WorldWideScience

Sample records for by-products

  1. Waste/By-Product Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    By‐ product Hydrogen Fuel Flexibility Biogas : generated from organic waste �Wastewater treatment plants can provide multiple MW of renewable... Waste /By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: � Waste bio‐mass: biogas to high temp fuel cells to produce H2 – there are over two dozen sites...13 Waste /By product Hydrogen ‐ Biogas

  2. Cements containing by-product gypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensted, J. [University of Greenwich, London (United Kingdom). School of Biological and Chemical Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Chemical by-product gypsum can readily replace natural gypsum in Portland cements and in blended cements like Portland pfa cement and Portland blast furnace cement without technical detriment in many instances. Indeed, sometimes the technical performance of the cement can be enhanced. The hydration chemistry is often changed, in that where there is at least some retardation of setting, more AFT phase (ettringite) is formed during early hydration at the expense of calcium silicate hydrates. By-product gypsum can also replace natural gypsum in speciality products like calcium aluminate cement-Portland cement mixes for producing quick setting cements and in calcium sulphoaluminate-type expansive cements. However, by-products gypsum have proved to be less successful for utilization in API Classes of oilwell cements, because of the greater difficulty in obtaining batch-to-batch consistency in properties like thickening time and slurry rheology. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Torrefaction of agricultural by-products (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrefaction of biomass involves heating at 200°C-300°C under inert atmosphere to remove volatiles and produce materials with higher energy values and low moisture. Agricultural by-products, such as apple, grape, olive, and tomato pomaces as well as almond and walnut shells, were torrefied at differ...

  4. Anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejnfelt, Anette; Angelidaki, Irini

    2009-01-01

    giving the best results. High concentrations of long-chain fatty acids and ammonia in the by-products were found to inhibit the biogas process at concentrations higher than 5 g lipids dm(-3) and 7 gN dm(-3) respectively. Pretreatment (pasteurization: 70 degrees C, sterilization: 133 degrees C, and alkali...

  5. ADVANCED GASIFICATION BY-PRODUCT UTILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

    2005-04-01

    The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2003 to August 31, 2004. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

  6. Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Harold Schobert

    2006-02-01

    With the recent passing of new legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

  7. Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

    2006-08-31

    With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The

  8. Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

    2006-08-31

    With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The

  9. Digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkari, Saman; Taghizadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was carried out to determine the digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products. Grapefruit pulp (GP), lemon pulp (LE), lime pulp (LI) and orange pulp (OP) were the test feed. Digestion kinetic of whole citrus by-products and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) fraction and acid detergent fiber (ADF) fractions of citrus by-products were measured using the in vitro gas production technique. Fermentation kinetics of the neutral detergent soluble carbohydrates (NDSC) fraction and hemicelluloses were calculated using a curve subtraction. The fermentation rate of whole was the highest for the LE (p fractions. There was no significant difference among potential gas production (A) volumes of whole test feeds (p fractions of citrus by-products have high potential for degradability. It could also be concluded that carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products have remarkable difference in digestion kinetics and digestive behavior.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfectants are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are popular alternatives, as they produce low...

  11. Formation and Occurrence of Disinfection By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants such as chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramines react with naturally occurring organic matter, anthropogenic contaminants, bromide, and iodide during the production of drinking water. There is concern about D...

  12. ANALYSIS OF BY-PRODUCTS MARKET IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keniyz N. V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Changing style of life, its rhythm and tendencies dictate their own conditions. The deficit of time makes us economize it on all, including the time for cooking. Among the main trends of the domestic meat market - switching consumers from frozen meat products to fresh cooled products. In connection with it the amount of consumers of meat semi-finished products grows. In the work there was considered the results of research of the Russian market of by-products. The market of frozen meat by-products is actively developed in large cities, where it has its own production. The participants of the market state that consumers have started to buy more frozen by-products by weight and the analysis of meat by-products assortment in retailing trade for 2014 testifies it. Trying to fasten their positions, operators of the market not only develop the production powers but work out new products and the analysis of dynamics of production volumes of meat by-products and shares of federal districts – producers of meat by-products testify it. The main players in this segment see the future market for complex, receipt, combined products and ready dishes that will lead to change of structure of meat semi-finished products sales

  13. NATURAL ANTIOXIDANT INGREDIENT FROM BY-PRODUCTS OF FRUITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. El-Baroty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The contents of total phenolics compounds and their phenolic constituents were quantified in organic and aqueous of four varieties (Zebdia, Sukkari, taimor and Hindi of mango (Mangifera indica L., seeds pulp and kernel, one varieties of pomegranate (Punica ranatum L., peel and peanut (Arachis hypogaea L., Giza 6, shell by-products. The antioxidant activities of all by products extracts were assessed by five antioxidant methods as well as by rancimate test. The total Phenolic content of aqueous and organic extracts of among all mango varieties, pomegranate and peanut shell showed the content values ranging from 71.06 to 124.18 mg/100g, 95.07 to 124.18 mg/100g and 41.64 to 71.06, respectively. Nineteen phenolic compounds were identified by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC among all mango varieties, of which vanillic acid, benzoic acid and mangiferin were occurred in high amounts. The major phenolic compounds were detected in pomegranate and peanut shell were chlorogenic and gallic and caffeic (24.42%, respectively. All fruits by products were exhibited remarkable antioxidant activity, with various degrees in all tested methods. However, among all by-products extracts, organic extract had higher antioxidant than that aqueous extracts toward all antioxidant tested. Mango kernel peel and pomegranates showed high radical scavenging activity, which could be compared with the synthetic antioxidants Butylated Hydroxyanisol (BHA. However, all by-products extracts exhibited high inhibit effect against the lipid peroxidation of sunflower oil (at 100°C as assessed by rancimat methods. However, this antioxidant activity was found to be strong significant correlation with phenolic contents (p<0.05 in by-product extracts. It can be thus concluded that varied varieties of mango, pomegranate and peanut by-products, although it constitutes the part of the fruits, it is valuable parts due to its antioxidant activities, it can be

  14. Maximizing Utilization of Energy from Crop By-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Haryanto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The availability of crop by-products is huge during harvesting times as related to the vast agricultural land area; however, their utilization is still limited due to lack of knowledge and handling problem. Seasonal effect is obvious especially during wet season when high rainfall hinders proper management of crop by-products. Crop by-products are energy rich feedstuffs in the form of chemical substance such as cellulose and hemicellulose. The utilization of cellulose and hemicellulose as sources of energy can be maximized by the application of technologies to increase the digestibility. Cellulose is polymer of glucose while hemicellulose is polymer of xylose which both can be converted to volatile fatty acids by rumen microbial enzyme activities and subsequently used by the host animal as source of energy. In addition, cellulose and hemicellulose can also be used as substrates for bioethanol production leaving behind residual matter with higher concentration of protein which is also appropriate for ruminant feeds. The fat content of crop by-products such as those in rice bran and corn germ can be extracted for oil production that can be used for human consumption with concomitant production of high nutritive value of residues for ruminant feeds. The oil extraction technologies are available; however the high cost of ethanol and oil production should obtain high attention to make the technologies more applicable at farmers’ level.

  15. Genotoxicity of Disinfection By-products: Comparison to Carcinogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) can be formed when water is disinfected by various agents such as chlorine, ozone, or chloramines. Among the >600 DBPs identified in drinking water, 11 are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and another ~70 DBPs that occur at s...

  16. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1993-04-01

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  17. By-product materials in cement clinker manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadayev, A. [ICS and E, Aurora, CO (United States); Kodess, B. [VNIIMS Gosstandart of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-02-01

    The use of Cl- and SO{sub 3}-containing by-products from chemical industries for manufacturing Portland cement clinker using a wet process was examined. The chemical and mineralogical compositions of the by-products and raw materials were determined. Homogeneous raw mixes containing different concentrations of by-products (5--30%) were prepared and the influence of the by-products on all steps of burning the mixes in a kiln to form a cement clinker was investigated. It was shown that introducing Cl- and SO{sub 3}-containing by-products to the raw mixes significantly changes all the cement clinker producing stages and changes the chemical and mineralogical compositions at all intermediate stages and in the finished products, forming new minerals containing Cl and SO{sub 3} [CaO{sub x} (SiO{sub 2}){sub y} CaCl{sub 2}] or [CaO{sub x} (SiO{sub 2}){sub y} CaSO{sub 4}] and increasing the amount of well-known intermediate minerals. The presence of the chlorides and sulfates in the cement clinker burning processes removes alkali from the raw mixes, turning them to volatile forms, accelerating the raw mineral decomposition processes and accelerating the formation processes of cement minerals (C{sub 2}S, C{sub 12}A{sub 7}, C{sub 4}AF) and formation of chloride and sulfate cycles in the kiln, forming clinker liquids and decreasing the formation and growth of the main cement minerals (C{sub 3}A, C{sub 3}S). The cement clinker contains some quantity of minerals with Cl or SO{sub 3}. Their presence in the final product decreases cement quality by reducing the amount of active CaO (C) and reducing the active CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio.

  18. Utilization of biodiesel by-products for mosquito control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Megha; Sharma, Satyawati; Dubey, Saurabh; Naik, Satya Narayan; Patanjali, Phool Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The current paper has elaborated the efficient utilization of non-edible oil seed cakes (NEOC), by-products of the bio-diesel extraction process to develop a herbal and novel mosquitocidal composition against the Aedes aegypti larvae. The composition consisted of botanical active ingredients, inerts, burning agents and preservatives; where the botanical active ingredients were karanja (Pongamia glabra) cake powder and jatropha (Jatropha curcas) cake powder, products left after the extraction of oil from karanja and jatropha seed. The percentage mortality value recorded for the combination with concentration, karanja cake powder (20%) and jatropha cake powder (20%), 1:1 was 96%. The coil formulations developed from these biodiesel by-products are of low cost, environmentally friendly and are less toxic than the synthetic active ingredients.

  19. The origins of religion: evolved adaptation or by-product?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyysiäinen, Ilkka; Hauser, Marc

    2010-03-01

    Considerable debate has surrounded the question of the origins and evolution of religion. One proposal views religion as an adaptation for cooperation, whereas an alternative proposal views religion as a by-product of evolved, non-religious, cognitive functions. We critically evaluate each approach, explore the link between religion and morality in particular, and argue that recent empirical work in moral psychology provides stronger support for the by-product approach. Specifically, despite differences in religious background, individuals show no difference in the pattern of their moral judgments for unfamiliar moral scenarios. These findings suggest that religion evolved from pre-existing cognitive functions, but that it may then have been subject to selection, creating an adaptively designed system for solving the problem of cooperation.

  20. By-product information can stabilize the reliability of communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, H Martin; Ruxton, G D

    2012-12-01

    Although communication underpins many biological processes, its function and basic definition remain contentious. In particular, researchers have debated whether information should be an integral part of a definition of communication and how it remains reliable. So far the handicap principle, assuming signal costs to stabilize reliable communication, has been the predominant paradigm in the study of animal communication. The role of by-product information produced by mechanisms other than the communicative interaction has been neglected in the debate on signal reliability. We argue that by-product information is common and that it provides the starting point for ritualization as the process of the evolution of communication. Second, by-product information remains unchanged during ritualization and enforces reliable communication by restricting the options for manipulation and cheating. Third, this perspective changes the focus of research on communication from studying signal costs to studying the costs of cheating. It can thus explain the reliability of signalling in many communication systems that do not rely on handicaps. We emphasize that communication can often be informative but that the evolution of communication does not cause the evolution of information because by-product information often predates and stimulates the evolution of communication. Communication is thus a consequence but not a cause of reliability. Communication is the interplay of inadvertent, informative traits and evolved traits that increase the stimulation and perception of perceivers. Viewing communication as a complex of inadvertent and derived traits facilitates understanding of the selective pressures shaping communication and those shaping information and its reliability. This viewpoint further contributes to resolving the current controversy on the role of information in communication.

  1. New insights into meat by-product utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldrá, Fidel; Mora, Leticia; Reig, Milagro

    2016-10-01

    Meat industry generates large volumes of by-products like blood, bones, meat trimmings, skin, fatty tissues, horns, hoofs, feet, skull and viscera among others that are costly to be treated and disposed ecologically. These costs can be balanced through innovation to generate added value products that increase its profitability. Rendering results in feed ingredients for livestock, poultry and aquaculture as well as for pet foods. Energy valorization can be obtained through the thermochemical processing of meat and bone meal or the use of waste animal fats for the production of biodiesel. More recently, new applications have been reported like the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates as alternative to plastics produced from petroleum. Other interesting valorization strategies are based on the hydrolysis of by-products to obtain added value products like bioactive peptides with relevant physiological effects as antihypertensive, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, etc. with promising applications in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry. This paper reports and discusses the latest developments and trends in the use and valorisation of meat industry by-products.

  2. Utilization of Biodiesel By-Products for Biogas Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kolesárová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reviews the possibility of using the by-products from biodiesel production as substrates for anaerobic digestion and production of biogas. The process of biodiesel production is predominantly carried out by catalyzed transesterification. Besides desired methylesters, this reaction provides also few other products, including crude glycerol, oil-pressed cakes, and washing water. Crude glycerol or g-phase is heavier separate liquid phase, composed mainly by glycerol. A couple of studies have demonstrated the possibility of biogas production, using g-phase as a single substrate, and it has also shown a great potential as a cosubstrate by anaerobic treatment of different types of organic waste or energy crops. Oil cakes or oil meals are solid residues obtained after oil extraction from the seeds. Another possible by-product is the washing water from raw biodiesel purification, which is an oily and soapy liquid. All of these materials have been suggested as feasible substrates for anaerobic degradation, although some issues and inhibitory factors have to be considered.

  3. Chlorine dioxine DBPs (disinfection by-products in drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lasagna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s it has been well known that, though water for human consumption is generally disinfected before being distributed along the network, the use of chemicals results in the formation of many different Disinfection By-Products (DBPs. In the case of chlorine dioxide, the most important and represented DBPs are chlorite and chlorate: after an introduction concerning the current Italian regulation on this subject, in the experimental part the results of a 7-year minitoring campaign, concerning water of different origin collected from taps in various Italian regions, are shown. The analytical technique used for the determination of chlorite and chlorate was Ion Chromatography. The result obtained are finally discussed.

  4. Detection of regulated disinfection by-products in cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes; Cabezas, Lourdes; Fernández-Salguero, Jose

    2016-08-01

    Cheese can contain regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs), mainly through contact with brine solutions prepared in disinfected water or sanitisers used to clean all contact surfaces, such as processing equipment and tanks. This study has focused on the possible presence of up to 10 trihalomethanes (THMs) and 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs) in a wide range of European cheeses. The study shows that 2 THMs, (in particular trichloromethane) and 3 HAAs (in particular dichloroacetic acid) can be found at μg/kg levels in the 56 cheeses analysed. Of the two types of DBPs, HAAs were generally present at higher concentrations, due to their hydrophilic and non-volatile nature. Despite their different nature (THMs are lipophilic), both of them have an affinity for fatty cheeses, increasing their concentrations as the percentage of water decreased because the DBPs were concentrated in the aqueous phase of the cheeses.

  5. Valorisation of by Products from Bleached Eucalyptus Kraft Pulp Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M. C.; Lopes, O. R.; Colodette, J. L.; Porto, A. O.; Rieumont, J.; Chaussy, D.; Belgacem, M. N.; Silva, G. G.

    2008-08-01

    Three industrial wastes arising from bleached hardwood kraft pulps, namely: unbleached screen rejects (USR), effluent treatment (ETW), and eucalyptus bark (EB) were analyzed with the aim of their possible valorization as an alternative source of cellulose. Their morphological properties were determined using MorFi apparatus. For this study the sample bleached kraft pulp, BKP, was analyzed as a reference. Lignin and carbohydrate contents were also quantified. These by-products were studied as such (i.e. without careful purification) because we intended to find rational and low-cost way of valorization. In fact any additional operation will induce an over cost. The results obtained indicate that these industrial wastes can be potential raw material in fibre-based applications (paper, composites…), since they contain a high proportion of cellulose with preserved fibrillar morphology. Some of these materials have low lignin and inorganic residue contents.

  6. Effect of Celebrity Endorsement in Advertising Activities by Product Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karasiewicz Grzegorz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to answer two related questions: are celebrity endorsements more likely to be result in a higher evaluation of the product being advertised than use of an anonymous individual (e.g. a typical consumer; and, if present, do these positive effects vary by product category? To answer these two questions research was conducted on a 237 student sample employing a quasi-experiment consisting of four groups (two product categories and two types of endorsers using data collected through an online survey. The results indicate that celebrity endorsements do have a positive impact on the evaluation of durable goods, but do not affect the evaluation of frequently purchased products. This finding largely confirms the assumptions of the match-up model, the meaning transfer model, and the ELM model.

  7. Wheat germ: not only a by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandolini, Andrea; Hidalgo, Alyssa

    2012-03-01

    The wheat germ (embryonic axis and scutellum) represents about 2.5-3.8% of total seed weight and is an important by-product of the flour milling industry. The germ contains about 10-15% lipids, 26-35% proteins, 17% sugars, 1.5-4.5% fibre and 4% minerals, as well as significant quantities of bioactive compounds such as tocopherols [300-740 mg/kg dry matter (DM)], phytosterols (24-50 mg/kg), policosanols (10 mg/kg), carotenoids (4-38 mg/kg), thiamin (15-23 mg/kg) and riboflavin (6-10 mg/kg). Oil recovery is achieved by mechanical pressing or solvent extraction, which retrieve about 50% or 90% lipids, respectively; innovative approaches, such as supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, are also proposed. The oil is rich in triglycerides (57% of total lipids), mainly linoleic (18:2), palmitic (16:0) and oleic (18:1) acids, but relevant amounts of sterols, mono- and diglycerides, phospho- and glycolipids are present. The lypophilic antioxidants tocopherols and carotenoids are also abundant. The main by-product of oil extraction is defatted germ meal, which has high protein content (30-32%), is rich in albumin (34.5% of total protein) and globulin (15.6%), and thus presents a well-balanced amino acid profile. Its principal mineral constituents are potassium, magnesium, calcium, zinc and manganese, in decreasing order. Total flavonoid content is about 0.35 g rutin equivalent/100 g DM. The wheat germ is therefore a unique source of concentrated nutrients, highly valued as food supplement. While the oil is widely appreciated for its pharmaceutical and nutritional value, the defatted germ meal is a promising source of high-quality vegetable proteins. Better nutrient separation from the kernel and improved fractioning techniques could also provide high-purity molecules with positive health benefits.

  8. Sampling from stochastic reservoir models constrained by production data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegstad, Bjoern Kaare

    1997-12-31

    When a petroleum reservoir is evaluated, it is important to forecast future production of oil and gas and to assess forecast uncertainty. This is done by defining a stochastic model for the reservoir characteristics, generating realizations from this model and applying a fluid flow simulator to the realizations. The reservoir characteristics define the geometry of the reservoir, initial saturation, petrophysical properties etc. This thesis discusses how to generate realizations constrained by production data, that is to say, the realizations should reproduce the observed production history of the petroleum reservoir within the uncertainty of these data. The topics discussed are: (1) Theoretical framework, (2) History matching, forecasting and forecasting uncertainty, (3) A three-dimensional test case, (4) Modelling transmissibility multipliers by Markov random fields, (5) Up scaling, (6) The link between model parameters, well observations and production history in a simple test case, (7) Sampling the posterior using optimization in a hierarchical model, (8) A comparison of Rejection Sampling and Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, (9) Stochastic simulation and conditioning by annealing in reservoir description, and (10) Uncertainty assessment in history matching and forecasting. 139 refs., 85 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Synthesis of zeolite phases from combustion by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimraksa, K.; Chindaprasirt, P.; Setthaya, N. [Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry

    2010-12-15

    Synthesis of zeolites from combustion by-products, including fly ash, bottom ash and rice husk ash, was studied. A molar ratio of SiO{sub 2}/Al2O{sub 3} of 1.5 was used for the syntheses. Refluxing and hydrothermal methods were also used for synthesis for comparison. The reaction temperatures of refluxing and hydrothermal methods were 100{sup o}C and 130{sup o}C, respectively. Sodalite, phillipsite-K, and zeolite P1 with analcime were obtained when fly ash, bottom ash and rice husk ash were used as starting materials, respectively. With rice husk ash as a starting material, zeolite P1 was produced. This result had advantages over previous studies as there was no prior activation required for the synthesis. The concentrations and types of alkaline used in the synthesis also determined the zeolite type. The different zeolites obtained from three systems were measured for specific surface area and pore size by using BET and Hg-porosimetry, respectively. Ammonium exchange capacities of the synthesised powders containing zeolites, sodalite, zeolite P1 and phillipsite-K were 38.5, 65.0 and 154.7 meq 100 g{sup 1}, respectively.

  10. Synthesis of zeolite phases from combustion by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimraksa, Kedsarin; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Setthaya, Naruemon

    2010-12-01

    Synthesis of zeolites from combustion by-products, including fly ash, bottom ash and rice husk ash, was studied. A molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 of 1.5 was used for the syntheses. Refluxing and hydrothermal methods were also used for synthesis for comparison. The reaction temperatures of refluxing and hydrothermal methods were 100 degrees C and 130 degrees C, respectively. Sodalite, phillipsite-K, and zeolite P1 with analcime were obtained when fly ash, bottom ash and rice husk ash were used as starting materials, respectively. With rice husk ash as a starting material, zeolite P1 was produced. This result had advantages over previous studies as there was no prior activation required for the synthesis. The concentrations and types of alkaline used in the synthesis also determined the zeolite type. The different zeolites obtained from three systems were measured for specific surface area and pore size by using BET and Hg-porosimetry, respectively. Ammonium exchange capacities of the synthesised powders containing zeolites, sodalite, zeolite P1 and phillipsite-K were 38.5, 65.0 and 154.7 meq 100 g(-1), respectively.

  11. Disinfection by-product formation during seawater desalination: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daekyun; Amy, Gary L; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-09-15

    Due to increased freshwater demand across the globe, seawater desalination has become the technology of choice in augmenting water supplies in many parts of the world. The use of chemical disinfection is necessary in desalination plants for pre-treatment to control both biofouling as well as the post-disinfection of desalinated water. Although chlorine is the most commonly used disinfectant in desalination plants, its reaction with organic matter produces various disinfection by-products (DBPs) (e.g., trihalomethanes [THMs], haloacetic acids [HAAs], and haloacetonitriles [HANs]), and some DBPs are regulated in many countries due to their potential risks to public health. To reduce the formation of chlorinated DBPs, alternative oxidants (disinfectants) such as chloramines, chlorine dioxide, and ozone can be considered, but they also produce other types of DBPs. In addition, due to high levels of bromide and iodide concentrations in seawater, highly cytotoxic and genotoxic DBP species (i.e., brominated and iodinated DBPs) may form in distribution systems, especially when desalinated water is blended with other source waters having higher levels of organic matter. This article reviews the knowledge accumulated in the last few decades on DBP formation during seawater desalination, and summarizes in detail, the occurrence of DBPs in various thermal and membrane plants involving different desalination processes. The review also identifies the current challenges and future research needs for controlling DBP formation in seawater desalination plants and to reduce the potential toxicity of desalinated water.

  12. Health impact of disinfection by-products in swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Villanueva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on the epidemiological evidence on the health impacts related to disinfection by-products (DBPs in swimming pools, which is a chemical hazard generated as an undesired consequence to reduce the microbial pathogens. Specific DBPs are carcinogenic, fetotoxic and/or irritant to the airways according to experimental studies. Epidemiological evidence shows that swimming in pools during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of reproductive outcomes. An epidemiological study suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with swimming pool attendance, although evidence is inconclusive. A higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms including asthma is found among swimming pool workers and elite swimmers, although the causality of this association is unclear. The body of evidence in children indicates that asthma is not increased by swimming pool attendance. Overall, the available knowledge suggests that the health benefits of swimming outweigh the potential health risks of chemical contamination. However, the positive effects of swimming should be enhanced by minimising potential risks.

  13. UTILIZATION OF LOW NOx COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.Y. Hwang; X. Huang; M.G. McKimpson; R.E. Tieder; A.M. Hein; J.M. Gillis; D.C. Popko; K.L. Paxton; Z. Li; X. Liu; X. Song; R.I. Kramer

    1998-12-01

    Low NO{sub x} combustion practices are critical for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from power plants. These low NO{sub x} combustion practices, however, generate high residual carbon contents in the fly ash produced. These high carbon contents threaten utilization of this combustion by-product. This research has successfully developed a separation technology to render fly ash into useful, quality-controlled materials. This technology offers great flexibility and has been shown to be applicable to all of the fly ashes tested (more than 10). The separated materials can be utilized in traditional fly ash applications, such as cement and concrete, as well as in nontraditional applications such as plastic fillers, metal matrix composites, refractories, and carbon adsorbents. Technologies to use beneficiated fly ash in these applications are being successfully developed. In the future, we will continue to refine the separation and utilization technologies to expand the utilization of fly ash. The disposal of more than 31 million tons of fly ash per year is an important environmental issue. With continued development, it will be possible to increase economic, energy and environmental benefits by re-directing more of this fly ash into useful materials.

  14. Minimization of the formation of disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Mohamed I; Gad-Allah, Tarek A; Ali, Mohamed E M; Yoon, Yeoman

    2012-09-01

    The drinking water industry is required to minimize DBPs levels while ensuring adequate disinfection. In this study, efficient and appropriate treatment scheme for the reduction of disinfection by-product (DBPs) formation in drinking water containing natural organic matter has been established. This was carried out by the investigation of different treatment schemes consisting of enhanced coagulation, sedimentation, disinfection by using chlorine dioxide/ozone, filtration by sand filter, or granular activated carbon (GAC). Bench scale treatment schemes were applied on actual samples from different selected sites to identify the best conditions for the treatment of water. Samples were collected from effluent of each step in the treatment train in order to analyze pH, UV absorbance at 254 nm (UVA(254)), specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA(254)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs). The obtained results indicated that using pre-ozonation/enhanced coagulation/activated carbon filtration treatment train appears to be the most effective method for reducing DBPs precursors in drinking water treatment.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  16. 40 CFR 63.302 - Standards for by-product coke oven batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... batteries. 63.302 Section 63.302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... National Emission Standards for Coke Oven Batteries § 63.302 Standards for by-product coke oven batteries... oven emissions from each affected existing by-product coke oven battery that exceed any of...

  17. Nutritional diversity of agricultural and agro-industrial by-products for ruminant feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.G. Azevêdo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-seven by-products were collected from regions throughout Brazil. Chemical composition, in vitro neutral detergent fiber digestibility (IVNDFD, and total digestible nutrients (TDN were determined with the objective of grouping by-products with similar nutritional characteristics. The by-products belonging to group one (G1 presented the highest content of neutral detergent fiber exclusive of ash and nitrogenous compounds [aNDFom(n] and lowest energy content, with 42.5% and 38.8% of IVNDFD and TDN, respectively. A new cluster analysis was carried in order to better characterize G2 by-products, six subgroups (SGs were established (SG1 to SG6. SG1 by-products had the highest and the lowest values for lignin and TDN, respectively. SG2 by-products had the highest aNDFom(n value, with TDN and IVNDFD values greater than 600 and 700g/kg, respectively, and crude protein (CP value below 200g/kg in dry matter (DM. Among all the subgroups, SG3 had the highest TDN (772g/kg and IVNDFD (934g/kg values and the lowest lignin (23g/kg in DM value. The ether extract was what most influenced the hierarchical establishment of residual grouping in SG4. SG5 by-products had the highest concentration of non-fibrous carbohydrate. Different from the other subgroups, SG6 by-products had the highest value of available CP.

  18. Preserving high-protein fish by-products through silages and fermentates

    Science.gov (United States)

    n Alaska, over three million metric tons of fish by-products are generated each year. However, due to the remote locations and seasonal nature of salmon fisheries, by-products are generally not fully utilized unless a fish meal plant is located nearby. Acidification is a common method for inhibiting...

  19. Hazard Analysis and identification of Critical Control Points of collagen extraction from cod by-products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberts, C.H.J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the European research project “UTILISATION AND STABILISATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COD SPECIES” (QLK1-CT-2000-01017 QLRT-2001-02829) is to investigate whether collagen from fish by-products could serve as an important raw material in high quality food. Since Atlantic cod is a major commodit

  20. In situ ruminal crude protein degradability of by-products from cereals, oilseeds and animal origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habib, G.; Khan, N.A.; Ali, M.; Bezabih, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a database on in situ ruminal crude protein (CP) degradability characteristics of by-products from cereal grains, oilseeds and animal origin commonly fed to ruminants in Pakistan and South Asian Countries. The oilseed by-products were soybean meal, sunflower me

  1. Wheat milling by-products and their impact on bread making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdane, Sami; Leys, Sofie; Jacobs, Pieter J; Dornez, Emmie; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2015-11-15

    This study investigates the relationship between the properties of dietary fiber (DF) rich wheat milling by-products and their impact on bread making. From coarse bran over coarse and fine weatings to low grade flour, the content of starch and lipids increased, while that of DF and ash decreased. Enzyme activity levels differed strongly and were not related to other by-product properties. Average particle size of the by-products was positively correlated with DF and ash contents and their hydration properties. When meals from flour and by-products were composed on the same overall starch level to compensate for differences in endosperm contamination in the by-products, bread specific volume was more strongly depressed with fine weatings and low grade flour than with coarse bran and weatings. This suggests that the properties of the former were intrinsically more detrimental to bread making than those of the latter.

  2. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) by-products and their valuable components: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahurul, M H A; Zaidul, I S M; Ghafoor, Kashif; Al-Juhaimi, Fahad Y; Nyam, Kar-Lin; Norulaini, N A N; Sahena, F; Mohd Omar, A K

    2015-09-15

    The large amount of waste produced by the food industries causes serious environmental problems and also results in economic losses if not utilized effectively. Different research reports have revealed that food industry by-products can be good sources of potentially valuable bioactive compounds. As such, the mango juice industry uses only the edible portions of the mangoes, and a considerable amount of peels and seeds are discarded as industrial waste. These mango by-products come from the tropical or subtropical fruit processing industries. Mango by-products, especially seeds and peels, are considered to be cheap sources of valuable food and nutraceutical ingredients. The main uses of natural food ingredients derived from mango by-products are presented and discussed, and the mainstream sectors of application for these by-products, such as in the food, pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic industries, are highlighted.

  3. Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Concentration by Reverse Osmosis Membrane Techniques of Disinfection By-Products from Water Disinfected by Chlorination and Ozonation/Postchlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    To conduct the health-effect studies described in subsequent articles in this series, concentrated aqueous mixtures of disinfection by-products were required for the two water treatment trains described in the preceding article (Miltner et al., 2008). To accomplish this, the fini...

  4. Quantification of bioactive compounds in pulps and by-products of tropical fruits from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Larissa Morais; Teixeira de Figueiredo, Evania Altina; Silva Ricardo, Nagila Maria Pontes; Pinto Vieira, Icaro Gusmao; Wilane de Figueiredo, Raimundo; Brasil, Isabella Montenegro; Gomes, Carmen L

    2014-01-15

    This study aimed to quantify the levels of resveratrol, coumarin, and other bioactives in pulps and by-products of twelve tropical fruits from Brazil obtained during pulp production process. Pineapple, acerola, monbin, cashew apple, guava, soursop, papaya, mango, passion fruit, surinam cherry, sapodilla, and tamarind pulps were evaluated as well as their by-products (peel, pulp's leftovers, and seed). Total phenolic, anthocyanins, yellow flavonoids, β-carotene and lycopene levels were also determined. Resveratrol was identified in guava and surinam cherry by-products and coumarin in passion fruit, guava and surinam cherry by-products and mango pulp. These fruit pulp and by-products could be considered a new natural source of both compounds. Overall, fruit by-products presented higher (P<0.05) bioactive content than their respective fruit pulps. This study provides novel information about tropical fruits and their by-products bioactive composition, which is essential for the understanding of their nutraceutical potential and future application in the food industry.

  5. SHORTER MENSTRUAL CYCLES ASSOCIATED WITH CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter Menstrual Cycles Associated with Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water. Gayle Windham, Kirsten Waller, Meredith Anderson, Laura Fenster, Pauline Mendola, Shanna Swan. California Department of Health Services.In previous studies of tap water consumption we...

  6. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, Indiana, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high and low r...

  7. By-Product Formation in Repetitive PCR Amplification of DNA Libraries during SELEX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolle, Fabian; Wilke, Julian; Wengel, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The selection of nucleic acid aptamers is an increasingly important approach to generate specific ligands binding to virtually any molecule of choice. However, selection-inherent amplification procedures are prone to artificial by-product formation that prohibits the enrichment of target-recogniz......The selection of nucleic acid aptamers is an increasingly important approach to generate specific ligands binding to virtually any molecule of choice. However, selection-inherent amplification procedures are prone to artificial by-product formation that prohibits the enrichment of target......-recognizing aptamers. Little is known about the formation of such by-products when employing nucleic acid libraries as templates. We report on the formation of two different forms of by-products, named ladder- and non-ladder-type observed during repetitive amplification in the course of in vitro selection experiments...

  8. THE UPTAKE OF WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS INTO FOODS DURING HOME PROCESSING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variety of organic compounds in tap water are produced as a result of disinfection process. Use of chlorine-containing chemicals for disinfection produces many disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles and haloacetic acid. Ozonation with secon...

  9. Aqueous chlorination of mefenamic acid: kinetics, transformation by-products and ecotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adira Wan Khalit, Wan Nor; Tay, Kheng Soo

    2016-05-18

    Mefenamic acid (Mfe) is one of the most frequently detected nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the environment. This study investigated the kinetics and the transformation by-products of Mfe during aqueous chlorination. The potential ecotoxicity of the transformation by-products was also evaluated. In the kinetic study, the second-order rate constant (kapp) for the reaction between Mfe and free available chlorine (FAC) was determined at 25 ± 0.1 °C. The result indicated that the degradation of Mfe by FAC is highly pH-dependent. When the pH was increased from 6 to 8, it was found that the kapp for the reaction between Mfe and FAC was decreased from 16.44 to 4.4 M(-1) s(-1). Characterization of the transformation by-products formed during the chlorination of Mfe was carried out using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry. Four major transformation by-products were identified. These transformation by-products were mainly formed through hydroxylation, chlorination and oxidation reactions. Ecotoxicity assessment revealed that transformation by-products, particularly monohydroxylated Mfe which is more toxic than Mfe, can be formed during aqueous chlorination.

  10. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31

    New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

  11. Canna edulis Ker by-product: chemical composition and characteristics of the dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Zhang; Wang, Zheng-Wu; Shi, Xian-Ming

    2010-08-01

    Canna edulis Ker by-product was recycled and utilized after starch extraction. The chemical composition, physical properties and antioxidant activity of the by-product were investigated. The by-product was mainly composed of dietary fiber (54.84% measured by AOAC method), and the insoluble dietary fiber constituted the major fraction. Then, the chemical composition of dietary fiber was tested using modified AOAC and Englyst methods. The results showed that dietary fiber was comprised of cellulose, hemicelluloses (including xyloglucans, arabinoxylans and glucuronoxylans), pectin and lignin. Moreover, the by-product contained relatively high content of phenolic compounds and exhibited a moderate antioxidant activity. In addition, the by-product showed both high water-holding capacity (12.5 mL/g) and oil-holding capacity (14 mL/g), and its suspension exhibited controllable viscosity. Therefore, the by-product from C. edulis is not only a source of dietary fiber but also a functional ingredient for food industry.

  12. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

    1993-04-01

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  13. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehouwer, R.; Dick, W.; Bigham, J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    A study was initiated in December 1990 to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. A Phase 1 report provided results of an extensive characterization of chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of 58 dry FGD by-product samples. The Phase 1 report concluded that high volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics related to their ability to substitute for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mine lands). Phase 2 objectives were (1) to conduct laboratory and greenhouse studies of FGD and soil (spoil) mixtures for agronomic and engineering applications, (2) to initiate field studies related to high volume agronomic and engineering uses, and (3) to develop the basic methodological framework for estimation of the financial and economic costs and benefits to society of several FGD reuse options and to make some preliminary runs of economic models. High volume beneficial reuses of dry FGD by-products have been successfully demonstrated. Adverse environmental impacts have been negligible. Although few sources of dry FGD by-products currently exist in Ohio and the United States there is potential for smaller coal-fired facilities to adopt S0{sub 2} scrubbing technologies that produce dry FGD material. Also much of what we have learned from studies on dry FGD by-products is applicable to the more prevalent wet FGD by-products. The adaptation of the technologies demonstrated in this project seem to be not only limited by economic constraints, but even more so, by the need to create awareness of the market potential of using these FGD by-products.

  14. Microbiological Evaluation of Pork and Chicken By-Products in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Jung, Hae-In; Kuk, Min; Lim, Jong-Soo; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the microbiological risk of pork and chicken by-products by enumerating indicator bacteria (total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and Escherichia coli) and identifying pathogens such as Campylobacter and Salmonella. The antibiotic resistance of pathogenic isolates was determined, and molecular subtyping was performed using automated repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR). Pork and chicken by-products were collected from 10 processing plants. The mean numbers of total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and E. coli from 95 pork by-product samples and 64 chicken by-product samples were 5.1, 3.6, and 2.4 log CFU/g and 4.5, 3.0, and 1.8 log CFU/g, respectively. The numbers of indicator bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (small intestine, large intestine, and gizzard) were significantly higher than those in other organs. Salmonella and Campylobacter species were detected in 3 and 5 of 95 pork by-product samples and in 6 and 3 of 64 chicken by-product samples, respectively. Four of 9 Salmonella isolates examined were resistant to eight antibiotics, and each of these resistant strains produced an extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Most Campylobacter isolates were resistant to tetracycline (7 of 8 strains) and quinolones (7 of 8 strains). The similarity in rep-PCR patterns among Salmonella isolates was more closely associated with serotype than with the processing plant and type of meat. Conversely, the rep-PCR patterns of Campylobacter isolates were specific to the processing plant. Our findings could help agencies develop regulations for protection from foodborne bacterial infections arising from animal by-products.

  15. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create several types of by-products. This project focused primarily on by-product materials obtained from what are commonly called ''dry scrubbers'' which produce a dry, solid material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Prior to this project, dry FGD by-products were generally treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing; The major objective of this project was to develop beneficial uses, via recycling, capable of providing economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD by-product. It is equally important, however, that the environmental impacts be carefully assessed so that the new uses developed are not only technically feasible but socially acceptable. Specific objectives developed for this project were derived over an 18-month period during extensive discussions with personnel from industry, regulatory agencies and research institutions. These were stated as follows: Objective 1: To characterize the material generated by dry FGD processes. Objective 2: To demonstrate the utilization of dry FGD by-product as a soil amendment on agricultural lands and on abandoned and active surface coal mines in Ohio. Objective 3: To demonstrate the use of dry FGD by-product as an engineering material for soil stabilization. Objective 4: To determine the quantities of dry FGD by-product that can be utilized in each of these applications. Objective 5. To determine the environmental and economic impacts of utilizing the material. Objective 6. To calibrate environmental, engineering, and economic models that can be used to determine the applicability and costs of utilizing these processes at other sites.

  16. Cyclic voltammetry to evaluate the antioxidant potential in winemaking by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Jara-Palacios, M; Luisa Escudero-Gilete, M; Miguel Hernández-Hierro, J; Heredia, Francisco J; Hernanz, Dolores

    2017-04-01

    Grape pomace is composed of seeds, skins and stems that are an important source of phenolic substances, which have antioxidant properties and potential benefits to human health. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) has been used to measure the total antioxidant potential of different winemaking by-products. The electrochemical behavior of pomace, seeds, skins and stems was measured by CV and lipid peroxidation inhibition by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) method. Differences for the electrochemical parameter were found between the by-products, pomace and seeds, which presented the greatest voltammetric peak area. Furthermore, the by-products induced inhibition of lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenates. Pomace and seeds showed higher capacity to inhibit lipid peroxidation than stems and skins, which could be because these by-products are richer in flavanols. Simple regression analyses showed that voltammetric parameters are highly correlated to the values obtained for lipid peroxidation inhibition. CV is a promising technique to estimate the total antioxidant potential of phenolic extract from winemaking by-products.

  17. Flue gas desulfurization by-products additions to acid soil: alfalfa productivity and environmental quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.; Dick, W.A.; Nelson, S.

    2001-07-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products are often alkaline and contain many plant nutrients. Land application of FGD by-products is encouraged but little information is available related to plant responses and environmental impacts concerning such use. Agricultural lime (ag-lime) and several new types of FGD by-products which contain either vermiculite or perlite were applied at 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 times the soil's lime requirement (LR) rate to an acidic soil (Wooster silt loam). The highest FGD by-products application rate was equivalent to 75.2 Mg ha{sup -1}. Growth of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was significantly increased compared to the untreated control in the second year after treatment with yields for the 1 x LR rate of FGD approximately 7-8 times greater compared to the untreated control and 30% greater than for the commercial ag-lime. Concentrations of Mo in alfalfa were significantly increased by FGD by-products application, compared to the untreated control, while compared to the ag-lime treatment, concentrations of B increased and Ba decreased. No soil contamination problems were observed, even at the 2xLR rate, indicating these materials can be safely applied to agricultural soils.

  18. Utilization of Food Processing By-products as Dietary, Functional, and Novel Fiber: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Satish Kumar; Bansal, Sangita; Mangal, Manisha; Dixit, Anil Kumar; Gupta, Ram K; Mangal, A K

    2016-07-26

    Fast growing food processing industry in most countries across the world, generates huge quantity of by-products, including pomace, hull, husk, pods, peel, shells, seeds, stems, stalks, bran, washings, pulp refuse, press cakes, etc., which have less use and create considerable environmental pollution. With growing interest in health promoting functional foods, the demand of natural bioactives has increased and exploration for new sources is on the way. Many of the food processing industrial by-products are rich sources of dietary, functional, and novel fibers. These by-products can be directly (or after certain modifications for isolation or purification of fiber) used for the manufacture of various foods, i.e. bread, buns, cake, pasta, noodles, biscuit, ice creams, yogurts, cheese, beverages, milk shakes, instant breakfasts, ice tea, juices, sports drinks, wine, powdered drink, fermented milk products, meat products and meat analogues, synthetic meat, etc. A comprehensive literature survey has been carried on this topic to give an overview in the field dietary fiber from food by-products. In this article, the developments in the definition of fiber, fiber classification, potential sources of dietary fibers in food processing by-products, their uses, functional properties, caloric content, energy values and the labelling regulations have been discussed.

  19. By-products of fruits processing as a source of phytochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Djilas

    Full Text Available The processing of fruits results in high amounts of waste materials such as peels, seeds, stones, and oilseed meals. A disposal of these materials usually represents a problem that is further aggravated by legal restrictions. Thus new aspects concerning the use of these wastes as by-products for further exploitation on the production of food additives or supplements with high nutritional value have gained increasing interest because these are high-value products and their recovery may be economically attractive. It is well known that by-products represent an important source of sugars, minerals, organic acid, dietary fibre and phenolics which have a wide range of action which includes antitumoral, antiviral, antibacterial, cardioprotective and antimutagenic activities. This review discusses the potential of the most important by-products of apple, grape and citrus fruits processing as a source of valuable compounds. The relevance of this topic is illustrated by a number of references.

