen atoms that can occur in potential sputtering of some metal oxides.

  9. Phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in surface waters--Their sources, occurrence, and potential contribution to estrogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarošová, Barbora; Javůrek, Jakub; Adamovský, Ondřej; Hilscherová, Klára

    2015-08-01

    This review discusses the potential contribution of phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens to in vitro estrogenic activities occurring in surface waters and in vivo estrogenic effects in fish. Main types, sources, and pathways of entry into aquatic environment of these detected compounds were summarized. Reviewed concentrations of phyto/mycoestrogens in surface waters were mostly undetectable or in low ng/L ranges, but exceeded tens of μg/L for the flavonoids biochanin A, daidzein and genistein at some sites. While a few phytosterols were reported to occur at relatively high concentrations in surface waters, information about their potencies in in vitro systems is very limited, and contradictory in some cases. The relative estrogenic activities of compounds (compared to standard estrogen 17β-estradiol) by various in vitro assays were included, and found to differ by orders of magnitude. These potencies were used to estimate total potential estrogenic activities based on chemical analyses of phyto/mycoestrogens. In vivo effective concentrations of waterborne phyto/mycoestrogens were available only for biochanin A, daidzein, formononetin, genistein, equol, sitosterol, and zearalenone. The lowest observable effect concentrations in vivo were reported for the mycoestrogen zearalenone. This compound and especially its metabolites also elicited the highest in vitro estrogenic potencies. Despite the limited information available, the review documents low contribution of phyto/mycoestrogens to estrogenic activity in vast majority of surface waters, but significant contribution to in vitro responses and potentially also to in vivo effects in areas with high concentrations.

  10. Bypass Flow Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Schultz

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measure the velocity fields that will populate the bypass flow study database.

  11. The Best Bypass Surgery Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Jensen, Birte Østergaard; Gluud, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Recent trials suggest that off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) reduces the risk of mortality and morbidity compared with conventional coronary artery bypass grafting (CCAB) using cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients with a moderate- to high-risk of complications after CCAB may have addit...

  12. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI...

  13. Partial Ileal Bypass Undone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beynen, A.C.; Schouten, J.A.; Hoitsma, H.F.W.

    1984-01-01

    Partial ileal bypass (PIB) for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia was introduced 20 years ago. About 110 cases have been described. We know of only 1 case of restoration of intestinal continuity; no details were given. We report here the second case of PIB in the Netherlands; the operation was r

  14. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    In coronary artery disease (CAD), the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to your heart muscle grow hardened and narrowed. You may try ... these treatments don't help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new ...

  15. Experimental laparoscopic aortobifemoral bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Y M; Chin, A K; Thompson, T A

    1995-08-01

    The goal of the present study is to develop a technique for laparoscopic aortobifemoral bypass. Piglets weighing between 60 and 78 kg were anesthetized with halothane. The lateral retroperitoneal approach was preferred to the more familiar anterior transperitoneal approach and was successfully completed in 19 piglets. The piglets were placed in the right lateral decubitus position. The first port (2 cm) was inserted halfway between the tip of the 12th rib and the iliac crest. Four other trocars were placed in the retroperitoneum after balloon inflation had allowed creation of a space which permitted visualization of the aorta from the left renal artery down to the aorto-iliac junction. After evacuation of the retropneumoperitoneum, the cavity was maintained using an abdominal lift device and a retractor. Using this approach, we performed four aorto-bifemoral bypasses (end-to-end aortic anastomosis) after conventional intravenous heparinization (100 IU/kg) in less than 4 h. Blood loss did not exceed 250 ml and the hematocrit remained stable. Postmortem evaluation of the grafts revealed they were positioned as in a conventional bypass, their limbs having followed in the created retroperitoneal tunnels along the path of the native arteries. No mortality occurred before sacrifice of the animals. We believe that this first performed series of totally retroperitoneal laparoscopic aortobifemoral bypasses in the porcine model is useful in preparation for human application due to the anatomical similarities in the periaortic region.

  16. Fine root branch orders contribute differentially to uptake, allocation, and return of potentially toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun-Jian; Kong, De-Liang; Wang, Wei; Guo, Da-Li; Wang, Yan-Bing; Xie, Qing-Long; Liu, Yang-Sheng; Zeng, Hui

    2013-10-15

    Growing evidence has revealed high heterogeneity of fine root networks in both structure and function, with different root orders corporately maintaining trees' physiological activities. However, little information is available on how fine root heterogeneity of trees responds to environmental stresses. We examined concentrations of seven potentially toxic metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb) within fine root networks and their correlations with root morphological and macro-elemental traits in six Chinese subtropical trees. The contributions of different orders of roots to fine-root metal storage and return were also estimated. Results showed no consistent pattern for the correlation among different metal concentration against root traits. Unlike root metal concentration that generally decreased with root order, root metal storage was commonly lowest in middle root orders. Root senescence was at least comparable to leaf senescence contributing to metal removal. Although the first-order roots constituted 7.2-22.3% of total fine root biomass, they disproportionately contributed to most of metal return fluxes via root senescence. The two distinct root functional modules contributed differentially to metal uptake, allocation, and return, with defensive (lower-order) roots effectively stabilizing and removing toxic metals and bulk buffering (higher-order) roots possessing a persistent but diluted metal pool. Our results suggest a strong association of physiological functions of metal detoxification and metal homeostasis with the structural heterogeneity in fine root architecture.

  17. The contribution of electrical synapses to field potential oscillations in the hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posłuszny, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Electrical synapses are a type of cellular membrane junction referred to as gap junctions (GJs). They provide a direct way to exchange ions between coupled cells and have been proposed as a structural basis for fast transmission of electrical potentials between neurons in the brain. For this reason GJs have been regarded as an important component within the neuronal networks that underlie synchronous neuronal activity and field potential oscillations. Initially, GJs appeared to play a particularly key role in the generation of high frequency oscillatory patterns in field potentials. In order to assess the scale of neuronal GJs contribution to field potential oscillations in the hippocampal formation, in vivo and in vitro studies are reviewed here. These investigations have shown that blocking the main neuronal GJs, those containing connexin 36 (Cx36-GJs), or knocking out the Cx36 gene affect field potential oscillatory patterns related to awake active behavior (gamma and theta rhythm) but have no effect on high frequency oscillations occurring during silent wake and sleep. Precisely how Cx36-GJs influence population activity of neurons is more complex than previously thought. Analysis of studies on the properties of transmission through GJ channels as well as Cx36-GJs functioning in pairs of coupled neurons provides some explanations of the specific influence of Cx36-GJs on field potential oscillations. It is proposed here that GJ transmission is strongly modulated by the level of neuronal network activity and changing behavioral states. Therefore, contribution of GJs to field potential oscillatory patterns depends on the behavioral state. I propose here a model, based on large body of experimental data gathered in this field by several authors, in which Cx36-GJ transmission especially contributes to oscillations related to active behavior, where it plays a role in filtering and enhancing coherent signals in the network under high-noise conditions. In contrast

  18. Potential contribution of wind farms to damp oscillations in weak grids with high wind penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, R.D. [Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Laboratorio de Electronica Industrial, Control e Instrumentacion (LEICI), Facultad de Ingenieria, P.O. Box 91, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Mantz, R.J. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICpba) (Argentina); Battaiotto, P.E. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-08-15

    In Argentinean Patagonia, there exists a growing interest in understanding local problems associated with the increasing of wind energy penetration in the grid. Recent papers show that some of these power quality problems can be reduced by the proper control of the wind farms. In this way, this work deals with the impact and potential contribution of wind generation on the damping of the electromechanical oscillations called inter- and intra-area oscillations. For gaining qualitative insights and understandings on this complex subject, a test system that allows to isolate the oscillations modes is considered. The analysis shows that new control concepts for wind farm can efficiently contribute to the power system damping. (author)

  19. Global Economic Effects of USA Biofuel Policy and the Potential Contribution from Advanced Biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gbadebo Oladosu; Keith Kline; Paul Leiby; Rocio Uria-Martinez; Maggie Davis; Mark Downing; Laurence Eaton

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the global economic effects of the USA renewable fuel standards (RFS2), and the potential contribution from advanced biofuels. Our simulation results imply that these mandates lead to an increase of 0.21 percent in the global gross domestic product (GDP) in 2022, including an increase of 0.8 percent in the USA and 0.02 percent in the rest of the world (ROW); relative to our baseline, no-RFS scenario. The incremental contributions to GDP from advanced biofuels in 2022 are estimated at 0.41 percent and 0.04 percent in the USA and ROW, respectively. Although production costs of advanced biofuels are higher than for conventional biofuels in our model, their economic benefits result from reductions in oil use, and their smaller impacts on food markets compared with conventional biofuels. Thus, the USA advanced biofuels targets are expected to have positive economic benefits.

  20. BMP7 and EREG Contribute to the Inductive Potential of Dental Mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Xuedong; Pi, Caixia; Xu, Ruoshi; Wan, Mian; Yang, Jing; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Chengcheng; Sun, Jianxun; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Liwei

    2015-05-08

    Odontogenesis is accomplished by reciprocal signaling between the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments. It is generally accepted that the inductive mesenchyme is capable of inducing the odontogenic commitment of both dental and non-dental epithelial cells. However, the duration of this signal in the developing dental mesenchyme and whether adult dental pulp tissue maintains its inductive capability remain unclear. This study investigated the contribution of growth factors to regulating the inductive potential of the dental mesenchyme. Human oral epithelial cells (OEs) were co-cultured with either human dental mesenchymal/papilla cells (FDPCs) or human dental pulp cells (ADPCs) under 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional conditions. Odontogenic-associated genes and proteins were detected by qPCR and immunofluorescence, respectively, and significant differences were observed between the two co-culture systems. The BMP7 and EREG expression levels in FDPCs were significantly higher than in ADPCs, as indicated by human growth factor PCR arrays and immunofluorescence analyses. OEs co-cultured with ADPCs supplemented with BMP7 and EREG expressed ameloblastic differentiation genes. Our study suggests that BMP7 and EREG expression in late bell-stage human dental papilla contributes to the inductive potential of dental mesenchyme. Furthermore, adult dental pulp cells supplemented with these two growth factors re-established the inductive potential of postnatal dental pulp tissue.

  1. BMP7 and EREG Contribute to the Inductive Potential of Dental Mesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Xuedong; Pi, Caixia; Xu, Ruoshi; Wan, Mian; Yang, Jing; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Chengcheng; Sun, Jianxun; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenesis is accomplished by reciprocal signaling between the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments. It is generally accepted that the inductive mesenchyme is capable of inducing the odontogenic commitment of both dental and non-dental epithelial cells. However, the duration of this signal in the developing dental mesenchyme and whether adult dental pulp tissue maintains its inductive capability remain unclear. This study investigated the contribution of growth factors to regulating the inductive potential of the dental mesenchyme. Human oral epithelial cells (OEs) were co-cultured with either human dental mesenchymal/papilla cells (FDPCs) or human dental pulp cells (ADPCs) under 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional conditions. Odontogenic-associated genes and proteins were detected by qPCR and immunofluorescence, respectively, and significant differences were observed between the two co-culture systems. The BMP7 and EREG expression levels in FDPCs were significantly higher than in ADPCs, as indicated by human growth factor PCR arrays and immunofluorescence analyses. OEs co-cultured with ADPCs supplemented with BMP7 and EREG expressed ameloblastic differentiation genes. Our study suggests that BMP7 and EREG expression in late bell-stage human dental papilla contributes to the inductive potential of dental mesenchyme. Furthermore, adult dental pulp cells supplemented with these two growth factors re-established the inductive potential of postnatal dental pulp tissue. PMID:25952286

  2. Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zakkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB revolutionized cardiac surgery and contributed immensely to improved patients outcomes. CPB is associated with the activation of different coagulation, proinflammatory, survival cascades and altered redox state. Haemolysis, ischaemia, and perfusion injury and neutrophils activation during CPB play a pivotal role in oxidative stress and the associated activation of proinflammatory and proapoptotic signalling pathways which can affect the function and recovery of multiple organs such as the myocardium, lungs, and kidneys and influence clinical outcomes. The administration of agents with antioxidant properties during surgery either intravenously or in the cardioplegia solution may reduce ROS burst and oxidative stress during CPB. Alternatively, the use of modified circuits such as minibypass can modify both proinflammatory responses and oxidative stress.

  3. Rare taxa have potential to make metabolic contributions in enhanced biological phosphorus removal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Christopher E; Strachan, Blake J; Hanson, Niels W; Hahn, Aria S; Hall, Eric R; Rabinowitz, Barry; Mavinic, Donald S; Ramey, William D; Hallam, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) relies on diverse but specialized microbial communities to mediate the cycling and ultimate removal of phosphorus from municipal wastewaters. However, little is known about microbial activity and dynamics in relation to process fluctuations in EBPR ecosystems. Here, we monitored temporal changes in microbial community structure and potential activity across each bioreactor zone in a pilot-scale EBPR treatment plant by examining the ratio of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) to SSU rRNA gene (rDNA) over a 120 day study period. Although the majority of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the EBPR ecosystem were rare, many maintained high potential activities based on SSU rRNA : rDNA ratios, suggesting that rare OTUs contribute substantially to protein synthesis potential in EBPR ecosystems. Few significant differences in OTU abundance and activity were observed between bioreactor redox zones, although differences in temporal activity were observed among phylogenetically cohesive OTUs. Moreover, observed temporal activity patterns could not be explained by measured process parameters, suggesting that other ecological drivers, such as grazing or viral lysis, modulated community interactions. Taken together, these results point towards complex interactions selected for within the EBPR ecosystem and highlight a previously unrecognized functional potential among low abundance microorganisms in engineered ecosystems. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Potential Contributions of Lethal and Edema Toxins to the Pathogenesis of Anthrax Associated Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Q. Eichacker

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of Bacillus anthracis in the US and Europe over the past 10 years have emphasized the health threat this lethal bacteria poses even for developed parts of the world. In contrast to cutaneous anthrax, inhalational disease in the US during the 2001 outbreaks and the newly identified injectional drug use form of disease in the UK and Germany have been associated with relatively high mortality rates. One notable aspect of these cases has been the difficulty in supporting patients once shock has developed. Anthrax bacilli produce several different components which likely contribute to this shock. Growing evidence indicates that both major anthrax toxins may produce substantial cardiovascular dysfunction. Lethal toxin (LT can alter peripheral vascular function; it also has direct myocardial depressant effects. Edema toxin (ET may have even more pronounced peripheral vascular effects than LT, including the ability to interfere with the actions of conventional vasopressors. Additionally, ET also appears capable of interfering with renal sodium and water retention. Importantly, the two toxins exert their actions via quite different mechanisms and therefore have the potential to worsen shock and outcome in an additive fashion. Finally, both toxins have the ability to inhibit host defense and microbial clearance, possibly contributing to the very high bacterial loads noted in patients dying with anthrax. This last point is clinically relevant since emerging data has begun to implicate other bacterial components such as anthrax cell wall in the shock and organ injury observed with infection. Taken together, accumulating evidence regarding the potential contribution of LT and ET to anthrax-associated shock supports efforts to develop adjunctive therapies that target both toxins in patients with progressive shock.

  5. Availability, usage and expected contribution of potential nursery habitats for the California halibut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodrie, F. Joel; Mendoza, Guillermo

    2006-06-01

    Coastal ecosystems have been identified as important nursery habitats for many of the world's fishery species. Beyond this, there remain many questions about what exactly constitutes high-value, even critical, habitat for juvenile fish. A first step in investigating nursery habitat value should be to catalogue the spatial coverage (availability) of all potential nursery habitats as well as the distribution (usage) of juvenile fish within those habitats. We conducted two years of fall surveys in the nearshore areas of San Diego County, CA, examining the spatial distribution of 0-group California halibut, Paralichthys californicus. The database generated by 527 otter trawls and block-net seine collections was used to produce a series of models employing regression trees to study the abiotic factors (water column and bottom features) that affect juvenile distributions. Along the exposed coast, highest 0-group densities (0.002-0.008 individuals/m 2 (indiv/m 2)) occurred where temperatures exceeded 21.5 °C (2003), and at depths between 3.3 and 5.2 m (2004). Within protected embayments, densities were higher at depths less than 1.5 m (0.054-0.430 indiv/m 2) and, in 2004, inside channeled marsh estuaries (0.156 indiv/m 2). The spatial coverage of potential nursery habitats was calculated using a Geographic Information System (GIS) database, and the total number of resident 0-group halibut within each site was estimated (habitat area × juvenile halibut density) as a proxy for expected contribution of halibut advancing to the adult stock from each nursery. Although 85% of the potential nursery habitat area occurred along the exposed coastline, 69% (2003) to 58% (2004) of 0-group halibut resided in protected embayments. Embayment contribution is much greater in the southern half of the study region, largely due to Mission and San Diego bays. We conclude that all nursery habitat types demonstrate the potential to contribute significantly to stock fitness, and that in

  6. Potential contribution of microbial communities in technical ceramics for the improvement of rheological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Bernardino; Miller, Ana Z.; Santos, Ricardo; Monteiro, Sílvia; Dias, Diamantino; Neves, Orquídia; Dionísio, Amélia; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2014-05-01

    Several bacterial and fungal species naturally occurring in ceramic raw materials used in construction, such as Aspergillus, Penicillium and Aureobasidium, are known to produce exopolysaccharides (EPS). These polymers excreted by the cells are of widespread occurrence and may confer unique and potentially interesting properties with potential industrial uses, such as viscosity control, gelation, and flocculation, during ceramic manufacturing. In this study, the microbial communities present in clay raw materials were identified by both cultural methods and DNA-based molecular techniques in order to appraise their potential contribution to enhance the performance of technical ceramics through the use of EPS. Mineralogical identification by X- Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of the clay raw materials, as well as characterization of rheological properties of ceramic slips were also performed. Microbial EPS production and its introduction into ceramic slips will be then carried out in order to evaluate their effects on the rheological properties of the ceramic slips, powders and conformed bodies. Some positive aspects related to the use of EPS are: reduction of the environmental impact caused by synthetic organic additives, reduction of production costs, as well as the costs related with operator protection systems, gaseous effluent treatments, complex landfill, among others.

  7. Relationship of femorodistal bypass patency to clinical outcome. Iloprost Bypass International Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, H R; Schroeder, T V; Simms, M H;

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between bypass patency, limb survival and clinical symptoms after femorodistal bypass procedures.......To investigate the relationship between bypass patency, limb survival and clinical symptoms after femorodistal bypass procedures....

  8. The europa initiative for esa's cosmic vision: a potential european contribution to nasa's Europa mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Michel; Jones, Geraint H.; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Sterken, Veerle J.

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of the habitability of Jupiter's icy moons is considered of high priority in the roadmaps of the main space agencies, including the decadal survey and esa's cosmic vision plan. the voyager and galileo missions indicated that europa and ganymede may meet the requirements of habitability, including deep liquid aqueous reservoirs in their interiors. indeed, they constitute different end-terms of ocean worlds, which deserve further characterization in the next decade. esa and nasa are now both planning to explore these ice moons through exciting and ambitious missions. esa selected in 2012 the juice mission mainly focused on ganymede and the jupiter system, while nasa is currently studying and implementing the europa mission. in 2015, nasa invited esa to provide a junior spacecraft to be carried on board its europa mission, opening a collaboration scheme similar to the very successful cassini-huygens approach. in order to define the best contribution that can be made to nasa's europa mission, a europa initiative has emerged in europe. its objective is to elaborate a community-based strategy for the proposition of the best possible esa contribution(s) to nasa's europa mission, as a candidate for the upcoming selection of esa's 5th medium-class mission . the science returns of the different potential contributions are analysed by six international working groups covering complementary science themes: a) magnetospheric interactions; b) exosphere, including neutrals, dust and plumes; c) geochemistry; d) geology, including expressions of exchanges between layers; e) geophysics, including characterization of liquid water distribution; f) astrobiology. each group is considering different spacecraft options in the contexts of their main scientific merits and limitations, their technical feasibility, and of their interest for the development of esa-nasa collaborations. there are five options under consideration: (1) an augmented payload to the europa mission main

  9. Dynamics of the late Na(+) current during cardiac action potential and its contribution to afterdepolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Balazs; Banyasz, Tamas; Jian, Zhong; Hegyi, Bence; Kistamas, Kornel; Nanasi, Peter P; Izu, Leighton T; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this work is to examine the contribution of late Na(+) current (INa,L) to the cardiac action potential (AP) and arrhythmogenic activities. In spite of the rapidly growing interest toward this current, there is no publication available on experimental recording of the dynamic INa,L current as it flows during AP with Ca(2+) cycling. Also unknown is how the current profile changes when the Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling is altered, and how the current contributes to the development of arrhythmias. In this study we use an innovative AP-clamp Sequential Dissection technique to directly record the INa,L current during the AP with Ca(2+) cycling in the guinea pig ventricular myocytes. First, we found that the magnitude of INa,L measured under AP-clamp is substantially larger than earlier studies indicated. CaMKII inhibition using KN-93 significantly reduced the current. Second, we recorded INa,L together with IKs, IKr, and IK1 in the same cell to understand how these currents counterbalance to shape the AP morphology. We found that the amplitude and the total charge carried by INa,L exceed that of IKs. Third, facilitation of INa,L by Anemone toxin II prolonged APD and induced Ca(2+) oscillations that led to early and delayed afterdepolarizations and triggered APs; these arrhythmogenic activities were eliminated by buffering Ca(2+) with BAPTA. In conclusion, INa,L contributes a significantly large inward current that prolongs APD and unbalances the Ca(2+) homeostasis to cause arrhythmogenic APs.

  10. Dynamics of the Late Na+ current during cardiac action potential and its contribution to afterdepolarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Balazs; Banyasz, Tamas; Jian, Zhong; Hegyi, Bence; Kistamas, Kornel; Nanasi, Peter P.; Izu, Leighton T.; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to examine the contribution of late Na+ current (INa,L) to the cardiac action potential (AP) and arrhythmogenic activities. In spite of the rapidly growing interest toward this current, there is no publication available on experimental recording of the dynamic INa,L current as it flows during AP with Ca2+ cycling. Also unknown is how the current profile changes when the Ca2+-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling is altered, and how the current contributes to the development of arrhythmias. In this study we use an innovative AP-clamp Sequential Dissection technique to directly record the INa,L current during the AP with Ca2+ cycling in the guinea pig ventricular myocytes. First, we found that the magnitude of INa,L measured under AP-clamp is substantially larger than earlier studies indicated. CaMKII inhibition using KN-93 significantly reduced the current. Second, we recorded INa,L together with IKs, IKr, and IK1 in the same cell to understand how these currents counterbalance to shape the AP morphology. We found that the amplitude and the total charge carried by INa,L exceed that of IKs. Third, facilitation of INa,L by Anemone toxin II prolonged APD and induced Ca2+ oscillations that led to early and delayed afterdepolarizations and triggered APs; these arrhythmogenic activities were eliminated by buffering Ca2+ with BAPTA. In conclusion, INa,L contributes a significantly large inward current that prolongs APD and unbalances the Ca2+ homeostasis to cause arrhythmogenic APs. PMID:24012538

  11. A Shab potassium channel contributes to action potential broadening in peptidergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocki, E A; Marshall, J; Kaczmarek, L K

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned the gene for a potassium channel, Aplysia Shab, that is expressed in the bag cell neurons of Aplysia. The voltage dependence and kinetics of the Aplysia Shab current in oocytes match those of IK2, one of the two delayed rectifiers in these neurons. Like IK2, but in contrast with other members of the Shab subfamily, the Aplysia Shab current inactivates within several hundred milliseconds. This inactivation occurs by a process whose properties do not match those previously described for C-type and N-type mechanisms. Neither truncation of the N-terminus nor block by tetraethylammonium alters the time course of inactivation. By incorporating the characteristics of Aplysia Shab into a computational model, we have shown how this current contributes to the normal enhancement of action potentials that occurs in the bag cell neurons at the onset of neuropeptide secretion.

  12. Nutrient composition of important fish species in Bangladesh and potential contribution to recommended nutrient intakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogard, Jessica R.; Thilsted, Shakuntala H.; Marks, Geoffrey C.;

    2015-01-01

    Fish, in Bangladesh where malnutrition remains a significant development challenge, is an irreplaceable animal-source food in the diet of millions. However, existing data on the nutrient composition of fish do not reflect the large diversity available and have focused on only a few select nutrients....... The purpose of this study was to fill the gaps in existing data on the nutrient profiles of common fish in Bangladesh by analysing the proximate, vitamin, mineral and fatty acid composition of 55 fish, shrimp and prawn species from inland capture, aquaculture and marine capture fisheries. When comparing......, and all typically consumed whole with head and bones, could potentially contribute ≥25% of RNIs for three or more of these nutrients, simultaneously, from a standard portion. This illustrates the diversity in nutrient content of fish species and in particular the rich nutrient composition of small...

  13. Radiative contribution to the effective potential in composite Higgs models from lattice gauge theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrand, Thomas; Golterman, Maarten; Jay, William I.; Neil, Ethan T.; Shamir, Yigal; Svetitsky, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    We develop methods to calculate the electroweak gauge boson contribution to the effective Higgs potential in the context of composite Higgs models, using lattice gauge theory. The calculation is analogous to that of the electromagnetic mass splitting of the pion multiplet in QCD. We discuss technical details of carrying out this calculation, including modeling of the momentum and fermion-mass dependence of the underlying current-current correlation function, direct integration of the correlation function over momentum, and fits based on the minimal-hadron approximation. We show results of a numerical study using valence overlap fermions, carried out in an SU(4) gauge theory with two flavors of Dirac fermions in the two-index antisymmetric representation.

  14. Postmyocardial Infarct Remodeling and Heart Failure: Potential Contributions from Pro- and Antiaging Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halliday A. Idikio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction and adverse postinfarct remodeling in older persons lead to poor outcome and need greater understanding of the contributions of age-related factors on abnormal cardiac function and management. In this perspective, how normal aging processes could contribute to the events of post-myocardial infarction and remodeling is reviewed. Post-myocardial infarction and remodeling involve cardiomechanical factors and neurohormonal response. Many factors prevent or accelerate aging including immunosenescence, recruitment and regeneration of stem cells, telomere shortening, oxidative damage, antiaging hormones klotho and melatonin, nutrition, and Sirtiun protein family, and these factors could affect post-MI remodeling and heart failure. Interest in stem cell repair of myocardial infarcts to mitigate post-MI remodeling needs more information on aging of stem cells, and potential effects on stem cell use in infarct repair. Integrating genomics and proteomics methods may help find clinically novel therapy in the management of post-MI remodeling and heart failure in aged individuals.

  15. Increasing access to modern contraceptives: the potential role of community solidarity through altruistic contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onwujekwe Obinna E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need for universal access to modern contraceptives in Nigeria, to facilitate the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and other national goals. This study provides information on the potential role of community solidarity in increasing access to contraceptives for the most-poor people through exploration of the role of altruism by determining level of altruistic willingness to pay (WTP for modern contraceptives across different geographic contexts in Nigeria. Methods It was a cross-sectional national survey which took place in six states spread across the six-geopolitical zones of the country. In each state, an urban and a rural area were selected for the study, giving a total of 6 urban and 6 rural sites. A pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from at least 720 randomly selected householders from each state. The targeted respondent in a household was a female primary care giver of child bearing age (usually the wives, or in her absence, another female household member of child bearing age. A scenario on altruistic WTP was presented before the value was elicited using a binary with open-ended follow-up question format. Test of validity of elicited altruistic WTP was undertaken using Tobit regression. Findings More than 50 % of the respondents across all the states were willing to contribute some money so that the very poor would be provided with modern contraceptives. The average amount of money that people were willing to contribute annually was 650 Naira (US$4.5. Mean altruistic WTP differed across SES quintiles and urban-rural divide (p  Conclusion There is room for community solidarity to ensure that the very poor benefit from modern contraceptives and assure universal coverage with modern contraceptives. The factors that determine altruistic WTP should be harnessed to ensure that altruistic contributions are actually made. The challenge will

  16. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation potentially contributing to cystic fibrosis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Aisling; Mawhinney, Leona; Armstrong, Michelle E; O'Reilly, Ciaran; Kennedy, Sarah; Caraher, Emma; Jülicher, Karen; O'Dwyer, David; Maher, Lewena; Schaffer, Kirsten; Fabre, Aurélie; McKone, Edward F; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Cooke, Gordon; Donnelly, Seamas C

    2017-08-02

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key proinflammatory mediator that we have previously shown to be associated with an aggressive clinical phenotype in cystic fibrosis. It possesses unique tautomerase enzymatic activity. However, to date, no human-derived substrate has been identified that has the capacity to interact with this cytokine's unique tautomerase activity. This led us to hypothesize that MIF may have the capacity to interact with external substrates. We describe for the first time how Pseudomonas aeruginosa can utilize human recombinant MIF (rMIF) to significantly (P < 0.01) enhance its endogenous biofilm formation. Our in vivo studies demonstrate that utilizing a small-molecular-weight inhibitor targeting MIF's tautomerase activity (SCD-19) significantly reduces the inflammatory response in a murine pulmonary chronic P. aeruginosa model. In addition, we show that in in vitro experiments, pretreatment of P. aeruginosa with rMIF is associated with reduced bacterial killing by tobramycin. Our novel findings support the concept of an anti-MIF strategy that targets this enzymatic activity as a potential future antibacterial therapeutic approach.-Tynan, A., Mawhinney, L., Armstrong, M. E., O'Reilly, C., Kennedy, S., Caraher, E., Jülicher, K., O'Dwyer, D., Maher, L., Schaffer, K., Fabre, A., McKone, E. F., Leng, L., Bucala, R., Bernhagen, J., Cooke, G., Donnelly, S. C. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation potentially contributing to cystic fibrosis pathogenesis. © FASEB.

  17. Potential of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterial Isolates to Contribute to Soil Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirima, George Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon- (PAH-) polluted sites is presently a major challenge in agroforestry. Consequently, microorganisms with PAH-degradation ability and soil fertility improvement attributes are sought after in order to achieve sustainable remediation of polluted sites. This study isolated PAH-degrading bacteria from enriched cultures of spent automobile engine-oil polluted soil. Isolates' partial 16S rRNA genes were sequenced and taxonomically classified. Isolates were further screened for their soil fertility attributes such as phosphate solubilization, atmospheric nitrogen fixation, and indoleacetic acid (IAA) production. A total of 44 isolates were obtained and belong to the genera Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Microbacterium, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Pseudoxanthomonas, Rhodococcus, and Stenotrophomonas. Data analysed by principal component analysis showed the Bacillus and Ochrobactrum isolates displayed outstanding IAA production. Generalized linear modelling statistical approaches were applied to evaluate the contribution of the four most represented genera (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, and Rhodococcus) to soil fertility. The Pseudomonas isolates were the most promising in all three soil fertility enhancement traits evaluated and all isolates showed potential for one or more of the attributes evaluated. These findings demonstrate a clear potential of the isolates to participate in restorative bioremediation of polluted soil, which will enhance sustainable agricultural production and environmental protection. PMID:27774456

  18. Potential of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterial Isolates to Contribute to Soil Fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bello-Akinosho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon- (PAH- polluted sites is presently a major challenge in agroforestry. Consequently, microorganisms with PAH-degradation ability and soil fertility improvement attributes are sought after in order to achieve sustainable remediation of polluted sites. This study isolated PAH-degrading bacteria from enriched cultures of spent automobile engine-oil polluted soil. Isolates’ partial 16S rRNA genes were sequenced and taxonomically classified. Isolates were further screened for their soil fertility attributes such as phosphate solubilization, atmospheric nitrogen fixation, and indoleacetic acid (IAA production. A total of 44 isolates were obtained and belong to the genera Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Microbacterium, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Pseudoxanthomonas, Rhodococcus, and Stenotrophomonas. Data analysed by principal component analysis showed the Bacillus and Ochrobactrum isolates displayed outstanding IAA production. Generalized linear modelling statistical approaches were applied to evaluate the contribution of the four most represented genera (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, and Rhodococcus to soil fertility. The Pseudomonas isolates were the most promising in all three soil fertility enhancement traits evaluated and all isolates showed potential for one or more of the attributes evaluated. These findings demonstrate a clear potential of the isolates to participate in restorative bioremediation of polluted soil, which will enhance sustainable agricultural production and environmental protection.

  19. Can a finding of cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials contribute to vestibular migraine diagnostics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihana Vešligaj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate differences in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP results with patients suffering from vestibular migraine and healthy people, taking into consideration values of threshold and latency of occurrence of the characteristic wave complex, size of amplitude, and interaural amplitude ratio. According to the results, determine the importance and usefulness of VEMP in vestibular migraine diagnostics. Methods A total number of 62 subjects were included in the study, 32 of them belonging to a group of patients suffering from vestibular migraine (VM, while other 30 were in a control group of healthy subjects. Information was collected during the diagnostic evaluation. General and otoneurological history of patients and bedside tests, audiological results, videonystagmography and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP were made. Results There was a difference in an interaural ratio of amplitudes in the experimental and control groups, but it was not found to be clinically significant. By ToneBurst 500 Hz method, the interaural amplitude ratio higher than 35% was measured in 46.97% subjects, while the response was totally unilaterally missing in 28.8% patients. Conclusion Even the sophisticated method as cVEMP does not give the ultimate result confirming the vestibular migraine diagnosis, and neither do other diagnostic methods. cVEMP result can contribute to the completion of full mosaic of vestibular migraine diagnostics.

  20. Coronary Artery Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri Ceberut

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ancient schwannoma is a rare variant of neural tumors though rarely seen in the thorax. The combination with coronary artery diseases is also rare. Here we describe a 66 year-old male who had undergone one-stage combined surgery for thoracic ancient schwannomas removal and coronary artery disease. The masses were, respectively, 13 cm in the middle mediastinum and 5 cm in diameter originating from the intercostal nerve. The tumors were successfully removed using sternotomy, and then a coronary artery bypass grafting was performed. Here we discuss this rare tumor in relation to the relevant literature.

  1. Robotic Reconnaissance Missions to Small Bodies and Their Potential Contributions to Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, P. A.; Rivkin, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Robotic reconnaissance missions to small bodies will directly address aspects of NASA's Asteroid Initiative and will contribute to future human exploration. The NASA Asteroid Initiative is comprised of two major components: the Grand Challenge and the Asteroid Mission. The first component, the Grand Challenge, focuses on protecting Earth's population from asteroid impacts by detecting potentially hazardous objects with enough warning time to either prevent them from impacting the planet, or to implement civil defense procedures. The Asteroid Mission involves sending astronauts to study and sample a near- Earth asteroid (NEA) prior to conducting exploration missions of the Martian system, which includes Phobos and Deimos. The science and technical data obtained from robotic precursor missions that investigate the surface and interior physical characteristics of an object will help identify the pertinent physical properties that will maximize operational efficiency and reduce mission risk for both robotic assets and crew operating in close proximity to, or at the surface of, a small body. These data will help fill crucial strategic knowledge gaps (SKGs) concerning asteroid physical characteristics that are relevant for human exploration considerations at similar small body destinations. Small Body Strategic Knowledge Gaps: For the past several years NASA has been interested in identifying the key SKGs related to future human destinations. These SKGs highlight the various unknowns and/or data gaps of targets that the science and engineering communities would like to have filled in prior to committing crews to explore the Solar System. An action team from the Small Bodies Assessment Group (SBAG) was formed specifically to identify the small body SKGs under the direction of the Human Exploration and Operations Missions Directorate (HEOMD), given NASA's recent interest in NEAs and the Martian moons as potential human destinations [1]. The action team

  2. Potential contribution of anammox to nitrogen loss from paddy soils in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Ru; Li, Hu; Nie, San-An; Su, Jian-Qiang; Weng, Bo-Sen; Zhu, Gui-Bing; Yao, Huai-Ying; Gilbert, Jack A; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-02-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of ammonium (anammox) process has been observed in diverse terrestrial ecosystems, while the contribution of anammox to N2 production in paddy soils is not well documented. In this study, the anammox activity and the abundance and diversity of anammox bacteria were investigated to assess the anammox potential of 12 typical paddy soils collected in southern China. Anammox bacteria related to "Candidatus Brocadia" and "Candidatus Kuenenia" and two novel unidentified clusters were detected, with "Candidatus Brocadia" comprising 50% of the anammox population. The prevalence of the anammox was confirmed by the quantitative PCR results based on hydrazine synthase (hzsB) genes, which showed that the abundance ranged from 1.16 × 10(4) to 9.65 × 10(4) copies per gram of dry weight. The anammox rates measured by the isotope-pairing technique ranged from 0.27 to 5.25 nmol N per gram of soil per hour in these paddy soils, which contributed 0.6 to 15% to soil N2 production. It is estimated that a total loss of 2.50 × 10(6) Mg N per year is linked to anammox in the paddy fields in southern China, which implied that ca. 10% of the applied ammonia fertilizers is lost via the anammox process. Anammox activity was significantly correlated with the abundance of hzsB genes, soil nitrate concentration, and C/N ratio. Additionally, ammonia concentration and pH were found to be significantly correlated with the anammox bacterial structure.

  3. The NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to sarcopenia and lower muscle glycolytic potential in old mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Marin Jane; Foley, Kevin P; D'Souza, Donna M; Li, Yujin E; Lau, Trevor C; Hawke, Thomas J; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2017-08-01

    The mechanisms underpinning decreased skeletal muscle strength and slowing of movement during aging are ill-defined. "Inflammaging," increased inflammation with advancing age, may contribute to aspects of sarcopenia, but little is known about the participatory immune components. We discovered that aging was associated with increased caspase-1 activity in mouse skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that the caspase-1-containing NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to sarcopenia in mice. Male C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) and NLRP3(-/-) mice were aged to 10 (adult) and 24 mo (old). NLRP3(-/-) mice were protected from decreased muscle mass (relative to body mass) and decreased size of type IIB and IIA myofibers, which occurred between 10 and 24 mo of age in WT mice. Old NLRP3(-/-) mice also had increased relative muscle strength and endurance and were protected from age-related increases in the number of myopathic fibers. We found no evidence of age-related or NLRP3-dependent changes in markers of systemic inflammation. Increased caspase-1 activity was associated with GAPDH proteolysis and reduced GAPDH enzymatic activity in skeletal muscles from old WT mice. Aging did not alter caspase-1 activity, GAPDH proteolysis, or GAPDH activity in skeletal muscles of NLRP3(-/-) mice. Our results show that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in age-related loss of muscle glycolytic potential. Deletion of NLRP3 mitigates both the decline in glycolytic myofiber size and the reduced activity of glycolytic enzymes in muscle during aging. We propose that the etiology of sarcopenia involves direct communication between immune responses and metabolic flux in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Vacuum-assisted drainage in cardiopulmonary bypass: advantages and disadvantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Filho, Élio Barreto; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; da Costa, Loredana Nilkenes Gomes; Antunes, Nilson

    2014-01-01

    Systematic review of vacuum assisted drainage in cardiopulmonary bypass, demonstrating its advantages and disadvantages, by case reports and evidence about its effects on microcirculation. We conducted a systematic search on the period 1997-2012, in the databases PubMed, Medline, Lilacs and SciELO. Of the 70 selected articles, 26 were included in the review. Although the vacuum assisted drainage has significant potential for complications and requires appropriate technology and professionalism, prevailed in literature reviewed the concept that vacuum assisted drainage contributed in reducing the rate of transfusions, hemodilutions, better operative field, no significant increase in hemolysis, reduced complications surgical, use of lower prime and of smaller diameter cannulas. PMID:25140478

  5. Robotic Missions to Small Bodies and Their Potential Contributions to Human Exploration and Planetary Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Paul A.; Rivkin, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Robotic missions to small bodies will directly address aspects of NASA's Asteroid Initiative and will contribute to future human exploration and planetary defense. The NASA Asteroid Initiative is comprised of two major components: the Grand Challenge and the Asteroid Mission. The first component, the Grand Challenge, focuses on protecting Earth's population from asteroid impacts by detecting potentially hazardous objects with enough warning time to either prevent them from impacting the planet, or to implement civil defense procedures. The Asteroid Mission involves sending astronauts to study and sample a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) prior to conducting exploration missions of the Martian system, which includes Phobos and Deimos. The science and technical data obtained from robotic precursor missions that investigate the surface and interior physical characteristics of an object will help identify the pertinent physical properties that will maximize operational efficiency and reduce mission risk for both robotic assets and crew operating in close proximity to, or at the surface of, a small body. These data will help fill crucial strategic knowledge gaps (SKGs) concerning asteroid physical characteristics that are relevant for human exploration considerations at similar small body destinations. These data can also be applied for gaining an understanding of pertinent small body physical characteristics that would also be beneficial for formulating future impact mitigation procedures. Small Body Strategic Knowledge Gaps: For the past several years NASA has been interested in identifying the key SKGs related to future human destinations. These SKGs highlight the various unknowns and/or data gaps of targets that the science and engineering communities would like to have filled in prior to committing crews to explore the Solar System. An action team from the Small Bodies Assessment Group (SBAG) was formed specifically to identify the small body SKGs under the

  6. Heart bypass surgery incision (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the left part of the chest between the ribs. This incision is much less traumatic than the traditional heart bypass surgery incision which separates the breast bone. Minimally invasive heart bypass surgery allows the patient less pain and a faster recovery.

  7. Spiritual Bypass: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Glosoff, Harriet L.; Hammond, Cheree

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of spiritual bypass has received limited attention in the transpersonal psychology and counseling literature and has not been subjected to empirical inquiry. This study examines the phenomenon of spiritual bypass by considering how spirituality, mindfulness, alexithymia (emotional restrictiveness), and narcissism work together to…

  8. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Lilian M.; Loviso, Claudia L.; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Lozada, Mariana

    2015-11-07

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32 ± 13 %) or Proteobacteria (29 ± 7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes.

  9. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibert, Lilian M; Loviso, Claudia L; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K; Dionisi, Hebe M; Lozada, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32 ± 13 %) or Proteobacteria (29 ± 7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes.

  10. Potential contribution of Type I lung epithelial cells to chronic neonatal lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry J. Rozycki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The alveolar surface is covered by large flat Type I cells (alveolar epithelial cells 1, AEC1. The normal physiological function of AEC1s involves gas exchange, based on their location in approximation to the capillary endothelium and their thinness, and in ion and water flux, as shown by the presence of solute active transport proteins, water channels, and impermeable tight junctions between cells. With the recent ability to produce relatively pure cultures of AEC1 cells, new functions have been described. These may be relevant to lung injury, repair and the abnormal development that characterizes bronchopulmonary dysplasia. To hypothesize a potential role for AEC1 in the development of lung injury and abnormal repair/development in premature lungs, evidence is presented for their presence in the developing lung, how their source may not be the Type II cell (AEC2 as has been assumed for forty years, and how the cell can be damaged by same type of stressors as those which lead to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD. Recent work shows that the cells are part of the innate immune response, capable of producing pro-inflammatory mediators, which could contribute to the increase in inflammation seen in early bronchopulmonary dysplasia. One of the receptors found exclusively on AEC1 cells in the lung, called RAGE, may also have a role in increased inflammation, and to alveolar simplification. While the current evidence for AEC1 involvement in BPD is circumstantial and limited at present, the accumulating data supports several hypotheses and questions regarding potential differences in the behavior of AEC1 cells from newborn and premature lung compared with the adult lung.

  11. Hypomethylation and Genetic Instability in Monosomy Blastocysts May Contribute to Decreased Implantation Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair R McCallie

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism responsible for gene regulation, chromatin remodeling, and genome stability, playing a fundamental role during embryonic development. The aim of this study was to determine if these epigenetic marks are associated with chromosomal aneuploidy in human blastocysts. Surplus, cryopreserved blastocysts that were donated to research with IRB consent were chosen with varying chromosomal aneuploidies and respective implantation potential: monosomies and trisomies 7, 11, 15, 21, and 22. DNA methylation analysis was performed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (~485,000 CpG sites. The methylation profiles of these human blastocysts were found to be similar across all samples, independent of chromosome constitution; however, more detailed examination identified significant hypomethylation in the chromosome involved in the monosomy. Real-time PCR was also performed to determine if downstream messenger RNA (mRNA was affected for genes on the monosomy chromosome. Gene dysregulation was observed for monosomy blastocysts within significant regions of hypo-methylation (AVEN, CYFIP1, FAM189A1, MYO9A, ADM2, PACSIN2, PARVB, and PIWIL3 (P < 0.05. Additional analysis was performed to examine the gene expression profiles of associated methylation regulators including: DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, DNMT3L, chromatin modifying regulators (CSNK1E, KDM1, PRKCA, and a post-translational modifier (PRMT5. Decreased RNA transcription was confirmed for each DNMT, and the regulators that impact DNMT activity, for only monosomy blastocysts (P < 0.05. In summary, monosomy blastocysts displayed hypomethylation for the chromosome involved in the error, as well as transcription alterations of associated developmental genes. Together, these modifications may be contributing to genetic instability and therefore be responsible for the limited implantation potential observed for full monosomy

  12. Potential for future sea-level contributions from the Antarctic ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeConto, Rob; Pollard, David; Gasson, Ed

    2017-04-01

    Recent Antarctic ice-sheet modeling that includes the effects of surface meltwater on ice-sheet dynamics (through hydrofracturing and ice-cliff collapse) has demonstrated the previously underappreciated sensitivity of the ice sheet to atmospheric warming in addition to sub-ice oceanic warming. Here, we improve on our modeling of future ice-sheet retreat by using time-evolving atmospheric climatologies from a high-resolution regional climate model, synchronized with SSTs, subsurface ocean temperatures, and sub-ice melt rates from the NCAR CCSM4 GCM. Ongoing improvements in ice-sheet model physics are tested and calibrated relative to observations of recent and ancient (Pliocene, Last InterGlacial, and Last Deglaciation) ice-sheet responses to warming. The model is applied to a range of future greenhouse-gas emissions scenarios, including modified RCP scenarios corresponding to the 1.5° and 2.0° targets of the Paris Agreement and higher emissions scenarios including RCP8.5. The results imply that a threshold in the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and outlet glaciers in East Antarctica might be exceeded in the absence of aggressive mitigation policies like those discussed in Paris. We also explore the maximum potential for Antarctica to contribute to future sea-level rise in high greenhouse gas emissions scenarios, by testing a range of model physical parameters within the bounds of observations.

  13. Contribution of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 to endothelin-1-induced thermal hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, T; Ji, W; Yamamoto, J; Niiyama, Y; Furuse, S; Namiki, A

    2008-06-26

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) plays an important role in peripheral pain processing. However, the mechanisms of the nociceptive action of ET-1 have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the contribution of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) to ET-1-induced thermal hyperalgesia. Intraplantar ET-1-induced thermal hyperalgesia was examined by assessing the paw withdrawal latency to noxious heat stimuli. In electrophysiological study, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed to investigate the interaction of ET-1 and TRPV1 using human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells expressing endothelin type A receptor (ET(A)) and TRPV1. Intraplantar ET-1 (3, 10 and 30 pmol) produced thermal hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. Thermal hyperalgesia was attenuated by the inhibition of ET(A) and protein kinase C (PKC) but not that of ET(B). ET-1-induced thermal hyperalgesia was significantly attenuated in TRPV1-deficient mice compared with that in wild-type mice. In voltage-clamp experiments, 10 nM capsaicin evoked small inward currents in HEK293 cells expressing TRPV1 and ET(A). In the presence of ET-1, capsaicin produced much larger current responses (Pthermal hyperalgesia.

  14. The Potential Contribution of Subsurface Drip Irrigation to Water-Saving Agriculture in the Western USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T L Thompson; PANG Huan-cheng; LI Yu-yi

    2009-01-01

    Water shortages within the western USA are resulting in the adoption of water-saving agricultural practices within this region. Among the many possible methods for saving water in agriculture, the adoption of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) provides a potential solution to the problem of low water use efficiency. Other advantages of SDI include reduced NO3 leaching compared to surface irrigation, higher yields, a dry soil surface for improved weed control, better crop health, and harvest flexibility for many specialty crops. The use of SDI also allows the virtual elimination of crop water stress, the ability to apply water and nutrients to the most active part of the root zone, protection of drip lines from damage due to cultivation and tillage, and the ability to irrigate with wastewater while preventing human contact. Yet, SDI is used only on a minority of cropland in the arid western USA. Reasons for the limited adoption of SDI include the high initial capital investment required, the need for intensive management, and the urbanization that is rapidly consuming farmland in parts of the western USA. The contributions of SDI to increasing yield, quality, and water use efficiency have been demonstrated. The two major barriers to SDI sustainability in arid regions are economics (i.e., paying for the SDI system), including the high cost of installation; and salt accumulation, which requires periodic leaching, specialized tillage methods, or transplanting of seedlings rather than direct-seeding. We will review advances in irrigation management with SDI.

  15. Transient Receptor Potential Channels Contribute to Pathological Structural and Functional Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer; Correll, Robert N.; Trappanese, Danielle M.; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Troupes, Constantine D.; Berretta, Remus M.; Kubo, Hajime; Madesh, Muniswamy; Chen, Xiongwen; Gao, Erhe; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Houser, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The cellular and molecular basis for post myocardial infarction (MI) structural and functional remodeling is not well understood. Objective To determine if Ca2+ influx through transient receptor potential (canonical) (TRPC) channels contributes to post-MI structural and functional remodeling. Methods and Results TRPC1/3/4/6 channel mRNA increased after MI in mice and was associated with TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry. Cardiac myocyte specific expression of a dominant negative (dn: loss of function) TRPC4 channel increased basal myocyte contractility and reduced hypertrophy and cardiac structural and functional remodeling after MI while increasing survival. We used adenovirus-mediated expression of TRPC3/4/6 channels in cultured adult feline myocytes (AFMs) to define mechanistic aspects of these TRPC-related effects. TRPC3/4/6 over expression in AFMs induced calcineurin (Cn)-Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) mediated hypertrophic signaling, which was reliant on caveolae targeting of TRPCs. TRPC3/4/6 expression in AFMs increased rested state contractions and increased spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ sparks mediated by enhanced phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. TRPC3/4/6 expression was associated with reduced contractility and response to catecholamines during steady state pacing, likely due to enhanced SR Ca2+ leak. Conclusions Ca2+ influx through TRPC channels expressed after MI activates pathological cardiac hypertrophy and reduces contractility reserve. Blocking post-MI TRPC activity improved post-MI cardiac structure and function. PMID:25047165

  16. Potential contribution of aromatase inhibition to the effects of nicotine and related compounds on the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegon, Anat; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Fowler, Joanna S

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking continues to be a major public health problem, and while smoking rates in men have shown some decrease over the last few decades, smoking rates among girls and young women are increasing. Practically all of the important aspects of cigarette smoking and many effects of nicotine are sexually dimorphic (reviewed by Pogun and Yararbas, 2009). Women become addicted more easily than men, while finding it harder to quit. Nicotine replacement appears to be less effective in women. This may be linked to the observation that women are more sensitive than men to non-nicotine cues or ingredients in cigarettes. The reasons for these sex differences are mostly unknown. Several lines of evidence suggest that many of the reported sex differences related to cigarette smoking may stem from the inhibitory effects of nicotine and other tobacco alkaloids on estrogen synthesis via the enzyme aromatase (cyp19a gene product). Aromatase is the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, catalyzing the conversion of androgens to estrogens. This review provides a summary of experimental evidence supporting brain aromatase as a potential mediator and/or modulator of nicotine actions in the brain, contributing to sex differences in smoking behavior. Additional research on the interaction between tobacco smoke, nicotine, and aromatase may help devise new, sex specific methods for prevention and treatment of smoking addiction.

  17. Potential contribution of aromatase inhibition to the effects of nicotine and related compounds on the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat eBiegon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking continues to be a major public health problem, and while smoking rates in men have shown some decrease over the last few decades, smoking rates among girls and young women are increasing. Practically all of the important aspects of cigarette smoking are sexually dimorphic. Women become addicted more easily than men, while finding it harder to quit. Nicotine replacement appears to be less effective in women. This may be linked to the observation that women are more sensitive than men to non-nicotine cues or ingredients in cigarettes. The reasons for these sex differences are mostly unknown. Several lines of evidence suggest that many of the reported sex differences related to cigarette smoking may stem from the inhibitory effects of nicotine and other tobacco alkaloids on estrogen synthesis via the enzyme aromatase (cyp19a gene product. Aromatase is the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, catalyzing the conversion of androgens to estrogens. This review provides a summary of experimental evidence supporting brain aromatase as a potential mediator and/or modulator of nicotine actions in the brain, contributing to sex differences in smoking behavior. Additional research on the interaction between tobacco smoke, nicotine and aromatase may help devise new, sex specific methods for prevention and treatment of smoking addiction.

  18. NASA's Potential Contributions for Remediation of Retention Ponds Using Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Lauren W.; Ryan, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    This Candidate Solution uses NASA Earth science research on atmospheric ozone and aerosols data (1) to help improve the prediction capabilities of water runoff models that are used to estimate runoff pollution from retention ponds, and (2) to understand the pollutant removal contribution and potential of photocatalytically coated materials that could be used in these ponds. Models (the EPA's SWMM and the USGS SLAMM) exist that estimate the release of pollutants into the environment from storm-water-related retention pond runoff. UV irradiance data acquired from the satellite mission Aura and from the OMI Surface UV algorithm will be incorporated into these models to enhance their capabilities, not only by increasing the general understanding of retention pond function (both the efficacy and efficiency) but additionally by adding photocatalytic materials to these retention ponds, augmenting their performance. State and local officials who run pollution protection programs could then develop and implement photocatalytic technologies for water pollution control in retention ponds and use them in conjunction with existing runoff models. More effective decisions about water pollution protection programs could be made, the persistence and toxicity of waste generated could be minimized, and subsequently our natural water resources would be improved. This Candidate Solution is in alignment with the Water Management and Public Health National Applications.

  19. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 in Epidermal Keratinocytes May Contribute to Acute Pain in Herpes Zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Bum; Kim, Hyeree; Cho, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Deuk; Chung, Jin Ho; Kim, Hei Sung

    2016-03-01

    The role of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) in the initiation of neurogenic inflammation and transduction of pain is well established. In this study 33 patients with herpes zoster (HZ) were recruited from a single centre and underwent a questionnaire interview at their first visit. Punch biopsies from the HZ lesions and the contralateral unaffected skin were performed to localize and quantify the expression of TRPV1. Immunofluorescent staining for TRPV1 was most prominent in the epidermal keratinocytes. Both TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in the HZ epidermis than in control epidermis (relative ratio 1.62 ± 0.27, p = 0.033 and 2.55 ± 0.51, p = 0.005, respectively). Protein TRPV1 ratio (HZ lesion/control) correlated with the degree of pain (measured on a visual analogue scale; VAS) (p = 0.017) and was significantly lower in patients who had taken either HZ medication or painkillers prior to their visit. These results suggest that non-neuronal TRPV1 may contribute to acute pain in herpes zoster.

  20. Incorporating E-learning in teaching English language to medical students: exploring its potential contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navidinia, Hossein; Zare Bidaki, Majid; Hekmati, Nargess

    2016-01-01

    Background: The spread of technology has influenced different aspects of human life, and teaching and learning are not exceptions. This study aimed to examine the potential contribution of the use of technology in teaching English language to medical students. Methods: This qualitative-action research study was conducted in Birjand University of Medical Sciences (BUMS), with 60 medical students taking a general English course in the Fall Semester of 2015. The class favored different tools and multimedia facilities such as a tube channel, e-dictionaries, educational films, and etextbooks to enhance students’ learning. In addition, the class had a weblog in which students could upload assignments and receive feedback from peers and the instructors. Results: The results revealed that e-learning could enhance students’ language proficiency and facilitate the teaching process. Learners preferred to use more e-dictionaries to learn the meaning of the new words, watch English medical films to boost their speaking and listening skills, and use the electronic version of their textbook as they could carry it wherever they wanted. Conclusion: The students preferred this method of learning English as they became more independent by using the electronic facilities. They found that learning English did not have a fixed institutionalized method, and e-learning activities could provide them with authentic input for language learning even outside of the classroom. PMID:28491837

  1. Transient receptor potential channel M2 contributes to neointimal hyperplasia in vascular walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Xiaochen; Zheng, Changbo; Zhao, Qiannan; Lan, Hui-Yao; Huang, Yu; Wan, Song; Mori, Yasuo; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2015-07-01

    A hallmark of atherosclerosis is progressive intimal thickening (namely neointimal hyperplasia), which leads to occlusive vascular diseases. Over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and alteration of Ca2+ signaling are among the key factors contributing to neointimal growth. In the present study, we investigated the role of TRPM2, a ROS-sensitive Ca2+ entry channel, in neointimal hyperplasia. Perivascular cuffs were used to induce neointimal hyperplasia in rat/mouse arteries. Immunostaining showed numerous TRPM2-positive smooth muscle cells in neointimal regions. ROS were over-produced and PCNA-positive proliferating cells were numerous in the neointimal regions. The neointimal hyperplasia was substantially reduced in Trpm2 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. In the cultured rat/mouse aortic smooth muscle cells, H2O2 treatment was found to stimulate cell proliferation and migration. The effect of H2O2 was reduced by a TRPM2-specific blocking antibody TM2E3 or Trpm2 knockout. The signaling molecules downstream of TRPM2 were found to be Axl and Akt. These data suggest a critical functional role of TRPM2 in the progression of neointimal hyperplasia. The study also highlights the possibility of targeting TRPM2 as a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of occlusive vascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Contribution of plasminogen activation towards the pathogenic potential of oral streptococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Itzek

    Full Text Available Oral streptococci are a heterogeneous group of human commensals, with a potential to cause serious infections. Activation of plasminogen has been shown to increase the virulence of typical human pathogenic streptococci such as S. pneumoniae. One important factor for plasminogen activation is the streptococcal α-enolase. Here we report that plasminogen activation is also common in oral streptococci species involved in clinical infection and that it depends on the action of human plasminogen activators. The ability to activate plasminogen did not require full conservation of the internal plasminogen binding sequence motif FYDKERKVY of α-enolase that was previously described as crucial for increased plasminogen binding, activation and virulence. Instead, experiments with recombinant α-enolase variants indicate that the naturally occurring variations do not impair plasminogen binding. In spite of these variations in the internal plasminogen binding motif oral streptococci showed similar activation of plasminogen. We conclude that the pathomechanism of plasminogen activation is conserved in oral streptococci that cause infections in human. This may contribute to their opportunistic pathogenic character that is unfurled in certain niches.

  3. Soils as a Solution: The Potential of Rangelands to Contribute to Climate Change Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, W. L.; Ryals, R.; DeLonge, M. S.; Owen, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The majority of soil-related climate change research has focused on describing the problem - estimating rates of carbon (C) losses and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from natural and managed ecosystems. More research is needed to explore potential solutions to climate change through mitigation and adaptation. Here we report on an integrated set of studies aimed at critically evaluating the biogeochemical potential of rangeland soils to help mitigate climate change, while improving the sustainability and productivity of food production systems. We explored direct effects through enhanced net primary production (NPP) and soil C sequestration, and indirect effects through diversion of high emitting sources to lower emitting organic matter dynamics. We used a combination of long- and short-term field experiments, modeling, laboratory assays, life cycle assessment (LCA), and meta-analyses in consultation with a diverse group of stakeholders from both the private and public sectors. We found that organic matter amendments held particularly strong potential. Compost amendments increased soil C storage by 0.5-1.0 Mg C ha-1 y-1 in surface soils over 5 y, and increased NPP and water holding capacity. We measured 1.0 Mg of new C ha-1 y-1 over 3 y. Long-term amendment of cattle manure increased surface soil C by 19.0±7.3 Mg C ha-1 relative to unmanured fields. However, field and modeling experiments suggested that manure amendments lead to large nitrous oxide emissions that eventually eliminated CO2e benefits, whereas compost amendments continued to benefit climate for decades longer. An LCA identified a broader range of climate impacts. When scaled to an area of 25% of California's rangelands, new C sequestered following compost amendments (21 million Mg CO2e) exceeded emissions from cattle (15 million Mg CO2e); diverting organics from waste streams to amendments led to additional GHG savings. In collaboration with our partners, our research contributed to the development of

  4. The Contribution of Robert F. Corwin to Self-Potential and Geotechnical Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitterman, D. V.

    2007-12-01

    Throughout his career, Robert F. Corwin developed innovative geophysical methods to solve geotechnical problems. Most notable is his work on self-potential (SP) where his focus was a blend of electricity and water, a potentially lethal brew, to solve very practical problems. Corwin's work in SP started with the idea of applying the technique to marine mineral exploration; this early work is characterized by a theme that ran through his career: understanding the effects that can influence measurements, developing methodologies to obtain consistent and reliable data, and interpreting those data in a conservative and believable manner supported by the facts. He expanded the electricity-water connection to geothermal fluids and the SP signals produced by them. He was involved in geothermal exploration throughout the western U.S. including Alaska and Mexico. In addition to developing reliable field techniques he worked on interpretational methods that made SP interpretation quantitative. Corwin's most significant contribution was the study of leaky dams using SP. Water leakage produces an SP anomaly because of the electrokinetic properties of geologic materials. Through a series of SP studies for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers he developed a methodology for making and interpreting SP measurements that helped locate, assess, and remediate leakage. This success led to numerous surveys throughout Canada for regional power authorities. Corwin returned to marine geophysical studies throughout his career including SP measurements to locate moveable concrete mats placed in the Mississippi River to control bank erosion. Because of changes in river flow, these large articulated mats were often undercut, moved, and reburied causing hazardous bank conditions. SP and electrical resistivity measurements were found to accurately locate the mats. Corwin also worked on electrical resistivity measurements of the ocean floor. Starting with stationary

  5. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  6. Can assessing for potential contribution of soil organic and inorganic components for butachlor sorption be improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Liu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Haizhen; Shi, Jiachun; Xu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Sorption of butachlor to various types of common soil components was investigated. Six pure minerals (montmorillonite [Mont], kaolinite [Kaol], Ca homoionic montmorillonite [Ca-Mont] and kaolinite [Ca-Kaol], amorphous hydrated Al and Fe oxides [AHOs-Al, AHOs-Fe]), four soil alkali-extractable pure humic acids (HAs), and the four corresponding HAs originated real unmodified and HO-treated soils were selected as the representative sorbents. Results showed that the HAs played a crucial role, and clay minerals (especially Mont) also showed an important effect in butachlor sorption. The AHOs may likely influence only in a mediator way by enhancing the availability of sorption domains of HAs. By removing 78% (on average) of the total organic carbon (TOC) from the soils with HO, the content ratio of clay to TOC (RCO) increased by an average of 367% and became >60. This change simultaneously decreased the sorption capacity of soils (40%, on average). Considering that the surface sorption domain on clay minerals may be highly exposed and more competitive after the partial removal of soil organic matter (SOM), this reaffirmed the potential contribution from clay minerals. It can thus be inferred that in the real soil where SOM and clay minerals are associated, the coating of clay minerals may have weakened the partition function of SOM or blocked some sorption domain within SOM, resulting in a decreased sorption of butachlor. Therefore, clay minerals, especially 2:1 type expanding minerals, may play a dual function vs. SOM content for the sorption of butachlor in soil.

  7. Pharmacovigilance of herbal medicines: the potential contributions of ethnobotanical and ethnopharmacological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Eliana; Barnes, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Typically, ethnobotanical/ethnopharmacological (EB/EP) surveys are used to describe uses, doses/dosages, sources and methods of preparation of traditional herbal medicines; their application to date in examining the adverse effects, contraindications and other safety aspects of these preparations is limited. From a pharmacovigilance perspective, numerous challenges exist in applying its existing methods to studying the safety profile of herbal medicines, particularly where used by indigenous cultures. This paper aims to contribute to the methodological aspects of EB/EP field work, and to extend the reach of pharmacovigilance, by proposing a tool comprising a list of questions that could be applied during interview and observational studies. The questions focus on the collection of information on the safety profile of traditional herbal medicines as it is embedded in traditional knowledge, as well as on identifying personal experiences (spontaneous reports) of adverse or undesirable effects associated with the use of traditional herbal medicines. Questions on the precise composition of traditional prescriptions or 'recipes', their preparation, storage, administration and dosing are also included. Strengths and limitations of the tool are discussed. From this interweaving of EB/EP and pharmacovigilance arises a concept of ethnopharmacovigilance for traditional herbal medicines: the scope of EB/EP is extended to include exploration of the potential harmful effects of medicinal plants, and the incorporation of pharmacovigilance questions into EB/EP studies provides a new opportunity for collection of 'general' traditional knowledge on the safety of traditional herbal medicines and, importantly, a conduit for collection of spontaneous reports of suspected adverse effects. Whether the proposed tool can yield data sufficiently rich and of an appropriate quality for application of EB/EP (e.g. data verification and quantitative analysis tools) and pharmacovigilance

  8. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Chandra Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery carried out on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB in a pregnant woman is associated with poor neonatal outcomes although maternal outcomes are similar to cardiac surgery in non-pregnant women. Most adverse maternal and fetal outcomes from cardiac surgery during pregnancy are attributed to effects of CPB. The CPB is associated with utero-placental hypoperfusion due to a number of factors, which may translate into low fetal cardiac output, hypoxia and even death. Better maternal and fetal outcomes may be achieved by early pre-operative optimization of maternal cardiovascular status, use of perioperative fetal monitoring, optimization of CPB, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling cardiac surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester.

  9. Contribution of Renal Impairment to Potentially Preventable Medication-Related Hospital Admissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leendertse, Anne J.; van Dijk, Elisabeth A.; De Smet, Peter A. G. M.; Egberts, Toine C. G.; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication errors and renal impairment contribute to severe adverse drug events, which may lead to hospital admission. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether medication errors and renal impairment contribute to hospital admission and examine these errors for strategies to prevent admissions. ME

  10. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: The Contribution of the Heavy Highly Charged (Minority) Solar Wind Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface helps determine the composition of the lunar exosphere and contributes to surface weathering. To date, only the effects of the two dominant solar wind constituents, H+ and He+, have been considered. The heavier, less abundant solar wind constituents have much larger sputtering yields because they have greater mass (kinetic sputtering) and they are highly charged (potential sputtering) Their contribution to total sputtering can therefore be orders of magnitude larger than their relative abundances would suggest

  11. Watershed Potential to Contribute Phosphorus from Geologic Materials to Receiving Streams, Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data layer is a cell-based Raster model characterizing the contribution of phosphorus (P) to streams from weathering and erosion of surficial geologic...

  12. Cardiopulmonary bypass in Jehovah's Witnesses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jehovah's Witnesses do not accept heterologous blood transfusion for religious ... cuit allowed successful open-heart surgery using cardiop- ulmonary bypass. .... 2 after isovolaemic hacmodilution and was between 5.8g% (Hct. 17.4%) and ...

  13. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass operation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueter, Marco; Abegg, Kathrin; Seyfried, Florian; Lutz, Thomas A; le Roux, Carel W

    2012-06-11

    rats of different strains and ages. Pre- and postoperative diets also varied significantly. Technical and experimental variations in published gastric bypass rat models complicate the comparison and identification of potential physiological mechanisms involved in gastric bypass. There is no clear evidence that any of these models is superior, but there is an emerging need for standardization of the procedure to achieve consistent and comparable data. This article therefore aims to summarize and discuss technical and experimental details of our previously validated and published gastric bypass rat model.

  14. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  15. Coronary Artery-Bypass-Graft Surgery Increases the Plasma Concentration of Exosomes Carrying a Cargo of Cardiac MicroRNAs: An Example of Exosome Trafficking Out of the Human Heart with Potential for Cardiac Biomarker Discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costanza Emanueli

    Full Text Available Exosome nanoparticles carry a composite cargo, including microRNAs (miRs. Cultured cardiovascular cells release miR-containing exosomes. The exosomal trafficking of miRNAs from the heart is largely unexplored. Working on clinical samples from coronary-artery by-pass graft (CABG surgery, we investigated if: 1 exosomes containing cardiac miRs and hence putatively released by cardiac cells increase in the circulation after surgery; 2 circulating exosomes and exosomal cardiac miRs correlate with cardiac troponin (cTn, the current "gold standard" surrogate biomarker of myocardial damage.The concentration of exosome-sized nanoparticles was determined in serial plasma samples. Cardiac-expressed (miR-1, miR-24, miR-133a/b, miR-208a/b, miR-210, non-cardiovascular (miR-122 and quality control miRs were measured in whole plasma and in plasma exosomes. Linear regression analyses were employed to establish the extent to which the circulating individual miRs, exosomes and exosomal cardiac miR correlated with cTn-I. Cardiac-expressed miRs and the nanoparticle number increased in the plasma on completion of surgery for up to 48 hours. The exosomal concentration of cardiac miRs also increased after CABG. Cardiac miRs in the whole plasma did not correlate significantly with cTn-I. By contrast cTn-I was positively correlated with the plasma exosome level and the exosomal cardiac miRs.The plasma concentrations of exosomes and their cargo of cardiac miRs increased in patients undergoing CABG and were positively correlated with hs-cTnI. These data provide evidence that CABG induces the trafficking of exosomes from the heart to the peripheral circulation. Future studies are necessary to investigate the potential of circulating exosomes as clinical biomarkers in cardiac patients.

  16. Potential contribution of hydro power plants to the energy consumption of East Asian islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, O.A.C.; Meijer, L.J.J.; Sarfianto, D.R.; Van der Ent, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Population growth, increasing energy demand and depleting fossil fuel resei-ves put a pressure on conventional methods of electricity generation. Hydropower is an alternative energy source that is known to have a large capacity potential. However, previous estimations of the potential capacity have

  17. Potential contribution of hydro power plants to the energy consumption of East Asian islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, O.A.C.; Meijer, L.J.J.; Sarfianto, D.R.; Van der Ent, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Population growth, increasing energy demand and depleting fossil fuel resei-ves put a pressure on conventional methods of electricity generation. Hydropower is an alternative energy source that is known to have a large capacity potential. However, previous estimations of the potential capacity have

  18. What Can Psychology Tell Us about Teaching Dance? The Potential Contribution of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedzoy, S. M.; Burden, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the potential contribution of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) to our understanding of student teachers' strength of intention to teach dance prior to and following an intensive eight-hour module before beginning their school-based practice. Students attending a primary Postgraduate Certificate in Education Course (PGCE)…

  19. Bypass rewiring and robustness of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junsang; Hahn, Sang Geun

    2016-08-01

    A concept of bypass rewiring is introduced, and random bypass rewiring is analytically and numerically investigated with simulations. Our results show that bypass rewiring makes networks robust against removal of nodes including random failures and attacks. In particular, random bypass rewiring connects all nodes except the removed nodes on an even degree infinite network and makes the percolation threshold 0 for arbitrary occupation probabilities. In our example, the even degree network is more robust than the original network with random bypass rewiring, while the original network is more robust than the even degree networks without random bypass. We propose a greedy bypass rewiring algorithm which guarantees the maximum size of the largest component at each step, assuming which node will be removed next is unknown. The simulation result shows that the greedy bypass rewiring algorithm improves the robustness of the autonomous system of the Internet under attacks more than random bypass rewiring.

  20. Bypass Rewiring and Robustness of Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Junsang

    2016-01-01

    A concept of bypass rewiring is introduced and random bypass rewiring is analytically and numerically investigated with simulations. Our results show that bypass rewiring makes networks robust against removal of nodes including random failures and attacks. Especially, random bypass rewiring connects all nodes except the removed nodes on an even degree infinite network and makes the percolation threshold $0$ for arbitrary occupation probabilities. In our example, the even degree network is more robust than the original network with random bypass rewiring while the original network is more robust than the even degree networks without random bypass. We propose a greedy bypass rewiring algorithm which guarantees the maximum size of the largest component at each step, assuming which node will be removed next is unknown. The simulation result shows that the greedy bypass rewiring algorithm improves the robustness of the autonomous system of the Internet under attacks more than random bypass rewiring.

  1. Nutrient contributions and biogas potential of co-digestion of feedstocks and dairy manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guiling; Neibergs, J Shannon; Harrison, Joseph H; Whitefield, Elizabeth M

    2017-06-01

    This study focused on collection of data on nutrient flow and biogas yield at a commercial anaerobic digester managed with dairy manure from a 1000 cow dairy and co-digestion of additional feedstocks. Feedstocks included: blood, fish, paper pulp, out of date beverages and grease trap waste. Mass flow of inputs and outputs, nutrient concentration of inputs and outputs, and biogas yield were obtained. It was determined that manure was the primary source of nutrients to the anaerobic digester when co-digested with feedstocks. The percentage of contribution from manure to the total nutrient inputs for total nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen, phosphorus and total solids was 46.3%, 67.7%, 32.8% and 23.4%, respectively. On average, manure contributed the greatest amount of total nitrogen and ammonia-nitrogen. Grease trap waste contributed the greatest amount of phosphorus and total solids at approximately 50%. Results demonstrated that a reliable estimate of nutrient inflow could be obtained from the product of the nutrient analyses of a single daily composite of influent subsamples times the total daily flow estimated with an in-line flow meter. This approach to estimate total daily nutrient inflow would be more cost effective than testing and summing the contribution of individual feedstocks. Data collected after liquid-solid separation confirmed that the majority (>75%) of nutrients remain with the liquid effluent portion of the manure stream. It was demonstrated that the ash concentration in solids before and after composting could be used to estimate the mass balance of total solids during the compost process. This data confirms that biogas or methane yield could be accurately measured from the ratio of % volatile solids to % total solids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Potential contribution of hydro power plants to the energy consumption of East Asian islands

    OpenAIRE

    Hoes, O. A. C.; Meijer, L.J.J.; Sarfianto, D.R.; R. J. van der Ent

    2014-01-01

    Population growth, increasing energy demand and depleting fossil fuel resei-ves put a pressure on conventional methods of electricity generation. Hydropower is an alternative energy source that is known to have a large capacity potential. However, previous estimations of the potential capacity have been inconsistent and incomplete. In this study we identified all locations on East Asian islands (from Japan, Taiwan Phillipines to Indonesia) which are suitable for hydropower. For this we combin...

  3. The Only Way out Is through: The Peril of Spiritual Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Bentley, Paige B.; Yarborough, J. Preston

    2007-01-01

    Given the increased attention to spirituality in the counseling literature, with a primary emphasis on helping clients find their spiritual path, it is important for counselors to be aware of one potential pitfall of the spiritual path, namely spiritual bypass. Spiritual bypass occurs when clients seek to use their spiritual beliefs, practices,…

  4. Potential contributions of extremophiles to hydrocarbon resources in marine extreme environments:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiasheng; WANG Yongbiao; LI Qing

    2007-01-01

    To understand the potential mechanism of marine extremophiles participating in the formation and the evolution of hydrocarbon resources in marine extreme environments,some typical kinds of extremophiles and their distributions in marine hydrothermal and cold vents are discussed and evaluated respectively.The potential relationship between extremophile activities and hydrocarbon resources in marine extreme environments are then discussed in details.It could be now preliminary concluded that archaea and bacteria are the two main kinds of extremophiles in marine extreme environments.The dominating microbe communities in hydrothermal vents are heterotrophic zymogens,sulfate reducers and methanogens,while the ANME-2 group(Methanosarcinales) surrounded by sulfate-reducing bacteria and ANME-1 group dominate in cold vents.Marine extremophiles would be able to use CH,and H2S to synthesize energy for metabolism and to support food chains for other unique macrobiota nearby,which together present a high abundance but a low diversity with distinct characteristics of horizontal and vertical distributions.Marine extremophiles might play an important role either directly or indirectly in the processes of hydrocarbon formation and subsequent alteration,and could indicate the evolution of hydrocarbon resources in marine extreme environments.Our research thus has a great significance both in theoretical approach of potential hydrocarbon resources formed by marine extremophile activities and in practical exploration of the potential hydrocarbonsource sedimentary layers formed in the Earth history or the potential strata in southern China.

  5. Distinct Contributions of Median Raphe Nucleus to Contextual Fear Conditioning and Fear-Potentiated Startle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R. C. B.; Cruz, A. P. M.; Avanzi, V.; Landeira-Fernandez, J.; Brandão, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Ascending 5-HT projections from the median raphe nucleus (MRN), probably to the hippocampus, are implicated in the acquisition of contextual fear (background stimuli), as assessed by freezing behavior. Foreground cues like light, used as a conditioned stimulus (CS) in classical fear conditioning, also cause freezing through thalamic transmission to the amygdala. As the MRN projects to the hippocampus and amygdala, the role of this raphe nucleus in fear conditioning to explicit cues remains to be explained. Here we analyzed the behavior of rats with MRN electrolytic lesions in a contextual conditioning situation and in a fear-potentiated startle procedure. The animals received MRN electrolytic lesions either before or on the day after two consecutive training sessions in which they were submitted to 10 conditioning trials, each in an experimental chamber (same context) where they. received foot-shocks (0.6 mA, 1 sec) paired to a 4-sec light CS. Seven to ten days later, the animals were submitted to testing sessions for assessing conditioned fear when they were placed for five shocks, and the duration of contextual freezing was recorded. The animals were then submitted to a fear-potentiated startle in response to a 4-sec light-CS, followed by white noise (100 dB, 50 ms). Control rats (sham) tested in the same context showed more freezing than did rats with pre- or post-training MRN lesions. Startle was clearly potentiated in the presence of light CS in the sham-lesioned animals. Whereas pretraining lesions reduced both freezing and fear-potentiated startle, the post-training lesions reduced only freezing to context, without changing the fear-potentiated startle. In a second experiment, neurotoxic lesions of the MRN with local injections of N-methyl-D-aspartate or the activation of 5-HT1A somatodendritic auto-receptors of the MRN by microinjections of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy- 2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) before the training sessions also

  6. The potential contributions of concept maps for learning website to assessment for learning practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Filiz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine the promising contributions of the Concept Maps for Learning (CMfL website to assessment for learning practices. The CMfL website generates concept maps from relatedness degree of concepts pairs through the Pathfinder Scaling Algorithm. This website also confirms the established principles of effective assessment for learning, for it is capable of automatically assessing students’ higher order knowledge, simultaneously identifying strengths and weaknesses, immediately providing useful feedback and being user-friendly. According to the default assessment plan, students first create concept maps on a particular subject and then they are given individualized visual feedback followed by associated instructional material (e.g., videos, website links, examples, problems, etc. based on a comparison of their concept map and a subject matter expert’s map. After studying the feedback and instructional material, teachers can monitor their students’ progress by having them create revised concept maps. Therefore, we claim that the CMfL website may reduce the workload of teachers as well as provide immediate and delayed feedback on the weaknesses of students in different forms such as graphical and multimedia. For the following study, we will examine whether these promising contributions to assessment for learning are valid in a variety of subjects.

  7. Modern Biotechnology—Potential Contribution and Challenges for Sustainable Food Production in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jane Morris

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern biotechnology, including the application of transgenic techniques to produce Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs, can play a significant role in increasing agricultural production in a sustainable way, but its products need to be tailored for the developing world. In sub-Saharan Africa, the capacity to develop GMOs and ensure they meet stringent regulatory requirements is somewhat limited. Most African governments contribute little to science and technology either financially or through strong policies. This leaves the determination of research and development priorities in the hands of international funding agencies. Whereas funding from the United States is generally supportive of GM technology, the opposite is true of funding from European sources. African countries are thus pulled in two different directions. One alternative to this dilemma might be for countries in the sub-Saharan Africa region to develop stronger South-South collaborations, but these need to be supported with adequate funding. African governments as well as external funding agencies are urged to consider the important role that biotechnology, including GM technology, can play in contributing to sustainable development in Africa, and to provide adequate support to the development of capacity to research, develop and commercialize GMOs in the region.

  8. Potential contribution of GALILEO to the TRF and the determination of ERPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, R.; Englich, S.:

    2006-10-01

    1. INTRODUCTION In addition to the existing GPS and GLONASS systems the EC and ESA plan to launch an European Satellite Navigation System (GALILEO) till end of 2009. 30 GALILEO satellites will populate three orbital planes with an inclination of about 56o. This paper strives to summarize potential improvements in geodetic point positioning and especially in the determination of Earth Rotation gained from the combined use of all three systems or at least of GPS+GALILEO.

  9. Energetic contribution potential of building-integrated photovoltaics on airports in warm climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruether, Ricardo [LabEEE - Laboratorio de Eficiencia Energetica em Edificacoes, UFSC - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Caixa Postal 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); LABSOLAR - Laboratorio de Energia Solar, UFSC - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Caixa Postal 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Braun, Priscila [LabEEE - Laboratorio de Eficiencia Energetica em Edificacoes, UFSC - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Caixa Postal 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Especially in warm climates, a considerable fraction of the electricity demand in commercial buildings is due to the intensive use of air-conditioning systems. Airport buildings in sunny and warm regions present a perfect match between energy demand and solar resource availability. Airport buildings are also typically large and horizontal, isolated and free of shading, and have a great potential for the integration of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. In this work, we assess the potential impact in energy demand reduction at the Florianopolis International Airport in Brazil (27 S, 48 W) with the use of building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) systems. We analyse the building's hourly energy consumption and solar irradiation data, to assess the match between energy demand and potential generation, and we estimate the PV power necessary to supply both the total amount and fractions of the annual energy demand. Our results show that the integration of PV systems on airport buildings in warm climates can supply the entire electric power consumption of an airport complex, in line with the general concept of a zero-energy building (ZEB). (author)

  10. Current peripheral bypass surgery: various clinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaa, Alexander te

    2011-01-01

    Substantial post-operative edema occurs in the majority of patients who undergo peripheral bypass surgery due to severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The pathophysiological mechanisms that underlay edema formation following peripheral bypass surgery include hyperemia, an increased capillary per

  11. Technology Solutions Case Study: Preventing Thermal Bypass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This project highlights the importance of continuous air barriers in full alignment with insulation to prevent thermal bypasses and achieve high energy performance, and recommends use of ENERGY STAR's Thermal Bypass Inspection Checklist.

  12. Current peripheral bypass surgery: various clinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaa, Alexander te

    2011-01-01

    Substantial post-operative edema occurs in the majority of patients who undergo peripheral bypass surgery due to severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The pathophysiological mechanisms that underlay edema formation following peripheral bypass surgery include hyperemia, an increased capillary per

  13. "Orpheus" cardiopulmonary bypass simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard W; Pybus, David A

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we describe a high-fidelity perfusion simulation system intended for use in the training and continuing education of perfusionists. The system comprises a hydraulic simulator, an electronic interface unit and a controlling computer with associated real-time computer models. It is designed for use within an actual operating theatre, or within a specialized simulation facility. The hydraulic simulator can be positioned on an operating table and physically connected to the circuit of the institutional heart-lung machine. The institutional monitoring system is used to display the arterial and central venous pressures, the ECG and the nasopharyngeal temperature using appropriate connections. The simulator is able to reproduce the full spectrum of normal and abnormal events that may present during the course of cardiopulmonary bypass. The system incorporates a sophisticated blood gas model that accurately predicts the behavior of a modern, hollow-fiber oxygenator. Output from this model is displayed in the manner of an in-line blood gas electrode and is updated every 500 msecs. The perfusionist is able to administer a wide variety of drugs during a simulation session including: vasoconstrictors (metaraminol, epinephrine and phenylephrine), a vasodilator (sodium nitroprusside), chronotropes (epinephrine and atropine), an inotrope (epinephrine) and modifiers of coagulation (heparin and protamine). Each drug has a pharmacokinetic profile based on a three-compartment model plus an effect compartment. The simulation system has potential roles in the skill training of perfusionists, the development of crisis management protocols, the certification and accreditation of perfusionists and the evaluation of new perfusion equipment and/or techniques.

  14. Perforation in the bypassed stomach following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasavas, Pavlos K; Yeaney, Woodrow W; Caushaj, Philip F; Keenan, Robert J; Landreneau, Rodney J; Gagné, Daniel J

    2003-10-01

    Access to the bypassed stomach is difficult following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP). The bypassed stomach is not readily available for endoscopic or radiographic evaluation. Diagnosis and treatment of peptic ulcer disease and its complications in the excluded stomach becomes difficult. We present a case of perforation in the bypassed stomach following LRYGBP secondary to peptic ulcer disease.

  15. Role of the endothelium in placental dysfunction after fetal cardiac bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, V M; McElhinney, D B; Rajasinghe, H A; Liddicoat, J R; Hendricks-Munoz, K; Fineman, J R; Hanley, F L

    1999-02-01

    Fetal cardiac bypass causes placental dysfunction, characterized by increased placental vascular resistance, decreased placental blood flow, hypoxia, and acidosis. Vasoactive factors produced by the vascular endothelium, such as nitric oxide and endothelin 1, are important regulators of placental vascular tone and may contribute to this placental dysfunction. To investigate the role of the vascular endothelium in placental dysfunction related to fetal cardiac bypass, we studied 3 groups of fetal sheep. In the first group (n = 7) we determined placental hemodynamic responses before and after bypass to an endothelium-dependent vasodilator (acetylcholine), an endothelium-independent vasodilator (nitroprusside), and endothelin 1. In the second group (n = 8) a nonspecific endothelin receptor blocker (PD 145065) was administered and placental hemodynamic values were measured before and after bypass. In the third group (n = 5) endothelin 1 levels were measured before and after bypass. Before fetal cardiac bypass exogenous endothelin 1 decreased placental blood flow by 9% and increased placental resistance by 9%. After bypass endothelin 1 decreased placental flow by 47% and increased resistance by 106%. There was also a significant attenuation of the placental vascular relaxation response to acetylcholine after bypass, whereas the response to nitroprusside was not significantly altered. In fetuses that received the PD 145065, placental vascular resistance increased significantly less than in control fetuses (28% versus 62%). Similarly, placental blood flow decreased significantly more (from 6. 3 +/- 3.1 to 28.3 +/- 10.4 pg/mL; P =.01) in control fetuses than in fetuses receiving PD 145065 (33% versus 20%). Umbilical venous endothelin 1 levels increased significantly in fetuses exposed to fetal bypass but did not change in control fetuses. The basal endothelial regulatory mechanisms of placental vascular tone were deranged after fetal cardiac bypass. Endothelin receptor

  16. CONTRIBUTION TO THE POTENTIAL OF USING FRP MATERIALS IN THE REHABILITATION AND STABILIZATION OF TIMBERED BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Čejka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wooden log, timbered perimeter and interior walls ranked among the most common building constructions used from the Early Middle Ages. In most cases, the local natural resources, i.e. wood, clay, straw and stone, were used for building houses with wooden framing. This article outlines typical defects and failures of timbered houses, “classic” techniques for the rehabilitation of these defects and failures indicating the potential of using composite materials based on high- strength fibres and epoxy resin in the rehabilitation and strengthening of timbered buildings.

  17. Potential Contribution of Traffic to Air Pollution in the State of Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Al-Mutairi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The reduction in ambient air pollution is a universal goal-particularly in urban areas, the lack of resources often necessitates identification and prioritization of sources of air pollutants. Efficient planning and effective management of environmental pollutants is thus important for optimum utilization of limited resources. Approach: This study examined seven years of data from three air pollution monitoring stations in the State of Kuwait. The stations-each located at a different district-were selected such that the influence of traffic source and oil refineries/power stations on ambient air pollution contaminants could be detected. A sampling plan was developed and CH4, CO, O3, SO2, NO, NOX and TS concentrations were measured both during peak-traffic hours as well as off-peak hours. Results: Analyses of the data showed that concentrations of the air pollutants had slightly increased over the seven-year study period and only those of the NOX and SO2, exceed the permitted standard levels. Traffic was the main source of air pollution in the district located adjacent to the city centre, while oil refineries contributed most to ambient air pollution in the rural district. Conclusion: The concentration levels of NO, NOX and Total Sulfate (TS were significantly less at the district located away from urban traffic and oil refineries compared to those of with heavy daily traffic congestions and those of the district in proximity to oil refineries.

  18. Earthquakes as a potential contributing factor to climate change at multi-decadal scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KeYan Fang; Heikki Seppä

    2014-01-01

    Climate changes at the multi-decadal scale are often associated with multi-decadal phase shifts of the dominant sea surface temperature (SST) pattern, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The PDO may be associated with the North Pacific branch of the Thermohaline Circulation (THC). Great earthquakes (M>8), particularly along the route of the THC, might modulate the vertical mixing and bring deep, cold water to surface, contributing to multi-decadal changes in surface currents and the PDO. This may eventually lead to multi-decadal climate changes. We tested this hypothesis for the Pacific Ocean where great earthquakes have been frequently recorded. We found associations between the PDO and recurrent earthquakes along the route of the deep currents of the THC in the modern period since 1900, and relationships between hydroclimate change in Monsoonal Asia and historical earthquakes since 1300. However, it should be noted that this hypothesis is very preliminary and has many gaps that needs further evidences from more observational records and modeling studies.

  19. A possible contribution to improving the therapeutic potentials of Babor's Typology of Alcohol Dependent Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Sérgio Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to replicate Babor's Typology and to explore clinical features related to personality traits that may underlie this classification, in order to improve its therapeutic possibilities. Methods Observational prospective study on a group of 273 male alcoholics. After a replication of Babor's variables, Cluster Analysis, Chi-Square – applied on clinical variables related to a Lappda Tipology – and Kappa tests were performed. Results The study identified two distinct clusters that held similar features to those described for the Type A/Type B classification. Besides presenting a lower socio-economic situation, Cluster 2 patients were associated with higher vulnerability and severe clinical features and also differed from Cluster 1 in their response to treatment. These replicated clusters retained connections and also differences in relation to the variables derived from the Lappda Typology. Conclusion Considering that each of the two replicated clusters seem to be associated to different personality traits – according to their correlations to the affective, cognitive and behavioral dimensions brought forward by the Lappda Typology – it is acceptable that this study may contribute to the development of more comprehensive and effective therapeutic strategies specifically tailored to target more specific personality traits of these subgroups of alcoholic patients.

  20. On the potential contribution of open lead particle emissions to the central Arctic aerosol concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Held

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available During the ice-breaker borne ASCOS expedition (Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study direct eddy covariance measurements of aerosol number fluxes were carried out in August 2008 on the edge of an ice floe drifting in the central Arctic Ocean between 2°–10° W longitude and 87°–87.5° N latitude. The median aerosol transfer velocities over different surface types (open water leads, ice ridges, snow and ice surfaces ranged from 0.27 to 0.68 mm s−1 during deposition-dominated episodes. Emission periods were observed more frequently over the open lead, while the snow behaved primarily as a deposition surface. Directly measured aerosol fluxes were compared with particle deposition parameterizations in order to estimate the emission flux from the observed net aerosol flux. Finally, the contribution of the open lead particle source to atmospheric variations in particle number concentration was evaluated and compared with the observed temporal evolution of particle number. The direct emission of aerosol particles from the open lead can only explain 5–10% of the observed particle number variation in the mixing layer close to the surface.

  1. The Microbiome in Mental Health: Potential Contribution of Gut Microbiota in Disease and Pharmacotherapy Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Stephanie A; Ellingrod, Vicki L

    2015-10-01

    The gut microbiome is composed of ~10(13) -10(14) microbial cells and viruses that exist in a symbiotic bidirectional communicative relationship with the host. Bacterial functions in the gut have an important role in healthy host metabolic function, and dysbiosis can contribute to the pathology of many medical conditions. Alterations in the relationship between gut microbiota and host have gained some attention in mental health because new evidence supports the association of gut bacteria to cognitive and emotional processes. Of interest, illnesses such as major depressive disorder are disproportionately prevalent in patients with gastrointestinal illnesses such as inflammatory bowel disease, which pathologically has been strongly linked to microbiome function. Not only is the microbiome associated with the disease itself, but it may also influence the effectiveness or adverse effects associated with pharmacologic agents used to treat these disorders. This field of study may also provide new insights on how dietary agents may help manage mental illness both directly as well as though their influence on the therapeutic and adverse effects of psychotropic agents.

  2. GIVING WOMEN VOICE: THE ETHIOPIAN FEMALE SKILLED DIASPORA’S POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION TO DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Amazan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Migration research, which tends to focus on the low paying and exploitative nature of female migrants’ work, often neglects female skilled migration. Under-representation of the gender dimension is not only common in international migration research, but is also present in policies, development strategies and initiatives. This lack of acknowledgement also impedes, and continues to marginalise, the role of women in development, and further perpetuates disparities between the sexes. Overall, the focus on gender within the study of international migration and diaspora mobility studies remains inadequate. The methodology behind this article involved questionnaires and semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted with Ethiopian skilled and highly-skilled professionals residing in North America. Some temporary and permanent returnees were interviewed, including government officials, local NGOs and members of international organizations. The research sheds new light on the gender dimensions of the role of the diaspora in contributing to the re-shaping of Ethiopian society. The article explores aspects of ambiguity among gender roles in both North America and in Ethiopia. This article will explore these themes and also discuss the gender dimension of skilled migration and female diaspora mobility in the context of African development, specifically relating to Ethiopia. It will analyse the role of women in the realm of international skilled migration, in order to recognize and empower migrant women as agents of development and change.

  3. The Potential of Strava Data to Contribute in Non-Motorised Transport (nmt) Planning in Johannesburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selala, M. K.; Musakwa, W.

    2016-06-01

    Transportation is one of the most fundamental challenges of urban development in the modern world. Cities are currently moving towards sustainable transportation, which includes non-motorised transportation (NMT). The city of Johannesburg has a goal of becoming a smart city, with sustainable development and smart mobility. Encouraging the use of non-motorised transportation and public transport has the potential of reducing the use of private motorised transport and therefor its negative consequences within the city of Johannesburg. There is limited research on cycling and how cyclists interact with cycling infrastructure within the city. The lack of such knowledge hinders proper planning for NMT. This research studies the ability of geolocation based services to provide such information which can be useful in planning for NMT. Strava Metro application is the example of such geolocation based services. The potential of this app to influence planning is investigated. According to the information acquired by Strava Metro, there are more cyclists in suburbs at the centre of Johannesburg and towards the north and to the east, and in Kibler Park at the south western part of the city. There are indications that the numbers of cycling activities recorded by Strava Metro are affected by the availability of gated communities, income levels, crime levels and the provision of infrastructure.

  4. Potential contributions to space geodesy from the IridiumNEXT constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, B. C.; Encarnação, J.; Ditmar, P.; Klees, R.

    2012-12-01

    The IridiumNEXT constellation will soon replace the existing Iridium satellite telecommunication network, with initial launches set to start in 2015. In addition to the primary task of providing global telecommunication services, each IridiumNEXT satellite will also carry a hosted payload that will provide both private and public institutions the opportunity to place an instrument suite on one or all of constellation's satellites. This creates the possibility to gather continuous, global observations of Earth over the entire 15 year projected mission lifetime. Access to such a platform creates the potential to investigate many of Earth's highly dynamic processes at a spatiotemporal resolution that is simply not possible from single-satellite missions. Space geodesy is one the numerous fields that would benefit from such a mission. Precise orbits of the IridiumNEXT satellites derived through an on-board GNSS receiver (plus accelerometers and star cameras) have the potential to observe the large-scale, high-frequency variations in Earth's gravity field at time scales as short as one day. Additional positioning data from ground-based laser ranging stations would help improve the orbit determination, in addition to providing the necessary link to improve estimates of geocenter motion and reference frames. In this presentation, we will analyze the expected geodetic science returns from such a mission and will discuss the instrumental requirements needed to achieve these objectives.

  5. Data Mashups: Potential Contribution to Decision Support on Climate Change and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lora E. Fleming

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Linking environmental, socioeconomic and health datasets provides new insights into the potential associations between climate change and human health and wellbeing, and underpins the development of decision support tools that will promote resilience to climate change, and thus enable more effective adaptation. This paper outlines the challenges and opportunities presented by advances in data collection, storage, analysis, and access, particularly focusing on “data mashups”. These data mashups are integrations of different types and sources of data, frequently using open application programming interfaces and data sources, to produce enriched results that were not necessarily the original reason for assembling the raw source data. As an illustration of this potential, this paper describes a recently funded initiative to create such a facility in the UK for use in decision support around climate change and health, and provides examples of suitable sources of data and the purposes to which they can be directed, particularly for policy makers and public health decision makers.

  6. Enzymatic activity in the rhizosphere of Spartina maritima: potential contribution for phytoremediation of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboreda, Rosa; Caçador, Isabel

    2008-02-01

    Extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) of five enzymes (peroxidase, phenol oxidase, beta-glucosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase and acid phosphatase) was analysed in sediments colonised by Spartina maritima in two salt marshes (Rosário and Pancas) of the Tagus estuary (Portugal) with different characteristics such as sediment parameters and metal contaminant levels. Our aim was a better understanding of the influence of the halophyte on microbial activity in the rhizosphere under different site conditions, and its potential consequences for metal cycling and phytoremediation in salt marshes. Acid phosphatase and beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase presented significantly higher EEA in Rosário than in Pancas, whereas the opposite occurred for peroxidase. This was mainly attributed to differences in organic matter between the two sites. A positive correlation between root biomass and EEA of hydrolases (beta-glucosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase and acid phosphatase) was found, indicating a possible influence of the halophyte in sediment microbial function. This would potentially affect metal cycling in the rhizosphere through microbial reactions.

  7. Contributing factors to potential turnover in a sample of South African management-level employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolph Muteswa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The overall purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which a number of key organisational variables influence the potential decision to leave the organisation in a sample of managerial-level employees. Organisational variables focused on included: career path strategies, management style, intrinsic and extrinsic rewards, team dynamics, training and development opportunities, and work / life balance. Methodology: An exploratory and descriptive research design was adopted. A questionnaire was developed by the researchers based on the related literature. 106 MBA students based in KwaZulu-Natal participated in the study. Findings: The three aspects of internal organisational functioning found to have a significant influence on the participant's potential turnover considerations were: management / leadership style, career path strategies and rewards. Value of the research: According to the Department of Labour (2008:5 there is need for an additional 22 600 managers in various professions in South Africa. As a result of the skills shortages, South African organisations find themselves competing with international organisations for managerial-level employees, resulting in a 'war for talent'. This research is of significant value to organisations as it provides information relevant to the design and support of talent management and retention strategies in South African organisations.

  8. Fibrin Adhesive: Clinical Application in Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fundaró, Pino; Velardi, Antonio R.; Santoli, Carmine

    1985-01-01

    Fibrin adhesive was used 72 times in a group of 67 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The indications were prophylactic sealing of potential sources of bleeding, topical hemostasis (control of bleeding sites dangerous or difficult to suture), and fixation of the graft in the optimal position. The method of glue application under varying circumstances is described and the results are reported. This experience suggests that in some cases the glue expedites the operation and makes it safer. We conclude that the fibrin sealing represents a valid aid in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:15227018

  9. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Bypass. 403.17 Section 403.17... GENERAL PRE-TREAT-MENT REGULATIONS FOR EXIST-ING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION § 403.17 Bypass. (a) Definitions. (1) Bypass means the intentional diversion of wastestreams from any portion of an Industrial...

  10. Undiagnosed phaeochromocytoma following infrainguinal bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, N; Schroeder, T V

    1998-01-01

    We present a rare case of undiagnosed phaeochromocytoma following infrainguinal bypass surgery. The patient, a 59-year-old lady, had a one year history of hypertension following a first femoro-tibial bypass and presented as a cardiorespiratory emergency in the admission room following her...... contralateral femoro-tibial bypass. The patient recovered after some days in intensive care despite a delayed diagnosis....

  11. Potential contribution of progesterone receptors to the development of sexual behavior in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroziers, Elodie; Brock, Olivier; Bakker, Julie

    2016-05-07

    We previously showed that estradiol can have both defeminizing and feminizing effects on the developing mouse brain. Pre- and early postnatal estradiol defeminized the ability to show lordosis in adulthood, whereas prepubertal estradiol feminized this ability. Furthermore, we found that estradiol upregulates progesterone receptors (PR) during development, inducing both a male-and female-typical pattern of PR expression in the mouse hypothalamus. In the present study, we took advantage of a newly developed PR antagonist (ZK 137316) to determine whether PR contributes to either male- or female-typical sexual differentiation. Thus groups of male and female C57Bl/6j mice were treated with ZK 137316 or OIL as control: males were treated neonatally (P0-P10), during the critical period for male sexual differentiation, and females were treated prepubertally (P15-P25), during the critical period for female sexual differentiation. In adulthood, mice were tested for sexual behavior. In males, some minor effects of neonatal ZK treatment on sexual behavior were observed: latencies to the first mount, intromission and ejaculation were decreased in neonatally ZK treated males; however, this effect disappeared by the second mating test. By contrast, female mice treated with ZK during the prepubertal period showed significantly less lordosis than OIL-treated females. Mate preferences were not affected in either males or females treated with ZK during development. Taken together, these results suggest a role for PR and thus perhaps progesterone in the development of lordosis behavior in female mice. By contrast, no obvious role for PR can be discerned in the development of male sexual behavior.

  12. Repaglinide-gemfibrozil drug interaction: inhibition of repaglinide glucuronidation as a potential additional contributing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Chen, Weiqi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Ling; Hong, Yang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Wenying; Zhang, Yueping; Tang, Yuwei; Zhang, Hongjian; Humphreys, William Griffith; Rodrigues, A David

    2010-12-01

    To further explore the mechanism underlying the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil, alone or in combination with itraconazole. Repaglinide metabolism was assessed in vitro (human liver subcellular fractions, fresh human hepatocytes, and recombinant enzymes) and the resulting incubates were analyzed, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and radioactivity counting, to identify and quantify the different metabolites therein. Chemical inhibitors, in addition to a trapping agent, were also employed to elucidate the importance of each metabolic pathway. Finally, a panel of human liver microsomes (genotyped for UGT1A1*28 allele status) was used to determine the importance of UGT1A1 in the direct glucuronidation of repaglinide. The results of the present study demonstrate that repaglinide can undergo direct glucuronidation, a pathway that can possibly contribute to the interaction with gemfibrozil. For example, [³H]-repaglinide formed glucuronide and oxidative metabolites (M2 and M4) when incubated with primary human hepatocytes. Gemfibrozil effectively inhibited (∼78%) both glucuronide and M4 formation, but had a minor effect on M2 formation. Concomitantly, the overall turnover of repaglinide was also inhibited (∼80%), and was completely abolished when gemfibrozil was co-incubated with itraconazole. These observations are in qualitative agreement with the in vivo findings. UGT1A1 plays a significant role in the glucuronidation of repaglinide. In addition, gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit repaglinide glucuronidation and the inhibition by gemfibrozil glucuronide is time-dependent. Inhibition of UGT enzymes, especially UGT1A1, by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide is an additional mechanism to consider when rationalizing the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. The isoflavone irilone contributes to the estrogenic potential of dietary supplements containing red clover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Stefanie; Schmalbach, Katja; Esch, Harald L; Lehmann, Leane

    2014-02-01

    A recent intervention study demonstrated the occurrence of irilone as second most abundant isoflavone next to daidzein in human plasma after consumption of a red clover-based dietary supplement (RCDS) containing predominately formononetin ≫ biochanin A > irilone (12 % of these isoflavones). To elucidate the relevance of this finding, in the present study (1) the representativeness of the isoflavone composition of the RCDS and (2) the estrogenic activity of irilone were investigated. Thus, major isoflavones were quantified in eight commercially available RCDS. Furthermore, the estrogenic activities of irilone and other isoflavones were determined by marker gene expression in Ishikawa and cell proliferation in MCF-7 cells. Irilone amounted to 1.8-10.9 mg/g capsule content and 5-18 % of the three major isoflavones, respectively, demonstrating the general occurrence of irilone in RCDS. Moreover, irilone significantly induced the activity of alkaline phosphatase (AlP) as well as AlP, progesterone receptor, and androgen receptor mRNA levels in Ishikawa cells. Furthermore, irilone significantly induced MCF-7 cell proliferation. Neither 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced AlP activity nor E2-induced MCF-7 cell proliferation was affected by irilone. ICI182,780 antagonized IRI-induced effects on both AlP activity and cell proliferation, suggesting an estrogen receptor agonistic mode of action. Taking into account the estrogenic activity of red clover isoflavones (formononetin, biochanin A, prunetin, glycitein) and their biotransformation products (daidzein, genistein, ethylphenol) as well as published plasma levels of isoflavones after consumption of RCDS, irilone could contribute approximately 50 % of the E2 equivalents estimated for daidzein.

  14. Potential contribution of materials investigations in reducing the risks of unavailability of nuclear civil engineering infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goy, R.; Gaine, C.; Cornish-Bowden, I.; Auge, L.; Thillard, G.; Capra, B. [Oxand (France)

    2011-07-01

    Many consulting assignments undertaken by Oxand within the framework of life-cycle management of existing nuclear civil engineering structures, relied on taking into account the structure's level of deterioration, the quantitative estimate of its residual strength capacity and the future progression of this capacity over time. The developments of structure assessment techniques allow more and more the integration of the real state of the existing structure by enhancing the value of measures and investigations carried out on structures. On one hand, this information allows to take into account the structure's ageing and therefore estimate the residual resistance and reliability. On the other hand, by investigating the real properties of the structure and of its operation, refined calculations can sometimes highlight a resistance margin of the structure 'such as built' higher than the one considered during design. The precision on the 'real' reliability of the structure allows to refine its management and thus to optimize the infrastructure's performance. Developments of assessment methods are increasingly oriented toward probabilistic approaches. Although they go out of the 'classical regulatory' framework, they bring precision on the 'real' reliability of the structure. Using higher assessment levels needs to have more important and precise input data, what can lead to the need to carry out more detailed investigations. However, these methods offer interesting ways, which can provide, in certain cases, useful additional information for the decision-making of actions to be engaged. The methodology is illustrated with the case of a network of reinforced concrete beams, which are subjected to a rapid increase in their mechanical stresses. In particular this example shows that investigations on the real performances of materials can provided a significant contribution in managing the risks of unavailability

  15. Early hypothalamic FTO overexpression in response to maternal obesity--potential contribution to postweaning hyperphagia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanni Caruso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrauterine and postnatal overnutrition program hyperphagia, adiposity and glucose intolerance in offspring. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene have been linked to increased risk of obesity. FTO is highly expressed in hypothalamic regions critical for energy balance and hyperphagic phenotypes were linked with FTO SNPs. As nutrition during fetal development can influence the expression of genes involved in metabolic function, we investigated the impact of maternal obesity on FTO. METHODS: Female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to chow or high fat diet (HFD for 5 weeks before mating, throughout gestation and lactation. On postnatal day 1 (PND1, some litters were adjusted to 3 pups (vs. 12 control to induce postnatal overnutrition. At PND20, rats were weaned onto chow or HFD for 15 weeks. FTO mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and liver, as well as hepatic markers of lipid metabolism were measured. RESULTS: At weaning, hypothalamic FTO mRNA expression was increased significantly in offspring of obese mothers and FTO was correlated with both visceral and epididymal fat mass (P<0.05; body weight approached significance (P = 0.07. Hepatic FTO and Fatty Acid Synthase mRNA expression were decreased by maternal obesity. At 18 weeks, FTO mRNA expression did not differ between groups; however body weight was significantly correlated with hypothalamic FTO. Postnatal HFD feeding significantly reduced hepatic Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1a but did not affect the expression of other hepatic markers investigated. FTO was not affected by chronic HFD feeding. SIGNIFICANCE: Maternal obesity significantly impacted FTO expression in both hypothalamus and liver at weaning. Early overexpression of hypothalamic FTO correlated with increased adiposity and later food intake of siblings exposed to HFD suggesting upregulation of FTO may contribute to subsequent hyperphagia, in line with some human

  16. Difference, adapted physical activity and human development: potential contribution of capabilities approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carla Filomena; Howe, P David

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a call to Adapted Physical Activity (APA) professionals to increase the reflexive nature of their practice. Drawing upon Foucault's concept of governmentality (1977) APA action may work against its own publicized goals of empowerment and self-determination. To highlight these inconsistencies, we will draw upon historical and social factors that explain the implicit dangers of practice not following policy. We propose that APA practitioners work according to ethical guidelines, based upon a capabilities approach (Nussbaum, 2006, 2011; Sen, 2009) to counteract possible adverse effects of APA practitioner action. A capabilities approach is conducive to the development of each individual's human potential, by holistically considering the consequences of physical activity (i.e., biological, cultural, social, and psychological dimensions). To conclude, this paper will offer suggestions that may lead to an ethical reflection aligned with the best interest of APA's users.

  17. Potential contributions of noncontact atomic force microscopy for the future Casimir force measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, W J

    2010-01-01

    Surface electric noise, i.e., the non-uniform distribution of charges and potentials on a surface, poses a great experimental challenge in modern precision force measurements. Such a challenge is encountered in a number of different experimental circumstances. The scientists employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) have long focused their efforts to understand the surface-related noise issues via variants of AFM techniques, such as Kelvin probe force microscopy or electric force microscopy. Recently, the physicists investigating quantum vacuum fluctuation phenomena between two closely-spaced objects have also begun to collect experimental evidence indicating a presence of surface effects neglected in their previous analyses. It now appears that the two seemingly disparate science communities are encountering effects rooted in the same surface phenomena. In this report, we suggest specific experimental tasks to be performed in the near future that are crucial not only for fostering needed collaborations between...

  18. Contributing to the early detection of Rett syndrome: the potential role of auditory Gestalt perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschik, Peter B; Einspieler, Christa; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    To assess whether there are qualitatively deviant characteristics in the early vocalizations of children with Rett syndrome, we had 400 native Austrian-German speakers listen to audio recordings of vocalizations from typically developing girls and girls with Rett syndrome. The audio recordings were rated as (a) inconspicuous, (b) conspicuous or (c) not able to decide between (a) and (b). The results showed that participants were accurate in differentiating the vocalizations of typically developing children compared to children with Rett syndrome. However, the accuracy for rating verbal behaviors was dependent on the type of vocalization with greater accuracy for canonical babbling compared to cooing vocalizations. The results suggest a potential role for the use of rating child vocalizations for early detection of Rett syndrome. This is important because clinical criteria related to speech and language development remain important for early identification of Rett syndrome.