  20. Soluble dietary fiber from Canna edulis Ker by-product and its physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Wang, Zheng-Wu

    2013-01-30

    Using Canna edulis Ker by-product as raw materials, soluble dietary fiber (SDF) was prepared using six different methods, including chemical, physical-chemical, enzymatic, physical-enzymatic, chemical-enzymatic and physical-chemical-enzymatic methods. As main component in the C. edulis by-product composed of cellulose, glucose converts to other single sugars, which form a series of compounds in the SDF. The treated methods have impact effects on single sugar composition, metal ion content, molecular size distribution, chemical bonds and groups in the structure, thermal property and color of the final product. In view of security, high yield and homogeneity as well as good thermal stability of final product, physical-enzymatic method will be a best choice for the production of SDF from C. edulis by-product. The SDF obtained can be used as dietary supplement and additive in the food industry.

  1. By-products of Opuntia ficus-indica as a source of antioxidant dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensadón, Sara; Hervert-Hernández, Deisy; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G; Goñi, Isabel

    2010-09-01

    Dietary fiber and bioactive compounds are widely used as functional ingredients in processed foods. The market in this field is competitive and the development of new types of quality ingredients for the food industry is on the rise. Opuntia ficus-indica (cactus pear) produces edible tender stems (cladodes) and fruits with a high nutritional value in terms of minerals, protein, dietary fiber and phytochemicals; however, around 20% of fresh weight of cladodes and 45% of fresh weight of fruits are by-products. The objective of this study was therefore to determine the nutritional value of by-products obtained from cladodes and fruits from two varieties of Opuntia ficus-indica, examining their dietary fiber and natural antioxidant compound contents in order to obtain quality ingredients for functional foods and increase the added value of these by-products.

  2. Ozonation of metoprolol in aqueous solution: ozonation by-products and mechanisms of degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Kheng Soo; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Abas, Mhd Radzi Bin

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the degradation pathway of metoprolol, a widely used β-blocker, in the ozonation via the identification of generated ozonation by-products (OPs). Structure elucidation of OPs was performed using HPLC coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight high-resolution mass spectrometry. Seven OPs were identified, and four of these have not been reported elsewhere. Identified OPs of metoprolol included aromatic ring breakdown by-products; aliphatic chain degraded by-products and aromatic ring mono-, di-, and tetrahydroxylated derivatives. Based on the detected OPs, metoprolol could be degraded through aromatic ring opening reaction via reaction with ozone (O3) and degradation of aliphatic chain and aromatic ring via reaction with hydroxyl radical (•OH).

  3. Nutritive value and nutrient digestibility of ensiled mango by-products

    OpenAIRE

    Sompong Sruamsiri

    2009-01-01

    Mango canning by-products (seed and peel) together with ensiled mango peel were subjected to analysis of dry matter (DM), ash, crude protein (CP), crude fibre (CF), ether extract (EE), nitrogen-free extract (NFE), gross energy (GE), neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and acid detergent fibre (ADF). In vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD), ADF (IVADFD) and NDF (IVNDFD) was determined after digesting the by-products in buffered rumen fluid for 24 or 48 h in an incubator. CP content in peel, seed and p...

  4. CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER AND MENSTRUAL CYCLE FUNCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water and Menstrual Cycle FunctionGayle C. Windham1, Kirsten Waller2, Meredith Anderson2, Laura Fenster1, Pauline Mendola3, Shanna Swan41California Department of Health Services, Division of Environmental and Occupational Disea...

  5. ANIMAL MODELS FOR STUDYING MISCARRIAGE: ILLUSTRATION WITH STUDY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal models for studying miscarriage: Illustration with study of drinking water disinfection by-productsAuthors & affiliations:Narotsky1, M.G. and S. Bielmeier Laffan2.1Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Tri...

  6. Utilization of agricultural by-products in healthful food products: Organogelators, antioxidants, and spreadable products

    Science.gov (United States)

    It was found that several agricultural by-products could be utilized for healthful food products. Three major applications that our research group has been focusing on will be discussed: 1) plant waxes for trans-fat free, low saturated fat-containing margarine and spread products, 2) extracts of cor...

  7. Torrefaction of agricultural by-products: Effects of temperature and time on energy yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural by-products, such as apple, grape, olive, and tomato pomaces as well as almond and walnut shells, were torrefied at different temperatures and times. Torrefaction of biomass involves heating in an inert atmosphere to remove volatile components for improved grindability and increased ene...

  8. Towards the Valorization of Humin By-products: Characterization, Solubilization and Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvoort, I. van

    2015-01-01

    During the acid-catalyzed dehydration of carbohydrates for the production of renewable bulk chemicals, such as furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and levulinic acid, large amounts of carbonaceous, insoluble by-products are typically formed by cross-polymerization reactions of HMF and several suga

  9. Innovations in value-addition of edible meat by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldrá, Fidel; Aristoy, M-Concepción; Mora, Leticia; Reig, Milagro

    2012-11-01

    While muscle foods are the more commonly consumed portion of an animal, meat by-products such as the entrails and internal organs are also widely consumed. Considered high-priced delicacies or waste material to be tossed away, the use and value of offal-edible and inedible meat by-products depend entirely on the culture and country in question. The skin, blood, bones, meat trimmings, fatty tissues, horns, hoofs, feet, skull, and internal organs of harvested animals comprise a wide variety of products including human or pet food or processed materials in animal feed, fertilizer, or fuel. Industry is using science and innovation to add value to animal by-products far beyond its usual profitability. Regardless of the final product's destination, it is still necessary to employ the most up-to-date and effective tools to analyze these products for nutritional properties, to search for key active molecules in nutrition like bioactive peptides, food safety (antimicrobial peptides), medicine, cosmetics or other fields, to develop new technological applications and to continue innovation towards advanced value-addition of meat by-products.

  10. "By-Products": The Added Value of Academic Writing Instruction for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpignan, Hadara; Rubin, Bella; Katznelson, Helen

    2007-01-01

    We previously defined the "by-products" of academic writing instruction as "affective and social changes perceived by students, "along with" changes in their writing, reflected in interpersonal and intrapersonal behaviors carried over into other spheres of their lives" [Katznelson, Perpignan, & Rubin, 2001. What…

  11. Hydrothermally treated xylan rich by-products yield different classes of xylo-oligosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabel, M.A.; Carvalheiro, F.; Garrote, G.; Avgerinos, E.; Koukios, E.; Parajo, J.C.; Girio, M.

    2002-01-01

    Four xylan rich by-products, namely wheat bran, brewery's spent grain, corn cobs and Eucalyptus wood, were characterised and subjected to a mild hydrothermal treatment in order to release and degrade the xylan from the starting materials. The chemical characterisation of the feedstock materials, wit

  12. Characterisation of complex xylo-oligosaccharides from xylan rich by-products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabel, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrolysates obtained by hydrothermal treatment of four xylan rich by-products (wheat bran, brewery's spent grain, corn cobs and Eucalyptus wood) were characterised. Depending on the feedstock material studied, the xylan originally present differed in substitution with arabinose, 4- O -methylglucuro

  13. "By-Products": The Added Value of Academic Writing Instruction for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpignan, Hadara; Rubin, Bella; Katznelson, Helen

    2007-01-01

    We previously defined the "by-products" of academic writing instruction as "affective and social changes perceived by students, "along with" changes in their writing, reflected in interpersonal and intrapersonal behaviors carried over into other spheres of their lives" [Katznelson, Perpignan, & Rubin, 2001. What develops along with the development…

  14. Developing environmental legislation to promote recycling of industrial by-products - an endless story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvari, Jaana

    2008-01-01

    In Finland during the last few decades, mineral industrial residues (by-products) have been used in earthworks, but only to a limited extent relative to their total volume. The most important barrier to efficient recycling of by-products has been the need for a site-specific environmental permit, since the permit process tends to be time-consuming and laborious. In 2000 a working group was set up to prepare national legislation, i.e., a Government decree, in order to promote the use of by-products in earth construction. The aim was to exempt certain residues from the environmental permit obligation. At the first stage, the working group determined specific decision criteria for the selection of the by-products to be included. For the selected residues, the acceptable construction applications and material-specific environmental standards were defined. Various difficulties were encountered during the preparation of the decree. These were mainly caused by the lack of data and by some ongoing changes in environmental regulations. Furthermore, the draft decree received several critical and partly contradictory comments and proposals for amendments. This resulted in considerable delay in implementation.

  15. Anaerobic co-digestion of by-products from sugar production with cow manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Cheng; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    Sugar beet leaves (SBL), sugar beet top (SBT), sugar beet pulp (SBP) and desugared molasses (DM) are by-products from the sugar production. In the present study we investigated the potential of SBL, SBT and SBP as feedstock for biogas production. The maximum methane potential of SBL, SBT and SBP...

  16. Photolysis of tembotrione and its main by-products under extreme artificial conditions:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvayrac, Christophe; Bontemps, Nataly [Laboratoire de Chimie des Biomolécules et de l' Environnement (LCBE, EA 4215), Université de Perpignan Via Domitia (UPVD), 52 avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan (France); Nouga-Bissoue, Achille [Ecole Nationale Supérieure de l' Enseignement Technique (ENSET), Université de Douala, BP 2701 Douala (Cameroon); Romdhane, Sana; Coste, Camille-Michel [Laboratoire de Chimie des Biomolécules et de l' Environnement (LCBE, EA 4215), Université de Perpignan Via Domitia (UPVD), 52 avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan (France); Cooper, Jean-Francois, E-mail: cooper@univ-perp.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie des Biomolécules et de l' Environnement (LCBE, EA 4215), Université de Perpignan Via Domitia (UPVD), 52 avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan (France)

    2013-05-01

    The photolytic behaviour of tembotrione, a new chemical herbicide intended for foliar application in corn, was investigated under unnatural and extreme photochemical exposure in aqueous solutions in the laboratory. It appeared that degradation was dependent on pH and occurred more rapidly under acidic and neutral conditions, leading predominantly to the formation of a xanthenedione type compound by intramolecular cyclisation with loss of HCl. Trace amounts of benzoic acid by-products appeared also during UV-C irradiation (λ = 254 nm) of the parent compound. Results were comparable to those obtained with sulcotrione, another β-triketone herbicide. These extreme irradiation conditions clearly accelerated the phototransformation of sulcotrione vs. simulated sunlight irradiation. Furthermore, the photolysis of the degradation by-products, resulting from either photolysis, hydrolysis or biotic pathways of the two active ingredients, was also carried out. The benzoic acid by-products appeared more stable to photolysis than their parent molecules. Xanthenedione derivatives were degraded more rapidly with several differences depending on the pH value. - Highlights: • Tembotrione and sulcotrione water photolysis appeared enhanced under unnatural and extreme conditions. • Triketones were easily photodegraded under acidic and neutral conditions. • Xanthenedione derivatives were the predominant by-products. • Phototransformation of xanthenedione derivatives was pH-dependent. • Benzoic acid derivatives can be relatively stable.

  17. Comparison of biochar formation from various agricultural by-products using FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar is charred material produced by the pyrolysis of organic biomass. In this work, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of different agricultural by-products feedstock and their derived biochars were collected to explore the potential of FTIR technique as a simple and rapid method for char...

  18. Bioenergy by-products as soil amendments? Implications for carbon sequestration and greenhuise gas emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayuela, M.L.; Oenema, O.; Kuikman, P.J.; Bakker, R.R.; Groenigen, van J.W.

    2010-01-01

    An important but little understood aspect of bioenergy production is its overall impact on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. Increased energy production from biomass will inevitably lead to higher input of its by-products to the soil as amendments or fertilizers. However, it is still unclear

  19. Prediction in processing is a by-product of language learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Franklin; Kidd, Evan; Rowland, Caroline F

    2013-08-01

    Both children and adults predict the content of upcoming language, suggesting that prediction is useful for learning as well as processing. We present an alternative model which can explain prediction behaviour as a by-product of language learning. We suggest that a consideration of language acquisition places important constraints on Pickering & Garrod's (P&G's) theory.

  20. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION AND CONTROL BY OZONATION AND BIOTREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increasing interest in using ozone in water treatment because it is a strong disinfectant and is able to oxidize the precursors of some disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, ozonation itself produces DBPs, like aldehydes and ketones, and increases the concentration ...

  1. Environment protection in the area of by-products facilities in coking plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan Tomal; Henryk Zembala; Krzysztof Kalinowski; Milan Fedorov; Ludovt Kosnac; Jan Hromiak [Biuro Projektow Koksoprojekt Sp. z o.o., Zabrze (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    20 slides/overheads outline the presentation on the subject of the environmental protection program implemented at the U.S. Steel Kosice Coking Plant. Actions taken include the control of emissions by a system of cooling coke oven gas. A hermetically sealed system uses nitrogen flow for tar management and hermetic loading of the liquid coal by-product Benzol.

  2. Productive performance lambs on grazing supplemented with concentrates containing fruit processing by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bonfim Manera

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the productive performance of sheep kept in irrigated Tifton 85 pastures receiving concentrate supplementation containing different fruits processing by-products. The pasture area corresponded to 0.58 ha, divided in 24 paddocks, under rotational grazing with 20 days of interval of grazing and four days of grazing. 24 male sheep, castrated with 26.9±2.4 of initial body weight and ten months like testers animals, were used. Three fruit processing by-products (guava, barbados cherry and grape wine industry including in 30% of dry matter basis in supplements, besides the treatment “control” containing traditional ingredients (dry ground corn, soybean meal and wheat bran, were compared. The experimental design was a completely randomized with six replicates by treatments. The concentrates evaluated containing fruit processing by-products did not affect the daily weight gain, the total weight gain and the final body weight of sheep kept in irrigated pastures. The stoking rate of pastures, an average was 90.96 lambs/ha and estimative of meat production by area of 2,756.50 kg/ha/year. Thus, guava, barbados cherry and grape wine industry by-products may substitute 30% of dry matter the traditional ingredients in concentrate without harming the productive performance of animals and area.

  3. Effects of an onion by-product on bioactivity and safety markers in healthy rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan-Marin, Eduvigis; Krath, Britta; Poulsen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    environment in healthy rats. Rats were fed during 4 weeks with a diet containing the products or a control feed balanced in carbohydrate. The onion by-product and the extract caused anaemia as expected in rodents for Allium products. No other toxicity was observed, including genotoxicity. Glutathione...

  4. By-product mutualism and the ambiguous effects of harsher environments - A game-theoretic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jaegher, Kris; Hoyer, Britta

    2016-01-01

    We construct two-player two-strategy game-theoretic models of by-product mutualism, where our focus lies on the way in which the probability of cooperation among players is affected by the degree of adversity facing the players. In our first model, cooperation consists of the production of a public

  5. Potential contamination issues arising from the use of biofuel and food industry by-products in animal feed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granby, Kit; Mortensen, Alicja; Broesboel-Jensen, B.

    2012-01-01

    By-products are secondary or discarded products from manufacturing. Contamination of by-products used for feed may result in carryover to animal food products and hence have impact on either animal health or food safety. Feed by-products from bioethanol production include, for example, 'dried dis...

  6. Characterization and Recovery of Rare Earths from Coal and By-Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granite, Evan J. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Roth, Elliot [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Alvin, Mary Anne [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Coal is a precious resource, both in the United States and around the world. The United States has a 250-year supply of coal, and generates between 30 - 40% of its electricity through coal combustion. Approximately 1 Gt of coal has been mined annually in the US, although the 2015 total will likely be closer to 900 Mt (http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/). Most of the coal is burned for power generation, but substantial quantities are also employed in the manufacture of steel, chemicals, and activated carbons. Coal has a positive impact upon many industries, including mining, power, rail transportation, manufacturing, chemical, steel, activated carbon, and fuels. Everything that is in the earth’s crust is also present within coal to some extent, and the challenge is always to utilize abundant domestic coal in clean and environmentally friendly manners. In the case of the rare earths, these valuable and extraordinarily useful elements are present within the abundant coal and coal by-products produced domestically and world-wide. These materials include the coals, as well as the combustion by-products such as ashes, coal preparation wastes, gasification slags, and mining by-products. All of these materials can be viewed as potential sources of rare earth elements. Most of the common inorganic lanthanide compounds, such as the phosphates found in coal, have very high melting, boiling, and thermal decomposition temperatures, allowing them to concentrate in combustion and gasification by-products. Furthermore, rare earths have been found in interesting concentrations in the strata above and below certain coal seams. Much of the recent research on coal utilization in the United States has focused upon the capture of pollutants such as acid gases, particulates, and mercury, and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. The possible recovery of rare earth and other critical elements from abundant coal and by-products is an exciting new research area, representing a

  7. Effects of an onion by-product on bioactivity and safety markers in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Marín, Eduvigis; Krath, Britta N; Poulsen, Morten; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Nielsen, Tom H; Hansen, Max; Barri, Thaer; Langkilde, Søren; Cano, M Pilar; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; Dragsted, Lars O

    2009-12-01

    Onions are excellent sources of bioactive compounds including fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and polyphenols. An onion by-product was characterised in order to be developed as a potentially bioactive food ingredient. Our main aim was to investigate whether the potential health and safety effects of this onion by-product were shared by either of two derived fractions, an extract containing the onion FOS and polyphenols and a residue fraction containing mainly cell wall materials. We report here on the effects of feeding these products on markers of potential toxicity, protective enzymes and gut environment in healthy rats. Rats were fed during 4 weeks with a diet containing the products or a control feed balanced in carbohydrate. The onion by-product and the extract caused anaemia as expected in rodents for Allium products. No other toxicity was observed, including genotoxicity. Glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) activities in erythrocytes increased when rats were fed with the onion extract. Hepatic gene expression of Gr, Gpx1, catalase, 5-aminolevulinate synthase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase was not altered in any group of the onion fed rats. By contrast, gamma-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit gene expression was upregulated but only in rats given the onion residue. The onion by-products as well as the soluble and insoluble fractions had prebiotic effects as evidenced by decreased pH, increased butyrate production and altered gut microbiota enzyme activities. In conclusion, the onion by-products have no in vivo genotoxicity, may support in vivo antioxidative defence and alter the functionality of the rat gut microbiota.

  8. Use of clean coal technology by-products as agricultural liming techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehouwer, R.C.; Sutton, P.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, OH (United States). Dept. of Agronomy

    1995-03-01

    Dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products are mixtures of coal fly-ash, anhydrite (CaCO{sub 4}), and unspent lime- or limestone-based sorbent. Dry FGD by-products frequently have neutralizing values greater than 50% CaCO{sub 3} equivalency and thus have potential for neutralizing acidic soils. Owing to the presence of soluble salts and various trace elements, however, soil application of dry FGD by-products may have adverse effects on plant growth and soil quality. The use of a dry FGD by-product as a limestone substitute was investigated in a field study on three acidic agricultural soils (pH 4.6, 4.8, and 5.8) in eastern Ohio. The by-product (60% CaCO{sub 3} equivalency) was applied in September, 1992, at rates of 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 times the lime requirement of the soils, and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea mays L.) were planted. Soils were sampled immediately after FGD application and three more times every six months thereafter. Samples were analyzed for pH and water soluble concentrations of 28 elements. Soil pH was increased by all FGD rates in the zone of incorporation (0--10 cm), with the highest rates giving a pH slightly above 7. Within one year pH increases could be detected at depths up to 30 cm. Calcium, Mg, and S increased, and Al, Mn, and Fe decreased with increasing dry FGD application rates. No trace element concentrations were changed by dry FGD application except B which was increased in the zone of incorporation. Dry FGD increased alfalfa yield on all three soils, and had no effect on corn yield. No detrimental effects on soil quality were observed.

  9. Optimal pH in chlorinated swimming pools - balancing formation of by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the optimal pH range for chlorinated swimming pools the formation of trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles and trichloramine was investigated in the pH-range 6.5–7.5 in batch experiments. An artificial body fluid analogue was used to simulate bather load as the precursor for by.......7 or lower. An optimal pH range for by-products formation in swimming pools was identified at pH 7.0–7.2. In the wider pH range (pH 6.8–7.5) the effect on by-product formation was negligible. Swimming pools should never be maintained at lower pH than 6.8 since formation of both haloacetonitriles...

  10. M dwarf stars-the by-product of X-ray selected AGN candidates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Bai; Yan-Chun Sun; Xiang-Tao He; Yang Chen; Jiang-Hua Wu; Qing-Kang Li; Richard F.Green; Wolfgang Voges

    2012-01-01

    X-ray loud M dwarfs are a major source of by-products (contamination)in the X-ray band of the multiwavelength quasar survey.As a by-product,the low dispersion spectra of 22 M dwarfs are obtained in which the spectra of 16 sources are taken for the first time.The spectral types and distances of the sample arc given based on spectral indices CaH2,CaH3,and TiOS.The parameter (ι)TiO/CaH is calculated to separate the different metallicity classes among dwarfs,subdwarfs and extreme subdwarfs.We also discuss the distributions in the diagrams of log( Lx/ Lbol),the ratio between X-ray and bolometric luminosity versus spectral type and infrared colors.

  11. Castanea sativa by-products: a review on added value and sustainable application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Nair; Rodrigues, Francisca; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P

    2015-01-01

    Castanea sativa Mill. is a species of the family Fagaceae abundant in south Europe and Asia. The fruits (chestnut) are an added value resource in producing countries. Chestnut economic value is increasing not only for nutritional qualities but also for the beneficial health effects related with its consumption. During chestnut processing, a large amount of waste material is generated namely inner shell, outer shell and leaves. Studies on chestnut by-products revealed a good profile of bioactive compounds with antioxidant, anticarcinogenic and cardioprotective properties. These agro-industrial wastes, after valorisation, can be used by other industries, such as pharmaceutical, food or cosmetics, generating more profits, reducing pollution costs and improving social, economic and environmental sustainability. The purpose of this review is to provide knowledge about the type of chestnut by-products produced, the studies concerning its chemical composition and biological activity, and also to discuss other possible applications of these materials.

  12. Stillage reflux in food waste ethanol fermentation and its by-product accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongzhi; Yang, Jian; Jia, Yan; Wang, Qunhui; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    Raw materials and pollution control are key issues for the ethanol fermentation industry. To address these concerns, food waste was selected as fermentation substrate, and stillage reflux was carried out in this study. Reflux was used seven times during fermentation. Corresponding ethanol and reducing sugar were detected. Accumulation of by-products, such as organic acid, sodium chloride, and glycerol, was investigated. Lactic acid was observed to accumulate up to 120g/L, and sodium chloride reached 0.14mol/L. Other by-products did not accumulate. The first five cycles of reflux increased ethanol concentration, which prolonged fermentation time. Further increases in reflux time negatively influenced ethanol fermentation. Single-factor analysis with lactic acid and sodium chloride demonstrated that both factors affected ethanol fermentation, but lactic acid induced more effects.

  13. Drinking Water Disinfection by In-line Electrolysis: Product and Inorganic By-Product Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, M. E. Henry

    This section covers peculiarities of so-called in-line electrolysis when drinking water is electrolysed to produce disinfection species killing microorganisms. Mainly mixed oxide electrodes (MIO) based on IrO2 and/or RuO2 coatings and boron-doped diamond electrodes were used in the studies. Artificial and real drinking water systems were electrolysed in continuous and discontinuous operating mode, varying water composition, current density and electrode materials. Results show, besides the ability of producing active chlorine, risks of inorganic disinfection by-products (DBPs) such as chlorate, perchlorate, nitrite, ammonium, chloramines, hydrogen peroxide and others. DBPs are responsible for analysis errors using DPD method for active chlorine measurements. Geometry may influence by-product yield. As a conclusion, the necessity of developing test routines for practical cell applications must be underlined.

  14. Extraction yield, antioxidant activity andphenolics from grape, mango and peanut agro-industrial by-products

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to determine and correlate the extraction yields, antioxidant activity, total phenolics and total flavonoids from grape, mango and peanut agro-industrial by-products. The β-carotene/linoleic acid autoxidation system and scavenging capacity for DPPH and ABTS free radicals assays were used. The results were expressed in terms of lyophilized sample or dry extract. Mango bagasse exhibited the highest extraction yield (37.07%) followed by peanut skin ...

  15. Optimization of the liquid biofertilizer production in batch fermentation with by-product from MSG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namfon, Panjanapongchai; Ratchanok, Sahaworarak; Chalida, Daengbussade

    2017-03-01

    The long term use of chemical fertilizers destroyed the friability of soil which obviously decreased quantity and quality of crops and especially affect microorganisms living in soils. The bio-fertilizer with microbial consortium is an environmental friendly alternative to solve this bottleneck due to harboring soil microorganisms such as Bacillus sp., Micrococcus sp., Pseudomonas sp., Staphylococcus sp. and Deinococcus sp. produced with natural by-product or waste from industries that is alternative and sustainable such as nutrient-rich (by-product) from Mono Sodium Glutamate (MSG) for producing liquid biofertilizer by batch fermentation. In this work, the concentration of reducing sugar from substrate as main carbon source was evaluated in shake flask with mixed cultures. The optimal conditions were studied comparing with two levels of reducing sugar concentration (10, 20 g/L) and inoculums concentration (10, 20 %v/v) with using (2×2) full factorial design. The results indicated that the by-product from monosodium glutamate is feasible for fermentation and inoculums concentration is mainly influenced the batch fermentation process. Moreover, the combined 20 g/L and 10%v/v were considerably concluded as an optimal condition, of which the concentration of vegetative cells and spores attained at 8.29×109 CFU/mL and 1.97×105 CFU/mL, respectively. Their spores cell yields from reducing sugar (Yx/s) were obtained at 1.22×106 and 3.34×105 CFU/g were markedly different. In conclusion, the liquid Biofertilizer was produced satisfactorily at 20 g/L reducing sugar and 10% v/v inoculums in shake flask culture. Moreover, these results suggested that the by-product from monosodium glutamate is feasible for low-cost substrate in economical scale and environmental-friendly.

  16. Biorefinery cascade processing for creating added value on tomato industrial by-products from Tunisia

    OpenAIRE

    Kehili, Mouna; Schmidt, Lisa Marie; Reynolds, Wienke; Zammel, Ayachi; Zetzl, Carsten; Smirnova, Irina; Allouche, Noureddine; Sayadi, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background In today’s consumer perception of industrial processes and food production, aspects like food quality, human health, environmental safety, and energy security have become the keywords. Therefore, much effort has been extended toward adding value to biowastes of agri-food industries through biorefinery processing approaches. This study focused, for the first time, on the valorization of tomato by-products of a Tunisian industry for the recovery of value-added compounds using biorefi...

  17. Supercritical Technologies for the Valorization of Wine Industry By-Products

    OpenAIRE

    Duba, Kurabachew Simon

    2015-01-01

    This study aim at the valorization of wine industry by products; particularly on the extraction and characterization of grape seeds oil using supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) and polyphenols from grape skins and defatted grape seeds using subcritical water (SW) and then, modeling of the kinetics of extractions and process economic analysis. The overall objective of the work is to develop recovery strategies for wine-making wastes in order to reduce their environmental impact and to valorize them in...

  18. Quality Parameters Of Wheat Bread Enriched With Pumpkin (Cucurbita Moschata) By-Products

    OpenAIRE

    Kampuse Solvita; Ozola Liene; Straumite Evita; Galoburda Ruta

    2015-01-01

    Pumpkin processing into puree, juice, candied fruit and pumpkin seed oil results in large amount of by-products. Pumpkins are rich in carotenes, vitamins, minerals, pectin and dietary fibre. The aim of the current study was to evaluate effect of pumpkin pomace and pumpkin residue powder on wheat bread quality. The total content of carotenes was analyzed by spectrophotometric method. The initial increase of pumpkin residue addition indicated increase in loaf volume, which started to decrease a...

  19. Hybrid poplar and forest soil response to municipal and industrial by-products: a greenhouse study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleri, Molly A; Gilmore, Daniel W; Mozaffari, Morteza; Rosen, Carl J; Halbach, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    Little research has been conducted in the Lake States (Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan) to evaluate the effects of municipal and industrial by-product applications on the early growth of short rotation woody crops such as hybrid poplar. Anticipated shortages of harvestable-age aspen in the next decade can be alleviated and rural development can be enhanced through the application of by-products to forest soils. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of inorganic fertilizer, boiler ash, biosolids, and the co-application of ash and biosolids application on tree growth and soil properties by measuring hybrid poplar clone NM-6 (Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry) yield, nutrient uptake, and select post-harvest soil properties after 15 wk of greenhouse growth. Treatments included a control of no amendment; agricultural lime; inorganic N, P, and K; three types of boiler ash; biosolids application rates equivalent to 70, 140, 210, and 280 kg available N ha(-1); and boiler ash co-applied with biosolids. All of the by-products treatments showed biomass production that was equal to or greater than inorganic fertilizer and lime treatments. A trend of increased biomass with increasing rates of biosolids was observed. Soil P concentration increased with increasing rates of biosolids application. None of the by-products treatments resulted in plant tissue metal concentrations greater than metal concentrations of plant tissue amended with inorganic amendments. Biosolids, boiler ash, and the co-application of biosolids and boiler ash together on forest soils were as beneficial to plant growth as inorganic fertilizers.

  20. Disinfection by-products in ballast water treatment: an evaluation of regulatory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werschkun, Barbara; Sommer, Yasmin; Banerji, Sangeeta

    2012-10-15

    To reduce the global spread of invasive aquatic species, international regulations will soon require reductions of the number of organisms in ballast water discharged by ships. For this purpose, ballast water treatment systems were developed and approved by an international procedure. These systems rely on established water treatment principles which, to different degrees, have been proven to generate disinfection by-products with hazardous properties but have only scarcely been investigated in marine environments. Our study evaluates the publicly available documentation about approved ballast water treatment systems with regard to by-product formation. The most commonly employed methods are chlorination, ozonation, and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Chlorination systems generate trihalomethanes, halogenated acetic acids, and bromate in substantially larger quantities than reported for other areas of application. Levels are highest in brackish water, and brominated species predominate, in particular bromoform and dibromoacetic acid. Ozonation, which is less frequently utilized, produces bromoform in lower concentrations but forms higher levels of bromate, both of which were effectively reduced by active carbon treatment. In systems based on UV radiation, medium pressure lamps are employed as well as UV-induced advanced oxidation. For all UV systems, by-product formation is reported only occasionally. The most notable observations were small increases in nitrite, hydrogen peroxide, halogenated methanes and acetic acids. The assessment of by-product formation during ballast water treatment is limited by the lacking completeness and quality of available information. This concerns the extent and statistical characterisation of chemical analysis as well as the documentation of the test water parameters.

  1. Trigonometric approximation of the conjugate series of a function of generalized Lipchitz class by product summability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Subrata K.; Acharya, D.; Nayak, P. C.; Misra, U. K.

    2016-06-01

    Trigonometric Fourier approximation and Lipchitz class of function had been introduced by Zygmund and McFadden respectively. Dealing with degree of approximation of conjugate series of a Fourier series of a function of Lipchitz class Misra et al. have established certain theorems. Extending their results, in this paper a theorem on trigonometric approximation of conjugate series of Fourier series of a function f ∈ W(Lp, ξ(t)) by product summability (E, s)(N, pn, qn) has been established.

  2. PERFORMANCE OF NILE TILAPIA (OREOCHROMIS NILOTICUS FED FISH MEAL AND POULTRY BY-PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. ADAM SULIEMAN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted at the Department of Fisheries and Wild life Science, College of Science and Technology of Animal Production, Sudan University of Science and Technology, to determine the feed efficiency of two locally formulated diets (A and B on performance of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. Two iso-caloric iso-nitrogenus diets were formulated by adding 60% wheat bran, 30% cotton seed cake and 10% poultry by-product (offal+intestine, while the diet (B contained 60% wheat bran, 30% cotton seed cake and 10% fish meal. The fish were fed twice a day at affixed feeding rate of 5% body weight of fish per day for 90 days. The total body weight, total length and standard length were measured every 10 days throughout the experimental period. The growth response and performance data of the studied fish (Oreochromis niloticus fed with diet (B containing fishmeal recorded a better growth response than that fish fed poultry by- product meal (diet A. The final weight increment, specific growth rate (SGR, feed conversion ratio (FCR and protein efficiency ratio (PER over the experimental period showed lowest value for the group fed the diet with poultry by-product (Diet A compared to those fed with the fishmeal (Diet B. Except the apparent protein utilization (APU was recorded higher for those fed with Diet A (23.31 than Diet B (11.99. The groups fed diet (A attained SGR 0.24, FCR 1.9, PER 0.75, APU 23.31, while it recorded in group (B, SGR 0.34, FCR 1.2, PER 1.06, APU 11.99. Therefore, fish meal is better as compared to poultry by-products for Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus nutrition.

  3. Digital by-product data in web 2.0 exploring mass collaboration of Wikipedia

    CERN Document Server

    He, Zeyi

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), every action on the Internet nowadays is recorded by digital by-product data: online purchases, tagging friends' photos, browsing webpages, etc. This unprecedented technological revolution has empowered us with unique abilities to understand not only people's behaviours, but also online platforms. Business corporates and academic researchers alike have both embarked on actively mining such information to stay ahead of the game in th...

  4. Effect of Industrial By-Products on Unconfined Compressive Strength of Solidified Organic Marine Clayey Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Gi Park

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of industrial by-products as admixture to ASTM Type I cement (ordinary Portland cement (OPC was investigated with the objective of improving the solidification of organic marine clayey soils. The industrial by-products considered in this paper were oyster-shell powder (OSP, steelmaking slag dust (SMS and fuel-gas-desulfurized (FGD gypsum. The industrial by-products were added to OPC at a ratio of 5% based on dry weight to produce a mixture used to solidify organic marine clayey soils. The dosage ratios of mixtures to organic marine clayey soils were 5, 10 and 15% on a dry weight basis. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS test after 28 days revealed that the highest strength was obtained with the OPC + SMS 15% mixing ratio. The UCS of specimens treated with this mixture was >500 kPa, compared with 300 kPa for specimens treated with a 15% OPC + OSP mixture and 200 kPa when 15% of OPC was used alone. These results were attributed to the more active hydration and pozzolanic reaction of the OPC + SMS mixture. This hypothesis was verified through X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analyses, and was confirmed by variations in the calcium carbonate (CaCO3 content of the materials during curing.

  5. Determination of aflatoxins in by-products of industrial processing of cocoa beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copetti, Marina V; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Pereira, José Luiz; Lemes, Daniel P; Nakano, Felipe; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2012-01-01

    This study has examined the occurrence of aflatoxins in 168 samples of different fractions obtained during the processing of cocoa in manufacturing plants (shell, nibs, mass, butter, cake and powder) using an optimised methodology for cocoa by-products. The method validation was based on selectivity, linearity, limit of detection and recovery. The method was shown to be adequate for use in quantifying the contamination of cocoa by aflatoxins B(1), B(2), G(1) and G(2). Furthermore, the method was easier to use than other methods available in the literature. For aflatoxin extraction from cocoa samples, a methanol-water solution was used, and then immunoaffinity columns were employed for clean-up before the determination by high-performance liquid chromatography. A survey demonstrated a widespread occurrence of aflatoxins in cocoa by-products, although in general the levels of aflatoxins present in the fractions from industrial processing of cocoa were low. A maximum aflatoxin contamination of 13.3 ng g(-1) was found in a nib sample. The lowest contamination levels were found in cocoa butter. Continued monitoring of aflatoxins in cocoa by-products is nevertheless necessary because these toxins have a high toxicity to humans and cocoa is widely consumed by children through cocoa-containing products, like candies.

  6. A Review of Antioxidant Peptides Derived from Meat Muscle and By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Xing, Lujuan; Fu, Qingquan; Zhou, Guang-hong; Zhang, Wan-gang

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant peptides are gradually being accepted as food ingredients, supplemented in functional food and nutraceuticals, to positively regulate oxidative stress in the human body against lipid and protein oxidation. Meat muscle and meat by-products are rich sources of proteins and can be regarded as good materials for the production of bioactive peptides by use of enzymatic hydrolysis or direct solvent extraction. In recent years, there has been a growing number of studies conducted to characterize antioxidant peptides or hydrolysates derived from meat muscle and by-products as well as processed meat products, including dry-cured hams. Antioxidant peptides obtained from animal sources could exert not only nutritional value but also bioavailability to benefit human health. This paper reviews the antioxidant peptides or protein hydrolysates identified in muscle protein and by-products. We focus on the procedure for the generation of peptides with antioxidant capacity including the acquisition of crude peptides, the assessment of antioxidant activity, and the purification and identification of the active fraction. It remains critical to perform validation experiments with a cell model, animal model or clinical trial to eliminate safety concerns before final application in the food system. In addition, some of the common characteristics on structure-activity relationship are also reviewed based on the identified antioxidant peptides. PMID:27657142

  7. Phytostabilization of semiarid soils residually contaminated with trace elements using by-products: Sustainability and risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-de-Mora, Alfredo, E-mail: perezdemora@gmail.com [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (IRNAS), CSIC, PO Box 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Madejon, Paula; Burgos, Pilar; Cabrera, Francisco [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (IRNAS), CSIC, PO Box 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Lepp, Nicholas W. [35, Victoria Road, Formby, Liverpool L37 7DH (United Kingdom); Madejon, Engracia [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (IRNAS), CSIC, PO Box 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    We investigated the efficiency of various by-products (sugarbeet lime, biosolid compost and leonardite), based on single or repeated applications to field plots, on the establishment of a vegetation cover compatible with a stabilization strategy on a multi-element (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) contaminated soil 4-6 years after initial amendment applications. Results indicate that the need for re-treatment is amendment- and element-dependent; in some cases, a single application may reduce trace element concentrations in above-ground biomass and enhance the establishment of a healthy vegetation cover. Amendment performance as evaluated by % cover, biomass and number of colonizing taxa differs; however, changes in plant community composition are not necessarily amendment-specific. Although the translocation of trace elements to the plant biotic compartment is greater in re-vegetated areas, overall loss of trace elements due to soil erosion and plant uptake is usually smaller compared to that in bare soil. - Highlights: > By-products enhance vegetation dynamics in contaminated semiarid soils. > Depending on the situation single or repeated incorporations may be required. > The structure of the plant community established is not amendment-dependent. > Phytostabilization reduces overall loss of trace elements in semiarid soils. - Phytostabilization using by-products as amendments is a suitable approach for long-term immobilization of various trace elements in semiarid contaminated soils.

  8. Study on Properties of Environment-friendly Concrete Containing Large Amount of Industrial by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, H.; Maruoka, M.; Sadayama, C.; Nemoto, M.; Yoshikawa, K.; Yamaji, M.

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to reduce CO2 discharged from the cement and concrete industries by effective use of industrial by-products, such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, and so on. In this paper, the properties of concrete containing large amount of industrial by-products and very small amount of alkaline activator including cement or sludge from ready mixed concrete plant are analyzed. As the result, it was confirmed that concretes containing large amount of industrial by-products can achieve sufficient compressive strength. However, these concretes showed poor frost resistance. It was thought that the reason was coarsening of air void system and this caused their poor frost resistance. Therefore, in order to micronize the air void system and improve frost resistance, the combination of air entraining agent and antifoaming agent was applied. By this method, it was confirmed that the frost resistance of some these concrete improved. In this study, other properties of these concretes, such as fresh properties and other durability were evaluated and it was confirmed that these concretes show sufficient properties.

  9. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a hepatoprotective and antioxidant extract of pea by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seida, Ahmed A; El Tanbouly, Nebal D; Islam, Wafaa T; Eid, Hanaa H; El Maraghy, Shohda A; El Senousy, Amira S

    2015-01-01

    The hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of the hydroalcoholic extract (PE) of pea (Pisum sativum L.) by-product were evaluated, using CCl4-induced oxidative stress and hepatic damage in rats. These activities were assessed via measuring alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total protein and albumin, malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), protein thiols (PSH), nitrite/nitrate levels, glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities, as well as, histopathological evaluation. PE revealed significant hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities mostly found in n-butanol fraction. Chromatographic fractionation of this active fraction led to the isolation of five flavonoid glycosides namely, quercetin-3-O-sophorotrioside (1), quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (2), quercetin-3-O-(6″″-O-E sinapoyl)-sophorotrioside (3), quercetin-3-O-(6″″-O-E feruloyl)-sophorotrioside (4) and quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5). The isolated compounds were quantified in PE, using a validated HPLC method and the nutritional composition of pea by-product was also investigated. Our results suggest that pea by-product contained biologically active constituents which can be utilised to obtain high value added products for nutraceutical use.

  10. Industrial waste materials and by-products as thermal energy storage (TES) materials: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Andrea; Miró, Laia; Gil, Antoni; Rodríguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; Barreneche, Camila; Calvet, Nicolas; Py, Xavier; Fernández, A. Inés; Grágeda, Mario; Ushak, Svetlana; Cabeza, Luisa F.

    2016-05-01

    A wide variety of potential materials for thermal energy storage (TES) have been identify depending on the implemented TES method, Sensible, latent or thermochemical. In order to improve the efficiency of TES systems more alternatives are continuously being sought. In this regard, this paper presents the review of low cost heat storage materials focused mainly in two objectives: on the one hand, the implementation of improved heat storage devices based on new appropriate materials and, on the other hand, the valorisation of waste industrial materials will have strong environmental, economic and societal benefits such as reducing the landfilled waste amounts, reducing the greenhouse emissions and others. Different industrial and municipal waste materials and by products have been considered as potential TES materials and have been characterized as such. Asbestos containing wastes, fly ashes, by-products from the salt industry and from the metal industry, wastes from recycling steel process and from copper refining process and dross from the aluminium industry, and municipal wastes (glass and nylon) have been considered. This work shows a great revalorization of wastes and by-product opportunity as TES materials, although more studies are needed to achieve industrial deployment of the idea.

  11. A Review of Antioxidant Peptides Derived from Meat Muscle and By-Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant peptides are gradually being accepted as food ingredients, supplemented in functional food and nutraceuticals, to positively regulate oxidative stress in the human body against lipid and protein oxidation. Meat muscle and meat by-products are rich sources of proteins and can be regarded as good materials for the production of bioactive peptides by use of enzymatic hydrolysis or direct solvent extraction. In recent years, there has been a growing number of studies conducted to characterize antioxidant peptides or hydrolysates derived from meat muscle and by-products as well as processed meat products, including dry-cured hams. Antioxidant peptides obtained from animal sources could exert not only nutritional value but also bioavailability to benefit human health. This paper reviews the antioxidant peptides or protein hydrolysates identified in muscle protein and by-products. We focus on the procedure for the generation of peptides with antioxidant capacity including the acquisition of crude peptides, the assessment of antioxidant activity, and the purification and identification of the active fraction. It remains critical to perform validation experiments with a cell model, animal model or clinical trial to eliminate safety concerns before final application in the food system. In addition, some of the common characteristics on structure-activity relationship are also reviewed based on the identified antioxidant peptides.

  12. Socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking water in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra Consol

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disinfection by-products in drinking water are chemical contaminants that have been associated with cancer and other adverse effects. Exposure occurs from consumption of tap water, inhalation and dermal absorption. Methods We determined the relationship between socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in 1271 controls from a multicentric bladder cancer case-control study in Spain. Information on lifetime drinking water sources, swimming pool attendance, showering-bathing practices, and socioeconomic status (education, income was collected through personal interviews. Results The most highly educated subjects consumed less tap water (57% and more bottled water (33% than illiterate subjects (69% and 17% respectively, p-value = 0.003. These differences became wider in recent time periods. The time spent bathing or showering was positively correlated with attained educational level (p Conclusions The most highly educated subjects were less exposed to chlorination by-products through ingestion but more exposed through dermal contact and inhalation in pools and showers/baths. Health risk perceptions and economic capacity may affect patterns of water consumption that can result in differences in exposure to water contaminants.