  19. [Contribution of cognitive evoked potentials for detecting early cognitive disorders in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnié, M N; Bensa, C; Laloux, L; Bertogliati, C; Faure, S; Lebrun, C

    2007-11-01

    In Multiple Sclerosis (MS), one of the most frequent neurological diseases in young adults, cognitive dysfunctions have been under considered whereas their evolution may produce a fronto-sous-cortical deterioration and more than half of the MS patients present such dysfunctions. Nevertheless sensory evoked-potentials are classically used in this disease, event-related potentials (ERP) are not included in the clinical exploration of MS. Two studies are presented aimed at further tracking the usefulness of ERP for detecting early cognitive dysfunctions in MS. All of the patients presented a relapsing remitting MS for less than 5 years with a moderate physical handicap and complained from their memory. They performed a neuropsychological set and ERP were elicited using the oddball paradigm in both modalities, visual and auditory. In the first study, 10 patients without cognitive dysfunction at the neuropsychological evaluation and 10 patients with an attention deficit participated with 10 age-matched controls. In the second study, 10 patients with memory impairment at the neuropsychological evaluation and 10 age-matched controls were included. Our data argue for an earlier modification of ERP parameters in the visual modality than in the auditory one, even before the modification of cognitive scores. In both studies, P300 parameters were correlated to neuropsychological performances (and especially to the attention examination in the first study and to memory tests in the second study) in both modalities. Taking into account the clinical usefulness of ERPs, it is nowadays important to include this electrophysiological method in evaluation and follow-up of MS, and not only using the auditory modality but also the visual presentation in order to detect earlier cognitive dysfunctions even before modification of neuropsychological performances.

  20. Lead ingestion as a potential contributing factor to the decline in vulture populations in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Botha, C J

    2017-01-01

    Vulture populations in southern Africa have been on the decline for years, which unlike the Asian vulture crisis, has no one specific cause. Reasons attributable are deliberate and secondary poisonings, drowning, power line injuries, electrocutions, traditional medicine ("muti" trade) and calcium deficiencies. However, lead toxicity as a potential causal factor is hardly mentioned. The potential for lead toxicity needs to be considered as substantial game hunting occurs in the region with little regulatory control on bullet types. In this study, we determined the whole blood lead concentrations of captive and wild vulture populations in South Africa and Namibia (n=185). Results were compared to previous published ranges indicative of background exposure (lead concentrations were higher for wild African White-backed vultures (Gyps africanus)(AWBV) than Cape vultures (G. coprotheres)(CGV) at 15.54±12.63μg/dL vs 12.53±8.88μg/dL (non-significantly different), while in the Bearded vultures (Gypaetus barbatus) no indication of exposure was evident. Very similar exposures resulted irrespective of the birds being in captivity or under wild, free-roaming conditions. A proportion of wild birds did, however, appear to be exposed to another source of lead than purely environmental (±12% and 30.6% for AWBV and CGV respectively). One bird, which had a whole blood concentration of 100μg/dL, died soon after capture. To find the relationship between whole blood lead concentration and likely exposure factors, birds were compared by their rural/urban location, vicinity to mines and surrounding soil lead concentrations. With no relationship being present for the latter factors, we believe that this is evidence that the portion of southern African vultures being exposed to unknown source of lead, which we suggest arises from leaded ammunition remaining from hunting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficiency Biliopancreatic bypass surgery in bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu I Yashkov

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A clinical significance in the treatment of bulimia nervosa patients with morbid obesity had already been raised [10, 13], but we did not find publications on the effectiveness of bariatric surgery in these cases. There is also information about the possibility of applying the operation bilio-pancreatic bypass, effective in patients with morbid obesity with uncontrolled eating behavior for the treatment of patients with anorexia BILIM not suffering from morbid obesity. In this article the data of clinical observation of a small sample of patients. As a result, the treatment of these patients found that severe nervous BILIM can be seen as a latent form of morbid obesity. The choice of treatment should depend not only on the initial body weight of the patient, but also on the severity of the nervous BILIM. Unsuccessful attempts at organized-balanced, conservative treatment of patients with severe bulimia nervosa may be considered a variant of surgical treatment, while bilio-pancreatic bypass surgery is considered as the most preferred operation, compared with the installation of the gastric balloon and others. All candidates for surgical treatment of obesity must identify clinical signs of bulimia nervosa, as this may influence the choice of method of operation. Further study of the role of hyperinsulinemia, secretion of ghrelin, leptin, intestinal peptide may contribute to the elucidation of the true causes of bulimia nervosa, probably has a similar origin with morbid obesity.

  2. Seeking potential contributions to future carbon budget in conterminous US forests considering disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangmin; Pan, Yude; Birdsey, Richard A.; Chen, Jing M.; Dugan, Alexa

    2016-09-01

    Currently, US forests constitute a large carbon sink, comprising about 9 % of the global terrestrial carbon sink. Wildfire is the most significant disturbance influencing carbon dynamics in US forests. Our objective is to estimate impacts of climate change, CO2 concentration, and nitrogen deposition on the future net biome productivity (NBP) of US forests until the end of twenty-first century under a range of disturbance conditions. We designate three forest disturbance scenarios under one future climate scenario to evaluate factor impacts for the future period (2011-2100): (1) no wildfires occur but forests continue to age (Saging), (2) no wildfires occur and forest ages are fixed in 2010 (Sfixed_nodis), and (3) wildfires occur according to a historical pattern, consequently changing forest age (Sdis_age_change). Results indicate that US forests remain a large carbon sink in the late twenty-first century under the Sfixed_nodis scenario; however, they become a carbon source under the Saging and Sdis_age_change scenarios. During the period of 2011 to 2100, climate is projected to have a small direct effect on NBP, while atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen deposition have large positive effects on NBP regardless of the future climate and disturbance scenarios. Meanwhile, responses to past disturbances under the Sfixed_nodis scenario increase NBP regardless of the future climate scenarios. Although disturbance effects on NBP under the Saging and Sdis_age_change scenarios decrease with time, both scenarios experience an increase in NBP prior to the 2050s and then a decrease in NBP until the end of the twenty-first century. This study indicates that there is potential to increase or at least maintain the carbon sink of conterminous US forests at the current level if future wildfires are reduced and age structures are maintained at a productive mix. The effects of CO2 on the future carbon sink may overwhelm effects of other factors at the end of the twenty

  3. In situ bypass og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1993-01-01

    From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 in situ bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients. Preoperative risk-factors were equally distributed among diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (NDM) patients, except for smoking habits (DM:48%, NDM:64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (DM:45%, NDM:29%, p...

  4. Deep-water sediment bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, Christopher J.; Jackson, Christopher A L; Hodgson, David M.; Hubbard, Stephen M.; Eggenhuisen, Joris T.

    2015-01-01

    Submarine gravity flows are a key process for transporting large volumes of sediment from the continents to the deep sea. The location, volume, and character of the sediment bypassed by these flows dictates the areal extent and thickness of the associated deposits. Despite its importance, sediment b

  5. Rearward Visibility Issues Related to Agricultural Tractors and Self-Propelled Machinery: Contributing Factors, Potential Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, S G; Field, W E

    2016-01-01

    As the size, complexity, and speed of agricultural tractors and self-propelled machinery have increased, so have the visibility-related issues, placing significant importance on the visual skills, alertness, and reactive abilities of the operator. Rearward movement of large agricultural equipment has been identified in the literature as causing both fatalities and injuries to bystanders who were not visible to the operator and damage to both the machine and stationary objects. The addition of monitoring assistance, while not a new concept, has advanced significantly, offering agricultural machinery operators greater options for increasing their awareness of the area surrounding the machine. In this research, we attempt to (1) identify and describe the key contributors to agricultural machinery visibility issues, i.e., operator-related and machine-related factors, and (2) enumerate and evaluate the potential solutions being offered that address these factors. Enhanced operator safety and efficiency should result from a better understanding of the efforts to solve the visibility problems inherent in large tractors and self-propelled agricultural machinery.

  6. Neurabin contributes to hippocampal long-term potentiation and contextual fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Jun Wu

    Full Text Available Neurabin is a scaffolding protein that interacts with actin and protein phosphatase-1. Highly enriched in the dendritic spine, neurabin is important for spine morphogenesis and synaptic formation. However, less is known about the role of neurabin in hippocampal plasticity and its possible effect on behavioral functions. Using neurabin knockout (KO mice, here we studied the function of neurabin in hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and behavioral memory. We demonstrated that neurabin KO mice showed a deficit in contextual fear memory but not auditory fear memory. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings in the hippocampal CA1 neurons showed that long-term potentiation (LTP was significantly reduced, whereas long-term depression (LTD was unaltered in neurabin KO mice. Moreover, increased AMPA receptor but not NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission was found in neurabin KO mice, and is accompanied by decreased phosphorylation of GluR1 at the PKA site (Ser845 but no change at the CaMKII/PKC site (Ser831. Pre-conditioning with LTD induction rescued the following LTP in neurabin KO mice, suggesting the loss of LTP may be due to the saturated synaptic transmission. Our results indicate that neurabin regulates contextual fear memory and LTP in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  7. Neurabin contributes to hippocampal long-term potentiation and contextual fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Long-Jun; Ren, Ming; Wang, Hansen; Kim, Susan S; Cao, Xiaoyan; Zhuo, Min

    2008-01-09

    Neurabin is a scaffolding protein that interacts with actin and protein phosphatase-1. Highly enriched in the dendritic spine, neurabin is important for spine morphogenesis and synaptic formation. However, less is known about the role of neurabin in hippocampal plasticity and its possible effect on behavioral functions. Using neurabin knockout (KO) mice, here we studied the function of neurabin in hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and behavioral memory. We demonstrated that neurabin KO mice showed a deficit in contextual fear memory but not auditory fear memory. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings in the hippocampal CA1 neurons showed that long-term potentiation (LTP) was significantly reduced, whereas long-term depression (LTD) was unaltered in neurabin KO mice. Moreover, increased AMPA receptor but not NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission was found in neurabin KO mice, and is accompanied by decreased phosphorylation of GluR1 at the PKA site (Ser845) but no change at the CaMKII/PKC site (Ser831). Pre-conditioning with LTD induction rescued the following LTP in neurabin KO mice, suggesting the loss of LTP may be due to the saturated synaptic transmission. Our results indicate that neurabin regulates contextual fear memory and LTP in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  8. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico F Galati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF regulates both action potential (AP generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF’s effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF’s function.

  9. Potential contribution of fish restocking to the recovery of deteriorated coral reefs: an alternative restoration method?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Obolski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Counteracting the worldwide trend of coral reef degeneration is a major challenge for the scientific community. A crucial management approach to minimizing stress effects on healthy reefs and helping the recovery of disturbed reefs is reef protection. However, the current rapid decline of the world’s reefs suggests that protection might be insufficient as a viable stand-alone management approach for some reefs. We thus suggest that the ecological restoration of coral reefs (CRR should be considered as a valid component of coral reef management, in addition to protection, if the applied method is economically applicable and scalable. This theoretical study examines the potential applicability and outcomes of restocking grazers as a restoration tool for coral reef recovery—a tool that has not been applied so far in reef restoration projects. We studied the effect of restocking grazing fish as a restoration method using a mathematical model of degrading reefs, and analyzed the financial outcomes of the restocking intervention. The results suggest that applying this restoration method, in addition to protection, can facilitate reef recovery. Moreover, our analysis suggests that the restocking approach almost always becomes profitable within several years. Considering the relatively low cost of this restoration approach and the feasibility of mass production of herbivorous fish, we suggest that this approach should be considered and examined as an additional viable restoration tool for coral reefs.

  10. Nerve growth factor contribution via transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 to ectopic orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Asano, Masatake; Omagari, Daisuke; Honda, Kuniya; Hitomi, Suzuro; Katagiri, Ayano; Iwata, Koichi

    2011-05-11

    It is well known that oral inflammation causes tenderness in temporomandibular joints or masseter muscles. The exact mechanism of such an orofacial ectopic hyperalgesia remains unclear. Here, we investigated the functional significance of interaction of nerve growth factor (NGF) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in relation to heat hyperalgesia in the whisker pad skin caused by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection into the lower lip. CFA injection induced heat hyperalgesia of the ipsilateral whisker pad skin. Moreover, it leads to enhancement of spontaneous activity and heat responses in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons that was elicited by heat stimulation of the whisker pad skin. The heat hyperalgesia was dose-dependently reversed by intraperitoneal TRPV1 antagonist administration, also diminished by neutralizing anti-NGF antibody administration into the lower lip and intraganglionic administration of K252a, a tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor. Nerve fibers in bundle of mandibular nerve and TG neurons that innervates the whisker pad skin and lower lip both expressed labeled NGF, which was administrated into the lower lip. Moreover, the NGF concentrations in ophthalmic-maxillary and mandibular divisions of the TG increased after CFA injection into the lower lip. The number of TRPV1-positive neurons that innervates the whisker pad skin and lower lip was increased after CFA injection into the lower lip, and this increase was annulled by anti-NGF administration. The present findings suggest that inflammation in the lower lip induces release of NGF that regulates TRPV1 expression in TG neurons. This TRPV1 overexpression may underlie ectopic heat hyperalgesia in the whisker pad skin.

  11. Potential contribution of SIM2 and ETS2 functional polymorphisms in Down syndrome associated malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Arpita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper expression and functioning of transcription factors (TFs are essential for regulation of different traits and thus could be crucial for the development of complex diseases. Subjects with Down syndrome (DS have a higher incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL while solid tumors, like breast cancer (BC and oral cancer (OC, show rare incidences. Triplication of the human chromosome 21 in DS is associated with altered genetic dosage of different TFs. V-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2 and Single Minded 2 (SIM2 are two such TFs that regulate several downstream genes involved in developmental and neurological pathways. Here we studied functional genetic polymorphisms (fSNP in ETS2 and SIM2 encoding genes in a group of patients and control subjects to better understand association of these variants with DS phenotypes. Methods We employed an in silico approach to identify potential target pathways of ETS2 and SIM2. fSNPs in genes encoding for these two TFs were identified using available databases. Selected sites were genotyped in individuals with DS, their parents, ALL, BC, OC as well as ethnically matched control individuals. We further analyzed these data by population-based statistical methods. Results Allelic/genotypic association analysis showed significant (P  Conclusions We infer from the present investigation that the difference in frequencies of fSNPs and their independent as well as interactive effects may be the cause for altered expression of SIM2 and ETS2 in DS and malignant groups, which affects different downstream biological pathways. Thus, altered expression of SIM2 and ETS2 could be one of the reasons for variable occurrence of different malignant conditions in DS.

  12. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV-1) channels contribute to cutaneous thermal hyperaemia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brett J; Fieger, Sarah M

    2010-11-01

    The initial, rapid increase in skin blood flow in response to direct application of heat is thought to be mediated by an axon reflex, which is dependent on intact cutaneous sensory nerves. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV-1) channels, which are putative channels located on sensory nerves, would attenuate the skin blood flow response to local heating in humans. Ten subjects were equipped with four microdialysis fibres which were randomly assigned one of four treatments: (1) vehicle control (90% propylene glycol + 10% lactated Ringer solution); (2) 20 mm capsazepine to inhibit TRPV-1 channels; (3) 10 mm l-NAME to inhibit NO synthase; and (4) combined 20 mm capsazepine + 10 mm l-NAME. Following baseline measurements, the temperature of skin heaters was increased from 33°C to 42°C at a rate of 1.0°C every 10 s and local temperature was held at 42°C for 20-30 min until a stable plateau in skin blood flow was achieved. An index of skin blood flow was measured directly over each microdialysis site via laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Beat-by-beat blood pressure was measured via photoplethysmography and verified via automated brachial auscultation. At the end of the local heating protocol, temperature of the heaters was increased to 43°C and 28 mm nitroprusside was infused to achieve maximal vasodilatation. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximal values (%CVCmax). Initial peak in capsazepine (44 ± 4%CVCmax), l-NAME (56 ± 4%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (32 ± 6%CVCmax) sites was significantly attenuated compared to control (87 ± 5%CVCmax; P thermal hyperaemia was significantly attenuated in capsazepine (73 ± 6%CVCmax), l-NAME (47 ± 5%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (31 ± 7%CVCmax) sites compared to control (92 ± 5%CVCmax; P thermal hyperaemia. These data further suggest a portion of the NO component of thermal hyperaemia may be

  13. Relative contribution of combined kinetic and exchange energy terms vs the electronic component of molecular electrostatic potential in hardness potential derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rituparna; Roy, Ram Kinkar

    2013-11-14

    The relative contribution of the sum of kinetic [(10/9)CFρ(r)2/3] and exchange energy [(4/9)CXρ(r)1/3] terms to that of the electronic part of the molecular electrostatic potential [Vel(r)] in the variants of hardness potential is investigated to assess the proposed definition of Δ+h(k) = −[VelN+1(k) – VelN(k)] and Δ–h(k) = −[VelN(k) – VelN–1(k)] (Saha; et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2013, 34, 662). Some substituted benzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (undergoing electrophilic aromatic substitution), carboxylic acids, and their derivatives are chosen to carry out the theoretical investigation as stated above. Intra- and intermolecular reactivity trends generated by Δ+h(k) and Δ–h(k) are found to be satisfactory and are correlated reasonably well with experimental results.

  14. Gastric cancer after mini-gastric bypass surgery: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Chi; Lee, Wei-Jei; Ser, Kong-Han; Chen, Jung-Chien; Tsou, Jun-Juin; Chen, Shu-Chun; Kuan, Wai-Sang

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer in the stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or mini-gastric bypass is rare, but a few cases have been reported since 1991, when the first case emerged. According to the literature, the interval between bypass surgery and the diagnosis of cancer ranged from 1 to 22 years. Given the difficulty of monitoring a bypassed stomach, the potential for gastric cancer must be considered, especially in countries with high incidence of this cancer. The literature reported the first case in the Asia-Pacific region - a woman developed advanced gastric cancer in her stomach 9 years after laparoscopic mini-gastric bypass for morbid obesity. © 2013 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Bypass materials in vascular surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidt, Daniela; Roll, Stephanie; Kulp, Werner; Müller-Nordhorn, Jaqueline; Vauth, Christoph; Greiner, Wolfgang; Willich, Stefan N.; von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Arteriosclerotic changes can lead to circulatory disturbances in various areas of the human vascular system. In addition to pharmacological therapy and the management of risk factors (e. g. hypertension, diabetes, lipid metabolism disorders, and lifestyle), surgical interventions also play an important role in the treatment of arteriosclerosis. Long-segment arterial occlusions, in particular, can be treated successfully with bypass sur-gery. A number of different materials are available for this type of operation, such as autologous vein or pros-thetic grafts comprised of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or Dacron®. Prosthetic materials are used especially in the treatment of peripheral artery disease, such as in aortoiliac or femoropopliteal bypass surgery. The present report will thus focus on this area in order to examine the effectiveness of different bypass materials. Among the efforts being made to refine the newly introduced DRG system in Germany, analysing the different bypass materials used in vascular surgery is particularly important. Indeed, in its current version the German DRG system does not distinguish between bypass materials in terms of reimbursement rates. Differences in cost structures are thus of especial interest to hospitals in their budget calculations, whereas both private and statutory health insurance funds are primarily interested in long-term results and their costs. Objectives The goal of this HTA is to compare the different bypass materials used in vascular surgery in terms of their medical efficiency and cost-effectiveness, as well as with regard to their ethical, social and legal implications. In addition, this report aims to point out the areas in which further medical, epidemiological and health economic research is still needed. Methods Relevant publications were identified by means of a structured search of databases accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI), as well as by

  16. Bypass materials in vascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich, Stephan N.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arteriosclerotic changes can lead to circulatory disturbances in various areas of the human vascular system. In addition to pharmacological therapy and the management of risk factors (e. g. hypertension, diabetes, lipid metabolism disorders, and lifestyle, surgical interventions also play an important role in the treatment of arteriosclerosis. Long-segment arterial occlusions, in particular, can be treated successfully with bypass sur-gery. A number of different materials are available for this type of operation, such as autologous vein or pros-thetic grafts comprised of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Dacron®. Prosthetic materials are used especially in the treatment of peripheral artery disease, such as in aortoiliac or femoropopliteal bypass surgery. The present report will thus focus on this area in order to examine the effectiveness of different bypass materials. Among the efforts being made to refine the newly introduced DRG system in Germany, analysing the different bypass materials used in vascular surgery is particularly important. Indeed, in its current version the German DRG system does not distinguish between bypass materials in terms of reimbursement rates. Differences in cost structures are thus of especial interest to hospitals in their budget calculations, whereas both private and statutory health insurance funds are primarily interested in long-term results and their costs. Objectives: The goal of this HTA is to compare the different bypass materials used in vascular surgery in terms of their medical efficiency and cost-effectiveness, as well as with regard to their ethical, social and legal implications. In addition, this report aims to point out the areas in which further medical, epidemiological and health economic research is still needed. Methods: Relevant publications were identified by means of a structured search of databases accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information

  17. Cardiopulmonary Bypass induced Fever and Systemic inflammatory response syndrome in Paediatric patients: Management Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Ghatnatti, Ravi; Teli, Anita; Bhattacharya, Shubhankar; Sengupta, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass is considered to be the common culprit for the occurrence of fever in the immediate post-operative period i.e, within 24 hours in pediatric patients. Other common causes contributing to fever are anaesthetic drugs, blood transfusions & pain. This early fever usually manifests as tachy-arrthymias in recovery room requiring interventions. This review intends to know the pathophysiology of fever and systemic inflammatory response syndrome after bypass (SIRAB) onset, pr...

  18. Contribution of large submarine landslide to tsunami potential in the NE Atlantic region: The Gorringe Bank case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Inês; Omira, Rachid; Baptista, Maria Ana; Miranda, Miguel; Terrinha, Pedro; Batista, Luis; Roque, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Tsunami is recognized as a natural hazard, and it is now widely accepted that submarine mass-failures are one of possible tsunami sources. Various studies on tsunami-induced by submarine landslides were carried out based on a spontaneous trigger of the mass-failure. In this study we focus on the deep-water submarine landslide in the Gorringe Bank (GB) area, NE Atlantic. In particular, we investigate the contribution of such mass-failure, as an additional source, to tsunami potential. We assume that an initial tsunami is generated by a large earthquake in the south west Iberia margin area that also initiates the failure of the GB landslide. This mass-failure can play the role of a secondary source of tsunami and contribute to tsunami potential. We simulate the tsunami generation as combination between the sea free surface perturbation caused instantaneously by the earthquake and the initial wave generated progressively due to the slide motion. Okada's equations are employed to compute the initial tsunami induced by the earthquake. While, a multi-layers viscous shallow water (VSW) model is used to simulate the flow of the submarine mass failure and the resulting tsunami wave. To model the propagation and coastal impact of the tsunami resulted from a combination of earthquake and landslide, we use a non-linear shallow water model and a nested grid system that allow estimating properly near-shore wave heights and inundation. We consider a 1755-like earthquake of magnitude Mw8.5, and a landslide of an approximate volume of about 60 km3. The characteristics of the landslide come from the analysis of detailed marine geological data including the erosional area (dimensions and scarps) and the seismic profiles. The results are presents in terms of: i) evidences of submarine mass failures in the area of GB; ii) simulations of the slide motion and the resulting tsunami wave; iii) simulations of the tsunami generated by a combination of two triggers: earthquake and landslide

  19. Bypass Gástrico BII.

    OpenAIRE

    Himpens, Jaques

    2014-01-01

    Hay varias técnicas de bypass gástrico para la reducción del peso, la cual se decide dependiendo de la historia, hábitos dietéticos, evaluación psicológica, estado médico, reflujo gastroesofágico, diabetes. El bypass gástrico Roux-en-Y es la única opción en 50% de los pacientes debido a reflujo, diabetes o ambas. Estos pacientes tienen ciertas características como el IMC, síndrome metabólico y diabetes. Los pacientes obesos presentan mayor resistencia a la insulina, que se encuentra regulada ...

  20. Characterization of voltage-gated K+ currents contributing to subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in hippocampal CA1 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, France; Haufler, Darrell; Skinner, Frances K; Lacaille, Jean-Claude

    2010-06-01

    CA1 inhibitory interneurons at the stratum lacunosum-moleculare and radiatum junction (LM/RAD-INs) display subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) involving voltage-dependent Na(+) and A-type K(+) currents. LM/RAD-INs also express other voltage-gated K(+) currents, although their properties and role in MPOs remain unclear. Here, we characterized these voltage-gated K(+) currents and investigated their role in MPOs. Using outside-out patch recordings from LM/RAD-IN somata, we distinguished four voltage-gated K(+) currents based on their pharmacology and activation/inactivation properties: a fast delayed rectifier current (I(Kfast)), a slow delayed rectifier current (I(Kslow)), a rapidly inactivating A-type current (I(A)), and a slowly inactivating current (I(D)). Their relative contribution to the total K(+) current was I(A) > I(Kfast) > I(Kslow) = I(D). The presence of I(D) and the relative contributions of K(+) currents in LM/RAD-INs are different from those of other CA1 interneurons, suggesting the presence of differential complement of K(+) currents in subgroups of interneurons. We next determined whether these K(+) currents were sufficient for MPO generation using a single-compartment model of LM/RAD-INs. The model captured the subthreshold voltage dependence of MPOs. Moreover, all K(+) currents were active at subthreshold potentials but I(D), I(A), and the persistent sodium current (I(NaP)) were most active near threshold. Using impedance analysis, we found that I(A) and I(NaP) contribute to MPO generation by modulating peak spectral frequency during MPOs and governing the voltage range over which MPOs occur. Our findings uncover a differential expression of a complement of K(+) channels that underlies intrinsic rhythmic activity in inhibitory interneurons.

  1. Reconnaissance Report Yolo Bypass, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    proximity of these plans, a plan for one area could not be constructed separately without creating major hydraulic impacts to the other area. In essence ...native woody species which may be commonly found include eucalyptus , acacia, giant reed, and honey locust. Yolo Bypass. In the project area, vegetation...forbs form an often dense ground cover. Non- native woody species which may be commonly found include eucalyptus , acacia, giant reed and honey locust

  2. Plastic Responses Contribute to Explaining Altitudinal and Temporal Variation in Potential Flower Longevity in High Andean Rhodolirion montanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavieres, Lohengrin A.

    2016-01-01

    The tendency for flower longevity to increase with altitude is believed by many alpine ecologists to play an important role in compensating for low pollination rates at high altitudes due to cold and variable weather conditions. However, current studies documenting an altitudinal increase in flower longevity in the alpine habitat derive principally from studies on open-pollinated flowers where lower pollinator visitation rates at higher altitudes will tend to lead to flower senescence later in the life-span of a flower in comparison with lower altitudes, and thus could confound the real altitudinal pattern in a species´ potential flower longevity. In a two-year study we tested the hypothesis that a plastic effect of temperature on flower longevity could contribute to an altitudinal increase in potential flower longevity measured in pollinator-excluded flowers in high Andean Rhodolirium montanum Phil. (Amaryllidaceae). Using supplemental warming we investigated whether temperature around flowers plastically affects potential flower longevity. We determined tightly temperature-controlled potential flower longevity and flower height for natural populations on three alpine sites spread over an altitudinal transect from 2350 and 3075 m a.s.l. An experimental increase of 3.1°C around flowers significantly decreased flower longevity indicating a plastic response of flowers to temperature. Flower height in natural populations decreased significantly with altitude. Although temperature negatively affects flower longevity under experimental conditions, we found no evidence that temperature around flowers explains site variation in flower longevity over the altitudinal gradient. In a wetter year, despite a 3.5°C temperature difference around flowers at the extremes of the altitudinal range, flower longevity showed no increase with altitude. However, in a drier year, flower longevity increased significantly with altitude. The emerging picture suggests an increase in flower

  3. Postsynaptic GABA(B) Receptors Contribute to the Termination of Giant Depolarizing Potentials in CA3 Neonatal Rat Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Ilgam; Minlebaev, Marat; Mukhtarov, Marat; Juzekaeva, Elvira; Khazipov, Roustem

    2017-01-01

    During development, hippocampal CA3 network generates recurrent population bursts, so-called Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs). GDPs are characterized by synchronous depolarization and firing of CA3 pyramidal cells followed by afterhyperpolarization (GDP-AHP). Here, we explored the properties of GDP-AHP in CA3 pyramidal cells using gramicidin perforated patch clamp recordings from neonatal rat hippocampal slices. We found that GDP-AHP occurs independently of whether CA3 pyramidal cells fire action potentials (APs) or remain silent during GDPs. However, the amplitude of GDP-AHP increased with the number of APs the cells fired during GDPs. The reversal potential of the GDP-AHP was close to the potassium equilibrium potential. During voltage-clamp recordings, current-voltage relationships of the postsynaptic currents activated during GDP-AHP were characterized by reversal near the potassium equilibrium potential and inward rectification, similar to the responses evoked by the GABA(B) receptor agonists. Finally, the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP55845 strongly reduced GDP-AHP and prolonged GDPs, eventually transforming them to the interictal and ictal-like discharges. Together, our findings suggest that the GDP-AHP involves two mechanisms: (i) postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor activated potassium currents, which are activated independently on whether the cell fires or not during GDPs; and (ii) activity-dependent, likely calcium activated potassium currents, whose contribution to the GDP-AHP is dependent on the amount of firing during GDPs. We propose that these two complementary inhibitory postsynaptic mechanisms cooperate in the termination of GDP. PMID:28701925

  4. GEOPHYSICAL CONTRIBUTION TO EVALUATE THE HYDROTHERMAL POTENTIALITY IN EGYPT: CASE STUDY: HAMMAM FARAUN AND ABU SWIERA, SINAI, EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Ayman I

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The geothermal potentiality in Egypt has a minor significance in the aspects of the Egyptians life, while the hydraulic and hydrocarbonresources are more convenient. However, some other applications for the geothermal activity such as direct warming, pools, and physiotherapy make the research for geothermal as requested. In the present work, two locations with rather good geothermal potentiality will be studied; these are HammamFaraun and Abu Swiera (water temperature is about 70 °C; at Sinai Peninsula.
    The contribution of the geophysical techniques to evaluate such potentiality could be considered, as its capability to identifythe reservoir characteristics and its implementation is acceptable. Therefore, a geophysical survey program has been conductedin terms of seventeen vertical electrical soundings (VES and two wide profiles of Control Source Electromagnetic (CSEM forward step at HammamFaraun and two wide profiles of CSEM at Abu Swiera. The geophysical techniques yield information on the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity, which is the most sensitive parameter to fluids in the rocks. 
    The analysis of the geophysical data, together with the field and geochemical studies lead to the conclusion that, the thermalwater in the subsurface formations might be considered as the preferred cause of the high conductivity in the subsurface on/close to the boarder of tectonically active regions, particularly, where the anomalous conductivity is correlated with high heat flow and other geophysical and geological parameters.

  5. Emergent cardiopulmonary bypass during pectus excavatum repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Craner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectus excavatum is a chest wall deformity that produces significant cardiopulmonary disability and is typically seen in younger patients. Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum or Nuss procedure has become a widely accepted technique for adult and pediatric patients. Although it is carried out through a thoracoscopic approach, the procedure is associated with a number of potential intraoperative and post-operative complications. We present a case of cardiac perforation requiring emergent cardiopulmonary bypass in a 29-year-old male with Marfan syndrome and previous mitral valve repair undergoing a Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum. This case illustrates the importance of vigilance and preparation by the surgeons, anesthesia providers as well as the institution to be prepared with resources to handle the possible complications. This includes available cardiac surgical backup, perfusionist support and adequate blood product availability.

  6. Additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in modification of graphene supported on SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xitong; Zhao, Shijun; Wang, Yuyu; Xue, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    The damage production induced by MeV highly charged ions (HCI) irradiations in graphene supported on a SiO2 substrate is investigated using molecular dynamics method. We get results in agreement with our recent experiments. We find that the electronic energy loss and potential energy deposition have similar effects on the defects creation in SiO2 substrate-supported graphene and both mechanisms of energy deposition seem to contribute in an additive way. The influences of the energy deposition depth and radius are studied. Only the energy deposited below the surface within 2.5 nm will induce the damage in graphene. Hence, the HCI can be a powerful tool to induce defects in graphene without causing deep damage of the substrate. When charge of incident Xeq+ is above 30, a nanopore is formed and the size of nanopore in graphene can be controlled by changing the incident charge state.

  7. Neuromuscular contributions to the age-related reduction in muscle power: Mechanisms and potential role of high velocity power training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Neal B; Connelly, Denise M; Rice, Charles L; Hunter, Susan W; Doherty, Timothy J

    2017-05-01

    Although much of the literature on neuromuscular changes with aging has focused on loss of muscle mass and isometric strength, deficits in muscle power are more pronounced with aging and may be a more sensitive measure of neuromuscular degeneration. This review aims to identify the adaptations to the neuromuscular system with aging, with specific emphasis on changes that result in decreased muscle power. We discuss how these changes in neuromuscular performance can affect mobility, and ultimately contribute to an increased risk for falls in older adults. Finally, we evaluate the literature regarding high-velocity muscle power training (PT), and its potential advantages over conventional strength training for improving functional performance and mitigating fall risk in older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. On-pump versus off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlind, Kim Christian

    2013-01-01

    Off pump coronary artery bypass surgery has been purported to be safer than conventional coronary artery bypass surgery performed using cardiopulmonary bypass. This theory was supported by a number of early series, but failed to be confirmed by a number of small, randomized controlled trials...... . Conversely, it has been suggested that revascularization after off pump surgery is associated with fewer grafts and lower graft patency, potentially leading to a higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and need for repeated, coronary interventions. Since 2009, three major randomized controlled trials have...

  9. Contribution of harmonicity and location to auditory object formation in free field: Evidence from event-related brain potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kelly L.; Alain, Claude

    2005-09-01

    The contribution of location and harmonicity cues in sound segregation was investigated using behavioral reports and source waveforms derived from the scalp-recorded evoked potentials. Participants were presented with sounds composed of multiple harmonics in a free-field environment. The third harmonic was either tuned or mistuned and could be presented from the same or different location from the remaining harmonics. Presenting the third harmonic at a different location than the remaining harmonics increased the likelihood of hearing the tuned or slightly (i.e., 2%) mistuned harmonic as a separate object. Partials mistuned by 16% of their original value ``pop out'' of the complex and were paralleled by an object-related negativity (ORN) that superimposed the N1 and P2 components. For the 2% mistuned stimuli, the ORN was present only when the mistuned harmonic was presented at a different location than the remaining harmonics. Presenting the tuned harmonic at a different location also yielded changes in neural activity between 150 and 250 ms after sound onset. The behavioral and electrophysiological results indicate that listeners can segregate sounds based on harmonicity or location alone. The results also indicate that a conjunction of harmonicity and location cues contribute to sound segregation primarily when harmonicity is ambiguous.

  10. Opioid analgesics and P-glycoprotein efflux transporters: a potential systems-level contribution to analgesic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Susan L; Coop, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Chronic clinical pain remains poorly treated. Despite attempts to develop novel analgesic agents, opioids remain the standard analgesics of choice in the clinical management of chronic and severe pain. However, mu opioid analgesics have undesired side effects including, but not limited to, respiratory depression, physical dependence and tolerance. A growing body of evidence suggests that P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux transporter, may contribute a systems-level approach to the development of opioid tolerance. Herein, we describe current in vitro and in vivo methodology available to analyze interactions between opioids and P-gp and critically analyze P-gp data associated with six commonly used mu opioids to include morphine, methadone, loperamide, meperidine, oxycodone, and fentanyl. Recent studies focused on the development of opioids lacking P-gp substrate activity are explored, concentrating on structure-activity relationships to develop an optimal opioid analgesic lacking this systems-level contribution to tolerance development. Continued work in this area will potentially allow for delineation of the mechanism responsible for opioid-related P-gp up-regulation and provide further support for evidence based medicine supporting clinical opioid rotation.

  11. Physiological traits contributed to the recent increase in yield potential of winter wheat from Henan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bangwei Zhou; lvaro Sanz-Sez; Abdelhalim Elazab; Tianmin Shen; Rut Snchez-Bragado; Jordi Bort; Maria Dolors Serret; Jos Luis Araus

    2014-01-01

    This experiment aims to test the traits responsible for the increase in yield potential of winter wheat released in Henan Province, China. Seven established cultivars released in the last 20 years and three advanced lines were assayed. The results showed that grain yield was positively correlated with harvest index (HI), kernel number per square meter, and aboveground biomass. In addition, the HI and aboveground biomass showed an increasing trend with the year of release. Therefore, we can conclude that bread wheat breeding advances during recent decades in Henan Province, China, have been achieved through an increase in HI, kernel number per square meter, and aboveground biomass. A higher d13C seems also to be involved in these advances, which suggests a progressive improvement in constitutive water use efficiency not associated with a trend towards lower stomatal conduc-tance in the most recent genotypes. However, genetic advance does not appear related to changes in photosynthesis rates on area basis when measured in the flag leaf or the spike, but only to a higher, whole-spike photosynthesis. Results also indirectly support the concept that under potential yield conditions, the spike contributed more than the flag leaf to kernel formation.

  12. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  13. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure... the coronary arteries. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ...

  14. Coronary Artery Bypass in Octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yen Chien

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD has increased with the expansion of life span among the elderly population in the world. Hence, the issue of the coronary artery bypass in octogenarians has attracted more attention. Recent literature about the topic revealed nearly the same excellent results as those in the younger population under the newly developed operative techniques and improving concept in perioperative management and postoperative care. In this article, we review the current status of the procedure that was thought to be dangerous in the earlier era, including its risk factors, result, and benefit.

  15. History of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2015-06-01

    The development of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), thereby permitting open-heart surgery, is one of the most important advances in medicine in the 20th century. Many currently practicing cardiac anesthesiologists, cardiac surgeons, and perfusionists are unaware of how recently it came into use (60 years) and how much the practice of CPB has changed during its short existence. In this paper, the development of CPB and the many changes and progress that has taken place over this brief period of time, making it a remarkably safe endeavor, are reviewed. The many as yet unresolved questions are also identified, which sets the stage for the other papers in this issue of this journal.

  16. Gut hormones and gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens J.

    2016-01-01

    , oxyntomodulin, neurotensin and peptide YY (PYY). However, some proximal hormones also show changes probably reflecting that the distribution of these hormones is not restricted to the bypassed segments of the gut. Thus, cholecystokinin responses are increased, whereas gastric inhibitory polypeptide responses......%. The increased insulin responses after the operation, one of the important mechanisms whereby these operations cause diabetes remission, is clearly due to a combination of the increased glucose absorption rates and the exaggerated GLP-1 secretion. The hormonal changes are therefore very important...

  17. MicroRNA from Moringa oleifera: Identification by High Throughput Sequencing and Their Potential Contribution to Plant Medicinal Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrò, Stefano; Zanella, Letizia; Kenzo, Maurice; Montesano, Carla; Minutolo, Antonella; Potestà, Marina; Sobze, Martin Sanou; Canini, Antonella; Cirilli, Marco; Muleo, Rosario; Colizzi, Vittorio; Galgani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Moringa oleifera is a widespread plant with substantial nutritional and medicinal value. We postulated that microRNAs (miRNAs), which are endogenous, noncoding small RNAs regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, might contribute to the medicinal properties of plants of this species after ingestion into human body, regulating human gene expression. However, the knowledge is scarce about miRNA in Moringa. Furthermore, in order to test the hypothesis on the pharmacological potential properties of miRNA, we conducted a high-throughput sequencing analysis using the Illumina platform. A total of 31,290,964 raw reads were produced from a library of small RNA isolated from M. oleifera seeds. We identified 94 conserved and two novel miRNAs that were validated by qRT-PCR assays. Results from qRT-PCR trials conducted on the expression of 20 Moringa miRNA showed that are conserved across multiple plant species as determined by their detection in tissue of other common crop plants. In silico analyses predicted target genes for the conserved miRNA that in turn allowed to relate the miRNAs to the regulation of physiological processes. Some of the predicted plant miRNAs have functional homology to their mammalian counterparts and regulated human genes when they were transfected into cell lines. To our knowledge, this is the first report of discovering M. oleifera miRNAs based on high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis and we provided new insight into a potential cross-species control of human gene expression. The widespread cultivation and consumption of M. oleifera, for nutritional and medicinal purposes, brings humans into close contact with products and extracts of this plant species. The potential for miRNA transfer should be evaluated as one possible mechanism of action to account for beneficial properties of this valuable species.

  18. Contribution of commonly analyzed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to potential toxicity in early life stages of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, H.; Ishaq, R.; Tjarnlund, U.; Akerman, G.; Grunder, K.; Bandh, C.; Broman, D.; Balk, L. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Environmental Science

    2006-06-15

    The potential toxicity of sediment extracts from a contaminated bay in Sweden was investigated through a series of bio-effect-directed fractionation experiments. The aim of the study was to determine the contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to potential toxicity in early life stages of rainbow trout. The connection between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and toxicopathic effects caused by environmental polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) mixtures was also investigated. Although samples from PAC polluted areas cause mortalities and toxicopathic effects, the mechanisms of toxicity have been established for only a few PACs. Ten samples of the top 10 cm of bottom sediment were collected from the polluted bay. A synthetic PAC mixture was prepared with 17 commonly analyzed PAHs in amounts equimolar to those found in the sediment PAC fraction. The synthetic PAC mixture was injected into eggs in 3 graded doses corresponding to the analyzed amount of PAHs in the sediment PAC fraction. Ten subfractions were isolated from the sediment PAC fraction and from the synthetic PAC mixture. Toxicopathic variables and hepatic Ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activities were recorded in larvae. Abnormalities in newly hatched larvae included hemorrhages in the yolk sac, head, trunk and tail region; edemas in the yolk sac; pericardium, and fins; and asymmetric yolk sacs. The 17 PAHs were unable to account for the toxicopathic effects, and could explain less than 4 per cent of the total EROD induction. Results indicated that mortalities caused by complex environmental PAC mixtures may involve mechanisms other than AhR mediation. Only a small percentage of the potential toxicity from a polluted sediment sample to early life stages of fish could be attributed to the 17 PAHs. It was concluded that the lack of a clear relationship between toxicopathic effects and EROD induction emphasizes the need for a battery of bio-markers for estimating environmental risk. 30 refs

  19. MicroRNA from Moringa oleifera: Identification by High Throughput Sequencing and Their Potential Contribution to Plant Medicinal Value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Pirrò

    Full Text Available Moringa oleifera is a widespread plant with substantial nutritional and medicinal value. We postulated that microRNAs (miRNAs, which are endogenous, noncoding small RNAs regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, might contribute to the medicinal properties of plants of this species after ingestion into human body, regulating human gene expression. However, the knowledge is scarce about miRNA in Moringa. Furthermore, in order to test the hypothesis on the pharmacological potential properties of miRNA, we conducted a high-throughput sequencing analysis using the Illumina platform. A total of 31,290,964 raw reads were produced from a library of small RNA isolated from M. oleifera seeds. We identified 94 conserved and two novel miRNAs that were validated by qRT-PCR assays. Results from qRT-PCR trials conducted on the expression of 20 Moringa miRNA showed that are conserved across multiple plant species as determined by their detection in tissue of other common crop plants. In silico analyses predicted target genes for the conserved miRNA that in turn allowed to relate the miRNAs to the regulation of physiological processes. Some of the predicted plant miRNAs have functional homology to their mammalian counterparts and regulated human genes when they were transfected into cell lines. To our knowledge, this is the first report of discovering M. oleifera miRNAs based on high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis and we provided new insight into a potential cross-species control of human gene expression. The widespread cultivation and consumption of M. oleifera, for nutritional and medicinal purposes, brings humans into close contact with products and extracts of this plant species. The potential for miRNA transfer should be evaluated as one possible mechanism of action to account for beneficial properties of this valuable species.

  20. On the coupling between precipitation and potential evapotranspiration: contributions to decadal drought anomalies in the Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shanlei; Chen, Haishan; Ju, Weimin; Wang, Guojie; Sun, Ge; Huang, Jin; Ma, Hedi; Gao, Chujie; Hua, Wenjian; Yan, Guixia

    2017-06-01

    Under the exacerbation of climate change, climate extreme events, especially for drought, happened frequently and intensively across the globe with greater spatial differences. We used the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index computed from the routine meteorological observations at 269 sites in Southwest China (SWC) to study the drought characteristics (e.g., extent, duration and intensity) and their decadal variations during 1971-2012. It was revealed that the drought, in responses to the coupling between decadal precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (PET) anomalies, differed among regions and periods. For the entire SWC, droughts in 1970s and 2000s+ was generally stronger than in 1980s and 1990s with respect to their spatial extent, duration and intensity, especially in 2000s+. It was well-known that drought was closely related with a lack of precipitation; however, the impact of atmospheric demand of evaporation (reflected by PET here) on drought (e.g., duration and intensity) was rarely paid enough attentions. To that end, a spatial multi-linear regression approach was proposed in this study for quantifying the contributions of decadal PET and precipitation variations to drought duration and intensity. We have found that the contributions of decadal PET anomalies to drought duration and intensity could exceed those of precipitation, e.g., during 1980s and 1990s in SWC. Additionally, despite the strongest droughts in 2000s+, it was suggested that PET could exert comparable impacts on drought anomalies as precipitation. All these findings implied that PET plays a critical role in drought event, which acts to amplify drought duration and intensity. To sum up, this study stressed the need for enough attentions for PET processes in drought studies.

  1. Long-term potentiation of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto cerebellar Purkinje neurons contributes to adaptation of vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kawaguchi, Shin-Ya; Shioi, Go; Hirano, Tomoo

    2013-10-23

    Synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum is thought to contribute to motor learning. In particular, long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje neuron (PN) excitatory synapses has attracted much attention of neuroscientists as a primary cellular mechanism for motor learning. In contrast, roles of plasticity at cerebellar inhibitory synapses in vivo remain unknown. Here, we have investigated the roles of long-lasting enhancement of transmission at GABAergic synapses on a PN that is known as rebound potentiation (RP). Previous studies demonstrated that binding of GABAA receptor with GABAA receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) is required for RP, and that a peptide that blocks this binding suppresses RP induction. To address the functional roles of RP, we generated transgenic mice that express this peptide fused to a fluorescent protein selectively in PNs using the PN-specific L7 promoter. These mice failed to show RP, although they showed no changes in the basal amplitude or frequency of miniature IPSCs. The transgenic mice also showed no abnormality in gross cerebellar morphology, LTD, or other excitatory synaptic properties, or intrinsic excitability of PNs. Next, we attempted to evaluate their motor control and learning ability by examining reflex eye movements. The basal dynamic properties of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and optokinetic response, and adaptation of the latter, were normal in the transgenic mice. In contrast, the transgenic mice showed defects in the adaptation of vestibulo-ocular reflex, a model paradigm of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. These results together suggest that RP contributes to a certain type of motor learning.

  2. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  3. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  4. Epicardial ultrasound in coronary artery bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budde, R.P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Chapter 1 Coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) is traditionally performed via a median sternotomy approach on cardiopulmonary bypass (arrested heart). Since the mid 1990ties, beating heart, minimally invasive and even totally endoscopic CABG are (re)explored. In all approaches to CABG, the

  5. Multimodality imaging of coronary artery bypass grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, Liesbeth Pauline

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes multiple imaging modalities to examine coronary artery bypass grafts, and the research which was performed to further develop noninvasive imaging techniques to detect stenoses in native coronary arteries and bypass grafts in patients who experienced recurrent chest pain after

  6. Multimodality imaging of coronary artery bypass grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, Liesbeth Pauline

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes multiple imaging modalities to examine coronary artery bypass grafts, and the research which was performed to further develop noninvasive imaging techniques to detect stenoses in native coronary arteries and bypass grafts in patients who experienced recurrent chest pain after c

  7. [Cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehner, T; Boehm, O; Probst, C; Poetzsch, B; Hoeft, A; Baumgarten, G; Knuefermann, P

    2012-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a standard procedure in cardiac surgery; however, apart from its therapeutic options a CPB might also initiate systemic and organ-specific complications, such as heart failure, renal and pulmonary dysfunction, impaired coagulation as well as neurological and cognitive dysfunction. The immunological response to the extracorporeal circulation generates systemic inflammation which often meets the definition of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The main inducers of SIRS are contact of blood with the artificial surfaces of the CPB, mechanical stress which affects the blood components and the extensive surgical trauma. Hence, a number of technical and surgical developments aim at reduction of the inflammatory response caused by the CPB. By reason of surgical demands, the majority of cardiothoracic procedures still depend on the use of CPB; however, there is an on-going development of new techniques trying to reduce the surgical trauma and the negative consequences of CPB. Here, minimized systems with biocompatible surfaces have been shown to be effective in attenuating the inflammatory response to CPB. Alternative procedures such as off-pump surgery may help to avoid CPB-associated complications but due to specific limitations will not replace conventional bypass surgery.

  8. The unique ion permeability profile of cochlear fibrocytes and its contribution to establishing their positive resting membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takamasa; Nin, Fumiaki; Murakami, Shingo; Ogata, Genki; Uetsuka, Satoru; Choi, Samuel; Nakagawa, Takashi; Inohara, Hidenori; Komune, Shizuo; Kurachi, Yoshihisa; Hibino, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic cells exhibit negative resting membrane potential (RMP) owing to the high K(+) permeability of the plasma membrane and the asymmetric [K(+)] between the extracellular and intracellular compartments. However, cochlear fibrocytes, which comprise the basolateral surface of a multilayer epithelial-like tissue, exhibit a RMP of +5 to +12 mV in vivo. This positive RMP is critical for the formation of an endocochlear potential (EP) of +80 mV in a K(+)-rich extracellular fluid, endolymph. The epithelial-like tissue bathes fibrocytes in a regular extracellular fluid, perilymph, and apically faces the endolymph. The EP, which is essential for hearing, represents the potential difference across the tissue. Using in vivo electrophysiological approaches, we describe a potential mechanism underlying the unusual RMP of guinea pig fibrocytes. The RMP was +9.0 ± 3.7 mV when fibrocytes were exposed to an artificial control perilymph (n = 28 cochleae). Perilymphatic perfusion of a solution containing low [Na(+)] (1 mM) markedly hyperpolarized the RMP to -31.1 ± 11.2 mV (n = 10; p control, Tukey-Kramer test after one-way ANOVA). Accordingly, the EP decreased. Little change in RMP was observed when the cells were treated with a high [K(+)] of 30 mM (+10.4 ± 2.3 mV; n = 7; p = 0.942 versus the control). During the infusion of a low [Cl(-)] solution (2.4 mM), the RMP moderately hyperpolarized to -0.9 ± 3.4 mV (n = 5; p control), although the membranes, if governed by Cl(-) permeability, should be depolarized. These observations imply that the fibrocyte membranes are more permeable to Na(+) than K(+) and Cl(-), and this unique profile and [Na(+)] gradient across the membranes contribute to the positive RMP.

  9. Assessing the Contribution of the Oscillatory Potentials to the Genesis of the Photopic ERG with the Discrete Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Allison L.; Trang, Nataly; Gauthier, Mercedes; Little, John M.; Lina, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The electroretinogram (ERG) is composed of slow (i.e., a-, b-waves) and fast (i.e., oscillatory potentials: OPs) components. OPs have been shown to be preferably affected in some diseases (such as diabetic retinopathy), while the a- and b-waves remain relatively intact. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of OPs to the building of the ERG and to examine whether a signal mostly composed of OPs could also exist. DWT analyses were performed on photopic ERGs (flash intensities: −2.23 to 2.64 log cd·s·m−2 in 21 steps) obtained from normal subjects (n = 40) and patients (n = 21) affected with a retinopathy. In controls, the %OP value (i.e., OPs energy/ERG energy) is stimulus- and amplitude-independent (range: 56.6–61.6%; CV = 6.3%). In contrast, the %OPs measured from the ERGs of our patients varied significantly more (range: 35.4%–89.2%; p < 0.05) depending on the pathology, some presenting with ERGs that are almost solely composed of OPs. In conclusion, patients may present with a wide range of %OP values. Findings herein also support the hypothesis that, in certain conditions, the photopic ERG can be mostly composed of high-frequency components. PMID:28101507

  10. Potential Implications of Research on Genetic or Heritable Contributions to Pedophilia for the Objectives of Criminal Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryessa, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing scientific research on possible genetic or heritable influences to the etiology of pedophilia, driven by national and public concerns about better understanding the disorder in order to reduce children’s vulnerabilities to pedophilic and child sex offenders. This research has corresponded to growing academic dialogue on how advances in genetic research, especially concerning the causes and development of particular mental disorders or behaviors, may affect traditional practices of criminal law and how the justice system views, manages, and adjudicates different types of criminal behavior and offenders. This paper strives to supplement this dialogue by exploring several of the many possible effects and implications of research surrounding genetic or heritable contributions to pedophilia for the five widely accepted objectives that enforce and regulate the punishment of criminal law. These include retribution, incapacitation, deterrence, rehabilitation, and restoration. Although still currently in early stages, genetic and heritability research on the etiology of pedophilia may have the potential moving forward to influence the current and established punitive methods and strategies of how the justice system perceives, adjudicates, regulates, and punishes pedophilic and sex offenders, as well as how to best prevent sexual offending against children by pedophilic offenders in the future. PMID:25557668

  11. A Potential Epigenetic Marker Mediating Serum Folate and Vitamin B12 Levels Contributes to the Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loo Keat Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a multifactorial disease that may be associated with aberrant DNA methylation profiles. We investigated epigenetic dysregulation for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene among ischemic stroke patients. Cases and controls were recruited after obtaining signed written informed consents following a screening process against the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Serum vitamin profiles (folate, vitamin B12, and homocysteine were determined using immunoassays. Methylation profiles for CpGs A and B in the MTHFR gene were determined using a bisulfite-pyrosequencing method. Methylation of MTHFR significantly increased the susceptibility risk for ischemic stroke. In particular, CpG A outperformed CpG B in mediating serum folate and vitamin B12 levels to increase ischemic stroke susceptibility risks by 4.73-fold. However, both CpGs A and B were not associated with serum homocysteine levels or ischemic stroke severity. CpG A is a potential epigenetic marker in mediating serum folate and vitamin B12 to contribute to ischemic stroke.

  12. Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase 2 Potentially Contributes to Hepatocellular Carcinoma-Associated Erythrocytosis by Maintaining Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-4α Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Sun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increased red blood cell count (Erythrocytosis is an important paraneoplastic syndrome of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and is a significant risk factor for lethal lung artery thromboembolism. HCC-associated erythrocytosis is partially caused by the ability of several HCC cells to produce erythropoietin (EPO. Prolyl-4-hydroxylase 2 (PHD2 is an enzyme encoded by the gene EGLN1. The best-known function of PHD2 is to mediate the oxygen-dependent degradation of the labile α-subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF. However, there is increasing evidence that PHD2 also regulates HIF-independent pathways by interacting with other substrates. Methods: In the EPO-producing human HCC cell line HepG2, the expression of PHD2 gene was silenced with siRNA. EPO production was estimated using quantitative PCR and ELISA. Results: In HepG2 cells, PHD2 suppresses the activity of TGF-β1 pathway and consequently maintains the expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF-4α, an important transcription factor promoting the EPO expression in hepatocytes. PHD2 knockdown caused a marked reduction of EPO production. HIF seemed not to be involved in this biology. Conclusion: Our findings show that PHD2 represents a potential contributing factor for HCC-associated erythrocytosis. Selective inhibition of PHD2 in HCC cells might be considered as a new way to manage erythrocytosis in HCC patients.

  13. Assessing the Contribution of the Oscillatory Potentials to the Genesis of the Photopic ERG with the Discrete Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gauvin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The electroretinogram (ERG is composed of slow (i.e., a-, b-waves and fast (i.e., oscillatory potentials: OPs components. OPs have been shown to be preferably affected in some diseases (such as diabetic retinopathy, while the a- and b-waves remain relatively intact. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of OPs to the building of the ERG and to examine whether a signal mostly composed of OPs could also exist. DWT analyses were performed on photopic ERGs (flash intensities: −2.23 to 2.64 log cd·s·m−2 in 21 steps obtained from normal subjects (n=40 and patients (n=21 affected with a retinopathy. In controls, the %OP value (i.e., OPs energy/ERG energy is stimulus- and amplitude-independent (range: 56.6–61.6%; CV = 6.3%. In contrast, the %OPs measured from the ERGs of our patients varied significantly more (range: 35.4%–89.2%; p<0.05 depending on the pathology, some presenting with ERGs that are almost solely composed of OPs. In conclusion, patients may present with a wide range of %OP values. Findings herein also support the hypothesis that, in certain conditions, the photopic ERG can be mostly composed of high-frequency components.

  14. Potential implications of research on genetic or heritable contributions to pedophilia for the objectives of criminal law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryessa, Colleen M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing scientific research on possible genetic or heritable influences to the etiology of pedophilia, driven by national and public concerns about better understanding the disorder in order to reduce children's vulnerabilities to pedophilic and child sex offenders. This research has corresponded to growing academic dialogue on how advances in genetic research, especially concerning the causes and development of particular mental disorders or behaviors, may affect traditional practices of criminal law and how the justice system views, manages, and adjudicates different types of criminal behavior and offenders. This paper strives to supplement this dialogue by exploring several of the many possible effects and implications of research surrounding genetic or heritable contributions to pedophilia for the five widely accepted objectives that enforce and regulate the punishment of criminal law. These include retribution, incapacitation, deterrence, rehabilitation, and restoration. Although still currently in early stages, genetic and heritability research on the etiology of pedophilia may have the potential moving forward to influence the current and established punitive methods and strategies of how the justice system perceives, adjudicates, regulates, and punishes pedophilic and sex offenders, as well as how to best prevent sexual offending against children by pedophilic offenders in the future.

  15. Evaluation of Adsorbed Arsenic and Potential Contribution to Shallow Groundwater in Tulare Lake Bed Area, Tulare Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S.; Fujii, R.; Chalmers, A.T.; Tanji, K.K.

    2004-01-01

    Elevated As concentrations in shallow groundwater in parts of the Tulare Basin, California, are a concern because of potential migration into deeper aquifers that could serve as a source of future drinking water. The objectives of this study were to evaluate adsorbed As and the potential contribution to groundwater using (i) isotopic dilution, (ii) successive extraction with an electrolyte solution resembling the pore-water chemical composition, and (iii) PO4 exchange for As. Sediment samples collected from 2 to 4 m below land surface in the Tulare Lake bed area contained a total As concentration of 24 mg As kg-1. Pore water extracted under hydraulic pressure contained a total As concentration of 590 ??g As L-1, which predominantly contained As as arsenate [As(V), 97%], a minor amount of arsenite [As(III), 3%], and non-detectable organic As. The isotopic dilution method [73As(V)] estimated that the concentration of adsorbed As(V) on the sediment was 5.7 mg As kg-1 at pH 8.5 and 6.7 mg As kg-1 at pH 7.5, respectively. Fourteen successive 24-h extractions with the artificial pore water released up to 57 to 61% of the adsorbed As(V) that was determined by isotopic dilution, indicating that only a portion of the adsorbed As could be released to groundwater. The phosphate-exchangeable As (0.1 M PO4, pH 8.5 or 7.5) was 63% of the isotopically exchangeable As(V). Thus, extraction of As by 0.1 M PO4 at ambient pHs is recommended as a method to determine the potential amount of As(V) on sediments that could be released to the solution phase. The overall results indicated that adsorbed As could be a significant source of As to groundwater. However, other factors that affect As transport such as the leaching rate need to be considered.

  16. Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and their contribution to ozone formation potential in a petrochemical industrialized city, Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chenhui; Mao, Xiaoxuan; Huang, Tao; Liang, Xiaoxue; Wang, Yanan; Shen, Yanjie; Jiang, Wanyanhan; Wang, Huiqin; Bai, Zhilin; Ma, Minquan; Yu, Zhousuo; Ma, Jianmin; Gao, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Hourly air concentrations of fifty-three non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were measured at downtown and suburb of Lanzhou, a petrochemical industrialized city, Northwest China in 2013. The measured data were used to investigate the seasonal characteristics of NMHCs air pollution and their contributions to the ozone formation in Lanzhou. Annually averaged NMHCs concentration was 38.29 ppbv in downtown Lanzhou. Among 53 NMHCs, alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics accounted for 57%, 23% and 20% of the total NMHCs air concentration, respectively. The atmospheric levels of toluene and propane with mean values of 4.62 and 4.56 ppbv were higher than other NMHCs, respectively. The ambient levels of NMHCs in downtown Lanzhou were compared with measured NMHCs data collected at a suburban site of Lanzhou, located near a large-scale petrochemical industry. Results show that the levels of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics in downtown Lanzhou were lower by factors of 3-11 than that in west suburb of the city. O3-isopleth plots show that ozone was formed in VOCs control area in downtown Lanzhou and NOx control area at the west suburban site during the summertime. Propylene-equivalent (Prop-Equiv) concentration and the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) in downtown Lanzhou indicate that cis-2-butene, propylene, and m/p-xylene were the first three compounds contributing to ozone formation potentials whereas in the petrochemical industrialized west suburb, ethane, propene, and trans-2-Butene played more important role in the summertime ozone formation. Principal component analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) were further applied to identify the dominant emission sources and examine their fractions in total NMHCs. Results suggest that vehicle emission, solvent usage, and industrial activities were major sources of NMHCs in the city, accounting for 58.34%, 22.19%, and 19.47% of the total monitored NMHCs in downtown Lanzhou, respectively. In the west suburb of the city

  17. Changing trends in emergency coronary bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganti, Manjula; Brister, Stephanie J; Yau, Terrence M; Collins, Susan; Badiwala, Mitesh; Rao, Vivek

    2011-10-01

    Patients undergoing emergency coronary artery bypass grafting represent a unique and high-risk population that remains challenging for cardiac surgeons. We examined the changing trends in patients undergoing emergency bypass grafting over the past 20 years. We conducted a retrospective review of our database between 1990 and 2009 and patients were divided into 2 groups based on year of operation: 1990-1999, n = 393; 2000-2009, n = 184. The primary outcomes of interest for this study are operative mortality and incidence of low cardiac output syndrome. The percentage of patients undergoing emergency coronary bypass grafting has decreased from 2.7% to 1.7% over time. The percentage of patients with dyslipidemia, hypertension, triple vessel disease, peripheral vascular disease, and left main disease increased over time (P emergency bypass grafting. The independent predictors of low cardiac output syndrome were small body surface area, congestive heart failure, shock, myocardial infarction, earlier decade (1990-1999) and increased age. Despite a changing preoperative risk profile, the operative mortality of emergency coronary artery bypass grafting has remained stable over the years. However, mortality remains significantly above the observed mortality in elective bypass grafting. Continued improvements in the management of heart failure and the care of the elderly will likely result in reduced risks of emergency coronary artery bypass grafting. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Do thermal tolerances and rapid thermal responses contribute to the invasion potential of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, Welma; Terblanche, John S; Addison, Pia

    2017-04-01

    Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) has shown remarkable range expansion over the past 10years and invaded several new continents including Africa. Here we report results of a detailed assessment of acute high and low temperature survival ability and the plasticity thereof, to test the hypothesis that traits of the thermal niche have contributed to the species' invasion ability. We also assess life-stage-related variation of thermal tolerances to determine potential stage-related environmental sensitivity. The temperatures at which c. 20% of the population survived of B. dorsalis were determined to be -6.5°C and 42.7°C, respectively, when using 2h exposures. Further, four life stages of B. dorsalis (egg, 3rd instar larvae, pupae and adults) were exposed to high and low discriminating temperatures to compare their thermal survival rates. The egg stage was found to be the most resistant life stage to both high and low temperatures, since 44±2.3% survived the low and 60±4.2% survived the high discriminating temperature treatments respectively. Finally, the potential for adult hardening responses to mediate tolerance of extremes was also considered using a diverse range of acute conditions (using 2h exposures to 15°C, 10°C and 5°C and 30°C, 35°C, 37°C and 39°C as hardening temperatures, and some treatments with and without recovery periods between hardening and discriminating temperature treatment). These showed that although some significant hardening responses could be detected in certain treatments (e.g. after exposure to 37°C and 39°C), the magnitude of this plasticity was generally low compared to two other wide-spread and more geographically-range-restricted con-familial species, Ceratitis capitata and C. rosa. In other words, Bactrocera dorsalis adults were unable to rapidly heat- or cold-harden to the same extent as the other Ceratitis species examined to date. These results suggest a narrower thermal niche in B. dorsalis compared

  19. The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Ian D. L.; Boardman, John; Collins, Adrian L.; Copeland-Phillips, Ruth; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Mighall, Tim M.; Pulley, Simon; Rowntree, Kate M.

    2017-03-01

    Several research projects undertaken by the authors and others over the last 14 years have used fallout and geogenic radionuclides for understanding erosion processes and sediment yield dynamics in South Africa over the last 100-200 years as European settlers colonised the interior plains and plateaux of the country and imported new livestock and farming techniques to the region. These projects have used two fallout radionuclides (210Pb and 137Cs) to date sediments accumulating in reservoirs, farm dams, wetlands, alluvial fans and floodouts and have used other fallout nuclides (7Be) and long-lived geogenic radionuclides (e.g. 40K, 235U) as part of a composite fingerprint exploring contemporary sediment sources and changes to sources through time. While successful in many parts of the world, applying these techniques in Southern Africa has posed a number of challenges often not encountered elsewhere. Here we explore some of the benefits and challenges in using gamma-emitting radionuclides, especially 137Cs, in these landscapes. Benefits include the potential for discriminating gully sidewall from topsoil sources, which has helped to identify contemporary gully systems as sediment conduits, rather than sources, and for providing a time-synchronous marker horizon in a range of sedimentary environments that has helped to develop robust chronologies. Challenges include the spatial variability in soil cover on steep rocky hillslopes, which is likely to challenge assumptions about the uniformity of initial fallout nuclide distribution, the paucity of stable (non-eroding) sites in order to estimate atmospheric fallout inventories, and the limited success of 210Pb dating in some rapidly accumulating high altitude catchments where sediments often comprise significant amounts of sand and gravel. Despite these challenges we present evidence suggesting that the use of gamma-emitting radionuclides can make a significant contribution to our understanding of erosion processes and

  20. Adiponectin Potentially Contributes to the Antidepressive Effects of Baduanjin Qigong Exercise in Women With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jessie S M; Li, Ang; Ng, Siu-Man; Ho, Rainbow T H; Xu, Aimin; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Wang, Xiao-Min; So, Kwok-Fai; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2017-03-13

    Our recent study demonstrates that adiponectin signaling plays a significant role in mediating physical exercise-exerted effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepression in mice. Whether the findings can be translated to humans remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Baduanjin Qigong exercise on adiponectin and to evaluate whether adiponectin is involved in the antidepressive effects of Qigong exercise on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)-like illness. This is a randomized, waitlist-controlled trial. One hundred eight female participants were randomly assigned to either Qigong exercise or waitlist groups. Sixteen 1.5-h Qigong lessons were conducted. Outcome measures were taken at three time points. Baseline adiponectin levels were negatively associated with body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist/hip ratio in women with CFS-like illness. Compared with the waitlist control, Qigong exercise significantly reduced anxiety and depression symptoms and significantly raised plasma adiponectin levels (median = 0.8 vs. -0.1, p Qigong exercise were associated with decreases in depression scores for the Qigong group (r = -0.38, p = 0.04). Moreover, adjusted linear regression analysis further identified Qigong exercise and change in adiponectin levels as the significant factors accounting for reduction of depression symptoms. Baduanjin Qigong significantly increased adiponectin levels in females with CFS-like illness. Decreases in depression symptoms were associated with increases in adiponectin levels following Qigong exercise, indicating that the potential contribution of adiponectin to Qigong exercise elicited antidepressive effects in human subjects.

  1. NASA's Potential Contributions for Using Solar Ultraviolet Radiation in Conjunction with Photocatalysis for Urban Air Pollution Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, robert E.; Underwood, Lauren W.

    2007-01-01

    More than 75 percent of the U.S. population lives in urban communities where people are exposed to levels of smog or pollution that exceed the EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) safety standards. Urban air quality presents a unique problem because of a number of complex variables, including traffic congestion, energy production, and energy consumption activities, all of which can contribute to and affect air pollution and air quality in this environment. In environmental engineering, photocatalysis is an area of research whose potential for environmental clean-up is rapidly developing popularity and success. Photocatalysis, a natural chemical process, is the acceleration of a photoreaction in the presence of a catalyst. Photocatalytic agents are activated when exposed to near UV (ultraviolet) light (320-400 nm) and water. In recent years, surfaces coated with photocatalytic materials have been extensively studied because pollutants on these surfaces will degrade when the surfaces are exposed to near UV light. Building materials, such as tiles, cement, glass, and aluminum sidings, can be coated with a thin film of a photocatalyst. These coated materials can then break down organic molecules, like air pollutants and smog precursors, into environmentally friendly compounds. These surfaces also exhibit a high affinity for water when exposed to UV light. Therefore, not only are the pollutants decomposed, but this superhydrophilic nature makes the surface self-cleaning, which helps to further increase the degradation rate by allowing rain and/or water to wash byproducts away. According to the Clean Air Act, each individual state is responsible for implementing prevention and regulatory programs to control air pollution. To operate an air quality program, states must adopt and/or develop a plan and obtain approval from the EPA. Federal approval provides a means for the EPA to maintain consistency among different state programs and ensures that they comply with the

  2. Propionibacterium acnes CAMP factor and host acid sphingomyelinase contribute to bacterial virulence: potential targets for inflammatory acne treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruaki Nakatsuji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the progression of acne vulgaris, the disruption of follicular epithelia by an over-growth of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes permits the bacteria to spread and become in contact with various skin and immune cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated in the present study that the Christie, Atkins, Munch-Peterson (CAMP factor of P. acnes is a secretory protein with co-hemolytic activity with sphingomyelinase that can confer cytotoxicity to HaCaT keratinocytes and RAW264.7 macrophages. The CAMP factor from bacteria and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase from the host cells were simultaneously present in the culture supernatant only when the cells were co-cultured with P. acnes. Either anti-CAMP factor serum or desipramine, a selective ASMase inhibitor, significantly abrogated the P. acnes-induced cell death of HaCaT and RAW264.7 cells. Intradermal injection of ICR mouse ears with live P. acnes induced considerable ear inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and an increase in cellular soluble ASMase. Suppression of ASMase by systemic treatment with desipramine significantly reduced inflammatory reaction induced by intradermal injection with P. acnes, suggesting the contribution of host ASMase in P. acnes-induced inflammatory reaction in vivo. Vaccination of mice with CAMP factor elicited a protective immunity against P. acnes-induced ear inflammation, indicating the involvement of CAMP factor in P. acnes-induced inflammation. Most notably, suppression of both bacterial CAMP factor and host ASMase using vaccination and specific antibody injection, respectively, cooperatively alleviated P. acnes-induced inflammation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings envision a novel infectious mechanism by which P. acnes CAMP factor may hijack host ASMase to amplify bacterial virulence to degrade and invade host cells. This work has identified both CAMP factor and ASMase as potential molecular targets for the development of drugs

  3. Effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on propofol pharmacokinetics and bispectral index during coronary surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Antonio G. Barbosa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Cardiopulmonary bypass is known to alter propofol pharmacokinetics in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, few studies have evaluated the impact of these alterations on postoperative pharmacodynamics. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that changes in propofol pharmacokinetics increase hypnotic effects after cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: Twenty patients scheduled for on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (group, n=10 or off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (group, n=10 coronary artery bypass grafts were anesthetized with sufentanil and a propofol target controlled infusion (2.0 µg/mL. Depth of hypnosis was monitored using the bispectral index. Blood samples were collected from the induction of anesthesia up to 12 hours after the end of propofol infusion, at predetermined intervals. Plasma propofol concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography, followed by a non-compartmental propofol pharmacokinetic analysis. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, considering p<0.05 as significant. RESULTS: After cardiopulmonary bypass, despite similar plasma propofol concentrations in both groups, bispectral index values were lower in the on-pump coronary artery bypass graft group. Time to extubation after the end of propofol infusion was greater in the on-pump coronary artery bypass graft group (334 ± 117 vs. 216 ± 85 min, p = 0.04. Patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass had shorter biological (1.82 ± 0.5 vs. 3.67 ± 1.15h, p < 0.01 and terminal elimination (6.27 ± 1.29 vs. 10.5h ± 2.18, p < 0.01 half-life values, as well as higher total plasma clearance (28.36 ± 11.40 vs.18.29 ± 7.67 mL/kg/min, p = 0.03, compared to patients in the off-pump coronary artery bypass graft group. CONCLUSION: Aside from the increased sensitivity of the brain to anesthetics after cardiopulmonary bypass, changes in propofol pharmacokinetics may contribute to its central nervous system effects.

  4. 30 CFR 57.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 57.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 57.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the... switch is held in the closed position by the hoistman. The overtravel by-pass switch shall...

  5. 30 CFR 56.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 56.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 56.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the... switch is held in the closed position by the hoistman. The overtravel by-pass switch shall...

  6. 34 CFR 76.677 - Continuation of a bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuation of a bypass. 76.677 Section 76.677... Be Met by the State and Its Subgrantees? Procedures for Bypass § 76.677 Continuation of a bypass. The Secretary continues a bypass until the Secretary determines that the grantee or subgrantee will meet...

  7. Bypassing health facilities for childbirth: a multilevel study in three districts of Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Mariano; Vora, Kranti; Costa, Ayesha De

    2016-01-01

    Bypassing available facilities for childbirth has important implications for maternal health service delivery and human resources within a health system. The results are the additional expenses imposed on the woman and her family, as well as the inefficient use of health system resources. Bypassing often indicates a lack of confidence in the care provided by the facility nearest to the mother, which implies a level of dysfunctionality that the health system needs to address. Over the past decade, India has experienced a steep rise in the proportion of facility births. The initiation of programs promoting facility births resulted in a rise from 39% in 2005 to 85% in 2014. There have been no reports on bypassing facilities for childbirth from India. In the context of steeply rising facility births, it is important to quantify the occurrence of and study the relative contributions of maternal characteristics and facility functionality to bypassing. 1) To determine the extent of bypassing health facilities for childbirth among rural mothers in three districts of Gujarat, India, 2) to identify associations between the functionality of an obstetric care (OC) facility and it being bypassed, and 3) to assess the relative contribution of maternal and facility characteristics to bypassing. A cross-sectional survey of 166 public and private OC facilities reporting ≥30 births in the 3 months before the survey was conducted in three purposively selected districts (Dahod, Sabarkantha, and Surendranagar) in the state of Gujarat, India. Besides information on each facility, data from 946 women giving birth at these facilities were also gathered. Data were analyzed using a multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression model. Off all mothers, 37.7% bypassed their nearest facility for childbirth. After adjusting for maternal characteristics, for every one-unit increase in the facility's emergency obstetric care (EmOC) signal functions, the odds of bypassing a facility for childbirth

  8. Bypassing health facilities for childbirth: a multilevel study in three districts of Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Mariano; Vora, Kranti; De Costa, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Background Bypassing available facilities for childbirth has important implications for maternal health service delivery and human resources within a health system. The results are the additional expenses imposed on the woman and her family, as well as the inefficient use of health system resources. Bypassing often indicates a lack of confidence in the care provided by the facility nearest to the mother, which implies a level of dysfunctionality that the health system needs to address. Over the past decade, India has experienced a steep rise in the proportion of facility births. The initiation of programs promoting facility births resulted in a rise from 39% in 2005 to 85% in 2014. There have been no reports on bypassing facilities for childbirth from India. In the context of steeply rising facility births, it is important to quantify the occurrence of and study the relative contributions of maternal characteristics and facility functionality to bypassing. Objectives 1) To determine the extent of bypassing health facilities for childbirth among rural mothers in three districts of Gujarat, India, 2) to identify associations between the functionality of an obstetric care (OC) facility and it being bypassed, and 3) to assess the relative contribution of maternal and facility characteristics to bypassing. Design A cross-sectional survey of 166 public and private OC facilities reporting ≥30 births in the 3 months before the survey was conducted in three purposively selected districts (Dahod, Sabarkantha, and Surendranagar) in the state of Gujarat, India. Besides information on each facility, data from 946 women giving birth at these facilities were also gathered. Data were analyzed using a multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression model. Results Off all mothers, 37.7% bypassed their nearest facility for childbirth. After adjusting for maternal characteristics, for every one-unit increase in the facility's emergency obstetric care (EmOC) signal functions, the odds

  9. Bypassing health facilities for childbirth: a multilevel study in three districts of Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Salazar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bypassing available facilities for childbirth has important implications for maternal health service delivery and human resources within a health system. The results are the additional expenses imposed on the woman and her family, as well as the inefficient use of health system resources. Bypassing often indicates a lack of confidence in the care provided by the facility nearest to the mother, which implies a level of dysfunctionality that the health system needs to address. Over the past decade, India has experienced a steep rise in the proportion of facility births. The initiation of programs promoting facility births resulted in a rise from 39% in 2005 to 85% in 2014. There have been no reports on bypassing facilities for childbirth from India. In the context of steeply rising facility births, it is important to quantify the occurrence of and study the relative contributions of maternal characteristics and facility functionality to bypassing. Objectives: 1 To determine the extent of bypassing health facilities for childbirth among rural mothers in three districts of Gujarat, India, 2 to identify associations between the functionality of an obstetric care (OC facility and it being bypassed, and 3 to assess the relative contribution of maternal and facility characteristics to bypassing. Design: A cross-sectional survey of 166 public and private OC facilities reporting ≥30 births in the 3 months before the survey was conducted in three purposively selected districts (Dahod, Sabarkantha, and Surendranagar in the state of Gujarat, India. Besides information on each facility, data from 946 women giving birth at these facilities were also gathered. Data were analyzed using a multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression model. Results: Off all mothers, 37.7% bypassed their nearest facility for childbirth. After adjusting for maternal characteristics, for every one-unit increase in the facility's emergency obstetric care (EmOC signal

  10. Elimination of gaseous microemboli from cardiopulmonary bypass using hypobaric oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Keith E; Rosinski, David J; Schonberger, Robert B; Kubera, Cathryn; Mathew, Eapen S; Nichols, Frank; Dyckman, William; Courtin, Francois; Sherburne, Bradford; Bordey, Angelique F; Gross, Jeffrey B

    2014-03-01

    Numerous gaseous microemboli (GME) are delivered into the arterial circulation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). These emboli damage end organs through multiple mechanisms that are thought to contribute to neurocognitive deficits after cardiac surgery. Here, we use hypobaric oxygenation to reduce dissolved gases in blood and greatly reduce GME delivery during CPB. Variable subatmospheric pressures were applied to 100% oxygen sweep gas in standard hollow fiber microporous membrane oxygenators to oxygenate and denitrogenate blood. GME were quantified using ultrasound while air embolism from the surgical field was simulated experimentally. We assessed end-organ tissues in swine postoperatively using light microscopy. Variable sweep gas pressures allowed reliable oxygenation independent of carbon dioxide removal while denitrogenating arterial blood. Hypobaric oxygenation produced dose-dependent reductions of Doppler signals produced by bolus and continuous GME loads in vitro. Swine were maintained using hypobaric oxygenation for 4 hours on CPB with no apparent adverse events. Compared with current practice standards of oxygen/air sweep gas, hypobaric oxygenation reduced GME volumes exiting the oxygenator (by 80%), exiting the arterial filter (95%), and arriving at the aortic cannula (∼100%), indicating progressive reabsorption of emboli throughout the CPB circuit in vivo. Analysis of brain tissue suggested decreased microvascular injury under hypobaric conditions. Hypobaric oxygenation is an effective, low-cost, common sense approach that capitalizes on the simple physical makeup of GME to achieve their near-total elimination during CPB. This technique holds great potential for limiting end-organ damage and improving outcomes in a variety of patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Coronary Bypass Surgery in a 105-Year-Old Patient with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temucin Noyan Ogus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery bypass grafting is one of the routine daily surgical procedures in the current era. Parallel to the increasing life expectancy, cardiac surgery is commonly performed in octogenarians. However, literature consists of only seldom reports of coronary artery bypass grafting in patients above 90 years of age. In this report, we present our management strategy in a 105-year-old patient who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting at our institution.

  12. Coronary bypass surgery in patients aged 70 years and over: Mortality, morbidity, & length of stay. Dar al-fouad experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ghali

    2014-03-01

    This study supports the continued performance of coronary artery bypass grafting in patients 70 years. Advanced age alone should not deter a cardiac surgeon from offering such a potentially beneficial intervention.

  13. Exhaust gas bypass valve control for thermoelectric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michael G; Yang, Jihui; Meisner, Greogry P.; Stabler, Francis R.; De Bock, Hendrik Pieter Jacobus; Anderson, Todd Alan

    2012-09-04

    A method of controlling engine exhaust flow through at least one of an exhaust bypass and a thermoelectric device via a bypass valve is provided. The method includes: determining a mass flow of exhaust exiting an engine; determining a desired exhaust pressure based on the mass flow of exhaust; comparing the desired exhaust pressure to a determined exhaust pressure; and determining a bypass valve control value based on the comparing, wherein the bypass valve control value is used to control the bypass valve.

  14. Case study: nutrition challenges of a marathon runner with a gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nancy

    2011-12-01

    A new type of athlete is appearing in the offices of sports dietitians: formerly obese people who have undergone gastric bypass surgery and now aspire to be marathoners, triathletes, and other types of endurance athletes. The standard nutrition advice offered to bypass patients is contrary to the standard sports advice given to athletes. Bypass athletes need to limit carbohydrates, fluids, and energy intake and consume a protein-based diet. This case study describes the sport nutrition concerns of a woman who, after having gastric bypass surgery, trained to run a marathon (42 km). Because of her limited ability to consume food and fluids, she experienced difficulty preventing fatigue and dehydration during her long training runs and the marathon itself. She learned through trial and error how to survive the nutritional challenges and complete the marathon. Health professionals need to be aware of the potential medical risks associated with endurance exercise in gastric bypass patients. Research is needed to determine the best sports nutrition practices for bypass patients. Only then can sport dietitians better educate this small but growing contingent of endurance athletes so the athletes can meet their training and performance goals and reduce their risk of experiencing serious health consequences.

  15. Determining the potential contribution of hyporheic flow to nitrogen and phosphorus retention in streams in a northern California watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, C. H.; Schade, J. D.; Thomas, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    An ongoing effort at the Angelo Coast Range Reserve in the Eel River watershed in Northern California has aimed to understand how stream network position influences feedbacks between nutrient cycles, stream metabolism, and consumer-resource interactions. This includes identifying when biotic interactions and organism metabolism are important determinants of nutrient flux and the ratio of nutrients retained. In general, ecosystem nutrient retention is hard to measure because difficulties arise in determining ecosystem boundaries. In streams we tend to measure the retention of limiting nutrients on a reach scale, assuming that nutrients retained are taken up by benthic organisms available to be influenced by higher-order trophic interactions, while at the same time acknowledging some fraction of stream water is interacting with the subsurface of the stream and nutrients are being retained there. Plateau nutrient addition experiments of N + P together were conducted in six streams with watershed areas between 0.6 - 145 km2. We used independent lab measurements of hyporheic sediment metabolism and retention of soluble nitrogen and phosphorus, with the reach-scale nutrient uptake and transient storage measurements to determine 1) the potential for hyporheic uptake to be contributing to the overall measured N and P uptake rates, 2) the hyporheic-surface exchange required to produce these rates and 3) the reasonableness of this exchange given transient storage values for the reach. Subsurface biotic and abiotic uptake was also measured. Subsurface uptake rates ranged from 0.5 - 5.9 µg NH4* kg-1 wet sediment and 20-50 µg PO4-P * kg-1 wet sediment and there is evidence that 66-100% of P uptake could be abiotic. In the smallest stream, nitrogen retention rates of ~5.0 µg NH4 m-2*s-1 were measured in entirely subsurface flow, compared with reach-scale retention of ~0.18 µg NH4 m-2*s-1 for the same stream. Hyporheic uptake could account for all of the surface water loss

  16. LncRNAs expression in preeclampsia placenta reveals the potential role of LncRNAs contributing to preeclampsia pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoju He

    284100, and CEACAMP8 might contribute to the mechanism underlying preeclampsia. Taken together, this study may provide potential targets for the future treatment of preeclampsia and novel insights into preeclampsia biology.

  17. Doppler spectral characteristics of infrainguinal vein bypasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina G; von Jessen, F; Sillesen, H

    1993-01-01

    With the aim of assessing the velocity profile of femoropopliteal and femorocrural vein bypasses, 128 patients undergoing infrainguinal vein bypass surgery entered a postoperative Duplex surveillance protocol, which included clinical assessment and Duplex scanning, using Doppler spectral analysis...... of arteriovenous fistulas the initially antegrade diastolic velocity was replaced by a retrograde flow within 3 months, whereas a forward flow in diastole was sustained in grafts with patent fistulas. Abnormal Duplex findings in 31 patients led to angiography and revision in 13 cases. Four revised grafts failed......, while nine remained patent at follow-up 1-12 months later. Ten (56%) of 18 non-revised bypasses with abnormal Duplex findings failed within 9 months compared to 1 (1%) of 76 bypasses with a normal velocity profile (p analysis provides...

  18. Sen perforation af tyndtarm efter laparoskopisk gastrisk bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Sigild, Ulf Henrik; Neuenschwander, Anders Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    We present two cases in which the patients were admitted to a local hospital with acute abdominal pain four or five months after having undergone laparoscopic gastric bypass. In both cases, operation revealed a perforation of the small bowel close to the distal anastomosis. In the first case......, a massive constipation of the small bowel was most likely a contributing factor. In the second case, the cause was a kink of the entero-entero anastomosis leading to obstruction and finally perforation of the biliary limp. Late perforations are among the rarely reported complications associated with gastric...

  19. The Potential Contribution of Distance Teaching Universities to Improving the Learning/Teaching Practices in Conventional Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri-Rozenblit, Sarah

    1990-01-01

    Based on the experience of Everyman's University (Israel), it is proposed that the experience of distance teaching institutions will contribute to: improving university textbook quality; enhancing independent study skills; improving college instruction; promoting interdisciplinary courses; promoting interinstitutional collaboration; advancing the…

  20. Augmented reality-assisted bypass surgery: embracing minimal invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, Ivan; Schaller, Karl; Bijlenga, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The overlay of virtual images on the surgical field, defined as augmented reality, has been used for image guidance during various neurosurgical procedures. Although this technology could conceivably address certain inherent problems of extracranial-to-intracranial bypass procedures, this potential has not been explored to date. We evaluate the usefulness of an augmented reality-based setup, which could help in harvesting donor vessels through their precise localization in real-time, in performing tailored craniotomies, and in identifying preoperatively selected recipient vessels for the purpose of anastomosis. Our method was applied to 3 patients with Moya-Moya disease who underwent superficial temporal artery-to-middle cerebral artery anastomoses and 1 patient who underwent an occipital artery-to-posteroinferior cerebellar artery bypass because of a dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery. Patients' heads, skulls, and extracranial and intracranial vessels were segmented preoperatively from 3-dimensional image data sets (3-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, angio-magnetic resonance imaging, angio-computed tomography), and injected intraoperatively into the operating microscope's eyepiece for image guidance. In each case, the described setup helped in precisely localizing donor and recipient vessels and in tailoring craniotomies to the injected images. The presented system based on augmented reality can optimize the workflow of extracranial-to-intracranial bypass procedures by providing essential anatomical information, entirely integrated to the surgical field, and help to perform minimally invasive procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Monsanto may bypass NIH in microbe test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Marjorie

    1985-01-11

    The Monsanto Company is planning to ask the Environmental Protection Agency for clearance to field test a genetically engineered microbial pesticide, bypassing the traditional approval process of the National Institutes of Health. Although only federally funded institutions are required to obtain NIH approval for genetic engineering tests, Monsanto is the first company to bypass the NIH regulatory process, which has become mired in a lawsuit brought by Jeremy Rifkin.

  2. Prophylactic digitalization for coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L W; Dickstein, R A; Fruehan, C T; Kane, P; Potts, J L; Smulyan, H; Webb, W R; Eich, R H

    1976-05-01

    One hundred and twenty patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass procedures were randomly placed into control and digitalized groups. All were initially in normal sinus rhythm and without evidence of congestive heart failure. Supraventricular arrhythmias occurred in 17 of 66 controls and in only three of 54 digitalized patients (P less than 0.01). There was no evidence of digitals toxicity. Based on this evidence we recommend prophylactic digitalization for patients having aortocoronary bypass operations.

  3. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter J.

    2012-03-13

    Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

  4. [Simplified laparoscopic gastric bypass. Initial experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Miguelena, Luis; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Ríos-Cruz, Daniel; Marín-Domínguez, Raúl; Castillo-González, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Obesity surgery includes various gastrointestinal procedures. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the prototype of mixed procedures being the most practiced worldwide. A similar and novel technique has been adopted by Dr. Almino Cardoso Ramos and Dr. Manoel Galvao called "simplified bypass," which has been accepted due to the greater ease and very similar results to the conventional technique. The aim of this study is to describe the results of the simplified gastric bypass for treatment of morbid obesity in our institution. We performed a descriptive, retrospective study of all patients undergoing simplified gastric bypass from January 2008 to July 2012 in the obesity clinic of a private hospital in Mexico City. A total of 90 patients diagnosed with morbid obesity underwent simplified gastric bypass. Complications occurred in 10% of patients; these were more frequent bleeding and internal hernia. Mortality in the study period was 0%. The average weight loss at 12 months was 72.7%. Simplified gastric bypass surgery is safe with good mid-term results and a loss of adequate weight in 71% of cases.

  5. An experimental study of nerve bypass graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jie; LI Xue-shi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the use of a nerve "bypass" graft as a possible alternative to neurolysis or segmental resection with interposition grafting in the treatment of neuroma-in-continuity. Methods: A sciatic nerve crush injury model was established in the Sprague-Dawley rat by compression with a straight hemostatic forceps. Epineurial windows were created proximal and distal to the injury site. An 8-mm segment of radial nerve was harvested and coaptated to the sciatic nerve at the epineurial window sites proximal and distal to the compressed segment (bypass group). A sciatic nerve crush injury without bypass served as a control. Nerve conduction studies were performed over an 8-week period. Sciatic nerves were then harvested and studied under transmission electron microscopy. Myelinated axon counts were obtained. Results: Nerve conduction velocity was significantly faster in the bypass group than in the control group at 8 weeks (63.57 m/s±5.83 m/s vs. 54.88 m/s±4.79m/s, P<0.01). Myelinated axon counts in distal segments were found more in the experimental sciatic nerve than in the control sciatic nerve. Significant axonal growth was noted in the bypass nerve segment itself. Conclusion: Nerve bypass may serve to augment peripheral axonal growth while avoiding further loss of the native nerve.

  6. Increased concentrations of L-lactate in the rectal lumen in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Jørgensen, V L; Poulsen, T D

    2005-01-01

    Gut ischaemia may contribute to morbidity in patients after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), but little is known about the metabolic state of the large bowel in such patients. Therefore we estimated the concentrations of L-lactate and Pco(2) in rectal mucosa in patients undergoing cardiac surgery wi...

  7. Contribution of Ca2+-dependent conductances to membrane potential fluctuations of medullary respiratory neurons of newborn rats in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onimaru, Hiroshi; Ballanyi, Klaus; Homma, Ikuo

    2003-11-01

    Ca2+-dependent conductances were studied in respiratory interneurons in the brainstem-spinal cord preparation of newborn rats. omega-Conotoxin-GVIA attenuated evoked postsynaptic potentials, spontaneous or evoked inspiratory spinal nerve activity and blocked spike afterhyperpolarization. Furthermore, omega-conotoxin-GVIA augmented rhythmic drive potentials of pre-inspiratory and inspiratory neurons and increased respiratory-related spike frequency of pre-inspiratory cells with no effect on inspiratory hyperpolarization. In contrast, omega-agatoxin-IVA depressed drive potentials of pre-inspiratory and inspiratory neurons and attenuated inspiratory hyperpolarization and spike frequency of pre-inspiratory cells. It did not affect spike shape and exerted only minor, non-significant, attenuating effects on spontaneous or evoked nerve bursts or evoked postsynaptic potentials. Nifedipine diminished drive potentials and spike frequency of pre-inspiratory neurons and shortened drive potentials in some cells. omega-Conotoxin-MVIIC attenuated drive potentials and intraburst firing rate of pre-inspiratory neurons and decreased substantially respiratory frequency. Respiratory rhythm disappeared following combined application of omega-conotoxin-GVIA, omega-conotoxin-MVIIC, omega-agatoxin-IVA and nifedipine. Apamin potentiated drive potentials and abolished spike afterhyperpolarization, whereas charybdotoxin and tetraethylammonium prolonged spike duration without effect on shape of drive potentials. The results show that specific sets of voltage-activated L-, N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels determine the activity of particular subclasses of neonatal respiratory neurons, whereas SK- and BK-type K+ channels attenuate drive potentials and shorten spikes, respectively, independent of cell type. We hypothesize that modulation of spontaneous activity of pre-inspiratory neurons via N-, L- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels is important for respiratory rhythm or pattern generation.

  8. Beyond Exclusion: Assessing Palestinian refugees’ struggle for protection and recognition and their potential contribution to a peace settlement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Handmaker (Jeff)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAt a time of constant change in the diplomatic and political debate, Imagining a Shared Future: Perspectives on Law, Conflict and Economic Development in the Middle East contributes to the discussion and development of solutions to the stagnating economic situation in Palestine. All too

  9. Gastric bypass surgery: Improving psoriasis through a GLP-1-dependent mechanism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Annesofie; Zachariae, Claus; Skov, Lone

    2011-01-01

    bypass surgery in patients with psoriasis may result in complete remission of the disease. A substantial weight loss is achieved in the months following surgery, which is likely to reduce psoriasis symptoms and risk of comorbidities. Interestingly, however, it has been described that improvement...... of psoriasis is initiated immediately following surgery before any weight loss could have happened. We hypothesize that the glucose-lowering gut incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is responsible for this effect. The levels of GLP-1 have been shown to increase up to 20 times after gastric bypass...... surgery. This most likely contributes importantly to the acute remission of type 2 diabetes, which is often induced by gastric bypass operations. The hormone is not hypersecreted after the purely restrictive bariatric procedure gastric banding and no case reports exist on improvement in psoriasis...

  10. Potential contributions of asphalt and coal tar to black carbon quantification in urban dust, soils, and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Ligouis, B.; Werth, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) using either chemical or thermal oxidation methods are generally thought to indicate the amount of char and/or soot present in a sample. In urban environments, however, asphalt and coal-tar particles worn from pavement are ubiquitous and, because of their pyrogenic origin, could contribute to measurements of BC. Here we explored the effect of the presence of asphalt and coal-tar particles on the quantification of BC in a range of urban environmental sample types, and evaluated biases in the different methods used for quantifying BC. Samples evaluated were pavement dust, residential and commercial area soils, lake sediments from a small urban watershed, and reference materials of asphalt and coal tar. Total BC was quantified using chemical treatment through acid dichromate (Cr2O7) oxidation and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375??C (CTO-375). BC species, including soot and char/charcoal, asphalt, and coal tar, were quantified with organic petrographic analysis. Comparison of results by the two oxidation methods and organic petrography indicates that both coal tar and asphalt contribute to BC quantified by Cr2O7 oxidation, and that coal tar contributes to BC quantified by CTO-375. These results are supported by treatment of asphalt and coal-tar reference samples with Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. The reference asphalt is resistant to Cr2O7 oxidation but not to CTO-375, and the reference coal tar is resistant to both Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. These results indicate that coal tar and/or asphalt can contribute to BC measurements in samples from urban areas using Cr2O7 oxidation or CTO-375, and caution is advised when interpreting BC measurements made with these methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Potential contributions of asphalt and coal tar to black carbon quantification in urban dust, soils, and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.; Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Ligouis, B.; Werth, C.J. [University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) using either chemical or thermal oxidation methods are generally thought to indicate the amount of char and/or soot present in a sample. In urban environments, however, asphalt and coal-tar particles worn from pavement are ubiquitous and, because of their pyrogenic origin, could contribute to measurements of BC. Here we explored the effect of the presence of asphalt and coal-tar particles on the quantification of BC in a range of urban environmental sample types, and evaluated biases in the different methods used for quantifying BC. Samples evaluated were pavement dust, residential and commercial area soils, lake sediments from a small urban watershed, and reference materials of asphalt and coal tar. Total BC was quantified using chemical treatment through acid dichromate (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) oxidation and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375{sup o}C (CTO-375). BC species, including soot and char/charcoal, asphalt, and coal tar, were quantified with organic petrographic analysis. Comparison of results by the two oxidation methods and organic petrography indicates that both coal tar and asphalt contribute to BC quantified by Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxidation, and that coal tar contributes to BC quantified by CTO-375. These results are supported by treatment of asphalt and coal-tar reference samples with Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. The reference asphalt is resistant to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxidation but not to CTO-375, and the reference coal tar is resistant to both Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. These results indicate that coal tar and/or asphalt can contribute to BC measurements in samples from urban areas using Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxidation or CTO-375, and caution is advised when interpreting BC measurements made with these methods.

  12. Potential contributions of asphalt and coal tar to black carbon quantification in urban dust, soils, and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaning; Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Ligouis, Bertrand; Werth, Charles J.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) using either chemical or thermal oxidation methods are generally thought to indicate the amount of char and/or soot present in a sample. In urban environments, however, asphalt and coal-tar particles worn from pavement are ubiquitous and, because of their pyrogenic origin, could contribute to measurements of BC. Here we explored the effect of the presence of asphalt and coal-tar particles on the quantification of BC in a range of urban environmental sample types, and evaluated biases in the different methods used for quantifying BC. Samples evaluated were pavement dust, residential and commercial area soils, lake sediments from a small urban watershed, and reference materials of asphalt and coal tar. Total BC was quantified using chemical treatment through acid dichromate (Cr 2O 7) oxidation and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375 °C (CTO-375). BC species, including soot and char/charcoal, asphalt, and coal tar, were quantified with organic petrographic analysis. Comparison of results by the two oxidation methods and organic petrography indicates that both coal tar and asphalt contribute to BC quantified by Cr 2O 7 oxidation, and that coal tar contributes to BC quantified by CTO-375. These results are supported by treatment of asphalt and coal-tar reference samples with Cr 2O 7 oxidation and CTO-375. The reference asphalt is resistant to Cr 2O 7 oxidation but not to CTO-375, and the reference coal tar is resistant to both Cr 2O 7 oxidation and CTO-375. These results indicate that coal tar and/or asphalt can contribute to BC measurements in samples from urban areas using Cr 2O 7 oxidation or CTO-375, and caution is advised when interpreting BC measurements made with these methods.

  13. Error-prone replication bypass of the primary aflatoxin B1 DNA adduct, AFB1-N7-Gua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chih; Li, Liang; Makarova, Alena V; Burgers, Peter M; Stone, Michael P; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2014-06-27

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The highest rates of early onset HCCs occur in geographical regions with high aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) exposure, concomitant with hepatitis B infection. Although the carcinogenic basis of AFB1 has been ascribed to its mutagenic effects, the mutagenic property of the primary AFB1-DNA adduct, AFB1-N7-Gua, in mammalian cells has not been studied extensively. Taking advantage of the ability to create vectors containing a site-specific DNA adduct, the mutagenic potential was determined in primate cells. This adduct was highly mutagenic following replication in COS-7 cells, with a mutation frequency of 45%. The spectrum of mutations was predominantly G to T base substitutions, a result that is consistent with previous mutation data derived from aflatoxin-associated HCCs. To assess which DNA polymerases (pol) might contribute to the mutational outcome, in vitro replication studies were performed. Unexpectedly, replicative pol δ and the error-prone translesion synthesis pol ζ were able to accurately bypass AFB1-N7-Gua. In contrast, replication bypass using pol κ was shown to occur with low fidelity and could account for the commonly detected G to T transversions.

  14. Internal Maxillary Bypass for Complex Pediatric Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Lu, Shuaibin; Qian, Hai; Shi, Xiang'en

    2017-07-01

    Complex pediatric aneurysms (PAs) are an unusual clinicopathologic entity. Data regarding the use of a bypass procedure to treat complex PAs are limited. Internal maxillary artery-to-middle cerebral artery bypass with radial artery graft was used to isolate PAs. Bypass patency and aneurysm stability were evaluated using intraoperative Doppler ultrasound, indocyanine green videoangiography, and postoperative angiography. Modified Rankin Scale was used to assess neurologic function. Over a 5-year period, 7 pediatric patients (≤18 years old) were included in our analysis. Mean age of patients was 14.4 years (range, 12-18 years), and mean size of PAs was 23.6 mm (range, 9-37 mm). All cases manifested with complex characteristics. Proximal artery occlusion was performed in 3 cases, complete excision following aneurysmal distal internal maxillary artery bypass was performed in 2 cases, and combined proximal artery occlusion and aneurysm excision was performed in the 2 remaining cases. Mean intraoperative blood flow was 61.6 mL/minute (range, 40.0-90.8 mL/minute). Graft patency rate was 100% during postoperative recovery and at the last follow-up examination (mean, 20 months; range, 7-45 months). All patients had excellent outcomes except for 1 patient who died of multiple-organ failure. Internal maxillary artery bypass is an essential technique for treatment of selected cases of complex PAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Modelisation of the contribution of the Na/Ca exchanger to cell membrane potential and intracellular ion concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlouli, S; Hamdache, F; Riane, H

    2008-09-01

    Modelisation plays a significant role in the study of ion transfer through the cell membrane and in the comprehension of cellular excitability. We were interested in the selective ion transfers through the K(Ca), Na(v), Ca(v) channels and the Na/Ca exchanger (NCX). The membrane behaves like an electric circuit because of the existence of ion gradients maintained by the cell. The non-linearity of this circuit gives rise to complex oscillations of the membrane potential. By application of the finite difference method (FDM) and the concept of percolation we studied the role of the NCX in the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and the oscillations of the membrane potential. The fractal representation of the distribution of active channels allows us to follow the diffusion of intracellular Ca(2+) ions. These calculations show that the hyperpolarization and the change in the burst duration of the membrane potential are primarily due to the NCX.

  16. [The framing of transgenics in São Paulo newspapers: the potential contribution of information to political participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Danilo; Berbel, Danilo Brancalhão

    2010-06-01

    In 2007, Brazil's National Health Surveillance Agency (Anvisa) conducted an online public consultation to obtain input on its Proposed Technical Regulations for assessing the safety of transgenic food products. The article describes the context and results of a research study that identified the main ways in which the newspapers Folha de S.Paulo and O Estado de S.Paulo framed and addressed topics related to the subject matter of this consultation. Our goal was to evaluate the gamut of information available that could contribute to this form of political participation. The journalistic coverage in question was generally fragmented; 70% of articles offered incomplete views on the topics in question.

  17. Modeling Sediment Bypassing around Rocky Headlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. A.; Largier, J. L.; Pasternack, G. B.; Erikson, L. H.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Barnard, P.

    2016-12-01

    Sediment bypassing rocky headlands remains understudied despite the importance of characterizing littoral processes and sediment budgets for erosion abatement, climate change adaptation, and beach management. This study was developed to identify controlling factors on and the mechanisms supporting sediment bypassing. Sediment flux around four idealized rocky headlands was investigated using the hydrodynamic model Delft3D and spectral wave model SWAN. The experimental design involved 120 simulations to explore the influence of headland morphology, substrate composition, sediment grain size, and oceanographic forcing. Headlands represented sizes and shapes found in natural settings, grain sizes ranged from fine to medium sand, and substrates from sandy beds to offshore bedrock reefs. The oceanography included a constructed representative tide, an alongshore background current, and four wave conditions derived from observational records in the eastern Pacific Ocean. A bypassing ratio was developed for alongshore flux between upstream and downstream cross-shore transects to determine the degree of blockage by a headland. Results showed that northwesterly oblique large waves (Hs = 7 m, Tp = 16 s) generated the most flux around headlands, whereas directly incident waves blocked flux across a headland apex. The headland shape heavily influenced the sediment fate by changing the relative angle between the shoreline and the incident waves. The bypassing ratio characterized each headland's capacity to allow alongshore flux under different wave conditions. All headlands may allow flux, although larger ones block sediment more effectively, promoting their ability to be littoral cell boundaries compared to smaller headlands. The controlling factors on sediment bypassing were determined to be wave angle, shape and size of the headland, and sediment grain size. This novel numerical modeling study advances headland modeling from the generic realm to broadly applicable classes of

  18. Contribution of time-activity pattern and microenvironment to black carbon (BC) inhalation exposure and potential internal dose among elementary school children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeran; Park, Donguk

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the contributions of activities or microenvironments (MEs) to daily total exposure to and potential dose of black carbon (BC). Daily BC exposures (24-h) were monitored using a micro-aethalometer micoAeth AE51 with forty school-aged children living in an urban area in Korea from August 2015 to January 2016. The children's time-activity patterns and the MEs they visited were investigated by means of a time-activity diary (TAD) and follow-up interviews with the children and their parents. Potential inhaled dose was estimated by multiplying the airborne BC concentrations (μg/m3) we monitored for the time the children spent in a particular ME by the inhalation rate (IR, m3/h) for the time-activity performed. The contribution of activities and MEs to overall daily exposure to and potential dose of BC was quantified. Overall mean daily potential dose was equal to 24.1 ± 10.6 μg/day (range: 6.6-46.3 μg/day). The largest contribution to BC exposure and potential dose (51.9% and 41.7% respectively) occurred in the home thanks to the large amount of time spent there. Transportation was where children received the most intense exposure to (14.8%) and potential dose (20.2%) of BC, while it accounted for 7.6% of daily time. School on weekdays during the semester was responsible for 20.3% of exposure and 22.5% of potential dose. Contribution to BC exposure and potential dose was altered by several time-activity parameters, such as type of day (weekdays vs. weekends; school days vs. holidays), season, and gender. Traveling by motor vehicle and subway showed more elevated exposure or potential dose intensity on weekdays or school days, probably influenced by the increased surrounding traffic volumes on these days compared to on weekends or holidays. This study may be used to prioritize targets for minimizing children's exposure to BC and to indicate outcomes of BC control strategies.

  19. Potential Contribution of Particulate Organic Matter in the Mississippi River to Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.

    2005-05-01

    Episodic hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico has drawn attention to high levels of nitrate in the Mississippi Basin that may be fueling algal productivity in the Gulf and resulting in low levels of dissolved oxygen. However, about half the N being transported in the Mississippi River is in the form of dissolved organic matter, and if much of it is bioavailable, it may be an important contributor to hypoxia in the Gulf. Since autochthonous organic matter is probably more bioavailable than terrestrial detritus, determination of (1) the relative contributions of different sources of particulate organic matter (POM) and (2) how controls on POM sources, characteristics, and lability vary both temporally and spatially, may provide critical information about other factors contributing to hypoxia. Therefore, riverine POM samples were collected bi-weekly to monthly from 30 USGS NASQAN sites in the Mississippi River Basin from 1996-2004, and analyzed for d13C, d15N, and C:N. These samples demonstrate that there is considerable temporal and spatial variation in the composition of fine-sized POM. A four-source mixing model (plankton, fresh terrestrial plant material, macrophytes, and soil organic material) is used to differentiate general sources of POM using d13C, d15N, and C:N ratios. Average values of d13C and C:N indicate that plankton and heterotrophic bacteria account for approximately half of the POM in the Basin, with higher percentages of plankton downstream of reservoirs and lower percentages in the mainstem of the river. Temporal patterns of d13C are complex but low d13C and C:N values in spring and summer suggest the occurrence of plankton blooms, whereas relatively elevated values in fall and winter are consistent with greater proportions of decaying macrophytes and/or terrestrial material. Many sites also show seasonal trends in d15N. Although soil and macrophyte detritus have overlapping d13C and C:N values, their relative contributions can be distinguished at many

  20. Analgesic Treatment in Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This review aimed to present an overview of the randomized controlled trials investigating analgesic regimens used in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery. Literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE databases in August 2013 in accordance to PRISMA guidelines. The litera......This review aimed to present an overview of the randomized controlled trials investigating analgesic regimens used in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery. Literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE databases in August 2013 in accordance to PRISMA guidelines...

  1. Annular MHD Physics for Turbojet Energy Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of annular Hall type MHD generator/accelerator ducts for turbojet energy bypass is evaluated assuming weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges. The equations for a 1-D, axisymmetric MHD generator/accelerator are derived and numerically integrated to determine the generator/accelerator performance characteristics. The concept offers a shockless means of interacting with high speed inlet flows and potentially offers variable inlet geometry performance without the complexity of moving parts simply by varying the generator loading parameter. The cycle analysis conducted iteratively with a spike inlet and turbojet flying at M = 7 at 30 km altitude is estimated to have a positive thrust per unit mass flow of 185 N-s/kg. The turbojet allowable combustor temperature is set at an aggressive 2200 deg K. The annular MHD Hall generator/accelerator is L = 3 m in length with a B(sub r) = 5 Tesla magnetic field and a conductivity of sigma = 5 mho/m for the generator and sigma= 1.0 mho/m for the accelerator. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the generator is eta(sub sg) = 84 percent at an enthalpy extraction ratio, eta(sub Ng) = 0.63. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the accelerator is eta(sub sa) = 81 percent at an enthalpy addition ratio, eta(sub Na) = 0.62. An assessment of the ionization fraction necessary to achieve a conductivity of sigma = 1.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 1.90 X 10(exp -6), and for sigma = 5.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 9.52 X 10(exp -6).

  2. Energetic and Entropic Contributions to the Landau–de Gennes Potential for Gay–Berne Models of Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Gupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Landau–de Gennes theory provides a successful macroscopic description of nematics. Cornerstone of this theory is a phenomenological expression for the effective free energy as a function of the orientational order parameter. Here, we show how such a macroscopic Landau–de Gennes free energy can systematically be constructed for a microscopic model of liquid crystals formed by interacting mesogens. For the specific example of the Gay–Berne model, we obtain an enhanced free energy that reduces to the familiar Landau–de Gennes expression in the limit of weak ordering. By carefully separating energetic and entropic contributions to the free energy, our approach reconciles the two traditional views on the isotropic–nematic transition of Maier–Saupe and Onsager, attributing the driving mechanism to attractive interactions and entropic effects, respectively.