  13. Identification and Mitigation of Generated Solid By-Products during Advanced Electrode Materials Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Candace S J; Dysart, Arthur D; Beltz, Jay H; Pol, Vilas G

    2016-03-01

    A scalable, solid-state elevated-temperature process was developed to produce high-capacity carbonaceous electrode materials for energy storage devices via decomposition of a starch-based precursor in an inert atmosphere. In a separate study, it is shown that the fabricated carbonaceous architectures are useful as an excellent electrode material for lithium-ion, sodium-ion, and lithium-sulfur batteries. This article focuses on the study and analysis of the formed nanometer-sized by-products during the lab-scale synthesis of the carbon material. The material production process was studied in operando (that is, during the entire duration of heat treatment). The unknown downstream particles in the process exhaust were collected and characterized via aerosol and liquid suspensions, and they were quantified using direct-reading instruments for number and mass concentrations. The airborne emissions were collected using the Tsai diffusion sampler (TDS) for characterization and further analysis. Released by-product aerosols collected in a deionized (DI) water trap were analyzed, and the aerosols emitted from the post-water-suspension were collected and characterized. After long-term sampling, individual particles in the nanometer size range were observed in the exhaust aerosol with layer-structured aggregates formed on the sampling substrate. Upon the characterization of the released aerosol by-products, methods were identified to mitigate possible human and environmental exposures upon industrial implementation.

  14. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevim, H.

    1997-06-01

    Disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) in an environmentally sound manner is a major issue facing the coal and utility industries in the US today. Disposal into abandoned sections of underground coal mines may overcome many of the surface disposal problems along with added benefits such as mitigation of subsidence and acid mine drainage. However, many of the abandoned underground coal mines are located far from power plants, requiring long distance hauling of by-products which will significantly contribute to the cost of disposal. For underground disposal to be economically competitive, the transportation and handling cost must be minimized. This requires careful selection of the system and optimal design for efficient operation. The materials handling and system economics research addresses these issues. Transportation and handling technologies for CCBs were investigated from technical, environmental and economic points of view. Five technologies were found promising: (1) Pneumatic Trucks, (2) Pressure Differential Rail Cars, (3) Collapsible Intermodal Containers, (4) Cylindrical Intermodal Tanks, and (5) Coal Hopper Cars with Automatic Retractable Tarping. The first two technologies are currently being utilized in transporting by-products from power plants to disposal sites, whereas the next three are either in development or in conceptualization phases. In this research project, engineering design and cost models were developed for the first four technologies. The engineering design models are in the form of spreadsheets and serve the purpose of determining efficient operating schedules and sizing of system components.

  15. [Degradation Kinetics and Formation of Disinfection By-products During Linuron Chlorination in Drinking Water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xiao; Hu, Chen-yan; Cheng, Ming; Gu, Jian

    2015-05-01

    Chlorination degradation of linuron was studied using the common disinfectant sodium hypochlorite, the effects of chlorine dosage, pH value, bromine ion concentrationand temperature were systematically investigated, and the formation characteristics of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during the chlorination reaction was analyzed. The results showed that the chlorination degradation kinetics of linuron by sodium hypochlorite could be well described by the second-order kinetic model. Moreover, pH values had a great impact on the degradation reaction, and the rate constant reached the maximum level at pH 7, and the base elementary reaction rate constants of HOCl and OCl- with linuron were 4.84 x 10(2) L · (mol · h)(-1) and 3.80 x 10(2) L · (mol · h)(-1), respectively. The reaction rate decreased with the addition of bromide ion and increased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, many kinds of disinfection by- products were produced during the chlorination degradation of linuron, including CF, DCAN, TCNM and halogen acetone. Under conditions of different solution pH and different bromide ion concentrations, there would be significant difference in the types and concentrations of disinfection by-products.

  16. Strategy of Utilization of Locally Available Crop Residues and By-Products for Livestock Feeding in Tunisia

    OpenAIRE

    Moujahed-Raach, A.; Moujahed, N.; Kayouli, C

    2001-01-01

    Important quantifies of crops residues and by-products are yearly available in North African countries. This paper presents the screening of the most important by-products in Tunisia, their nutritional characteristics and the appropriate strategies to use most of them in order to improve ruminants feeding systems. One or several by-products are specifie of each region of the country, but most of them are localised in the northern region. Some of the agricultural wastes are available in import...

  17. A Management State of POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants) and the Measuring Direction - Centered By-Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Gyu; Lee, Hee Seon [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    The chemical materials, DDT and Dioxin, threaten the human health and take the high toxicity on ecosystem and a living thing. Because the chemical materials remain in environment for a long time due to a slow natural decomposition, they are biologically concentrated through the food cycle in ecosystem and have a characteristic to move a long distance. Owing to such toxicity and the characteristics of chemical materials, the world organization named them as Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and has been actively progressing the international movement to strictly restrict them since the middle of 1990s. POPs regulation agreement, which is on progress centered in UNEP, is facing to the conclusion of the agreement of 2001 year. An agricultural chemical of organic chlorine among 12 POPs indicated by UNEP has been already prohibited in the domestic use and manufacturing or not registered, so the basic research, including search and monitoring if POPs remain or not, is required afterward. Because Dioxin, Puran, Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) among POPs, which are produced as by-products from all kinds of industrial processes, are not raw materials dislike other POPs, their use and manufacturing cannot be only prohibited by the related law but also they have few substitutes. Therefore, they should be applied by the different regulation from the existing toxic chemicals in order to manage the toxicity of the materials. However, the regulation on by-products among POPs is just in the beginning stage, and even the producing source has not been yet confirmed. This study suggests the necessity of the management on Dioxin, Puran, HCB, by-products among POPs, and presents the measuring direction with grasping the domestic and foreign trend of the regulation on the materials. 70 refs., 2 figs., 56 tabs.

  18. Utilization of agro-based industrial by-products for biogas production in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngoc, U.N.; Schnitzer, H. [Graz Univ. of Technology, (Austria). Inst. for Resource Efficient and Sustainable Systems; Berghold, H. [Joanneum Research Inst. for Sustainable Techniques and Systems (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    Due to the rapid rates of urbanization occurring in many countries in the world, the importance of an efficient and effective solid waste management system and the utilization/reuse of waste are more critical than ever before, especially for agricultural residues and agro-based industrial by-products. Over the past decade, the amount of solid waste generated in Vietnam has been increasing steadily. Numbers are predicted to continue to increase as well. There is significant potential to use the large amount of wastes for biogas conversion processes and for further production of commercial energy. This paper presented starts with estimation and analysis of the amounts of organic waste, agricultural residues, and agro-based industrial by-products generated from food industrial processes using general data sources for Vietnam. A laboratory study examined the use of agro-based industrial by-products and agricultural residues from cassava, sweet potato, pineapple residues, organic wastes, manures as input materials for biogas production in the anaerobic process. This paper provided an overview of Vietnam as a country, as well as a general overview of the amount of organic waste generated in the country. It also discussed the fermentation tests that were conducted to find out the potential of biogas production from some residues. It was concluded that a significant portion of waste could be reused as an environmentally sound source of energy. The utilization of agricultural residues and industrial byproducts as input materials for biogas production will not only reduce the quantity of organic waste thrown into landfills, but also reduce the negative impact on the environment. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 7 figs.

  19. Extractants to assess zinc phytoavailability in mineral fertilizer and industrial by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Prado Cenciani de Souza

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient analytical methods for the quantification of plant-available Zn contained in mineral fertilizers and industrial by-products are fundamental for the control and marketing of these inputs. In this sense, there are some doubts on the part of the scientific community as well as of the fertilizer production sector, whether the extractor requested by the government (Normative Instruction No. 28, called 2nd extractor, which is citric acid 2 % (2 % CA (Brasil, 2007b, is effective in predicting the plant availability of Zn via mineral fertilizers and about the agronomic significance of the required minimal solubility of 60 % compared to the total content (HCl (Brasil, 2007a. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the alternative extractors DTPA, EDTA, neutral ammonium citrate (NAC, buffer solution pH 6.0, 10 % HCl, 10 % sulfuric acid, 1 % acetic acid, water, and hot water to quantify the contents of Zn available for maize and compare them with indices of agronomic efficiency of fertilizers and industrial by-products when applied to dystrophic Clayey Red Latosol and Dystrophic Alic Red Yellow Latosol with medium texture. The rate of Zn applied to the soil was 5 mg kg-1, using the sources zinc sulfate, commercial granular zinc, ash and galvanic sludge, ash and two brass slags. Most Zn was extracted from the sources by DTPA, 10 % HCl, NAC, 1% acetic acid, and 10 % sulfuric acid. Recovery by the extractors 2 % CA, EDTA, water, and hot water was low. The agronomic efficiency index was found to be high when using galvanic sludge (238 % and commercial granular zinc (142 % and lower with brass slag I and II (67 and 27 %, respectively. The sources galvanizing ash and brass ash showed solubility lower than 60 % in 2 % CA, despite agronomic efficiency indices of 78 and 125 %, respectively. The low agronomic efficiency index of industrial by-products such as brass slag I and galvanizing ash can be compensated by higher doses, provided there is no

  20. Conversion of the biodiesel by-product glycerol by the non-conventional yeast Pachysolen tannophilus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoying

    The focus on de veloping new renewable energy in the transportation sector by the EU has boosted the production of biodiesel from rapeseed and other vegetable oils in Europe. This has led to an immense increase in the production of glycerol, which is an inevitable byproduct from the biodiesel...... production process. Since the volume of the glycerol by-product has exceeded the current market need, biodiesel producers are looking for new methods for sustainable glycerol management and improving the competitiveness of the biodiesel industries. The EU Commission funded GLYFINERY project is one initiative...

  1. Potential for by-product recovery in geothermal energy operations issue paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-07-01

    This document identifies and discusses the significant issues raised by the idea of recovering useful by-products from wastes (primarily spent brine) generated during geothermal power production. The physical availability of numerous valuable materials in geothermal brines has captured the interest of geothermal resource developers and other parties ever since their presence was known. The prospects for utilizing huge volumes of highly-saline geothermal brines for electricity generation in the Imperial Valley of California have served to maintain this interest in both private sector and government circles.

  2. Utilization of cocoa by-products as an alternative source of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agyeman, K.O.G.; Oldham, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The complete utilization of the by-products from the cocoa industry of Ghana has been investigated. Large-scale collection of cocoa sweating (i.e. the liquid which drains from the fresh bean when exposed to air) using the basket and sweat-box methods has been devised. It was found that collection and alcohol fermentation of the sweating can be done by farmers themselves. The fermented sweating had an alcohol level of 7-10% (w/w). The dried cocoa husks have also been used successfully for either production of potash or as a source of fuel. 10 references.

  3. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-06-01

    This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

  4. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-05-10

    This fourteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fourteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

  5. Hemp fines - an agricultural by-product for biocomposites? A holistic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Spierling, Sebastian; Koplin, Tobias; Endres, Hans-Josef

    2014-01-01

    The technical, environmental and economic potential of hemp fines as a natural filler in bioplastics to produce biocomposites is the subject of this study – giving a holistic overview. Hemp fines are an agricultural by-product of the hemp fibres and shives production. Shives and fibres are for example used in the paper, animal bedding or composite area. About 15 to 20 wt.-% per kg hemp straw results in hemp fines after processing. In 2010 about 11,439 metric tons of hemp fines were produced i...

  6. Fluosorbent injection by-products. Final report, January 1997 through December 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Sid [Sorbent Technologies Corp., Twinsburg, OH (United States)

    2000-02-29

    Few, if any, economical alternatives exist for small coal-fired boilers that require a flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) system which does not generate wastes. A new duct-injection technology, called "Fluesorbent," was developed to help fill this gap. Fluesorbent was intentionally designed so that the saturated S02-sorbent materials can be used as beneficial soil amendments after they were used for FGD. A. Project Objective: The objective of this project was to demonstrate in the field that saturated Fluesorbent materials can be utilized beneficially on agricultural and grass lands. B. Project Results: The results of this project suggest that, indeed, saturated Fluesorbent has excellent potential as a commercial soil amendment for crops, such as alfalfa and soybeans, and for turf. Yields of alfalfa and turf were substantially increased in field testing on acidic soils by one-time applications of Fluesorbent FGD by-products. In the first two years of field testing, alfalfa yields on field plots with the FGD by-products were approximately 40% greater than on plots treated with an equivalent amount of agricultural lime. In a third, drought-influenced year, the gains were smaller. Turf grass growth was fully twice that of untreated plots and more than 10% greater than with ag-lime. A small farm trial with a modified version of the Fluesorbent by-product increased soybean yield by 25%. A small trial with corn, however, indicated no significant improvement. Even though the Fluesorbent contained fly ash, the alfalfa and turf grown in FGD-treated plots contained significantly lower levels of heavy metals than that grown in untreated or lime-treated plots. In a project greenhouse experiment, the fly ashes from five different coal boilers from around Ohio produced equivalent yields when mixed with Fluesorbent, indicating wide potential applicability of the new technology. The Fluesorbent materials were also found to be easy to extrude into pellets for use with mixed fertilizers

  7. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-05-11

    This fifteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fifteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

  8. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced Clean Coal Technology by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini; Wiles Elder

    1999-04-05

    This eleventh quarterly report describes work done during the eleventh three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ``Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

  9. Transforming Beef By-products into Valuable Ingredients: Which Spell/Recipe to Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchion, Maeve; McCarthy, Mary; O’Callaghan, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Satisfying the increasing global demand for protein results in challenges from a supply perspective. Increased use of animal proteins, through greater use of meat by-products, could form part of the solution, subject to consumer acceptance. This research investigates consumer evaluations of food products that incorporate ingredients derived from offals that have been produced through a range of food processing technologies. Using focus groups incorporating product stimuli representing various combinations of offals, processing, and carrier products, the research finds that the physical state and perceived naturalness of the ingredients influences acceptance. It also highlights the impact of life experiences, linked to demographic characteristics, on interpretations and evaluations of products and processes. Ideational influences, i.e., knowledge of the nature or origin of the substance, are reasons for rejecting some concepts, with misalignment between nature of processing and the product resulting in rejection of others. Lack of perceived necessity also results in rejection. Alignment of ingredients with existing culinary practices and routines, communication of potential sensory, or other benefits as well as naturalness are factors likely to promote acceptance, and generate repeat purchase, in some consumer segments. Trust in oversight that the products are safe is a prerequisite for acceptance in all cases. These findings have implications for pathways to increase sustainability of beef production and consumption through increased use of beef by-products. PMID:27965963

  10. Bacterial Cellulose Production from Industrial Waste and by-Product Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouko, Erminda; Kourmentza, Constantina; Ladakis, Dimitrios; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Mandala, Ioanna; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Paloukis, Fotis; Alves, Vitor; Koutinas, Apostolis

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of fermentation media derived from waste and by-product streams from biodiesel and confectionery industries could lead to highly efficient production of bacterial cellulose. Batch fermentations with the bacterial strain Komagataeibacter sucrofermentans DSM (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen) 15973 were initially carried out in synthetic media using commercial sugars and crude glycerol. The highest bacterial cellulose concentration was achieved when crude glycerol (3.2 g/L) and commercial sucrose (4.9 g/L) were used. The combination of crude glycerol and sunflower meal hydrolysates as the sole fermentation media resulted in bacterial cellulose production of 13.3 g/L. Similar results (13 g/L) were obtained when flour-rich hydrolysates produced from confectionery industry waste streams were used. The properties of bacterial celluloses developed when different fermentation media were used showed water holding capacities of 102–138 g·water/g·dry bacterial cellulose, viscosities of 4.7–9.3 dL/g, degree of polymerization of 1889.1–2672.8, stress at break of 72.3–139.5 MPa and Young’s modulus of 0.97–1.64 GPa. This study demonstrated that by-product streams from the biodiesel industry and waste streams from confectionery industries could be used as the sole sources of nutrients for the production of bacterial cellulose with similar properties as those produced with commercial sources of nutrients. PMID:26140376

  11. Pressurized Hot Ethanol Extraction of Carotenoids from Carrot By-Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotta Turner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are known for their antioxidant activity and health promoting effects. One of the richest sources of carotenoids are carrots. However, about 25% of the annual production is regarded as by-products due to strict market policies. The aim of this study was to extract carotenoids from those by-products. Conventional carotenoid extraction methods require the use of organic solvents, which are costly, environmentally hazardous, and require expensive disposal procedures. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE utilizes conventional solvents at elevated temperatures and pressure, and it requires less solvent and shorter extraction times. The extraction solvent of choice in this study was ethanol, which is a solvent generally recognized as safe (GRAS. The extraction procedure was optimized by varying the extraction time (2–10 min and the temperature (60–180 °C. β-Carotene was used as an indicator for carotenoids content in the carrots. The results showed that time and temperatures of extraction have significant effect on the yield of carotenoids. Increasing the flush volume during extraction did not improve the extractability of carotenoids, indicating that the extraction method was mainly desorption/diffusion controlled. Use of a dispersing agent that absorbs the moisture content was important for the efficiency of extraction. Analysing the content of β-carotene at the different length of extraction cycles showed that about 80% was recovered after around 20 min of extraction.

  12. Eco-efficiency through by-product synergy: North American case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, J. R. [Hatch Associates, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The Business Council for Sustainable Development-Gulf of Mexico/US EPA defines the concept of by-products synergy (BPS) as 'the synergy among diverse industries, agriculture, and communities resulting in profitable conversion of by-products and wastes to resources promoting sustainability'. Various North American examples of this process are described (e.g. slag from steel production used in manufacturing portland cement, cellophane scrap used as a fluidizing agent in oil well operations, wood chips used to generate electricity, fly ash used in the manufacture of roofing shingles, and water from coffee processing used in waste-water treatment in a newsprint plant) to illustrate the concept's potential. In addition to benefits to the environment, the principal advantage of BPS is that it lowers the barriers that existed between industries in the past, and makes it possible to link disparate business partners, to move into new markets, and to combine products and services from different industries.

  13. Natural Bioactive Compounds from Winery By-Products as Health Promoters: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teixeira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of food composition for human health has increased consumers’ interest in the consumption of fruits and vegetables, as well as foods enriched in bioactive compounds and nutraceuticals. This fact has led to a growing attention of suppliers on reuse of agro-industrial wastes rich in healthy plant ingredients. On this matter, grape has been pointed out as a rich source of bioactive compounds. Currently, up to 210 million tons of grapes (Vitis vinifera L. are produced annually, being the 15% of the produced grapes addressed to the wine-making industry. This socio-economic activity generates a large amount of solid waste (up to 30%, w/w of the material used. Winery wastes include biodegradable solids namely stems, skins, and seeds. Bioactive compounds from winery by-products have disclosed interesting health promoting activities both in vitro and in vivo. This is a comprehensive review on the phytochemicals present in winery by-products, extraction techniques, industrial uses, and biological activities demonstrated by their bioactive compounds concerning potential for human health.

  14. Analytical evaluation of natural radionuclides and their radioactive equilibrium in raw materials and by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Chung, Kun Ho; Lim, Jong-Myoung; Kim, Chang-Jong; Jang, Mee; Kang, Mun Ja; Park, Sang Tae

    2015-03-01

    An investigation into the distribution of natural radionuclides and radioactive secular equilibrium in raw materials and by-products in a domestic distribution was conducted to deduce the optimum conditions for the analytical evaluation of natural radionuclides for (238)U, (226)Ra, and (232)Th using a gamma-ray spectrometer and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The range of the specific activities of natural radionuclides was first evaluated by analyzing (228)Ac and (214)Bi, which are (232)Th and (226)Ra indicators, respectively, in about 100 samples of raw materials and by-products through a gamma-ray spectrometer. From further experiments using several samples selected based on the results of the distribution of natural radionuclides, the validation of their analytical evaluations for the indirect measurements using a gamma-ray spectrometer and direct measurements using ICP-MS was assured by comparing their results. Chemically processed products from the raw materials, such as Zr sand and ceramic balls, were generally shown for the type of bead and particularly analyzed showing a definite disequilibrium with above a 50% difference between (238)U and (226)Ra in the uranium series and (232)Th and (228)Ra in the thorium series.

  15. Determination of Physical, Chemical and Digestibility of some Agricultural by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    majed dehgan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, physical and chemical characteristics and estimation of effective fiber and digestibility of some agricultural by-products such as lerd, pulp and date kernel, grape pomace, pistachio hulls, lime and rice straw were determined by using in vitro technique. Experimental data were analyzed as a complete randomized design, with three replicates. Physical and chemical characteristics and digestibility parameters among samples were significantly different. Rice straw due to high water holding capacity and low-density mass were floating on the liquid phase of reticulo-rumen and stimulates rumination but palm seed with high bulk density tends to deposit in the rumen. Chemical characteristics such as non-fibrous carbohydrates of lemon pulp and pistachio hull and crude protein of grape pomace, lerd and pulp of date were significantly different between samples. Results of physical characteristics, particle size separation and physical effective cell wall showed that rice straw provides adequate fiber in diet. Also, to some extent physical effective cell wall can be provided by grape pomace, kernel and lerd of date. The predictions of particle size separation and physical effective cell wall were found to compare reasonably well when new Pennsylvania sieves, compare to old ones, were used. By considering physical and chemical characteristics of above mentioned agricultural by-products date pulp with non-fibrous carbohydrate and high protein content and digestibility can be used in higher amounts in ruminant diets.

  16. Effect of chlorine dioxide on cyanobacterial cell integrity, toxin degradation and disinfection by-product formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiqing; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Li, Lei; Deng, Jing; Zhu, Mingqiu; Zhu, Shumin

    2014-06-01

    Bench scale tests were conducted to study the effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) oxidation on cell integrity, toxin degradation and disinfection by-product formation of Microcystis aeruginosa. The simulated cyanobacterial suspension was prepared at a concentration of 1.0×10(6)cells/mL and the cell integrity was measured with flow cytometry. Results indicated that ClO2 can inhibit the photosynthetic capacity of M. aeruginosa cells and almost no integral cells were left after oxidation at a ClO2 dose of 1.0mg/L. The total toxin was degraded more rapidly with the ClO2 dosage increasing from 0.1mg/L to 1.0mg/L. Moreover, the damage on cell structure after oxidation resulted in released intracellular organic matter, which contributed to the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) as disinfection by-products. Therefore, the use of ClO2 as an oxidant for treating algal-rich water should be carefully considered.

  17. Toluene decomposition performance and NOx by-product formation during a DBD-catalyst process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yufang; Liao, Xiaobin; Fu, Mingli; Huang, Haibao; Ye, Daiqi

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of toluene decomposition and formation of nitrogen oxide (NOx) by-products were investigated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with/without catalyst at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Four kinds of metal oxides, i.e., manganese oxide (MnOx), iron oxide (FeOx), cobalt oxide (CoOx) and copper oxide (CuO), supported on Al2O3/nickel foam, were used as catalysts. It was found that introducing catalysts could improve toluene removal efficiency, promote decomposition of by-product ozone and enhance CO2 selectivity. In addition, NOx was suppressed with the decrease of specific energy density (SED) and the increase of humidity, gas flow rate and toluene concentration, or catalyst introduction. Among the four kinds of catalysts, the CuO catalyst showed the best performance in NOx suppression. The MnOx catalyst exhibited the lowest concentration of O3 and highest CO2 selectivity but the highest concentration of NOx. A possible pathway for NOx production in DBD was discussed. The contributions of oxygen active species and hydroxyl radicals are dominant in NOx suppression.

  18. PIXE characterization of by-products resulting from the zinc recycling of industrial cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemantle, C.S. [School of Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering and DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, P/Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Pilot Tools (Pty) (Ltd), P.O. Box 27420, Benrose 2011 (South Africa); Sacks, N. [School of Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering and DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, P/Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Topic, M. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Faculty of Health & Wellness Sciences, CPUT, Bellville (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    By-product materials of the widely used zinc recycling process of cemented carbides have been studied. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-PIXE techniques have identified elemental concentrations, distributions and purity of by-product materials from an industrial zinc recycling plant. Cobalt surface enrichment, lamellar microstructures of varying composition, including alternating tungsten carbide (WC) grains and globular cobalt, and regions of excess zinc contamination were found in materials with incomplete zinc penetration. Liquid Co–Zn formation occurred above 72 wt.% Zn at the furnace temperature of 930 °C, and was extracted towards the surface of poorly zinc infiltrated material, primarily by the vacuum used for zinc distillation. Surface enrichment was not observed in material that was zinc infiltrated to the sample center, which was more friable and exhibited more homogeneous porosity and elemental concentrations. The result of incomplete zinc infiltration was an enriched surface zone of up to 60 wt.% Co, compared to an original sample composition of ∼10–15 wt.% Co. The impact on resulting powders could be higher or inhomogeneous cobalt content, as well as unacceptably high zinc concentrations. PIXE has proven it can be a powerful technique for solving industrial problems in the cemented carbide cutting tool industry, by identifying trace elements and their locations (such as Zn to 0.1 wt.% accuracy), as well as the distribution of major elements within WC–Co materials.

  19. Transforming beef by-products into valuable ingredients: which spell/recipe to use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeve Mary Henchion

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Satisfying the increasing global demand for protein results in challenges from a supply perspective. Increased use of animal proteins, through greater use of meat by-products, could form part of the solution, subject to consumer acceptance. This research investigates consumer evaluations of food products that incorporate ingredients derived from offals that have been produced through a range of food processing technologies. Using focus groups incorporating product stimuli representing various combinations of offals, processing and carrier products, the research finds that the physical state and perceived naturalness of the ingredients influences acceptance. It also highlights the impact of life experiences, linked to demographic characteristics, on interpretations and evaluations of products and processes. Ideational influences, i.e. knowledge of the nature or origin of the substance, are reasons for rejecting some concepts, with misalignment between nature of processing and the product resulting in rejection of others. Lack of perceived necessity also results in rejection. Alignment of ingredients with existing culinary practices and routines, communication of potential sensory or other benefits as well as naturalness are factors likely to promote acceptance, and generate repeat purchase, in some consumer segments. Trust in oversight that the products are safe is a prerequisite for acceptance in all cases. These findings have implications for pathways to increase sustainability of beef production and consumption through increased use of beef by-products.

  20. Formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in 10 chlorinated and chloraminated drinking water supply systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Deborah; Linge, Kathryn L; Joll, Cynthia A

    2016-09-01

    The presence of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) in drinking water supplies is a public health concern, particularly since some N-DBPs have been reported to be more toxic than the regulated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. In this paper, a comprehensive evaluation of the presence of N-DBPs in 10 drinking water supply systems in Western Australia is presented. A suite of 28 N-DBPs, including N-nitrosamines, haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloacetamides (HAAms) and halonitromethanes (HNMs), were measured and evaluated for relationships with bulk parameters in the waters before disinfection. A number of N-DBPs were frequently detected in disinfected waters, although at generally low concentrations (water, N-DBP concentrations were significantly correlated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and ammonia, and these, in addition to high bromide in one of the waters, led to elevated concentrations of brominated HANs (26.6 μg/L of dibromoacetonitrile). There were significant differences in the occurrence of all classes of N-DBPs between chlorinated and chloraminated waters, except for HNMs, which were detected at relatively low concentrations in both water types. Trends observed in one large distribution system suggest that N-DBPs can continue to form or degrade within distribution systems, and redosing of disinfectant may cause further by-product formation.

  1. Bacterial Cellulose Production from Industrial Waste and by-Product Streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouko, Erminda; Kourmentza, Constantina; Ladakis, Dimitrios; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Mandala, Ioanna; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Paloukis, Fotis; Alves, Vitor; Koutinas, Apostolis

    2015-07-01

    The utilization of fermentation media derived from waste and by-product streams from biodiesel and confectionery industries could lead to highly efficient production of bacterial cellulose. Batch fermentations with the bacterial strain Komagataeibacter sucrofermentans DSM (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen) 15973 were initially carried out in synthetic media using commercial sugars and crude glycerol. The highest bacterial cellulose concentration was achieved when crude glycerol (3.2 g/L) and commercial sucrose (4.9 g/L) were used. The combination of crude glycerol and sunflower meal hydrolysates as the sole fermentation media resulted in bacterial cellulose production of 13.3 g/L. Similar results (13 g/L) were obtained when flour-rich hydrolysates produced from confectionery industry waste streams were used. The properties of bacterial celluloses developed when different fermentation media were used showed water holding capacities of 102-138 g · water/g · dry bacterial cellulose, viscosities of 4.7-9.3 dL/g, degree of polymerization of 1889.1-2672.8, stress at break of 72.3-139.5 MPa and Young's modulus of 0.97-1.64 GPa. This study demonstrated that by-product streams from the biodiesel industry and waste streams from confectionery industries could be used as the sole sources of nutrients for the production of bacterial cellulose with similar properties as those produced with commercial sources of nutrients.

  2. Bacterial Cellulose Production from Industrial Waste and by-Product Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erminda Tsouko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of fermentation media derived from waste and by-product streams from biodiesel and confectionery industries could lead to highly efficient production of bacterial cellulose. Batch fermentations with the bacterial strain Komagataeibacter sucrofermentans DSM (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen 15973 were initially carried out in synthetic media using commercial sugars and crude glycerol. The highest bacterial cellulose concentration was achieved when crude glycerol (3.2 g/L and commercial sucrose (4.9 g/L were used. The combination of crude glycerol and sunflower meal hydrolysates as the sole fermentation media resulted in bacterial cellulose production of 13.3 g/L. Similar results (13 g/L were obtained when flour-rich hydrolysates produced from confectionery industry waste streams were used. The properties of bacterial celluloses developed when different fermentation media were used showed water holding capacities of 102–138 g·water/g·dry bacterial cellulose, viscosities of 4.7–9.3 dL/g, degree of polymerization of 1889.1–2672.8, stress at break of 72.3–139.5 MPa and Young’s modulus of 0.97–1.64 GPa. This study demonstrated that by-product streams from the biodiesel industry and waste streams from confectionery industries could be used as the sole sources of nutrients for the production of bacterial cellulose with similar properties as those produced with commercial sources of nutrients.

  3. Utilisation of Food and Woodworking Production By-products by Composting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uldis Viesturs

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to develop laboratory-scale technologies for composting milk/cheese whey, spent liquor, brewery yeast, fish processing by-products, etc., adding these by-products and special microorganism associations to the basic material - sawdust, bark, etc., also arranging different experimental composting sites. Two Trichoderma strains (Tr. lignorum, Tr. viride and a nitrification association for regulating the circulation of nitrogen-ammonification and nitrification processes were applied. Monitoring of the composting quality was realised by microbiological and chemical analyses, and biotests for compost quality (toxicity assessment. For purifying the polluted air from the composting facilities, the biofiltration technique was realised in a modified SSF system. Biodegradation of ammonia was investigated in a two-stage system with the inert packing material - dolomite broken bricks, and hemoautotrophic microorganisms: DN-1 (Pseudomonas sp., DN-2 (Nitrosomonas sp., DN-3 (Nitrobacter sp. and DN-13 (Sarcina sp.. For hydrogen sulphide biodegradation, Thiobacillus thioparus-3 was immobilised on glass bricks as the carrier material. Biodegradation efficiency of hydrogen sulphide was 87%. Biodegradation of ammonia in the first step in the two-stage system reached 77%, degradation of the gas remaining in the second step was 75%. Compost's quality was similar to black soil - brown-coloured, with good soil odour and without toxic compounds.

  4. Natural bioactive compounds from winery by-products as health promoters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Ana; Baenas, Nieves; Dominguez-Perles, Raul; Barros, Ana; Rosa, Eduardo; Moreno, Diego A; Garcia-Viguera, Cristina

    2014-09-04

    The relevance of food composition for human health has increased consumers' interest in the consumption of fruits and vegetables, as well as foods enriched in bioactive compounds and nutraceuticals. This fact has led to a growing attention of suppliers on reuse of agro-industrial wastes rich in healthy plant ingredients. On this matter, grape has been pointed out as a rich source of bioactive compounds. Currently, up to 210 million tons of grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) are produced annually, being the 15% of the produced grapes addressed to the wine-making industry. This socio-economic activity generates a large amount of solid waste (up to 30%, w/w of the material used). Winery wastes include biodegradable solids namely stems, skins, and seeds. Bioactive compounds from winery by-products have disclosed interesting health promoting activities both in vitro and in vivo. This is a comprehensive review on the phytochemicals present in winery by-products, extraction techniques, industrial uses, and biological activities demonstrated by their bioactive compounds concerning potential for human health.

  5. Utilisation of biomass gasification by-products for onsite energy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakalis, S; Sotiropoulos, A; Moustakas, K; Malamis, D; Baratieri, M

    2016-06-01

    Small scale biomass gasification is a sector with growth and increasing applications owing to the environmental goals of the European Union and the incentivised policies of most European countries. This study addresses two aspects, which are at the centre of attention concerning the operation and development of small scale gasifiers; reuse of waste and increase of energy efficiency. Several authors have denoted that the low electrical efficiency of these systems is the main barrier for further commercial development. In addition, gasification has several by-products that have no further use and are discarded as waste. In the framework of this manuscript, a secondary reactor is introduced and modelled. The main operating principle is the utilisation of char and flue gases for further energy production. These by-products are reformed into secondary producer gas by means of a secondary reactor. In addition, a set of heat exchangers capture the waste heat and optimise the process. This case study is modelled in a MATLAB-Cantera environment. The model is non-stoichiometric and applies the Gibbs minimisation principle. The simulations show that some of the thermal energy is depleted during the process owing to the preheating of flue gases. Nonetheless, the addition of a secondary reactor results in an increase of the electrical power production efficiency and the combined heat and power (CHP) efficiency.

  6. Reduction of wastewaters and valorisation of by-products from "Serpa" cheese manufacture using nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magueijo, V; Minhalma, M; Queiroz, D; Geraldes, V; Macedo, A; de Pinho, M N

    2005-01-01

    Second cheese whey (SCW) is a by-product of cheese and curd cheese production that is usually not recovered and therefore contributes substantially to the negative environmental impact of the cheese manufacture plants. Membrane technology, namely nanofiltration (NF), is used in this work for the recovery of SCW organic nutrients, resulting from "Serpa" cheese and curd production. The SCW is processed by NF to recover a rich lactose fraction in the concentrate and a process water with a high salt content in the permeate. The permeation experiments were carried out in a plate and frame NF unit, where two NF membranes (NFT50 and HR-95-PP) were characterized and tested. The NF permeation experiments were performed accordingly with two different operation modes: total recirculation and concentration. In order to select the best membrane and operating pressure for the SCW fractionation, total recirculation experiments were carried out. After the membrane selection, the concentration experiments showed that the selected membrane (NFT50) at 30 bar allows a water recovery of approximately 80%, concentrating the second cheese whey nutrients approximately 5 times. Therefore, the NF operation can successfully reduce the wastewater organic load and simultaneously contribute to the valorisation of the cheese and curd cheese manufacture by-products.

  7. Optimization of "Serpa" cheese whey nanofiltration for effluent minimization and by-products recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhalma, Miguel; Magueijo, Vítor; Queiroz, Denise P; de Pinho, Maria Norberta

    2007-01-01

    Second cheese whey (SCW) is a by-product of cheese and curd cheese production that is usually not recovered and therefore substantially contributes to the negative environmental impact of the cheese manufacture plants. Membrane technology, namely nanofiltration (NF), is used in this work for the recovery of SCW organic nutrients, resulting from "Serpa" cheese and curd production. The SCW is processed by NF to recover a rich lactose fraction in the concentrate and a process water with a high salt content in the permeate. The permeation experiments were carried out in a plate & frame NF unit, where two NF membranes (NFT50 and HR-95-PP) were characterized and tested. The NF permeation experiments were performed accordingly with two different operation modes: total recirculation and concentration. In order to select the best membrane and operating pressure for the SCW fractionation, total recirculation experiments were carried out. The NF modeling was also performed, in terms of permeate fluxes and rejection coefficients using the resistances-in-series model and the solution-diffusion model, respectively. After the membrane selection, the concentration experiments showed that the selected membrane (NFT50) at 3.0MPa allows a water recovery of approximately 80%, concentrating the SCW nutrients approximately 5 times. Therefore, the NF operation can successfully reduce the wastewater organic load and simultaneously contributes to the valorization of the cheese and curd cheese manufacture by-products.

  8. Solar photocatalytic treatment of landfill leachate using a solid mineral by-product as a catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, Rodrigo; Prieto-Rodríguez, Lucia; Oller, Isabel; Maldonado, Manuel I; Malato, Sixto; Otal, Emilia; Vilches, Luis F; Fernández-Pereira, Constantino

    2012-08-01

    The treatment of municipal solid waste landfill leachate in a pilot plant made up of solar compound parabolic collectors, using a solid industrial titanium by-product (WTiO(2)) containing TiO(2) and Fe(III) as a photocatalyst, was investigated. In the study evidence was found showing that the degradation performed with WTiO(2) was mainly due to the Fe provided by this by-product, instead of TiO(2). However, although TiO(2) had very little effect by itself, a synergistic effect was observed between Fe and TiO(2). The application of WTiO(2), which produced coupled photo-Fenton and heterogeneous catalysis reactions, achieved a surprisingly high depuration level (86% of COD removal), higher than that reached by photo-Fenton using commercial FeSO(4) (43%) in the same conditions. After the oxidation process the biodegradability and toxicity of the landfill leachate were studied. The results showed that the leachate biodegradability was substantially increased, at least in the first stages of the process, and again that WTiO(2) was more efficient than FeSO(4) in terms of increasing biodegradability.

  9. New chlorinated amphetamine-type-stimulants disinfection-by-products formed during drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Fontela, Maria; Pineda, Oriol; Ventura, Francesc; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2012-06-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated high removal rates of amphetamine-type-stimulants (ATSs) through conventional drinking water treatments; however the behaviour of these compounds through disinfection steps and their transformation into disinfection-by-products (DBPs) is still unknown. In this work, for the first time, the reactivity of some ATSs such as amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) with chlorine has been investigated under simulated and real drinking water treatment conditions in order to evaluate their ability to give rise to transformation products. Two new DBPs from these illicit drugs have been found. A common chlorinated-by-product (3-chlorobenzo)-1,3-dioxole, was identified for both MDA and MDEA while for MDMA, 3-chlorocatechol was found. The presence of these DBPs in water samples collected through drinking water treatment was studied in order to evaluate their formation under real conditions. Both compounds were generated through treatment from raw river water samples containing ATSs at concentration levels ranging from 1 to 15 ng/L for MDA and from 2.3 to 78 ng/L for MDMA. One of them, (3-chlorobenzo)-1,3-dioxole, found after the first chlorination step, was eliminated after ozone and GAC treatment while the MDMA DBP mainly generated after the postchlorination step, showed to be recalcitrant and it was found in final treated waters at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5.8 ng/L.

  10. In vitro inhibitory effects of plant-derived by-products against Cryptosporidium parvum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teichmann Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disposal of organic plant wastes and by-products from the food or pharmaceutical industries usually involves high costs. In the present study, 42 samples derived from such by-products were screened in vitro against Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite that may contaminate drinking water and cause diarrhoea. The novel bioassay was previously established in the microtitre plate format. Human ileocaecal adenocarcinoma (HCT-8 cell cultures were seeded with C. parvum oocysts and parasite development was monitored by an indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT and microscopic assessment for clusters of secondary infection (CSI. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs and potential detrimental effects on the host cells were determined. An ethanolic extract from olive (Olea europaea pomace, after oil pressing and phenol recovery, reproducibly inhibited C. parvum development (MIC = 250–500 μg mL−1, IC50 = 361 (279–438 μg mL−1, IC90 = 467 (398–615 μg mL−1. Accordingly, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, trans-coniferyl alcohol and oleuropein were selected as reference test compounds, but their contributions to the observed activity of the olive pomace extract were insignificant. The established test system proved to be a fast and efficient assay for identifying anti-cryptosporidial activities in biological waste material and comparison with selected reference compounds.

  11. In vitro inhibitory effects of plant-derived by-products against Cryptosporidium parvum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Klaus; Kuliberda, Maxime; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Pacher, Thomas; Zitterl-Eglseer, Karin; Joachim, Anja; Hadacek, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Disposal of organic plant wastes and by-products from the food or pharmaceutical industries usually involves high costs. In the present study, 42 samples derived from such by-products were screened in vitro against Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite that may contaminate drinking water and cause diarrhoea. The novel bioassay was previously established in the microtitre plate format. Human ileocaecal adenocarcinoma (HCT-8) cell cultures were seeded with C. parvum oocysts and parasite development was monitored by an indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT) and microscopic assessment for clusters of secondary infection (CSI). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and potential detrimental effects on the host cells were determined. An ethanolic extract from olive (Olea europaea) pomace, after oil pressing and phenol recovery, reproducibly inhibited C. parvum development (MIC = 250–500 μg mL−1, IC50 = 361 (279–438) μg mL−1, IC90 = 467 (398–615) μg mL−1). Accordingly, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, trans-coniferyl alcohol and oleuropein were selected as reference test compounds, but their contributions to the observed activity of the olive pomace extract were insignificant. The established test system proved to be a fast and efficient assay for identifying anti-cryptosporidial activities in biological waste material and comparison with selected reference compounds. PMID:27627637

  12. Industrial vegetable oil by-products increase the ductility of polylactide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ruellan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of industrial by-products of the vegetable oil industry as ductility increasing additives of polylactide (PLA was investigated. Vegetable oil deodorization condensates were melt-blended by twin-screw extrusion up to a maximum inclusion quantity of 20 wt% without preliminary purification. Sample films were obtained by single screw cast extrusion. Compounded PLA films featured largely improved ductility in tensile testing with an elongation at break up to 180%. The glass transition temperature remained higher than room temperature. The native mixture of molecules, which composed the deodorization condensates, had superior performance compared to a synthetic mixture of main compounds. The investigation of the correlation between composition of the additives and the ductility of the PLA blends by Principal Component Analysis showed synergy in property improvement between fatty acids having a melting point below and beyond the room temperature. Furthermore, a compatibilizing effect of molecules present in the native mixture was evidenced. Oil deodorization condensates, which are a price competitive by-product of the vegetable oil industry, are therefore a very promising biobased and biodegradable additive for improving the ductility of PLA.

  13. Thin layer drying kinetics of by-products from olive oil processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Irene; Miranda, Teresa; Arranz, Jose Ignacio; Rojas, Carmen Victoria

    2011-01-01

    The thin-layer behavior of by-products from olive oil production was determined in a solar dryer in passive and active operation modes for a temperature range of 20-50 °C. The increase in the air temperature reduced the drying time of olive pomace, sludge and olive mill wastewater. Moisture ratio was analyzed to obtain effective diffusivity values, varying in the oil mill by-products from 9.136 × 10(-11) to 1.406 × 10(-9) m(2)/s in forced convection (m(a) = 0.22 kg/s), and from 9.296 × 10(-11) to 6.277 × 10(-10) m(2)/s in natural convection (m(a) = 0.042 kg/s). Diffusivity values at each temperature were obtained using the Fick's diffusion model and, regardless of the convection, they increased with the air temperature. The temperature dependence on the effective diffusivity was determined by an Arrhenius type relationship. The activation energies were found to be 38.64 kJ/mol, 30.44 kJ/mol and 47.64 kJ/mol for the olive pomace, the sludge and the olive mill wastewater in active mode, respectively, and 91.35 kJ/mol, 14.04 kJ/mol and 77.15 kJ/mol in natural mode, in that order.

  14. Characterization and value-added utilization of proteins extracted from the by-products from catfish fillet processing plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channel catfish farming is the most important warm water aquaculture in the Southeastern United States. The by-products, including heads, skin, bone frame and viscera, account for 55-65% of the whole fish mass after fillet processing. The by-products contain 35% of protein on a dry basis, and may be...