  3. Contribution to reviewing potentials of natural resources of the Sjenica-Pešter plateau for organizing organic sheep production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Mila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigating possibilities for organizing and developing organic production in sheep farming, in the territory of the Sjenica-Pešter plateau. The results of investigations on yield, floristic and chemical composition, as well as harmful matter, demonstrate that conditions exist for the development of organic production, in particular of organic lamb meet. On the grounds of its known characteristics, the Sjenica-Pešter Pramenka breed presents the most suitable breed for organizing organic sheep production. Organic sheep production can largely contribute to rural development and the advancement of this region. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TP 31085: Organizovanje održive proizvodnje organskog uzgoja jagnjadi kao podrška ruralnom razvoju

  4. An Approach for Assessing Consequences of Potential Supply Chain and insider Contributed Cyber Attacks on Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Tsong-Lun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Varuttamaseni, Athi [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Baek, Joo-Seok [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pepper, Susan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This paper provides an approach for developing potential attacks on I and C systems of NPPs and assessing their consequences. An important concept is that the NPPs were not designed to cope with Stuxnet-type of attacks (and any other cyber attacks). That is, the plants were only designed for design basis accidents. The safety margins and redundancies built in the design are all based on design basis accidents. They may be helpful in mitigating cyberattacks, but may not be adequate.

  5. An Approach for Assessing Consequences of Potential Supply Chain and Insider Contributed Cyber Attacks on Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Tsong-Lun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Varuttamaseni, Athi [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Baek, Joo-Seok [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pepper, Susan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This paper provides an approach for developing potential attacks on I and C systems of NPPs and assessing their consequences. An important concept is that the NPPs were not designed to cope with Stuxnet-type of attacks (and any other cyber attacks). That is, the plants were only designed for design basis accidents. The safety margins and redundancies built in the design are all based on design basis accidents. They may be helpful in mitigating cyberattacks, but may not be adequate.

  6. Variable volume combustor with an air bypass system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Ostebee, Heath Michael; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-02-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with flow of fuel and a flow of air in a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within a liner and an air bypass system position about the liner. The air bypass system variably allows a bypass portion of the flow of air to bypass the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  7. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed under § 154.532(b) has a bypass, the bypass must be of 1.0 mm (0.0394 in.) or less in diameter. Cargo Hose...

  8. The contribution of ventricular apicobasal and transmural repolarization patterns to the development of the T wave body surface potentials in frogs (Rana temporaria) and pike (Esox lucius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaykshnorayte, Marina A; Azarov, Jan E; Tsvetkova, Alena S; Vityazev, Vladimir A; Ovechkin, Alexey O; Shmakov, Dmitry N

    2011-05-01

    The study aimed at the simultaneous determination of the transmural and apicobasal differences in the repolarization timing and the comparison of the contributions of these two repolarization gradients to the development of the body surface T wave potentials in animals with the single heart ventricle (fishes and amphibians). Unipolar potentials were measured on the body surface, epicardium and in the intramural (subepicardial, Epi; midmyocardial; and subendocardial, Endo) ventricular layers of 9 pike and 8 frogs. Activation times, repolarization times and activation-recovery intervals were determined. A transmural gradient in repolarization durations in frogs (Endo>Epi, Ppike that produces a repolarization sequence from Endo to Epi (Endopike and frogs.

  9. Does chochos (L. mutabilis) production have the potential to increase farm revenues and contribute to food security if it replaces soybean or maize production in Ecuador?

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Chochos (L. mutabilis) production does not satisfy Ecuador’s demand. Therefore, this paper intends to find if chochos production have the potential to increase farmers revenue and contribute to food security if it replaces maize and soybeans, while assuming three scenarios for chochos production that influence farmers revenue. If so, how would it affect the land use change in terms of food security? A gross margin calculation with three scenarios—current, double and triple revenue—for choc...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545 Ventricular bypass (assist) device. (a) Identification. A ventricular bypass (assist) device is a device that...

  11. Obstructive and enteropathic syndromes after jejunoileal bypass surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S.

    1981-05-15

    Small bowel bypass procedures for morbid obesity have been associated with many postoperative complications. With the use of the Scott procedure, the bypassed or excluded small bowel segment has recently been the focus of 2 syndromes - 'bypass enteritis' and 'defunctioned bowel syndrome'. We describe these postoperative complications and present their significant radiologic features.

  12. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction....4430 Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return sucker...

  13. 20 CFR 631.18 - Federal by-pass authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Federal by-pass authority. 631.18 Section 631... Procedures § 631.18 Federal by-pass authority. (a) In the event that a State fails to submit a biennial State... Secretary's intent to exercise by-pass authority and an opportunity to request and to receive a...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  15. [Contribution of the EEG and evoked potentials in the prognosis of post-anoxic comas in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, D; Devaux, A M; Proust, B

    1989-12-01

    Six children with post-anoxic coma were studied and there was evidence of preserved brainstem function together with the presence of electrocerebral activity on EEG. There is no definite prognosis with slow EEG; patients can either die, survive, but with major neurological damage, or recover completely. In that case, evoked potentials have a good prognostic value. Normal BAEP indicate that patients will survive. However, absence of the cortical component of SEP indicates major cerebral damage. Evolution towards a vegetative state can therefore be predicted.

  16. [Intraluminal Aspect of Femoro-femoral Cross-over Bypass Graft Mimics Bladder Stone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonak, I; Wiedemann, A; Heppner, H J

    2016-04-01

    Iatrogenic bladder perforation with delayed diagnosis and treatment in the context of the placement of a vascular prosthesis, e.g. a femoro-femoral cross-over bypass graft, is extremely rare. This is emphasised by the present publication, which is the second published case study worldwide. To identify such a situation is very important because there is a risk of inappropriate treatment if such a bypass complication remains undetected, and the potential complications of an improperly intended "treatment of a bladder stone" may be deleterious or even lethal. Therefore, the involved disciplines should be aware of this possibility in order to initiate relevant diagnostic measures, especially diagnostic cystoscopy, without any delay if symptoms such as voiding disorders or alguria coincide with vascular bypass grafting.

  17. (Updated) NCI Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget Proposes $25 Million for Frederick National Lab | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; image by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer The additional funding requested for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) in the Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget was $25 million, or approximately 3.5 percent of the total additional funding request of $715 million. Officially called the Professional Judgment Budget, the Bypass Budget is a result of the National Cancer Act of 1971, which authorizes NCI to submit a budget directly to the president, to send to Congress. With a focus on NCI’s research priorities and areas of cancer research with potential for investment, the Bypass Budget specifies additional funding, over and above the current budget, that is needed to advance

  18. (Updated) NCI Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget Proposes $25 Million for Frederick National Lab | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; image by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer The additional funding requested for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) in the Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget was $25 million, or approximately 3.5 percent of the total additional funding request of $715 million. Officially called the Professional Judgment Budget, the Bypass Budget is a result of the National Cancer Act of 1971, which authorizes NCI to submit a budget directly to the president, to send to Congress. With a focus on NCI’s research priorities and areas of cancer research with potential for investment, the Bypass Budget specifies additional funding, over and above the current budget, that is needed to advance

  19. Redox-mediated bypass of restriction point via skipping of G1pm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene James J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that cancer cells bypass the restriction point, R, and undergo uncontrolled cell proliferation. Hypothesis and evidence We suggest here that fibrosarcoma cells enter G1ps directly from M, skipping G1pm, hence bypassing R, in response to redox modulation. Evidence is presented from the published literature that demonstrate a shortening of the cycle period of transformed fibroblasts (SV-3T3 compared to the nontransformed 3T3 fibroblasts, corresponding to the duration of G1pm in the 3T3 fibroblasts. Evidence is also presented that demonstrate that redox modulation can induce the CUA-4 fibroblasts to bypass R, resulting in a cycle period closely corresponding to the cycle period of fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080. Conclusion The evidence supports our hypothesis that a low internal redox potential can cause fibrosarcoma cells to skip the G1pm phase of the cell cycle.

  20. Greater Metacognition and Lower Fear of Negative Evaluation: Potential Factors Contributing to Improved Stigma Resistance among Individuals Diagnosed with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Ruth L; Luther, Lauren; Salyers, Michelle P; Buck, Kelly D; Lysaker, Paul H

    2017-01-01

    Stigma resistance, one's ability to block the internalization of stigma, appears to be a key domain of recovery. However, the conditions in which one is most likely to resist stigma have not been identified, and models of stigma resistance have yet to incorporate one's ability to consider the mind of others. The present study investigated the impact of the interaction between metacognition, or one's ability to form an integrated representation of oneself, others, and the world, and fear of negative evaluation on one's ability to resist stigma. Narratives of encounters with stigma shared by 41 persons with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders were first coded for spontaneous expressions of fear of negative evaluation from others. Two-step cluster analyses were then conducted in order to test the hypothesis that metacognition and fearing negative evaluation from others are important, interacting pathways which contribute to resisting stigma. Those with high (n = 11; 26.8%), intermediate (n = 9; 22.0%), and low metacognition (n = 21; 51.2%) significantly differed on stigma resistance (F = 9.49, pmetacognition group was most likely to resist stigma. Those with high and low metacognition did not express fear of negative evaluation, while those with intermediate metacognition did express fear of negative evaluation.

  1. Collybistin binds and inhibits mTORC1 signaling: a potential novel mechanism contributing to intellectual disability and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Camila Oliveira Freitas; Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Rosenberg, Carla; Kok, Fernando; Martins, Stephanie; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Sertie, Andrea Laurato

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis regulation via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway has key roles in neural development and function, and its dysregulation is involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with autism and intellectual disability. mTOR regulates assembly of the translation initiation machinery by interacting with the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF3 complex and by controlling phosphorylation of key translational regulators. Collybistin (CB), a neuron-specific Rho-GEF responsible for X-linked intellectual disability with epilepsy, also interacts with eIF3, and its binding partner gephyrin associates with mTOR. Therefore, we hypothesized that CB also binds mTOR and affects mTORC1 signaling activity in neuronal cells. Here, by using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from a male patient with a deletion of entire CB gene and from control individuals, as well as a heterologous expression system, we describe that CB physically interacts with mTOR and inhibits mTORC1 signaling pathway and protein synthesis. These findings suggest that disinhibited mTORC1 signaling may also contribute to the pathological process in patients with loss-of-function variants in CB.

  2. Preferential loss of mismatch repair function in refractory and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia: potential contribution to AML progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guogen Mao; Fenghua Yuan; Kimberly Absher; C Darrell Jennings; Dianna S Howard; Craig T Jordan; Liya Gu

    2008-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematological cancer. Despite therapeutic regimens that lead to complete remission, the vast majority of patients undergo relapse. The molecular mechanisms underlying AML development and relapse remain incompletely defined. To explore whether loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) function is involved in AML, we screened two key MMR genes, MSH2 and MLH1, for mutations and promoter hypermethylation in leukemia specimens from 53 AML patients and blood from 17 non-cancer controls. We show here that whereas no amino acid alteration or promoter hypermethylation was detected in all control samples, 18 AML patients exhibited either mutations in MMR genes or hypermethylation in the MLH1 promoter. In vitro functional MMR analysis revealed that almost all the mutations analyzed resulted in loss of MMR function. MMR defects were significantly more frequent in patients with refractory or relapsed AML compared with newly diagnosed patients. These observations suggest for the first time that the loss of MMR function is associated with refractory and relapsed AML and may contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  3. Unhealthy parenting and potential mediators as contributing factors to future intimate violence: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jonathan P; Hage, Sally M; Bush, Imelda; Burns, Lauren Key

    2006-07-01

    Efforts to understand and prevent intimate violence have often focused on the intergenerational transmission of intimate violence. Although witnessing and/or experiencing abuse in the family of origin is well supported in the literature as a key component of the intergenerational transmission of intimate violence, there has been less attention to other family-of-origin factors that contribute to or mediate and/or moderate future intimate violence. Particularly, a focus on the effect of parenting on future intimate violence is needed beyond the effect of modeling abusive behavior. In this article, corporal punishment and poor parenting are reviewed as family-of-origin factors related to future intimate violence. In addition, attachment theory, interpersonal skills, and emotional and behavioral regulation and/or conduct disorder are reviewed as variables that may result and mediate the relationship between family-of-origin factors and future intimate violence. Implications for preventing intimate violence by intervening in the family of origin are also identified.

  4. Contribution of cyclopentenone prostaglandins to the resolution of inflammation through the potentiation of apoptosis in activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, S; Castrillo, A; Alvarez, A M; Boscá, L

    2000-12-01

    Activation of the macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 with LPS and IFN-gamma induces apoptosis through the synthesis of high concentrations of NO due to the expression of NO synthase-2. In addition to NO, activated macrophages release other molecules involved in the inflammatory response, such as reactive oxygen intermediates and PGs. Treatment of macrophages with cyclopentenone PGs, which are synthesized late in the inflammatory onset, exerted a negative regulation on cell activation by impairing the expression of genes involved in host defense, among them NO synthase-2. However, despite the attenuation of NO synthesis, the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with respect to activated cells in the absence of cyclopentenone PGs. Analysis of the mechanisms by which these PGs enhanced apoptosis suggested a potentiation of superoxide anion synthesis that reacted with NO, leading to the formation of higher concentrations of peroxynitrite, a more reactive and proapoptotic molecule than the precursors. The effect of the cyclopentenone 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) on superoxide synthesis was dependent on p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, but was independent of the interaction with peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma. The potentiation of apoptosis induced by cyclopentenone PGs involved an increase in the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and in the nitration of this protein. These results suggest a role for cyclopentenone PGs in the resolution of inflammation by inducing apoptosis of activated cells.

  5. Training in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Tips and Tricks of the Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Giuseppe Maria; Malvindi, Pietro Giorgio; Kowalewski, Mariusz; Sansone, Fabrizio; Menicanti, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass is often the first procedure cardiac surgeons are confronted with during their residencies. This article discusses the surgical steps and the potential difficulties encountered during this procedure and how they can be solved. The "point of view" of an experienced surgeon is provided to the trainees and to the readers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bypassing BDD Construction for Reliability Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Poul Frederick; Nikolskaia, Macha; Rauzy, Antoine

    2000-01-01

    In this note, we propose a Boolean Expression Diagram (BED)-based algorithm to compute the minimal p-cuts of boolean reliability models such as fault trees. BEDs make it possible to bypass the Binary Decision Diagram (BDD) construction, which is the main cost of fault tree assessment....

  7. Robotically-Assisted Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry A. Folliguet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Robotic surgery enables to perform coronary surgery totally endoscopically. This report describes our experience using the da Vinci system for coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods. Patients requiring single-or-double vessel revascularization were eligible. The procedure was performed without cardiopulmonary bypass on a beating heart. Results. From April 2004 to May 2008, fifty-six patients were enrolled in the study. Twenty-four patients underwent robotic harvesting of the mammary conduit followed by minimal invasive direct coronary artery bypass (MIDCAB, and twenty-three patients had a totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass (TECAB grafting. Nine patients (16% were converted to open techniques. The mean total operating time for TECAB was 372±104 minutes and for MIDCAB was 220±69 minutes. Followup was complete for all patients up to one year. There was one hospital death following MIDCAB and two deaths at follow up. Forty-eight patients had an angiogram or CT scan revealing occlusion or anastomotic stenoses (>50% in 6 patients. Overall permeability was 92%. Conclusions. Robotic surgery can be performed with promising results.

  8. Intraoperative arteriography during femoral-popliteal bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, J E; Bekassy, S M; DeBakey, M E

    1975-07-01

    Minor technical errors may jeopardize the patency of femoral-popliteal bypass grafts. In an attempt to detect such errors, intraoperative arteriography has been routinely employed. It allows immediate recognition and correction of the most common abnormal findings: intraluminal debris, intimal dissection, distal thrombosis, arterial spasm, and kinking of the graft.

  9. Cephalic veins in coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, P; Jakobsen, Erik; Lerbjerg, G

    1996-01-01

    Various alternative conduits for aortocoronary bypass grafting have been suggested when the saphenous vein quality is inadequate. During a 10-year period we have used the cephalic vein in 39 patients. Eighteen entered an angiographic follow-up study. A total of 31 arm vein grafts were used with 4...

  10. Planetary science: Bypassing the habitable zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2017-08-01

    In our own solar system, Venus is too hot, Mars is too cold and Earth is just right. Simulations show that making an icy planet habitable is not as simple as melting its ice: many icy bodies swing from too cold to too hot, bypassing just right.

  11. Gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Patrick H; Kang, Young S; Cahill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Gastric infarction is an extremely rare occurrence owing to the stomach’s extensive vascular supply. We report an unusual case of gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery. We describe the imaging findings and discuss possible causes of this condition. PMID:27200168

  12. Cephalic veins in coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, P; Jakobsen, Erik; Lerbjerg, G;

    1996-01-01

    Various alternative conduits for aortocoronary bypass grafting have been suggested when the saphenous vein quality is inadequate. During a 10-year period we have used the cephalic vein in 39 patients. Eighteen entered an angiographic follow-up study. A total of 31 arm vein grafts were used with 4...

  13. Typology of potential high contribution areas in the sediment budget in the Upper Guil Catchment (Queyras, French Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissak, Candide; Fort, Monique; Fassetta, Gilles Arnaud; Viel, Vincent; Carlier, Benoit

    2015-04-01

    In mountainous areas, especially in large river catchments with torrential tributaries, the production and sediment transport significantly increase flood impacts in the valley bottoms. For a better understanding of Alpine river catchments considered as complex systems, we focused our research on the Guil River catchment (Queyras, Southern French Alps - 317km²). This catchment is prone to catastrophic summer floods (June 1957 (> R.I. 100 yr), June 2000 (R.I. 30 yr)...) characterized by considerable sediment transport from tributaries to downvalley, very much facilitated by strong hillslope-channel connectivity (≈12,000 m3 volume of sediment aggraded during the June 2000 flood event). During the last flood events, several infrastructures and buildings were seriously damaged. Most of them were located at confluences and, at specific reaches such as canyon reaches constrained by infrastructures. For risk mitigation some protection equipments were built after the 1957 event, but most of them are now poorly maintained and might be less effective in case of flood event. In the frame of SAMCO (ANR 12 SENV-0004) project designed for mountain hazard mitigation in a context of Climate Change, one objective is to understand the hydro-geomorphological functioning of Alpine catchments for a sustainable management of sediment yield, transfer and deposition. Part of our study is aimed at a better assessment of sediment transfers, especially on adjacent sediment supply (i.e. from hillslope to channel, and from tributaries to the trunk river) for a better management of sediment fluxes in the frame of the local "River Scheme". For this reason, we decided to establish a sediment budget of the Guil River catchment, with a quantitative assessment and a spatial analysis of erosion, transport, and deposition processes. The initial phase of our study consists in identifying contributive, erosion and deposition areas with a twofold approach: (i) assessment of longitudinal sedimentary

  14. Extrahepatic sources of factor VIII potentially contribute to the coagulation cascade correcting the bleeding phenotype of mice with hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolini, Diego; Merlin, Simone; Feola, Maria; Ranaldo, Gabriella; Amoruso, Angela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zaffaroni, Mauro; Ferrero, Alessandro; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Valente, Guido; Gupta, Sanjeev; Prat, Maria; Follenzi, Antonia

    2015-07-01

    A large fraction of factor VIII in blood originates from liver sinusoidal endothelial cells although extrahepatic sources also contribute to plasma factor VIII levels. Identification of cell-types other than endothelial cells with the capacity to synthesize and release factor VIII will be helpful for therapeutic approaches in hemophilia A. Recent cell therapy and bone marrow transplantation studies indicated that Küpffer cells, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells could synthesize factor VIII in sufficient amount to ameliorate the bleeding phenotype in hemophilic mice. To further establish the role of blood cells in expressing factor VIII, we studied various types of mouse and human hematopoietic cells. We identified factor VIII in cells isolated from peripheral and cord blood, as well as bone marrow. Co-staining for cell type-specific markers verified that factor VIII was expressed in monocytes, macrophages and megakaryocytes. We additionally verified that factor VIII was expressed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and endothelial cells elsewhere, e.g., in the spleen, lungs and kidneys. Factor VIII was well expressed in sinusoidal endothelial cells and Küpffer cells isolated from human liver, whereas by comparison isolated human hepatocytes expressed factor VIII at very low levels. After transplantation of CD34(+) human cord blood cells into NOD/SCIDγNull-hemophilia A mice, fluorescence activated cell sorting of peripheral blood showed >40% donor cells engrafted in the majority of mice. In these animals, plasma factor VIII activity 12 weeks after cell transplantation was up to 5% and nine of 12 mice survived after a tail clip-assay. In conclusion, hematopoietic cells, in addition to endothelial cells, express and secrete factor VIII: this information should offer further opportunities for understanding mechanisms of factor VIII synthesis and replenishment.

  15. The potential contribution of marital-cohabitation status to racial, ethnic, and nativity differentials in birth outcomes in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kate; Raley, R Kelly; Hummer, Robert A; Schiefelbein, Emily

    2012-05-01

    Disparities in infant mortality by race/ethnicity and nativity are widely known. Patterns of marriage and union formation also vary by race, ethnicity and nativity and may contribute to disparities in birth outcomes. Using population level data, we build on previous research of race/ethnic disparities in birth outcomes by investigating the role of union status. Data come from the 2006 Birth Record from Texas Vital Statistics. The final sample size included 369,839 births to Texas women aged 18 and older. Birth outcomes were constructed from indicators of low birth weight and preterm birth. Logistic regression estimates odds of low birth weight and preterm birth by race/ethnicity and nativity and union status. Race/ethnicity/nativity and union status are significant and independent predictors of birth outcomes. US born Black and Mexican Origin mothers had higher odds of preterm birth and low birth weight babies compared to US born White mothers. Unmarried mothers had higher odds of adverse birth outcomes compared to married women. There was only modest support that the association between race/ethnicity/nativity status and birth outcomes could be explained by divergent patterns in union status. Though disparities in birth outcomes are persistent across race, ethnicity and nativity, the results suggest that union status at birth is a very weak factor in accounting for these disparities. Differing patterns in union status did not account for the Black-White and Mexican Origin-White gaps in infant health outcomes. Additional research aimed at uncovering the processes that put these mothers and infants at higher risk is needed.

  16. General practitioners' views of pharmacists' current and potential contributions to medication review and prescribing in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatah E

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Internationally, non-medical practitioners are increasingly involved in tasks traditionally undertaken by general practitioners (GPs, such as medication review and prescribing. This study aims to evaluate GPs' perceptions of pharmacists' contributions to those services. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were carried out in two localities with GPs whose patients had and had not undergone a pharmacist-led adherence support Medication Use Review (MUR. GPs were asked their opinions of pharmacists' provision of MUR, clinical medication review and prescribing. Data were analysed thematically using NVivo 8 and grouped by strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT category. FINDINGS: Eighteen GPs were interviewed. GPs mentioned their own skills, training and knowledge of clinical conditions. These were considered GPs' major strengths. GPs' perceived weaknesses were their time constraints and heavy workloads. GPs thought pharmacists' strengths were their knowledge of pharmacology and having more time for in-depth medication review than GPs. Nevertheless, GPs felt pharmacist-led medication reviews might confuse patients, and increase GP workloads. GPs were concerned that pharmacist prescribing might include pharmacists making a diagnosis. This is not the proposed model for New Zealand. In general, GPs were more accepting of pharmacists providing medication reviews than of pharmacist prescribing, unless appropriate controls, close collaboration and co-location of services took place. CONCLUSION: GPs perceived their own skills were well suited to reviewing medication and prescribing, but thought pharmacists might also have strengths and skills in these areas. In future, GPs thought that working together with pharmacists in these services might be possible in a collaborative setting.

  17. Dayside and nightside contributions to the cross polar cap potential: placing an upper limit on a viscous-like interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations of changes in size of the ionospheric polar cap allow the dayside and nightside reconnection rates to be quantified. From these it is straightforward to estimate the rate of antisunward transport of magnetic flux across the polar regions, quantified by the cross polar cap potential ΦPC. When correlated with upstream measurements of the north-south component of the IMF, ΦPC is found to increase for more negative Bz, as expected. However, we also find that ΦPC does not, on average, decrease to zero, even for strongly northward IMF. In the past this has been interpreted as evidence for a viscous interaction between the magnetosheath flow and the outer boundaries of the magnetosphere. In contrast, we show that this is the consequence of flows excited by tail reconnection, which is inherently uncorrelated with IMF Bz.

  18. [Visual evoked potentials and the E-UFA test. Laboratory contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, A; Caputo, D; Vanzulli, F; Zibetti, A

    1979-09-29

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and electrophoretic mobility test of erythrocytes (E-UFA test) were compared in 50 multiple sclerosis (M.S.) patients as diagnostic tests. Abnormal VEPs were recorded in 35 patients. E-UFA test was found positive in 31 cases. With respect to Mc Alpine diagnostic criteria, 26 out of 33 definite M.S., 6 out of 9 probable M.S. and 3 out of 8 possible M.S. cases had abnormal VEPs. A positive response in E-UFA test was observed rispectively in 16, 8, 7 patients. Complessively 48 cases (96%) had an abnormal response to the one and/or to the other of the two tests, which apper complementar in early diagnosis of M.S.

  19. The Staphylococcus aureus NuoL-like protein MpsA contributes to the generation of membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Sonja; Steffen, Wojtek; Steuber, Julia; Götz, Friedrich

    2015-03-01

    In aerobic microorganisms, the entry point of respiratory electron transfer is represented by the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase. The enzyme couples the oxidation of NADH with the reduction of quinone. In the type 1 NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Ndh1), this reaction is accompanied by the translocation of cations, such as H(+) or Na(+). In Escherichia coli, cation translocation is accomplished by the subunit NuoL, thus generating membrane potential (Δψ). Some microorganisms achieve NADH oxidation by the alternative, nonelectrogenic type 2 NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Ndh2), which is not cation translocating. Since these enzymes had not been described in Staphylococcus aureus, the goal of this study was to identify proteins operating in the NADH:quinone segment of its respiratory chain. We demonstrated that Ndh2 represents a NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in S. aureus. Additionally, we identified a hypothetical protein in S. aureus showing sequence similarity to the proton-translocating subunit NuoL of complex I in E. coli: the NuoL-like protein MpsA. Mutants with deletion of the nuoL-like gene mpsA and its corresponding operon, mpsABC (mps for membrane potential-generating system), exhibited a small-colony-variant-like phenotype and were severely affected in Δψ and oxygen consumption rates. The MpsABC proteins did not confer NADH oxidation activity. Using an Na(+)/H(+) antiporter-deficient E. coli strain, we could show that MpsABC constitute a cation-translocating system capable of Na(+) transport. Our study demonstrates that MpsABC represent an important functional system of the respiratory chain of S. aureus that acts as an electrogenic unit responsible for the generation of Δψ.

  20. Post-Bypass Extensive Ascites due to Splanchnic Bypass and the Effectiveness of Hyperalimentation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Temizkan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Reperfusion edema may develop in the early periods of chronic ischemic tissue reperfusion. Reperfusion edema may be represented after the splanchnic bypass with ascites, abdominal distension, and liver and kidney function impairment. In this article, we are reporting the hyperalimentation treatment and its results for the common ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, after a coeliac and superior mesenteric artery bypass. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(2.000: 124-128

  1. Audiometric changes after coronary artery bypass graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorsandi M T

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing is one of the most significant senses; There fore, any defect can be frightening. The incidence of sever hearing loss following coronary artery bypass surgery has been estimated as one per thousand. This Prospective study carried out to determine hearing effects of coronary artery bypass surgery."nMethods: age, audiometric changes before and after surgery (hearing levels at multiple frequencies, speech reception threshold and speech discrimination score, minimum blood pressure during the operation, and the time on bypass, measured on One hundred consecutive patients who candidate for coronary artery bypass surgery and the results analysed."nResults: One hundred patients completed the tests. Based on hearing changes found on pre- and post-operative tests, the patients were divided into 3 groups: Those with no change (47 patients according to their audiometric results; those with slight changes ≤10 db (43 patients; and those having average deficits of more than 10 db (10 patients. All the patients were male. None of the patients had complete or severe sensorineural hearing loss. The third group had more prolonged pumping duration when compared with the others groups (p=0.002. Furthermore, 90 percent of patients with a sensorineural hearing loss more than 10 db had diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia as risk factors."nConclusion: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a sequela in patients who undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery; however, it was usually mild and asymptomatic. Pumping time during the operation is a significant factor in occurring of this complication. With proper treatment of underlying diseases and eliminating the risk factors with improvement of our cardiopulmonary pumps we probably can get better hearing results.

  2. An appraisal of the current and potential value of web 2.0 contributions to continuing education in oral implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, M; Engelke, W; Helms, H-J; Bleckmann, A

    2012-08-01

    To systematically assess the informational value, quality, intention, source and bias of web 2.0 footage whose aim is peer-to-peer education about oral implantology. YouTube (http://www.youtube.com) was scanned on 15 October 2010 for oral implantology-related videos using an adequately pre-defined search query. Search results were filtered with the system-generated category 'education' and the additional criterion 'most viewed'. Only those videos with at least 1000 views were included (total 124, of which 27 were excluded because they were not related to implantology). Filtered videos were discussed and rated with particular regard to the educational needs of potential groups of addressees [(i) undergraduates and laymen, (ii) dentists without or currently undergoing a specialisation in oral implantology and (iii) dentists who have completed a specialisation in the field of oral implantology] by a jury consisting of (i) an accredited post-graduate university instructor with 22 years of professional teaching experience in the field of implantology, (ii) a university lecturer in dentistry/orthodontics with 10 years teaching experience and (iii) a university haematologist/oncologist. They were required to fill out a questionnaire for each video. The data were statistically analysed using non-parametric ANOVA (α = 5%) and a sign test (α = 0.05/3 = 0.017). The YouTube scan produced 1710 results in the category 'EDU'. The analysis revealed that there is a wide range of instructional footage on this topic, but with highly variable range in quality and informational value. Footage intention was to large proportions (47.4%) a mixture of education and advertisement. Its usefulness differed significantly for the three groups of addressees, offering greater novelty to undergraduates and post-graduates. YouTube and similar social media websites may have a potential capacity and value in complementing continuing education in the technique of oral implantology. As a means of

  3. Modeling cumulative effects in life cycle assessment: the case of fertilizer in wheat production contributing to the global warming potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laratte, Bertrand; Guillaume, Bertrand; Kim, Junbeum; Birregah, Babiga

    2014-05-15

    This paper aims at presenting a dynamic indicator for life cycle assessment (LCA) measuring cumulative impacts over time of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fertilizers used for wheat cultivation and production. Our approach offers a dynamic indicator of global warming potential (GWP), one of the most used indicator of environmental impacts (e.g. in the Kyoto Protocol). For a case study, the wheat production in France was selected and considered by using data from official sources about fertilizer consumption and production of wheat. We propose to assess GWP environmental impact based on LCA method. The system boundary is limited to the fertilizer production for 1 ton of wheat produced (functional unit) from 1910 to 2010. As applied to wheat production in France, traditional LCA shows a maximum GWP impact of 500 kg CO2-eq for 1 ton of wheat production, whereas the GWP impact of wheat production over time with our approach to dynamic LCA and its cumulative effects increases to 18,000 kg CO2-eq for 1 ton of wheat production. In this paper, only one substance and one impact assessment indicator are presented. However, the methodology can be generalized and improved by using different substances and indicators.

  4. Molecular-based isothermal tests for field diagnosis of malaria and their potential contribution to malaria elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriero, Eniyou C; Jacobs, Jan; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Nwakanma, Davis; D'Alessandro, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    In countries where malaria transmission has decreased substantially, thanks to the scale-up of control interventions, malaria elimination may be feasible. Nevertheless, this goal requires new strategies such as the active detection and treatment of infected individuals. As the detection threshold for the currently used diagnostic methods is 100 parasites/μL, most low-density, asymptomatic infections able to maintain transmission cannot be detected. Identifying them by molecular methods such as PCR is a possible option but the field deployment of these tests is problematic. Isothermal amplification of nucleic acids (at a constant temperature) offers the opportunity of addressing some of the challenges related to the field deployment of molecular diagnostic methods. One of the novel isothermal amplification methods for which a substantial amount of work has been done is the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay. The present review describes LAMP and several other isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods, such as thermophilic helicase-dependent amplification, strand displacement amplification, recombinase polymerase amplification and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, and explores their potential use as high-throughput, field-based molecular tests for malaria diagnosis.

  5. Contributions to the knowledge and capitalization of spa potential for tourism: Băile Buziaș resort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRINA CÎRCIUMARU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Romania is a country that has rich spa resources that consist of natural healing factors, scattered over the entire country: mineral and thermal waters, mud and therapeutic gases, lakes and therapeutic salt. Spa tourism resources generated since antiquity the oldest and most characteristic form of tourism in Romania - health tourism. Spa sector is one of the six elements (called health and wellness within the national touristic brand. Băile Buziaş is one of the oldest spa in Romania, known in Roman times as the Centum Putei [4]. Due to favorable natural conditions, with rich mineral springs and a mild climate, Buziaş may be the "spa pearl" of Banat, framing the resort in a strategy to exploit the spa potential, which is a necessity that needs to be solved rapidly. Strategy construction is realized using strategic questions: What are our resources? How can we improve the spa resort? How can we develop a spa product? What are the promotion techniques of this product on the Romania’ resort market and abroad?

  6. Dayside and nightside contributions to cross-polar cap potential variations: the 20 March 2001 ICME case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Andalsvik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the association between temporal-spatial structure of polar cap convection and auroral electrojet intensifications during a 5-h-long interval of strong forcing of the magnetosphere by an ICME/Magnetic cloud on 20 March 2001. We use data from coordinated ground-satellite observations in the 15:00–20:00 MLT sector. We take advantage of the good latitudinal coverage in the polar cap and in the auroral zone of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard – Scandinavia – Russia and the stable magnetic field conditions in ICMEs. The electrojet events are characterized by a sequence of 10 min-long AL excursions to −1000/−1500 nT followed by poleward expansions and auroral streamers. These events are superimposed on a high disturbance level when the AL index remains around −500 nT for several hours. These signatures are different from those appearing in classical substorms, most notably the absence of a complete recovery phase when AL usually reaches above −100 nT. We concentrate on polar cap convection in both hemispheres (DMSP F13 data in relation to the ICME By conditions, electrojet intensifications, and the global UV auroral configuration obtained from the IMAGE spacecraft. The temporal evolution of convection properties such as the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP drop and flow channels at the dawn/dusk polar cap (PC boundaries around the time of the electrojet events are investigated. This approach allows us to distinguish between dayside (magnetopause reconnection and nightside (magnetotail reconnection sources of the PC convection events within the context of the expanding-contracting model of high-latitude convection in the Dungey cycle. Inter-hemispheric symmetries/asymmetries in the presence of newly-discovered convection channels at the dawn or dusk side PC boundaries are determined.

  7. Risk factors for vulnerable youth in urban townships in South Africa: The potential contribution of reactive attachment disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Rachel; Rochat, Tamsen J; Tomlinson, Mark; Minnis, Helen

    2013-12-01

    Reactive attachment disorder (RAD) is a psychiatric disorder developing in early or middle childhood as a consequence of significant failures in the caregiving environment. RAD results in children failing to relate socially, either by exhibiting markedly inhibited behaviour or by indiscriminate social behaviour and is associated with significant socio-behavioural problems in the longer term. This study examined RAD in South Africa, a setting with high environmental risks. We recruited a sub-sample of 40 10-year-old children from a cohort enrolled during pregnancy for whom early attachment status was known. Children were purposefully selected to represent the four attachment categories using the data available on the strange situation procedure (SSP) at 18 months. The Manchester Child Attachment Story Task (MCAST) assessed current attachment and RAD was diagnosed using a standardised assessment package. A high proportion of the children (5/40% or 12.5%) fulfilled diagnostic criteria for RAD; all were boys and were displaying the disinhibited type. SSP classification at 18 months was not significantly associated with RAD symptoms at age of 10 years, while current MCAST classifications were. This suggests that children in this sample are at much higher risk of RAD than in high-income populations, and despite a fairly typical attachment distribution in this population at 18 months, RAD was evidenced in later childhood and associated with current attachment disorganisation. The strengths of this research include its longitudinal nature and use of diagnostic assessments. Given increasing evidence that RAD is relatively stable over time and introduces longer term socio-behavioural risks; the high rate of RAD in this sample (12.5%) highlights potential developmental threats to children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Our results should be interpreted with caution given sample size and risk of selection bias. Further research is needed to confirm these findings.

  8. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering Enhancements of Lunar Regolith Erosion: The Contribution of the Heavy Multicharged (Minority) Solar Wind Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    We report preliminary results for H+, Ar+1, Ar+6 and Ar+9 ion sputtering of JSC-1A lunar regolith simulant at solar wind velocities, obtain ed at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility using quadrupole ma ss spectrometry. The multi-charged Ar ions were used as proxies for i ntermediate mass solar wind multicharged ions. Prior to the Ar beam e xposures, the sample was exposed to high fluence H+ irradiation to si mulate H-loading due to the dominant solar wind constituent. A x80 en hancement of oxygen sputtering by Ar+ over same velocity H+ was measu red and an additional x2 increase for Ar+9 over same velocity Ar+ was demonstrated, giving clear evidence of the importance of potential s puttering by multicharged ions. This enhancement was observed to pers ist to the maximum fluences investigated (approx 10(exp 16)/sq cm). As discussed in a companion abstract by N. Barghouty, such persistent s puttering enhancement has significant implications on weathering and aging of lunar regolith. In addition, XPS measurements showed strong evidence of Fe reduction for those target areas that had been exposed to high fluence Ar+ and Ar+8 beams. Preferential oxidation of the Fe -reduced beam-exposed regions during transfer to the XPS system led t o enhanced O concentrations in those regions as well. On the basis of these very promising preliminary results, a NASA-LASER project on mo re extensive measurements was recently selected for funding. The prop osal expands the collaboration with NASA-MSFC for the simulation effort, and adds a new collaboration with NASA-GSFC for lunar mission-rele vant measurements.

  9. Examining the potential contribution of social theory to developing and supporting Australian Indigenous-mainstream health service partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Emma; Taylor, Kate P; Durey, Angela; Bessarab, Dawn; Thompson, Sandra C

    2014-09-20

    The substantial gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians has been slow to improve, despite increased dedicated funding. Partnerships between Australian Indigenous and mainstream Western biomedical organisations are recognised as crucial to improved Indigenous health outcomes. However, these partnerships often experience challenges, particularly in the context of Australia's race and political relations. We examined the relevant literature in order to identify the potential role for social theory and theoretical models in developing and maintaining intercultural partnerships. Having identified relevant theoretical models, terms and possible key words, a range of databases were searched and relevant articles selected for inclusion. An integrative approach brought together theoretical models and practical considerations about working in partnership, to inform our analysis of the literature. Considering partnerships between Australian Indigenous and mainstream health organisations as 'bi-cultural' is simplistic: rather they are culturally diverse across social and professional levels. As such, partnerships between Australian Indigenous and mainstream health organisations may be better conceptualised as 'intercultural', operating across diverse and shifting cultural frames of reference. Theories identified by this review as useful to guide partnerships include power relations, reflexivity and dialogue, borders and strangeness and the intercultural or third space. This paper examines how these theoretical approaches can develop understanding and improve intercultural engagement between mainstream and Australian Indigenous partners in healthcare. Rather than viewing partnerships merely as arrangements between disembodied entities, sometimes contractual in nature, they are better seen as activities between people and organisations and essentially dependent on relationships, occurring in an intercultural space that is complex, dynamic and

  10. EFFECTS OF GRAPHITE SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON BYPASS FLOW COMPUTATIONS FOR AN HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich Johnson; Yu-Hsin Tung; Hiroyuki Sato

    2011-07-01

    Bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) occurs between graphite blocks as they sit side by side in the core. Bypass flow is not intentionally designed to occur in the reactor, but is present because of tolerances in manufacture, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. It is desired to increase the knowledge of the effects of such flow, which has been estimated to be as much as 20% of the total helium coolant flow. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can provide estimates of the scale and impacts of bypass flow. Previous CFD calculations have examined the effects of bypass gap width, level and distribution of heat generation and effects of shrinkage. The present contribution examines the effects of graphite surface roughness on the bypass flow for different relative roughness factors on three gap widths. Such calculations should be validated using specific bypass flow measurements. While such experiments are currently underway for the specific reference prismatic HTGR design for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) program of the U. S. Dept. of Energy, the data are not yet available. To enhance confidence in the present calculations, wall shear stress and heat transfer results for several turbulence models and their associated wall treatments are first compared for flow in a single tube that is representative of a coolant channel in the prismatic HTGR core. The results are compared to published correlations for wall shear stress and Nusselt number in turbulent pipe flow. Turbulence models that perform well are then used to make bypass flow calculations in a symmetric onetwelfth sector of a prismatic block that includes bypass flow. The comparison of shear stress and Nusselt number results with published correlations constitutes a partial validation of the CFD model. Calculations are also compared to ones made previously using a different CFD code. Results indicate that

  11. Contribution of water-soluble and insoluble components and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the reactive oxygen species-generating potential of fine ambient aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vishal; Rico-Martinez, Roberto; Kotra, Neel; King, Laura; Liu, Jiumeng; Snell, Terry W; Weber, Rodney J

    2012-10-16

    Relative contributions of water- and methanol-soluble compounds and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the ROS (reactive oxygen species)-generating potential of ambient fine aerosols (D(p) Hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions were then subsequently segregated via a C-18 solid phase extraction column. The DTT assay response was significantly higher for the methanol extract, and for both extracts a substantial fraction of PM oxidative potential was associated with the hydrophobic compounds as evident from a substantial attenuation in DTT response after passing PM extracts through the C-18 column (64% for water and 83% for methanol extract; both median values). The DTT activities of water and methanol extracts were correlated with the water-soluble (R = 0.86) and water-insoluble organic carbon (R = 0.94) contents of the PM, respectively. Brown carbon (BrC), which predominantly represents the hydrophobic organic fraction (referred to as humic-like substances, HULIS), was also correlated with DTT activity in both the water (R = 0.78) and methanol extracts (R = 0.83). Oxidative potential was not correlated with any metals measured in the extracts. These findings suggest that the hydrophobic components of both water-soluble and insoluble organic aerosols substantially contribute to the oxidative properties of ambient PM. Further investigation of these hydrophobic organic compounds could help identify sources of a significant fraction of ambient aerosol toxicity.

  12. Intellectual and non-intellectual determinants of high academic achievement – the contribution of personality traits to the assessment of high performance potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Schubhart

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a study is presented which tries to explain and predict high academic achievement in children or adolescents on the basis of intellectual and non-intellectual determinants – in this case, performance relevant personality traits as well as the social environment of stimulation. The prognosis of high academic achievement is based on a new diagnostic model, the Viennese Diagnostic Model of High Achievement Potential, which undergoes its first empirical validation here. The results show impressive evidence that performance-relevant personality traits and categories of social environment of stimulation contribute to high academic achievement in children and adolescents of above-average intelligence.

  13. Mechanisms by which Human Cells Bypass Damaged Bases during DNA Replication after Ultraviolet Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Cleaver

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The replication of damaged DNA involves cascading mechanisms of increasing complexity but decreasing accuracy. The most accurate mechanism uses low-fidelity DNA polymerases, Pol H and Pol I, which have active sites sufficiently large to accommodate a pyrimidine dimer. Replicative bypass of DNA damage by these polymerases produces an accurately replicated, newly synthesized strand. Pol H negative cells (XP-V cell lines either adopt a proposed secondary bypass mechanism or a recombinational mode. The mechanism of the secondary bypass is unclear, but a number of experiments suggests roles for excision repair to remove damage ahead of replication forks, hRad6/18 proteolysis to clear the blocked forks, and the Rad17-RFC and 9-1-1 complexes to establish a new replication apparatus. This alternative pathway requires functional p53. In Pol H negative cells in which p53 is also inactive, the arrested fork fragments into DNA double strand breaks. Foci containing PCNA, Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1, and gamma-H2Ax can then be detected, along with chromosomal rearrangement and high frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges. The recruitment of recombination components to the arrested forks represents the ultimate failure of replication machinery to relieve the arrested state and bypass the damage. The resulting chromosomal instability in surviving cells will contribute to malignant transformation.

  14. Patient Directed Perfusion Pressure on Bypass, an Analogy from Electrical Engineering—A New Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Richard; Poole, Robert; Palmer, Kenneth; Johnson, Ian; Poullis, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Organ ischemia, particularly mesenteric and renal, can occur despite a seemingly adequate perfusion flow and pressure during a period of cardiopulmonary bypass. The blood pressure to run bypass at remains a contentious issue. We present the concept that perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass should be patient specific, depending on an individual’s resting pre-procedural blood pressure. Four simulated arterial traces with variable morphology, but identical systolic and diastolic blood pressures, were analyzed to calculate the medical mean, arithmetic mean, and root mean square of the blood pressure tracing. Using the standard medical formula for calculation of mean blood pressure, you can potentially underestimate perfusion pressure by 12 mmHg in a normotensive subject. The root mean square pressure calculates the equivalent non pulsatile pressure that will deliver the same hydraulic power to the circulation as its pulsatile equivalent. Patient specific perfusion pressures, calculated via root mean square may potentially help reduce the incidence of organ ischemia during cardiopulmonary bypass. Clinical trials are needed to confirm or refute this concept. PMID:20437793

  15. Patient directed perfusion pressure on bypass, an analogy from electrical engineering--a new concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Richard; Poole, Robert; Palmer, Kenneth; Johnson, Ian; Poullis, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Organ ischemia, particularly mesenteric and renal, can occur despite a seemingly adequate perfusion flow and pressure during a period of cardiopulmonary bypass. The blood pressure to run bypass at remains a contentious issue. We present the concept that perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass should be patient specific, depending on an individual's resting pre-procedural blood pressure. Four simulated arterial traces with variable morphology, but identical systolic and diastolic blood pressures, were analyzed to calculate the medical mean, arithmetic mean, and root mean square of the blood pressure tracing. Using the standard medical formula for calculation of mean blood pressure, you can potentially underestimate perfusion pressure by 12 mmHg in a normotensive subject. The root mean square pressure calculates the equivalent non pulsatile pressure that will deliver the same hydraulic power to the circulation as its pulsatile equivalent. Patient specific perfusion pressures, calculated via root mean square may potentially help reduce the incidence of organ ischemia during cardiopulmonary bypass. Clinical trials are needed to confirm or refute this concept.

  16. Bypass systems for shared outlets. Bypass-systemen voor gemeenschappelijke afvoersystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkhof, W.; Huijzer, E.L.; Beltman, H.A.

    1993-05-01

    In stacked buildings large pressure differences can occur when appliances with individual air supply pipes are connected to a communal outlet. This can be prevented by using a so-called bypass system, which couples the air supply pipe directly to the combustion gases outlet. In case of overpressure on the air supply of an appliance, air will be transported to the combustion gases outlet around the appliance. Descriptions are given of two GASTEC-developed indoor systems: a mechanical bypass system and an aerodynamic bypass system. The aerodynamic system has been optimized for a retrofitting boiler project in Assen, Netherlands. In this project a communal heating system has been replaced by individual central heating boilers. The appliance used was a high-efficiency boiler, the NEFIT Turbo 21. The disadvantage of the mechanical bypass system is one of the moving parts: the valve, which is too sensitive for pollution and failures. Large pressure difference reductions are possible by means of the aerodynamic bypass system. Recirculation can be prevented by high-speed injection of the combustion gases in the combustion gases outlet. 13 figs., 26 tabs., 2 appendices, 2 refs.

  17. Coronary artery bypass grafting for Kawasaki disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hong-wei; CHANG Qian; XU Jian-ping; SONG Yun-hu; SUN Han-song; HU Sheng-shou

    2010-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is the leading cause of pediatric ischemic heart disease. The incidence of serious coronary sequelae is low and about 2%-3% of patients with KD, but once myocardial infarction occurs in children, the mortality is quite high and 22% at the first infarction.This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with KD.Methods Eight patients with a history of KD underwent CABG between October 1997 and July 2005. The number of bypass grafts placed was 2 to 4 per patient (mean 2.5±0.8). Various bypass grafts were used in patients, i.e. the left internal mammary artery (LIMA) in 3 patients, bilateral internal mammary artery (IMA) in 2 patients, LIMA plus gastroepiploic artery (GEA) in 1 patient and total saphenous vein grafts (SVGs) in 2 patients. The combined procedures included ventricular aneurysmectomy in 1 patient, mitral valve plasty in 1 and right coronary aneurysmectomy in 1. One patient was not able to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), after being supported with intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP), the patient was weaned from CPB successfully.Results One patient died of low cardiac output syndrome and acute renal failure 19 days after operation. Other patients recovered and were discharged uneventfully. During the follow-up that ranged from 3 to 57 months (mean 27 months),clincal angina disappeared or improved. Cardiac function was in Class Ⅰ-Ⅱ (NYHA).Conclusion CABG is a safe and effective procedure for Kawasaki coronary artery disease. However long-term results need to be followed up.

  18. Power turbine bypass for improved compression braking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, R.M.; Lutz, T.P.; Stang, J.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a turbocompound engine having a power turbine bypass control. It comprises an internal combustion engine having a crankshaft, an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold; turbocharger means connected with the intake and exhaust manifolds for converting exhaust gas energy into mechanical energy for boosting intake air pressure; power turbine means for producing mechanical energy from energy remaining in the exhaust gases exiting the first turbine.

  19. Assessing the effect of long-range pollutant transportation on air quality in Seoul using the conditional potential source contribution function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ukkyo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Lee, Yun Gon

    2017-02-01

    It is important to estimate the effects of the long-range transport of atmospheric pollutants for efficient and effective strategies to control air quality. In this study, the contributions of trans-boundary transport to the mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 in Seoul, Korea from 2001 to 2014 were estimated based on the conditional potential source contribution function (CPSCF) method. Eastern China was found to be the major source of trans-boundary pollution in Seoul, but moderate sources were also located in northeastern China. The contribution of long-range transport from Japan was negligible. The spatial distributions of the potential source contribution function (PSCF) values of each pollutant showed reasonable consistency with their emission inventory and satellite products. The PSCF values of SO2 and PM10 from eastern China were higher than those of NO2 and CO. The mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 in Seoul for the period from 2001 to 2014 were 5.34, 37.0, and 619.1 ppb, and 57.4 4 μg/m3, respectively. The contributions of long-range transport to the mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 in Seoul were 0.74, 3.4, and 39.0 ppb, and 12.1 μg/m3, respectively, which are 14%, 9%, 6%, and 21% of the mean concentrations, respectively. The annual mean concentrations of SO2 and NO2 followed statistically significant increasing linear trends (0.5 and 1.6 ppb per decade, respectively), whereas the trends in the annual mean concentrations of CO and PM10 were statistically insignificant. The trends in the ratio of the increased concentrations associated with long-range transport to the annual mean concentrations of the pollutants were statistically insignificant. However, the results indicate that the trans-boundary transport of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 from eastern China consistently affected air quality in Seoul over the study period (2001-2014). Regionally, the effects of the long-range transport of pollutants from Beijing and Harbin

  20. Gastrointestinal Transcriptomic Response of Metabolic Vitamin B12 Pathways in Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Priscila; Belarmino, Giliane; Torrinhas, Raquel S; Machado, Natasha M; Fonseca, Danielle C; Ravacci, Graziela R; Ishida, Robson K; Guarda, Ismael F M S; de Moura, Eduardo G; Sakai, Paulo; Santo, Marco A; da Silva, Ismael D C G; Pereira, Claudia C A; Logullo, Angela F; Heymsfield, Steven; Giannella-Neto, Daniel; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is highly prevalent and may contribute to postoperative complications. Decreased production of intrinsic factor owing to gastric fundus removal is thought to have a major role, but other components of B12 metabolism may also be affected. We evaluated changes in the expression levels of multiple B12 pathway-encoding genes in gastrointestinal (GI) tissues to evaluate the potential roles in contributing to post-RYGB B12 deficiency. Methods: During double-balloon enteroscopy, serial GI biopsies were collected from 20 obese women (age, 46.9±6.2 years; body mass index, 46.5±5.3 kg/m2) with adult-onset type 2 diabetes (fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dl; hemoglobin A1c≥6.5%) before and, at the same site, 3 months after RYGB. Gene expression levels were assessed by the Affymetrix Human GeneChip 1.0 ST microarray. Findings were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RT–qPCR). Results: Gene expression levels with significant changes (P≤0.05) included: transcobalamin I (TCN1) in remnant (−1.914-fold) and excluded (−1.985-fold) gastric regions; gastric intrinsic factor (GIF) in duodenum (−0.725-fold); and cubilin (CUBN) in duodenum (+0.982-fold), jejunum (+1.311-fold), and ileum (+0.685-fold). Validation by RT–qPCR confirmed (P≤0.05) observed changes for TCN1 in the remnant gastric region (−0.132-fold) and CUBN in jejunum (+2.833-fold). Conclusions: RYGB affects multiple pathway-encoding genes that may be associated with postoperative B12 deficiency. Decreased TCN1 levels seem to be the main contributing factor. Increased CUBN levels suggest an adaptive genetic reprogramming of intestinal tissue aiming to compensate for impaired intestinal B12 delivery. PMID:28055029

  1. Patient's Perception About Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelminda Maria Bulhões Mendonça

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The diagnosis of coronary artery disease referred for heart surgery has an important psychological component. The purpose of this study was to access the difficulties experienced by individuals awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting and to determine strategies that facilitate adaptation to a new lifestyle, modified by the disease. METHODS: A qualitative, exploratory study involving patients admitted to a university teaching hospital in the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting. Semi-structured interviews were performed in accordance with a previously defined script based on the study objective. Each transcription was read in its entirety to verify the representativeness, homogeneity and pertinence of the data obtained (pre-analysis, followed by separation of categories of analysis. RESULTS: The descriptions of this study show that patients admitted to the completion of coronary artery bypass grafting experience a wide range of psychological difficulties, considering that surgery acquires interpretations that vary according to individuals' subjectivity. The patients recognized the benefit of being able to discuss their feelings as a means of diminishing their fear and anxiety. CONCLUSION: Helping patients find resources to confront more positively the daily hospitalization is an important aspect for the health care professionals who assist them. This goal can be achieved through modification of the biomedical model of care for a biopsychosocial view. The investment of time and attention is of fundamental importance and aims to overcome existing deficiencies that interfere with the outcome of patients after cardiac surgery.

  2. Atypical complications of gastric bypass surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Myrosia T. [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)]. E-mail: mmitchell@radiology.bsd.uchicago.edu; Pizzitola, Victor J. [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Knuttinen, M-Grace [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Robinson, Tiffany [University of Chicago, Department of Internal Medicine, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gasparaitis, Arunas E. [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Although gastric bypass surgery continues to grow in popularity for weight loss and weight maintenance in the morbidly obese, there has been little attention given to the imaging of complications associated with these surgeries. The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the variety of gastric bypass surgery complications that can be identified radiographically, with attention to the more unusual complications. This study was performed with institutional Internal Review Board approval. We performed a 5-year retrospective review of all patients who had undergone gastric bypass surgery, had complications of the surgery, and had studies performed in our department to image these complications. These studies consisted of contrast fluoroscopy and CT. We identified the more common complications of anastomotic stenoses and anastomotic leaks. We also identified six unusual complications as follow: (1) internal herniation through the small bowel mesentery, (2) internal herniation through the transverse mesocolon, (3) external herniation through the abdominal wall incision, (4) enterocutaneous fistulas, (5) antiperistaltic construction of the Roux-en-Y, and (6) incorrect anstomoses of the Roux limbs resulting in a Roux-en-O configuration. Our findings show that a thorough understanding of expected postoperative bowel configuration is essential in the evaluation of these patients. In addition, fluoroscopic evaluation should assess not only anatomy, but also motility.