  15. Characterization of Animal By-Product Hydrolysates to Be Used as Healthy and Bioactive Ingredients in Food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Trine Desiree

    The world meat production and consumption has increased rapidly over the last couple of decades, due to population and income growth. In contrast to the meat, the consumption of animal by-products has been declining, leaving large amounts of by-products underutilized. As many by-products are highly...... and their “meat factor” effect, i.e. their ability to enhance in vitro iron availability. Hydrolysates of different animal by-products displayed antioxidant capacities as observed by several assays intended to test different antioxidant mechanisms. The radical scavenging capacity of the hydrolysates was found...... with a higher dose. These results are interesting in regard to optimizing the value of animal by-products by converting such tissues into bioactive hydrolysates for potential use as natural ingredients in functional foods....

  16. Organic amendments derived from a pharmaceutical by-product: benefits and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Giovanni; Cucina, Mirko; Zadra, Claudia; Pezzolla, Daniela; Sordi, Simone; Carla Marcotullio, Maria; Curini, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    The application of organic amendments to soils, such as sewage sludge, anaerobic digestate and compost is considered a tool for improving soil fertility and enhancing C stocks. The addition of these different organic materials allows a good supply of nutrients for plants but also contributes to C sequestration, affects the microbial activity and the transformation of soil organic matter (SOM). Moreover, the addition of organic amendment has gained importance as a source of CO2 emissions and then as a cause of the "Global Warming". Therefore, it is important to investigate the factors controlling the SOM mineralization in order to improve the soil C sequestration and decreasing at the same time CO2 emissions. Moreover, the quality of organic matter added to the soil will play an important role in these dynamics. Based on these considerations, the aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of the application to an arable soil of different organic materials derived from a pharmaceutical by-product which results from the fermentative biomass after the separation of the lipopolypeptidic antibiotic produced. A microcosm soil experiment was carried out using three different materials: a sewage sludge derived from the stabilization process of the by-product, a digestate obtained from the anaerobic treatment of the by-product and a compost produced by the aerobic treatment of the same digestate. To achieve this aim, the short-term variations of CO2 emissions, enzymatic soil activities (Dehydrogenase total activity and Fluoresceine diacetate hydrolysis), SOM quantity and quality were studied. In addition, process-related residues of antibiotic and decanoic acid (a precursor added during the fermentation) were analyzed on the organic materials to assess their possible presence. Through these analyses it was possible to state that the application to the soil of sewage sludge and anaerobic digestate may have a strong influence on the short-term variations of the

  17. Nutritive value and nutrient digestibility of ensiled mango by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompong Sruamsiri

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mango canning by-products (seed and peel together with ensiled mango peel were subjected to analysis of dry matter (DM, ash, crude protein (CP, crude fibre (CF, ether extract (EE, nitrogen-free extract (NFE, gross energy (GE, neutral detergent fibre (NDF and acid detergent fibre (ADF. In vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD, ADF (IVADFD and NDF (IVNDFD was determined after digesting the by-products in buffered rumen fluid for 24 or 48 h in an incubator. CP content in peel, seed and peel silage is 4.68, 4.19 and 5.27% respectively. As expected, mango seed has a higher fibre content than mango peel and peel silage as indicated by NDF (53.01 vs 25.87 and 27.56% respectively and ADF (31.02 vs 19.14 and 17.68% respectively. However, mango seed also has greater GE than mango peel and peel silage (4,070 vs 3,827 and 3,984 kcal/g DM respectively, probably due partly to its high fat content.Four head of male native cattle were used to determine nutrient digestibility of ensiled mango by-products by randomly allowing them to receive ensiled mango peel with rice straw (EMPR and different levels of Leucaena leaves. Treatments consisted of: 1 ensiled mango peel + rice straw (90:10; 2 ensiled mango peel + rice straw + Leucaena leaves (85:10:5; 3 ensiled mango peel + rice straw + Leucaena leaves (80:10:10; and 4 ensiled mango peel + rice straw + Leucaena leaves (75:10:15. Addition of Leucaena leaves to silage increased apparent digestibility of DM (53.84, 55.43, 59.04 and 58.69% for the four formulations above respectively, probably because of increasing amounts of CP from Leucaena leaves, resulting in greater digestibility of NDF (39.11, 44.47, 47.12 and 43.32% for the four formulations above respectively. Total digestible nutrients (TDN and digestible energy (DE showed the same trends as apparent digestibility of DM.

  18. Novel process to recover by-products from the pickling baths of stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frias, C.; Negro, C.; Formoso, A.; Van Erkel, J.; Maas, W.; Kemppainen, J.; Mancia, F. [Tecnicas Reunidas, S.A., Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Development of an integrated process (the PIBARE process) which is able to recover and recycle free and complex acids back to the pickling tank is described. The recovery of these by-products proceeds while the metals are recovered in the form of electrodeposited metal alloy and are internally recycled to the stainless steel manufacturing process. Virtually no solid residue or liquid is produced in the process. Results after three years of investigation are very promising, having achieved all stated objectives at least on the laboratory scale. The new technology promises significant economic and environmental benefits over other existing technologies for the treatment of spent baths. However, since the benefits have not been confirmed at the pilot scale, commercial application would require additional research, including finding more efficient and more selective anionic membranes. 3 tabs., 6 figs.

  19. Cellulose Nanocrystals Obtained from Rice By-Products and Their Binding Potential to Metallic Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Albernaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to develop and optimize a method to obtain cellulose nanocrystals from the agricultural by-products rice husk and straw and to evaluate their electrostructural modifications in the presence of metallic ions. First, different particle formation conditions and routes were tested and analyzed by spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and Zeta potential measurements. Then, electrostructural effects of ions Na(I, Cd(II, and Al(III on the optimized nanoparticles were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and electrical conductivity (EC assessments. The produced cellulose nanocrystals adopted a rod-like shape. AFM height distribution and EC data indicated that the nanocrystals have more affinity in binding with Na(I > Al(III > Cd(II. These data suggest that the use of these cellulose nanocrystals in the bioremediation field is promising, both in metal sorption from wastewater and as an alternative for water desalination.

  20. Flour production from shrimp by-products and sensory evaluation of flour-based products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Mendes Fernandes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the production of flour using by-products (cephalothorax obtained from the shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei industry, and to perform a sensory analysis of shrimp flour-based products. Physicochemical and microbiological analyses on fresh cephalothorax and on manufactured flour were performed, as well as the determination of cholesterol content of this flour, and the sensorial evaluation of soup and pastry made with this flour. By the microbiological analyses, no pathogenic microorganism was detected in the samples. Physicochemical analyses of flour showed high levels of protein (50.05% and minerals (20.97%. Shrimp cephalothorax flour showed high levels of cholesterol. The sensory evaluation indicated a good acceptance of the products, with satisfactory acceptability index (81% for soup, and 83% for pastry, which indicates that shrimp cephalothorax in the form of flour has a potential for developing new products.

  1. Pseudo-Anosov Mapping Classes and Their Representations by Products of Two Dehn Twists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaohui ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Let S be a Riemann surface of analytically finite type (p, n) with 3p-3+n > 0. Let a ∈ (~S) and S = (~S) - {a}. In this article, the author studies those pseudo-Anosov maps on S that are isotopic to the identity on S and can be represented by products of Dehn twists. It is also proved that for any pseudo-Anosov map f of S isotopic to the identity on S, there are infinitely many pseudo-Anosov maps F on S - {b} = (~S) - {a, b}, where b is a point on S, such that F is isotopic to f on S as b is filled in.

  2. Alien Biochemistries and Their Metabolic By-Products. Lessons from Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, S.

    2014-03-01

    While the metabolisms of terran organisms are accessible for study and their byproducts are, for the most part, well known, the "diversity" of terran biology arises (as far as we know) from a single common ancestor, represents only a small fraction of possible chemical difersity, and may reflect only a fraction of the possible chemical diversity that might support Darwinian evolution [1]. This talk will consider laboratory experiments on origins [2] and synthetic biology [3], asking how they might inform us about alternative biochemistries, and whether we have any chance of observing remotely their by-products, recognizing the uncertanties in both our models for "weird life" and our models of abiotic processes in incompletely defined planetary environments.

  3. EFFECT OF PHYTATECONTENTS OF CEREAL BY-PRODUCTS ON BIOAVAILABILITY OF TOT AL PHOSPHORUS IN POULTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishtiaq Ahmad

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Four cereal by-products were examined for their total and phytate phosphorus contents. Feeding trial for bioavailability was conducted on 18 weeks old cockerels of White Leg Horn breed which were starved for24 hours and were forced-fed 30 grams of finely ground single feedstuff and droppings were collected at pre-determined time intervals. The bioavailability of total phosphorus for wheat bran, rice polishing, wheat middling and gram kara was 37.11 , 15.37,61.32 and 62.64%, respectively while phytate phosphorus contents were 0.66, 1.16, 0.24 and 0.17%, respectively. The bioavailability of total phosphorus was negatively correlated with the phytate phosphorus contents of these feed stuffs (P< 0.01 .

  4. Early age shrinkage pattern of concrete on replacement of fine aggregate with industrial by-product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Mishra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This is an experimental work carried out to investigate early age shrinkage pattern of concrete, prepared, on 50% replacement of industrial by-product (like pond ash and granulated blast furnace slag as fine aggregate using OPC, PPC and PSC as a binder. This is to observe the effect of pond ash and slag as they are having some cementitious properties and effect of cement type is also discussed. All the mixes were prepared keeping in view of pumpable concrete without any super plasticizers. Higher shrinkage value indicates the presence of more bleed water or internal moisture. It is concluded that slag is the best option for fine aggregate replacement for concrete making and durable structure.

  5. Recent Advances in Phospholipids from Colostrum, Milk and Dairy By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verardo, Vito; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana Maria; Arráez-Román, David; Hettinga, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    Milk is one of the most important foods for mammals, because it is the first form of feed providing energy, nutrients and immunological factors. In the last few years, milk lipids have attracted the attention of researchers due to the presence of several bioactive components in the lipid fraction. The lipid fraction of milk and dairy products contains several components of nutritional significance, such as ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, CLA, short chain fatty acids, gangliosides and phospholipids. Prospective cohort evidence has shown that phospholipids play an important role in the human diet and reinforce the possible relationship between their consumption and prevention of several chronic diseases. Because of these potential benefits of phospholipids in the human diet, this review is focused on the recent advances in phospholipids from colostrum, milk and dairy by-products. Phospholipid composition, its main determination methods and the health activities of these compounds will be addressed. PMID:28106745

  6. Nutritional and phytochemical composition of Annona cherimola Mill. fruits and by-products: Potential health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Tânia Gonçalves; Santos, Filipa; Sanches-Silva, Ana; Beatriz Oliveira, M; Bento, Ana Cristina; Costa, Helena S

    2016-02-15

    Annona cherimola Mill., commonly known as cherimoya, is a tropical fruit well known due to its tasty flavour. In the present study the antioxidant activity of pulp, peel and seeds of four cultivars from A. cherimola Mill. from Madeira Island (Madeira, Funchal, Perry Vidal and Mateus II) was analysed. Moreover, nutritional composition (proximates and vitamins) and bioactive compounds content were determined. The peel of Madeira cultivar showed the highest antioxidant capacity, with an EC50 of 0.97mg/mL, and total flavonoids (44.7 epicatechin equivalents/100g). The most abundant carotenoid was lutein, with values ranging from 129 to 232μg/100g. The highest l-ascorbic acid content (4.41mg/100g) was found in the peel of Perry Vidal cultivar. These results highlight A. cherimola Mill. antioxidant properties, especially in its by-products and encourage their application in cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food processing industries, as added value natural extracts.

  7. Peptidoglycan from fermentation by-product triggers defense responses in grapevine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly under attack from a variety of microorganisms, and rely on a series of complex detection and response systems to protect themselves from infection. Here, we found that a by-product of glutamate fermentation triggered defense responses in grapevine, increasing the expression of defense response genes in cultured cells, foliar chitinase activity, and resistance to infection by downy mildew in leaf explants. To identify the molecule that triggered this innate immunity, we fractionated and purified candidates extracted from Corynebacterium glutamicum, a bacterium used in the production of amino acids by fermentation. Using hydrolysis by lysozyme, a silkworm larva plasma detection system, and gel filtration analysis, we identified peptidoglycan as inducing the defense responses. Peptidoglycans of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus also generated similar defensive responses.

  8. Lecithin: a by-product of biodiesel production and a source of choline for dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igino Andrighetto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of soy lecithins (L, a by-product of the biodiesel production process, and choline chloride microencapsulated with hydrogenated vegetable oils (C on dry matter intake, milk yield,  milk quality traits, milk choline and haematological profile of dairy cows. A total of 12 mid-lactating Holstein Friesian cows were assigned to one of two experimental groups and fed according to cross-over design (2 diets x 2 periods. Diets were isoenergetic, isofibrous and isonitrogenous and had the same content of choline. Dry matter intake was not affected by the diet, but L led to lower milk choline (P

  9. The Possibilities of Using By-Products from Olive Oil in Ruminant Feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Boga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, meeting adequately nutrient requirements of animal is a major problem due to cost of feed. This situation results in the feed manufacturers to search alternative feed source in order to provide more economical feeding in animal nutrition. In Turkey known as a paradise of olive, a number of substances were discharged to the environment during olive processing. After pressing of olive, the olive remains such as olive cake and black water cause off-odour, groundwater pollution, visual pollution and formation of a fly in environment. Among these by-products, olive cake has been extensively used as fuel. However, olive cake and black water can be used as alternative animal feed due to their high nutrient contents. In this review, the importance and use of the olive cake and black water in animal nutrition will be discussed.

  10. Recent Advances in Phospholipids from Colostrum, Milk and Dairy By-Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Verardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Milk is one of the most important foods for mammals, because it is the first form of feed providing energy, nutrients and immunological factors. In the last few years, milk lipids have attracted the attention of researchers due to the presence of several bioactive components in the lipid fraction. The lipid fraction of milk and dairy products contains several components of nutritional significance, such as ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, CLA, short chain fatty acids, gangliosides and phospholipids. Prospective cohort evidence has shown that phospholipids play an important role in the human diet and reinforce the possible relationship between their consumption and prevention of several chronic diseases. Because of these potential benefits of phospholipids in the human diet, this review is focused on the recent advances in phospholipids from colostrum, milk and dairy by-products. Phospholipid composition, its main determination methods and the health activities of these compounds will be addressed.

  11. Chemical and functional properties of fibre concentrates obtained from by-products of coconut kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalegama, L L W C; Nedra Karunaratne, D; Sivakanesan, Ramiah; Jayasekara, Chitrangani

    2013-11-01

    The coconut kernel residues obtained after extraction of coconut milk (MR) and virgin coconut oil (VOR) were analysed for their potential as dietary fibres. VOR was defatted and treated chemically using three solvent systems to isolate coconut cell wall polysaccharides (CCWP). Nutritional composition of VOR, MR and CCWPs indicated that crude fibre, neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre and hemicelluloses contents were higher in CCWPs than in VOR and MR. MR contained a notably higher content of fat than VOR and CCWPs. The oil holding capacity, water holding capacity and swelling capacity were also higher in CCWPs than in VOR and MR. All the isolates and MR and VOR had high metal binding capacities. The CCWPs when compared with commercially available fibre isolates, indicated improved dietary fibre properties. These results show that chemical treatment of coconut kernel by-products can enhance the performance of dietary fibre to yield a better product.

  12. Influence of fermentation by-products on the purification of ethanol from water using pervaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovau, S; Gaykawad, S; Straathof, A J J; Van der Bruggen, B

    2011-01-01

    Pervaporation is claimed to be a promising separation technique for the purification of ethanol from fermentation broths during bio-ethanol production. In this study, influence of fermentation by-products on the purification of ethanol from water during hydrophobic pervaporation was investigated. Sugars and salts were found to increase the membrane performance. Reason for this was a change in vapor/liquid equilibrium. 2,3-butanediol decreased the ethanol flux and selectivity factor, while glycerol exhibited no effect. This was explained by a strong sorption of butanediol into PDMS and no sorption of glycerol. Due to the presence of carboxylic acids, hydrophobicity degree of the Pervap 4060 membrane decreased, which resulted in an irreversible increase in water flux and decrease in separation performance. These observations suggested the presence of silicalite-based fillers in the membrane. When the pH was raised to a value above the dissociation constant, no changes in hydrophobicity degree and membrane performance were found.

  13. Reducing the formation of disinfection by-products by pre-ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Nan; Ma, Ying-Shih; Zing, Fang-Fong

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply the pre-ozonation process to reduce the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). The raw water sample, collected from the Te-Chi Reservoir in central Taiwan, has been polluted by fertilizer. Three types of resins were used to isolate the natural organic matter into seven types of organic fractions. The pre-ozonation was used to oxidize each organic fraction to study the reduction of DBPs of each fraction. Experimental results indicated that the pre-ozonation could reduce the concentration of dissolved organic carbon resulting in the reduction of DBP formation. With the pre-ozonation, 9-54% of DOC and more than 40% of DBPs were reduced. With the analysis of UV adsorption and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), the reduction of A254 and unsaturated functional groups such as aromatic ring and C=C bond containing in the water sample is the major reaction mechanism.

  14. Development of a database management system for Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Leary, E.M.; Peck, W.D.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F. [and others

    1997-06-01

    Coal combustion by-products (CCBs) are produced in high volumes worldwide. Utilization of these materials is economically and environmentally advantageous and is expected to increase as disposal costs increase. The American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) is developing a database to contain characterization and utilization information on CCBs. This database will provide information for use by managers, marketers, operations personnel, and researchers that will aid in their decision making and long-term planning for issues related to CCBs. The comprehensive nature of the database and the interactive user application will enable ACAA members to efficiently and economically access a wealth of data on CCBs and will promote the technically sound, environmentally safe, and commercially competitive use of CCBs.

  15. Molecular structure of a new chlorinated disinfection by-product in drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Huijuan; Wang, Huaqin; You, Zhen; Zou, Huixian; Shen, Xing

    2005-06-01

    A new found chlorinated disinfection by-product (DBP) in drinking water was isolated and characterized by MS, FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray diffraction method was also carried out to determinate the exact structure of the compound. The crystal is of monoclinic, and space group P2 1/ m with a=7.8800(16), b=6.7950(14), c=8.8350(18) Å, β=115.02(3)°, V=428.67(15) Å 3, Z=4, Dc=1.778 g/cm 3, μ=1.028 mm -1 and F(000)=228, R=0.0510 and wR=0.2205 for 982 unique reflections with 918 observed ones [ I>2 σ( I)]. The results confirmed the structure of this compound. It was finally identified as 2,2,4-trichloro-5-methoxy-cyclopent-4-ene-1,3-dione (TCMCD).

  16. Removal of disinfection by-product formation potentials by biologically assisted GAC treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The object of this paper is to evaluate the removal of disinfection by-products formation potential by artificially intensified biological activated carbon(BAC) process which is developed on the basis of traditional ozone granular activated carbon (GAC). The results show that 23.1% of trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) and 68% of haloacetic acid formation potential (HAAFP) can be removed by BAC,respectively. Under the same conditions, the removal rates of the same substances were 12.2% and 13-25 % respectively only by GAC process. Compared with GAC, the high removal rates of the two formed potential substances were due to the increasing of bioactivity of the media and the synergistic capabilities of biological degradation cooperating with activated carbon adsorption of organic compounds. BAC process has some advantages such as long backwashing cycle time, low backwashing intensity and prolonged activated carbon lifetime, etc.

  17. Enrichment of functional properties of ice cream with pomegranate by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çam, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Fatma; Aslan, Duygu; Dinç, Merve

    2013-10-01

    Pomegranate peel rich in phenolics, and pomegranate seed which contain a conjugated fatty acid namely punicic acid in lipid fraction remain as by-products after processing the fruit into juice. Ice cream is poor in polyunsaturated fatty acids and phenolics, therefore, this study was conducted to improve the functional properties of ice cream by incorporating pomegranate peel phenolics and pomegranate seed oil. Incorporation of the peel phenolics into ice cream at the levels of 0.1% and 0.4% (w/w) resulted in significant changes in the pH, total acidity, and color of the samples. The most prominent outcomes of phenolic incorporation were sharp improvements in antioxidant and antidiabetic activities as well as the phenolic content of ice creams. Replacement of pomegranate seed oil by milk fat at the levels of 2.0% and 4.0% (w/w) increased the conjugated fatty acid content. However, perception of oxidized flavor increased with the additional seed oil. When one considers the functional and nutritional improvements in the enrichment of the ice cream together with overall acceptability results of the sensory analysis, then it follows from this study that ice creams enriched with pomegranate peel phenolics up to 0.4% (w/w) and pomegranate seed oil up to 2.0% (w/w) could be introduced to markets as functional ice cream. Enrichment of ice creams with pomegranate by-products might provide consumers health benefits with striking functional properties of punicalagins in pomegranate peel, and punicic acid in pomegranate seed oil.

  18. Using event related potentials to identify a user's behavioural intention aroused by product form design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Guo, Fu; Zhang, Xuefeng; Qu, Qingxing; Liu, Weilin

    2016-07-01

    The capacity of product form to arouse user's behavioural intention plays a decisive role in further user experience, even in purchase decision, while traditional methods rarely give a fully understanding of user experience evoked by product form, especially the feeling of anticipated use of product. Behavioural intention aroused by product form designs has not yet been investigated electrophysiologically. Hence event related potentials (ERPs) were applied to explore the process of behavioural intention when users browsed different smart phone form designs with brand and price not taken into account for mainly studying the brain activity evoked by variety of product forms. Smart phone pictures with different anticipated user experience were displayed with equiprobability randomly. Participants were asked to click the left mouse button when certain picture gave them a feeling of behavioural intention to interact with. The brain signal of each participant was recorded by Curry 7.0. The results show that pictures with an ability to arouse participants' behavioural intention for further experience can evoke enhanced N300 and LPPs (late positive potentials) in central-parietal, parietal and occipital regions. The scalp topography shows that central-parietal, parietal and occipital regions are more activated. The results indicate that the discrepancy of ERPs can reflect the neural activities of behavioural intention formed or not. Moreover, amplitude of ERPs occurred in corresponding brain areas can be used to measure user experience. The exploring of neural correlated with behavioural intention provide an accurate measurement method of user's perception and help marketers to know which product can arouse users' behavioural intention, maybe taken as an evaluating indicator of product design.

  19. Characterization and transformation of an industrial by-product (coated paper sludge into a pozzolanic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San José, J. T.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effective re-use of industrial by-products calls for an understanding of their chemical, mineralogical and physical characteristics. The by-product used in this study was coated paper industry sludge from a plant whose sole prime material is recycled paper. Due to its high organic and calcium carbonate content and the presence of several clayey materials such as talc and kaolinite, incineration conditions had a significant effect on the mineralogy of such sludge. The present study examined the impact of such conditions on the pozzolanic properties of coated paper sludge. Several temperature intervals ranging from 600 to 750 ºC were studied to determine the conditions yielding the most promising pozzolanic properties.La necesidad de dar un correcto uso a los subproductos industriales requiere del conocimiento de sus características, tanto desde un punto de vista químico como mineralógico y físico. El subproducto utilizado para esta investigación es un lodo de papel estucado procedente de la industria papelera, la cual usa como materias primas un 100% de material reciclado. Debido al alto contenido de materia orgánica y carbonato cálcico y a la presencia de diferentes materiales arcillosos, como el talco y la caolinita, las condiciones de calcinación presentan un papel principal en la mineralogía de este lodo. En el actual trabajo se considera el papel que juegan estas condiciones, tiempo y permanencia en horno, en las propiedades puzolánicas del lodo de papel estucado como material cementante. Por esta razón, se estudiaron diferentes intervalos de temperatura, entre 600 y 750 ºC y 2 horas de permanencia en horno con el objetivo de obtener las mejores propiedades puzolánicas.

  20. Possibility of using by-products of the steelmaking industry for removing lead from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín, M. I.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A study is made of the use of two steelmaking industry by-products (rolling mill scale and blast furnace sludge as adsorbent materials for removing Pb2+ ions from aqueous solutions. The adsorption of Pb2+ on these materials has been studied by the determination of adsorption isotherms. Several variables that affect the process (contact time, initial lead ion concentration and temperature were evaluated. The adsorption processes are analysed using the Langmuir theory. Desorption processes for the metal from loaded by-products were also studied under different experimental conditions. This paper shows that these industrial residues are effective adsorbents for lead ions in aqueous solutions within the range of working concentrations.

    Se estudia el uso de dos subproductos de la industria del acero (cascarilla de laminación y lodo de horno alto como materiales adsorbentes para eliminar iones Pb2+ de soluciones acuosas. La adsorción de Pb2+ sobre estos materiales se ha estudiado determinando las isotermas de adsorción. Se evaluaron diferentes variables que afectan al proceso (tiempo de contacto, concentración inicial de iones plomo y temperatura. Los procesos de adsorción se estudian usando la teoría de Langmuir. Los procesos de desorción de los metales también se estudiaron bajo diferentes condiciones experimentales. Este trabajo muestra que estos residuos industriales son adsorbentes efectivos de iones plomo en soluciones acuosas en el rango de las concentraciones de trabajo utilizadas.

  1. Nutrient and dissolved organic carbon removal from natural waters using industrial by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Laura A; Douglas, Grant B; Coleman, Shandel; Yuan, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation of excess nutrients in wastewater and stormwater is required to safeguard aquatic ecosystems. The use of low-cost, mineral-based industrial by-products with high Ca, Mg, Fe or Al content as a solid phase in constructed wetlands potentially offers a cost-effective wastewater treatment option in areas without centralised water treatment facilities. Our objective was to investigate use of water treatment residuals (WTRs), coal fly ash (CFA), and granular activated carbon (GAC) from biomass combustion in in-situ water treatment schemes to manage dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nutrients. Both CaO- and CaCO(3)-based WTRs effectively attenuated inorganic N species but exhibited little capacity for organic N removal. The CaO-based WTR demonstrated effective attenuation of DOC and P in column trials, and a high capacity for P sorption in batch experiments. Granular activated carbon proved effective for DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) removal in column trials, but was ineffective for P attenuation. Only CFA demonstrated effective removal of a broad suite of inorganic and organic nutrients and DOC; however, Se concentrations in column effluents exceeded Australian and New Zealand water quality guideline values. Water treated by filtering through the CaO-based WTR exhibited nutrient ratios characteristic of potential P-limitation with no potential N- or Si-limitation respective to growth of aquatic biota, indicating that treatment of nutrient-rich water using the CaO-based WTR may result in conditions less favourable for cyanobacterial growth and more favourable for growth of diatoms. Results show that selected industrial by-products may mitigate eutrophication through targeted use in nutrient intervention schemes.

  2. Opportunities, perspectives and limits in lactic acid production from waste and industrial by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Dragana D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In line with the goals of sustainable development and environmental protection today great attention is directed towards new technologies for waste and industrial by-products utilization. Waste products represent potentially good raw material for production other valuable products, such as bioethanol, biogas, biodiesel, organic acids, enzymes, microbial biomass, etc. Since the first industrial production to the present, lactic acid has found wide application in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. In recent years, the demand for lactic acid has been increasing considerably owing to its potential use as a monomer for the production of poly-lactic acid (PLA polymers which are biodegradable and biocompatible with wide applications. Waste and industrial by-products such are whey, molasses, stillage, waste starch and lignocellulosic materials are a good source of fermentable sugars and many other substances of great importance for the growth of microorganisms, such as proteins, minerals and vitamins. Utilization of waste products for production of lactic acid could help to reduce the total cost of lactic acid production and except the economic viability of the process offers a solution of their disposal. Fermentation process depends on chemical and physical nature of feedstocks and the lactic acid producer. This review describes the characteristics, abilities and limits of microorganisms involved in lactic acid production, as well as the characteristics and types of waste products for lactic acid production. The fermentation methods that have been recently reported to improve lactic acid production are summarized and compared. In order to improve processes and productivity, fed-batch fermentation, fermentation with immobilized cell systems and mixed cultures and opportunities of open (non-sterilized fermentation have been investigated.

  3. Waste-to-energy possibilities for industrial olive and grape by-products in Extremadura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celma, A.R.; Rojas, S. [Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Energetica; Lopez-Rodriguez, F. [Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Area de Proyectos de Ingenieria

    2007-07-15

    The olive and grape agro-industrial sectors have a major economic importance in Extremadura. Annual production of olive oil is more than 50 x 10{sup 3} t, and of wine is more than 3 x 10{sup 6} hectolitres. The large amounts of by-products are in most cases under-used, although they could be converted into a zero cost of the waste at the point of origin. In this context, the present work describes an estimate of plant size, and an economic analysis of grate firing+steam turbine (GF/ST) and fluidized bed combustion+steam turbine (FBC/ST) waste-to-energy solutions using industrial olive and grape by-products in Extremadura. The fuel is dry olive husk waste (OH), olive mill wastewater (OMW), OH+OMW sludge, and grape waste from wineries, with total calculated specific costs of 3.28, 8.09, 2.67, and 2.05 EUR GJ{sup -1} with respect to the lower heating value (LHV), respectively. The logistics component corresponding to trucking the biomass to the power production plant is that of greatest economic importance, even when the logistics strategy includes de-centralized drying plants. For real onsite availabilities of OH 21.084 x 10{sup 3} t, OMW 37.483 x 10{sup 3} t, olive sludge 87.462 x 10{sup 3} t, and grape waste 89.486 x 10{sup 3} t, the gross power is 19.13 MW for a GF/ST plant and 20.46 MW for an FBC/ST plant. The results are compared using standard economic indices - net present value (NPV), profitability index (PI), internal rate of return (IRR), and payback time (PBT). A sensitivity and risk analysis of the proposals showed the GF/ST option to be the better suited to the studied scenario, with better values for all the indicators. (author)

  4. Coal slurry solids/coal fluidized bed combustion by-product mixtures as plant growth media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmody, R.G.; Green, W.P.; Dreher, G.B.

    1998-01-01

    Fine-textured, pyritic waste produced by coal cleaning is stored in slurry settling ponds that eventually require reclamation. Conventionally, reclamation involves covering the dewatered coal slurry solids (CSS) with 1.3 m of soil to allow plant growth and prevent acid generation by pyrite oxidation. This study was conducted to determine the feasiblity of a less costly reclamation approach that would eliminate the soil cover and allow direct seeding of plants into amended CSS materials. Potential acidity of the CSS would be neutralized by additions of fluidized-bed combustion by-product (FBCB), an alkaline by-product of coal combustion. The experiment involved two sources of CSS and FBCB materials from Illinois. Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.), tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), and sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis (L.) Lam.) were seeded in the greenhouse into pots containing mixtures of the materials. CSS-1 had a high CaCO3:FeS2 ratio and needed no FBCB added to compensate for its potential acidity. CSS-2 was mixed with the FBCB materials to neutralize potential acidity (labeled Mix A and B). Initial pH was 5.6, 8.8, and 9.2 for the CSS-1, Mix A, and Mix B materials, respectively. At the end of the 70-day experiment, pH was 5.9 for all mixtures. Tall fescue and sweet clover grew well in all the treatments, but birdsfoot trefoil had poor emergence and survival. Elevated tissue levels of B, Cd, and Se were found in some plants. Salinity, low moisture holding capacity, and potentially phytotoxic B may limit the efficacy of this reclamation method.

  5. Application of bacteriophages specific to hydrogen sulfide-producing bacteria in raw poultry by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Liu, Xiaohua; Jiang, Xiuping

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide-producing bacteria (SPB) can spoil raw animal materials and release harmful hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas. The objective of this study was to apply a SPB-specific bacteriophage cocktail to control H2S production by SPB in different raw poultry by-products in the laboratory (20, 30, and 37°C) and greenhouse (average temperature 29 to 31°C, humidity 34.8 to 59.8%, and light intensity 604.8 Wm(2)) by simulating transportation and a rendering facility. The amount of H2S production was determined using either test strips impregnated with lead acetate or a H2S monitor. In the laboratory, phage treatment applied to fresh chicken meat inoculated with SPB, spoiled chicken meat, chicken guts, and chicken feathers reduced H2S production by approximately 25 to 69% at temperatures from 20 to 37°C. In the greenhouse, phage treatment achieved approximately a 30 to 85% reduction of H2S yield in chicken offal and feathers. Among all phage treatments, multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100 exhibited the highest inhibitory activities against SPB on H2S production. Several factors such as initial SPB level, temperature, and MOI affect lytic activities of bacteriophages. Our study demonstrated that the phage cocktail is effective to reduce the production of H2S by SPB significantly in raw animal materials. This biological control method can control SPB in raw poultry by-products at ambient temperatures, leading to a safer working environment and high quality product with less nutrient degradation for the rendering industry.

  6. A modern solid waste management strategy--the generation of new by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudala-Ksiazek, Sylwia; Pierpaoli, Mattia; Kulbat, Eliza; Luczkiewicz, Aneta

    2016-03-01

    To benefit the environment and society, EU legislation has introduced a 'zero waste' strategy, in which waste material should be converted to resources. Such legislation is supported by the solid waste hierarchy concept, which is a set of priorities in waste management. Under this concept, municipal solid waste plants (MSWPs) should be equipped with sorting and recycling facilities, composting/incineration units and landfill prisms for residual bulk disposal. However, each of the aforementioned facilities generates by-products that must be treated. This project focuses on the leachates from landfill prisms, including modern prism (MP) that meet EU requirements and previous prism (PP) that provide for the storage of permitted biodegradable waste as well as technological wastewaters from sorting unit (SU) and composting unit (CU), which are usually overlooked. The physico-chemical parameters of the liquid by-products collected over 38 months were supported by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) amplifications of functional genes transcripts and a metagenomic approach that describes the archaeal and bacterial community in the MP. The obtained data show that SU and especially CU generate wastewater that is rich in nutrients, organic matter and heavy metals. Through their on-site pre-treatment and recirculation via landfill prisms, the landfill waste decomposition process may be accelerated because of the introduction of organic matter and greenhouse gas emissions may be increased. These results have been confirmed by the progressive abundance of both archaeal community and the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene. The resulting multivariate data set, supported by a principal component analysis, provides useful information for the design, operation and risk assessment of modern MSWPs.

  7. STARCH/PULP-FIBER BASED PACKAGING FOAMS AND CAST FILMS CONTAINING ALASKAN FISH BY-PRODUCTS (WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed H. Imam

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Baked starch/pulp foams were prepared from formulations containing zero to 25 weight percent of processed Alaskan fish by-products that consisted mostly of salmon heads, pollock heads, and pollock frames (bones and associated remains produced in the filleting operation. Fish by-products thermoformed well along with starch and pulp fiber, and the foam product (panels exhibited useful mechanical properties. Foams with all three fish by-products, ranging between 10 and 15 wt%, showed the highest flexural modulus (500-770 Mpa. Above 20% fiber content, the modulus dropped considerably in all foam samples. Foam panels with pollock frames had the highest flexural modulus, at about 15% fiber content (770 Mpa. Foams with salmon heads registered the lowest modulus, at 25% concentration. Attempts were also made to cast starch-glycerol-poly (vinyl alcohol films containing 25% fish by-product (salmon heads. These films showed a tensile strength of 15 Mpa and elongation at break of 78.2%. All foams containing fish by-product degraded well in compost at ambient temperature (24oC, loosing roughly between 75-80% of their weight within 7 weeks. The films degraded at a much higher rate initially. When left in water, foams prepared without fish by-product absorbed water much more quickly and deteriorated faster, whereas, water absorption in foams with fish by-product was initially delayed and/or slowed for about 24 h. After this period, water absorption was rapid.

  8. HPLC evaluation of the minor lipid components of by-products resulting from edible oil processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EL-Shami, Safinaz Mohamed M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytical evaluation of some by-products resulting from edible oil refining processing steps has been carried out. By-product samples were taken from four different local refineries that apply chemical refining technology. Pretreatment of the representative samples of the by-products were done prior to analysis followed by chromatographic isolation and derivatization of the minor components, namely, free and acylated sterol (FS and AS as well as free and acylated sterylglycosides (FSG and ASG. However, tocopherols were directly determined in the pretreated samples. HPLC, using different detectors, was carried out for the determination of these minor components. Several authors have focused on the analysis of sterols and sterol esters, as well as tocopherols in the refining byproducts; however sterylglycosides, as biologically important components, have not been dealt with. This study throws light on the by – products enriched with certain minor components to be possibly utilized as sources for such components. Also, the role of the conditions of the refining steps followed in removing these valuable minor components from oils was discussed. It was found that soapstock samples contained various amounts of total tocopherols ranging from 80 to 230ppm; total FS and AS ranged from 240 to 4000 mg/100g while total FSG and ASG ranged from 1120 to 6375 mg/100g. In the case of deodorization distillate samples total tocopherols ranged from 960 to 7360ppm; total FS and AS ranged from 1020 to 4160 mg/100g and total FSG, ASG ranged from 395 to 880 mg/100g.El trabajo realiza una evaluación analítica de algunos subproductos resultantes del la refinación de aceites comestibles. Las muestras procedieron de 4 plantas que aplicaban refinación química. Después de un pretratamiento de las muestras estas se sometieron a un análisis cromatográfico para el aislamiento y derivatización de los siguientes componentes minoritarios: esteroles libres y

  9. Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donal F. Day

    2009-03-31

    The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of

  10. Nutritive composition of soybean by-products and nutrient digestibility of soybean pod husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompong Sruamsiri

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Soybean by-products (soybean germ, soybean milk residue, soybean hull, soybean pod husk and soybean stem were subjected to proximate analysis, and in vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD, ADF (IVADFD and NDF (IVNDFD were determined after digesting the by-products in buffered rumen fluid for 24 or 48 h in 2 ANKOMII Daisy Incubators using Completely Randomised Design. Four native cattle (body weight 210 + 13.5 kg were used to determine nutrient digestibility of soybean pod husk. They were randomly assigned by Cross-over Design to receive two roughage sources, i.e. guinea grass and guinea grass + soybean pod husk (60:40 DM basis, in two experimental periods. Guinea grass was harvested on the 35th day after the first cut of the year and used as green forage. Total collection method was used to determine the digestibility coefficients and digestibility by difference was used to calculate nutrient digestibility of soybean pod husk.The nutritive composition showed that soybean germ was highest in CP content (42.27% of DM and EE content (5.07% of DM but lowest in NDF and ADF content (20.09 and 21.53% of DM respectively. The average CP content of soybean straw, soybean stem and soybean pod husk was low (4.91, 4.67 and 5.04% respectively, while ADF content was high (42.76, 38.01 and 42.08% respectively. In vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD, ADF (IVADFD and NDF (IVNDFD showed that all of them, except soybean stem, can be used as cattle feed, e.g. as supplemented feed or admixture in concentrate feed. Digestibility coefficients of guinea grass were higher in CP, CF and EE when compared to the other groups. The apparent digestibility of CP and CF were highly different (P0.05. The digestibility of nutrients (DM, OM, CP, CF, NFE, NDF and ADF of soybean pod husk were 53.81 + 4.3, 59.69 + 4.6, 42.38 + 3.8, 30.71 + 3.2, 50.74 + 4.3, 75.26 + 4.0, 45.78 + 3.7 and 30.53 + 4.2 % respectively. Soybean pod husk was higher in total digestible nutrients (TDN (51.87 + 3.3 vs

  11. Chronic toxicity of parabens and their chlorinated by-products in Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Masanori; Abe, Ryoko; Makino, Masakazu; Tatarazako, Norihisa

    2015-01-01

    The chronic toxicity of 12 compounds of parabens and their chlorinated by-products was investigated using 7-day Ceriodaphnia dubia test under static renewal condition in order to generate information on how to disinfect by-products of preservatives that are discharged in aquatic systems. The mortality and inhibition of reproduction tended to increase with increasing hydrophobicity and decreased with the degree of chlorination of parabens. The EC50 values for mortality, offspring number, and first brood production ranged between 0.30-3.1, 0.047-12, and 1.3-6.3 mg L(-1) , respectively. For the number of neonates, the most sensitive endpoint, the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) and lowest-observed-effect concentration (LOEC) values ranged from 0.63 to 10 mg L(-1) and from 1.2 to 19 mg L(-1) , respectively. Methylparaben (MP), benzylparaben (BnP), and dichlorinated BnP (Cl2 BnP) elicited a significant decrease in offspring numbers even at their lowest concentration tested; the NOEC for these compounds was determined to be less than the lowest test concentration (1.3, 0.04, and 0.63 mg L(-1) for MP, BnP, and Cl2 BnP, respectively). Propylparaben (PP), chlorinated PP, isopropylparaben (iPP), and chlorinated iPP exhibited nonmonotonic concentration-dependent response; their NOEC and LOEC values could not be determined. The multivariate approach involving principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four groups that corresponded to the toxicological profiles of parabens. Our results suggested that disinfection of parabens by chlorination could reduce aquatic toxicity of original compounds. The findings obtained in our study together with the data available on paraben concentrations in aquatic systems can be used to perform preliminary risk assessment by comparing the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) with the predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) for the marine aquatic environment. The calculated PEC/PNEC ratios ranged from 0

  12. CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO DIBROMOACETIC ACID, A WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT, DIMINISHES PRIMORDIAL FOLLICLES IN THE RABBIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to dibromoacetic acid (DBA), a commonly occurring water disinfection by-product, has detrimental effects on spermatogenesis and fertility in rats and rabbits. Despite indications of important reproductive consequences of DBA exposure in males, reproductive sequelae follo...

  13. The utilization of biochemically modified microfibers from grain by-products as reinforcement for polypropylene biocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Bledzki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The presented research study aims to evaluate microfibers from grain by-products as a substitute for wood flour in wood-thermoplastic composites. Grain husks are an abundant and cheap source of annual, renewable raw material, which besides lignocellulose, may also contain substantial amounts of starch, proteins and fats. These grain residues may negatively affect the mechanical properties of their composites, and generate an odor when decomposition occurs at higher temperatures during plastics processing. Such odors may also be present in the end-product. In order to overcome this drawback, in this research study, a simple and effective enzymatic treatment is proposed. This environmental friendly process removed protein, starch and fats in selective manner. Treated microfibers have shown enhanced thermal stability for ca. 20°C at 1% of weight loss. This correlates with lower amount of odor emission during plastics processing as well as in the final, injection molded parts (25–65% decrease. The mechanical properties of composites were either preserved, or slightly improved. All results were compared to standard injection molded softwood WPC.

  14. Evidence of Anti-Proliferative Activities in Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis By-Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Elise Carbonneau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Shellfish waste components contain significant levels of high quality protein and are therefore a potential source for biofunctional high-value peptides. The feasibility of applying a pilot scale enzymatic hydrolysis process to whole Mytilus edulis and, by fractionation, recover hydrolysates presenting a biological activity of interest, was evaluated. Fractions were tested on four immortalized cancerous cell lines: A549, BT549, HCT15 and PC3. The 50 kDa fraction, enriched in peptides, presented anti-proliferative activity with all cell lines and results suggest a bioactive molecule synergy within the fraction. At a protein concentration of 44 µg/mL, the 50 kDa fraction induced a mortality of 90% for PC3, 89% for A549, 85% for HCT15 and of 81% for BT549 cell lines. At the low protein concentration of only 11 µg/mL the 50 kDa fraction still entails a cell mortality of 76% for A549 and 87% for PC3 cell lines. The 50 kDa fraction contains 56% of proteins, 3% of lipids and 6% of minerals on a dry weight basis and the lowest levels detected of taurine and methionine and highest levels of threonine, proline and glycine amino acids. The enzymatic hydrolysis process suggests that Mytilus edulis by-products should be viewed as high-valued products with strong potential as anti-proliferative agent and promising active ingredients in functional foods.