  3. Potential contribution of planktonic components to ammonium cycling in the coastal area off central-southern Chile during non-upwelling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Veronica; Morales, Carmen E.; Farías, Laura; Cornejo, Marcela; Graco, Michelle; Eissler, Yoanna; Cuevas, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    The potential contributions of different microbial components (consumption and production, and carbon assimilation associated with photolithotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic (nitrification) metabolisms in the water column were performed. Despite low water column concentrations of ammonium in wintertime, intense ammonium transformations were registered. Prokaryotes (or bacterioplankton) contributed most to ammonium generation rates over the entire water column; these rates increased with depth (0.4-3.1 μM d -1). In surface waters (10 m depth), aerobic ammonium oxidation (potentially by Bacteria and Archaea) was the dominant consumption process (average 0.7 μM d -1) whereas in the subsurface layer (20 and 50 m depth), unexpectedly, eukaryotes accounted for most of its consumption (average 2.1 μM d -1). Nitrification oxidized an important proportion of the ammonium in both layers (from 25% to 100%) and provided regenerated nitrate. The integrated water column rates of chemosynthesis (0.005 g C m -2 d -1) represented a large proportion (51%) of the total dark carbon fixation during the non-upwelling season when integrated rates of photosynthesis are relatively low (0.42 g C m -2 d -1) and microbial food webs dominate the transfer of carbon within this coastal system.

  4. Investigations on contribution of glial inwardly-rectifying K+ current to membrane potential and ion flux: An experimental and theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Nan Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The inwardly rectifying K+ current [IK(IR] allows large inward K+ currents at potentials negative to K+ equilibrium potential (EK and it becomes small outward K+ currents at those positive to EK. How changes of such currents enriched in glial cells can influence the functions of glial cell, neurons, or both is not clearly defined, although mutations of Kir4.1 channels have been demonstrated to cause serious neurological disorders. In this study, we identified the presence of IK(IR in human glioma cells (U373 and U87 cells. The amplitude of IK(IR in U373 cells was subject to inhibition by amitriptyline, arecoline, or BaCl2. The activity of inwardly rectifying K+ channels was also clearly detected, and single-channel conductance of these channels was calculated to be around 23 pS. Moreover, based on a simulation model derived from neuron–glial interaction mediated by ion flux, we further found out that incorporation of glial IK(IR conductance into the model can significantly contribute to regulation of extracellular K+ concentrations and glial resting potential, particularly during high-frequency stimulation. Glial cells and neurons can mutually modulate their expression of ion channels through K+ ions released into the extracellular space. It is thus anticipated that glial IK(IR may be a potential target utilized to influence the activity of neuronal and glial cells as well as their interaction.

  5. Local anaesthetic toxicity after bilateral thoracic paravertebral block in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, A M-H; Karmakar, M K; Ng, S K; Wan, S; Ng, C S H; Wong, R H L; Chan, S K C; Joynt, G M

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a small pilot observational study of the effects of bilateral thoracic paravertebral block (BTPB) as an adjunct to perioperative analgesia in coronary artery bypass surgery patients. The initial ropivacaine dose prior to induction of general anaesthesia was 3 mg/kg, which was followed at the end of the surgery by infusion of ropivacaine 0.25% 0.1 ml/kg/hour on each side (e.g. total 35 mg/hour for a 70 kg person). The BTPB did not eliminate the need for supplemental opioids after CABG in the eight patients studied. Moreover, in spite of boluses that were within the manufacturer's recommendation for epidural and major nerve blocks, and an infusion rate that was only slightly higher than what appeared to be safe for epidural infusion, potentially toxic total plasma ropivacaine concentrations were common. We also could not exclude the possibility that the high ropivacaine concentrations were contributing to postoperative mental state changes in the postoperative period. Also, one patient developed local anaesthetic toxicity after the bilateral paravertebral dose. As a result, the study was terminated early after four days. The question of whether paravertebral block confers benefits in cardiac surgery remains unanswered. However, we believe that the bolus dosage and the injection rate we used for BTPB were both too high, and caution other clinicians against the use of these doses. Future studies on the use of BTPB in cardiac surgery patients should include reduced ropivacaine doses injected over longer periods.

  6. Transporter protein and drug-conjugated gold nanoparticles capable of bypassing the blood-brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhua; Walker, Janelle Buttry; Minic, Zeljka; Liu, Fangchao; Goshgarian, Harry; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-05-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to the inability of many drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we show that wheat germ agglutinin horse radish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) chemically conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be transported to the spinal cord and brainstem following intramuscular injection into the diaphragm of rats. We synthesized and determined the size and chemical composition of a three-part nanoconjugate consisting of WGA-HRP, AuNPs, and drugs for the treatment of diaphragm paralysis associated with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Upon injection into the diaphragm muscle of rats, we show that the nanoconjugate is capable of delivering the drug at a much lower dose than the unconjugated drug injected systemically to effectively induce respiratory recovery in rats following SCI. This study not only demonstrates a promising strategy to deliver drugs to the CNS bypassing the BBB but also contributes a potential nanotherapy for the treatment of respiratory muscle paralysis resulted from cervical SCI.

  7. Using Zero Balance Ultrafiltration with Dialysate as a Replacement Fluid for Hyperkalemia during Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Michele; Raghunathan, Karthik; Welsby, Ian; Maxwell, Cory

    2014-09-01

    Avoiding or managing hyperkalemia during cardiac surgery, especially in a patient with chronic renal insufficiency, can be challenging. Hyperkalemic cardioplegia solution is usually administered to achieve and maintain an electrical arrest of the heart. This solution eventually mixes in with the systemic circulation, contributing to elevated systemic potassium levels. Administration of packed red blood cells, hemolysis, tissue damage, and acidosis are also common causes of hyperkalemia. Current strategies to avoid or manage hyperkalemia include minimizing the volume of cardioplegia administered, shifting potassium from the extracellular into the intracellular space (by the administration of sodium bicarbonate when the pH is low and/or dextrose-insulin when effects relatively independent of serum pH are desired), using zero-balanced ultrafiltration (Z-BUF) with normal saline as the replacement fluid (to remove potassium from the body rather than simply shift the electrolyte across cellular membranes), and, occasionally, hemodialysis (1). We report the application of Z-BUF using an electrolyte-balanced, low potassium dialysate solution rather than isotonic saline to avoid a high chloride load and the potential for hyperchloremic acidosis to successfully treat hyperkalemia while on cardiopulmonary bypass.

  8. Ryanodine receptors contribute to the induction of nociceptive input-evoked long-term potentiation in the rat spinal cord slice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhi-Qi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous study demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO contributes to long-term potentiation (LTP of C-fiber-evoked field potentials by tetanic stimulation of the sciatic nerve in the spinal cord in vivo. Ryanodine receptor (RyR is a downstream target for NO. The present study further explored the role of RyR in synaptic plasticity of the spinal pain pathway. Results By means of field potential recordings in the adult male rat in vivo, we showed that RyR antagonist reduced LTP of C-fiber-evoked responses in the spinal dorsal horn by tetanic stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Using spinal cord slice preparations and field potential recordings from superficial dorsal horn, high frequency stimulation of Lissauer's tract (LT stably induced LTP of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs. Perfusion of RyR antagonists blocked the induction of LT stimulation-evoked spinal LTP, while Ins(1,4,5P3 receptor (IP3R antagonist had no significant effect on LTP induction. Moreover, activation of RyRs by caffeine without high frequency stimulation induced a long-term potentiation in the presence of bicuculline methiodide and strychnine. Further, in patch-clamp recordings from superficial dorsal horn neurons, activation of RyRs resulted in a large increase in the frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs. Immunohistochemical study showed that RyRs were expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. Likewise, calcium imaging in small DRG neurons illustrated that activation of RyRs elevated [Ca2+]i in small DRG neurons. Conclusions These data indicate that activation of presynaptic RyRs play a crucial role in the induction of LTP in the spinal pain pathway, probably through enhancement of transmitter release.

  9. Potential effects of maternal contribution on egg and larva population dynamics of striped bass: Integrated individual-based model and directed field sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, J.H., Jr. (Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    We have used a bioenergetically-driven, individual-based model (IBM) of striped bass as a framework for synthesizing available information on population biology and quantifying, in a relative sense, factors that potentially affect year class success. The IBM has been configured to simulate environmental conditions experienced by several striped bass populations; i.e., in the Potomac River, MD; in Hudson River, NY; in the Santee-Cooper River System, SC, and; in the San Joaquin-Sacramento River System CA. These sites represent extremes in the geographic distribution and thus, environmental variability of striped bass spawning. At each location, data describing the physio-chemical and biological characteristics of the spawning population and nursery area are being collected and synthesized by means of a prioritized, directed field sampling program that is organized by the individual-based recruitment model. Here, we employ the striped bass IBM configured for the Potomac River, MD from spawning into the larval period to evaluate the potential for maternal contribution to affect larva survival and growth. Model simulations in which the size distribution and spawning day of females are altered indicate that larva survival is enhanced (3.3-fold increase) when a high fraction of females in the spawning population are large. Larva stage duration also is less ({bar X} = 18.4 d and 22.2 d) when large and small females, respectively, are mothers in simulations. Although inconclusive, these preliminary results for Potomac River striped bass suggest that the effects of female size, timing of spawning nad maternal contribution on recruitment dynamics potentially are important and illustrate our approach to the study of recruitment in striped bass. We hope to use the model, field collections and management alternatives that vary from site to site, in an iterative manner for some time to come. 54 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Potential effects of maternal contribution on egg and larva population dynamics of striped bass: Integrated individual-based model and directed field sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, J.H., Jr. (Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    We have used a bioenergetically-driven, individual-based model (IBM) of striped bass as a framework for synthesizing available information on population biology and quantifying, in a relative sense, factors that potentially affect year class success. The IBM has been configured to simulate environmental conditions experienced by several striped bass populations; i.e., in the Potomac River, MD; in Hudson River, NY; in the Santee-Cooper River System, SC, and; in the San Joaquin-Sacramento River System CA. These sites represent extremes in the geographic distribution and thus, environmental variability of striped bass spawning. At each location, data describing the physio-chemical and biological characteristics of the spawning population and nursery area are being collected and synthesized by means of a prioritized, directed field sampling program that is organized by the individual-based recruitment model. Here, we employ the striped bass IBM configured for the Potomac River, MD from spawning into the larval period to evaluate the potential for maternal contribution to affect larva survival and growth. Model simulations in which the size distribution and spawning day of females are altered indicate that larva survival is enhanced (3.3-fold increase) when a high fraction of females in the spawning population are large. Larva stage duration also is less ({bar X} = 18.4 d and 22.2 d) when large and small females, respectively, are mothers in simulations. Although inconclusive, these preliminary results for Potomac River striped bass suggest that the effects of female size, timing of spawning nad maternal contribution on recruitment dynamics potentially are important and illustrate our approach to the study of recruitment in striped bass. We hope to use the model, field collections and management alternatives that vary from site to site, in an iterative manner for some time to come. 54 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Dynamic Experimental Study of a Multi—bypass Pulse Tube Refrigerator with Two—bypass Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YonglinJu; ChaoWang; 等

    1998-01-01

    A dynamic experimental apparatus to measure the instantaneous velocity and pressure in the multibypass pulse tube refrigerator(MPTR) was designed and constructed.Some important experimental results of the instantaneous measurements of the velocity and the pressure in the MPTR with twobypass tubes during actual operation are prsented.The effects of the middle-bypass version on the dynamic pressure and mass flow rate at the cold end of the pulse tube are ev aluated from experimental measurements.DC-flow phenomena are observed in this MPTR.The reasons of the multi-bypass version improved the performance of pulse tube refrigertor are given.

  12. Extra-intracranial standard bypass in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandow, Nora; von Weitzel-Mudersbach, Paul; Rosenbaum, Sverre;

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic atherosclerotic vessel occlusion and cerebrovascular hemodynamic insufficiency may benefit from extra-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery. Due to demographic changes, an increasing number of elderly patients presents with cerebrovascular hemodynamic insufficiency. So far......, little data for EC-IC bypass surgery in elderly patients suffering occlusive cerebrovascular disease are available. We therefore designed a retrospective study to address the question whether EC-IC bypass is a safe and efficient treatment in a patient cohort ≥70 years....

  13. A marked increase in gastric fluid volume during cardiopulmonary bypass

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Major physiological stress occurs during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. This is related to hypothermia and artificial organ perfusion. Thus, serious gastrointestinal complications, particularly upper gastrointestinal bleeding, sometimes follow cardiac surgery. We have compared the antisecretory effects of a preanesthetic H2 antagonist (roxatidine, cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group, n = 15) and a proton pump inhibitor (rabeprazole, cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI group, n = 15) in patie...

  14. Thrombosed aneurysm of saphenous vein coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Rodolfo Mendes; Nastri, Rogério; Ferez, Marcus Antônio; Costa, Mauro José Brandão da; Laguna, Claudio Benedini; Valentin, Marcus Vinicius Nascimento

    2017-06-01

    We describe the case of a male patient, aged 76 years, referred for cardiac investigation due to retrosternal chest pain and dyspnea. He had a history of acute myocardial infarction and angioplasties in the last 30 years, including a saphenous vein coronary artery bypass grafting (SVCABG). Echocardiogram showed hypoechoic oval formation near the right ventricle, suggesting a pericardial cyst. Computed angiotomography revealed a predominantly fusiform and thrombosed aneurysmal dilation of the SVCABG to the right coronary artery. SVCABG aneurysms are very rare and potentially fatal. They usually appear in the late postoperative period, and patients are often asymptomatic. On radiography, it is frequently presented as enlargement of the mediastinum, with echocardiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging being very useful for diagnosis. Coronary angiography is the gold standard to detect these cases. Our report illustrates a rare situation arising late from a relatively common surgery. Due to its severity, proper recognition in the routine assessment of patients with a similar history is essential.

  15. Electrostatic potentials of the S-locus F-box proteins contribute to the pollen S specificity in self-incompatibility in Petunia hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junhui; Zhang, Yue; Song, Yanzhai; Zhang, Hui; Fan, Jiangbo; Li, Qun; Zhang, Dongfen; Xue, Yongbiao

    2017-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is a self/non-self discrimination system found widely in angiosperms and, in many species, is controlled by a single polymorphic S-locus. In the Solanaceae, Rosaceae and Plantaginaceae, the S-locus encodes a single S-RNase and a cluster of S-locus F-box (SLF) proteins to control the pistil and pollen expression of SI, respectively. Previous studies have shown that their cytosolic interactions determine their recognition specificity, but the physical force between their interactions remains unclear. In this study, we show that the electrostatic potentials of SLF contribute to the pollen S specificity through a physical mechanism of 'like charges repel and unlike charges attract' between SLFs and S-RNases in Petunia hybrida. Strikingly, the alteration of a single C-terminal amino acid of SLF reversed its surface electrostatic potentials and subsequently the pollen S specificity. Collectively, our results reveal that the electrostatic potentials act as a major physical force between cytosolic SLFs and S-RNases, providing a mechanistic insight into the self/non-self discrimination between cytosolic proteins in angiosperms.

  16. Partitioning the contributions of mega-, macro- and meiofauna to benthic metabolism on the upper continental slope of New Zealand: Potential links with environmental factors and trawling intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Daniel; Pilditch, Conrad A.; Nodder, Scott D.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding and predicting change in deep-sea benthic ecosystem function remains a major challenge. Here, we conducted analyses combining data on the abundance and biomass of benthic fauna and sediment community oxygen consumption (SCOC) on New Zealand's continental margin to estimate and compare the contributions of meio-, macro-, and megafauna to total benthic metabolism and identify potential links with environmental factors and trawling intensity. We focussed on two regions in close proximity-the high surface primary productivity Chatham Rise and low surface productivity Challenger Plateau. Mean megafauna biomass was twenty times greater on Chatham Rise than Challenger Plateau, likely reflecting differences in food supply between the two regions; this contrast in megafaunal biomass was mainly due to differences in mean body weight rather than abundance. Meio- and macrofauna made similar contributions to SCOC and together accounted for 12% of benthic metabolism on average. In contrast, the estimated contribution of megafauna never exceeded 1.5%. Significant positive correlations between faunal respiration and food availability indicate a link between food supply and benthic community function. Our analyses also show that fauna made a greater contribution to SCOC in conditions of high food availability, and that microorganisms (i.e., the proportion of SCOC not accounted for by the fauna) tended to be more dominant at sites with low food availability. These findings provide support for the concept that large organisms are more strongly affected by a reduction in food resources than small organisms, which in turn underlies one of the most widely described patterns in the deep-sea benthos, i.e., the reduction in organism body size with depth. Because metabolism in deep-sea sediments is typically dominated by microorganisms and small fauna, the absence of a relationship between bottom trawling intensity and the respiration of benthic fauna in the present study may

  17. Hormonal and metabolic responses of fetal lamb during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏肇伉; 周成斌; 张海波; 祝忠群

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the hormonal and metabolic responses of fetal lamb during cardiopulmonary bypass.Methods Six pregnant ewes underwent fetal cardiopulmonary bypasses with artificial oxygenators and roller pumps for 30 minutes, which maintained the blood gas value at the fetal physiological level. The fetal blood pressure, heart rate, pH value and blood lactate levels were monitored. The levels of catecholamine, cortisol and insulin were measured pre-bypass and then again 30 minutes later. The blood glucose and free fatty acid levels were monitored continuously during the bypass. Fetal hepatic PAS staining was also carried out.Results There were no changes before and during the bypass in fetal blood pressure, heart rate and blood gas. However, pH values decreased and blood lactate levels increased (P<0.05). The fetal catecholamine and cortisol levels increased significantly (P<0.01), while the levels of insulin did not change. The blood glucose and free fatty acid levels increased at the beginning of the bypass (P<0.01), and then gradually slowed down during the bypass. The fetal hepatic PAS staining showed that hepatic glycogen was consumed in large amounts. After 30 minutes of bypass, the fetal lamb would not survive more than 1 hour.Conclusion The fetal lamb has a strong negative reaction to cardiopulmonary bypass.

  18. Obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women following gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlac, Janne Foss; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Lidegaard, Ojvind

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women following gastric bypass, compared with adipose women without surgery and with a normal weight control population. DESIGN: Historical controlled cohort study. SETTING: Denmark. POPULATION: All women undergoing gastric bypass during...... the period 1996-2011, and subsequently giving birth. METHODS AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women without gastric bypass matched on age, parity, plurality, year, and body mass index, and normal weight women. RESULTS: In 415 women giving birth after gastric bypass we found...

  19. Endovascular exclusion of aortoesophageal fistula after coarctation extraanatomical bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Patrick O; Gemayel, Gino; Mugnai, Damiano; Murith, Nicolas; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2014-07-01

    Extraanatomical bypass has been advocated as the primary technique in adolescents or adults presenting with aortic coarctation. This approach carries significant morbidity, and graft-related complications may be more important in the young patient population. A 52-year-old man who had previously undergone extraanatomical bypass of aortic coarctation was diagnosed with a distal anastomotic pseudoaneurysm and aortoesophageal fistula. This was managed by proximal bypass plugging with an occluder, endovascular exclusion with a stent-graft in the thoracic descending aorta covering the pseudoaneurysm, and coarctation balloon dilation. Aortoesophageal fistula is a late complication observed after extraanatomical bypass for coarctation. This case illustrates this rare complication.

  20. Evaluation of potential variables contributing to the development and duration of plantar lesions in a population of aquarium-maintained African penguins (Spheniscus demersus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlacher-Reid, Claire; Dunn, J Lawrence; Camp, Tracy; Macha, Laurie; Mazzaro, Lisa; Tuttle, Allison D

    2012-01-01

    Bumblefoot (pododermatitis), often described as the most significant environmental disease of captive penguins, is commonly due to excessive pressure or trauma on the plantar surface of the avian foot, resulting in inflammation or necrosis and causing severe swelling, abrasions, or cracks in the skin. Although not formally evaluated in penguins, contributing factors for bumblefoot are thought to be similar to those initiating the condition in raptors and poultry. These factors include substrate, body weight, and lack of exercise. The primary purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate variables potentially contributing to the development and duration of plantar lesions in aquarium-maintained African penguins (Spheniscus demersus), including sex, weight, age, season, exhibit activity, and territory substrate. Results indicate that males develop significantly more plantar lesions than females. Penguins weighing between 3.51 and 4.0 kg develop plantar lesions significantly more often than penguins weighing between 2.5 and 3.5 kg, and because male African penguins ordinarily weigh significantly more than females, weight is likely a contributing factor in the development of lesions in males compared with females. Significantly more plantar lesions were observed in penguins standing for greater than 50% of their time on exhibit than swimming. Penguins occupying smooth concrete territories developed more plantar lesions compared with penguins occupying grate territories. Recommendations for minimizing bumblefoot in African penguins include training penguins for monthly foot examinations for early detection of plantar lesions predisposing for the disease, encouraging swimming activity, and replacing smooth surfaces on exhibit with surfaces providing variable degrees of pressure and texture on the feet. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Decrease of Na, K-ATPase Electrogenic Contribution and Resting Membrane Potential of Rat Soleus after 3 Days of Hindlimb Unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoi, I. I.; Kravtsova, V. V.; Drabkina, T. M.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Shenkman, B. S.

    2008-06-01

    The Na,K-ATPase activity is critically important for excitability, electrogenesis and contractility of skeletal muscle expressing ? and ? isoforms of the enzyme [6, 9]. It is well known that disuse induced by hindlimb unloading (HU) leads to progressive atrophy of skeletal muscle; the muscle undergoes a number of dramatic remodeling events. In particular, changes in ion channel expression in response to muscle unweighting were observed [1, 8]. Decrease of resting membrane potential (RMP), electrogenic contribution of Na,K-ATPase and membrane resistance during 7-28 days of HU was shown [8, 10]. The intrinsic mechanisms involved in the process have not been revealed until present. At the same time, the understanding of these mechanisms could be crucial for the disclosing the mechanisms underlying the resting Ca2+ accumulation in the cytoplasm of the unloaded muscle [3, 7]. In the present study, the effect of early (3 days) HU-induced disuse of slow-twitch soleus muscle on membrane electrogenesis as well as on electrogenic contribution of Na,K-ATPase isoforms was investigated.

  2. "We'll Get to You When We Get to You": Exploring Potential Contributions of Health Care Staff Behaviors to Patient Perceptions of Discrimination and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeu, Gabriel S; Cherrington, Andrea L; Andreae, Lynn; Prince, Candice; Holt, Cheryl L; Halanych, Jewell H

    2015-10-01

    We qualitatively assessed patients' perceptions of discrimination and patient satisfaction in the health care setting specific to interactions with nonphysician health care staff. We conducted 12 focus-group interviews with African American and European American participants, stratified by race and gender, from June to November 2008. We used a topic guide to facilitate discussion and identify factors contributing to perceived discrimination and analyzed transcripts for relevant themes using a codebook. We enrolled 92 participants: 55 African Americans and 37 European Americans, all of whom reported perceived discrimination and lower patient satisfaction as a result of interactions with nonphysician health care staff. Perceived discrimination was associated with 2 main characteristics: insurance or socioeconomic status and race. Both verbal and nonverbal communication style on the part of nonphysician health care staff were related to individuals' perceptions of how they were treated. The behaviors of nonphysician health care staff in the clinical setting can potentially contribute to patients' perceptions of discrimination and lowered patient satisfaction. Future interventions to reduce health care discrimination should include a focus on staff cultural competence and customer service skills.

  3. Flow cytometric evaluation of the contribution of ionic silver to genotoxic potential of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Saura C; Njoroge, Joyce; Bryce, Steven M; Zheng, Jiwen; Ihrie, John

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to nanosilver found in food- and cosmetics-related consumer products is of public concern because of the lack of information about its safety. In this study, two widely used in vitro cell culture models, human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells, and the flow cytometric micronucleus (FCMN) assay were evaluated as tools for rapid predictive screening of the potential genotoxicity of nanosilver. Recently, we reported the genotoxicity of 20 nm nanosilver using these systems. In the current study presented here, we tested the hypothesis that the nanoparticle size and cell types were critical determinants of its genotoxicity. To test this hypothesis, we used the FCMN assay to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 50 nm nanosilver of the same shape, composition, surface charge and obtained from the same commercial source using the same experimental conditions and in vitro models (HepG2 and Caco2) as previously tested for the 20 nm silver. Results of our study show that up to the concentrations tested in these cultured cell test systems, the smaller (20 nm) nanoparticle is genotoxic to both the cell types by inducing micronucleus (MN). However, the larger (50 nm) nanosilver induces MN only in HepG2 cells, but not in Caco2 cells. Also in this study, we evaluated the contribution of ionic silver to the genotoxic potential of nanosilver using silver acetate as the representative ionic silver. The MN frequencies in HepG2 and Caco2 cells exposed to the ionic silver in the concentration range tested are not statistically significant from the control values except at the top concentrations for both the cell types. Therefore, our results indicate that the ionic silver may not contribute to the MN-forming ability of nanosilver in HepG2 and Caco2 cells. Also our results suggest that the HepG2 and Caco2 cell cultures and the FCMN assay are useful tools for rapid predictive screening of a genotoxic potential of food- and cosmetics-related chemicals including nanosilver.

  4. The M-current contributes to high threshold membrane potential oscillations in a cell type-specific way in the pedunculopontine nucleus of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla eBordas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pedunculopontine nucleus is known as a cholinergic nucleus of the reticular activating system, participating in regulation of sleep and wakefulness. Besides cholinergic neurons, it consists of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons as well. According to classical and recent studies, more subgroups of neurons were defined. Groups based on the neurotransmitter released by a neuron are not homogenous, but can be further subdivided.The PPN neurons do not only provide cholinergic and non-cholinergic inputs to several subcortical brain areas but they are also targets of cholinergic and other different neuromodulatory actions. Although cholinergic neuromodulation has been already investigated in the nucleus, one of its characteristic targets, the M-type potassium current has not been described yet.Using slice electrophysiology, we provide evidence in the present work that cholinergic neurons possess M-current, whereas GABAergic neurons lack it. The M-current contributes to certain functional differences of cholinergic and GABAergic neurons, as spike frequency adaptation, action potential firing frequency or the amplitude difference of medium afterhyperpolarizations. Furthermore, we showed that high threshold membrane potential oscillation with high power, around 20 Hz frequency is a functional property of almost all cholinergic cells, whereas GABAergic neurons have only low amplitude oscillations. Blockade of the M-current abolished the oscillatory activity at 20 Hz, and largely diminished it at other frequencies.Taken together, the M-current seems to be characteristic for PPN cholinergic neurons. It provides a possibility for modulating gamma band activity of these cells, thus contributing to neuromodulatory regulation of the reticular activating system.

  5. Reoperative coronary bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass through a small thoracotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, PW; Grandjean, JG; Mariani, MA

    Background. The danger of coronary reoperations is mainly hidden in the reopening of the sternum and in the manipulation of the heart and the old grafts. Therefore, the minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass procedure seems an ideal technique for coronary reoperations if only the left

  6. On streak breakdown in bypass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Philipp; Brandt, Luca; de Lange, H. C.; Henningson, Dan S.

    2008-10-01

    Recent theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigations performed at the Department of Mechanics, KTH Stockholm, and the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, are reviewed, and new material is presented to clarify the role of the boundary-layer streaks and their instability with respect to turbulent breakdown in bypass transition in a boundary layer subject to free-stream turbulence. The importance of the streak secondary-instability process for the generation of turbulent spots is clearly shown. The secondary instability manifests itself as a growing wave packet located on the low-speed streak, increasing in amplitude as it is dispersing in the streamwise direction. In particular, qualitative and quantitative data pertaining to temporal sinuous secondary instability of a steady streak, impulse responses both on a parallel and a spatially developing streak, a model problem of bypass transition, and full simulations and experiments of bypass transition itself are collected and compared. In all the flow cases considered, similar characteristics in terms of not only growth rates, group velocity, and wavelengths but also three-dimensional visualizations of the streak breakdown have been found. The wavelength of the instability is about an order of magnitude larger than the local boundary-layer displacement thickness δ∗, the group velocity about 0.8 of the free-stream velocity U∞, and the growth rate on the order of a few percent of U∞/δ∗. The characteristic structures at the breakdown are quasistreamwise vortices, located on the flanks of the low-speed region arranged in a staggered pattern.

  7. Indications and Outcomes of Prophylactic and Therapeutic Extracranial-to-intracranial Arterial Bypass for Cerebral Revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Gazyakan, MD, MSc

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: The collaboration of neurosurgeons and plastic surgeons in performing EC-IC bypass can result in excellent outcomes with a high bypass patency rate and few complications, particularly for prophylactic EC-IC bypass.

  8. Ex-situ liver surgery without veno-venous bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Ming Zhang; Xiong-Wei Hu; Jia-Hong Dong; Zhi-Xian Hong; Zhao-Hai Wang; Gao-Hua Li; Rui-Zhao Qi

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the results of hepatic resection with ex-situ hypothermic perfusion and without veno-venous bypass.METHODS:In 3 patients with liver tumor,the degree of the inferior vena cava and/or main hepatic vein involvement was verified when the liver was dissociated in the operation.It was impossible to resect the tumors by the routine hepatectomy,so the patients underwent ex-situ liver surgery,vein cava replacement and hepatic autotransplantation without veno-venous bypass.All surgical procedures were carried out or supervised by a senior surgeon.A retrospective analysis was performed for the prospectively collected data from patients with liver tumor undergoing ex-situ liver surgery,vein cava replacement and hepatic autotransplantation without veno-venous bypass.We also compared our data with the 9 cases of Pichlmayr's group.RESULTS:Three patients with liver tumor were analysed.The first case was a 60-year-old female with a huge haemangioma located in S1,S4,S5,S6,S7 and S8 of liver; the second was a 64-year-old man with cholangiocarcinoma in S1,S2,S3 and S4 and the third one was a 55-year-old man with a huge cholangiocarcinoma in S1,S5,S7 and S8.The operation time for the three patients were 6.6,6.4 and 7.3 h,respectively.The anhepatic phases were 3.8,2.8 and 4.0 h.The volume of blood loss during operation were 1200,3100,2000 mL in the three patients,respectively.The survival periods without recurrence were 22 and 17 mo in the first two cases.As for the third case complicated with postoperative hepatic vein outflow obstruction,emergency hepatic vein outflow extending operation and assistant living donor liver transplantation were performed the next day,and finally died of liver and renal failure on the third day.Operation time (6.7 ± 0.47h vs 13.7 ± 2.6 h) and anhepatic phase (3.5 ± 0.64 h vs 5.7 ± 1.7 h) were compared between Pichlmayr's group and our series (P =0.78).CONCLUSION:Ex-situ liver resection and liver autotransplantation has shown a potential

  9. Genome-Wide Overexpression Screen Identifies Genes Able to Bypass p16-Mediated Senescence in Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Jae; Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Shakhbazov, Konstanin; Ranall, Max V; Fox, Carly; Lambie, Duncan; Stevenson, Alexander J; Yaswen, Paul; Gonda, Thomas J; Gabrielli, Brian

    2017-03-01

    Malignant melanomas often arise from nevi, which result from initial oncogene-induced hyperproliferation of melanocytes that are maintained in a CDKN2A/p16-mediated senescent state. Thus, genes that can bypass this senescence barrier are likely to contribute to melanoma development. We have performed a gain-of-function screen of 17,030 lentivirally expressed human open reading frames (ORFs) in a melanoma cell line containing an inducible p16 construct to identify such genes. Genes known to bypass p16-induced senescence arrest, including the human papilloma virus 18 E7 gene ( HPV18E7), and genes such as the p16-binding CDK6 with expected functions, as well as panel of novel genes, were identified, including high-mobility group box (HMGB) proteins. A number of these were further validated in two other models of p16-induced senescence. Tissue immunohistochemistry demonstrated higher levels of CDK6 in primary melanomas compared with normal skin and nevi. Reduction of CDK6 levels drove melanoma cells expressing functional p16 into senescence, demonstrating its contribution to bypass senescence.

  10. Flow characteristics in narrowed coronary bypass graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernad, S. I. [Romanian Academy – Timisoara Branch, Mihai Viteazul Str. 24, RO-300223, Timisoara (Romania); Bosioc, A.; Totorean, A. F. [University Politehnica of Timisoara, Department of Hydraulic Machinery, Mihai Viteazul Str. 1, RO-300222, Timisoara (Romania); Bernad, E. S.; Petre, I. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Victor Babes Timisoara, P-ta Eftimie Murgu, 2, Timisoara (Romania)

    2016-06-08

    Tortuous saphenous vein graft (SVG) hemodynamics was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. Computed tomography (CT) technology is used for non-invasive bypass graft assessment 7 days after surgery. CT investigation shown two regions with severe shape remodelling first is an elbow type contortion and second is a severe curvature with tortuous area reduction. In conclusion, the helical flow induced by vessel torsion may stabilize the blood flow in the distal part of the SVG, reducing the flow disturbance and suppressing the flow separation, but in the distal end of the graft, promote the inflammatory processes in the vessels.

  11. TRAS principles blight arterial bypass and plasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari M

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available A new concept--Tissue Requisitions (Principle I/Relinquishes (Principle II Arterial Supply--of TRAS principles is introduced to help appreciate the failures/successes of modern medicine′s attempts at restoring arterial flow in luminally compromised coronary/carotid fields, an invasive branch rightly called vascular ReRheology, which comprises diagnosing/treating arterial blocks. The technical wizardry of arterial reconstruction (bypass or lumen--restoration (plasty has to reckon with the TRAS principles all the time.

  12. Bypass variants of Zgornji Hotič

    OpenAIRE

    Vozelj, Nejc

    2014-01-01

    In my Graduation Thesis we presented the solution of road through Zgornji Hotič. This road si daily very busy, because the road is the main connection between the capital of Slovenia and the region Zasavje. The discussed road through Zgornji Hotič is problematic because of dangerous sections of the road and nearby buildings, which lower the transportability and safety of the road. As a solution we have decided to make a bypass between the south-end of Zgornji Hotič and the river Sava. We have...

  13. Hemodynamics Simulation of Stenosed Coronary Bypass Graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU You-jun; QIAO Aike; DU Jian-jun

    2005-01-01

    By means of FEM, the physiological blood flow in coronary bypass graft is simulated. The stenosis in coronary artery is involved in the graft model,and the deformation of graft end to allow the surgical suture with a smaller diameter coronary is taken into consideration. The flow pattern, secondary flow and wall shear stress in the vicinity of anastomosis are analyzed. It is shown that a zone of low wall stress and high wall stress gradient exists downstream the toe. The floor opposed to the anastomosis is an area of high wall stress and high wall stress gradient. Both the toe downstream and the anastomosis bottom floor are prone to intimal hyperplasia.

  14. Work on the Geneva motorway bypass

    CERN Multimedia

    État de Genève, DCTI, Direction du génie civil

    2006-01-01

    Work on the airport section of the Geneva motorway bypass is continuing and will require the temporary closure of two sliproads allowing traffic to make a U-turn near the airport and the Palexpo exhibition centre. The sliproads on the French and Lausanne sides will be closed until autumn 2006. U-turns will still be possible via clearly marked deviations. For further information: www.autoroute-aeroport.ch We would like to thank you in advance for your understanding. Civil Engineering Department, DCTI, State of Geneva

  15. Flow characteristics in narrowed coronary bypass graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad, S. I.; Bosioc, A.; Bernad, E. S.; Petre, I.; Totorean, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    Tortuous saphenous vein graft (SVG) hemodynamics was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. Computed tomography (CT) technology is used for non-invasive bypass graft assessment 7 days after surgery. CT investigation shown two regions with severe shape remodelling first is an elbow type contortion and second is a severe curvature with tortuous area reduction. In conclusion, the helical flow induced by vessel torsion may stabilize the blood flow in the distal part of the SVG, reducing the flow disturbance and suppressing the flow separation, but in the distal end of the graft, promote the inflammatory processes in the vessels.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor- α and interleukin-6: potential interorgan inflammatory mediators contributing to destructive periodontal disease in obesity or metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Roozbeh; Ka, Khady; Huang, Ting; Khalili, Saeed; Nguyen, Bich Hong; Nicolau, Belinda; Tran, Simon D

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide health burden in the last two decades. Obesity has been associated with increased comorbidities, such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, and destructive periodontal disease. Obesity is also part of a group of risk factors occurring together in an individual, which is referred to as metabolic syndrome. Clinical studies have shown higher risk for destructive periodontal disease in obesity and metabolic syndrome. However, the role of obesity and metabolic syndrome in the onset and development of destructive periodontal disease has not yet been fully understood. In this review, we discuss a working model, which focuses on interorgan inflammation as a common etiological factor for destructive periodontal disease associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Specifically, we suggest that elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF- α ) or interleukin 6 (IL-6)--both adipokines and known risk factors for destructive periodontal disease--in obesity and metabolic syndrome contribute to the onset and development of destructive periodontal disease. The connections between destructive periodontal disease and systemic conditions, such as obesity or metabolic syndrome, are complex and potentially multidirectional. This review largely focuses on TNF- α and IL-6, inflammatory mediators, as potential common risk factors and does not exclude other biological mechanisms.

  17. Contribution of the cashew gum (Anacardium occidentale L.) for development of layer-by-layer films with potential application in nanobiomedical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, I.M.S. [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, CCN, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Teresina, PI, 64049-550 (Brazil); Nucleo de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, BIOTEC, Campus Parnaiba, CMRV, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Parnaiba, PI, 64202-020 (Brazil); Zampa, M.F. [Nucleo de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, BIOTEC, Campus Parnaiba, CMRV, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Parnaiba, PI, 64202-020 (Brazil); Campus Parnaiba, Instituto Federal de Educacao Ciencia e Tecnologia do Piaui, IFPI, Parnaiba, PI, 64210-260 (Brazil); Moura, J.B.; Santos, J.R. dos [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, CCN, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Teresina, PI, 64049-550 (Brazil); Eaton, P. [REQUIMTE, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, Porto, 4169-007 (Portugal); Zucolotto, V. [Grupo de Biofisica Molecular Sergio Mascarenhas, Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, IFSC, USP, Sao Carlos, SP, 13566-590 (Brazil); and others

    2012-08-01

    The search for bioactive molecules to be employed as recognition elements in biosensors has stimulated researchers to pore over the rich Brazilian biodiversity. In this sense, we introduce the use of natural cashew gum (Anacardium occidentale L.) as an active biomaterial to be used in the form of layer-by-layer films, in conjunction with phthalocyanines, which were tested as electrochemical sensors for dopamine detection. We investigated the effects of chemical composition of cashew gum from two different regions of Brazil (Piaui and Ceara states) on the physico-chemical characteristics of these nanostructures. The morphology of the nanostructures containing cashew gum was studied by atomic force microscopy which indicates that smooth films punctuated by globular features were formed that showed low roughness values. The results indicate that, independent of the origin, cashew gum stands out as an excellent film forming material with potential application in nanobiomedical devices as electrochemical sensors. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study focused on the use of cashew gum for the formation of LbL films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LbL films containing cashew gums were investigated by AFM and cyclic voltammetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cashew gum contributed to obtain stable films with well-defined redox processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cashew gum films detected dopamine in low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These LbL films presented potential application in nanobiomedical devices.

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interleukin-6: Potential Interorgan Inflammatory Mediators Contributing to Destructive Periodontal Disease in Obesity or Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Khosravi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a worldwide health burden in the last two decades. Obesity has been associated with increased comorbidities, such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, and destructive periodontal disease. Obesity is also part of a group of risk factors occurring together in an individual, which is referred to as metabolic syndrome. Clinical studies have shown higher risk for destructive periodontal disease in obesity and metabolic syndrome. However, the role of obesity and metabolic syndrome in the onset and development of destructive periodontal disease has not yet been fully understood. In this review, we discuss a working model, which focuses on interorgan inflammation as a common etiological factor for destructive periodontal disease associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Specifically, we suggest that elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α or interleukin 6 (IL-6—both adipokines and known risk factors for destructive periodontal disease—in obesity and metabolic syndrome contribute to the onset and development of destructive periodontal disease. The connections between destructive periodontal disease and systemic conditions, such as obesity or metabolic syndrome, are complex and potentially multidirectional. This review largely focuses on TNF-α and IL-6, inflammatory mediators, as potential common risk factors and does not exclude other biological mechanisms.

  19. Calculation of radar signal delays in the vicinity of the Sun due to the contribution of a Yukawa correction term in the gravitational potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haranas, Ioannis; Ragos, Omiros

    2011-07-01

    There has been a renewed interest in the recent years in the possibility of deviations from the predictions of Newton's "inverse-square law" of universal gravitation. One of the reasons for renewing this interest lies in various theoretical attempts to construct a unified elementary particle theory, in which there is a natural prediction of new forces over macroscopic distances. Therefore the existence of such a force would only coexist with gravity, and in principle could only be detected as a deviation from the inverse square law, or in the "universality of free fall" experiments. New experimental techniques such that of Sagnac interferometry can help explore the range of the Yukawa correction λ≥1014 m where such forces might be present. It may be, that future space missions might be operating in this range which has been unexplored for very long time. To study the effect of the Yukawa correction to the gravitational potential and its corresponding signal delay in the vicinity of the Sun, we use a spherically symmetric modified space time metric where the Yukawa correction its added to the gravitational potential. Next, the Yukawa correction contribution to the signal delay is evaluated. In the case where the distance of closest approach is much less than the range λ, it results to a signal time delay that satisfies the relation t( b< λ)≅37.7 t( b= λ).

  20. Gastric bypass surgery: Improving psoriasis through a GLP-1-dependent mechanism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Annesofie; Zachariae, Claus; Skov, Lone;

    2011-01-01

    of psoriasis is initiated immediately following surgery before any weight loss could have happened. We hypothesize that the glucose-lowering gut incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is responsible for this effect. The levels of GLP-1 have been shown to increase up to 20 times after gastric bypass...... surgery. This most likely contributes importantly to the acute remission of type 2 diabetes, which is often induced by gastric bypass operations. The hormone is not hypersecreted after the purely restrictive bariatric procedure gastric banding and no case reports exist on improvement in psoriasis......Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease and obesity constitutes a risk factor for the disease. Obese patients with psoriasis are often more difficult to treat and are at increased risk for dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Case reports suggest that gastric...

  1. Is there a role for robotic totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass in patients with a colostomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibber, Marc; Lehr, Eric J; Kon, Zachary N; Wehman, P Brody; Griffith, Bartley P; Bonatti, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative colostomy presents a significant risk of sternal wound complications, mediastinitis, and ostomy injury in patients requiring coronary artery bypass grafting. Less invasive procedures in coronary surgery have a potential to reduce the risk of sternal wound healing problems. Robotic totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with a colostomy has not been reported. We describe a case of completely endoscopic coronary surgery using the da Vinci Si system in a patient with a transverse colostomy. Single left internal mammary artery grafting to the left anterior coronary artery was performed successfully on the beating heart. We regard this technique as the least invasive method of surgical coronary revascularization with a potential to reduce the risk of surgical site infection and mediastinitis in patients with a colostomy.

  2. Using Social Media to Measure the Contribution of Red List Species to the Nature-Based Tourism Potential of African Protected Areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Willemen

    Full Text Available Cultural ecosystem services are defined by people's perception of the environment, which make them hard to quantify systematically. Methods to describe cultural benefits from ecosystems typically include resource-demanding survey techniques, which are not suitable to assess cultural ecosystem services for large areas. In this paper we explore a method to quantify cultural benefits through the enjoyment of natured-based tourism, by assessing the potential tourism attractiveness of species for each protected area in Africa using the IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species. We use the number of pictures of wildlife posted on a photo sharing website as a proxy for charisma, popularity, and ease of observation, as these factors combined are assumed to determine how attractive species are for the global wildlife tourist. Based on photo counts of 2473 African animals and plants, species that seem most attractive to nature-based tourism are the Lion, African Elephant and Leopard. Combining the photo counts with species range data, African protected areas with the highest potential to attract wildlife tourists based on attractive species occurrence were Samburu National Reserve in Kenya, Mukogodo Forest Reserve located just north of Mount Kenya, and Addo Elephant National Park in South-Africa. The proposed method requires only three data sources which are freely accessible and available online, which could make the proposed index tractable for large scale quantitative ecosystem service assessments. The index directly links species presence to the tourism potential of protected areas, making the connection between nature and human benefits explicit, but excludes other important contributing factors for tourism, such as accessibility and safety. This social media based index provides a broad understanding of those species that are popular globally; in many cases these are not the species of highest conservation concern.

  3. Using Social Media to Measure the Contribution of Red List Species to the Nature-Based Tourism Potential of African Protected Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemen, Louise; Cottam, Andrew J; Drakou, Evangelia G; Burgess, Neil D

    2015-01-01

    Cultural ecosystem services are defined by people's perception of the environment, which make them hard to quantify systematically. Methods to describe cultural benefits from ecosystems typically include resource-demanding survey techniques, which are not suitable to assess cultural ecosystem services for large areas. In this paper we explore a method to quantify cultural benefits through the enjoyment of natured-based tourism, by assessing the potential tourism attractiveness of species for each protected area in Africa using the IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species. We use the number of pictures of wildlife posted on a photo sharing website as a proxy for charisma, popularity, and ease of observation, as these factors combined are assumed to determine how attractive species are for the global wildlife tourist. Based on photo counts of 2473 African animals and plants, species that seem most attractive to nature-based tourism are the Lion, African Elephant and Leopard. Combining the photo counts with species range data, African protected areas with the highest potential to attract wildlife tourists based on attractive species occurrence were Samburu National Reserve in Kenya, Mukogodo Forest Reserve located just north of Mount Kenya, and Addo Elephant National Park in South-Africa. The proposed method requires only three data sources which are freely accessible and available online, which could make the proposed index tractable for large scale quantitative ecosystem service assessments. The index directly links species presence to the tourism potential of protected areas, making the connection between nature and human benefits explicit, but excludes other important contributing factors for tourism, such as accessibility and safety. This social media based index provides a broad understanding of those species that are popular globally; in many cases these are not the species of highest conservation concern.

  4. Using Social Media to Measure the Contribution of Red List Species to the Nature-Based Tourism Potential of African Protected Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakou, Evangelia G.; Burgess, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    Cultural ecosystem services are defined by people’s perception of the environment, which make them hard to quantify systematically. Methods to describe cultural benefits from ecosystems typically include resource-demanding survey techniques, which are not suitable to assess cultural ecosystem services for large areas. In this paper we explore a method to quantify cultural benefits through the enjoyment of natured-based tourism, by assessing the potential tourism attractiveness of species for each protected area in Africa using the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species. We use the number of pictures of wildlife posted on a photo sharing website as a proxy for charisma, popularity, and ease of observation, as these factors combined are assumed to determine how attractive species are for the global wildlife tourist. Based on photo counts of 2473 African animals and plants, species that seem most attractive to nature-based tourism are the Lion, African Elephant and Leopard. Combining the photo counts with species range data, African protected areas with the highest potential to attract wildlife tourists based on attractive species occurrence were Samburu National Reserve in Kenya, Mukogodo Forest Reserve located just north of Mount Kenya, and Addo Elephant National Park in South-Africa. The proposed method requires only three data sources which are freely accessible and available online, which could make the proposed index tractable for large scale quantitative ecosystem service assessments. The index directly links species presence to the tourism potential of protected areas, making the connection between nature and human benefits explicit, but excludes other important contributing factors for tourism, such as accessibility and safety. This social media based index provides a broad understanding of those species that are popular globally; in many cases these are not the species of highest conservation concern. PMID:26068111

  5. POSTEMBRYONIC SUBTOTIPOTENT STEM CELLS DERIVED FROM A VARIETY OF FETAL TISSUES HAVE MULTIPLE DIFFERENTIATION POTENTIAL AND GREATLY CONTRIBUTE TO STEM CELL PLASTICITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To isolate and culture PSSCs from different tissues and determine their characteristics anddifferentiation potential in vitro. Methods: PSSCs were isolated and cultured from human aborted fetal bone mar-row, liver, skin, skeletal muscle, lung and pancreas. Morphology and biological activities were assessed. Pheno-types were analyzed by FACS and immunohistochemieal staining. We tested the potential of PSSCs to differentiateinto multiple cell lineages, such as bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, nerve , endothelial cell and hematopoietic progeni-tor cells. Results: PSSCs could be isolated from human aborted fetal above. PSSCs were a population of adherent cells characterized by a typical fibroblast - like morphology. PSSCs had few endoplasmic reticulum and mitochon- drias. It could be expanded by successive cycles of trypsinization, seeding, and culture ex vitro. PSSCs had a capa-bility of passaging up to 30 times without displaying significant changes in morphology, with a 2 -fold increase in cell number after each passage. Cell cycle analysis revealed that more than 90 % of cells were in the G0/G1 phases, while a small population of cells were actively engaged in proliferation. These cells were positively stained by FITC labeled CD44, CD29, CD13, but negative for CD34, HLA- DR. The culture- expanded PSSCs have multilineage differentiation potential giving rise to cells of osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, myogenic, neurogenic, hematopoietic and endotielial lineages. Conclusion:PSSCs may still remain in a number of tissues after embryonic development,could be identified by their phenotypic and functional characteristics, and contribute significantly to multipotent differentiation outside the tissue of origin.

  6. Antioxidative effect of propofol during cardiopulmonary bypass in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-hai ZHANG; Shou-yong WANG; Shang-long YAO

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the antioxidative potential of propofol (an intravenous anesthetic with a chemical structure similar to phenol-based free radical scavengers such as vitamin E) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). METHODS:Thirty adult patients referred for elective cardiac procedure with CPB were included and randomly allocated to a nously for anesthesia maintenance, whereas those allocated to the control group received fentanyl 10 μg/kg intravenously and inhaled enflurane (1%-1.5 %). Blood samples were collected at 7 time points: before the start of CPB,at 30 and 60 min of CPB, at the conclusion of CPB, 10 min after the administration of protamine, and 12 and 24 h after the cessation of CPB. Plasma levels of free F2-isoprostanes (sensitive markers of free radicals production)and complement C5a were determined by mass-spectrometric assay and enzyme immunoassay, respectively. Neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells was observed at x200 magnification under a light microscope. RESULTS:Levels of F2-isoprostanes, complement C5a and neutrophil adhesion rate increased significantly during and after CPB in both groups. There were significantly higher levels of F2-isoprostanes, C5a, and more neutrophils adhering to endothelial cells in the control group than those in the propofol group, respectively. CONCLUSION: Cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with a great production of damaging free radicals. Propofol may be beneficial both as an anesthetic and as a potent free radical scavenger in patients presenting pathologies associated with free radical reactions during CPB.

  7. Dacron or PTFE for above-knee femoropopliteal bypass. a multicenter randomised study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L P; Lepäntalo, M; Fossdal, J E

    2007-01-01

    To compare polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and polyester grafts (Dacron) for above knee femoropopliteal bypass.......To compare polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and polyester grafts (Dacron) for above knee femoropopliteal bypass....

  8. Computed tomography perfusion evaluation after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.C.; Riordan, A.J.; Smit, E.J.; Jong, H.W. de; Zwan, A. van der; Velthuis, B.K.; Viergever, M.A.; Dankbaar, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Perfusion imaging is increasingly used for postoperative evaluation of extracranial to intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery. Altered hemodynamics and delayed arrival of the contrast agent in the area fed by the bypass can influence perfusion measurement. We compared perfusion asymmetry obt

  9. Haemodynamics during maximal exercise after coronary bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M.F. Rousseau (Francois); J. Cosyns; R. Ponlot; L.A. Brasseur; J-M.R. Detry (Jean-Marie)

    1978-01-01

    textabstractFifty patients underwent an objective measurement of physical working capacity by means of a multistage test of maximally tolerated exertion before and after coronary bypass surgery; 29 patients also had haemodynamic measurements during maximal exercise before and after coronary bypass s

  10. Renal tubular acidosis secondary to jejunoileal bypass for morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Ladefoged, Jens; Thorup, Jørgen Mogens

    1985-01-01

    Renal handling of acid and base was studied in patients with persistent metabolic acidosis 3-9 years after jejunoileal bypass for morbid obesity. Excretion of acid was studied before and after intravenous infusion of NH4Cl and excretion of bicarbonate after infusion of NaHCO3. Bypass patients...

  11. Haemodynamics during maximal exercise after coronary bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M.F. Rousseau (Francois); J. Cosyns; R. Ponlot; L.A. Brasseur; J-M.R. Detry (Jean-Marie)

    1978-01-01

    textabstractFifty patients underwent an objective measurement of physical working capacity by means of a multistage test of maximally tolerated exertion before and after coronary bypass surgery; 29 patients also had haemodynamic measurements during maximal exercise before and after coronary bypass

  12. 20 CFR 631.38 - State by-pass authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false State by-pass authority. 631.38 Section 631.38 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE III OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT State Administration § 631.38 State by-pass authority....

  13. Computed tomography perfusion evaluation after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Pieter C.; Riordan, Alan J.; Smit, Ewoud J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.; van der Zwan, Albert; Velthuis, BK; Viergever, Max A.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Perfusion imaging is increasingly used for postoperative evaluation of extracranial to intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery. Altered hemodynamics and delayed arrival of the contrast agent in the area fed by the bypass can influence perfusion measurement. We compared perfusion asymmetry obt

  14. Lower leg electrical impedance after distal bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belanger, G K; Bolbjerg, M L; Heegaard, N H;

    1998-01-01

    Electrical impedance was determined in 13 patients following distal bypass surgery to evaluate lower leg oedema as reflected by its circumference. Tissue injury was assessed by the plasma concentration of muscle enzymes. After surgery, the volume of the control lower leg increased from 1250 (816...... to be a useful method for the evaluation of lower leg oedema after distal bypass surgery....

  15. Diagnostic tools for post-gastric bypass hypoglycaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emous, M.; Ubels, F. L.; van Beek, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of its evident success, several late complications can occur after gastric bypass surgery. One of these is post-gastric bypass hypoglycaemia. No evidence-based guidelines exist in the literature on how to confirm the presence of this syndrome. This study aims to describe and compare the tes

  16. Sen perforation af tyndtarm efter laparoskopisk gastrisk bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Sigild, Ulf Henrik; Neuenschwander, Anders Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    We present two cases in which the patients were admitted to a local hospital with acute abdominal pain four or five months after having undergone laparoscopic gastric bypass. In both cases, operation revealed a perforation of the small bowel close to the distal anastomosis. In the first case...... bypass but as our two cases illustrate they are important to keep in mind....

  17. Reverse bias protected solar array with integrated bypass battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for protecting the photovoltaic cells in a photovoltaic (PV) array from reverse bias damage by utilizing a rechargeable battery for bypassing current from a shaded photovoltaic cell or group of cells, avoiding the need for a bypass diode. Further, the method mitigates the voltage degradation of a PV array caused by shaded cells.