  15. Anaerobic biodegradability of Category 2 animal by-products: methane potential and inoculum source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdniakova, Tatiana A; Costa, José C; Santos, Ricardo J; Alves, M M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2012-11-01

    Category 2 animal by-products that need to be sterilized with steam pressure according Regulation (EC) 1774/2002 are studied. In this work, 2 sets of experiments were performed in mesophilic conditions: (i) biomethane potential determination testing 0.5%, 2.0% and 5.0% total solids (TS), using sludge from the anaerobic digester of a wastewater treatment plant as inoculum; (ii) biodegradability tests at a constant TS concentration of 2.0% and different inoculum sources (digested sludge from a wastewater treatment plant; granular sludge from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor; leachate from a municipal solid waste landfill; and sludge from the slaughterhouse wastewater treatment anaerobic lagoon) to select the more adapted inoculum to the substrate in study. The higher specific methane production was of 317 mL CH(4)g(-1) VS(substrate) for 2.0% TS. The digested sludge from the wastewater treatment plant led to the lowest lag-phase period and higher methane potential rate.

  16. The trapping characteristic of low density polyethylene in the presence of crosslinking by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Nuriziani; Chen, George

    2009-08-01

    The by-products of dicumyl peroxide (DCP) from the crosslinking process such as acetophenone, cumyl alcohol and α-methylstyrene are said to be the sources of space charge formation in XLPE cable due to deep traps in the chemicals. However, by using space-charge-experimental approach, it appeared that these chemicals show a different trapping nature. This paper is intended to present this approach. Additive-free low density polyethylene (LDPE) was used as base material so that each chemical can be tested individually. Space charge measurement was done using the pulse electroacoustic (PEA) method. All results were compared to the clean LDPE to identify the contribution of the chemicals to the trapping characteristic. The data collected supported that although the chemicals introduce charge in the insulator, the charge decay is extremely fast especially in the presence of α-methylstyrene. It is believed that the chemicals modify the trapping characteristic of LDPE so that more shallow traps are formed in the insulator.

  17. The trapping characteristic of low density polyethylene in the presence of crosslinking by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussin, Nuriziani; Chen, George, E-mail: nh07r@ecs.soton.ac.u [School of Electronics and Computer Science University Of Southampton, SO16 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    The by-products of dicumyl peroxide (DCP) from the crosslinking process such as acetophenone, cumyl alcohol and {alpha}-methylstyrene are said to be the sources of space charge formation in XLPE cable due to deep traps in the chemicals. However, by using space-charge-experimental approach, it appeared that these chemicals show a different trapping nature. This paper is intended to present this approach. Additive-free low density polyethylene (LDPE) was used as base material so that each chemical can be tested individually. Space charge measurement was done using the pulse electroacoustic (PEA) method. All results were compared to the clean LDPE to identify the contribution of the chemicals to the trapping characteristic. The data collected supported that although the chemicals introduce charge in the insulator, the charge decay is extremely fast especially in the presence of {alpha}-methylstyrene. It is believed that the chemicals modify the trapping characteristic of LDPE so that more shallow traps are formed in the insulator.

  18. Addressing Facts and Gaps in the Phenolics Chemistry of Winery By-Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson F. L. Machado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Grape and wine phenolics display a noticeable structural diversity, encompassing distinct compounds ranging from simple molecules to oligomers, as well as polymers usually designated as tannins. Since these compounds contribute critically to the organoleptic properties of wines, their analysis and quantification are of primordial importance for winery industry operators. Besides, the occurrence of these compounds has been also extensively described in winery residues, which have been pointed as a valuable source of bioactive phytochemicals presenting potential for the development of new added value products that could fit the current market demands. Therefore, the cumulative knowledge generated during the last decades has allowed the identification of the most promising compounds displaying interesting biological functions, as well as the chemical features responsible for the observed bioactivities. In this regard, the present review explores the scope of the existing knowledge, concerning the compounds found in these winery by-products, as well as the chemical features presumably responsible for the biological functions already identified. Moreover, the present work will hopefully pave the way for further actions to develop new powerful applications to these materials, thus, contributing to more sustainable valorization procedures and the development of newly obtained compounds with enhanced biological properties.

  19. Formation of disinfection by-products in the ultraviolet/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ding; Bolton, James R; Andrews, Susan A; Hofmann, Ron

    2015-06-15

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) formation may be a concern when applying ultraviolet light and free chlorine (UV/chlorine) as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) for drinking water treatment, due to typically large chlorine doses (e.g. 5-10 mg L(-1) as free chlorine). A potential mitigating factor is the low chlorine contact times for this AOP treatment (e.g. seconds). Full-scale and pilot-scale test results showed minimal trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetic acid (HAA) formation during UV/chlorine treatment, while dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) were produced rapidly. Adsorbable organic halide (AOX) formation was significant when applying the UV/chlorine process in water that had not been previously chlorinated, while little additional formation was observed in prechlorinated water. Chlorine photolysis led to chlorate and bromate formation, equivalent to approximately 2-17% and 0.01-0.05% of the photolyzed chlorine, respectively. No perchlorate or chlorite formation was observed. During simulated secondary disinfection of AOP-treated water, DBP formation potential for THMs, HAAs, HANs, and AOX was observed to increase approximately to the same extent as was observed for pretreatment using the more common AOP of UV combined with hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2).

  20. Tracking disinfection by-products and arsenic removal during various drinking water treatment trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubić, Aleksandra; Dalmacija, Bozo; Agbaba, Jasmina; Ivancev-Tumbas, Ivana; Klasnja, Mile; Dalmacija, Milena

    2010-01-01

    In the central Banat region (Northern Serbia), groundwater is used as a drinking water source. Raw water originates from a 40-80 m and 100-150 m deep layer. It contains a high amount of natural organic matter (DOC = 9.17+/-0.87 mg C/L) with a trihalomethanes formation potential of 448+/-88.2 microg/L and a haloacetic acid formation potential of 174+/-68.9 microg/L. A high amount of arsenic (86.0+/-3.4 microg/L) is also found in this water. This study used a pilot-scale system to investigate the possibilities of combining polyaluminium chloride and ferrous-chloride to remove disinfection by-products precursors and arsenic by coagulation. Two treatment trains with different pre-treatment steps were investigated (ozone vs. H2O2/O3). For the final water polishing, filtration with granulated activated carbon (GAC) was applied. Both investigated treatment lines achieved a satisfactory chemical water quality. Simulation of disinfection conditions was performed and the contents of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids measured, to investigate whether the chemical quality of the water remained satisfactory over a 48 hour period.

  1. The influence of pomegranate by-product and punicalagins on selected groups of human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialonska, Dobroslawa; Ramnani, Priya; Kasimsetty, Sashi G; Muntha, Kesava R; Gibson, Glenn R; Ferreira, Daneel

    2010-06-15

    We have examined the gut bacterial metabolism of pomegranate by-product (POMx) and major pomegranate polyphenols, punicalagins, using pH-controlled, stirred, batch culture fermentation systems reflective of the distal region of the human large intestine. Incubation of POMx or punicalagins with faecal bacteria resulted in formation of the dibenzopyranone-type urolithins. The time course profile confirmed the tetrahydroxylated urolithin D as the first product of microbial transformation, followed by compounds with decreasing number of phenolic hydroxy groups: the trihydroxy analogue urolithin C and dihydroxylated urolithin A. POMx exposure enhanced the growth of total bacteria, Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp., without influencing the Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group and the C. histolyticum group. In addition, POMx increased concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) viz. acetate, propionate and butyrate in the fermentation medium. Punicalagins did not affect the growth of bacteria or production of SCFA. The results suggest that POMx oligomers, composed of gallic acid, ellagic acid and glucose units, may account for the enhanced growth of probiotic bacteria.

  2. Simultaneous Control of Microorganisms and Disinfection By-products by Sequential Chlorination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO CHEN; XIAO-JIAN ZHANG; WEN-JIE HE; HONG-DA HAN

    2007-01-01

    Objective To introduce a new sequential chlorination disinfection process in which short-term free chlorine and chloramine are sequentially added. Methods Pilot tests of this sequential chlorination were carried out in a drinking water plant. Results The sequential chlorination disinfection process had the same or better efficiency on microbe (including virus)inactivation compared with the free chlorine disinfection process. There seemed to be some synergetic disinfection effect between free chlorine and monochloramine because they attacked different targets. The sequential chlorination disinfection process resulted in 35.7%-77.0% TTHM formation and 36.6%-54.8% THAA5 formation less than the free chlorination process.The poorer the water quality was, the more advantage the sequential chlorination disinfection had over the free chlorination.Conclusion This process takes advantages of free chlorine's quick inactivation of microorganisms and chloramine's low disinfection by-product (DBP) yield and long-term residual effect, allowing simultaneous control of microbes and DBPs in an effective and economic way.

  3. Disinfection by-products in filter backwash water: implications to water quality in recycle designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, N J; Porter, M; Walsh, M E

    2010-08-01

    The overall purpose of this research was to investigate disinfection by-product (DBP) concentrations and formation potential in filter backwash water (FBWW) and evaluate at bench-scale the potential impact of untreated FBWW recycle on water quality in conventional drinking water treatment. Two chlorinated organic compound groups of DBPs currently regulated in North America were evaluated, specifically trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). FBWW samples were collected from four conventional filtration water treatment plants (WTP) in Nova Scotia, Canada, in three separate sampling and plant audit campaigns. THM and HAA formation potential tests demonstrated that the particulate organic material contained within FBWW is available for reaction with chlorine to form DBPs. The results of the study found higher concentrations of TTHMs and HAA9s in FBWW samples from two of the plants that target a higher free chlorine residual in the wash water used to clean the filters (e.g., clearwell) compared to the other two plants that target a lower clear well free chlorine residual concentration. Bench-scale experiments showed that FBWW storage time and conditions can impact TTHM concentrations in these waste streams, suggesting that optimization opportunities exist to reduce TTHM concentrations in FBWW recycle streams prior to blending with raw water. However, mass balance calculations demonstrated that FBWW recycle practice by blending 10% untreated FBWW with raw water prior to coagulation did not impact DBP concentrations introduced to the rapid mix stage of a plant's treatment train.

  4. Biofuel Production by Fermentation of Water Plants and Agricultural Lignocellulosic by-Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anker Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While at present most energy crops are depriving human feedstock, fermentation of agricultural residues and fast growing water plants possesses a good prospect to become a significant source for bio-fuel; as both substrates are widely available and do not require agricultural areas. Water hyacinth for instance can be cultivated in fresh, brackish or wastewater and owing to its rapid growth and availability. Since owing to its natural abundance it is considered to be an invasive plant in most continents, its utilization and use as a renewable energy source may also contribute for its dilution and control. Agricultural lignocellulosic surplus by-products are also a promising fermentable substrate for bioethanol production, as it decreases both disposal expenses and greenhouse gases emissions. This paper describes a scheme and methodology for transformation of any lignocellulosic biomass into biofuel by simple cost effective operation scheme, integrating an innovative process of mechanochemical activation pre-treatment followed by fermentation of the herbal digest and ethanol production through differential distillation. Under this approach several complex and costly staged of conventional ethanol production scheme may be replaced and by genetic engineering of custom fermenting microorganisms the fermentation process becomes a fully continuous industrial process.

  5. Modulation of brown adipocyte activity by milk by-products: Stimulation of brown adipogenesis by buttermilk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Hiroki; Kida, Ryosuke; Muto, Kengo; Nara, Takayuki Y; Kato, Ken; Hashimoto, Osamu; Kawada, Teruo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-12-01

    Brown adipocytes dissipate chemical energy in the form of heat through the expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1); Ucp1 expression is further upregulated by the stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors in brown adipocytes. An increase in energy expenditure by activated brown adipocytes potentially contributes to the prevention of or therapeutics for obesity. The present study examined the effects of milk by-products, buttermilk and butter oil, on brown adipogenesis and the function of brown adipocytes. The treatment with buttermilk modulated brown adipogenesis, depending on the product tested; during brown adipogenesis, buttermilk 1 inhibited the differentiation of HB2 brown preadipocytes. In contrast, buttermilk 3 and 5 increased the expression of Ucp1 in the absence of isoproterenol (Iso), a β-adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting the stimulation of brown adipogenesis. In addition, the Iso-induced expression of Ucp1 was enhanced by buttermilk 2 and 3. The treatment with buttermilk did not affect the basal or induced expression of Ucp1 by Iso in HB2 brown adipocytes, except for buttermilk 5, which increased the basal expression of Ucp1. Conversely, butter oil did not significantly affect the expression of Ucp1, irrespective of the cell phase of HB2 cells, ie, treatment during brown adipogenesis or of brown adipocytes. The results of the present study indicate that buttermilk is a regulator of brown adipogenesis and suggest its usefulness as a potential food material for antiobesity.

  6. The epidemiology and possible mechanisms of disinfection by-products in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Grellier, James; Smith, Rachel; Iszatt, Nina; Bennett, James; Best, Nicky; Toledano, Mireille

    2009-10-13

    This paper summarizes the epidemiological evidence for adverse health effects associated with disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water and describes the potential mechanism of action. There appears to be good epidemiological evidence for a relationship between exposure to DBPs, as measured by trihalomethanes (THMs), in drinking water and bladder cancer, but the evidence for other cancers including colorectal cancer is inconclusive and inconsistent. There appears to be some evidence for an association between exposure to DBPs, specifically THMs, and little for gestational age/intrauterine growth retardation and, to a lesser extent, pre-term delivery, but evidence for relationships with other outcomes such as low birth weight, stillbirth, congenital anomalies and semen quality is inconclusive and inconsistent. Major limitations in exposure assessment, small sample sizes and potential biases may account for the inconclusive and inconsistent results in epidemiological studies. Moreover, most studies have focused on total THMs as the exposure metric, whereas other DBPs appear to be more toxic than the THMs, albeit generally occurring at lower levels in the water. The mechanisms through which DBPs may cause adverse health effects including cancer and adverse reproductive effects have not been well investigated. Several mechanisms have been suggested, including genotoxicity, oxidative stress, disruption of folate metabolism, disruption of the synthesis and/or secretion of placental syncytiotrophoblast-derived chorionic gonadotropin and lowering of testosterone levels, but further work is required in this area.

  7. Formation of disinfection by-products after pre-oxidation with chlorine dioxide or ferrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Guo, Wanhong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Feng; Ye, Tingjin; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    The effect of pre-oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) or ferrate (Fe(VI)) on the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination or chloramination was tested with natural waters from 12 sources (9 surface waters, 1 groundwater, and 2 wastewater effluents). DBPs investigated included trihalomethanes (THM), chloral hydrate (CH), haloketones (HK), haloacetonitriles (HAN) and trichloronitromethane (TCNM), chlorite and chlorate. Chlorite and chlorate were found in the ClO2-treated waters. Application of 1 mg/L ClO2 ahead of chlorination reduced the formation potential for THM by up to 45% and the formation of HK, HAN and TCNM in most of the samples. The CH formation results were mixed. The formation of CH and HK was enhanced with low doses of Fe(VI) (1 mg/L as Fe), but was greatly reduced at higher doses (20 mg/L Fe). Fe(VI) reduced the formation of THM, HAN and TCNM in most of the samples. Reduced potential for the formation of NDMA was observed in most of the samples after both ClO2 and Fe(VI) pre-oxidation.

  8. Chitin and chitosan from the Norway lobster by-products: Antimicrobial and anti-proliferative activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayari, Nadhem; Sila, Assaâd; Abdelmalek, Baha Eddine; Abdallah, Rihab Ben; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Bougatef, Ali; Balti, Rafik

    2016-06-01

    Chitin was recovered through enzymatic deproteinization of the Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) processing by-products. The obtained chitin was characterized and converted into chitosan by N-deacetylation, the acid-soluble form of chitin. Chitosan samples were then characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 13 Cross polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS)-NMR spectroscopy. The antimicrobial activity and anti-proliferative capacity of chitosan were evaluated. Antimicrobial activity assays indicated that prepared chitosan exhibited marked inhibitory activity against the bacterial and fungal strains tested. Further, cytotoxic effects of chitosan samples on human colon carcinoma cells HCT116 was evaluated using the MTT assay. Chitosan showed the antiproliferative capacity against the colon-cancer-cell HCT116 in a dose dependent manner with IC50 of 4.6mg/ml. Indeed, HCT116 cell proliferation was significantly inhibited (p<0.05) between 13.5 and 67.5% at 0.5-6mg/mL of chitosan after 24h of cell treatment. The chitosan showed high antitumor activity which seemed to be dependent on its characteristics such as acetylation degree.

  9. Evaluation of several microcrystalline celluloses obtained from agricultural by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, John; Lopez, Alvin; Guisao, Santiago; Ortiz, Carlos

    2011-07-01

    Microcrystalline cellulose (MCCI) has been widely used as an excipient for direct compression due to its good flowability, compressibility, and compactibility. In this study, MCCI was obtained from agricultural by-products, such as corn cob, sugar cane bagasse, rice husk, and cotton by pursuing acid hydrolysis, neutralization, clarification, and drying steps. Further, infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, degree of polymerization (DP), and powder and tableting properties were evaluated and compared to those of Avicel PH101, Avicel PH102, and Avicel PH200. Except for the commercial products, all materials showed a DP from 55 to 97. Particles of commercial products and corn cob had an irregular shape, whereas bagasse particles were elongated and thick. Rice and cotton particles exhibited a flake-like and fiber-like shape, respectively. MCCI as obtained from rice husk and cotton was the most densified material, while that produced from corn cob and bagasse was bulky, porous, and more compressible. All products had a moisture content of less than 10% and yields from 7.4% to 60.4%. MCCI as obtained from bagasse was the most porous and compressible material among all materials. This product also showed the best tableting properties along with Avicel products. Likewise, all MCCI products obtained from the above-mentioned sources showed a more rapid disintegration time than that of Avicel products. These materials can be used as a potential source of MCCI in the production of solid dosage forms.

  10. Fatty acids and algal lipids as precursors of chlorination by-products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Liang; Yuen Shan Lui; Huachang Hong

    2012-01-01

    Six common algal fatty acids (FAs) with different numbers of double bonds,lipophilic fractions and proteins extracted from the diatom Navicula pelliculosa and algal cells were chlorinated to evaluate their potential in generating disinfection by-products (DBPs).The result showed that the more double bonds in the FAs,the higher the amounts of chloroform and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) produced,but such a pattern was not observed for trichloroacetic acid (TCAA).Based on the previously reported composition of fatty acids in algal lipids,the DBP generation potentials of algal lipids were calculated.These predicted values were much lower than those measured in the chlorinated algal lipophilic fraction,suggesting unknown lipophilic fraction(s) served as potent DBPs precursors.Another calculation attempted to predict DBP production in algal cells based on algal lipid and protein composition,given quantified measured DBP production per unit algal lipid and proteins.The analysis showed that the observed DBP production was similar to that predicted (< 35% difference),suggesting that algal biochemical compositions may serve as a bioindicator for preliminary estimation of chloroform,DCAA and TCAA formation upon chlorinating algae.

  11. Production of bioethanol and associated by-products from potato starch residue stream by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashem, Mohamed [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Biological Science Department, P.O. Box 10255, Abha 61321 (Saudi Arabia); Darwish, Soumia M.I. [Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Assiut University (Egypt)

    2010-07-15

    Potato starch residue stream produced during chips manufacturing was used as an economical source for biomass and bioethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results demonstrated that 1% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 100 C for 1 h was enough to hydrolyze all starch contained in the residue stream. Two strains of S. cerevisiae (y-1646 and commercial one) were able to utilize and ferment the acid-treated residue stream under both aerobic and semi-anaerobic conditions. The maximum yield of ethanol (5.52 g L{sup -1}) was achieved at 35 C by S. cerevisiae y-1646 after 36 h when ZnCl{sub 2} (0.4 g L{sup -1}) was added. Addition of NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} as a source of nitrogen did not significantly affect either growth or ethanol production by S. cerevisiae y-1646. Some secondary by-products including alcohol derivatives and medical active compound were found to be associated with the ethanol production process. (author)

  12. Use of coal combustion by-products for solidification/stabilization of hazardous wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassett, D.J.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

    1997-05-01

    Five low-rank coal combustion fly ash samples extensively characterized in previous projects were used as a pool of candidate materials for potential use as waste stabilization agents. Two of these fly ash samples were selected because ettringite formed in the solid in long-term leaching experiments, and an associated reduction in leachate concentration of at least one trace element was noted for each sample. The stabilization experiments were designed to evaluate the removal of relatively high concentrations of boron and selenium from a simulated wastewater. Sulfate was added as one variable in order to determine if high concentrations of sulfate would impact the ability of the ettringite to include trace elements in its structure. The following conclusions can be drawn from the information obtained in this research: CCBs (coal combustion by-products) can be useful in the chemical fixation of potentially hazardous trace elements; indication of ettringite formation alone is not adequate for selecting a CCB for waste stabilization applications; moderate sulfate concentrations do not promote or inhibit trace element sorption; ettringite formation mechanisms may impact trace element fixation and need to be elucidated; laboratory demonstration of the CCB with the stabilization process being proposed is necessary to verify the efficacy of the material and process; and the final waste form must be evaluated prior to management according to the required regulatory procedures.

  13. Application of by-products in the development of foodstuffs for particular nutritional uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislava Matejová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to test potential by-product utilization in the development of foodstuffs for people intolerant for gluten. In this work were used three kinds of pomace – apple, buckwheat and grape (varieties Alibernet and Cabernet. Obtained dried pomace was applied into the baking products in ratio 5%, 10% and 15%. Apple and buckwheat pomace were applied into the breads and grape pomace were used in biscuits. The obtained products were sensory evaluated and texture analysis was used for determination of firmness. In terms of overall quality of tested breads, the evaluators indicated that bread with 5% addition of buckwheat pomace was the sample with the highest quality and from biscuit category products with 5% addition of grape pomace (Alibernet were shown to be the best. Regarding the texture determination the highest firmness showed a control sample in the case of biscuits and with the addition of pomace into the biscuits product firmness decreased. Contrary, in case of breads with the addition of pomace, the firmness increased. The results of texture analysis were statistically evaluated by non-parametric Wilcoxon test, among the samples there was no statistical significant difference found.

  14. Local agro-industrial by-products with potential use in Ghanaian aquaculture: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obirikorang, Kwasi Adu; Amisah, Stephen; Fialor, Simon Cudjoe

    2015-01-01

    The inability of Ghana’s capture-based fisheries to meet national demand has placed aquaculture in an advantageous position to satisfy this supply deficit. The majority of fish farmers in Ghana, however, resort to local feed mixtures, occasionally in combination with commercial aquafeeds, demonst......The inability of Ghana’s capture-based fisheries to meet national demand has placed aquaculture in an advantageous position to satisfy this supply deficit. The majority of fish farmers in Ghana, however, resort to local feed mixtures, occasionally in combination with commercial aquafeeds......, demonstrating that the sector has not yet reached its full potential in terms of production volumes and efficiency. Fish meal is available in limited quantities and is prohibitively expensive in Ghana, making it essential to develop suitable complete and supplementary diets using low-cost and locally available...... plant by-products for use in fish grow-out facilities, particularly in tilapia production, which accounts for over 80 % of aquaculture production. This review thus identifies local agro-industrial byproducts with potential use in fish feeds based on their nutritional composition, total annual production...

  15. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.

    2003-09-12

    Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

  16. Control of disinfection by-product formation using ozone-based advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chung; Wang, Yu-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    The effects of ozone dosage, water temperature and catalyst addition in an ozonation-fluidized bed reactor (O3/FBR) on treated water quality and on the control of chlorinated and ozonated disinfection by-products (DBPs) were investigated. A biofiltration column was used to evaluate its removal efficiency on biodegradable organic matter and to reduce DBP formation. The Dong-Gang River, polluted by agricultural and domestic wastewater in Pingtung, Taiwan, was used as the water source. The treated water quality in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biodegradable DOC, ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) and specific UV absorbance (SUVA) improved with increasing ozone and catalyst dosages. Catalytic ozonation was more effective than ozonation alone at reducing the formation of DBPs at a given dosage. Experimental results show that water temperature had little effect on the treated water quality with the O3/FBR system used in this study (p > 0.05). The combination of O3/FBR and the biofiltration process effectively decreased the amount ofDBP precursors. The concentration of total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) was less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) requirement, which is 80 microg/L, for all treated waters and the concentration of five haloacetic acids (HAA5) fell below 60 microg/L with an ozone dosage higher than 2.5 mg/L.

  17. Removal of disinfection by-product precursors with ozone-UV advanced oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, A; Bérubé, P R

    2005-05-01

    The efficacy of using ozone (O3), ultraviolet irradiation (UV) and the combined O3-UV advanced oxidation process (AOP) to remove 2 classes of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors from raw surface water samples have been evaluated and compared. In particular, trihalomethane and haloacetic acids formation potentials were measured. Laboratory batch scale experiments were carried out as a function of ozone and UV dosage in order to study the removal kinetics. It is concluded that the combined O3-UV AOP is more effective than either the ozone or UV treatment alone. Ozone-UV AOP is capable of mineralizing up to 50% of the total organic carbon from the raw source water at an ozone dose of 0.62+/-0.019 mg O3/mL and a UV dose of 1.61 W s/cm2. In addition, O3-UV AOP can reduce trihalomethane formation potential by roughly 80% and haloacetic acids formation potential by roughly 70% at the same ozone and UV dosage.

  18. Evaluation of several microcrystalline celluloses obtained from agricultural by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rojas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystalline cellulose (MCCI has been widely used as an excipient for direct compression due to its good flowability, compressibility, and compactibility. In this study, MCCI was obtained from agricultural by-products, such as corn cob, sugar cane bagasse, rice husk, and cotton by pursuing acid hydrolysis, neutralization, clarification, and drying steps. Further, infrared spectroscopy (IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, optical microscopy, degree of polymerization (DP, and powder and tableting properties were evaluated and compared to those of Avicel PH101, Avicel PH102, and Avicel PH200. Except for the commercial products, all materials showed a DP from 55 to 97. Particles of commercial products and corn cob had an irregular shape, whereas bagasse particles were elongated and thick. Rice and cotton particles exhibited a flake-like and fiber-like shape, respectively. MCCI as obtained from rice husk and cotton was the most densified material, while that produced from corn cob and bagasse was bulky, porous, and more compressible. All products had a moisture content of less than 10% and yields from 7.4% to 60.4%. MCCI as obtained from bagasse was the most porous and compressible material among all materials. This product also showed the best tableting properties along with Avicel products. Likewise, all MCCI products obtained from the above-mentioned sources showed a more rapid disintegration time than that of Avicel products. These materials can be used as a potential source of MCCI in the production of solid dosage forms.

  19. Eco-Materials Made From Industrial By-Products and Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, S.

    2007-03-01

    The eco-materials made from steel-making slag and carbon dioxide are introduced. Steel-making slag is one of industrial by-products and it has been wanted to be used in more beneficial way. Carbon dioxide is also wanted to be decreased the emission for green house effects. The materials made with steel-making slag by carbonation have very high strength and very high durability for hydration and abrasion. Mechanisms of carbonation reaction is discussed, in which the effects of water content, temperature, porosity of compacts, gas content and pressure, etc. are discussed. The compressive strength was obtained about 100 MPa at a porosity of 10 volume %these carbonated blocks have higher abrasion resistance than hydrated cement pastes. The most benefit in this process is no energy is required for the reaction except that of grinding, handling and/or transportation of materials. The exhaust gas from plant will be available for the source of carbon dioxide. Lastly, Marine block, matrix of glass fiber reinforced concrete, and artificial aggregate are introduced as application examples.

  20. PHYTOAVAILABILITY OF COPPER IN INDUSTRIAL BY-PRODUCTS AND MINERAL FERTILIZERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Prado Cenciani de Souza

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alternative copper (Cu sources could be used in fertilizer production, although the bioavailability of copper in these materials is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the extractants neutral ammonium citrate (NAC, 2 % citric acid, 1 % acetic acid, 10 % HCl, 10 % H2SO4, buffer solution pH 6.0, DTPA, EDTA, water, and hot water in the quantification of available Cu content in several sources, relating them to the relative agronomic efficiency (RAE of wheat grown in a clayey Latossolo Vermelho eutrófico (Oxisol and Neossolo Quartzarênico (Typic Quartzipsamment. Copper was applied at the rate of 1.5 mg kg-1 as scrap slag, brass slag, Cu ore, granulated copper, and copper sulfate. The extractants 10 % HCl, 10 % H2SO4, and NAC extracted higher Cu concentrations. The RAE values of brass slag and Cu ore were similar to or higher than those of Cu sulfate and granulated Cu. Solubility in the 2nd NAC extractant, officially required for mineral fertilizers with Cu, was lower than 60 % for the scrap slag, Cu ore, and granulated copper sources. This fact indicates that adoption of the NAC extractant may be ineffective for industrial by-products, although no extractant was more efficient in predicting Cu availability for wheat fertilized with the Cu sources tested.

  1. Evidence of arsenic release promoted by disinfection by-products within drinking-water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Botsaris, George; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Kalyvas, Harris; Costa, Costas N

    2014-02-15

    Changes in disinfectant type could trigger a cascade of reactions releasing pipe-anchored metals/metalloids into finished water. However, the effect of pre-formed disinfection by-products on the release of sorbed contaminants (arsenic-As in particular) from drinking water distribution system pipe scales remains unexplored. A bench-scale study using a factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the independent and interaction effects of trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids (HAA) on arsenic (As) release from either scales-only or scale-biofilm conglomerates (SBC) both anchored on asbestos/cement pipe coupons. A model biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was allowed to grow on select pipe coupons prior experimentation. Either TTHM or HAA individual dosing did not promote As release from either scales only or SBC, detecting water. In the case of scales-only coupons, the combination of the highest spike level of TTHM and HAA significantly (pdisinfected finished water in pipe networks remains to be investigated in the field.

  2. Removal of disinfection by-products formation potential by biologically intensified process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Dong; LI Wei-guang; CUI Fu-yi; HE Xin; ZHANG Jin-song

    2005-01-01

    The removal of disinfection by-products formation potential(DBPFP) in artificially intensified biological activated carbon(IBAC) process which is developed on the basis of traditional ozone granular activated carbon was evaluated. By IBAC removals of 31% and 68% for THMFP and HAAFP were obtained respectively. Under identical conditions, the removals of the same substances were 4% and 32% respectively only by the granular activated carbon(GAC) process. Compared with GAC, the high removal rates of the two formed potential substances were due to the increasing of bioactivity of the media and the synergistic capabilities of biological degradation cooperating with activated carbon adsorption of organic compounds. A clear linear correlation ( R2 = 0.9562 and R2 = 0.9007) between DOC HAAFP removal rate and Empty Bed Contact Time(EBCT) of IBAC process was observed, while that between THMFP removal rate and EBCT of GAC was R2 = 0.9782. In addition certain linear correlations between THMFP, HAAFP and UV254 ( R2 = 0.855 and R2 = 0.7702) were found for the treated water. For IBAC process there are also more advantages such as long backwashing cycle time, low backwashing intensity and prolonging activated carbon lifetime and so on.

  3. Ion-cyclotron instability in plasmas described by product-bi-kappa distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, M. S. dos; Ziebell, L. F., E-mail: luiz.ziebell@ufrgs.br; Gaelzer, R., E-mail: rudi.gaelzer@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Caixa Postal 15051, CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-12-15

    The dispersion relation for parallel propagating waves in the ion-cyclotron branch is investigated numerically by considering that the velocity distribution of the ion population is a function of type product-bi-kappa. We investigate the effects of the non-thermal features and of the anisotropy associated with this type of distribution on the ion-cyclotron instability, as well as the influence of different forms of the electron distribution, by considering Maxwellian distributions, bi-kappa distributions, and product-bi-kappa distributions. The cases of ions described by either Maxwellian or bi-kappa distributions are also considered, for comparison. The results of the numerical analysis show that the increase in the non-thermal character associated with the anisotropic kappa distributions for ions contributes to enhance the instability as compared to that obtained in the Maxwellian case, in magnitude and in wave number range, with more significant enhancement for the case of ion product-bi-kappa distributions than for the case of ion bi-kappa distributions. It is also shown that the ion-cyclotron instability is decreased if the electrons are described by product-bi-kappa distributions, while electrons described by bi-kappa distributions lead to growth rates which are very similar to those obtained considering a Maxwellian distribution for the electron population.

  4. In situ detection of lipid peroxidation by-products in chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, V; Kollinger, M; Fabre, M; Holstege, A; Poynard, T; Bedossa, P

    1997-07-01

    Lipid peroxidation is an autocatalytic mechanism leading to oxidative destruction of cellular membranes. The deleterious consequences of this mechanism are related in part to the formation of reactive aldehydic products that bind to intra- or extracellular molecules to form adducts. Specific antibodies directed against malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) adducts, major aldehydic metabolites of lipid peroxidation, allowed us to investigate in situ, with an immunohistochemical procedure, the occurrence of lipid peroxidation in a panel of different chronic liver diseases. Intracellular HNE and MDA adducts were detected respectively in 24 of 39 cases (62%) and in 12 of 34 cases investigated (35%). They were localized mainly in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes, with the strongest staining observed in hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, and in areas of acute alcoholic hepatitis in cases of alcoholic liver diseases. A peculiar pattern of immunostaining was observed in primary biliary cirrhosis where biliary cells of destroyed but also intact bile ducts strongly expressed HNE adducts. The liver extracellular matrix also displayed MDA adducts (30 of 34 cases, 88%) and HNE adducts (23 of 39 cases, 59%). While HNE adducts were specifically localized on large bundles of collagen fibers, MDA adducts were detected in a thin reticular network and in sinusoidal cells around portal tracts or fibrous septa. In conclusion, lipid peroxidation by-products are detectable in chronic liver diseases. Immunohistochemical results suggest that this mechanism is implicated very early in the pathogenesis of some of these diseases.

  5. Ordinary Toxicity of Chlorine Dioxide and By-products Chlorite and Chlorate in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 常爱敏; 黄君礼

    2003-01-01

    Acute toxicity and accumulated toxicity of chlorine dioxide (C1O2) and by-products chlorite ( C1O-2 ) and chlorate (C1O-3) in water acted on mice are studied by the method of Horn and accumulation coefficient.Subchronic toxicity of the mixture of C1O2 and C1O-2 and ClO-3 in water acted on rat is studied though feeding test for 90 days, including statistical analysis of variance on weight gaining, food utilization efficiency, index of blood and serum, liver (or kidney)to body weight ratio, and histopathological examination on liver and kidney. The results show that aqueous solution of C1O2, NaC1O2 and NaC1O3 (with the concentration of 276. 5 mg/L, 200 mg/L and 200 mg/L respectively) and the mixed aqueous solution of C1O2 with the concentration of 553 mg/L are actually non poisonous, and non-cumulative aqueous solution as well.

  6. Separation of Nitration By-Products in Commercial-Grade Trinitro-Toluene by High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    MRL-TN-464 SEPARATION OF NITRATION BY-PRODUCTS IN COMMERCIAL-GRADE TITR-TOLUENE BY HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY Peter J. Sanders ABSTRACT...UNCLASSIFIED TITLE SEPARATION OF NITRATION BY-PRODUCTS IN COMMERCIAL-GRADE TRXNITRO-TOLUENE BY HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY AUTHOR(S...PRODUCTS IN COMMERCIAL-GRADE TRINITRO-TOLUENE BY HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY 16 INTRODUCTION Fbr some time, a need has existed for the

  7. Developmental Toxicity of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products to Embryos of the African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-10

    developmental toxicity tests with embryos of the South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis used to evaluate four individual DWDB; bromodichloromethane...SUBJECT TERMS Developmental toxicity; FETAX; water disinfection by-products; frogs ; Xenopus laevis; embryo malformations; embryo mortality...Disinfection By-Products to Embryos of the African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis) L. M. Brennan,1 M. W. Toussaint,1 D. M. Kumsher,1 W. E. Dennis,’ A. B

  8. By-products from ethanol production - the forgotten part of the equation. Possibilities and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinsted Jensen, H.; Bjoernsson, A.H.; Lind, K.M.

    2013-06-15

    Conventional bioethanol is produced from starch based feedstocks either via dry or wet milling, using typically maize or wheat. One by-product from bioethanol production is dried distiller's grain with solubles (DDGS), which has proven to be a valuable feed commodity for animal husbandry. Particularly, DDGS replaces expensive protein feed at a competitive price for farmers, which has hitherto led to a rapidly increasing market for distiller's grain with solubles in the US, who is by far the largest producer of grain-based bioethanol in the world. The US also exports DDGS since it has a long shelf-life and can therefore be shipped overseas. Exports of DDGS from the US are increasingly taking place with Asia but also Europe and South-America as international destinations. Studies indicate that the price of DDGS in the US follows the corn price and is roughly at the same price level, even though protein contents in distiller's grain with solubles are higher than for cereals. With this price relationship, feed diets incorporating DDGS produce cost savings for farmers. An example for a Danish dairy farm shows that with this price relationship profits would increase by around 5 % per dairy cow if DDGS is included in the fodder plan, accounting for roughly 10 % of the energy content. Given that the US exports large amounts of DDGS it would be expected that the price level in Denmark would be highly influenced by US export prices, if Danish farmers adopt DDGS in their feed rations. One major barrier for increased acceptance of DDGS by potential buyers/farmers is the absence of a standard for the product. Pre-tested and pre-blended food diets with DDGS could lead to greater certainty of effects and acceptance by farmers. This could presumably increase the price of DDGS from current levels, which is lower than the feed value appears to suggest, due to uncertainty around the product as well as varying quality of DDGS. When DDGS replaces traditional animal feed

  9. Biochars made from agro-industrial by-products remove chlorine and lower water toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzachristas, Andreas; Xirou, Maria; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Dailianis, Stefanos; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.

    2016-04-01

    Chlorination is the most common disinfection process for water and treated wastewater. For the industrial use of water in food production, chlorine can add undesired taste and odor to the final product. For this reason, dechlorination is desired for food industries that use municipal tap water. For treated wastewater discharge or reuse, chlorine can be toxic to the receiving aqueous systems and to the irrigated plants. In both the above cases, dechlorination is also required. Traditionally activated carbon has been used as the ideal material for the removal of chlorine. The main mechanisms that describe the interaction between activated carbon and HOCl or OCl- are described by the following equations (AWWA, 1990): HOCl + C* → C*O + H+ + Cl- (1), OCl- + C* → C*O + Cl- (2) Where C* and C*O represent the activated carbon surface and a surface oxide, respectively. The present study proposes the use of agro-industrial by-products for the production of biochars that will be used for dechlorination of tap-water used for food-industry production. Different raw materials such as malt spent rootlets, coffee residue, olive and grape seeds, etc. are used for the production of biochar. Various temperatures and air-to-solid ratios are tested for optimizing biochar production. Batch tests as well as a column test are employed to study the dechlorination efficiency and kinetics of the different raw and biochar materials as well as those of commercial activated carbons. As chlorine concentration increases the removal also increases linearily. After 1 and 24 hours of contact the chlorine relative removal efficiencies for the biochar made from olive seeds are 50 and 77 ± 4%, respectively. It seems that the removal kinetics are faster during the first hour; then, removal continues but with a slower rate. Most of the biochars tested (with 3 mg of solid in 20 mL of chlorine solution at initial concentration Co=1.5 mg/L) demonstrated removal efficiencies with an average of 9.4 ± 0

  10. Fingerprinting the reactive toxicity pathways of 50 drinking water disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalter, Daniel; O'Malley, Elissa; von Gunten, Urs; Escher, Beate I

    2016-03-15

    A set of nine in vitro cellular bioassays indicative of different stages of the cellular toxicity pathway was applied to 50 disinfection by-products (DBPs) to obtain a better understanding of the commonalities and differences in the molecular mechanisms of reactive toxicity of DBPs. An Eschericia coli test battery revealed reactivity towards proteins/peptides for 64% of the compounds. 98% activated the NRf2-mediated oxidative stress response and 68% induced an adaptive stress response to genotoxic effects as indicated by the activation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. All DBPs reactive towards DNA in the E. coli assay and activating p53 also induced oxidative stress, confirming earlier studies that the latter could trigger DBP's carcinogenicity. The energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital ELUMO as reactivity descriptor was linearly correlated with oxidative stress induction for trihalomethanes (r(2)=0.98) and haloacetamides (r(2)=0.58), indicating that potency of these DBPs is connected to electrophilicity. However, the descriptive power was poor for haloacetic acids (HAAs) and haloacetonitriles (r(2) (0.80, indicating that HAAs' potency is connected to both, electrophilicity and speciation. Based on the activation of oxidative stress response and the soft electrophilic character of most tested DBPs we hypothesize that indirect genotoxicity-e.g., through oxidative stress induction and/or enzyme inhibition-is more plausible than direct DNA damage for most investigated DBPs. The results provide not only a mechanistic understanding of the cellular effects of DBPs but the effect concentrations may also serve to evaluate mixture effects of DBPs in water samples.

  11. Genotoxic Effects in Swimmers Exposed to Disinfection By-products in Indoor Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Font-Ribera, Laia; Liviac, Danae; Bustamante, Mariona; Espinoza, Felicidad; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Espinosa, Aina; Fernandez, Pilar; DeMarini, David M.; Grimalt, Joan O.; Grummt, Tamara; Marcos, Ricard

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has been associated with cancer risk. A recent study (Villanueva et al. 2007; Am J Epidemiol 165:148–156) found an increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools relative to those not attending. Objectives We evaluated adults who swam in chlorinated pools to determine whether exposure to DBPs in pool water is associated with biomarkers of genotoxicity. Methods We collected blood, urine, and exhaled air samples from 49 nonsmoking adult volunteers before and after they swam for 40 min in an indoor chlorinated pool. We estimated associations between the concentrations of four trihalomethanes (THMs) in exhaled breath and changes in micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage (comet assay) in peripheral blood lymphocytes before and 1 hr after swimming; urine mutagenicity (Ames assay) before and 2 hr after swimming; and MN in exfoliated urothelial cells before and 2 weeks after swimming. We also estimated associations and interactions with polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair or to DBP metabolism. Results After swimming, the total concentration of the four THMs in exhaled breath was seven times higher than before swimming. The change in the frequency of micronucleated lymphocytes after swimming increased in association with higher exhaled concentrations of the brominated THMs (p = 0.03 for bromodichloromethane, p = 0.05 for chlorodibromomethane, p = 0.01 for bromoform) but not chloroform. Swimming was not associated with DNA damage detectable by the comet assay. Urine mutagenicity increased significantly after swimming, in association with the higher concentration of exhaled bromoform (p = 0.004). We found no significant associations with changes in micronucleated urothelial cells. Conclusions Our findings support potential genotoxic effects of exposure to DBPs from swimming pools. The positive health effects gained by swimming could be increased by reducing the potential health

  12. Evaluation of some by-Products using In situ and In vitro Gas Production Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besharati Maghsoud

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Food by-products in Iran are produced in high levels. In this study, in situ and in vitro gas production techniques were used to describe nutritive value of apple pomace, tomato pomace and noodle waste. For this purpose two ruminal fistulated sheep were used. Nylon bags which were approximately (6×12 cm containing 5 g samples (2 mm screen were incubated in duplicate in the rumen of fistulated sheep for 0,2,4,6,8,12,16,24,36 and 48 h. The gas production was recorded after 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 36 and 48 h of incubation and the equation of P = A (1-e-ct was used to describe the kinetics of gas production. The data was analyzed using completely randomized design. DM and CP disappearance were significantly different among feedstuffs (p<0.05. After 48 h of incubation DM disappearance in noodle waste was highest and in tomato pomace was lowest. Regarding to the results, at the most incubation times tomato pomace had lower CP disappearance among feedstuffs (p<0.05. Potential gas production (A and rates of gas production (c differed among feedstuffs. Apple pomace showed higher potential gas production (A (305.1 mL g1 DM and tomato pomace had higher rate of gas production (c (0.09 h1 than the other feedstuffs. According to gas production volume, the value for the ME, OMD and SCFA ranged from in 8.87 noodle waste to 9.76 in apple pomace, 56.1 in tomato pomace to 64.3 in apple pomace and 0.919 in noodle waste to 1.168 in apple pomace, respectively. Partitioning factor in noodle waste was highest and in tomato pomace was lowest. In the present study, feeds composition significantly affected the degradation parameters.