  18. The in situ saphenous vein bypass graft: radiologic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, W; Nozick, J; Richmand, D; Rodgers, B; Simpson, A; Argila, C; Honickman, S

    1986-03-01

    The use of the in situ saphenous vein for bypassing arterial occlusions in the lower extremities appears to have a higher patency rate than other bypass procedures but presents unique technical problems, such as lysing valves and occluding venous tributaries. Forty-four patients undergoing in situ bypasses had preoperative arteriograms. Special attention was paid to the small runoff vessels around the ankle, which are not suitable for reversed bypass procedures but may be adequate for in situ bypasses. Eight patients also had preoperative saphenous venograms, which revealed surgically important abnormalities in six cases. Postoperative arteriograms obtained within 2 weeks in 10 patients and within 2-12 months in 15 patients revealed persistent arteriovenous fistulas in four patients, stenoses in nine, occlusions in five, and progressive disease in the nonbypassed arteries in five patients. Early recognition of these problems led to 11 surgical repairs; nine repairs used the interventional radiologic procedures of balloon angioplasty, transcatheter embolization, and catheter thrombolysis. In this group of 44 patients, five patients died with patent bypasses and three patients required amputation despite functioning bypasses. Only four amputations were attributed to bypass failure. This low figure may be due to the close cooperation of the vascular surgeons and the vascular radiologists in dealing with these complicated cases.

  19. PROPOSAL OF A REVISIONAL SURGERY TO TREAT NON-INSULINOMA HYPERINSULINEMIC HYPOGLICEMIA POSTGASTRIC BYPASS

    OpenAIRE

    SAMPAIO-NETO, José; BRANCO-FILHO,Alcides José; NASSIF, Luis Sérgio; NASSIF, André Thá; MASI, Flávia David João De; XIMENEZ,Daniele Rezende

    2015-01-01

    Background : Hyperinsulinemic hypoglicemia with severe neuroglycopenic symptoms has been identified as a late and rare complication in patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, the potential gravity of its manifestations requires effective treatment of this condition. The absence of treatment makes it necessary to develop more effective clinical or surgical methods. Aim : To present one surgical option to revisional surgery in the treatment of hyperinsulinemic hypoglicemia M...

  20. Previous gastric bypass surgery complicating total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Bianca; Jacobson, Adam S; Alon, Eran E; Via, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Hypocalcemia is a well-known complication of total thyroidectomy. Patients who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery may be at increased risk of hypocalcemia due to gastrointestinal malabsorption, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and an underlying vitamin D deficiency. We present the case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent a total thyroidectomy for the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Her history included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Following the thyroid surgery, she developed postoperative hypocalcemia that required large doses of oral calcium carbonate (7.5 g/day), oral calcitriol (up to 4 μg/day), intravenous calcium gluconate (2.0 g/day), calcium citrate (2.0 g/day), and ergocalciferol (50,000 IU/day). Her serum calcium levels remained normal on this regimen after hospital discharge despite persistent hypoparathyroidism. Bariatric surgery patients who undergo thyroid surgery require aggressive supplementation to maintain normal serum calcium levels. Preoperative supplementation with calcium and vitamin D is strongly recommended.

  1. Abundance and distribution of major groups of diazotrophic cyanobacteria and their potential contribution to N₂ fixation in the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Nicole L; Turk, Kendra A; Achilles, Katherine M; Paerl, Ryan; Hewson, Ian; Morrison, Amanda E; Montoya, Joseph P; Edwards, Christopher A; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2010-12-01

    The abundances of six N₂-fixing cyanobacterial phylotypes were profiled at 22 stations across the tropical Atlantic Ocean during June 2006, and used to model the contribution of the diazotrophs to N₂ fixation. Diazotroph abundances were measured by targeting the nifH gene of Trichodesmium, unicellular groups A, B, C (UCYN-A, UCYN-B and UCYN-C), and diatom-cyanobiont symbioses Hemiaulus-Richelia, Rhizosolenia-Richelia and Chaetoceros-Calothrix. West to east gradients in temperature, salinity and nutrients [NO₃⁻ + NO₂⁻, PO₄³⁻, Si(OH)₄] showed the influence of the Amazon River plume and its effect on the distributions of the diazotrophs. Trichodesmium accounted for more than 93% of all nifH genes detected, dominated the warmer waters of the western Atlantic, and was the only diazotroph detected at the equatorial upwelling station. UCYN-A was the next most abundant (> 5% of all nifH genes) and dominated the cooler waters of the eastern Atlantic near the Cape Verde Islands. UCYN-C was found at a single depth (200 m) of high salinity and low temperature and nutrients, whereas UCYN-B cells were widespread but in very low abundance (6.1 × 10¹ ± 4.6 × 10² gene copies l⁻¹). The diatom-cyanobionts were observed primarily in the western Atlantic within or near the high Si(OH)₄ input of the Amazon River plume. Overall, highest diazotroph abundances were observed at the surface and declined with depth, except for some subsurface peaks in Trichodesmium, UCYN-B and UCYN-A. Modelled contributions of Trichodesmium, UCYN-B and UCYN-A to total N₂ fixation suggested that Trichodesmium had the largest input, except for the potential of UCYN-A at the Cape Verde Islands.

  2. Hard time to be parents? Sea urchin fishery shifts potential reproductive contribution of population onto the shoulders of the young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Loi

    2017-03-01

    undersized ones. Conversely, the high density of the undersized individuals released a similar amount of gametes to the commercial-size class in the low-pressure zone. Discussion Overall, the lack of the commercial-size class in the high-pressure zone does not seem to be very alarming for the self-supporting capacity of the population, and the reproductive potential contribution seems to depend more on the total density of fertile sea urchins than on their size. However, since population survival in the high-pressure zone is supported by the high density of undersized sea urchins between 30 and 50 mm, management measures should be addressed to maintain these sizes and to shed light on the source of the larval supply.

  3. Complement activation in coronary artery bypass grafting patients without cardiopulmonary bypass - The role of tissue injury by surgical incision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; Mariani, MA; Boonstra, PW; Grandjean, JG; van Oeveren, W

    1999-01-01

    Study objectives: Complement activation is a trigger in inducing inflammation in patients who undergo coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and is usually thought to be induced by the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), In this study, we examined whether tissue injury caused by chest surgical inci

  4. On the contribution of external cost calculations to energy system governance: The case of a potential large-scale nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laes, Erik, E-mail: erik.laes@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Meskens, Gaston, E-mail: gaston.meskens@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Sluijs, Jeroen P. van der, E-mail: j.p.vandersluijs@uu.nl [Copernicus Institute, Department of Science Technology and Society, Utrecht University, Budapestlaan 6, 584 CD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    The contribution of nuclear power to a sustainable energy future is a contested issue. This paper presents a critical review of an attempt to objectify this debate through the calculation of the external costs of a potential large-scale nuclear accident in the ExternE project. A careful dissection of the ExternE approach resulted in a list of 30 calculation steps and assumptions, from which the 6 most contentious ones were selected through a stakeholder internet survey. The policy robustness and relevance of these key assumptions were then assessed in a workshop using the concept of a 'pedigree of knowledge'. Overall, the workshop outcomes revealed the stakeholder and expert panel's scepticism about the assumptions made: generally these were considered not very plausible, subjected to disagreement, and to a large extent inspired by contextual factors. Such criticism indicates a limited validity and useability of the calculated nuclear accident externality as a trustworthy sustainability indicator. Furthermore, it is our contention that the ExternE project could benefit greatly - in terms of gaining public trust - from employing highly visible procedures of extended peer review such as the pedigree assessment applied to our specific case of the external costs of a potential large-scale nuclear accident. - Highlights: > Six most contentious assumptions were selected through a stakeholder internet survey. > Policy robustness of these assumptions was assessed in a pedigree assessment workshop. > Assumptions were considered implausible, controversial, and inspired by contextual factors. > This indicates a limited validity and useability as a trustworthy sustainability indicator.

  5. Presynaptic calcium stores contribute to nicotine-elicited potentiation of evoked synaptic transmission at CA3-CA1 connections in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Magueresse, Corentin; Cherubini, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    Nicotine acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that are widely expressed throughout the central nervous system. It is well established that presynaptic, alpha7-containing nAChRs modulate glutamate release in several brain areas, and that this modulation requires extracellular calcium. However, the intracellular mechanisms consecutive to nAChR opening are unclear. Recent studies have suggested a role for presynaptic calcium stores in the increase of neurotransmitter release following nAChR activation. Using the minimal stimulation protocol at low-probability Schaffer collateral synapses in acute hippocampal slices from neonatal rats, we show that nicotine acting on presynaptic alpha7 nAChRs persistently upregulates glutamate release. We tested the role of calcium stores in this potentiation. First, we examined the relationship between calcium stores and glutamate release. We found that bath application of SERCA pump inhibitors (cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin), as well as an agonist of ryanodine receptors (ryanodine 2 microM) increases the probability of glutamate release at CA3-CA1 synapses, decreases the coefficient of variation and the paired-pulse ratio, indicating that presynaptic activation of calcium-induced calcium release can modulate glutamatergic transmission. Next, we investigated whether blocking calcium release from internal stores could alter the effect of nicotine. Preincubation with thapsigargin (10 microM), cyclopiazonic acid (30 microM), or with a high (blocking) concentration of ryanodine (100 microM) for 30 min to 5 h failed to block the effect of nicotine. However, after preincubation in ryanodine, nicotine-elicited potentiation was significantly shortened. These results indicate that at immature Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, activation of presynaptic calcium stores is not necessary for but contributes to nicotine-elicited increase of neurotransmitter release.

  6. Multivariate analysis of structure and contribution per shares made by potential risk factors at malignant neoplasms in trachea, bronchial tubes and lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.T. Aydinov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article gives the results of multivariate analysis of structure and contribution per shares made by potential risk factors at malignant neoplasms in trachea, bronchial tubes and lung. The authors used specialized databases comprising personified records on oncologic diseases in Taganrog, Rostov region, over 1986-2015 (30,684 registered cases of malignant neoplasms, including 3,480 cases of trachea cancer, bronchial tubes cancer, and lung cancer. When carrying out analytical research we applied both multivariate statistical techniques (factor analysis and hierarchical cluster correlation analysis and conventional techniques of epidemiologic analysis including etiologic fraction calculation (EF, as well as an original technique of assessing actual (epidemiologic risk. Average long-term morbidity with trachea, bronchial tubes and lung cancer over 2011-2015 amounts to 46.64 o / oooo . Over the last 15 years a stable decreasing trend has formed, annual average growth being – 1.22 %. This localization holds the 3rd rank place in oncologic morbidity structure, its specific weight being 10.02 %. We determined etiological fraction (EF for smoking as a priority risk factor causing trachea, bronchial tubes and lung cancer; this fraction amounts to 76.19 % for people aged 40 and older, and to 81.99 % for those aged 60 and older. Application of multivariate statistical techniques (factor analysis and cluster correlation analysis in this research enabled us to make factor structure more simple; namely, to highlight, interpret, give a quantitative estimate of self-descriptiveness and rank four group (latent potential risk factors causing lung cancer.

  7. Behandling med duodenal-jejunal bypass-sleeve ved svær overvægt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Ulrich; Gylvin, Silas; Vilmann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are risk factors for several co-morbidities reducing life expectancy. Conservative treatment of obesity is generally ineffective in the long-term. Bariatric surgery has proven effective, but is associated with potential complications. Duodenal-jejunal bypass sleeve is a novel...

  8. Blood pressure reduction after gastric bypass surgery is explained by a decrease in cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brussel, Peter M; van den Bogaard, Bas; de Weijer, Barbara A; Truijen, Jasper; Krediet, C T Paul; Janssen, Ignace M; van de Laar, Arnold; Kaasjager, Karin; Fliers, Eric; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Serlie, Mireille J; van den Born, Bert-Jan H

    2017-02-01

    Blood pressure (BP) decreases in the first weeks after Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Yet the pathophysiology of the BP-lowering effects observed after gastric bypass surgery is incompletely understood. We evaluated BP, systemic hemodynamics, and baroreflex sensitivity in 15 obese women[mean age 42 ± 7 standard deviation (SD) yr, body mass index 45 ± 6 kg/m(2)] 2 wk before and 6 wk following Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Six weeks after gastric bypass surgery, mean body weight decreased by 13 ± 5 kg (10%, P decreased from 137 ± 10/86 ± 6 to 128 ± 12/81 ± 9 mmHg (P decreased from 128 ± 14/80 ± 9 to 114 ± 10/73 ± 6 mmHg (P = 0.01, P = 0.05), whereas nighttime BP decreased from 111 ± 13/66 ± 7 to 102 ± 9/62 ± 7 mmHg (P = 0.04, P decrease in BP was associated with a 1.6 ± 1.2 l/min (20%, P decrease in cardiac output (CO), while systemic vascular resistance increased (153 ± 189 dyn·s·cm(-5), 15%, P decreased (192 mmHg/s, 19%, P = 0.01), suggesting a reduction in left ventricular contractility. Baroreflex sensitivity increased from 9.0 [6.4-14.3] to 13.8 [8.5-19.0] ms/mmHg (median [interquartile range]; P decrease in CO independent of changes in body weight. The contribution of heart rate to the reduction in CO together with enhanced baroreflex sensitivity suggests a shift toward increased parasympathetic cardiovascular control. The reason for the decrease in blood pressure (BP) in the first weeks after gastric bypass surgery remains to be elucidated. We show that the reduction in BP following surgery is caused by a decrease in cardiac output. In addition, the maximal ascending slope in systolic blood pressure decreased suggesting a reduction in left ventricular contractility and cardiac workload. These findings help to understand the physiological changes following gastric bypass surgery and are relevant in light of the increased risk of heart failure in these patients. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. The effects of unitization on the contribution of familiarity and recollection processes to associative recognition memory: evidence from event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Li, Juan; Xiao, Fengqiu; Broster, Lucas S; Jiang, Yang; Xi, Mingjing

    2015-03-01

    Familiarity and recollection are two independent cognitive processes involved in recognition memory. It is traditionally believed that both familiarity and recollection can support item recognition, whereas only recollection can support associative recognition. Here, using a standard associative recognition task, we examined whether associative retrieval of unitized associations involved differential patterns of familiarity and recollection processes relative to non-unitized associations. The extent of engagement of familiarity and recollection processes during associative retrieval was estimated by using event-related potentials (ERPs). Twenty participants studied compound words and unrelated word pairs during encoding. Subsequently, they were asked to decide whether a presented word pair was intact, rearranged, or a new pair while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded. ERP results showed that compound words evoked a significant early frontal old/new effect (associated with familiarity) between ERPs to intact and rearranged word pairs, whereas this effect disappeared for the unrelated word pairs. In addition, the left parietal old/new effect (associated with recollection) between ERPs to intact and rearranged word pairs was greater for compounds than for unrelated word pairs. These findings suggest that unitization enhances the contribution of both familiarity and recollection processes to associative recognition.

  10. Contributions of Letter-Speech Sound Learning and Visual Print Tuning to Reading Improvement: Evidence from Brain Potential and Dyslexia Training Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga González, Gorka; Žarić, Gojko; Tijms, Jurgen; Bonte, Milene; van der Molen, Maurits W.

    2017-01-01

    We use a neurocognitive perspective to discuss the contribution of learning letter-speech sound (L-SS) associations and visual specialization in the initial phases of reading in dyslexic children. We review findings from associative learning studies on related cognitive skills important for establishing and consolidating L-SS associations. Then we review brain potential studies, including our own, that yielded two markers associated with reading fluency. Here we show that the marker related to visual specialization (N170) predicts word and pseudoword reading fluency in children who received additional practice in the processing of morphological word structure. Conversely, L-SS integration (indexed by mismatch negativity (MMN)) may only remain important when direct orthography to semantic conversion is not possible, such as in pseudoword reading. In addition, the correlation between these two markers supports the notion that multisensory integration facilitates visual specialization. Finally, we review the role of implicit learning and executive functions in audiovisual learning in dyslexia. Implications for remedial research are discussed and suggestions for future studies are presented. PMID:28106790

  11. Contributions of Letter-Speech Sound Learning and Visual Print Tuning to Reading Improvement: Evidence from Brain Potential and Dyslexia Training Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Fraga González

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a neurocognitive perspective to discuss the contribution of learning letter-speech sound (L-SS associations and visual specialization in the initial phases of reading in dyslexic children. We review findings from associative learning studies on related cognitive skills important for establishing and consolidating L-SS associations. Then we review brain potential studies, including our own, that yielded two markers associated with reading fluency. Here we show that the marker related to visual specialization (N170 predicts word and pseudoword reading fluency in children who received additional practice in the processing of morphological word structure. Conversely, L-SS integration (indexed by mismatch negativity (MMN may only remain important when direct orthography to semantic conversion is not possible, such as in pseudoword reading. In addition, the correlation between these two markers supports the notion that multisensory integration facilitates visual specialization. Finally, we review the role of implicit learning and executive functions in audiovisual learning in dyslexia. Implications for remedial research are discussed and suggestions for future studies are presented.

  12. Spectroscopic and DFT studies of second-sphere variants of the type 1 copper site in azurin: covalent and nonlocal electrostatic contributions to reduction potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadt, Ryan G; Sun, Ning; Marshall, Nicholas M; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Lu, Yi; Solomon, Edward I

    2012-10-10

    The reduction potentials (E(0)) of type 1 (T1) or blue copper (BC) sites in proteins and enzymes with identical first coordination spheres around the redox active copper ion can vary by ~400 mV. Here, we use a combination of low-temperature electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance, resonance Raman, and S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopies to investigate a series of second-sphere variants--F114P, N47S, and F114N in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin--which modulate hydrogen bonding to and protein-derived dipoles nearby the Cu-S(Cys) bond. Density functional theory calculations correlated to the experimental data allow for the fractionation of the contributions to tuning E(0) into covalent and nonlocal electrostatic components. These are found to be significant, comparable in magnitude, and additive for active H-bonds, while passive H-bonds are mostly nonlocal electrostatic in nature. For dipoles, these terms can be additive to or oppose one another. This study provides a methodology for uncoupling covalency from nonlocal electrostatics, which, when coupled to X-ray crystallographic data, distinguishes specific local interactions from more long-range protein/active interactions, while affording further insight into the second-sphere mechanisms available to the protein to tune the E(0) of electron-transfer sites in biology.

  13. Yolo Bypass Juvenile Salmon Utilization Study 2016—Summary of acoustically tagged juvenile salmon and study fish release, Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Hurst, William R.

    2017-09-12

    The Yolo Bypass is a flood control bypass in Sacramento Valley, California. Flood plain habitats may be used for juvenile salmon rearing, however, the potential value of such habitats can be difficult to evaluate because of the intermittent nature of inundation events. The Yolo Bypass Juvenile Salmon Utilization Study (YBUS) used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the movements and survival of juvenile salmon adjacent to and within the Yolo Bypass during the winter of 2016. This report presents numbers, size data, and release data (times, dates, and locations) for the 1,197 acoustically tagged juvenile salmon released for the YBUS from February 21 to March 18, 2016. Detailed descriptions of the surgical implantation of transmitters are also presented. These data are presented to support the collaborative, interagency analysis and reporting of the study findings.

  14. A marked increase in gastric fluid volume during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Kudo, Mihoko; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kushikata, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Major physiological stress occurs during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. This is related to hypothermia and artificial organ perfusion. Thus, serious gastrointestinal complications, particularly upper gastrointestinal bleeding, sometimes follow cardiac surgery. We have compared the antisecretory effects of a preanesthetic H2 antagonist (roxatidine, cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group, n = 15) and a proton pump inhibitor (rabeprazole, cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI group, n = 15) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, and also compared in patients undergoing a off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery (off-pump cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group, n = 15). Gastric pH (5.14 ± 0.61) and gastric fluid volume (13.2 ± 2.4 mL) at the end of surgery in off-pump cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 groups was significantly lower and higher than those in both cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 (6.25 ± 0.54, 51.3 ± 8.0 mL) and cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI (7.29 ± 0.13, 63.5 ± 14.8 mL) groups, respectively although those variables did not differ between groups after the induction of anesthesia. Plasma gastrin (142 ± 7 pg/mL) at the end of surgery and maximal blood lactate levels (1.50 ± 0.61 mM) in off-pump cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group were also significantly lower than those in both cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 (455 ± 96 pg/mL, 3.97 ± 0.80 mM) and cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI (525 ± 27 pg/mL, 3.15 ± 0.44 mM) groups, respectively. In addition, there was a significant correlation between gastric fluid volume and maximal blood lactate (r = 0.596). In conclusion, cardiopulmonary bypass may cause an increase in gastric fluid volume which neither H2 antagonist nor PPI suppresses. A significant correlation between gastric fluid volume and maximal blood lactate suggests that gastric fluid volume may predict degree of gastrointestinal tract hypoperfusion. PMID:21765601

  15. Hard time to be parents? Sea urchin fishery shifts potential reproductive contribution of population onto the shoulders of the young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Barbara; Guala, Ivan; Pires da Silva, Rodrigo; Brundu, Gianni; Baroli, Maura; Farina, Simone

    2017-01-01

    -supporting capacity of the population, and the reproductive potential contribution seems to depend more on the total density of fertile sea urchins than on their size. However, since population survival in the high-pressure zone is supported by the high density of undersized sea urchins between 30 and 50 mm, management measures should be addressed to maintain these sizes and to shed light on the source of the larval supply.

  16. Bypass technology enhances the efficiency of wind power plants; Bypass-Technologie erhoeht WEA-Effizienz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebach, Thorsten [EKS Engel GmbH und Co. KG, Wenden (Germany)

    2013-04-01

    A reliable operation of wind power parks significantly depends on a trouble-free data communication. If one or more network participants break down, then it depends on the topology whether the complete power distribution system is available or not. An optical bypass such as it is supplied by EKS Engel GmbH and Co. KG (Wenden, Federal Republic of Germany) offers a remedial action.

  17. Transient Diabetes Insipidus Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekim, Meral; Ekim, Hasan; Yilmaz, Yunus Keser; Bolat, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) results from inadequate output of Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH) from the pituitary gland (central DI) or the inability of the kidney tubules to respond to ADH (nephrogenic DI). ADH is an octapeptide produced in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB) has been shown to cause a six-fold increased circulating ADH levels 12 hours after surgery. However, in some cases, ADH release may be transiently suppressed due to cardioplegia (cardiac standstill) or CPB leading to DI. We present the postoperative course of a 60-year-old man who developed transient DI after CPB. He was successfully treated by applying nasal desmopressin therapy. Relevant biochemical parameters should be monitored closely in patients who produce excessive urine after open heart surgery.

  18. Current status of coronary artery bypass surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xin

    2009-01-01

    @@ Surgical revascularization for atherosclerotic heart disease, also called coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), was first performed in 1962, and is one of the great achievements in medicine. Relief of angina, improvement of exercise tolerance, and the realization of survival benefit have been documented.1 CABG has been used in multi-vessel disease and left main stenosis for over 40 years.2 In the last two decades the mortality of CABG has decreased to less than 2% despite an aging population with increased risk factors. However, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), especially with drug-eluting stents, has been challenging CABG, While PCI has improved, CABG has also progressed with better peri-operative management, a higher use of arterial grafting, off-pump surgery, and improved techniques with minimally invasive surgical options.3,4

  19. Factor V Leiden and Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Victor; Rosin, Mark; Marcoux, Jo-Anne; Olson, Marnie; Bezaire, Jennifer; Dalshaug, Gregory

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a patient with factor V Leiden with an antithrombin III activity of 67% who received a successful aortic valve replacement supported by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A safe level of anticoagulation was achieved by monitoring activated clotting time (ACT) and heparin concentration ensuring adequate anticoagulation throughout the procedure. Results from ACT, heparin dose response, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography are given. Factor V Leiden patients can be safely anti-coagulated using heparin for CPB procedures when monitored with ACT, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography. Postoperative chest tube losses were 360 mL, less than half our institutional average. Anticoagulation for the pre-and post-operative phase is also discussed.

  20. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact - Mckay Bypass Canal Extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1998-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1262) to extend the McKay Bypass Canal on the east side of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. The McKay Bypass Canal Extension (Extension) is needed to route water from the existing canal around the Walnut Creek drainage, thus preventing potential co-mingling of Broomfield city water (collected from the Coal Creek drainage) with Site runoff water. The EA describes and analyzes the environmental effects of the Proposed Action (using a buried pipeline for the extension), and the alternatives of taking no action, using an open ditch for the extension, and using an aboveground pipeline for the extension. The EA was the subject of a public comment period from July 22 to August 6, 1998. Written comments regarding the EA were received from the City of Broomfield and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

  1. Alongshore sediment bypassing as a control on river mouth morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.; Nardin, William; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    River mouths, shoreline locations where fluvial and coastal sediments are partitioned via erosion, trapping, and redistribution, are responsible for the ultimate sedimentary architecture of deltas and, because of their dynamic nature, also pose great management and engineering challenges. To investigate the interaction between fluvial and littoral processes at wave-dominated river mouths, we modeled their morphologic evolution using the coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model Delft3D-SWAN. Model experiments replicate alongshore migration of river mouths, river mouth spit development, and eventual spit breaching, suggesting that these are emergent phenomena that can develop even under constant fluvial and wave conditions. Furthermore, we find that sediment bypassing of a river mouth develops though feedbacks between waves and river mouth morphology, resulting in either continuous bypassing pathways or episodic bar bypassing pathways. Model results demonstrate that waves refracting into the river mouth bar create a zone of low alongshore sediment transport updrift of the river mouth, which reduces sediment bypassing. Sediment bypassing, in turn, controls the river mouth migration rate and the size of the river mouth spit. As a result, an intermediate amount of river discharge maximizes river mouth migration. The fraction of alongshore sediment bypassing can be predicted from the balance between the jet and the wave momentum flux. Quantitative comparisons show a match between our modeled predictions of river mouth bypassing and migration rates observed in natural settings.

  2. The Staphylococcus aureus FASII bypass escape route from FASII inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Claire; Halpern, David; Kénanian, Gérald; Pathania, Amit; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Lamberet, Gilles; Gruss, Alexandra; Gloux, Karine

    2017-07-17

    Antimicrobials targeting the fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway are being developed as alternative treatments for bacterial infections. Emergence of resistance to FASII inhibitors was mainly considered as a consequence of mutations in the FASII target genes. However, an alternative and efficient anti-FASII resistance strategy, called here FASII bypass, was uncovered. Bacteria that bypass FASII incorporate exogenous fatty acids in membrane lipids, and thus dispense with the need for FASII. This strategy is used by numerous Gram-positive low GC % bacteria, including streptococci, enterococci, and staphylococci. Some bacteria repress FASII genes once fatty acids are available, and "constitutively" shift to FASII bypass. Others, such as the major pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, can undergo high frequency mutations that favor FASII bypass. This capacity is particularly relevant during infection, as the host supplies the fatty acids needed for bacteria to bypass FASII and thus become resistant to FASII inhibitors. Screenings for anti-FASII resistance in the presence of exogenous fatty acids confirmed that FASII bypass confers anti-FASII resistance among clinical and veterinary isolates. Polymorphisms in S. aureus FASII initiation enzymes favor FASII bypass, possibly by increasing availability of acyl-carrier protein, a required intermediate. Here we review FASII bypass and consequences in light of proposed uses of anti-FASII to treat infections, with a focus on FASII bypass in S. aureus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  3. Seasonal Variation of Climatological Bypassing Flows around the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiang; ZHANG Renhe

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated diagnostically the seasonal variation of the bypassing flows caused by the splitting effect of the Tibetan Plateau (TP).The relationships among the splitting bypassing flows around the TP to precipitation in China,the westerly jet stream,and the thermal status over the TP are revealed.The bypassing flows occur from the 1st to the 22nd pentad and from the 59th to the 73rd pentad,respectively,and they disappear from the 29th to the 58th pentad.They are strongest in winter from the 1st to the 22nd pentad and from the 59th to the 73rd pentad,respectively.During the rebuilding of the bypassing flows from mid-October to mid-February,they are the main cause of precipitation over southeastern China.The enhancement of the bypassing flow intensity in March cau cause the precipitation to increase in the early stage of the persistent spring rain over southeastern China.From winter to summer,the seasonal transition of the bypassing flows in the lower troposphere precedes that of the westerly jet stream axis in the upper troposphere to the west of the TP by ~4 pentads,while from summer to winter lags by ~4 pentads.The seasonal variation of the thermal status over the TP plays an important role in the bypassing flows around the TP.The strengthening of the heating over the TP weakens the bypassing flows,and the increase in cooling over the TP is related to the rebuilding and strengthening of the bypassing flows.

  4. Acute mesenteric ischemia after cardio-pulmonary bypass surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bassam Abboud; Ronald Daher; Joe Boujaoude

    2008-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a highly-lethal surgical emergency.Several pathophysiologic events (arterial obstruction,venous thrombosis and diffuse vasospasm) lead to a sudden decrease in mesenteric blood flow.Ischemia/reperfusion syndrome of the intestine is responsible for systemic abnormalities,leading to multi-organ failure and death.Early diagnosis is difficult because the clinical presentation is subtle,and the biological and radiological diagnostic tools lack sensitivity and specificity.Therapeutic options vary from conservative resuscitation,medical treatment,endovascular techniques and surgical resection and revascularization.A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis,and prompt treatment is the only hope of reducing the mortality rate.Studies are in progress to provide more accurate diagnostic tools for early diagnosis.AMI can complicate the post-operative course of patients following cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB).Several factors contribute to the systemic hypo-perfusion state,which is the most frequent pathophysiologic event.In this particular setting,the clinical presentation of AMI can be misleading,while the laboratory and radiological diagnostic tests often produce inconclusive results.The management strategies are controversial,but early treatment is critical for saving lives.Based on the experience of our team,we consider prompt exploratory laparotomy,irrespective of the results of the diagnostic tests,is the only way to provide objective assessment and adequate treatment,leading to dramatic reduction in the mortality rate.

  5. Gastric Bypass Reduces Symptoms and Hormonal Responses in Hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Niclas; Börjesson, Joey Lau; Sundbom, Magnus; Wiklund, Urban; Karlsson, F Anders; Eriksson, Jan W

    2016-09-01

    Gastric bypass (GBP) surgery, one of the most common bariatric procedures, induces weight loss and metabolic effects. The mechanisms are not fully understood, but reduced food intake and effects on gastrointestinal hormones are thought to contribute. We recently observed that GBP patients have lowered glucose levels and frequent asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. Here, we subjected patients before and after undergoing GBP surgery to hypoglycemia and examined symptoms and hormonal and autonomic nerve responses. Twelve obese patients without diabetes (8 women, mean age 43.1 years [SD 10.8] and BMI 40.6 kg/m(2) [SD 3.1]) were examined before and 23 weeks (range 19-25) after GBP surgery with hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (stepwise to plasma glucose 2.7 mmol/L). The mean change in Edinburgh Hypoglycemia Score during clamp was attenuated from 10.7 (6.4) before surgery to 5.2 (4.9) after surgery. There were also marked postsurgery reductions in levels of glucagon, cortisol, and catecholamine and the sympathetic nerve responses to hypoglycemia. In addition, growth hormone displayed a delayed response but to a higher peak level. Levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose during hypoglycemia but rose less postsurgery compared with presurgery. Thus, GBP surgery causes a resetting of glucose homeostasis, which reduces symptoms and neurohormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Further studies should address the underlying mechanisms as well as their impact on the overall metabolic effects of GBP surgery.

  6. Effect of cardiopulmonary bypass on gastrointestinal perfusion and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaer, J A; Shaw, A D; Wild, R; Swift, R I; Munsch, C M; Smith, P L; Taylor, K M

    1994-02-01

    Gastric mucosal tonometry was used to determine the adequacy of gastrointestinal perfusion in 10 patients undergoing elective myocardial revascularization. Patients were prospectively randomized to receive either pulsatile or nonpulsatile flow during cardiopulmonary bypass. All patients showed a reduction in gastric mucosal perfusion during bypass, manifested by a reduction in the gastric mucosal pH, which occurred independently of variations in the arterial pH. In the group of patients receiving nonpulsatile flow, this reduction was significantly greater (p < 0.05). Cardiopulmonary bypass using nonpulsatile flow is associated with the development of a gastric mucosal acidosis, which may have implications for the development of postoperative complications.

  7. Asendan Desendan Aortic Bypass: Atan Kalpte Mediyan Sternotomi Yoluyla Onarim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Akyuz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 9-month-old patient presenting for redo aortic arch surgery because of recoarctation. In present case, ascending-to-descending aortic bypass via median sternotomy was performed without cardiopulmonary bypass with good result. In spite of the fact that the different surgical and intervention treatment options of aortic coarctation are quite satisfactory, a certain group of patients need reoperation because of recoarctation. The recoarctation repair of the aorta with the extra-anatomic aortic bypass is considered a low-risk procedure with high success rate.

  8. 34 CFR 300.198 - Continuation of a by-pass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuation of a by-pass. 300.198 Section 300.198... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility By-Pass for Children in Private Schools § 300.198 Continuation of a by-pass. The Secretary continues a by-pass until the Secretary determines that the SEA, LEA...

  9. 34 CFR 300.192 - Notice of intent to implement a by-pass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notice of intent to implement a by-pass. 300.192... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility By-Pass for Children in Private Schools § 300.192 Notice of intent to implement a by-pass. (a) Before taking any final action to implement a by-pass,...

  10. 34 CFR 300.191 - Provisions for services under a by-pass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Provisions for services under a by-pass. 300.191... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility By-Pass for Children in Private Schools § 300.191 Provisions for services under a by-pass. (a) Before implementing a by-pass, the Secretary consults...

  11. H2O2 generated by NADPH oxidase 4 contributes to transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel-mediated mechanosensation in the rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chian-Shiung; Lee, Shang-Hsing; Huang, Ho-Shiang; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-08-15

    The presence of NADPH oxidase (Nox) in the kidney, especially Nox4, results in H2O2 production, which regulates Na(+) excretion and urine formation. Redox-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels (TRPV1s) are distributed in mechanosensory fibers of the renal pelvis and monitor changes in intrapelvic pressure (IPP) during urine formation. The present study tested whether H2O2 derived from Nox4 affects TRPV1 function in renal sensory responses. Perfusion of H2O2 into the renal pelvis dose dependently increased afferent renal nerve activity and substance P (SP) release. These responses were attenuated by cotreatment with catalase or TRPV1 blockers. In single unit recordings, H2O2 activated afferent renal nerve activity in response to rising IPP but not high salt. Western blots revealed that Nox2 (gp91(phox)) and Nox4 are both present in the rat kidney, but Nox4 is abundant in the renal pelvis and originates from dorsal root ganglia. This distribution was associated with expression of the Nox4 regulators p22(phox) and polymerase δ-interacting protein 2. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that IPP increases polymerase δ-interacting protein 2 association with Nox4 or p22(phox) in the renal pelvis. Interestingly, immunofluorescence labeling demonstrated that Nox4 colocalizes with TRPV1 in sensory fibers of the renal pelvis, indicating that H2O2 generated from Nox4 may affect TRPV1 activity. Stepwise increases in IPP and saline loading resulted in H2O2 and SP release, sensory activation, diuresis, and natriuresis. These effects, however, were remarkably attenuated by Nox inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that Nox4-positive fibers liberate H2O2 after mechanostimulation, thereby contributing to a renal sensory nerve-mediated diuretic/natriuretic response.

  12. Linitis Plastica of the bypassed stomach 7 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenen, Filip Wn; Gys, Ben; Moreels, Tom; Michielsen, Maartje; Gys, Tobie; Lafullarde, Thierry

    2016-06-03

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is currently the preferred surgical procedure to treat morbid obesity. It has proven its effects on excess weight loss and its positive effect on comorbidities. One of the main issues, however, is the postoperative evaluation of the bypassed gastric remnant. In literature, cancer of the excluded stomach after RYGB is rare. We describe the case of a 52-year-old woman with gastric linitis plastica in the bypassed stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, diagnosed by means of laparoscopy and Single-Balloon enteroscopy, and it's clinical importance. Linitis plastica of the excluded stomach after RYGB is a very rare entity. This case report shows the importance of long-term postoperative follow-up, and the importance of Single-Balloon enteroscopy for visualization of the bypassed stomach remnant, when other investigations remain without results. This case report is only the second report of a linitis plastica in the bypassed stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

  13. Effect of cardiopulmonary bypass on tissue injury markers and endothelial activation during coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG is done either using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB or without using CPB (OPCAB. But, recently, reports have shown that CPB is associated with increased postoperative morbidity because of the involvement of many systems. Aims: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the influence of the technique of surgery on various tissue injury markers and the extent of endothelial activation in patients undergoing CABG and OPCAB coronary revascularization. Settings and Design: This study was conducted at a tertiary healthcare center during the period May 2008 to December 2009. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective nonrandomized blinded study. The activities of Creatine Phosphokinase (CK and its isoenzyme CK-MB, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, levels of cardiac Troponin I, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-I and systemic nitric oxide production were assessed. Statistical analysis: All the results were expressed as Mean±SD. P value ≤0.05 was considered significant. The statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS Version 11.5-computer software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results: The surgical trauma had elevated CK, CK-MB and Troponin I in both the groups and further elevation was seen in the CABG group in comparison to OPCAB (P<0.001. The Troponin I concentrations showed an increase from 0.11±0.02 preoperatively to 6.59±0.59 (ng/ml at 24 h (P<0.001 compared to the OPCAB group. Mean serum levels of sVCAM-1 increased significantly after surgery in both the groups (P<0.02. To determine serum nitric oxide (NO production, NO2− and NO3− (stable end products of NO oxidation were analyzed which also increased significantly at 24 h in both the groups. But the increase was not significant at 48 h in both the groups compared to the preoperative value in our study. Conclusion: The present study indicates that, despite comparable surgical trauma, the OPCAB significantly reduces

  14. Cancer stem cells display extremely large evolvability: alternating plastic and rigid networks as a potential Mechanism: network models, novel therapeutic target strategies, and the contributions of hypoxia, inflammation and cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csermely, Peter; Hódsági, János; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Módos, Dezső; Perez-Lopez, Áron R; Szalay, Kristóf; Veres, Dániel V; Lenti, Katalin; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2015-02-01

    Cancer is increasingly perceived as a systems-level, network phenomenon. The major trend of malignant transformation can be described as a two-phase process, where an initial increase of network plasticity is followed by a decrease of plasticity at late stages of tumor development. The fluctuating intensity of stress factors, like hypoxia, inflammation and the either cooperative or hostile interactions of tumor inter-cellular networks, all increase the adaptation potential of cancer cells. This may lead to the bypass of cellular senescence, and to the development of cancer stem cells. We propose that the central tenet of cancer stem cell definition lies exactly in the indefinability of cancer stem cells. Actual properties of cancer stem cells depend on the individual "stress-history" of the given tumor. Cancer stem cells are characterized by an extremely large evolvability (i.e. a capacity to generate heritable phenotypic variation), which corresponds well with the defining hallmarks of cancer stem cells: the possession of the capacity to self-renew and to repeatedly re-build the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise a tumor in new environments. Cancer stem cells represent a cell population, which is adapted to adapt. We argue that the high evolvability of cancer stem cells is helped by their repeated transitions between plastic (proliferative, symmetrically dividing) and rigid (quiescent, asymmetrically dividing, often more invasive) phenotypes having plastic and rigid networks. Thus, cancer stem cells reverse and replay cancer development multiple times. We describe network models potentially explaining cancer stem cell-like behavior. Finally, we propose novel strategies including combination therapies and multi-target drugs to overcome the Nietzschean dilemma of cancer stem cell targeting: "what does not kill me makes me stronger".

  15. Rodent models of cardiopulmonary bypass: utility in improving perioperative outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, F.

    2008-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical and anesthesia techniques, subtle neurologic injury still remains an important complication after cardiac surgery. Because the causes are multifactorial and complex, research in an appropriate small animal model for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is warranted. This thesis

  16. Value of Optical Bypass in Packet Ring Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper firstly examines the value of optical bypass scheme in packet ring networks. An Integer Linear Program (ILP) formulation is presented and analytical results under different traffic patterns are given.

  17. Severe hypoglycaemia post-gastric bypass requiring partial pancreatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patti, M E; McMahon, G; Mun, E C;

    2005-01-01

    was assessed in all three patients. RESULTS: All three patients had evidence of severe postprandial hyperinsulinaemia and hypoglycaemia. In one patient, reversal of gastric bypass was ineffective in reversing hypoglycaemia. All three patients ultimately required partial pancreatectomy for control...

  18. [Psychoprophylaxis in patients after coronary artery bypass graft operations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymaszewska, Joanna; Chładzińska-Kiejna, Sylwia; Górna, Renata; Kustrzycki, Wojciech

    2004-05-01

    The paper presented problems of quality of life and psychosocial functioning of patients following coronary artery bypass grafting operations. Possibilities of psychoprophylactic effects towards these patients and its efficacy were described.

  19. Predicting the need for blood during cardiopulmonary bypass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    from the depot. Supply logistics of banked blood may be problematic during car- ... delivery that occurs on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In spite of patient ... whole body oxygen consumption, there is a time lapse before stable.

  20. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - January 2003 Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence R. Zirker; James E. Francfort

    2003-01-01

    This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

  1. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - First Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirker, L.R.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-31

    This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

  2. Induction and detection of disturbed homeostasis in cardiopulmonary bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vroege, R; Meerman, FT; Eijsman, L; Wildevuur, WR; Wildevuur, CRH; van Oeveren, W

    2004-01-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) haemodynamic alterations, haemostasis and the inflammatory response are the main causes of homeostatic disruption. Even with CPB procedures of short duration, the homeostasis of a patient is disrupted and, in many cases, requires intensive postoperative treatment

  3. Prolonged successful therapy for hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia after gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myint, K S; Greenfield, J R; Farooqi, I S;

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia following gastric bypass surgery (GBS) is increasingly recognised. However, its pathophysiology remains unclear. Some patients require pancreatectomy. Medical therapy with calcium channel blockers, acarbose and diazoxide has been reported to be beneficial...

  4. Antiplatelet therapy at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremke, Michael; Tang, Mariann; Bak, Mikkel;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this multicentre cohort study was to examine the relationship between antiplatelet therapy (APT) at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and postoperative bleeding complications, transfusion requirements and adverse cardiovascular events. METHODS: A matched...

  5. Canals, Bypass Canal, Published in 2002, Duchesne County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Canals dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2002. It is described as 'Bypass Canal'. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  6. Effect of closure of the mesenteric defect during laparoscopic gastric bypass and prevention of internal hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Sara Danshøj; Naver, Lars; Jess, Per

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study is to evaluate the benefits and disadvantages of closing the mesenteric defects during gastric bypass to avoid internal herniation (IH). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study is performed as a single-centre, randomised, controlled, blinded trial. Patients are randomly...... is the incidence of IH. CONCLUSION: This study will be the first Danish, randomised, controlled study comparing conventional LRYGB with and without closure of the mesenteric defects. The results will contribute to evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of IH. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION...

  7. Palliative surgical bypass for unresectable periampullar y carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shivendra Singh; Ajay Kumar Sachdev; Adarsh Chaudhary; Anil Kumar Agarwal

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Around 60% to 80% of patients with periampullary carcinoma are unresectable either due to distant metastasis or local vascular invasion. With the advancement of endoscopic interventional procedures, the role of surgical bypass has diminished. However, surgical bypass is still appropriate in patients with unresectable disease discovered at the time of surgery. This study was conducted to assess the results of palliative surgical bypass for patients with unresectable periampullary carcinoma at our hospital, a tertiary referral center of Northern India. METHOD:The study group comprised 204 patients who had undergone surgical bypass for advanced periampullary carcinoma over the last 15 years. RESULTS:Between January 1990 and December 2004, 204 patients (128 males, 76 females) consisting of 179 patients with carcinoma of head of the pancreas, 14 patients with ampullary carcinoma, 8 patients with lower end cholangiocarcinoma and 3 patients with duodenal carcinoma underwent surgical bypass. Their average age was 51 years (range 20-78 years). Both biliary and gastric bypasses were done in 158 (77.45%), biliary bypass alone in 37 (18.13%), and gastric bypass alone in 9 (4.32%). Biliary bypass was done by Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy, and gastric bypass by retrocolic gastrojejunostomy. The overall postoperative mortality and morbidity were 0.98%and 26.9%, respectively. The patients who died had undergone previously endoscopic intervention. Complications included wound infection in 12.25% of the patients, bile leak in 5.12%, delayed gastric emptying in 5.38%, ascitic leak from drains in 8.8%, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 1.96%. The incidences of wound infection and bile leak both were signiifcantly higher in patients who had had preoperative biliary stenting. None of the patients who had undergone Roux-en-Y hepati-cojejunostomy+retrocolic gastrojejunostomy required any intervention later in their life. CONCLUSIONS:Surgical bypass is a safe procedure with

  8. Radiologic evaluation following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carucci, Laura R. [Department of Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, P.O. Box 980615, Richmond, VA 23298-0615 (United States)]. E-mail: lcarucci@vcu.edu; Turner, Mary Ann [Department of Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, P.O. Box 980615, Richmond, VA 23298-0615 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Morbid obesity is an increasing health problem, and bariatric surgery is becoming a popular treatment option. Radiologists must be familiar with performing and interpreting studies in this patient population. The typical postoperative findings of the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) procedure for morbid obesity on upper gastrointestinal (UGI) series are presented. An overview of the potential complications that may be diagnosed with contrast studies and computed tomography (CT) is provided in addition to a description of potential pitfalls in interpreting these studies.

  9. Potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol in the Mexico City region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hodzic

    2010-01-01

    variability. The predicted production from anthropogenic and biomass burning S/IVOC represents 40–60% of the total SOA at the surface during the day and is somewhat larger than that from aromatics, especially at the T1 site at the edge of the city. The SOA production from the continued multi-generation S/IVOC oxidation products continues actively downwind. Similar to aircraft observations, the predicted OA/ΔCO ratio for the ROB case increases from 20–30 μg sm−3 ppm−1 up to 60–70 μg sm−3 ppm−1 between a fresh and 1-day aged air mass, while the GRI case produces a 30–40% higher OA growth than observed. The predicted average O/C ratio of total OA for the ROB case is 0.16 at T0, substantially below observed value of 0.5. A much better agreement for O/C ratios and temporal variability (R2=0.63 is achieved with the updated GRI treatment. Both treatments show a deficiency in regard to POA evolution with a tendency to over-evaporate POA upon dilution of the urban plume suggesting that atmospheric HOA may be less volatile than assumed in these parameterizations. This study highlights the important potential role of S/IVOC chemistry in the SOA budget in this region, and highlights the need for improvements in current parameterizations. We note that our simulations did not include other proposed pathways of SOA formation such as formation from very volatile species like glyoxal, which can also contribute SOA mass and especially increase the O/C ratio.

  10. Gastric bypass patients' goal-strategy-monitoring networks for long-term dietary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Amanda; Bisogni, Carole A

    2014-10-01

    Following gastric bypass surgery, patients must make dramatic dietary changes, but little is known about patients' perspectives on long-term dietary management after this surgery. This grounded theory, qualitative study sought to advance conceptual understanding of food choice by examining how gastric bypass patients constructed personal food systems to guide food and eating behaviors 12 months post-surgery. Two in-depth interviews were conducted with each of 16 adults, purposively sampled from bariatric support groups. Using constant comparative analysis of verbatim interview transcripts, researchers identified participants' goal-strategy-monitoring networks representing how participants used specific food and eating behaviors towards their main goals of: Weight Management, Overall Health, Avoiding Negative Reactions to Eating, and Integrating Dietary Changes with Daily Life. Linked to each main goal was a hierarchy of intermediary goals, strategies, and tactics. Participants used monitoring behaviors to assess strategy effectiveness towards goal achievement. Individuals' Weight Management networks were compared to uncover similarities and differences among strategy use and monitoring methods among those who maintained weight loss and those who regained weight. The complex, multilevel goal-strategy-monitoring networks identified illustrate the "work" involved in constructing new personal food systems after surgery, as well as advance understanding of strategies as a component of people's personal food systems. These findings provide researchers and practitioners with insight into the long-term dietary issues that gastric bypass patients face and a potential method for representing how people relate deliberate dietary behaviors to their goals.

  11. Nurse’s Perception of Stressors Associated with Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Parvan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiac surgery has many physiological, psychological, emotional, growth and spiritual potential consequences due to stress. Identifying and understanding the nature of stress can help nurses in controlling and reducing it. However, few studies have been conducted to identify the stressors. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine nurses' perceptions of patients' stressors associated with coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods: During a two month investigation, qualified nurses (n = 68 of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass were selected on the third to fifth day after surgery. With the use of Revised Cardiac Surgery Stressors Scale (RCSSS, interpersonal, intrapersonal and extrapersonal stressors were determined. Results: The findings showed that the most interpersonal, intrapersonal and extrapersonal stressors were; “the need to have cardiac surgery”, “death due to illness or surgery”, “needing assistance with various activities”, “doctors and nurses discussing about other patients”, “having chest tube” and “Payment of hospital and medical bills”. Conclusion: Identification of stressors in patients with coronary artery bypass graft helps nurses in taking better care of them. It would make a better ground for the officials and practitioners towards managing the stressors, especially interpersonal and extrapersonal stressors. Thereby patients are helped to cope with stressors.

  12. Gastric bezoar after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, Ismail; Tardum Tardu, Ali; Tolan, Kerem; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Karagul, Servet; Kirmizi, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to present a patient with gastric pouch bezoar after having a bariatric surgery. Presentation of case Sixty-three years old morbid obese female had a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery 14 months ago. She has lost 88% of her excess body mass index; but started to suffer from nausea, abdominal distention and vomiting lately, especially for the last two months. The initial evaluation by endoscopy, computed tomography (CT) and an upper gastrointestinal contrast series overlooked the pathology in the gastric pouch and did not display any abnormality. However, a second endoscopy revealed a 5 cm in diameter phytobezoar in the gastric pouch which was later endoscopically removed. After the bezoar removal, her complaints relieved completely. Discussion The gastric bezoars may be confused with the other pathologies because of the dyspeptic complaints of these patients. The patients that had a bariatric surgery; are more prone to bezoar formation due to their potential eating disorders and because of the gastro-enterostomy made to a small gastric pouch after the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Conclusion Possibility of a bezoar formation should be kept in mind in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass patients who has nausea and vomiting complaints. Removal of the bezoar provides a dramatic improvement in the complaints of these patients. PMID:27107501

  13. Breath Hydrogen as a Biomarker for Glucose Malabsorption after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Andalib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Abdominal symptoms are common after bariatric surgery, and these individuals commonly have upper gut bacterial overgrowth, a known cause of malabsorption. Breath hydrogen determination after oral glucose is a safe and inexpensive test for malabsorption. This study is designed to investigate breath hydrogen levels after oral glucose in symptomatic individuals who had undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Methods. This is a retrospective study of individuals (n=63; 60 females; 3 males; mean age 49 years who had gastric bypass surgery and then glucose breath testing to evaluate abdominal symptoms. Results. Among 63 postoperative individuals, 51 (81% had a late rise (≥45 minutes in breath hydrogen or methane, supporting glucose malabsorption; 46 (90% of these 51 subjects also had an early rise (≤30 minutes in breath hydrogen or methane supporting upper gut bacterial overgrowth. Glucose malabsorption was more frequent in subjects with upper gut bacterial overgrowth compared to subjects with no evidence for bacterial overgrowth (P<0.001. Conclusion. These data support the presence of intestinal glucose malabsorption associated with upper gut bacterial overgrowth in individuals with abdominal symptoms after gastric bypass surgery. Breath hydrogen testing after oral glucose should be considered to evaluate potential malabsorption in symptomatic, postoperative individuals.

  14. Night Blindness and Vitamin A Deficiency following Jejunoilieal Bypass Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Paul C; Canny, Christopher L.

    1989-01-01

    A 42-year-old man who developed severe night blindness 15 years following jejunoileal bypass surgery for morbid obesity is described. Ophthamological testing, including dark adaptation, electroretinography and serum vitamin A levels, confirmed a diagnosis of vitamin A deficiency. Oral vitamin A 25,000 iu/day for two months resulted in a full recovery of visual deficits. Nutritional vitamin A deficiency is discussed in the context of intestinal bypass surgery.

  15. Severe peripheral neuropathy following gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity.

    OpenAIRE

    Maryniak, O.

    1984-01-01

    Severe weakness in the limbs developed in a young woman 3 1/2 months after successful gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity. Electromyography confirmed the clinical impression of generalized axonal polyneuropathy. Vitamin B replacement therapy was started. The gastric bypass was not reversed, and the patient continued to lose weight while undergoing rehabilitation. After 10 months she had almost fully recovered. Her total weight loss was 76 kg. Neuropathy is an uncommon but serious compli...

  16. Association of sex with patency of femorodistal bypass grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, H R; Schroeder, T V; Simms, M H;

    2000-01-01

    There is evidence for superior patency in infra-inguinal bypass procedures in men compared to women. A large, prospectively planned series was investigated in order to confirm this finding and to determine the origin of this difference in outcome.......There is evidence for superior patency in infra-inguinal bypass procedures in men compared to women. A large, prospectively planned series was investigated in order to confirm this finding and to determine the origin of this difference in outcome....

  17. Intra-aortic balloon pump use does not affect the renal function in patients undergoing off pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniraju Geetha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal dysfunction is known to occur during cardiac surgery. A few factors such as perioperative hypotension, use of potential nephrotoxic therapeutic agents, radio opaque contrast media in the recent past, intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP and cardiopulmonary bypass have been blamed as the contributing factors to the causation of postoperative renal dysfunction in cardiac surgical patients. At times, in patients with renal failure and low cardiac output status, one may face the dilemma if the use of IABP is safe. We undertook this prospective observational study to determine the degree of possible renal injury when IABP is used by measuring serial values of serum creatinine and Cystatin C. Elective patients scheduled for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery requiring preoperative use of IABP were included in this study. Cystatin C and serum creatinine levels were checked at fixed intervals after institution of IABP. Twenty-two patients were eligible for enrolment to the study. There was no significant change in the values of serum creatinine; from the basal value of 1.10 ± 0.233 to 0.98 ± 0.363 mg /dL (P value >0.05. Cystatin C levels significantly decreased from the basal level of 0.98 ± 0.29 to 0.89 ± 0.23 (P value <0.05. Contrary to the belief, Cystatin C, the early indicator of renal dysfunction decreases suggesting absence of renal injury after the use of IABP. Absence of elevation of cystatin C levels in our study suggests the lack of potential of the IABP to cause renal dysfunction in patients who received elective IABP therapy preoperatively.

  18. Hydroxyethyl starch versus Ringer solution in cardiopulmonary bypass prime solutions (a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozyazıcıoglu Ahmet

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our study we compared the Ringer solution, which is the standard prime solution of our department, with the HES (Hydroxyethyl starch 130-0.4 solution, which can be a potential alternative prime solution with an indispensable material for the cardio-pulmonary bypass applications. Methods 140 patients undergoing to CABG (Coronary Artery Bypass Graft surgery were electively enrolled to the study. 1500 ml Ringer solution + 200 ml mannitol + 60 ml sodium bicarbonate + 150 U/kg heparin was used as a prime solution to start cardiopulmonary by-pass in 70 patients which was defined as group 1. On the other hand, 1500 ml HES 130 - 0.4 + 200 ml mannitol + 60 ml sodium bicarbonate + 150 U/kg heparin was used as a prime solution in 70 patients in group 2. Results INR (International Normalized Ratio, urea levels and blood platelet counts were significantly different between the groups. INR level was higher in group 1, while blood urea and creatinine levels and platelet count were higher in group 2 at the end of the 12th and 24nd hours postoperatively (p = 0.001. In this study, it was shown that the usage of HES 130-0.4 as a prime solution did not have negative effect on postoperative INR level, platelet count, the need for transfusion and the amount of drainage, despite the negative opinions that similar solutions caused coagulation disorders. Another interesting result of the study was that blood platelet count at 24th hour was statistically significantly higher in group 2 (p = 0.001. Conclusion HES 130-0.4 solution is an alternative colloidal solution which can be used as the prime solution or as a mixture with the crystalloids in cardio-pulmonary bypass applications.