  13. Re-use of clean coal technology by-products in construction of low permeability liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, W.E.; Butalia, T.S.; Whitlatch, E.E.; Mitsch, W.

    2000-12-01

    This final project report presents the results of a research program conducted at The Ohio State University from October 1, 1996 to March 31, 2000 to investigate the use of stabilized flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials in the construction of low permeability liners. The small scale laboratory tests, medium scale mesocosm wetland experiments, and construction and monitoring of a full-scale FGD lined facility (capacity of one million gallons) shows that stabilized FGD materials can be used as low permeability liners in the construction of water and manure holding ponds, and constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment. Actual permeability coefficients in the range of 10{sup -7} cm/sec (3 x 10{sup -9} ft/sec) can be obtained in the field by properly compacting lime and fly ash enriched stabilized FGD materials. Leachate from the FGD material meets Ohio's non-toxic criteria for coal combustion by-products, and for most potential contaminants the national primary and secondary drinking water standards are also met. The low permeability non-toxic FGD material investigated in this study poses very minimal risks, if any, for groundwater contamination. Construction FGD-lined wetlands offer the opportunity for increased phosphorus retention giving rise to the potential use of these materials as a liners for wastewater treatment wetlands. While plant growth was observed to be less vigorous for FGD lined wetland mesocosms compared to the control, the above and below ground biomass were not significantly different. Cost estimates for FGD liners compared favourably with clay liners for varying haul distances.

  14. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  15. Fate of disinfection by-products in groundwater during aquifer storage and recovery with reclaimed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelic, Paul; Nicholson, Brenton C; Dillon, Peter J; Barry, Karen E

    2005-05-01

    Knowledge on the behaviour of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is limited even though this can be an important consideration where recovered waters are used for potable purposes. A reclaimed water ASR trial in an anoxic aquifer in South Australia has provided some of the first quantitative information at field-scale on the fate and transport of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). The results revealed that THM half-lives varied from storage phase of the trial, as compared to an observation well situated 4 m away, which remained nitrate-reducing. These findings agree with previous laboratory-based studies which also show persistence declining with increased bromination of THMs and reducing redox conditions. Modelling suggests that the chlorinated injectant has sufficient residual chlorine and natural organic matter for substantial increases in THMs to occur within the aquifer, however this is masked in some of the field observations due to concurrent attenuation, particularly for the more rapidly attenuated brominated compounds. The model is based on data taken from water distribution systems and may not be representative for ASR since bromide and ammonia concentrations in the injected water and the possible role of organic carbon in the aquifer were not taken into consideration. During the storage phase DBP formation potentials were reduced as a result of the removal of precursor material despite an increase in the THM formation potential per unit weight of total organic carbon. This suggests that water quality improvements with respect to THMs and HAAs can be achieved through ASR in anoxic aquifers.

  16. Aqueous photodegradation of 4-tert-butylphenol: By-products, degradation pathway and theoretical calculation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yanlin [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shi, Jin; Chen, Hongche [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention, Department of Environmental Science & Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhao, Jianfu [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dong, Wenbo, E-mail: wbdong@fudan.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention, Department of Environmental Science & Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2016-10-01

    4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP), an endocrine disrupting chemical, is widely distributed in natural bodies of water but is difficult to biodegrade. In this study, we focused on the transformation of 4-t-BP in photo-initiated degradation processes. The steady-state photolysis and laser flash photolysis (LFP) experiments were conducted in order to elucidate its degradation mechanism. Identification of products was performed using the GC–MS, LC-MS and theoretical calculation techniques. The oxidation pathway of 4-t-BP by hydroxyl radical (HO·) was also studied and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was added to produce HO·. 4-tert-butylcatechol and 4-tert-butylphenol dimer were produced in 4-t-BP direct photolysis. 4-tert-butylcatechol and hydroquinone were produced by the oxidation of HO·. But the formation mechanism of 4-tert-butylcatechol in the two processes was different. The benzene ring was fractured in 4-t-BP oxidation process and 29% of TOC was degraded after 16 h irradiation. - Highlights: • Photodegradation of 4-t-BP, an endocrine disrupting chemical, has been investigated. • 3 stable byproducts were identified from photolysis and oxidation processes. • 5 transient by-products were concluded from LFP experiments. • The theoretical calculation was performed to confirm the byproducts. • 4-t-BP was degraded with increasing efficiency: 254 nm < H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/313 nm < H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/254 nm.

  17. Bioanalytical and chemical evaluation of disinfection by-products in swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ruby Y L; Farré, Maria José; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Molendijk, Jeffrey; Escher, Beate I

    2014-08-01

    Pool water disinfection is vital to prevent microbial pathogens. However, potentially hazardous disinfection by-products (DBP) are formed from the reaction between disinfectants and organic/inorganic precursors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of DBPs in various swimming pool types in Brisbane, Australia, including outdoor, indoor and baby pools, and the dynamics after a complete water renewal. Chemical analysis of 36 regulated and commonly found DBPs and total adsorbable organic halogens as well as in vitro bioassays targeting cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity were used to evaluate swimming pool water quality. Dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid dominated in the pool water samples with higher levels (up to 2600 μg/L) than the health guideline values set by the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines (100 μg/L). Chlorinated DBPs occurred at higher concentrations compared to tap water, while brominated DBPs decreased gradually with increasing pool water age. Biological effects were expressed as chloroacetic acid equivalent concentrations and compared to predicted effects from chemical analysis and biological characterisation of haloacetic acids. The quantified haloacetic acids explained 35-118% of the absorbable organic halogens but less than 4% of the observed non-specific toxicity (cytotoxicity), and less than 1% of the observed oxidative stress response and genotoxicity. While the DBP concentrations in Australian pools found in this study are not likely to cause any adverse health effect, they are higher than in other countries and could be reduced by better hygiene of pool users, such as thorough showering prior to entering the pool and avoiding urination during swimming.

  18. Methylene Blue Removal by Biochars from Food Industry By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, Alexis; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.

    2016-04-01

    Biomass produced by food industries is mainly used as feedstock or in composting. In recent years, considerable research effort has been focused on the production of biochar under oxygen-limited conditions from carbon-rich biomass, such as food industry by-products, as mitigation measure for global warming once it is used as a soil amendment. The present study presents the findings of an experimental work, which investigated the use of different biochars for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Biochars were produced from malt spent rootlets (MSR) from brewering and espresso coffee residue from coffee shops. MSR was pyrolyzed at temperatures of 300, 400, 500, 750, 850, and 900oC and the coffee residue was pyrolyzed at 850oC. The charring process was performed under limited-oxygen conditions using specialized containers. The surface area and the porosity of the materials were determined. Batch experiments were conducted in order to evaluate the sorption capacity of the above materials, and samples were agitated for 24 h at 25oC, at an optimum pH of about 7. Kinetic analysis was conducted over a period of 24 h, and isotherm studies were also constructed. The surface area of biochar produced from MSR and the MB removal were considerably increased at pyrolysis temperatures higher than 500oC. At 850oC, the maximum surface area value (300 m2 g-1) was observed, and the MB sorption capacity was 99 mg g-1. Based on the kinetic experimental data, sorption capacities at 120 min were over 58% of their equilibrium values for the biochars used. The maximum MB sorption capacity, based on the isotherm data, was 130 mg g-1, for the two biochars employed.

  19. New perspectives on the cancer risks of trichloroethylene, its metabolites, and chlorination by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, K.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Slone, T.; Gold, L.S.; Manley, N.; Revzan, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-08

    Scientific developments in the 1990`s have important implications for the assessment of cancer risks posed by exposures to trichloroethylene (TCE). These new developments include: epidemiological studies; experimental studies of TCE carcinogenicity, metabolism and metabolite carcinogenicity; applications of new physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for TCE; and new pharmacodynamic data obtained for TCE and its rhetabolites. Following a review of previous assessments of TCE carcinogenicity, each of these new sets of developments is summarized. The new epidemiological data do not provide evidence of TCE carcinogenicity in humans, and the new pharmacodynamic data support the hypothesis that TCE carcinogenicity is caused by TCE-induced cytotoxicity. Based on this information, PBPK-based estimates for likely no-adverse effect levels (NOAELs) for human exposures to TCE are calculated to be 16 ppb for TCE in air respired 24 hr/day, and 210 ppb for TCE in drinking water. Cancer risks of zero are predicted for TCE exposures below these calculated NOAELs. For comparison, hypothetical cancer risks posed by lifetime ingestive and multiroute household exposures to TCE in drinking water, at the currently enforced Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) concentration of 5 ppb are extrapolated from animal bioassay data using a conservative, linear dose-response model. These TCE-related risks are compared to corresponding ones associated with concentrations of chlorination by-products (CBP) in household water. It is shown that, from the standpoint of comparative hypothetical cancer risks, based on conservative linear dose-response extrapolations, there would likely be no health benefit, and more likely a possible health detriment, associated with any switch from a household water supply containing <375 ppb TCE to one containing CBP at levels corresponding to the currently proposed 80-ppb MCL for total trihalomethanes.

  20. Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2009-10-01

    Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH(4)) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH(4) production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt(-1)), while observed CO(2) production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH(4) emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha(-1)) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha(-1) application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH(4) emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH(4) production rates as well as total seasonal CH(4) flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH(4) emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

  1. Extraction yield, antioxidant activity andphenolics from grape, mango and peanut agro-industrial by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Costa Braga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to determine and correlate the extraction yields, antioxidant activity, total phenolics and total flavonoids from grape, mango and peanut agro-industrial by-products. The β-carotene/linoleic acid autoxidation system and scavenging capacity for DPPH and ABTS free radicals assays were used. The results were expressed in terms of lyophilized sample or dry extract. Mango bagasse exhibited the highest extraction yield (37.07% followed by peanut skin (15.17% and grape marc (7.92%. In terms of lyophilized sample, total phenolics did not vary significantly among the residues evaluated (average of 60.33mg EAG g-1; however, when they were expressed as dry extract grape marc exhibited the highest total phenolic (768.56±116.35mg GAE g-1, followed by peanut skin (404.40±13.22mg GAE g-1 and mango bagasse (160.25±4.52mg GAE g-1, Peanut skin exhibited the highest content of total flavonoids (2.44mg QE g-1, while grape marc (1.76mg QE g-1 and mango bagasse (1.70 mg QE g-1 showed no significant differences. The extraction yield showed strong negative linear correlation with total phenolic and total flavonoid. This study showed that peanut skin was the sample with the highest antioxidant activity and it was strongly influenced by total flavonoids. All extracts of byproducts showed antioxidant activity comparable to α-tocopherol, and they can be a source of natural compounds with potential to replace synthetic antioxidants such as BHT.

  2. Strontium Isotope Study of Coal Untilization By-products Interacting with Environmental Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

    2011-09-01

    Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements—including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc—during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB–water interaction.

  3. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini [Water ApS, Farum Gydevej 64, 3520 Farum (Denmark); Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, Kamilla M.S., E-mail: kmsh@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Henrik R. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  4. Putative nanobacteria represent physiological remnants and culture by-products of normal calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John D; Martel, Jan; Young, Lena; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Young, Andrew; Young, David

    2009-01-01

    earlier as NB may thus represent remnants and by-products of physiological mechanisms used for calcium homeostasis, a concept which explains the vast body of NB literature as well as explains the true origin of NB as lifeless protein-mineralo entities with questionable role in pathogenesis.

  5. Utilization of citrus crops processing by-products in the preparation of tarhana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Magala

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available After processing of citrus fruits (e.g. lemon, orange, grapefruit, mandarin for juice and essential oils production, approximately 50% of the original fruit mass is left as waste material. Citrus crops processing by-products are valuable components as they contain nutrients such as pectins, saccharides, carotenoids, some vitamins, minerals, polyphenols and substances with antioxidant activity. Utilisation of these kind of side products in the recipe of various cereal product led to enhancement of final product nutritional value and better sensory attributes as well as improvement of product functional properties. In this work was studied the effect of orange and mandarin dietary fibre application at level 5 and 10% (w/w in tarhana preparation and the influence on tarhana fermentation process. Chemical analysis showed, that dietary fibre preparations reached higher concentration of ash, fat and total dietary fibre compared to wheat flour. Wheat flour exhibited higher moisture content and protein concentration than citrus dietary fibre preparations. Orange and mandarin dietary fibre preparations showed higher values of water and oil absorption capacity, swelling capacity and least gellation concentration compared to wheat flour. Application of fruit dietary fibre preparations to tarhana recipe caused a rapid decrease in pH from 4.70 - 5.02 to values 4.31 - 4.51 during fermentation process. Reducing saccharides served as an available source of energy for fermenting microbiota and their concentration decreased from 24.5 - 32.8 to 2.2 - 0.2 g/kg after 144 h incubation. Fermentation also led to lactic acid (1.67 - 2.09 g/kg and acetic acid (1.91 - 2.53 g/kg production as a consequence of present microorganisms metabolic activity. Sensory evaluation of samples showed, that higher proportion of citrus dietary fibre preparations (10% negatively affected taste, odour, consistency and sourness. Among all prepared tarhana samples with proportion of citrus

  6. Removal Of Contaminants From Aqueous Solutions Using Hop (Humulus Lupulus L. Agricultural By-Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partelová Denisa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural wastes can be used as an alternative to the existing sorbents for the removal of metals or synthetic dyes from contaminated liquids. In this work, the fine powdered biomass of the hop (Humulus lupulus L. variety Osvald's clone 72 and variety Bohemie as a sorbent for the removal of Cd from aqueous solutions of CdCl2 spiked with radionuclide 109Cd and synthetic dyes thioflavine T (ThT or methylene blue (MB from single dye solutions under conditions of batch systems was used. The maximum sorption capacity Q = 264 µmol Cd/g (d.w. was found in the case of the leaf biomass of hop (H. lupulus L. variety Osvald's clone 72 at the initial concentration of CdCl2 10,000 µmol/dm3, whereby the sorption capacity decreased in the order Qleaves : Qstems : Qroots = 1.0 : 0.8 : 0.7. The sorbed amount of Cd was removed from the hop biomass with the following increasing desorption efficiency of the extraction reagents: deionised H2O << 0.1 mol/dm3 HCl ≤ 0.1 mol/dm3 EDTA-Na2. Similarly as in the case of Cd sorption, the kinetics of ThT and MB sorption by the leaf biomass of the hop (H. lupulus L. variety Bohemie were also showed as two-phase processes. The maximum sorption of ThT approx. Q = 19 mg/g (d.w. and MB approx. Q = 70 mg/g (d.w. were found within the range of the initial values of pH 4 – 7. The sorption of both dyes by the leaf biomass from single dye solutions decreased with increasing biomass concentration and on the other hand increased with increasing the initial concentrations of ThT or MB. The process of ThT and MB sorption was better described by the Langmuir model than the Freundlich model of sorption isotherm. From the obtained values of Qmax, it was found that in the case of MB the dried leaf biomass showed more than 2-times higher sorption capacity (Qmax = 184 mg/g; d.w. in comparison with the value predicted for ThT. Obtained results suggest that dried plant biomass of hop (H. lupulus L. as agricultural by-products can be used

  7. Bioanalytical and chemical assessment of the disinfection by-product formation potential: role of organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Maria José; Day, Sophie; Neale, Peta A; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2013-09-15

    Disinfection by-products (DBP) formed from natural organic matter and disinfectants like chlorine and chloramine may cause adverse health effects. Here, we evaluate how the quantity and quality of natural organic matter and other precursors influence the formation of DBPs during chlorination and chloramination using a comprehensive approach including chemical analysis of regulated and emerging DBPs, total organic halogen quantification, organic matter characterisation and bioanalytical tools. In vitro bioassays allow us to assess the hazard potential of DBPs early in the chain of cellular events, when the DBPs react with their molecular target(s) and activate stress response and defence mechanisms. Given the reactive properties of known DBPs, a suite of bioassays targeting reactive modes of toxic action including genotoxicity and sensitive early warning endpoints such as protein damage and oxidative stress were evaluated in addition to cytotoxicity. Coagulated surface water was collected from three different drinking water treatment plants, along with reverse osmosis permeate from a desalination plant, and DBP formation potential was assessed after chlorination and chloramination. While effects were low or below the limit of detection before disinfection, the observed effects and DBP levels increased after disinfection and were generally higher after chlorination than after chloramination, indicating that chlorination forms higher concentrations of DBPs or more potent DBPs in the studied waters. Bacterial cytotoxicity, assessed using the bioluminescence inhibition assay, and induction of the oxidative stress response were the most sensitive endpoints, followed by genotoxicity. Source waters with higher dissolved organic carbon levels induced increased DBP formation and caused greater effects in the endpoints related to DNA damage repair, glutathione conjugation/protein damage and the Nrf2 oxidative stress response pathway after disinfection. Fractionation studies

  8. Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

    2007-03-31

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury

  9. Altering the thermal resistance of foodborne bacterial pathogens with an eggshell membrane waste by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, A L; Sheldon, B W

    2001-04-01

    Eggshells from egg-breaking operations are a significant waste disposal problem. Thus, the development of value-added by-products from this waste would be welcomed by the industry. The ability of extracted eggshell membranes containing, several bacteriolytic enzymes (i.e., lysozyme and beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase) or other membrane components to alter the thermal resistance of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial pathogens was evaluated. Mid-log phase cells of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EC), Listeria monocytogenes Scott A (LM), and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) were suspended in 100 ml of 0.1% peptone water (pH 6.9, 10(7-8) CFU/ml) containing either 0 (control) or 10 g of an eggshell membrane extract and incubated at 37 degrees C for 45 min. Following exposure, membrane-free samples (1.5 ml) were heated in a 56 degrees C (LM, SA), 54 degrees C (SE, ST), or 52 degrees C (EC) water bath from 0 to 14 min in sealed glass reaction vials (12 by 32 mm), and the survivors were recovered on brain heart infusion agar. Population reductions ranging from 27.6% (SA) to 99.8% (LM) (ST, 43.8%; SE, 47.5%; EC, 71.8%) were observed for cells treated for 45 min with extracted membrane, as compared to controls. D-value reductions ranging from 0 (LM) to 87.2% (SE) (SA, 36.7%; EC, 83.3%; ST, 86.3%) were observed when membrane-treated cells were subsequently heat inactivated. The effects of exposure pH, time, temperature, and organic load on membrane activity were also evaluated with Salmonella Typhimurium. Exposure pH (5.0 versus 6.9), time (15 versus 45 min), and temperature (4 degrees C versus 37 degrees C) did not significantly reduce the impact of eggshell membranes on D-values. However, the presence of organic matter (0.1% peptone water versus skim milk) significantly reduced the thermal resistance-reducing capacity of the membranes. These preliminary findings provide information on the potential use of extracted eggshell

  10. Putative nanobacteria represent physiological remnants and culture by-products of normal calcium homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Young

    structures described earlier as NB may thus represent remnants and by-products of physiological mechanisms used for calcium homeostasis, a concept which explains the vast body of NB literature as well as explains the true origin of NB as lifeless protein-mineralo entities with questionable role in pathogenesis.

  11. Protein co-products and by-products of the biodiesel industry for ruminants feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andrés Botero Carrera

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to classify 20 protein co-products and by-products of the biodiesel industry with potential to use in ruminant feeding. The meals evaluated were: cottonseed, canudo-de-pito, crambe, sunflower, castor-oil seeds detoxified with calcium, non-detoxified castor-oil seeds and soybean; and the cakes were: cottonseed, peanut, babassu, crambe, palm oil, sunflower, licuri, macauba seeds, non-detoxified castor-oil seeds, turnip and jatropha. The samples were quantified to determine dry matter (DM, organic matter (OM, crude protein (CP, ether extract (EE, neutral detergent fiber corrected for ash and protein (NDFap, non-fiber carbohydrates (NFC, acid detergent fiber corrected for ash and protein (ADFap, lignin, cutin and starch levels. The CP profile was characterized in fractions A, B1, B2, B3 and C. The in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD, in vitro neutral detergent fiber digestibility (IVNDFD, rumen degradable and undegradable protein, intestinal digestibility, indigestible neutral detergent fiber and undegradable neutral detergent insoluble protein were evaluated. The OM, CP, EE, NDFap, NFC, ADFap, lignin, cutin and starch contents varied from 81.95 to 95.41%, 18.92 to 57.75%, 0.56 to 18.40%, 10.13 to 62.30%, 3.89 to 27.88%, 6.15 to 36.86%, 1.19 to 5.04%, 0 to 17.87% and 0.68 to 14.50%, respectively. The values of fractions A, B1, B2, B3 and C ranged from 5.40 to 43.31%, 0.08 to 37.63%, 16.75 to 79.39%, 1.86 to 59.15% and 0.60 to 11.47%, respectively. Concentrations of IVDMD, IVNDFD, rumen-degradable and undegradable protein, intestinal digestibility, indigestible NDF and undegradable neutral detergent insoluble protein ranged from 31.00 to 95.92%, 55.04 to 97.74%, 41.06 to 97.61%, 2.39 to 58.94, 9.27 to 94.26%, 1.05 to 40.80% and 0.29 to 2.92%, respectively. Some of these products can replace soybean meal, specially the Macauba seeds cake, cottonseed meal and peanut and turnip cakes based on digestive

  12. Production of fructosyl transferase by Aspergillus oryzae CFR 202 in solid-state fermentation using agricultural by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, P T; Ramesh, M N; Prapulla, S G

    2004-10-01

    Fructosyl transferase (FTase) production by Aspergillus oryzae CFR 202 was carried out by solid-state fermentation (SSF), using various agricultural by-products like cereal bran, corn products, sugarcane bagasse,cassava bagasse (tippi) and by-products of coffee and tea processing. The FTase produced was used for the production of fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), using 60% sucrose as substrate. Among the cereal bran used, rice bran and wheat bran were good substrates for FTase production by A. oryzae CFR 202. Among the various corn products used, corn germ supported maximum FTase production, whereas among the by-products of coffee and tea processing used, spent coffee and spent tea were good substrates, with supplementation of yeast extract and complete synthetic media. FTase had maximum activity at 60 degrees C and pH 6.0. FTase was stable up to 40 degrees C and in the pH range 5.0-7.0. Maximum FOS production was obtained with FTase after 8 h of reaction with 60% sucrose. FTase produced by SSF using wheat bran was purified 107-fold by ammonium sulphate precipitation (30-80%), DEAE cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 chromatography. The molecular mass of the purified FTase was 116.3 kDa by SDS-PAGE. This study indicates the potential for the use of agricultural by-products for the efficient production of FTase enzyme by A. oryzae CFR 202 in SSF, thereby resulting in value addition of those by-products.

  13. GLYCERINE: FROM A INCONVINIENT BIODIESEL BY-PRODUCT TO A POSSIBLE APPLICATION AS A FLOCCULANT IN WATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAUTO, Marcelo Antunes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycerin is a by-product obtained during the biodiesel manufacture, through the transesterification reaction of vegetal oils. The prevision of excedent glycerine in the next few years, due to the increasing of the biodiesel production in Brazil, has been generating a discussion about new applications to this by-product. This article presents a theoretical study about the possible synthesis of a new flocculant agent, from semi-refined glycerine and p-nitrobenzoic acid to produce a quaternary ammonium salt, to be used in water treatment. The reactions which would occur during the synthesis of the flocculant agent and the necessary tests to the product validation are presented.

  14. Influence of brick air scrubber by-product on growth and development of corn and hybrid poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Carla N; Bauerle, William L; Owino, Tom O; Chastain, John P; Klaine, Stephen J

    2007-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of spent reagent from air pollution control scrubbers used at a brick manufacturing facility on emergence, growth, and physiological responses of corn and hybrid poplar plants. Scrubber by-product was obtained from General Shale Brick, Louisville, KY. Potting substrate was weighed and quantities of scrubber by-product were added to the substrate to obtain treatments of 0%, 6.25%, 12.5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% scrubber by-product (w:w) for the corn study. Each treatment mix was potted into nine replicate polyethylene pots and four corn seeds were sown per pot. The pots were randomized in a greenhouse at Clemson University and the number of seedlings emerging from each treatment, dark-adapted leaf chlorophyll a fluorescence, and shoot heights were measured at the end of a 21-day growth period. Then, dry shoot biomass was determined for plants from each treatment and plant tissues were analyzed for selected constituents. For the poplar study, nine-inch cuttings of hybrid poplar clone 15-29 (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides) and clone OP367 (P. deltoides x P. nigra) were planted in treatments of scrubber by-product-potting soil mixes of 0% , 5% , 10% , and 25% w:w. Leaf chlorophyll a fluorescence was measured over six weeks and cumulative leaf area, dry biomass, and nutrient content of tissues were determined upon harvest. Results of these studies indicate that percent seedling emergence for corn plants decreased with increasing scrubber by-product application rates. Application rates up to 12.5% scrubber by-product w:w had no adverse effect on corn seedling emergence. Shoot elongation, biomass production, and the status of the photosynthetic apparatus of the seedlings were also not severely impaired at applications below this level. A critical value of 58.2% w:w scrubber by-product was estimated to cause 25% inhibition of seedling emergence. Biomass production, cumulative leaf area, and chlorophyll a fluorescence of

  15. Do-Fluoride "Cryolite By- product Carbon White" Awarded the 13th China Excellent Patent Award%Do-Fluoride "Cryolite By- product Carbon White" Awarded the 13th China Excellent Patent Award

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On November 4, the results of the 13th China Patent Awards were publicized by the State Intellectual Property Office of the People's Republic of China. The patent of "production method of cryolite by-product carbon white" declared by Henan Province Jiaozuo Do-Fluoride Company was awarded China Excellent Patent Award.

  16. Effect of selection of pH in swimming pool on formation of chlorination by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans;

    2011-01-01

    Chlorine is used as disinfection agent in public swimming pools, but also reacts with organic matter in the water forming chlorinat ed disinfection by-products. In order to evaluate the effect of choice of pHsetpoint in the pool we investigated the effect of chlorination of artificial body fluid...

  17. The healthy men study: an evaluation of exposure to disinfection by-products in tap water and sperm quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Chlorination of drinking water generates disinfection by-products (DBPs), which have been shown to disrupt spermatogenesis in rodents at high doses, suggesting that DBPs could pose a reproductive risk to men. In this study we assessed DBP exposure and testicular toxic...

  18. Significance of pH on the Cytotoxic Potential of the Water Disinfection By-Product Iodoacetic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significance of pH on the Cytotoxic Potential of the Water Disinfection By-Product Iodoacetic Acid Vicki Richardson1, Susan D. Richardson2, Mary Moyer3, Jane Ellen Simmons1, and Anthony DeAngelo1, 1U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2University of...

  19. Cumulative toxicity of an environmentally relevant mixture of nine regulated disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat reproductive bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    CUMULATIVE TOXICITY OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY RELEVANT MIXTURE OF NINE REGULATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN A MULTIGENERATIONAL RAT REPRODUCTIVE BIOASSAY J E Simmons, GR. Klinefelter, JM Goldman, AB DeAngelo, DS Best, A McDonald, LF Strader, AS Murr, JD Suarez, MH George, ES Hunte...

  20. Reproductive toxicity of a mixture of regulated drinking-water disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND:Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloaretic acids (HAAs) are regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs); their joint reproductive toxicity in drinking water is unknown.OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate a drinking water mixture of the four regulated THMs and five regulated HAAs ...

  1. Feruloyl esterases as a tool for the release of phenolic compounds from agro-industrial by-products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benoit, Isabelle; Navarro, David; Marnet, Nathalie; Rakotomanomana, Nnjara; Lesage-Meessen, Laurence; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude; Asther, Marcel; Asther, Michèle

    2006-01-01

    Agro-industrial by-products are a potential source of added-value phenolic acids with promising applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Here two purified feruloyl esterases from Aspergillus niger, FAEA and FAEB were tested for their ability to release phenolic acids such as caffeic a

  2. 78 FR 67371 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine... Report on Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products of its... a.m. until adjournment, approximately 11:30 a.m. Document Availability: Draft monographs...

  3. 78 FR 51733 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine... Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products of its Synthesis.... Document Availability: Draft monographs will be available by August 28, 2013, at...

  4. Proteomic analysis of processing by-products from canned and fresh tuna: identification of potentially functional food proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartín, Esther; Arboleya, Juan Carlos; Iloro, Ibon; Escuredo, Kepa; Elortza, Felix; Moreno, F Javier

    2012-09-15

    Proteomic approaches have been used to identify the main proteins present in processing by-products generated by the canning tuna-industry, as well as in by-products derived from filleting of skeletal red muscle of fresh tuna. Following fractionation by using an ammonium sulphate precipitation method, three proteins (tropomyosin, haemoglobin and the stress-shock protein ubiquitin) were identified in the highly heterogeneous and heat-treated material discarded by the canning-industry. Additionally, this fractionation method was successful to obtain tropomyosin of high purity from the heterogeneous starting material. By-products from skeletal red muscle of fresh tuna were efficiently fractionated to sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar fractions, prior to the identification based mainly on the combined searching of the peptide mass fingerprint (MALDI-TOF) and peptide fragment fingerprinting (MALDI LIFT-TOF/TOF) spectra of fifteen bands separated by 1D SDS-PAGE. Thus, the sarcoplasmic fraction contained myoglobin and several enzymes that are essential for efficient energy production, whereas the myofibrillar fraction had important contractile proteins, such as actin, tropomyosin, myosin or an isoform of the enzyme creatine kinase. Application of proteomic technologies has revealed new knowledge on the composition of important by-products from tuna species, enabling a better evaluation of their potential applications.

  5. Ethnic ingroup friendships in schools : Testing the by-product hypothesis in England, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Sanne; Maas, Ineke; van Tubergen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This study set out to examine to what extent ethnic ingroup friendship in secondary school classes are a by-product of cultural and socioeconomic ingroup friendship. Based on homophily theory, we expected similar opinions, leisure activities, religion, risk behaviour and socioeconomic factors to (pa

  6. Developmental toxicity of mixtures: the water disinfection by-products dichloro-, dibromo- and bromochloro acetic acid in rat embryo culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chlorination of drinking water results in production of numerous disinfection by-products (DBPs). One of the important classes of DBPs is the haloacetic acids. We have previously shown that the haloacetic acids (HAs), dichloro (DCA), dibromo (DBA) and bromochloro (BCA) acetic...

  7. Nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions during initial decomposition of animal by-products applied as fertilisers to soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayuela, M.L.; Velthof, G.L.; Mondini, C.; Sinicco, T.; Groenigen, van J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The recycling of organic wastes as soil amendments is notably promoted in sustainable agricultural systems. However, for many animal by-products approved by organic farming regulations little is known about their effects on the greenhouse gas balance of the soil, in particular on N2O emissions. In t

  8. Strategy of Utilization of Locally Available Crop Residues and By-Products for Livestock Feeding in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moujahed-Raach, A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Important quantities of crop residues and by-products are yearly available in North African countries. This paper presents the screening of the most important by-products in Tunisia, their nutritional characteristics and the appropriate strategies to use most of them in order to improve ruminants feeding systems. One or several by-products are specifie of each region of the country but most of them are localized in the northern region. Some of the agricultural wastes are available in important quantities but are of nutritionally poor or moderate qualities (straw, olive wastes, poultry litter, etc, while others are produced in limited amounts but are of very interesting feeding values (sugar beet pulp, brewers grain, date residue, etc. The main applied strategies to valorize Tunisian agricultural by-products consist in ammoniation of cereal straws along with supplementation with multinutriment blocks and formulation of balanced diets based totally or partially on them. These alternatives are crucial in the improvement of feeding values of studied diets and animal performances essentially by improving micro-bial activity in the rumen. In Tunisia such solution could be applied both in extensive and moderate animal production systems.

  9. Strategy of Utilization of Locally Available Crop Residues and By-Products for Livestock Feeding in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moujahed-Raach, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Important quantifies of crops residues and by-products are yearly available in North African countries. This paper presents the screening of the most important by-products in Tunisia, their nutritional characteristics and the appropriate strategies to use most of them in order to improve ruminants feeding systems. One or several by-products are specifie of each region of the country, but most of them are localised in the northern region. Some of the agricultural wastes are available in important quantifies but are of nutritionally poor or moderate qualifies (straw, olive wastes, poultry litter, etc, while others are produced in limited amounts but are of very interesting feeding values (sugar beet pulp, brewers grain, date residue, etc. The main applied strategies to valorise Tunisian agricultural by-products consist in ammoniation of cereal straws along with supplementation with multinutriment blocks and formulation of balanced diets based totally or partially on them. These alternatives are crucial in the improvement of feeding values of studied diets and animal performances essentially by improving microbial activity in the rumen. In Tunisia such solution could be applied both in extensive and moderate animal production systems.

  10. Ongoing Meta-analysis on the Association between Disinfection By-product Exposure and Small for Gestational Age Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are potentially harmful chemicals formed in drinking water by the reaction of naturally occurring organic matter with disinfectants aimed to kill microbial pathogens. Though numerous DBP species exist, only a few species have been examined in toxic...

  11. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 1, [Annual report], December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Haefner, R. [Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1993-04-01

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  12. Differential attraction of parasitoids in relation to specificity of kairomones from herbivores and their by-products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumera Afsheen; Xia Wang; Ran Li; Chuan-Shu Zhu; Yong-Gen Lou

    2008-01-01

    Infochemicals are used by foraging parasitoids in the host selection process from habitat preference until host recognition. Kairomones from the herbivore host plays a vital role in the attraction of parasitoids, particularly in the micro-habitat. Parasitoids are specifically attracted to their respective herbivore species even when different herbivores are present on the same plant. Chemicals emitted from different stages of host (eggs, larvae,pupae, adult), host by-products (e.g., frass, exuviae, mandibular gland secretions, defense secretions etc.), or intra-specific infocbemicals (pheromones) can be main signals for the parasitoids. Parasitoids can differentiate between host and non-host, between different hosts and host stages by perceiving specific volatile and contact kairomones from the host itself,host along with its by-product, by-products alone or intra-specific infochemicals; of which frass (by-product) and intra-specific infochemicals are the most reported ones. Adult and larval parasitoids have been reported to be attracted to kairomones of their target stage or byproduct of their host. Pupal parasitoids have been found to utilize kairomones from the preceding host stage while egg parasitoids are known to exploit a variety of host infochemicals,for example, either from eggs themselves or other non-target host stages, especially adults and adult-related by-products. The kairomonal chemicals identified so far include various groups, but mainly hydrocarbons. A high degree of host specificity and host acceptance is important for the parasitoids as any mistake may result in the loss of fitness.

  13. Valorization of industrial waste and by-product streams via fermentation for the production of chemicals and biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutinas, Apostolis A; Vlysidis, Anestis; Pleissner, Daniel; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Lopez Garcia, Isabel; Kookos, Ioannis K; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Kwan, Tsz Him; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2014-04-21

    The transition from a fossil fuel-based economy to a bio-based economy necessitates the exploitation of synergies, scientific innovations and breakthroughs, and step changes in the infrastructure of chemical industry. Sustainable production of chemicals and biopolymers should be dependent entirely on renewable carbon. White biotechnology could provide the necessary tools for the evolution of microbial bioconversion into a key unit operation in future biorefineries. Waste and by-product streams from existing industrial sectors (e.g., food industry, pulp and paper industry, biodiesel and bioethanol production) could be used as renewable resources for both biorefinery development and production of nutrient-complete fermentation feedstocks. This review focuses on the potential of utilizing waste and by-product streams from current industrial activities for the production of chemicals and biopolymers via microbial bioconversion. The first part of this review presents the current status and prospects on fermentative production of important platform chemicals (i.e., selected C2-C6 metabolic products and single cell oil) and biopolymers (i.e., polyhydroxyalkanoates and bacterial cellulose). In the second part, the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of waste and by-product streams from existing industrial sectors are presented. In the third part, the techno-economic aspects of bioconversion processes are critically reviewed. Four case studies showing the potential of case-specific waste and by-product streams for the production of succinic acid and polyhydroxyalkanoates are presented. It is evident that fermentative production of chemicals and biopolymers via refining of waste and by-product streams is a highly important research area with significant prospects for industrial applications.

  14. New advances in the integrated management of food processing by-products in Europe: sustainable exploitation of fruit and cereal processing by-products with the production of new food products (NAMASTE EU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Fabio; Zanaroli, Giulio; Vannini, Lucia; Guerzoni, Elisabetta; Bordoni, Alessandra; Viaggi, Davide; Robertson, Jim; Waldron, Keith; Bald, Carlos; Esturo, Aintzane; Talens, Clara; Tueros, Itziar; Cebrián, Marta; Sebők, András; Kuti, Tunde; Broeze, Jan; Macias, Marta; Brendle, Hans-Georg

    2013-09-25

    By-products generated every year by the European fruit and cereal processing industry currently exceed several million tons. They are disposed of mainly through landfills and thus are largely unexploited sources of several valuable biobased compounds potentially profitable in the formulation of novel food products. The opportunity to design novel strategies to turn them into added value products and food ingredients via novel and sustainable processes is the main target of recently EC-funded FP7 project NAMASTE-EU. NAMASTE-EU aims at developing new laboratory-scale protocols and processes for the exploitation of citrus processing by-products and wheat bran surpluses via the production of ingredients useful for the formulation of new beverage and food products. Among the main results achieved in the first two years of the project, there are the development and assessment of procedures for the selection, stabilization and the physical/biological treatment of citrus and wheat processing by-products, the obtainment and recovery of some bioactive molecules and ingredients and the development of procedures for assessing the quality of the obtained ingredients and for their exploitation in the preparation of new food products.

  15. The chemical and sensory qualities of smoked blood sausage made with the edible by-products of goat slaughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F A P; Amaral, D S; Guerra, I C D; Dalmás, P S; Arcanjo, N M O; Bezerra, T K A; Beltrão Filho, E M; Moreira, R T; Madruga, M S

    2013-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate smoked blood sausage prepared using goat blood (50%), viscera (10%) and meat fragments (20%). Microbiological, chemical and sensory evaluations were conducted. The quality analyses showed that smoked goat blood sausage is rich in high biological value proteins, amino acids, essential fatty acids, and iron (26.65mg/100g). The smoked goat blood sausage was rated to have a sensory acceptance of greater than 80%. The use of edible by-products from the slaughter of goats in the formulation of smoked blood sausage is viable because it uses low-cost raw materials; furthermore, the utilisation of these by-products can generate income for producers, allowing them to offer a meat product of high nutritional and sensory quality.

  16. The heat insulating properties of potato starch extruded with addition of chosen by- products of food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdybel Ewa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at determination of time of heat transition through the layer of quince, apple, linen, rose pomace and potato pulp, as well as layer of potato starch and potato starch extruded with addition of above mentioned by-products. Additionally the attempt of creation a heat insulating barrier from researched raw material was made. The heat conductivity of researched materials was dependent on the type of material and its humidity. Extruded potato starch is characterized by smaller heat conductivity than potato starch extruded with addition of pomace. The obtained rigid extruded starch moulders were characterized by higher heat insulating properties than the loose beads. It is possible to use starch and by-products of food industry for production of heat insulating materials.

  17. In situ olive mill residual co-composting for soil organic fertility restoration and by-product sustainable reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Casacchia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The addition of organic matter in the form of compost improves overall physical, chemical and biological properties of soils but, to be really sustainable, the composting process should be carried out using the by-products available in situ. Two different soils of a Mediterranean olive orchard, one managed traditionally (NAS and the other amended with compost (AS, were investigated in a two-year experiment. Increases in total organic matter, total nitrogen and pH, were detected in AS if compared to NAS. Significant increases in total and specific microbial counts were observed in AS, with a clear amelioration of microbiological soil quality. The results demonstrated that soil amendment using compost deriving from olive mill by-products can be an important agricultural practice for supporting and stimulating soil microorganisms and, at the same time, for re-using these byproducts, so avoiding their negative environmental impact.

  18. Copper, zinc, calcium and magnesium content of alcoholic beverages and by-products from Spain: nutritional supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Alarcon, M; Velasco, C; Jodral, A; Terrés, C; Olalla, M; Lopez, H; Lopez, M C

    2007-07-01

    Levels of copper, zinc, calcium and magnesium were measured in alcoholic beverages (whiskies, gins, rums, liquors, brandies, wines and beers) and by-products (non-alcoholic liquors and vinegars) using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Mineral concentrations were found to be significantly different between the nine alcoholic and non-alcoholic by-products studied (p < 0.001). In distilled alcoholic beverages, concentrations measured in rums and brandies were statistically lower than those determined in gins and alcoholic liquors (p = 0.001). For Cu, measured concentrations were statistically different for each of the five groups of distilled alcoholic beverages studied (p < 0.001). In fermented beverages, Zn, Ca and Mg levels were significantly higher than those concentrations determined in distilled drinks (p < 0.005). Contrarily, Cu concentrations were statistically lower (p < 0.001). Wines designated as sherry had significantly higher Ca and Mg levels (p < 0.005). White wines had significantly higher Ca and Zn levels (p < 0.05) compared with red wines and, contrarily, Cu concentrations were significantly lower (p < 0.005). In wine samples and corresponding by-products (brandy and vinegar), statistical differences were established for all minerals analysed (p < 0.01). Remarkably, for Cu, the concentrations determined in brandies were statistically higher. On the basis of element levels and the official data on consumption of alcoholic beverages and by-products in Spain, their contribution to the daily dietary intake (DDI) was calculated to be 124.6 microg Cu day(-1) and 193.3 microg Zn day(-1), 40.3 mg Ca day(-1) and 19.9 mg Mg day(-1). From all studied elements, Cu was the one for which alcoholic beverages constitute a significant source (more than 10% of recommended daily intake). These findings are of potential use to food composition tables.

  19. Synthesis by-products from the Wacker oxidation of safrole in methanol using rho-benzoquinone and palladium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, M; Klass, G

    2006-12-20

    This paper reports the identification of a number of by-products, which are produced during the Wacker oxidation of safrole to 3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl-2-propanone (MDP2P) using rho-benzoquinone and palladium chloride when methanol is utilised as the solvent. Also described is the retrieval of these compounds from illicit samples from a clandestine laboratory, which was uncovered in South Australia in September 2003.

  20. The Effect of Different Boiling and Filtering Devices on the Concentration of Disinfection By-Products in Tap Water

    OpenAIRE

    Glòria Carrasco-Turigas; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Fernando Goñi; Panu Rantakokko; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are ubiquitous contaminants in tap drinking water with the potential to produce adverse health effects. Filtering and boiling tap water can lead to changes in the DBP concentrations and modify the exposure through ingestion. Changes in the concentration of 4 individual trihalomethanes (THM4) (chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM)), MX, and bromate were tested when boiling and filtering high bromine-conta...