  19. Present and potential future contributions of sulfate, black and organic carbon aerosols from China to global air quality, premature mortality and radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikawa, Eri; Naik, Vaishali; Horowitz, Larry W.; Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.

    Aerosols are harmful to human health and have both direct and indirect effects on climate. China is a major contributor to global emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO 2), a sulfate (SO 42-) precursor, organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) aerosols. Although increasingly examined, the effect of present and potential future levels of these emissions on global premature mortality and climate change has not been well quantified. Through both direct radiative effects and indirect effects on clouds, SO 42- and OC exert negative radiative forcing (cooling) while BC exerts positive forcing (warming). We analyze the effect of China's emissions of SO 2, SO 42-, OC and BC in 2000 and for three emission scenarios in 2030 on global surface aerosol concentrations, premature mortality, and radiative forcing (RF). Using global models of chemical transport (MOZART-2) and radiative transfer (GFDL RTM), and combining simulation results with gridded population data, mortality rates, and concentration-response relationships from the epidemiological literature, we estimate the contribution of Chinese aerosols to global annual premature mortality and to RF in 2000 and 2030. In 2000, we estimate these aerosols cause approximately 470 000 premature deaths in China and an additional 30 000 deaths globally. In 2030, aggressive emission controls lead to a 50% reduction in premature deaths from the 2000 level to 240 000 in China and 10 000 elsewhere, while under a high emissions scenario premature deaths increase 50% from the 2000 level to 720 000 in China and to 40 000 elsewhere. Because the negative RF from SO 42- and OC is larger than the positive forcing from BC, Chinese aerosols lead to global net direct RF of -74 mW m -2 in 2000 and between -15 and -97 mW m -2 in 2030 depending on the emissions scenario. Our analysis indicates that increased effort to reduce greenhouse gases is essential to address climate change as China's anticipated reduction of aerosols will result in the

  20. LncRNAs expression in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats reveals the potential role of LncRNAs contributing to rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Qin, Xiu-Juan; Li, Wei-Ping; Ma, Rong; Wang, Ting; Li, Zhu-Qing

    2016-11-15

    Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) are an important class of widespread molecules involved in diverse biological functions, which are exceptionally expressed in numerous types of diseases. Currently, limited study on LncRNA in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is available. In this study, we aimed to identify the specifically expressed LncRNA that are relevant to adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in rats, and to explore the possible molecular mechanisms of RA pathogenesis. To identify LncRNAs specifically expressed in rheumatoid arthritis, the expression of LncRNAs in synoviums of rats from the model group (n=3) was compared with that in the control group (n=3) using Arraystar Rat LncRNA/mRNA microarray and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Up to 260 LncRNAs were found to be differentially expressed (≥1.5-fold-change) in the synoviums between AA model and the normal rats (170 up-regulated and 90 down-regulated LncRNAs in AA rats compared with normal rats). Coding-non-coding gene co-expression networks (CNC network) were drawn based on the correlation analysis between the differentially expressed LncRNAs and mRNAs. Six LncRNAs, XR_008357, U75927, MRAK046251, XR_006457, DQ266363 and MRAK003448, were selected to analyze the relationship between LncRNAs and RA via the CNC network and GO analysis. Real-time PCR result confirmed that the six LncRNAs were specifically expressed in the AA rats. These results revealed that clusters of LncRNAs were uniquely expressed in AA rats compared with controls, which manifests that these differentially expressed LncRNAs in AA rats might play a vital role in RA development. Up-regulation or down-regulation of the six LncRNAs might contribute to the molecular mechanism underlying RA. To sum up, our study provides potential targets for treatment of RA and novel profound understanding of the pathogenesis of RA. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. A tag and trace approach to assess the potential contribution of earthworm casts to soil erosion on hillslopes under permanent pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Philip; Walling, Desmond; Quine, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    This communication presents preliminary results from a tag and trace experiment to assess the potential contribution of earthworm casts to soil erosion on a gentle (i.e. 4%) hillslope under permanent pasture using artificial radionuclides, caesium-134 (134Cs) and cobalt-60 (60Co). A rapid and repeatable laboratory-based procedure was devised for tagging groups of intact, air-dried casts by immersion into solutions containing a known activity concentration of either 134Cs or 60Co, each mixed in 2 l of water. For the tracing component of the work, fifteen intact casts representing the equivalent of 203 g of sediment were labelled with 216 Bq of 134Cs activity and evenly distributed across the upslope half of a 0.6 m long * 0.5 m wide bounded area of pasture, at a distance of ≥ 0.3 m from a plot outlet. A further fifteen intact casts representing the equivalent of 190.7 g of sediment were labelled with 224 Bq of 60Co activity and evenly distributed across the downslope half of the plot, at a distance of ≤ 0.3 m from the plot outlet. Over the following 76 days, all casts were exposed to natural weather events, during which time, 186.3 mm of rainfall generated 16 separate storm runoff samples. Sediment was recovered from the runoff, assayed by gamma spectrometry and a simple mixing model was used to partition the sediment into labelled material and unlabelled surface material. Provisional results indicate that a total of 26.8 g of 60Co-labelled sediment, equivalent to 14.1% of the total mass deployed, was recovered from a distance of ≤ 0.3 m from their original position. In contrast, 9.1 g of 134Cs-labelled sediment, equivalent to 4.5% of the total mass deployed, was recovered from a distance of ≥ 0.3 m from their original position. This presentation discusses key findings, with a particular focus on the temporal changes in sediment-supply, as well as a number of uncertainties associated with the technique. Despite these uncertainties, however, the essentially

  2. Potential contribution of prescription practices to the emergence and spread of chloroquine resistance in south-west Nigeria: caution in the use of artemisinin combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogundahunsi Olumide A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prescription practices have been shown to influence the emergence of anti-malarial drug resistance. Thus efforts in this study were devoted to evaluating the prescribing practices prior to introduction of the artemisinin based combination therapy (ACT in Nigeria and its potential contribution to emergence of chloroquine resistant malaria in south-west Nigeria, in order to forestall a similar situation with the ACT. Methods A retrospective quantitative study was designed to examine case records of patients treated for malaria in either a government or a private hospital in Ibadan, south-west Nigeria, over a 20-year period, cutting across three phases of resistance to chloroquine in Nigeria: pre-resistance, emerging resistance and dissemination of resistance. Patient prescriptions were examined for use of anti-malarial drugs, sub-therapeutic doses of chloroquine, co-administration of anti-histamines with chloroquine. Descriptive statistics of frequency and percentage were used to describe trends in the parameters assessed using EPI-info. Results Case record files of 2,529 patients were examined. Chloroquine was the main drug used in treatment of malaria throughout the periods studied, with frequency of prescription at both sites ranging from 91.4% to 98.3% during the pre-resistance years. It was administered as standard doses during the pre resistance years. Anti-histamines, especially promethazine, were routinely co-administered with chloroquine at this period too. However, the practice of prescribing sub-therapeutic doses of chloroquine at the private health care facility coincided with the latter phase of emerging resistance and phase of dissemination of resistance. Frequency of prescription of sub-therapeutic doses increased from 6.7% in 1983 (pre-resistance years to 43.6% in 1997 (dissemination of resistance phase at the private health care facility. Frequency of co-administration of anti-histamines with chloroquine also

  3. Contributions of the maternal uterine environment and piglet genotype on weaning survivability potential: I. Development of neonatal piglets after reciprocal embryo transfers between Meishan and White crossbred gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, J R; Vallet, J L; Ford, J J; Freking, B A; Cushman, R A; Oliver, W T; Rempel, L A

    2012-07-01

    In commercial pigs, the greatest susceptibility for pre-weaning mortality occurs in low birth-weight piglets. Despite their overall decreased birth weight, Meishan (MS) piglets have decreased pre-weaning mortality rates compared with contemporary Western breeds. The objective of the current study was to determine the contributions of the maternal uterine environment, piglet genotype, and their interaction on the development of neonatal piglets pertaining to pre-weaning survivability using reciprocal embryo transfer between MS and White crossbred (WC) pigs. Twenty-five successful pregnancies were produced from 2 farrowing seasons, generating litters of maternal uterine environment (MUE) by piglet genotype (PigG) combinations; MS × MS (n = 4 litters), MS × WC (n = 7 litters), WC × MS (n = 7 litters), and WC × WC (n = 7 litters). At approximately 24 h of age (Day 1), piglets (n = 173) were weighed and a blood sample was taken. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, glucose, plasma urea nitrogen, albumin, NEFA, lactate, and cortisol were measured in all blood samples. Representative piglets (n = 46) from each litter were harvested and body measurements (i.e., organ weights, tissue glycogen content, and body composition) were determined. Piglet data were analyzed by ANOVA using MIXED model procedures. Both MUE (P piglet BW, illustrating that piglets gestated in WC gilts were heavier than piglets gestated in MS gilts, and WC piglets were heavier than MS piglets. Serum albumin concentrations were increased (P piglets compared with WC piglets, indicating greater liver maturity. Significant MUE × PigG interactions were observed for hematocrit and hemoglobin, in which the greatest concentrations were observed in MS piglets gestated in MS and WC gilts, and the lowest concentrations were observed in WC piglets gestated in WC gilts, demonstrating increased oxygen-carrying capability. The percentage of fat and nitrogen, as well as the GE of the body, were greater (P piglets, indicating

  4. One-dimensional Arterial Network Model for Bypass Grafts Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Ghigo, Arthur; Wang, Xiaofei; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2016-01-01

    We propose an arterial network model based on 1D blood hemodynamic equations to study the behavior of different vascular surgical bypass grafts in case of an arterial occlusive pathology: an obliteration or stenosis of the iliac artery. We investigate the performances of three different bypass grafts (Aorto-Femoral, Axillo-Femoral and cross-over Femoral) depending on the degree of obliteration of the stenosis. Numerical simulations show that all bypass grafts are efficient since we retrieve in all cases the normal hemodynamics in the stenosed region while ensuring at the same time a global healthy circulation. We analyze in particular the Axillo-Femoral bypass graft by performing hundreds of simulations by varying the values of the Young's modulus [0.1--50 MPa] and the radius [0.01--5 cm] of the bypass graft. We show that the Young's modulus and radius of commercial bypass grafts are optimal in terms of hemodynamic considerations. The numerical findings prove that this approach could be used to optimize or pl...

  5. Bypass Selection for Control of Heat Exchanger Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Lin; LUO Xionglin; HOU Benquan; BAI Yujie

    2013-01-01

    Considering the flexibility and controllability of heat exchanger networks (HENs),bypasses are widely used for effective control of process stream target temperatures.However,the optimal location for the bypass is generally difficult to design with the trade-off between controllability and capital investments.In this paper,based on the steady-state model of heat exchanger networks the optimal bypass location was firstly selected by iteratively calculating the non-square Relative Gain Array (ns-RGA).To simplify the calculation process,rules of bypass selection were also proposed.In order to evaluate this method,then,the structural controllability of heat exchanger networks was analyzed.With both the consideration of the controllability and capital investments,the bypasses locations were finally selected.A case study on the HEN in Crude Distillation Unit was presented in which the ns-RGA and structural controllability were used to select bypasses and also to evaluate the results.

  6. Cerebroprotective effect of piracetam in patients undergoing coronary bypass burgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinski, Sebastian; Claus, Benjamin; Alaaraj, Nour; Dohmen, Pascal Maria; Kirilova, Kremena; Neumann, Konrad; Uebelhack, Ralf; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2008-11-01

    Reduction of cognitive function is a possible side effect after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass. We investigated the cerebroprotective effect of piracetam on cognitive performance in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients scheduled for elective, primary and isolated coronary bypass surgery were randomised either to piracetam or placebo group. The study was performed in a double blind fashion. Patients received either 12 g piracetam or placebo at the beginning of the operation. Six neuropsychological subtests from the Syndrom Kurz Test and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale were performed preoperatively and on the third postoperative day. To assess the overall cognitive function and the degree of cognitive decline across all tests after surgery we combined the six test-scores by principal component analysis. A total number of 120 patients were enrolled into the study. Preoperative overall cognitive function were not significantly different between the groups. The postoperative combined score of the neuropsychological tests showed a deterioration of cognitive function in both groups (placebo-pre: -0.06+/-0.99 vs placebo-post: -1.38+/-1.11; ppiracetam-pre: 0.06+/-1.02 vs piracetam-post: -0.65+/-0.93; ppiracetam patients performed significantly better compared to the placebo patients after the operation and had a less decline of overall cognitive function (pPiracetam has a cerebroprotective effect in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. It reduces an early postoperative substantial decline of neuropsychological abilities.

  7. Progress on Complications of Direct Bypass for Moyamoya Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinlu; Shi, Lei; Guo, Yunbao; Xu, Baofeng; Xu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) involves progressive occlusion of the intracranial internal carotid artery resulting in formation of moyamoya-like vessels at the base of the brain. It can be characterized by hemorrhage or ischemia. Direct vascular bypass is the main and most effective treatment of MMD. However, patients with MMD differ from those with normal cerebral vessels. MMD patients have unstable intracranial artery hemodynamics and a poor blood flow reserve; therefore, during the direct bypass of superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis, perioperative risk factors and anesthesia can affect the hemodynamics of these patients. When brain tissue cannot tolerate a high blood flow rate, it becomes prone to hyperperfusion syndrome, which leads to neurological function defects and can even cause intracranial hemorrhage in severe cases. The brain tissue is prone to infarction when hemodynamic equilibrium is affected. In addition, bypass vessels become susceptible to occlusion or atrophy when blood resistance increases. Even compression of the temporalis affects bypass vessels. Because the STA is used in MMD surgery, the scalp becomes ischemic and is likely to develop necrosis and infection. These complications of MMD surgery are difficult to manage and are not well understood. To date, no systematic studies of the complications that occur after direct bypass in MMD have been performed, and reported complications are hidden among various case studies; therefore, this paper presents a review and summary of the literature in PubMed on the complications of direct bypass in MMD. PMID:27499690

  8. Progress on Complications of Direct Bypass for Moyamoya Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinlu; Shi, Lei; Guo, Yunbao; Xu, Baofeng; Xu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) involves progressive occlusion of the intracranial internal carotid artery resulting in formation of moyamoya-like vessels at the base of the brain. It can be characterized by hemorrhage or ischemia. Direct vascular bypass is the main and most effective treatment of MMD. However, patients with MMD differ from those with normal cerebral vessels. MMD patients have unstable intracranial artery hemodynamics and a poor blood flow reserve; therefore, during the direct bypass of superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis, perioperative risk factors and anesthesia can affect the hemodynamics of these patients. When brain tissue cannot tolerate a high blood flow rate, it becomes prone to hyperperfusion syndrome, which leads to neurological function defects and can even cause intracranial hemorrhage in severe cases. The brain tissue is prone to infarction when hemodynamic equilibrium is affected. In addition, bypass vessels become susceptible to occlusion or atrophy when blood resistance increases. Even compression of the temporalis affects bypass vessels. Because the STA is used in MMD surgery, the scalp becomes ischemic and is likely to develop necrosis and infection. These complications of MMD surgery are difficult to manage and are not well understood. To date, no systematic studies of the complications that occur after direct bypass in MMD have been performed, and reported complications are hidden among various case studies; therefore, this paper presents a review and summary of the literature in PubMed on the complications of direct bypass in MMD.

  9. Staged hernia repair preceded by gastric bypass for the treatment of morbidly obese patients with complex ventral hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, W L; Polhill, J L; Chen, A Y; Kuwada, T S; Gersin, K S; Getz, S B; Kercher, K W; Heniford, B T

    2008-10-01

    Obesity may be the most predominant risk factor for recurrence following ventral hernia repair. This is secondary to significantly increased intra-abdominal pressures, higher rates of wound complications, and the technical difficulties encountered due to obesity. Medically managed weight loss prior to surgery is difficult. One potential strategy is to provide a surgical means to correct patient weight prior to hernia repair. After institutional review board approval, we reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent gastric bypass surgery prior to the definitive repair of a complex ventral hernia at our medical center. Twenty-seven morbidly obese patients with an average of 3.7 (range 1-10) failed ventral hernia repairs underwent gastric bypass prior to definitive ventral hernia repair. Twenty-two of the gastric bypasses were open operations and five were laparoscopic. The patients' average pre-bypass body mass index (BMI) was 51 kg/m2 (range 39-69 kg/m2), which decreased to an average of 33 kg/m2 (range 25-37 kg/m2) at the time of hernia repair at a mean of 1.3 years (range 0.9-3.1 years) after gastric bypass. Seven patients had hernia repair at the same time as their gastric bypass (four sutured, three biologic mesh), all of which recurred. Of the 27 patients, 19 had an open hernia repair and eight had a laparoscopic repair. Panniculectomy was performed concurrently in 15 patients who had an open repair. Prior to formal hernia repair, one patient required an urgent operation to repair a hernia incarceration and a small-bowel obstruction 11 months after gastric bypass. The average hernia and mesh size was 203 cm2 (range 24-1,350 cm2) and 1,040 cm2 (range 400-2,700 cm2), respectively. There have been no recurrences at an average follow-up of 20 months (range 2 months-5 years). Gastric bypass prior to staged ventral hernia repair in morbidly obese patients with complex ventral hernias is a safe and definitive method to effect weight loss and facilitate a

  10. Kinetic modeling of tricarboxylic acid cycle and glyoxylate bypass in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and its application to assessment of drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Indira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting persistent tubercule bacilli has become an important challenge in the development of anti-tuberculous drugs. As the glyoxylate bypass is essential for persistent bacilli, interference with it holds the potential for designing new antibacterial drugs. We have developed kinetic models of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glyoxylate bypass in Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and studied the effects of inhibition of various enzymes in the M. tuberculosis model. Results We used E. coli to validate the pathway-modeling protocol and showed that changes in metabolic flux can be estimated from gene expression data. The M. tuberculosis model reproduced the observation that deletion of one of the two isocitrate lyase genes has little effect on bacterial growth in macrophages, but deletion of both genes leads to the elimination of the bacilli from the lungs. It also substantiated the inhibition of isocitrate lyases by 3-nitropropionate. On the basis of our simulation studies, we propose that: (i fractional inactivation of both isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 is required for a flux through the glyoxylate bypass in persistent mycobacteria; and (ii increasing the amount of active isocitrate dehydrogenases can stop the flux through the glyoxylate bypass, so the kinase that inactivates isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and/or the proposed inactivator of isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 is a potential target for drugs against persistent mycobacteria. In addition, competitive inhibition of isocitrate lyases along with a reduction in the inactivation of isocitrate dehydrogenases appears to be a feasible strategy for targeting persistent mycobacteria. Conclusion We used kinetic modeling of biochemical pathways to assess various potential anti-tuberculous drug targets that interfere with the glyoxylate bypass flux, and indicated the type of inhibition needed to eliminate the pathogen. The advantage of such an

  11. Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hodzic

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that observed local and regional levels of secondary organic aerosols (SOA in polluted areas cannot be explained by the oxidation and partitioning of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC precursors, at least using current mechanisms and parameterizations. In this study, the 3-D regional air quality model CHIMERE is applied to estimate the potential contribution to SOA formation of recently identified semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic precursors (S/IVOC in and around Mexico City for the MILAGRO field experiment during March 2006. The model has been updated to include explicitly the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosols (POA, their gas-particle partitioning and the gas-phase oxidation of the vapors. Two recently proposed parameterizations, those of Robinson et al. (2007 ("ROB" and Grieshop et al. (2009 ("GRI" are compared and evaluated against surface and aircraft measurements. The 3-D model results are assessed by comparing with the concentrations of OA components from Positive Matrix Factorization of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS data, and for the first time also with oxygen-to-carbon ratios derived from high-resolution AMS measurements. The results show a substantial enhancement in predicted SOA concentrations (2–4 times with respect to the previously published base case without S/IVOCs (Hodzic et al., 2009, both within and downwind of the city leading to much reduced discrepancies with the total OA measurements. Model improvements in OA predictions are associated with the better-captured SOA magnitude and diurnal variability. The predicted production from anthropogenic and biomass burning S/IVOC represents 40–60% of the total measured SOA at the surface during the day and is somewhat larger than that from commonly measured aromatic VOCs, especially at the T1 site at the edge of the city. The SOA production from the continued multi-generation S/IVOC oxidation products continues actively

  12. Current status of mini-gastric bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Kamal K.; Kumar, Parveen; Carr, William RJ; Jennings, Neil; Schroeder, Norbert; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    Mini-gastric bypass (MGP) is a promising bariatric procedure. Tens of thousands of this procedure have been performed throughout the world since Rutledge performed the first procedure in the United States of America in 1997. Several thousands of these have even been documented in the published scientific literature. Despite a proven track record over nearly two decades, this operation continues to polarise the bariatric community. A large number of surgeons across the world have strong objections to this procedure and do not perform it. The risk of symptomatic (bile) reflux, marginal ulceration, severe malnutrition, and long-term risk of gastric and oesophageal cancers are some of the commonly voiced concerns. Despite these expressed fears, several advantages such as technical simplicity, shorter learning curve, ease of revision and reversal, non-inferior weight loss and comorbidity resolution outcomes have prompted some surgeons to advocate a wider adoption of this procedure. This review examines the current status of these controversial aspects in the light of the published academic literature in English. PMID:27251826

  13. Post-gastric bypass hypoglycaemia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantavasinkul, Prapimporn C; Torquati, Alfonso; Corsino, Leonor

    2016-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is a highly effective treatment for severe obesity, resulting in substantial weight loss and normalizing obesity-related comorbidities. However, long-term consequences can occur, such as postbariatric surgery hypoglycaemia. This is a challenging medical problem, and the number of patients presenting with it has been increasing. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most popular bariatric procedure, and it is the surgery most commonly associated with the development of postbariatric surgery hypoglycaemia. To date, the pathogenesis of this condition has not been completely established. However, various factors - particularly increased postprandial glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 secretion - have been considered as crucial mediator. The mechanisms responsible for diabetic remission after bariatric surgery may be responsible for the development of hypoglycaemia, which typically occurs 1-3 h after a meal and is concurrent with inappropriate hyperinsulinaemia. Carbohydrate-rich foods usually provoke hypoglycaemic symptoms, which can typically be alleviated by strict dietary modifications, including carbohydrate restriction and avoidance of high glycaemic index foods and simple sugars. Few patients require further medical intervention, such as medications, but some patients have required a pancreatectomy. Because this option is not always successful, it is no longer routinely recommended. Clinical trials are needed to further determine the pathophysiology of this condition as well as the best diagnostic and treatment approaches for these patients.

  14. Postoperative abdominal complications after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Guohua

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic experiences on the patients who suffered abdominal complications after cardiovascular surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass(CPB. Methods A total of 2349 consecutive patients submitted to cardiovascular surgery with CPB in our hospital from Jan 2004 to Dec 2010 were involved. The clinical data of any abdominal complication, including its incidence, characters, relative risks, diagnostic measures, medical or surgical management and mortality, was retrospectively analyzed. Results Of all the patients, 33(1.4% developed abdominal complications postoperatively, including 11(33.3% cases of paralytic ileus, 9(27.3% of gastrointestinal haemorrhage, 2(6.1% of gastroduodenal ulcer perforation, 2(6.1% of acute calculus cholecystitis, 3(9.1% of acute acalculus cholecystitis, 4(12.1% of hepatic dysfunction and 2(6.1% of ischemia bowel diseases. Of the 33 patients, 26 (78.8% accepted medical treatment and 7 (21.2% underwent subsequent surgical intervention. There were 5(15.2% deaths in this series, which was significantly higher than the overall mortality (2.7%. Positive history of peptic ulcer, advanced ages, bad heart function, preoperative IABP support, prolonged CPB time, low cardiac output and prolonged mechanical ventilation are the risk factors of abdominal complications. Conclusions Abdominal complications after cardiovascular surgery with CPB have a low incidence but a higher mortality. Early detection and prompt appropriate intervention are essential for the outcome of the patients.

  15. Current status of mini-gastric bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal K Mahawar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mini-gastric bypass (MGP is a promising bariatric procedure. Tens of thousands of this procedure have been performed throughout the world since Rutledge performed the first procedure in the United States of America in 1997. Several thousands of these have even been documented in the published scientific literature. Despite a proven track record over nearly two decades, this operation continues to polarise the bariatric community. A large number of surgeons across the world have strong objections to this procedure and do not perform it. The risk of symptomatic (bile reflux, marginal ulceration, severe malnutrition, and long-term risk of gastric and oesophageal cancers are some of the commonly voiced concerns. Despite these expressed fears, several advantages such as technical simplicity, shorter learning curve, ease of revision and reversal, non-inferior weight loss and comorbidity resolution outcomes have prompted some surgeons to advocate a wider adoption of this procedure. This review examines the current status of these controversial aspects in the light of the published academic literature in English.

  16. SUrgical versus PERcutaneous Bypass: SUPERB-trial; Heparin-bonded endoluminal versus surgical femoro-popliteal bypass: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensvelt, M.M.A.; Holewijn, S.; Fritschy, W.M.; Wikkeling, O.R.; Walraven, L.A. van; Wallis de Vries, B.M.; Zeebregts, C.J.A.; Reijnen, M.M.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endovascular treatment options for the superficial femoral artery are evolving rapidly. For long lesions, the venous femoropopliteal bypass considered to be superior above the prosthetic bypass. An endoluminal bypass, however, may provide equal patency rates compared to the prosthetic ab

  17. SUrgical versus PERcutaneous Bypass : SUPERB-trial; Heparin-bonded endoluminal versus surgical femoro-popliteal bypass: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensvelt, Mare M. A.; Holewijn, Suzanne; Fritschy, Wilbert M.; Wikkeling, Otmar R. M.; van Walraven, Laurens A.; de Vries, Bas M. Wallis; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Endovascular treatment options for the superficial femoral artery are evolving rapidly. For long lesions, the venous femoropopliteal bypass considered to be superior above the prosthetic bypass. An endoluminal bypass, however, may provide equal patency rates compared to the prosthetic ab

  18. The influence of nutrients, biliary-pancreatic secretions, and systemic trophic hormones on intestinal adaptation in a Roux-en-Y bypass model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taqi, Esmaeel; Wallace, Laurie E; de Heuvel, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    The signals that govern the upregulation of nutrient absorption (adaptation) after intestinal resection are not well understood. A Gastric Roux-en-Y bypass (GRYB) model was used to isolate the relative contributions of direct mucosal stimulation by nutrients, biliary-pancreatic secretions, and sy...

  19. Gut hormones, early dumping and resting energy expenditure in patients with good and poor weight loss response after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, C; Jørgensen, N B; Bojsen-Møller, K N

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To identify factors contributing to the variation in weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).Design:Cross-sectional study of patients with good (excess body mass index lost (EBL) >60%) and poor weight loss response (EBL 12 months after RYGB and a lean control group matched...

  20. Maximal blood flow acceleration analysis in the early diastolic phase for aortocoronary artery bypass grafts: a new transit-time flow measurement predictor of graft failure following coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Takemi; Orihashi, Kazumasa; Nishimori, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2016-11-01

    Maximal graft flow acceleration (max df/dt) determined using transit-time flowmetry (TTFM) in the diastolic phase was assessed as a potential predictor of graft failure for aortocoronary artery (AC) bypass grafts in coronary artery bypass patients. Max df/dt was retrospectively measured in 114 aortocoronary artery bypass grafts. TTFM data were fitted to a 9-polynomial curve, which was derived from the first-derivative curve, to measure max df/dt (9-polynomial max df/dt). Abnormal TTFM was defined as a mean flow of 5 or a diastolic filling ratio of polynomial max df/dt was significantly lower in abnormal TTFM/failing by the CAG group compared with abnormal TTFM/patent by the CAG group (1.08 ± 0.89 vs. 2.05 ± 1.51 ml/s(2), respectively; P polynomial max df/dt in the early diastolic phase may be a promising predictor of future graft failure for AC bypass grafts, particularly in abnormal TTFM grafts.

  1. Potential contribution of fish feed and phytoplankton to the content of volatile terpenes in cultured Pangasius (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) and Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podduturi, Raju; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin; Mahmud, Sultan

    2017-01-01

    Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol are the most recognized off-flavors in freshwater fish, but terpenes may also contribute off-flavor in fish. We identified six monoterpenes, 11 sesquiterpenes, and three terpene-related compounds in pangasius and tilapia from aquaculture farms in Bangladesh. The con...

  2. Nitric oxide contributes to cytokine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic beta cells via potentiation of JNK activity and inhibition of Akt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, J; Binzer, J; Andersson, Annica;

    2005-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines cause beta cell secretory dysfunction and apoptosis--a process implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Cytokines induce the expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) leading to NO production. NO contributes to cytokine-induced apoptosis, but t...

  3. Strategies to prevent intraoperative lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siminelakis Stavros N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During open heart surgery the influence of a series of factors such as cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, hypothermia, operation and anaesthesia, as well as medication and transfusion can cause a diffuse trauma in the lungs. This injury leads mostly to a postoperative interstitial pulmonary oedema and abnormal gas exchange. Substantial improvements in all of the above mentioned factors may lead to a better lung function postoperatively. By avoiding CPB, reducing its time, or by minimizing the extracorporeal surface area with the use of miniaturized circuits of CPB, beneficial effects on lung function are reported. In addition, replacement of circuit surface with biocompatible surfaces like heparin-coated, and material-independent sources of blood activation, a better postoperative lung function is observed. Meticulous myocardial protection by using hypothermia and cardioplegia methods during ischemia and reperfusion remain one of the cornerstones of postoperative lung function. The partial restoration of pulmonary artery perfusion during CPB possibly contributes to prevent pulmonary ischemia and lung dysfunction. Using medication such as corticosteroids and aprotinin, which protect the lungs during CPB, and leukocyte depletion filters for operations expected to exceed 90 minutes in CPB-time appear to be protective against the toxic impact of CPB in the lungs. The newer methods of ultrafiltration used to scavenge pro-inflammatory factors seem to be protective for the lung function. In a similar way, reducing the use of cardiotomy suction device, as well as the contact-time between free blood and pericardium, it is expected that the postoperative lung function will be improved.

  4. Photovoltaic-module bypass-diode encapsulation. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-06-20

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented in this annual report. A comprehensive survey of available pad-mounted PN junction and Schottky diodes led to the selection of Semicon PN junction diode cells for this application. Diode junction-to-heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1/sup 0/C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150/sup 0/C. Based on the results of a detailed thermal analysis, which covered the range of bypass currents from 2 to 20 amperes, three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed and fabricated. Thermal testing of these modules has enabled the formation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally-mounted packaged diodes. An assessment of bypass diode reliability, which relies heavily on rectifying diode failure rate data, leads to the general conclusion that, when proper designed and installed, these devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  5. Thermal activation of dislocations in large scale obstacle bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobie, Cameron; Capolungo, Laurent; McDowell, David L.; Martinez, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    Dislocation dynamics simulations have been used extensively to predict hardening caused by dislocation-obstacle interactions, including irradiation defect hardening in the athermal case. Incorporating the role of thermal energy on these interactions is possible with a framework provided by harmonic transition state theory (HTST) enabling direct access to thermally activated reaction rates using the Arrhenius equation, including rates of dislocation-obstacle bypass processes. Moving beyond unit dislocation-defect reactions to a representative environment containing a large number of defects requires coarse-graining the activation energy barriers of a population of obstacles into an effective energy barrier that accurately represents the large scale collective process. The work presented here investigates the relationship between unit dislocation-defect bypass processes and the distribution of activation energy barriers calculated for ensemble bypass processes. A significant difference between these cases is observed, which is attributed to the inherent cooperative nature of dislocation bypass processes. In addition to the dislocation-defect interaction, the morphology of the dislocation segments pinned to the defects play an important role on the activation energies for bypass. A phenomenological model for activation energy stress dependence is shown to describe well the effect of a distribution of activation energies, and a probabilistic activation energy model incorporating the stress distribution in a material is presented.

  6. Potential Contribution of Work-Related Psychosocial Stress to the Development of Cardiovascular Disease and Type II Diabetes: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnak, Kristine M

    2014-01-01

    Two of the major causes of death worldwide are cardiovascular disease and Type II diabetes. Although death due to these diseases is assessed separately, the physiological process that is attributed to the development of cardiovascular disease can be linked to the development of Type II diabetes and the impact that this disease has on the cardiovascular system. Physiological, genetic, and personal factors contribute to the development of both these disorders. It has also been hypothesized that work-related stress may contribute to the development of Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes some of the studies examining the role of work-related stress on the development of these chronic disorders. Because women may be more susceptible to the physiological effects of work-related stress, the papers cited in this review focus on studies that examined the difference in responses of men or women to work-related stress or on studies that focused on the effects of stress on women alone. Based on the papers summarized, it is concluded that (1) work-related stress may directly contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease by inducing increases in blood pressure and changes in heart rate that have negative consequences on functioning of the cardiovascular system; (2) workers reporting increased levels of stress may display an increased risk of Type II diabetes because they adopt poor health habits (ie, increased level of smoking, inactivity etc), which in turn contribute to the development of cardiovascular problems; and (3) women in high demand and low-control occupations report an increased level of stress at work, and thus may be at a greater risk of negative health consequences.

  7. Relative importance of polychlorinated naphthalenes compared to dioxins, and polychlorinated biphenyls in human serum from Korea: Contribution to TEQs and potential sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyokeun; Kang, Jung-Ho; Baek, Song-Yee [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyojadong, Namgu, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon-Seok, E-mail: yschang@postech.ac.k [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyojadong, Namgu, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in human have been studied extensively; however, polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) have been studied less widely. The mean concentrations of PCNs, PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs in 61 healthy human volunteers were 2170 pg/g lipid, 452 pg/g lipid, 116 pg/g lipid, and 120 ng/g lipid respectively, and the mean toxic equivalents (TEQs) contributed by PCNs, PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs were 5.88, 5.22, 5.48, and 5.33 pg/g lipid, respectively. PCNs contributed to 26.8% of the total TEQs. 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD, 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF, PCB126, and hepta-CN-73 accounted for >62% of the total TEQs in the human serum samples. The overall serum PCN homologue profiles of all subjects were dominated by tetra- and penta-CN homologues, and the most predominant individual congener was hepta-CN-73, which contributed 17.5% of the total serum PCN concentration. Enrichment of hepta-CN-73 in the human serum samples might be due to contributors from combustion sources. - Hepta-CN-73 from combustion sources was the predominant and major toxic congener in human serum.

  8. Neuroprotective Strategies during Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Aida; Dhein, Stefan; Dähnert, Ingo; Klein, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Aortocoronary bypass or valve surgery usually require cardiac arrest using cardioplegic solutions. Although, in principle, in a number of cases beating heart surgery (so-called off-pump technique) is possible, aortic or valve surgery or correction of congenital heart diseases mostly require cardiopulmonary arrest. During this condition, the heart-lung machine also named cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has to take over the circulation. It is noteworthy that the invention of a machine bypassing the heart and lungs enabled complex cardiac operations, but possible negative effects of the CPB on other organs, especially the brain, cannot be neglected. Thus, neuroprotection during CPB is still a matter of great interest. In this review, we will describe the impact of CPB on the brain and focus on pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies to protect the brain. PMID:27879647

  9. Vitamin deficiency after gastric bypass surgery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrana, Marc R; Davis, William E

    2009-10-01

    More than 60% of the adult US population now meets the criteria for being overweight or obese. Gastric bypass surgery has become a popular and effective way to combat this medical problem. Despite the success of these procedures, they are associated with many complications, including malnutrition, neurological compromise, and vitamin deficiency. Research has determined that even with multivitamin supplementation for life, a large percentage of bypass patients develop vitamin deficiencies. We present a case of beriberi after Roux-en-Y bypass that illustrates the importance of close follow up. A thorough review of vitamin deficiencies in this unique patient population is explored. Vitamin supplementation and treatment recommendations are compiled from the most up-to-date sources. Even patients on regular supplements should be closely monitored for vitamin deficiencies. Patient education regarding vitamin supplementation is vital; it should begin prior to surgery and continue throughout the postoperative period and beyond.

  10. A Comparative Performance Analysis of Low Power Bypassing Array Multipliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirlakalla Ravi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Low power design of VLSI circuits has been identified as vital technology in battery powered portable electronic devices and signal processing applications such as Digital Signal Processors (DSP. Multiplier has an important role in the DSPs. Without degrading the performance of the processor, low power parallel multipliers are needed to be design. Bypassing is the widely used technique in the DSPs when the input operand of the multiplier is zero. A Row based Bypassing Multiplier with compressor at the final addition of the ripple carry adder (RCA is designed to focus on low power and high speed. The proposed bypassing multiplier with compressor shows high performance and energy efficiency than Kuo multiplier with Carry Save Adder (CSA at the final RCA.

  11. Coronary artery bypass and superior vena cava syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, T V; Masrani, K; Thomas, J L

    1999-01-01

    Superior vena cava syndrome is the obstruction of the superior vena cava or its main tributaries by benign or malignant lesions. The syndrome causes edema and engorgement of the vessels on the face, neck, and arms, nonproductive cough, and dyspnea. We discuss the case of a 48-year-old obese diabetic woman who was admitted with unstable angina. She had previously been diagnosed with superior vena cava syndrome. Urgent coronary artery bypass grafting was necessary Although thousands of coronary artery bypasses are performed every year, there are not many reports on patients with superior vena cava syndrome who successfully undergo cardiopulmonary bypass and coronary artery grafting with an internal mammary artery as the conduit. The results of the case and alternative recommended methods are discussed.

  12. Rankine cycle load limiting through use of a recuperator bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Timothy C.

    2011-08-16

    A system for converting heat from an engine into work includes a boiler coupled to a heat source for transferring heat to a working fluid, a turbine that transforms the heat into work, a condenser that transforms the working fluid into liquid, a recuperator with one flow path that routes working fluid from the turbine to the condenser, and another flow path that routes liquid working fluid from the condenser to the boiler, the recuperator being configured to transfer heat to the liquid working fluid, and a bypass valve in parallel with the second flow path. The bypass valve is movable between a closed position, permitting flow through the second flow path and an opened position, under high engine load conditions, bypassing the second flow path.

  13. Proposal of bypass in heat recovery system with sucking air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siažik, Ján; Malcho, Milan; Rezničák, Štefan

    2016-06-01

    Waste heat is utilized in a wide variety of technologies for a number of reasons. But the significant one such reason is use of the energy contained for example in waste water or waste heat that would otherwise left unused. Other considerable reason it is also reduces primary costs to operate the technology. The article deals with the arrangement section of the unit in heat recovery systems where the entry of waste gases into defluorinastion device. The technologies re-use heat often use the bypass. Bypass fulfill their duty in equipment failures, for example heat exchanger where it is not possible to stop the operationimmediately and the hot combustion gases can flow bypass without interrupting operation.

  14. Clinical outcomes in randomized trials of off- vs. on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Penninga, Luit; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    To assess the clinical outcomes of off- vs. on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in randomized trials.......To assess the clinical outcomes of off- vs. on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in randomized trials....

  15. Managing the Inflammatory Response after Cardiopulmonary Bypass : Review of the Studies in Animal Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liguori, Gabriel Romero; Kanas, Alexandre Fligelman; Moreira, Luiz Felipe Pinho

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review studies performed in animal models that evaluated therapeutic interventions to inflammatory response and microcirculatory changes after cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: It was used the search strategy ("Cardiopulmonary Bypass" (MeSH)) and ("Microcirculation" (MeSH) or "Inflammat

  16. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with mirror-imaging dextrocardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xin; Sun, Hansong; Wang, Xianqiang

    2015-08-01

    Dextrocardia requires alterations in techniques during coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. We report two cases undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery and discuss techniques for the operative management of these patients.

  17. History and Current Status of Robotic Totally Endoscopic Coronary Artery Bypass

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jeffrey D; Srivastava, Mukta; Bonatti, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Robotic totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass (TECAB) is a minimally invasive endoscopic surgical approach using the daVinci robotic telemanipulation system to perform coronary artery bypass grafting on the arrested or beating heart...

  18. Tidlige erfaringer med duplexovervågning af femoropopliteale og -krurale vene-bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina G; von Jessen, Frants; Schroeder, T V

    1993-01-01

    Identification and correction of graft stenoses in femoropopliteal and -crural vein bypasses can prevent reconstruction failure. Sixty six consecutive vein bypasses entered a postoperative surveillance protocol, which implied clinical assessment, measurement of ankle blood pressure and duplex-sca...

  19. Reduced complement activation during cardiopulmonary bypass does not affect the postoperative acute phase response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Goor, J.; Nieuwland, R.; van den Brink, A.; van Oeveren, W.; Rutten, 27818; Tijssen, J.; Eijsman, L.; Rutten, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: In the present study the relationship was evaluated between perioperative inflammation and the postoperative acute phase response in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) assisted by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). CPB circuits contained either non-coated-

  20. Altered ghrelin secretion in mice in response to diet-induced obesity and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Aki Uchida; Juliet F. Zechner; Mani, Bharath K.; Won-mee Park; Vincent Aguirre; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined potential mechanisms for altered circulating ghrelin levels observed in diet-induced obesity (DIO) and following weight loss resulting from Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). We hypothesized that circulating ghrelin levels were altered in obesity and after weight loss through changes in ghrelin cell responsiveness to physiological cues. We confirmed lower ghrelin levels in DIO mice and demonstrated elevated ghrelin levels in mice 6 weeks post-RYGB. In both DIO and RYG...

  1. [Prevalence of early and late dumping after gastric bypass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héraïef, R; Giusti, V

    2014-03-26

    Gastric bypass surgery is an effective treatment of obesity, bringing a significant weight loss and a major improvement of carbohydrate profile. However, in some patients, a deregulation in carbohydrate metabolism between insulin secretion and sensitivity is observed, whereupon early and late dumping happen. Their prevalence isn't well studied, although it seems that 10 to 20% of patients are affected. We've studied a cohort of 70 patients who undergone gastric bypass surgery at the CHUV. 18 (25.7%) patients have a positive anamnesis for early dumping and 10 (14.3%) for late dumping, being it superior as what is described in the literature.

  2. Dextrocardia with situs inversus totalis: coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Salila; Anis, Mariam; Darr, Umer

    2012-01-01

    Dextrocardia with situs inversus is a rare congenital abnormality involving a left-handed mal rotation of the visceral organs. The incidence of coronary artery disease is the same as that in the general population. Performing coronary artery bypass surgery on patients with dextrocardia poses a more challenging task. It is recommended that the right internal mammary artery be the first choice of graft for the anterior descending artery for a "situs inversus" situation. We report 2 cases of patients with Dextrocardia who developed coronary artery disease and underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Also mentioned is the slight difference in our technique.

  3. Gene expression profile after cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruel, Marc; Bianchi, Cesario; Khan, Tanveer A; Xu, Shu; Liddicoat, John R; Voisine, Pierre; Araujo, Eugenio; Lyon, Helen; Kohane, Isaac S; Libermann, Towia A; Sellke, Frank W

    2003-11-01

    This study examines the cardiac and peripheral gene expression responses to cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest. Atrial myocardium and skeletal muscle were harvested from 16 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting before and after cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest. Ten sample pairs were selected for patient similarity, and oligonucleotide microarray analyses of 12,625 genes were performed using matched precardiopulmonary bypass tissues as controls. Array results were validated with Northern blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and immunoblotting. Statistical analyses were nonparametric. Median durations of cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest were 74 and 60 minutes, respectively. Compared with precardiopulmonary bypass, postcardiopulmonary bypass myocardial tissues revealed 480 up-regulated and 626 down-regulated genes with a threshold P value of.025 or less (signal-to-noise ratio: 3.46); skeletal muscle tissues showed 560 and 348 such genes, respectively (signal-to-noise ratio: 3.04). Up-regulated genes in cardiac tissues included inflammatory and transcription activators FOS; jun B proto-oncogene; nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 3; MYC; transcription factor-8; endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1; and cysteine-rich 61; apoptotic genes nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A; and stress genes dual-specificity phosphatase-1, dual-specificity phosphatase-5, and B-cell translocation gene 2. Up-regulated skeletal muscle genes included interleukin 6; interleukin 8; tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 11B; nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 3; transcription factor-8; interleukin 13; jun B proto-oncogene; interleukin 1B; glycoprotein Ib, platelet, alpha polypeptide; and Ras-associated protein RAB27A. Down-regulated genes included haptoglobin and numerous immunoglobulins in the heart, and factor H

  4. The contribution of urbanization to recent extreme heat events and a potential mitigation strategy in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei metropolitan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingna; Yan, Xiaodong; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Xuezhen

    2013-11-01

    This paper addresses the contribution of urban land use change to near-surface air temperature during the summer extreme heat events of the early twenty-first century in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei metropolitan area. This study uses the Weather Research Forecasting model with a single urban canopy model and the newest actual urban cover datasets. The results show that urban land use characteristics that have evolved over the past ~20 years in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei metropolitan area have had a significant impact on the extreme temperatures occurring during extreme heat events. Simulations show that new urban development has caused an intensification and expansion of the areas experiencing extreme heat waves with an average increase in temperature of approximately 0.60 °C. This change is most obvious at night with an increase up to 0.95 °C, for which the total contribution of anthropogenic heat is 34 %. We also simulate the effects of geo-engineering strategies increasing the albedo of urban roofs, an effective way of reducing urban heat island, which can reduce the urban mean temperature by approximately 0.51 °C and counter approximately 80 % of the heat wave results from urban sprawl during the last 20 years.

  5. Post-Primary Education and Energy Literacy: An Analysis of the Potential for Geography Curricula to Contribute to Australian Students' Energy Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, Brad; Kriewaldt, Jeana

    2014-01-01

    Unparalleled amounts of energy derived from fossil fuels now drive societies and shape people's worldviews. Geography's unique perspectives have significant potential to expand understandings of the effects of production and consumption of energy by drawing on the concept of sustainability using an integrated systems approach. As citizens' energy…

  6. Evaluation of the potential expansiveness of soils in the Hermanos Cruz neighbourhood, Pinar del Rio, Cuba: a contribution to urban planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinthaka-Ganepola, G.A.; Mohammed, A. S.; Ordaz Hernandez, A.; Estevez Cruz, E.; Hernandez Santana, J.R.

    2016-07-01

    Expansive soils can be categorized as one of the geohazards observed in the urban environment, representing a silent hazard to buildings and infrastructure. To evaluate this problematic soil it is necessary to know some of its geotechnical properties. Generally, the average values of soil properties are used in the methods which characterize the geological formation and the lithological group, which causes a great degree of uncertainty. To overcome this problem, this study proposes a procedure for estimating and modelling the principle soil properties that have an impact on expansive soils. The selected case study is located in the Hermanos Cruz neighbourhood in the city of Pinar del Rio in Cuba. The investigation was organized into the following stages: primary assessment of the potential expansiveness of the soils, modelling of the soil properties utilizing 3D geostatistical methods and finally the cartographic representation of the potential Expansiveness of soils on a Geographic Information System (GIS) platform at different depth zones which are of importance in the construction of shallow foundations of engineering works. The application of this methodology in the Hermanos Cruz neighbourhood revealed that its soils possess a potential expansiveness of low to medium, apart from some isolated zones which show a potential expansiveness of medium to high. (Author)

  7. Hereditary spherocytosis in a patient undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spegar, J; Riha, H; Kotulak, T; Vanek, T

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is a genetically determined abnormality of red blood cells. It is the most common cause of inherited haemolysis in Europe and North America within the Caucasian population. We document a patient who underwent an aortocoronary bypass procedure on cardiopulmonary bypass. In view of the uncertain tolerance of the abnormal red cells in hereditary spherocytosis to cardiopulmonary bypass, we reviewed the patient's chart and analyzed recorded values of these parameters: free plasma haemoglobin, renal parameters, cystatin C, bilirubin, liver tests, urine samples. From the results, we can see that slight haemolysis-elevated bilirubin in the blood sample and elevated bilirubin and urobilinogen in the urine sample occurred on the first postoperative day. The levels of these parameters slowly decreased during the next postoperative days. There was no real clinical effect of this haemolysis on renal functions.

  8. Single vs double antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndrome: Predictors of bleeding after coronary artery bypass grafting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo; Tarzia; Giacomo; Bortolussi; Edward; Buratto; Carla; Paolini; Carlo; Dal; Lin; Giulio; Rizzoli; Tomaso; Bottio; Gino; Gerosa

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the contribution of anti-platelet therapy and derangements of pre-operative classical coagulation and thromboelastometry parameters to major bleeding post-coronary artery bypass grafting(CABG).METHODS:Two groups of CABG patients were studied:Group A,treated with aspirin alone(n=50),and Group B treated with aspirin and clopidogrel(n=50).Both had similar preoperative,clinical,biologic characteristics and operative management.Classic coagulation parameters and rotational thromboelastometry(ROTEM)profiles were determined preoperatively for both groups and the same heparin treatment was administered.ROTEM profiles(INTEM and EXTEM assays)were analyzed,both for traditional parameters,and thrombin generation potential,expressed by area-under-curve(AUC).RESULTS:There was no significant difference betweenrates of major bleeding between patients treated with aspirin alone,compared with those treated with aspirin and clopidogrel(12%vs 16%,P=0.77).In the 14 cases of major bleeding,pre-operative classic coagulation and traditional ROTEM parameters were comparable.Conversely we observed that the AUC in the EXTEM test was significantly lower in bleeders(5030±1115 Ohm*min)than non-bleeders(6568±548Ohm*min)(P<0.0001).CONCLUSION:We observed that patients with a low AUC value were at a significantly higher risk of bleeding compared to patients with higher AUC,regardless of antiplatelet treatment.This suggests that thrombin generation potential,irrespective of the degree of platelet inhibition,correlates with surgical bleeding.

  9. Sound identification in human auditory cortex: Differential contribution of local field potentials and high gamma power as revealed by direct intracranial recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourski, Kirill V; Steinschneider, Mitchell; Rhone, Ariane E; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A; McMurray, Bob

    2015-09-01

    High gamma power has become the principal means of assessing auditory cortical activation in human intracranial studies, albeit at the expense of low frequency local field potentials (LFPs). It is unclear whether limiting analyses to high gamma impedes ability of clarifying auditory cortical organization. We compared the two measures obtained from posterolateral superior temporal gyrus (PLST) and evaluated their relative utility in sound categorization. Subjects were neurosurgical patients undergoing invasive monitoring for medically refractory epilepsy. Stimuli (consonant-vowel syllables varying in voicing and place of articulation and control tones) elicited robust evoked potentials and high gamma activity on PLST. LFPs had greater across-subject variability, yet yielded higher classification accuracy, relative to high gamma power. Classification was enhanced by including temporal detail of LFPs and combining LFP and high gamma. We conclude that future studies should consider utilizing both LFP and high gamma when investigating the functional organization of human auditory cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Using social media to measure the contribution of red list species to the nature-based tourism potential of African protected areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemen, Louise; Cottam, Andrew J.; Drakou, Evangelia G.;

    2015-01-01

    most attractive to nature-based tourism are the Lion, African Elephant and Leopard. Combining the photo counts with species range data, African protected areas with the highest potential to attract wildlife tourists based on attractive species occurrence were Samburu National Reserve in Kenya, Mukogodo...... Forest Reserve located just north of Mount Kenya, and Addo Elephant National Park in South-Africa. The proposed method requires only three data sources which are freely accessible and available online, which could make the proposed index tractable for large scale quantitative ecosystem service...... services for large areas. In this paper we explore a method to quantify cultural benefits through the enjoyment of natured-based tourism, by assessing the potential tourism attractiveness of species for each protected area in Africa using the IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species. We use the number...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4210 - Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Devices § 870.4210 Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing is a device used in cardiopulmonary surgery to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter,...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator...

  13. On-Pump Versus Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in Elderly Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Susanne Juel; Houlind, Kim; Kjeldsen, Bo Juul;

    2012-01-01

    Conventional coronary artery bypass grafting performed with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass is a well-validated treatment for patients with ischemic heart disease. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) has been suggested to reduce the number of perioperative complications, especially...... in elderly patients....

  14. Fabrication of nanofiber non-wovens on the melt blowing die with air by-passes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Ting; Yang Kang; Wu Li-Li

    2016-01-01

    The air flow field of the melt blowing die with air by-passes is simulated. The results show that fibers fabricated on the die with air by-passes are much finer than those without air by-passes, which indicates an energy-saving approach to fabricating nanofibers on the melt blowing equipment.

  15. Fabrication of nanofiber non-wovens on the melt blowing die with air by-passes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ting

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The air flow field of the melt blowing die with air by-passes is simulated. The results show that fibers fabricated on the die with air by-passes are much finer than those without air by-passes, which indicates an energy-saving approach to fabricating nanofibers on the melt blowing equipment.

  16. On-pump versus off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlind, Kim Christian

    2013-01-01

    Off pump coronary artery bypass surgery has been purported to be safer than conventional coronary artery bypass surgery performed using cardiopulmonary bypass. This theory was supported by a number of early series, but failed to be confirmed by a number of small, randomized controlled trials . Co...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class II...

  18. Patient Bypass Behavior and Critical Access Hospitals: Implications for Patient Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiexin (Jason); Bellamy, Gail R.; McCormick, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the extent of bypass for inpatient care among patients living in Critical Access Hospital (CAH) service areas, and to determine factors associated with bypass, the reasons for bypass, and what CAHs can do to retain patients locally. Methods: Six hundred and forty-seven subjects, aged 18 years and older, who had been admitted to…

  19. Different contributions of platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide in long-term potentiation of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettorossi, V E; Grassi, S

    2001-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the differential role of nitric oxide (NO) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) in long-term potentiation (LTP) induced in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents. The NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO) and the PAF receptor antagonist ginkgolide B (BN-52021) were administered before and after induction of potentiation. The effect of carboxy-PTIO was to completely prevent LTP. By contrast, BN-52021 only reduced the amplitude of HFS potentiation, which could develop fully at the drug washout or decline to zero, becoming a short-term phenomenon, in the case of long-lasting PAF receptor block. Both drugs, when given after HFS, had no effect on the already established potentiation, but whilst BN-52021 showed an influence within 5 min of the LTP induction, carboxy-PTIO did not affect the response once HFS was delivered. Moreover, we showed that the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, and methylcarbamyl PAF (mc-PAF) induced LTP which was associated with an increase in glutamate release as shown by reduction in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio. The mc-PAF LTP was prevented by the NO scavenger, while NO LTP was only reduced by BN-52021. We suggest that NO and PAF are implicated as retrograde messengers in two different phases of vestibular LTP: NO in the induction phase; and PAF in the full expression phase.

  20. [Coronary artery bypass surgery: methods of performance monitoring and quality control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, A; Sergeant, P; Ennker, J

    2009-10-01

    , the special advantages of the procedure can be utilised to reach a nearly complete avoidance of postoperative stroke through combining the procedure with aorta no-touch technique. The long-term success of the bypass operation depends on the type of bypass material in additions to many other factors. Both internal mammary arteries are considered the most durable.Using an operation preparation check contributes to the operative success.