  1. Mineralogical and physical considerations related to the separation and recovery of constituents from aluminum smelter by-products and wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumpton, A.J.; Wilhelmy, J.F.; Blackburn, D.; Caouette, J.L. [Centre de Recherches Minerales, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-10-01

    Several by-products and waste products of aluminum smelting were characterized mineralogically and physically, in order to evaluate the potential for their decontamination or separation and recovery into valuable products using mineral processing techniques. The test samples were selected from among Bayer process red mud, bath-alumina mixture, cleaned anode butts, anode recycle residues, spent potlining, saltcake and fluorogypsum. Several of these materials were shown to be composed either of highly liberated, potentially separable mineral phases, or of locked minerals which could be partially liberated by grinding to smaller but practical particle sizes. An analysis of specific physical properties of the liberated constituent mineral phases was accompanied by preliminary experimental evaluation of their separability. An assessment was made of potential mineral processing techniques including size and form differentiation, gravitational and magnetic field separation, flotation, separation based on surface charging phenomena or work function, and pneumatic tabling. The results confirmed the suitability of low-cost physical separation techniques for the treatment of some by-products and wastes. This paper presents results of a preliminary evaluation of two smelter products. The conference paper will analyze and discuss in more detail the potential for the mineral processing of these and other smelter by-products and wastes.

  2. Chemical and functional properties of the different by-products of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) from industrial canning processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Cano, Domingo; Pérez-Llamas, Francisca; Frutos, María José; Arnao, Marino B; Espinosa, Cristóbal; López-Jiménez, José Ángel; Castillo, Julián; Zamora, Salvador

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the basic chemical composition and functional properties of six by-product fractions collected from different steps of artichoke industrial processing were evaluated. Fractions differed in thermal treatment, the bract position in the artichoke head and the cutting size. Contents of moisture, ash, protein, fat, dietary fibre, inulin, total phenolics, total flavonoids, caffeoyl derivatives and flavones were analysed. Antioxidant activity values were also determined. All assessed artichoke by-product fractions contained high-dietary fibre (53.6-67.0%) and low fat (2.5-3.7%). Artichoke by-product fractions contained high levels of inulin, especially in the boiled inner bracts (30%). Total phenolic and flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity (153-729 μmol gallic acid equivalents, 6.9-19.2 μmol quercetin equivalents and 85-234 μmol ascorbic acid equivalents per gram of dry matter, respectively) varied widely with the bract positions in the artichoke head and the thermal treatments. The more interesting fractions for use as functional ingredients were those situated closer to the artichoke heart and thermally treated.

  3. Influence of by-product feeds and tallow on lactation performance of Holstein cows during two seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, H G; Spain, J N; Ellersieck, M R

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of fibrous by-product feeds and tallow on lactation performance and ruminal fermentation. Diets were arranged as a 2 x 2 factorial of low and high NDF with or without added tallow. Corn and soybean meal were replaced with corn gluten feed, soyhulls, wheat middlings, and high moisture, whole ear corn. Forty-eight Holstein cows were used in two seasonal replicates of a randomized block design. Addition of tallow decreased intake of the low fiber diet, but not the high fiber diet, during winter. Intake was unaffected by diet during summer. Dietary NDF percentage did not change DMI. Milk production was unaffected by addition of tallow but was more persistent for cows fed low fiber diets. Tallow reduced milk protein percentage but did not change milk fat percentage. Fibrous feeds did not influence milk composition. Four fistulated cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Fibrous by-product feeds decreased total VFA concentration. Acetate to propionate ratio increased when tallow was added to high fiber diets but decreased when tallow was added to low fiber diets. Tallow and fibrous by-product feeds can be used to support milk production.

  4. Antioxidant activity, cytotoxic activity and metabolic profiling of juices obtained from saffron (Crocus sativus L.) floral by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Rosa, Antonella; Montoro, Paola; Fenu, Maurizio Antonio; Pizza, Cosimo

    2016-05-15

    Juices obtained from cold-pressed saffron (Crocus sativus L.) floral by-products were evaluated as a potential source of compounds with antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. Floral by-products were split in two batches for extraction 24 and 48h after flower harvesting, respectively. The in vitro anti-oxidant activity of these extracts was tested using the FRAP and DPPH assays, and two biological models of lipid oxidation (activity in preventing cholesterol degradation and protection against Cu(2+)-mediated degradation of the liposomal unsaturated fatty acids). The cytotoxic activity was evaluated using the MTT assay. The results show that extracts obtained 48h post-harvest contained higher levels of total polar phenols and had the highest antioxidant activity in all of the performed assays. The LC-DAD and LC-ESI-(HR)MS(n) metabolic profiles showed high levels of kaempferol derivatives and anthocyanins. This study suggests that juices from saffron floral by-products could potentially be used to develop new products for the food and health industry.

  5. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, April 1, 1996--April 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Brackebusch, F.; Carpenter, J. [and others

    1998-12-31

    This report represents the Final Technical Progress Report for Phase II of the overall program for a cooperative research agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy - MORGANTOWN Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC). Under the agreement, SIUC will develop and demonstrate technologies for the handling, transport, and placement in abandoned underground coal mines of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products, such as fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized bed combustion by-products, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground placement. The overall program is divided into three (3) phases. Phase II of the program is primarily concerned with developing and testing the hardware for the actual underground placement demonstrations. Two technologies have been identified and hardware procured for full-scale demonstrations: (1) hydraulic placement, where coal combustion by-products (CCBs) will be placed underground as a past-like mixture containing about 70 to 75 percent solids; and (2) pneumatic placement, where CCBs will be placed underground as a relatively dry material using compressed air. 42 refs., 36 figs., 36 tabs.

  6. Integrated biovalorization of wine and olive mill by-products to produce enzymes of industrial interest and soil amendments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reina, R.; Ullrich, R.; García-Romera, I.; Liers, C.; Aranda, E.

    2016-11-01

    An integral and affordable strategy for the simultaneous production of lignin-modifying and carbohydrate active enzymes and organic amendment, with the aid of a saprobe fungus was developed by using olive oil and wine extraction by-products. The polyporal fungus Trametes versicolor was cultivated in soy or barley media supplemented with dry olive mill residue (DOR) as well as with grape pomace and stalks (GPS) in solid state fermentation (SSF). This strategy led to a 4-fold increase in the activity of laccase, the principal enzyme produced by SFF, in DOR-soy media as compared to controls. T. versicolor managed to secrete lignin-modifying enzymes in GPS, although no stimulative effect was observed. GPS-barley media turned out to be the appropriate medium to elicit most of the carbohydrate active enzymes. The reuse of exhausted solid by-products as amendments after fermentation was also investigated. The water soluble compound polymerization profile of fermented residues was found to correlate with the effect of phytotoxic depletion. The incubation of DOR and GPS with T. versicolor not only reduced its phytotoxicity but also stimulated the plant growth. This study provides a basis for understanding the stimulation and repression of two groups of enzymes of industrial interest in the presence of different carbon and nitrogen sources from by-products, possible enzyme recovery and the final reuse as soil amendments. (Author)

  7. Integrated biovalorization of wine and olive mill by-products to produce enzymes of industrial interest and soil amendments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Reina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An integral and affordable strategy for the simultaneous production of lignin-modifying and carbohydrate active enzymes and organic amendment, with the aid of a saprobe fungus was developed by using olive oil and wine extraction by-products. The polyporal fungus Trametes versicolor was cultivated in soy or barley media supplemented with dry olive mill residue (DOR as well as with grape pomace and stalks (GPS in solid state fermentation (SSF. This strategy led to a 4-fold increase in the activity of laccase, the principal enzyme produced by SFF, in DOR-soy media as compared to controls. T. versicolor managed to secrete lignin-modifying enzymes in GPS, although no stimulative effect was observed. GPS-barley media turned out to be the appropriate medium to elicit most of the carbohydrate active enzymes. The reuse of exhausted solid by-products as amendments after fermentation was also investigated. The water soluble compound polymerization profile of fermented residues was found to correlate with the effect of phytotoxic depletion. The incubation of DOR and GPS with T. versicolor not only reduced its phytotoxicity but also stimulated the plant growth. This study provides a basis for understanding the stimulation and repression of two groups of enzymes of industrial interest in the presence of different carbon and nitrogen sources from by-products, possible enzyme recovery and the final reuse as soil amendments.

  8. Mutagenic activities of a chlorination by-product of butamifos, its structural isomer, and their related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoshita, Masahiro; Kosaka, Koji; Endo, Osamu; Asami, Mari; Aizawa, Takako

    2010-01-01

    The mutagenic activities of 5-methyl-2-nitrophenol (5M2NP), a chlorination by-product of butamifos, its structural isomer 2-methyl-5-nitrophenol (2M5NP), and related compounds were evaluated by the Ames assay. The mutagenic activities of 5M2NP and 2M5NP were negative or not particularly high. However, those of their chlorinated derivatives were increased in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 and the overproducer strains YG1026, and YG1029 in the absence and/or presence of a rat liver metabolic activation system (S9 mix), particularly for YG1029. The mutagenic activities of 6-chloro-2-methyl-5-nitrophenol (6C2M5NP) in YG1029 in the absence and presence of S9 mix were 70000 and 110000 revertants mg(-1), respectively. When nitro functions of 6C2M5NP and 4-chloro-5-methyl-2-nitrophenol (4C5M2NP) were reduced to amino functions, their mutagenic activities were markedly decreased. The mutagenic activities of 5M2NP and 4C5M2NP were lower than those of 2M5NP and 6C2M5NP, respectively. Thus, it was shown that substituent position is a key factor for the mutagenic activities of methylnitrophenols (MNPs) and related compounds. The mutagenic activities of the extracts of 2M5NP in chlorination increased early during the reaction time and then decreased. The main chlorination by-product contributing to the mutagenic activities of the extracts of 2M5NP in chlorination was 6C2M5NP. The results of chlorination of 2M5NP suggested that MNPs were present as their dichlorinated derivatives or further chlorination by-products in drinking water.

  9. Methane emission of Santa Inês sheep fed cottonseed by-products containing different levels of gossypol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paulo de Mello Tavares; Oliveira, Pedro Batelli; Campeche, Aline; Moreira, Guilherme Dias; Paim, Tiago do Prado; McManus, Concepta; Abdalla, Adibe Luiz; Dantas, Angela Maria Morais; de Souza, Jurandir Rodrigues; Louvandini, Helder

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the methane (CH4) emission of Santa Inês sheep fed cottonseed by-products, verifying if the gossypol content of these feedstuffs affects CH4 emission. Twelve late-lactating Santa Inês sheep (44.8 ± 7.5 kg body weight (BW)) were allocated in metabolic cages for an experimental period of 19 days, 14 days for adaptation and 5 days for measuring CH4 emission and dry matter intake (DMI). The animals were divided into four treatments, established in accordance with the cottonseed by-product used in concentrate formulation: Control (CON - no cottonseed by-product), Whole cottonseed (WCS), Cottonseed cake (CSC), and Cottonseed meal (CSM). The free gossypol level of the concentrates were 0, 1,276, 350, and 190 ppm for CON, WCS, CSC, and CSM, respectively. Also, the animals received Cynodon dactylon cv. Coast Cross hay, water, and mineral salt ad libitum. The ether extract content of the diets was balanced between treatments by including soybean oil in concentrates. The technique used to measure the CH4 emission was the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer technique, and the gas samples collected were quantified by analysis in gas chromatography system. The CH4 emission was evaluated considering the daily emission (g CH4/day); DMI (g CH4/kg DMI); and BW (g CH4/kg BW). No statistical difference was found (P > 0.05) between treatments for DMI and CH4 parameters. In the regression analysis, no significant relation (P > 0.05) between gossypol content and CH4 emission was observed. These results suggest that gossypol does not affect rumen methanogenesis.

  10. Relationship of two in vitro assays in protein efficiency ratio determination on selected agricultural by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster B. Wardlaw

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of agricultural by-products as food and feed has been of increasing interest. Protein is a crucial nutrient obtained from those sources. However, in vivo method (a rat study for protein efficiency ratio (PER determination is time consuming and expensive. C-PER and DC-PER are in vitro assays, which involve mathematical calculations using amino acid information from the sample. These two methods have been proven suitable for predicting protein quality of various samples with high correlation to the in vivo assay. Rapid prediction with less cost is the advantage of these methods. Theoretically, C-PER and DC-PER of each sample should have high correlation as they are computed from the same amino acid information. However, the efficiency of the methods is probably based on a range of certain information, especially protein digestibility. This study was conducted to demonstrate one of the limitations of the in vitro assays as shown in selected agricultural by-products. Three categories of selected agricultural by-products were feed-grade egg product (FGEP; 8 samples, distillers' dried grain (DDG; 4 samples, and defatted wheat germ (DWG; 8 samples. Protein contents, amino acid profiles, in vitro protein digestibility, C-PER and DC-PER were determined. Proteins in FGEP categories were significantly higher (P<0.05 than DWG and DDG, respectively. Both C-PER and DC-PER of all samples showed high correlation except in DWG-424. The low correlation in DWG-424 may be due to its low protein digestibility. It may also indicate the limitation of C-PER assay. The assay therefore may not be suitable for samples with low protein digestibility.

  11. THE EVALUATING EFFECTIVENESS OF BY-PRODUCTS AND PLANT COMPONENTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY OF DOUGH HALF-STUFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryabova A. V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the estimation of effectiveness in the use of by-products, cameline-seed oil and amaranth flour in the meat by-products in the dough. By-products were used for the purpose of the expansion of the assortment of the meat semi-finished products in the dough. Amaranth flour was introduced for the purpose of an improvement in the organoleptic and functional- technological characteristics of the stuffing and an increase in the quantity of protein. Cameline-seed oil was added for the purpose of the enrichment of product by omega- acids. As the experimental models we have made pelmeni (ravioli, the relationship of dough and stuffing in which comprised 1:1. In the prototypes the flour from the amaranth was introduced in quantity 5, 10 and 15%. Cameline-seed oil was introduced in quantity 2%. Models with the amaranth flour in quantity 5% had the smaller output of product and the insufficient moisture-binding ability. Models with the content of flour from the amaranth in quantity 15% had the strong smell of plant component. Experimental model with a quantity of amaranth flour 10% on the organoleptic characteristic proved to be best, and there composition was acknowledged most optimum. The studies of the experimental models of meat semi-finished products in the dough showed that the use of amaranth flour contributes to an increase in the moisture-binding ability of stuffing, to an increase in the output of product, to an increase in the content of protein and irreplaceable amino acids. According to the results of all conducted studies is made the conclusion that flour amaranth can be used as the moisture-binding component for making of meat semi-finished products in the dough

  12. Evaluation of wastewater treatment by-products as soil amendment: Growth of sorghum-sudan grass and trace elements concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapatham, Paramasivam; Potts, Mariel C; Delise, Jeffrey A; Sajwan, Kenneth S; Alva, Ashok K; Jayaraman, Kuppuswamy; Chakraborty, Paromita

    2012-01-01

    Wastewater treatment by-products (WTBP), such as sewage sludge (SS) may be used to enhance soil chemical, physical, and biological properties. These enhanced soil properties, in turn, could from its source of production to its site of application. These concerns may be mitigated by incineration of the SS to produce ash (SSA) and dissolved in water and stored in ponds as contribute to an increase in plant growth, production, mineral nutrition. Some SS is difficult to handle due to bad odor in its raw state and has large mass, hence expensive for transportation weathered SSA (WSSA). A greenhouse study was conducted using Candler fine sand CFS; (CFS; pH = 6.8) and Ogeechee loamy sand OLS; (pH = 5.2) with application of either 0, 24.7, 49.4, 98.8, or 148.2 Mg ha(-1) as either SS, SSA, or WSSA to evaluate the biomass production and elemental composition responses of sorghum-sudan grass (Sorghum vulgaris var. Sudanese hitche). Shoot and root biomass were 2 to 3 fold greater in the soil amended with SS, than either SSA or WSSA. Concentrations of nutrient and trace elements in the shoots and roots increased with increasing rates of amendments. Application of these by-products up to 98.8 Mg ha(-1) rate did not adversely affect growth or accumulation of trace elements in sorghum-sudan grass. Long-term field studies are recommended to investigate the potential leaching of various elements from the amended soils in addition to evaluation of plant growth and production responses to determine the acceptable rates of these by-products as amendments to agricultural soils.

  13. STUDIES ON THE PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME FEED INGREDIENTS IN NIGERIA 1: PROTEIN SOURCES AND INDUSTRIAL BY-PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. OMEDE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical characteristics such as particle size (PS, bulk density (BD, water holding capacity (WHC and specific gravity (SG of eight feed raw materials grouped into protein sources (groundnut cake (GNC, soybean meal (SBM, foreign fishmeal (FFM and local fishmeal (LFM and industrial by-products (wheat offal (WO, brewers’ dried grains (BDG, palm kernel cake (PKC and rice husk (RH were studied. The effects of different PS (unmodified, ≥1.00 mm and <1.00 mm on BD, WHC and SG of the experimental materials were studied using a Randomized Completely Block Design (RCBD. Particle size effect was significant for BD, WHC and SG characteristics of the feed ingredients studied. SBM and PKC consistently recorded higher BD values across PS than other feed raw materials in their individual groups. Among the protein sources, decreasing the particle size, (≥1.00 mm and <1.00 mm increased the BD values of GNC and SBM and then FFM and LFM respectively. SBM proved to hold more water than the other protein feedstuffs across all PS. At <1.00 mm PS, RH had the lowest capacity to absorb water. Again, GNC and SBM SG values increased at ≥1.00 mm PS and subsequently decreased at <1.00 mm PS. FFM and LFM also had increased SG value up to the <1.00 mm PS. Industrial by-products (WO, BDG, PKC and RH did not follow similar pattern in their PS-SG effects. Type of machines used and processing methods applied on these industrial by-products may be an explanation to that observation.

  14. Recovery of SO2 and MgO from By-Products of MgO Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liyun; Lu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Quanhai; Guo, Qiang

    2014-11-01

    An industrial demonstration unit using natural gas as a heat source was built to calcine the by-products of MgO wet flue gas desulfurization from power plants; influencing factors on the SO2 content in calciner gas were comprehensively analyzed; and an advantageous recycling condition of MgO and SO2 from by-products was summarized. Results showed that the SO2 content in the calciner gas was increased by more than 10 times under a lower excess air coefficient, a higher feed rate, a lower crystal water in by-products, and a higher feed port position. For the tests conducted under the excess air coefficient above and below one, the effect of the furnace temperature on the SO2 content in the calciner gas was reversed. Results of activity analysis indicate that particles of MgO generated under the calcination temperature of 900-1,000°C had a high activity. In contrast, due to the slight sintering, MgO generated under the calcination temperature of 1,100°C had a low activity. To recycle SO2 as well as MgO, a temperature range of 900-927°C for TE103 is proposed. These studies will prompt the desulfurization market diversification, reduce the sulfur's dependence on imports for making sulfuric acid, be meaningful to balance the usage of the natural resource in China, and be regarded as a reference for the development of this technology for other similar developing countries.

  15. Near infrared spectroscopy for enforcement of European legislation concerning the use of animal by-products in animal feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martnez A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises the work done in the framework of two R&D projects aimed to demonstrate the contribution of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS to help the enforcement of the European legislation governing the use of animal by-products in animal feeds. Three different types of animal feed products were studied: compound feeds (CFs, animal protein byproducts meals (APBPs and animal fats by-products (AFBPs. The quantitative and qualitative chemometric models produced with a large collection of compound feed samples (n = 1005 ground and 523 unground have demonstrated, that NIRS can be used for the detection and quantification of the meat and bone meal (MBM added to compound feeds. Discriminant models produced with unground samples produced 100% of correctly classified samples in two cloned instruments placed in two different locations. The results also show that two dimensions NIR spectra of Animal By-Products (ABP, animal meals and fats may contain information about the animal species or group of species from which the ABPs were produced. However, further work is needed to enlarge the sample bank and the spectral libraries with well authenticated samples in order to increase the robustness of the quantitative and qualitative NIRS models. The paper opens expectations for using NIRS for the enforcement of legislation concerning the use of ABPs in animal feeds. More research and demonstration efforts have to be done in order to obtain more definitive and robust predictive models and for optimising its implementation either at-line, on-line and in-line in feed factories and inspection laboratories.

  16. Biodegradation of Tributyltin (TBT) by Extremophile Bacteria from Atacama Desert and Speciation of Tin By-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez, Jorge; Riffo, Paula; Santander, Paola; Mansilla, Héctor D; Mondaca, María Angélica; Campos, Víctor; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri

    2015-07-01

    Biodegradation of tributyltin (TBT) by four tin resistant Gram negative bacteria isolated from extremely contaminated river sediments in the Atacama Desert in Chile was studied. Moraxella osloensis showed the greatest resistance and degradation capability of TBT, producing less toxic by-products, such as dibutyltin (DBT) and inorganic tin. In 7 days, approximately 80 % of TBT degradation was achieved, generating close to 20 % of DBT as degradation product. The degradation rate constant (k) was 0.022 [day(-1)] and TBT half-life (t1/2) in culture was 4.3 days. Debutylation is stated a probable mechanism of TBT degradation.

  17. Towards the industrial production of antioxidants from food processing by-products with ultrasound-assisted extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virot, Matthieu; Tomao, Valérie; Le Bourvellec, Carine; Renard, Catherine M C G; Chemat, Farid

    2010-08-01

    Apple pomace, a by-product of the cider production, has been studied as a potential source of polyphenols, compounds of great interest for the industry. Ultrasound has been used to improve extraction efficiency in terms of time needed and total polyphenol content. A preliminary study has been first investigated to optimize ethanol proportion of aqueous extractant (50%, v/v) and solid/liquid ratio (polyphenols extraction from apple pomace appears to be a relevant, rapid, sustainable alternative to conventional procedure, and that scale up of the process is possible.

  18. Combined UV treatment and ozonation for the removal of by-product precursors in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools. UV treatment is the most common approach, as it is particularly efficient at removing combined chlorine. However, the UV treatment of pool water increases chlorine reactivity...... and the formation of chloro-organic DBPs such as trihalomethanes. Based on the similar selective reactivity of ozone and chlorine, we hypothesised that the created reactivity to chlorine, as a result of the UV treatment of dissolved organic matter in swimming pool water, might also be expressed as increased...... for a new treatment method for swimming pools....

  19. Prediction of apparent metabolisable energy content of cereal grains and by-products for poultry from its chemical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Losada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the metabolisable energy content of ninety batches of cereal grains and cereal by-products for poultry, regression models derived from different sample aggregations and using chemical components as independent variables were compared. Several statistics have been calculated to estimate the error of prediction. The results indicate that the highest levels of significance and coefficients of determination were obtained for equations derived from the larger data sets. However, the lowest prediction errors were associated to equations calculated for data or groups of data closer to the ingredient ­studied.

  20. Expansion and functional properties of extruded snacks enriched with nutrition sources from food processing by-products

    OpenAIRE

    Korkerd, Sopida; Wanlapa, Sorada; Puttanlek, Chureerat; Uttapap, Dudsadee; Rungsardthong, Vilai

    2015-01-01

    Rich sources of protein and dietary fiber from food processing by-products, defatted soybean meal, germinated brown rice meal, and mango peel fiber, were added to corn grit at 20 % (w/w) to produce fortified extruded snacks. Increase of total dietary fiber from 4.82 % (wb) to 5.92–17.80 % (wb) and protein from 5.03 % (wb) to 5.46–13.34 % were observed. The product indicated high expansion and good acceptance tested by sensory panels. There were 22.33–33.53 and 5.30–11.53 fold increase in the ...

  1. Prediction of apparent metabolisable energy content of cereal grains and by-products for poultry from its chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losada, B.; Blas, C. de; Garcia-Rebollar, P.; Cachaldora, P.; Mendez, J.; Ibañez, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to predict the metabolisable energy content of ninety batches of cereal grains and cereal by-products for poultry, regression models derived from different sample aggregations and using chemical components as independent variables were compared. Several statistics have been calculated to estimate the error of prediction. The results indicate that the highest levels of significance and coefficients of determination were obtained for equations derived from the larger data sets. However, the lowest prediction errors were associated to equations calculated for data or groups of data closer to the ingredient studied. (Author)

  2. By Product Synergy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    properties of hazardous waste but also including the BPS concept and maintaining the normal procedure of managing hazardous waste via DRMO only as a last...graduated from Teniente Benjamin Matienzo Technical High School in Presidencia Roque Saenz Peña, Chaco, República Argentina. He entered the Escuela de...Department Chief. He entered Escuela Superior de Guerra Aérea, the Argentine Air War and Staff College in 2005 where he received the Staff Officer

  3. Optimization of extrusion variables for the production of snacks from by-products of rice and soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lairy Silva Coutinho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to define the process conditions to obtain snacks from the by-products of rice and soybean with physical characteristics suitable for marketing. Therefore, the effects of moisture and extrusion temperature on the expansion and color of the products obtained experimentally obtained were evaluated, and the proximate composition of the by-products and that of the snack with greater desirability were determined. Response surface methodology and rotational central composite design were used, and desirability test based on the regression models adjusted was applied. The most desirable snack, with the highest expansion index (3.39, specific volume (13.5 mL.g-1, and the chromaticity coordinate a* (2.79, was obtained under 12 g.100 g-1 moisture and 85ºC of temperature in the third zone of the extruder. The snack produced under these conditions attained content of protein and lipid content 41 and 64% higher than that of the traditional corn snack. It can be concluded that producing extruded snack made form a mixture of broken grains, rice bran, and soybean okara (81:9:10 is technologically feasible, enabling the development of a new product with good nutritional value that can improve the diet of children, the main consumers of this type of food.

  4. UTILIZATION OF BY-PRODUCT OF CHEESEMAKING AGRIBUSINESS INDUSTRY FOR DEVELOPMENT OF FOOD PRODUCTS AND REDUCTION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Becker Rohlfes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The uses of by-products of cheese industry is still not significant in Brazil, since about 15% of liquid whey is used as raw material in food industry technology. The liquid whey has excellent technological properties, making it an alternative to minimize environmental impacts, besides it enables the use of the same nutritional properties in the production of new food products or adding value to the existing ones. The present study aimed to use liquid whey as an ingredient in the formulation of ice cream, hard candies, ham and breads, as well as to evaluate the influence of it in technological characteristics of the products and to quantify the volume of whey used. In order to evaluate the use of liquid whey, the products were developed with partial or total replacement of milk or water by whey, being the substitution accompanied by the determination of centesimal composition, as well as evaluating the visual characteristics of each product. The results show that the preparation of the products under study with substitution of raw milk or water is viable, proving that using liquid whey is a technological possibility of using a by-product considered to be an environmental pollutant. It was concluded that the use of liquid whey in the food industry reduces the environmental impact, since there is a reduction in the volume of whey discharged into the environment.

  5. Global Warming Implications of the Use of By-Products and Recycled Materials in Western Australia’s Housing Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Lawania

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Western Australia’s housing sector is growing rapidly and around half a million houses are expected to be built by 2030, which not only will result in increased energy and resources demand but will have socio-economic impacts. Majority of Western Australians live in detached houses made of energy intensive clay bricks, which have a high potential to generate construction and demolition (C&D waste. Therefore, there is a need to look into the use of alternative materials and construction methods. Due to Western Australia’s temperate climate, concrete could not only offer a comfortable living space but an operational energy saving also can be achieved. This paper has assessed the global warming implications of cast in-situ concrete sandwich wall system as an alternative to clay brick walls (CBW with partial replacement of cement in concrete with by-products such as fly ash (FA and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS, natural aggregate (NA with recycled crushed aggregate (RCA, natural sand (NS with manufactured sand (MS and, polyethylene terephthalate (PET foam core as a replacement to polystyrene core for construction of a typical 4 × 2 × 2 detached house in Perth. Life cycle management (LCM approach has been used to determine global warming reduction benefits due to the use of available by-products and recycled materials in Western Australian houses.

  6. Production of FucoPol by Enterobacter A47 using waste tomato paste by-product as sole carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Sílvia; Freitas, Filomena; Sevrin, Chantal; Grandfils, Christian; Reis, Maria A M

    2017-03-01

    Out-of-specification tomato paste, a by-product from the tomato processing industry, was used as the sole substrate for cultivation of the bacterium Enterobacter A47 and production of FucoPol, a value-added fucose-rich extracellular polysaccharide. Among the different tested fed-batch strategies, pH-stat, DO-stat and continuous substrate feeding, the highest production (8.77gL(-1)) and overall volumetric productivity (2.92gL(-1)d(-1)) were obtained with continuous substrate feeding at a constant flow rate of 11gh(-1). The polymer produced had the typical FucoPol composition (37mol% fucose, 27mol% galactose, 23mol% glucose and 12mol% glucuronic acid, with an acyl groups content of 13wt%). The average molecular weight was 4.4×10(6)Da and the polydispersity index was 1.2. This study demonstrated that out-of-specification tomato paste is a suitable low-cost substrate for the production of FucoPol, thus providing a route for the valorization of this by-product into a high-value microbial product.

  7. Functional properties and dietary fiber characterization of mango processing by-products (Mangifera indica L., cv Ataulfo and Tommy Atkins).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Magaña, María de Lourdes; García, Hugo S; Bello-Pérez, Luis A; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G; de Oca, Miguel Mata-Montes

    2013-09-01

    Several reports have focused on utilization of post-harvest residues of crops, while neglecting those residues produced by mango processing. These residues represent a waste of nutrients and a source of environmental contaminants. Such by-products could be valuable sources of dietary fiber (DF), antioxidant compounds, and single carbohydrates. The aim of this study was to evaluate some functional properties (FP), and the content of DF and polyphenols (PP) of the peel and coarse material obtained from residues during the industrial processing of Ataulfo and Tommy Atkins mangoes. The total dietary fiber (TDF) content was about 225 mg/g and 387 mg/g (dry weight) for the coarse material and the peel, respectively, from which soluble dietary fiber represented 23 and 42%, respectively. The main neutral sugar identified was rhamnose, especially in peels; the klason lignin (KL) content was 92 mg/g, which highlights the Ataulfo peel (Ataulfo-P) and the Tommy Atkins peel (Tommy Atkins-P). The extractable PP content in Ataulfo-P was higher than in Tommy-Atkins-P, and interesting data for non-extractable PP were obtained in the residues. FP as swelling, water holding, oil holding, and glucose absorption in the residues was studied, obtaining better functional properties when compared to cellulose fiber. The results show that mango industrial by-products, mainly from the Ataulfo-P variety, could be used as ingredients in food products because of their functional properties as well as their DF and PP content.

  8. EVALUATION OF NUTRITIVE VALUE AND IN VITRO METHANE PRODUCTION OF FEEDSTUFFS FROM AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD INDUSTRY BY-PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Santoso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the nutrient degradability, in vitro methane (CH4 production ofseveral agricultural and food industry by-products in relation to their chemical composition. Twenty-onesamples of 7 feedstuffs from agricultural and food industry by-products consisted of corn straw, potatostraw, rice straw, cocoa pod, sago waste, rice bran, soybean curd residue were evaluated by an in vitro gasproduction and nutrient degradability. The feedstuffs varied greatly in their crude protein (CP, neutraldetergent fiber (NDF and non-fiber carbohydrate (NFC contents. Crude protein ranged from 1.5 to 21.8%,NDF from 31.6 to 71.1% and NFC from 1.5 to 50.8%. Among the seven feedstuffs, soybean curd residuehad the highest CP content, on the other hand it had the lowest NDF content. Dry matter (DM and organicmatter (OM degradability were highest (P<0.01 in soybean curd residue among the feedstuffs. The CH4production was significantly higher (P<0.01 in rice straw, cocoa pod and corn straw as compared to sagowaste. There was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.60; P<0.01 between NDF concentration and CH4production. However, the total gas productions was negatively correlated (r = -0.75; P<0.01 with NDFcontent. The CH4 production of feedstuff is influenced by NDF content.

  9. Health impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking water in Europe: HIWATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Smith, Rachel; Golfinopoulos, Spyros; Best, Nicky; Bennett, James; Aggazzotti, Gabriella; Righi, Elena; Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Bucchini, Luca; Cordier, Sylvaine; Villanueva, Cristina M; Moreno, Victor; La Vecchia, Carlo; Bosetti, Cristina; Vartiainen, Terttu; Rautiu, Radu; Toledano, Mireille; Iszatt, Nina; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2009-06-01

    There appears to be very good epidemiological evidence for a relationship between chlorination by-products, as measured by trihalomethanes (THMs), in drinking water and bladder cancer, but the evidence for other cancers, including colorectal cancer appears to be inconclusive and inconsistent. There appears to be some evidence for a relationship between chlorination by-products, as measured by THMs, and small for gestational age (SGA)/intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and preterm delivery, but evidence for other outcomes such as low birth weight (LBW), stillbirth, congenital anomalies and semen quality appears to be inconclusive and inconsistent.The overall aim of the HIWATE study is to investigate potential human health risks (e.g. bladder and colorectal cancer, premature births, SGA, semen quality, stillbirth, congenital anomalies) associated with long-term exposure to low levels of disinfectants (such as chlorine) and DBPs occurring in water for human consumption and use in the food industry. The study will comprise risk-benefit analyses including quantitative assessments of risk associated with microbial contamination of drinking water versus chemical risk and will compare alternative treatment options. The outcome will be improved risk assessment and better information for risk management. The work is divided into different topics (exposure assessment, epidemiology, risk assessment and management) and studies.

  10. Formation of hazardous inorganic by-products during electrolysis of seawater as a disinfection process for desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Byung Soo; Oh, Sang Guen; Hwang, Youn Young; Yu, Hye-Weon; Kang, Joon-Wun; Kim, In S

    2010-11-01

    From our previous study, an electrochemical process was determined to be a promising tool for disinfection in a seawater desalination system, but an investigation on the production of several hazardous by-products is still required. In this study, a more intensive exploration of the formation patterns of perchlorate and bromate during the electrolysis of seawater was conducted. In addition, the rejection efficiencies of the targeted by-products by membrane processes (microfiltration and seawater reverse osmosis) were investigated to uncover the concentrations remaining in the final product from a membrane-based seawater desalination system for the production of drinking water. On the electrolysis of seawater, perchlorate did not provoke any problem due to the low concentrations formed, but bromate was produced at a much higher level, resulting in critical limitation in the application of the electrochemical process to the desalination of seawater. Even though the formed bromate was rejected via microfiltration and reverse osmosis during the 1st and 2nd passes, the residual concentration was a few orders of magnitude higher than the USEPA regulation. Consequently, it was concluded that the application of the electrochemical process to seawater desalination cannot be recommended without the control of bromate.

  11. Determination of phenolic acids in seeds of black cumin, flax, pomegranate and pumpkin and their by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krimer-Malešević Vera M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten phenolic acids, contained in the seeds of black cumin (Nigella sativa L., flax (Linum usitatissimum L., pomegranate (Punica granatum L. and pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. and their oil industry by-products, separated into the free, esterified, and insoluble-bound forms, were quantitatively analysed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector. The chromatographic data were interpreted using Principal Component Analysis (PCA. The PCA model with three principal components (PC1-PC2-PC3 fitted well with 12 examined plant samples, allowing their division into groups according to their origin. The total phenolic variables could be represented by two PCs and for the pattern recognition of the analysed samples, 13 phenolic variables are sufficient, including: free, esterified and insoluble-bound forms of gallic and syringic acids, free vanillic, insoluble bound p-coumaric, esterified p-hydroxybenzaldehide, and free and insoluble-bound forms of p-hydroxybenzoic and trans-synapic acids. This might have potential application in simplified screening of phenolic compounds in seeds and their oil industry by-products or in food component analysis or authenticity detection in such plant materials.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46010

  12. Agricultural by-products as low-cost sorbents for the removal of heavy metals from dilute wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humelnicu, D; Ignat, M; Doroftei, F

    2015-05-01

    n the last years, much attention has been focused on the use of low-cost adsorbents for the removal of Cu(II) and Zn(II) from contaminated waters. In this context, we studied the sorption performances of two kinds of by-products resulted from the agriculture: soy bran and mustard husk. The effects of contact time, the initial metal ion concentration, pH, sorbent mass, and temperature on the adsorption capacity of the agricultural by-products as sorbents were investigated. The thermodynamic parameters associated with the adsorption process indicated that the process is spontaneous and endothermic. Modeling of experimental adsorption isotherm data showed that non-linear Langmuir isotherm fits better than other isotherms. The obtained values for the separation factor, R L were less than one which supports that the adsorption process was favorable. The obtained results indicated that the soy bran has a higher sorption capacity toward zinc ions (74.02 mg g(-1)) than mustard husk (63.69 mg g(-1)). Therefore, there is a great requirement for the search of biomaterials that are cheap and easily available for the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater. The studied sorbents have the advantage of very low cost and great availability for simple operational experiments.

  13. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J; de Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-12-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutagenic activity for Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 both with and without metabolic activation. UV alone hardly affects the mutagenicity of the stored river water for S. typh. TA 98. In all studies, practically no mutagenic activity for S. typh. TA 100 was found. Although remarkable changes in the concentration of individual organic compounds are reported, the identity of the mutagens detected is yet unclear. Compounds of possible interest due to their removal by ozonation are 1,3,3-trimethyloxindole, dicyclopentadiene and several alkylquinolines. Compounds which might be responsible for the increased mutagenicity after chlorination are two brominated acetonitriles and tri(2-chlorethyl) phosphate. Furthermore, the concentration procedure with adsorption on XAD resin and the subsequent elution step may have affected the results. It is proposed to focus further research more on the less volatile by-products of disinfection than on the trihalomethanes.

  14. UV-based advanced oxidation processes for the treatment of odour compounds: efficiency and by-product formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoschke, Kristin; Dietrich, Norman; Börnick, Hilmar; Worch, Eckhard

    2012-10-15

    The occurrence of the taste and odour compounds geosmin and 2-methyl isoborneol (2-MIB) affects the organoleptic quality of raw waters from drinking water reservoirs worldwide. UV-based oxidation processes for the removal of these substances are an alternative to adsorption and biological processes, since they additionally provide disinfection of the raw water. We could show that the concentration of geosmin and 2-MIB could be reduced by VUV irradiation and the combination of UV irradiation with ozone and hydrogen peroxide in pure water and water from a drinking water reservoir. The figure of merit EE/O is an appropriate tool to compare the AOPs and showed that VUV and UV/O(3) yielded the lowest treatment costs for the odour compounds in pure and raw water, respectively. Additionally, VUV irradiation with addition of ozone, generated by the VUV lamp, was evaluated. The generation of ozone and the irradiation were performed in a single reactor system using the same low-pressure mercury lamp, thereby reducing the energy consumption of the treatment process. The formation of the undesired by-products nitrite and bromate was investigated. The combination of VUV irradiation with ozone produced by a VUV lamp avoided the formation of relevant concentrations of the by-products. The internal generation of ozone is capable to produce ozone concentrations sufficient to reduce EE/O below 1 kWh m(-3) and without the risk of the formation of nitrite or bromate above the maximum contaminant level.

  15. Ultra-high pressure LC for astaxanthin determination in shrimp by-products and active food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches-Silva, A; Ribeiro, T; Albuquerque, T G; Paseiro, P; Sendón, R; de Quirós, A Bernaldo; López-Cervantes, J; Sánchez-Machado, D I; Soto Valdez, H; Angulo, I; Aurrekoetxea, G P; Costa, H S

    2013-06-01

    Nowadays, there is increasing interest in natural antioxidants from food by-products. Astaxanthin is a potent antioxidant and one of the major carotenoids in crustaceans and salmonids. An ultra-high pressure liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of astaxanthin in shrimp by-products, and its migration from new packaging materials to food simulants was also studied. The method uses an UPLC® BEH guard-column (2.1 × 5 mm, 1.7 µm particle size) and an UPLC® BEH analytical column (2.1 × 50 mm, 1.7 µm particle size). Chromatographic separation was achieved using a programmed gradient mobile phase consisting of (A) acetonitrile-methanol (containing 0.05 m ammonium acetate)-dichloromethane (75:20:5, v/v/v) and (B) ultrapure water. This method was evaluated with respect to validation parameters such as linearity, precision, limit of detection, limit of quantification and recovery. Low-density polyethylene films were prepared with different amounts of the lipid fraction of fermented shrimp waste by extrusion, and migration was evaluated into food simulants (isooctane and ethanol 95%, v/v). Migration was not detected under the tested conditions.

  16. Expansion and functional properties of extruded snacks enriched with nutrition sources from food processing by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkerd, Sopida; Wanlapa, Sorada; Puttanlek, Chureerat; Uttapap, Dudsadee; Rungsardthong, Vilai

    2016-01-01

    Rich sources of protein and dietary fiber from food processing by-products, defatted soybean meal, germinated brown rice meal, and mango peel fiber, were added to corn grit at 20 % (w/w) to produce fortified extruded snacks. Increase of total dietary fiber from 4.82 % (wb) to 5.92-17.80 % (wb) and protein from 5.03 % (wb) to 5.46-13.34 % were observed. The product indicated high expansion and good acceptance tested by sensory panels. There were 22.33-33.53 and 5.30-11.53 fold increase in the phenolics and antioxidant activity in the enriched snack products. The effects of feed moisture content, screw speed, and barrel temperature on expansion and nutritional properties of the extruded products were investigated by using response surface methodology. Regression equations describing the effect of each variable on the product responses were obtained. The snacks extruded with feed moisture 13-15 % (wb) and extrusion temperature at 160-180 °C indicated the products with high preference in terms of expansion ratio between insoluble dietary fiber and soluble dietary fiber balance. The results showed that the by-products could be successfully used for nutritional supplemented expanded snacks.

  17. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 6, Field study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 3 titled. Use of FGD by-product gypsum enriched with magnesium hydroxide as a soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, J. M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Soto, U. I. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Stehouwer, R. C. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Yibirin, H. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center

    1999-04-30

    A variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies have been developed to meet environmental restrictions imposed by the federal Clean Air Act and its amendments. These technologies include wet scrubber systems that dramatically reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Although such systems are effective, they also produce large volumes of sludge that must be dewatered, stabilized, and disposed of in landfills. Disposal is an expensive and environmentally questionable process for which suitable alternatives are needed. Wet scrubbing of flue gases with magnesium (Mg)-enhanced lime has the potential to become a leading FGD technology. When combined with aforced oxidation system, the wet sludges resulting from this process can be modified and refined to produce gypsum (CaS04∙2H2O) and magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] of sufficient purity for beneficial re-use in the construction (wallboard) and pharmaceutical industries. The pilot plant at the CINERGY Zimmer Station near Cincinnati can also produce gypsum by-products formulated to contain varying amounts of Mg(OH)2- Such materials may have value to the agriculture, forestry, and lawn-care industries as soil "conditioners", liming agents, and nutritional supplements capable of supplying calcium (Ca), Mg, and sulfur (S) for plant growth. This report describes three field studies designed to evaluate by-product gypsum and Mg-gypsum from the Zimmer Station power plant as amendments for improving the quality of mine spoils and agricultural soils that were unproductive because of phytotoxic levels of dissolved aluminum (Al) and low pH. The technical literature suggests that gypsum may be more effective than agricultural limestone for ameliorating Al toxicity below the immediate zone of application. Such considerations are important for deep-rooted plant species that attempt to utilize water and nutrients occurring at depth in the spoil/soil.

  18. Oxidative stability during storage of fish oil from filleting by-products of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is largely independent of the processing and production temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honold, Philipp; Nouard, Marie-Louise; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is the main fish species produced in Danish fresh water farming. Large amounts of fileting by-products like heads, bones, tails (HBT), and intestines are produced when rainbow trout is processed to smoked rainbow trout filets. The filleting by-products can...

  19. Influence of ultrasound enhancement on chlorine dioxide consumption and disinfection by-products formation for secondary effluents disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Junyuan; Li, Zifu; Lan, Juanru; Li, Yajie; Yang, Xin; Wang, Dongling

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been promoted as an alternative disinfectant because of its high disinfection efficiency and less formation of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, particle-associated microorganisms could be protected during the disinfection process, which decreases the disinfection efficiency or increases the required dosage. Besides, the formation of inorganic disinfection by-products is a significant concern in environment health. Ultrasound (US)-combined disinfection methods are becoming increasingly attractive because they are efficient and environmentally friendly. In this study, US was introduced as an enhancement method to identify its influence on ClO2 demand reduction and to minimize the production of potential DBPs for secondary effluents disinfection. Fecal coliform was used as an indicator, and DBPs, including trichloromethane (TCM), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), chlorite (ClO2(-)), and chlorate (ClO3(-)), were analyzed to observe the potential DBPs formation. Results show that US pretreatment could reduce half of ClO2 dosage compared with ClO2 disinfection alone for the same disinfection efficiency, and that an input power density of 2.64 kJ/L pretreatment with the 1.5mg/L ClO2 was enough to meet the discharge requirement in China (i.e., fecal coliform below 1000 CFU/L for Class 1A) for secondary effluent disinfection, and the ClO2(-) concentration in the disinfection effluent was only 1.37 mg/L at the same time. Furthermore, the different effects of US on the two processes (US as pretreatment and simultaneous US/ClO2 disinfection) were also analyzed, including deagglomerating, cell damage, and synergistic disinfection as well as degasing/sonolysis. It was proved that the production of TCM, DCAA, and TCAA was insignificantly influenced with the introduction of US, but US pretreatment did reduce the production of ClO2(-) and ClO3(-) effectually. In general, US pretreatment could be a better option for

  20. Chemical composition and biological value of spray dried porcine blood by-products and bone protein hydrolysate for young chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamroz, D; Wiliczkiewicz, A; Orda, J; Skorupińska, J; Słupczyńska, M; Kuryszko, J

    2011-10-01

    The chemical composition of spray dried porcine blood by-products is characterised by wide variation in crude protein contents. In spray dried porcine blood plasma (SDBP) it varied between 670-780 g/kg, in spray dried blood cells (SDBC) between 830-930 g/kg, and in bone protein hydrolysate (BPH) in a range of 740-780 g/kg. Compared with fish meal, these feeds are poor in Met and Lys. Moreover, in BPH deep deficits of Met, Cys, Thr and other amino acids were found. The experiment comprised 7 dietary treatments: SDBP, SDBC, and BPH, each at an inclusion rate of 20 or 40 g/kg diet, plus a control. The addition of 20 or 40 g/kg of the analysed meals into feeds for very young chickens (1-28 d post hatch) significantly decreased the body weight (BW) of birds. Only the treatments with 40 g/kg of SDBP and SDBC showed no significant difference in BW as compared with the control. There were no significant differences between treatments and type of meal for feed intake, haematocrit and haemoglobin concentrations in blood. Addition of bone protein and blood cell meals to feed decreased the IgG concentration in blood and caused shortening of the femur and tibia bones. However, changes in the mineral composition of bones were not significantly affected by the type of meal used. The blood by-products, which are rich in microelements, improved retention of Ca and Cu only. In comparison to control chickens, significantly better accretion of these minerals was found in treatments containing 20 g/kg of SDBP or 40 g/kg of SDBC. Great variability in apparent ileal amino acid digestibility in chickens was determined. In this respect, some significant differences related to the type of meal fed were confirmed for Asp, Pro, Val, Tyr and His. In general, the apparent ileal digestibility of amino acids was about 2-3 percentage units better in chickens fed on diets containing the animal by products than in control birds.

  1. (L)-Valine production with minimization of by-products' synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum and Brevibacterium flavum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaohu; Chen, Xinde; Zhang, Yue; Qian, He; Zhang, Weiguo

    2012-12-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 and Brevibacterium flavum JV16 were engineered for L-valine production by over-expressing ilvEBN ( r ) C genes at 31 °C in 72 h fermentation. Different strategies were carried out to reduce the by-products' accumulation in L-valine fermentation and also to increase the availability of precursor for L-valine biosynthesis. The native promoter of ilvA of C. glutamicum was replaced with a weak promoter MPilvA (P-ilvAM1CG) to reduce the biosynthetic rate of L-isoleucine. Effect of different relative dissolved oxygen on L-valine production and by-products' formation was recorded, indicating that 15 % saturation may be the most appropriate relative dissolved oxygen for L-valine fermentation with almost no L-lactic acid and L-glutamate formed. To minimize L-alanine accumulation, alaT and/or avtA was inactivated in C. glutamicum and B. flavum, respectively. Compared to high concentration of L-alanine accumulated by alaT inactivated strains harboring ilvEBN ( r ) C genes, L-alanine concentration was reduced to 0.18 g/L by C. glutamicum ATCC13032MPilvA△avtA pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C, and 0.22 g/L by B. flavum JV16avtA::Cm pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C. Meanwhile, L-valine production and conversion efficiency were enhanced to 31.15 g/L and 0.173 g/g by C. glutamicum ATCC13032MPilvA△avtA pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C, 38.82 g/L and 0.252 g/g by B. flavum JV16avtA::Cm pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C. This study provides combined strategies to improve L-valine yield by minimization of by-products' production.

  2. Neutralization/prevention of acid rock drainage using mixtures of alkaline by-products and sulfidic mine wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakangas, Lena; Andersson, Elin; Mueller, Seth

    2013-11-01

    Backfilling of open pit with sulfidic waste rock followed by inundation is a common method for reducing sulfide oxidation after mine closure. This approach can be complemented by mixing the waste rock with alkaline materials from pulp and steel mills to increase the system's neutralization potential. Leachates from 1 m3 tanks containing sulfide-rich (ca.30 wt %) waste rock formed under dry and water saturated conditions under laboratory conditions were characterized and compared to those formed from mixtures. The waste rock leachate produced an acidic leachate (pH9). The decrease of elemental concentration in the leachate was most pronounced for Pb and Zn, while Al and S were relatively high. Overall, the results obtained were promising and suggest that alkaline by-products could be useful additives for minimizing ARD formation.

  3. Natural compounds from grape by-products enhance nutritive value and reduce formation of CML in model muffins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildner-Szkudlarz, Sylwia; Siger, Aleksander; Szwengiel, Artur; Bajerska, Joanna

    2015-04-01

    This study had the objective of determining the effects of the addition of different ingredients and grape by-products (GP) to muffins on CML content. It was found that ingredients, such as salt, baking powder and protein-rich components, reduced CML from 50% to 86%. The use of all ingredients simultaneously caused the highest reduction in CML, suggesting synergistic effects in the muffin formula. Raw cane sugar produced higher amounts of CML than refined sucrose, probably due to metal-ion mediated degradation of fructoselysine. The CML content was correlated with the level of oleic acid at -0.829 and with the level of linoleic acid at 0.913. Muffins enriched with appropriate levels of GP (20%) showed a lowering of the CML level and no significant changes in the sensory profile. GP added to the model system with protein-rich ingredients resulted in the weakest inhibitory effects, probably due to the polyphenol-protein binding mechanism.

  4. Occurrence of ochratoxin A in cocoa by-products and determination of its reduction during chocolate manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copetti, Marina V; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Nester, Melanie A; Efraim, Priscilla; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2013-01-01

    This work reports an investigation carried out to assess the natural occurrence of ochratoxin A in 168 samples from different fractions obtained during the technological processing of cocoa (shell, nibs, liquor, butter, cake and cocoa powder) and the reduction of ochratoxin A during chocolate manufacture. Ochratoxin A analyses were performed with immunoaffinity columns and detection by high performance liquid chromatography. Concerning the natural ochratoxin A contamination in cocoa by-products, the highest levels of ochratoxin A were found in the shell, cocoa powder and cocoa cake. The cocoa butter was the least contaminated, showing that ochratoxin A seems to remain in the defatted cocoa solids. Under the technological conditions applied during the manufacture of chocolate in this study and the level of contamination present in the cocoa beans, this experiment demonstrated that 93.6% of ochratoxin A present in the beans was reduced during the chocolate producing.

  5. Feruloyl esterases as a tool for the release of phenolic compounds from agro-industrial by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Isabelle; Navarro, David; Marnet, Nathalie; Rakotomanomana, Nnjara; Lesage-Meessen, Laurence; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude; Asther, Marcel; Asther, Michèle

    2006-08-14

    Agro-industrial by-products are a potential source of added-value phenolic acids with promising applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Here two purified feruloyl esterases from Aspergillus niger, FAEA and FAEB were tested for their ability to release phenolic acids such as caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid from coffee pulp, apple marc and wheat straw. Their hydrolysis activity was evaluated and compared with their action on maize bran and sugar beet pulp. The specificity of both enzymes against natural and synthetic substrates was evaluated; particular attention was paid to quinic esters and lignin monomers. The efficiency of both enzymes on model substrates was studied. We show the ability of these enzymes to hydrolyze quinic esters and ester linkages between phenolic acids and lignin monomer.

  6. MODEL SYSTEM EVALUATIONS OF MEAT EMULSIONS PREPARED WITH DIFFERENT EDIBLE BEEF BY PRODUCTS AND FATS AND OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa KARAKAYA

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Emulsion parameters of different meat by-products (beef head-meat, beef heart and liver and animal fats and oil (beef fat, mutton fat, sheep tail-fat and corn oil were studied in a model system. The results of the study showed that the highest emulsion capacity (EC was with the heart meat and beef fat emulsion while the lowest EC was measured in the beef head-meat and sheep tail-fat combination. Corn oil gave the best emulsification with beef head-meat and liver, and beef fat resulted the second best results. Beef head-meat gave the most stable emulsion with all fats, but the emulsions prepared with heart and liver were generally unstable.

  7. Reduction of Precursors of Chlorination By-products in Drinking Water Using Fluidized-bed Biofilm Reactor at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU-GUANG XIE; DONG-HUI WEN; DONG-WEN SHI; XIAO-YAN TANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the reduction of chlorination by-products (CBPs) precursors using the fluidized-bed biofilm reactor (FBBR). Methods Reduction of total organic carbon (TOC), ultraviolet absorbance (UV254), trihalomethane (THM)formation potential (THMFP), haloacetic acid (HAA) formation potential (HAAFP), and ammonia in FBBR were evaluated in detail. Results The reduction of TOC or UV254 was low, on average 12.6% and 4.7%, respectively, while the reduction of THMFP and HAAFP was significant. The reduction of ammonia was 30%-40% even below 3℃, however, it could quickly rise to over 50% above 3℃. Conclusions The FBBR effectively reduces CBPs and ammonia in drinking water even at low temperature and seems to be a very promising and competitive drinking water reactor for polluted surface source waters, especially in China.

  8. Monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products inhibit follicle growth and steroidogenesis in mouse ovarian antral follicles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Clara H; Gao, Liying; Dettro, Tyler; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Ricke, William A; Plewa, Michael J; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-07-01

    Water disinfection greatly reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases, but the reaction between disinfectants and natural organic matter in water leads to the formation of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). DBPs have been shown to be toxic, but their effects on the ovary are not well defined. This study tested the hypothesis that monohalogenated DBPs (chloroacetic acid, CAA; bromoacetic acid, BAA; iodoacetic acid, IAA) inhibit antral follicle growth and steroidogenesis in mouse ovarian follicles. Antral follicles were isolated and cultured with either vehicle or DBPs (0.25-1.00mM of CAA; 2-15μM of BAA or IAA) for 48 and 96h. Follicle growth was measured every 24h and the media were analyzed for estradiol levels at 96h. Exposure to DBPs significantly inhibited antral follicle growth and reduced estradiol levels compared to controls. These data demonstrate that DBP exposure caused ovarian toxicity in vitro.

  9. Analysis of oxyhalide disinfection by-products and other anions of interest in drinking water by ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautman, D P; Bolyard, M

    1992-06-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency is developing regulations for various drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). This effort involves developing analytical methods for the DBPs formed as a result of different disinfection treatments and collecting occurrence data for these species. Ion chromatography is one method being used to analyze drinking water samples for the following inorganic DBPs: chlorite, chlorate and bromate. These anions, however, are difficult to separate from common interfering anions of chloride, carbonate and nitrate. A method is therefore presented by which tetraborate/boric acid is used to separate these anions. Method detection limits of the order of 10 micrograms/l, using conductivity and UV detection were obtained. Stability studies of chlorite showing the effectiveness of ethylenediamine as a preservative and summary data for an occurrence of nitrite, nitrate and the DBP precursor bromide are presented.

  10. Communal nursing in wild house mice is not a by-product of group living: Females choose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidt, Andrea; Lindholm, Anna K.; König, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Communal nursing, the provision of milk to non-offspring, has been argued to be a non-adaptive by-product of group living. We used 2 years of field data from a wild house mouse population to investigate this question. Communal nursing never occurred among females that previously lacked overlap in nest box use. Females nursed communally in only 33 % of cases in which there was a communal nursing partner available from the same social group. Solitarily nursing females were not socially isolated in their group; nevertheless, high spatial associations prior to reproduction predict which potential female partner was chosen for communal nursing. An increase in partner availability increased the probability of communal nursing, but population density itself had a negative effect, which may reflect increased female reproductive competition during summer. These results argue that females are selective in their choice of nursing partners and provide further support that communal nursing with the right partner is adaptive.

  11. Digestibility and postprandial ammonia excretion in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed diets containing different oilseed by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obirikorang, Kwasi Adu; Amisah, Stephen; Fialor, Simon Cudjoe

    2015-01-01

    . A fishmeal-based diet served as control against three test diets in which 30 % of each of the oilseed by-products was included. Diets were randomly assigned to triplicate groups of fish (similar to 1 kg bulk weight) for the digestibility trials which spanned a total of 9 days. The partial inclusion...... of oilseed meals did not significantly affect apparent protein digestibility, although lipid, ash and dry matter digestibilities were significantly affected (p Fish fed the soybean meal diets significantly reduced their feed intake and showed lower growth and feed utilization efficiencies over...... the trial period. The inclusions of the plant proteins caused a reduction in ammonia excretion rates with the palm kernel meal diet recording the lowest mean excretion rates of 117 mg kg(-1) day(-1) which was twofold lower than the highest mean daily ammonia excretion rate of the fish group fed the fishmeal...

  12. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

    1995-10-01

    On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues (CCBs) in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground CCB placement. This report describes progress in the following areas: environmental characterization, mix development and geotechnical characterization, material handling and system economics, underground placement, and field demonstration.

  13. Formation of iodinated disinfection by-products during oxidation of iodide-containing water with potassium permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tao; Xu, Bin; Lin, Yi-Li; Hu, Chen-Yan; Xia, Sheng-Ji; Lin, Lin; Mwakagenda, Seleli Andrew; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2012-11-30

    This study shows that iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs) including iodoform (IF), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and triiodoacetic acid (TIAA) can be produced when iodide-containing waters are in contact with potassium permanganate. IF was found as the major I-DBP species during the oxidation. Iodide was oxidized to HOI, I(2) and I(3)(-), consequently, which led to the formation of iodinated organic compounds. I-DBPs varied with reaction time, solution pH, initial concentrations of iodide and potassium permanganate. Yields of IF, IAA and TIAA increased with reaction time and considerable I-DBPs were formed within 12 h. Peak IF yields were found at circumneutral pH range. However, formation of IAA and TIAA was favored under acidic conditions. Molar ratio of iodide to potassium permanganate showed significant influence on formation of IF, IAA and TIAA. The formation of IF, IAA and TIAA also depended on the characteristics of the waters.

  14. Ultra-high pressure LC determination of glucosamine in shrimp by-products and migration tests of chitosan films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches-Silva, Ana; Ribeiro, Tiago; Albuquerque, Tânia G; Paseiro, Perfecto; Sendón, Raquel; de Quirós, Ana Bernaldo; López-Cervantes, Jaime; Sánchez-Machado, Dalia I; Valdez, Herlinda Soto; Angulo, Inmaculada; Aurrekoetxea, Goizane P; Costa, Helena S

    2012-03-01

    Chitosan, a multiple applications molecule, was isolated from shrimp by-products by fermentation. The amount of chitosan in the solid fraction of the fermented extract was measured after its conversion in the respective glucosamine units. The procedure includes an acid hydrolysis (110 °C, 4 h with HCl 8 M) and a derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (Fmoc-Cl). Ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography method was developed and optimized. Excellent peaks resolution was achieved in just 10 min. The method was evaluated in what concerns to validation parameters such as linearity, repeatability, quantification limit, and recovery. Migration tests of films prepared with chitosan were carried out in two simulants: ultrapure water and ethanol 95% (v/v).

  15. Evaluation of potential antigenotoxic, cytotoxic and proapoptotic effects of the olive oil by-product "alperujo", hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol and verbascoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anter, Jaouad; Tasset, Inmaculada; Demyda-Peyrás, Sebastián; Ranchal, Isidora; Moreno-Millán, Miguel; Romero-Jimenez, Magdalena; Muntané, Jordi; Luque de Castro, María Dolores; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés; Alonso-Moraga, Ángeles

    2014-09-15

    Olive oil is an integral ingredient of the "Mediterranean diet". The olive oil industry generates large quantities of a by-product called "alperujo" (AL) during the two-phase centrifugation system developed in the early nineties. AL could be a potent exploitable source of natural phenolic antioxidants. Our results showed that AL and its distinctive phenols hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol and verbascoside were not genotoxic in the Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) of Drosophila melanogaster and exerted antigenotoxic activity against DNA oxidative damage generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Alperujo and hydroxytyrosol also exhibited notable antiproliferative and caspase 3-dependent proapoptotic effects toward the human tumoral cell line HL60. AL can provide a cheap and efficient source of chemopreventive phenolic compounds with strong antioxidant properties, becoming a promising and potent therapeutic drug in the future.

  16. Nutritional evaluation of elephant-grass silages with different levels of by-products from the cashew juice industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Holanda Ferreira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study was conducted to evaluate the intake, apparent digestibility (AD, and degradability in situ of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum silages containing 0, 35.0, 70.0, 105.0, and 140.0 g kg-1 by-product from dried cashew apple (DCBP (as fed basis. A completely randomized design with four replicates was adopted. For the study of degradability in situ, one adult male cattle was used in a completely randomized design with split plots. Intake and AD of dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, acid detergent fiber (ADF, hemicellulose, and cellulose were evaluated, and the digestible energy (DE and nitrogen balance (NB of the silages were determined. The degradability in situ of DM, CP, and NDF was also determined. Addition of DCBP provided an increase in the intakes of DM, CP, NDF, and ADF. No effects of the levels of addition of DCBP were observed on the coefficients of AD of the silages. Regarding NB, positive values were only detected in the treatment with 105.0 g kg-1 DCBP. In the analysis of the degradability in situ, the incubation periods increased the rates of disappearance of DM, CP, and NDF. However, no effect of the levels of DCBP were observed on the effective degradability of DM. The by-product from dried cashew apple can be included at up to 140.0 g kg-1 in silages of elephant grass, but the high contents of acid detergent insoluble nitrogen may compromise the use and availability of nitrogen to the animals.

  17. Rehabilitation of semi-arid coal mine spoil bank soils with mine residues and farm organic by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.; Bosch-Serra, A.; Estudillos, G.; Poch, R.M. [University of Lleida, Lleida (Spain). Dept. of Environmental & Soil Science

    2009-07-01

    A method of rehabilitating coal mine soils was studied under the conditions of a semi-arid climate, lack of topsoil but availability of farm by-products in NE Spain. The objectives of the research were to assess a new method in order to achieve a suitable substrate for the establishment of native vegetation, to evaluate environmental impacts associated with the reclamation process, and to determine the time necessary to integrate the treated area into the surrounding environment. Eight plots (10 x 35 m{sup 2}) were established in September 1997. Substrate combinations of two types of mine spoil (coal dust and coarse-sized material), two levels of pig slurry (39 and 94 Mg ha{sup -1}dry-wt), and cereal straw (0 and 15 Mg ha{sup -1}) were applied. Monitoring of select physical and chemical soil properties and vegetation characteristics was performed from 1997 until 2005. The bulk density and the saturated hydraulic conductivity measured did not limit plant development and water availability. Initial substrate salinity (1.37 S m{sup -1}) decreased with time and in the long term did not limit plant colonization to salinity-adapted species. Initial nitrate concentration was 298 mg kg{sup -1}, but was reduced significantly to acceptable values in 3 years (55 mg kg{sup -1}) and the measured pH (7.6) was maintained at the level of initial spoil values. Vegetation cover reached up to 90%. In the treated area, spontaneous vegetation cover (15 to 70%) colonized the nonsown areas widely. In the medium term, vegetation cover tended to be higher in plots with a thicker layer of coal dust material and the higher slurry rate. Soil rehabilitation and environmental reintegration, taking into account soil and vegetation indicators, was possible in the studied area with low cost inputs using residual materials from mining activities and animal husbandry by-products.

  18. Potential Water Retention Capacity as a Factor in Silage Effluent Control: Experiments with High Moisture By-product Feedstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Okine Abdul; Masaaki, Hanada; Yimamu, Aibibula; Meiji, Okamoto

    2012-04-01

    The role of moisture absorptive capacity of pre-silage material and its relationship with silage effluent in high moisture by-product feedstuffs (HMBF) is assessed. The term water retention capacity which is sometimes used in explaining the rate of effluent control in ensilage may be inadequate, since it accounts exclusively for the capacity of an absorbent incorporated into a pre-silage material prior to ensiling, without consideration to how much the pre-silage material can release. A new terminology, 'potential water retention capacity' (PWRC), which attempts to address this shortcoming, is proposed. Data were pooled from a series of experiments conducted separately over a period of five years using laboratory silos with four categories of agro by-products (n = 27) with differing moisture contents (highest 96.9%, lowest 78.1% in fresh matter, respectively), and their silages (n = 81). These were from a vegetable source (Daikon, Raphanus sativus), a root tuber source (potato pulp), a fruit source (apple pomace) and a cereal source (brewer's grain), respectively. The pre-silage materials were adjusted with dry in-silo absorbents consisting wheat straw, wheat or rice bran, beet pulp and bean stalks. The pooled mean for the moisture contents of all pre-silage materials was 78.3% (±10.3). Silage effluent decreased (p<0.01), with increase in PWRC of pre-silage material. The theoretical moisture content and PWRC of pre-silage material necessary to stem effluent flow completely in HMBF silage was 69.1% and 82.9 g/100 g in fresh matter, respectively. The high correlation (r = 0.76) between PWRC of ensiled material and silage effluent indicated that the latter is an important factor in silage-effluent relationship.

  19. [Formation and Variation of Brominated Disinfection By-products in A Combined Ultrafiltration and Reverse Osmosis Process for Seawater Desalination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Sun, Ying-xue; Shi, Na; Hu, Hong-ying

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and brominated disinfection by-products ( Br-DBPs ) during a seawater desalination ultrafiltration (UF) combined reverse osmosis (RO) process were studied. The seawater contained high level of bromide ion (45.6-50.9 mg x L(-1)) and aromatic compounds with specific ultraviolet absorbance ( SUVA) of 3.6-6.0 L x (mg x m)(-1). The tryptophan-like aromatic protein, fulvic acid-like and soluble microbial by-product-like were the main fluorescent DOM in the seawater. After pre-chlorination of the seawater, the concentrations of DBPs was significantly increased in the influent of UF, which was dominantly the Br-DBPs. Bromoform (CHBr3) accounted for 70.48% - 91.50% of total trihalomethanes (THMs), dibromoacetic acid (Br2CHCO2H) occupied 81.14% - 100% of total haloacetic acids (HAAs) and dibromoacetonitrile (C2HBr2N) occupied 83.77% - 87.45% of total haloacetonitriles ( HANs). The removal efficiency of THMs, HAAs and HANs by the UF membrane was 36.63% - 40.39%, 73.83% - 95.38% and 100%, respectively. The RO membrane could completely remove the HAAs, while a little of the THMs was penetrated. The antiestrogenic activity in the seawater was 0.35 - 0.44 mg x L(-1), which was increased 32% - 69% after the pre-chlorination. The DBPs and other bio-toxic organics which formed during the UF-RO process were finally concentrated in the UF concentrate and RO concentrate.

  20. Effects of microbial inoculants and amino acid production by-product on fermentation and chemical composition of sugarcane silages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Mazza Rodrigues

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition, fermentation patterns and aerobic stability of sugarcane silages with addition of amino acid production (monosodium glutamate by-product (APB and microbial inoculants. Mature sugarcane was chopped and ensiled in laboratory silos (n = 4/treatment without additives (control and with APB (10 g/kg, Pioneer 1174® (PIO, 1.0 mg/kg, Lactobacillus plantarum + Streptoccoccus faecium, Pioneer, Lalsil Cana (2.0 mg/kg, Lactobacillus buchineri, Lallemand or Mercosil Maís 11C33® (1.0 mg/kg, Lactobacillus buchineri + Lactobacillus plantarum + Streptoccoccus faecium, Timac Agro. Fresh silage and silage liquor samples were obtained to assess pH, chemical composition and organic acid concentrations. Silage temperature was recorded throughout seven days to evaluate aerobic stability. The addition of APB decreased lactic acid levels, increased pH and N-NH3 and did not alter ethanol, acetic and butyric acids concentrations or dry matter (DM losses. Microbial inoculants enhanced acetic acid levels, although only Pioneer 1174® and Mercosil Maís 11C33® lowered ethanol, butyric acid and DM losses. The addition of APB increased CP content and did not modify DM, soluble carbohydrates contents or in vitro dry matter digestibility. Additives did not alter silage maximum temperature or temperature increasing rate; however, Pioneer 1174® and Mercosil Maís 11C33® increased the time elapsed to reach maximum temperature. Monosodium glutamate production by-product does not alter fermentation patterns or aerobic stability of sugarcane silages, whereas homofermentative bacteria can provide silages of good quality.

  1. Identification and characterization of an imidazolium by-product formed during the synthesis of 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, John D; Kavanagh, Pierce; McLaughlin, Gavin; O'Brien, John; Talbot, Brian; Barry, Michael; Twamley, Brendan; Dowling, Geraldine; Brandt, Simon D

    2015-10-01

    4-Methylmethcathinone (2-methylamino-1-(4-methylphenyl)propan-1-one, mephedrone) is a psychoactive substance that has been associated with recreational use worldwide. Analytical data related to mephedrone are abundantly available but the characterization of by-products obtained during organic synthesis remains to be explored. This study presents the identification of a 1,2,3,5-tetramethyl-4-(4-methylphenyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium salt (TMMPI), which was formed during the synthesis of mephedrone. When diethyl ether was added to the crude reaction product, solid material precipitated from the solution. Analytical characterization of TMMPI employed a range of analytical techniques including chromatographic analysis in combination with various mass spectrometric detection methods, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and crystal structure analysis. Additional confirmation was obtained from organic synthesis of the imidazolium by-product. When TMMPI was subjected to analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), isomerization and degradation into two distinct compounds were observed, which pointed towards thermal instability under GC conditions. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based investigation into a micro-scale synthesis of mephedrone and three additional analogues revealed that the corresponding TMMPI analogue was formed. Interestingly, storage of mephedrone freebase in a number of organic solvents also gave rise to TMMPI and it appeared that its formation during storage was significantly reduced in the absence of air. The present study aimed to support clandestine forensic investigations by employing analytical strategies that are applicable to manufacturing sites. The imidazolium salts will most likely be found amongst the waste products of any clandestine lab site under investigation rather than with the desired product.

  2. [Formation of Disinfection By-Products During Chlor(am)ination of Danjiangkou Reservoir Water and Comparison of Disinfection Processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min-sheng; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Tian-yang; Cheng, Tuo; Xia, Sheng-ji; Chu, Wen-hai

    2015-09-01

    This study discussed the formation of volatile carbonaceous disinfection by-products (DBPs) and nitrogenous DBPs during chlor(am) ination of Danjingkou Reservoir water which was the source of the Middle Route Project of South-to-North Water Diversion Project. The effects of disinfection methods, disinfectant dosage, reaction time, pH values and bromide ion concentration were investigated. And the disinfection parameters were optimized. Four DBPs, including chloroform (CF), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dichloroacetonitrile(DCAN) and trichloronitromethane(TCNM), were observed during the chlorination. But only CF and TCNM were detected during the chloramination of water. The disinfection by-product (DBP) concentration from chlorination is 7. 5 times higher than that from chloramination, and the yield of DBPs from short time chlorination then chloramination is in between the first two methods. All kinds of DBPs detected increased with the dosage of increasing chlorine, but the increases slowed down when the dosage was higher than 2 mg . L -1. The formation of CF varied a little as the dosage of chloramine increasing. TCNM was detected when the chloramine dosage was greater than 2 mg . L -1. As reaction time going on, chlorine decayed much faster than chloramine, while DBP formation under chlorination was faster than that of chloramination. THM produced by chlorine increased with the increasing pH, while chloramination showed no obvious changes. As the bromide ion increasing, the species of DBPs transformed from chlorinated DBPs to brominated ones, and the total yield of DBPs increased during both chlorination and chloramination, but the former one was obviously more than that of the latter one. In order to reduce the risk of DBP formation, the chloramination is suggested in the treatment of water from Danjiangkou Reservoir. And if chlorination is applied, the disinfectant dosage should be controlled seriously.

  3. Potential Water Retention Capacity as a Factor in Silage Effluent Control: Experiments with High Moisture By-product Feedstuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Okine Abdul; Masaaki, Hanada; Yimamu, Aibibula; Meiji, Okamoto

    2012-01-01

    The role of moisture absorptive capacity of pre-silage material and its relationship with silage effluent in high moisture by-product feedstuffs (HMBF) is assessed. The term water retention capacity which is sometimes used in explaining the rate of effluent control in ensilage may be inadequate, since it accounts exclusively for the capacity of an absorbent incorporated into a pre-silage material prior to ensiling, without consideration to how much the pre-silage material can release. A new terminology, ‘potential water retention capacity’ (PWRC), which attempts to address this shortcoming, is proposed. Data were pooled from a series of experiments conducted separately over a period of five years using laboratory silos with four categories of agro by-products (n = 27) with differing moisture contents (highest 96.9%, lowest 78.1% in fresh matter, respectively), and their silages (n = 81). These were from a vegetable source (Daikon, Raphanus sativus), a root tuber source (potato pulp), a fruit source (apple pomace) and a cereal source (brewer’s grain), respectively. The pre-silage materials were adjusted with dry in-silo absorbents consisting wheat straw, wheat or rice bran, beet pulp and bean stalks. The pooled mean for the moisture contents of all pre-silage materials was 78.3% (±10.3). Silage effluent decreased (p<0.01), with increase in PWRC of pre-silage material. The theoretical moisture content and PWRC of pre-silage material necessary to stem effluent flow completely in HMBF silage was 69.1% and 82.9 g/100 g in fresh matter, respectively. The high correlation (r = 0.76) between PWRC of ensiled material and silage effluent indicated that the latter is an important factor in silage-effluent relationship. PMID:25049587

  4. Amino acid, fatty acid, and mineral profiles of materials recovered from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) processing by-products using isoelectric solubilization/precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-C; Tou, J C; Jaczynski, J

    2007-11-01

    Protein, lipid, and insolubles (bones, skin, scales, fins, insoluble protein, and more) were recovered from rainbow trout processing by-products by means of isoelectric solubilization/precipitation at basic pH and acidic pH. Isoelectric solubilization/precipitation of the trout processing by-products resulted in the recovery of protein that was higher (P processing by-products. Basic pH treatments yielded a higher (P processing by-products, indicating that the pH treatments had no effect on these FAs. Ca and P contents of the processing by-products exceeded the recommended dietary allowances (RDA), but Fe and Mg did not. Basic pH treatments yielded protein with the lowest (P minerals and the highest (P processing by-products effectively removed minerals from the recovered protein without removal of the bones, skin, scales, fins, and so on, prior to processing. The results indicated that isoelectric solubilization/precipitation, particularly at basic pH, permitted recovery of high-quality protein and lipids from fish processing by-products for human food uses; also, the recovered insolubles may be used in animal feeds as a source of minerals.

  5. The spontaneous combustion of coal and its by-products in the Witbank and Sasolburg coalfields of South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pone, J. Denis N. [Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 228 Housler Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hein, Kim A.A. [School of Geosciences, University of the Witwatersrand Johannesburg, P/Bag 3, 2050, WITS (South Africa); Stracher, Glenn B. [Division of Science and Mathematics, East Georgia College, Swainsboro, Georgia 30401 (United States); Annegarn, Harold J. [Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, 2006 (South Africa); Finkleman, Robert B. [University of Texas at Dallas, Department of Geosciences, Richardson, TX 75083-0688 (United States); Blake, Donald R. [Department of Chemistry, 570 Rowland Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2025 (United States); McCormack, John K. [Electron Microbeam Facility, Department of Geological Sciences, MS 172, Mackay School of Mines, University of Nevada, Reno, Navada 8955-0047 (United States); Schroeder, Paul [Department of Geology, University of Georgia, 210 Field Street, Athens, GA 30602-2501 (United States)

    2007-10-01

    Spontaneous combustion of coal seams in the Witbank and Sasolburg coalfields, South Africa, was studied in order to determine if toxic chemical elements and compounds are being mobilised into the environment. Samples of the minerals forming on the surface of coal seams, and gases escaping from vents, were analysed to verify the presence of these elements and compounds. Gas temperature measurements at coal-fire vents range from 34 C to 630 C. The coal-fire gas minerals (CFGM) identified included sulphur compounds and salammoniac. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of CFGM by-products confirmed the presence of mascagnite ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}), illite ((Al,Si){sub 4}O{sub 10}[(OH){sub 2},H{sub 2}O]) letovicite ((NH{sub 4}){sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}), phlogopite (KMg{sub 3}(AlSi{sub 3})O{sub 10}(F,OH){sub 2}), titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), barite (BaSO{sub 4}), iron sulphate (FeSO{sub 4}), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O) and silicate. An unknown and unclassified sulphur-nitrogen-chlorine CFGM was also identified. The minerals are interpreted to have formed by condensation or sublimation; several may be alteration products. Other heavy elements found in the CFGM's are mercury, arsenic, lead, zinc, and copper. Arsenic and mercury were the major elements of potential environmental significance found accumulating around coal-fire vents. Relatively high concentrations of toluene, benzene and xylene were found in the gas collected at both Witbank and Sasolburg coalfields. Benzene, toluene and xylenes are known to possess carcinogenic proprieties. Thirty-two aliphatic compounds were detected, as well as halogenated compounds including bromomethane, iodomethane and trichloromethane in low concentrations, and dichloromethane and chloromethane in high concentrations. The highest concentrations of halogenated compounds were measured for gas samples from the Witbank coalfield. High concentrations of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane were also detected. The

  6. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 1, Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kevin [Dravo Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Beeghly, Joel H. [Dravo Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2000-11-30

    About 30 electric utility units with a combined total of 15,000 MW utilize magnesium enhanced lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. A disadvantage of this and other inhibited or natural oxidation wet FGD systems is the capital and operating cost associated with landfill disposal of the calcium sulfite based solids. Fixation to stabilize the solids for compaction in a landfill also consumes fly ash that otherwise may be marketable. This Executive Summary describes efforts to dewater the magnesium hydroxide and gypsum slurries and then process the solids into a more user friendly and higher value form. To eliminate the cost of solids disposal in its first generation Thiosorbic® system, the Dravo Lime Company developed the ThioClear® process that utilizes a magnesium based absorber liquor to remove S02 with minimal suspended solids. Magnesium enhanced lime is added to an oxidized bleed stream of thickener overflow (TOF) to produce magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] and gypsum (CaS04 • 2H20), as by-products. This process was demonstrated at the 3 to 5 MW closed loop FGD system pilot plant at the Miami Fort Station of Cinergy, near Cincinnati, Ohio with the help of OCDO Grant Agreement CDO/D-91-6. A similar process strictly for'recovery and reuse of Mg(OH)2 began operation at the Zimmer Station of Cinergy in late 1994 that can produce 900 pounds of Mg(OH)2 per hour and 2,600 pounds of gypsum per hour. This by-product plant, called the Zimmer Slipstream Magnesium Hydroxide Recovery Project Demonstration, was conducted with the help of OCDO Grant Agreement CDO/D-921-004. Full scale ThioClear® plants began operating in 1997 at the 130 MW Applied Energy Services plant, in Monaca, PA, and in year 2000 at the 1,330 MW Allegheny Energy Pleasants Station at St. Marys, WV.

  7. Responses of late-lactation cows to forage substitutes in low-forage diets supplemented with by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M B; Chase, L E

    2014-05-01

    In response to drought-induced forage shortages along with increased corn and soy prices, this study was conducted to evaluate lactation responses of dairy cows to lower-forage diets supplemented with forage substitutes. By-product feeds were used to completely replace corn grain and soybean feeds. Forty-eight late-lactation cows were assigned to 1 of 4 diets using a randomized complete block design with a 2-wk covariate period followed by a 4-wk experimental period. The covariate diet contained corn grain, soybean meal, and 61% forage. Experimental diets contained chopped wheat straw (WS)/sugar beet pulp at 0/12, 3/9, 6/6, or 9/3 percentages of diet dry matter (DM). Corn silage (20%), alfalfa silage (20%), pelleted corn gluten feed (25.5%), distillers grains (8%), whole cottonseed (5%), cane molasses/whey blend (7%), and vitamin and mineral mix with monensin (2.5%) comprised the rest of diet DM. The WS/sugar beet pulp diets averaged 16.5% crude protein, 35% neutral detergent fiber, and 11% starch (DM basis). Cows consuming the experimental diets maintained a 3.5% fat- and protein-corrected milk production (35.2 kg; standard deviation=5.6 kg) that was numerically similar to that measured in the covariate period (35.3 kg; standard deviation=5.0 kg). Intakes of DM and crude protein declined linearly as WS increased, whereas neutral detergent fiber intake increased linearly. Linear increases in time spent ruminating (from 409 to 502 min/d) and eating (from 156 to 223 min/d) were noted as WS inclusion increased. Yields of milk fat and 3.5% fat-and protein-corrected milk did not change as WS increased, but those of protein and lactose declined linearly. Phosphorous intakes were in excess of recommended levels and decreased linearly with increasing WS inclusion. Nutritional model predictions for multiparous cows were closest to actual performance for the National Research Council 2001 model when a metabolizable protein basis was used; primiparous cow performance was

  8. Effect of treating alfalfa silage with pistachio by-products extract on Saanen dairy goats performance and microbial nitrogen synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarpour, A; Naserian, A A; Pourmollae, F; Ghaffari, M H

    2016-08-01

    A lactation experiment was conducted to determine the influence of addition of pistachio by-products extract (PBE) to alfalfa silage (AS) on performance, rumen fermentation, milk yield and composition, and microbial nitrogen synthesis. Eight multiparous dairy goats (1.8 ± 0.25 kg of milk yield) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to compare two types of AS (supplemented with or without PBE) with two levels of dietary crude protein (14% vs. 16% CP). Dietary treatments were (i) AS with 14% CP of DM diet without PBE (14%CP-PBE), (ii) AS with 14% CP of DM diet with PBE (14%CP + PBE), (iii) AS with 16% CP of DM diet without PBE (16%CP-PBE) and (iv) AS with 16% CP of DM diet with PBE (16%CP + PBE). PBE was sprayed on fresh alfalfa at a ratio of 500 ml/kg alfalfa DM to get the final concentration of 1% tannin as tannic acid equivalent on DM basis. Intake of CP was greater (p < 0.01) in goats fed 16% CP diets than those fed 14% CP diets, regardless of PBE supplementation. Supplementation of PBE tended to decrease (p = 0.09) rumen NH3 -N concentration regardless of the level of CP in the diet. Supplementation of PBE tended (p = 0.09) to decrease total purine derivatives regardless of the level of CP in the diet with no significant change in microbial nitrogen supply. Efficiency of microbial nitrogen synthesis (EMNS) had a tendency (p = 0.07) to decrease in PBE supplemented diets. There was also a tendency (p = 0.10) for more EMNS in 14% CP fed goats than those fed 16% CP diets. Therefore, AS supplemented with PBE may lead to less concentration of ruminal NH3 -N because of decreased degradation of CP by rumen micro-organisms in response to pistachio by-products tannins.

  9. The study of interrelationship between raw water quality parameters, chlorine demand and the formation of disinfection by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Md. Pauzi; Yee, Lim Fang; Ata, Sadia; Abdullah, Abass; Ishak, Basar; Abidin, Khairul Nidzham Zainal

    Disinfection is the most crucial process in the treatment of drinking water supply and is the final barrier against bacteriological impurities in drinking water. Chlorine is the primary disinfectant used in the drinking water treatment process throughout Malaysia. However, the occurrence of various disinfection by-products such as trihalomethanes (THM) and haloacetic acids created a major issue on the potential health hazards which may pose adverse health effects in both human and animals. To simulate real water treatment conditions and to represent the conditions inherent in a tropical country, this study was performed at an urbanized water treatment plant with a daily production of about 549,000 m 3 of treated water. The purpose of this work is to examine the relationship between the water quality parameters in the raw water with chlorine demand and the formation of disinfection by-products. This study also investigated the possibility of the statistical model applications for the prediction of chlorine demand and the THM formation. Two models were developed to estimate the chlorine demand and the THM formation. For the statistical evaluation, correlation and simple linear regression analysis were conducted using SPSS. The results of Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for the estimation of goodness-of-fit of the dependent variables of the models to the normal distribution showed that all the dependent variables followed the normal distribution at significance level of 0.05. Good linear correlations were observed between the independent parameters and formation of THM and the chlorine demand. This study also revealed that ammonia and the specific ultraviolet absorbent (SUVA) were the function of chlorine consumption in the treatment process. Chlorine dosage and SUVA increase the yield of THM. Chlorine demand and THM formation was moderately sensitive, but significant to the pH. The level of significance ( α) for the statistical tests and the inclusion of a variable in the

  10. Prediction of crude protein digestibility of animal by-product meals for dogs by the protein solubility in pepsin method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Iris M; Sakomura, Nilva K; Pontieri, Cristiana F F; Rebelato, Aline; Putarov, Thaila C; Malheiros, Euclides B; Gomes, Márcia de O S; Castrillo, Carlos; Carciofi, Aulus C

    2014-01-01

    Animal by-product meals have large variability in crude protein (CP) content and digestibility. In vivo digestibility procedures are precise but laborious, and in vitro methods could be an alternative to evaluate and classify these ingredients. The present study reports prediction equations to estimate the CP digestibility of meat and bone meal (MBM) and poultry by-product meal (PM) using the protein solubility in pepsin method (PSP). Total tract CP digestibility of eight MBM and eight PM samples was determined in dogs by the substitution method. A basal diet was formulated for dog maintenance, and sixteen diets were produced by mixing 70 % of the basal diet and 30 % of each tested meal. Six dogs per diet were used to determine ingredient digestibility. In addition, PSP of the MBM and PM samples was determined using three pepsin concentrations: 0·02, 0·002 and 0·0002 %. The CP content of MBM and PM ranged from 39 to 46 % and 57 to 69 %, respectively, and their mean CP digestibility by dogs was 76 (2·4) and 85 (2·6) %, respectively. The pepsin concentration with higher Pearson correlation coefficients with the in vivo results were 0·0002 % for MBM (r 0·380; P = 0·008) and 0·02 % for PM (r 0·482; P = 0·005). The relationship between the in vivo and in vitro results was better explained by the following equations: CP digestibility of MBM = 61·7 + 0·2644 × PSP at 0·0002 % (P = 0·008; R (2) 0·126); and CP digestibility of PM = 54·1 + 0·3833 × PSP at 0·02 % (P = 0·005; R (2) 0·216). Although significant, the coefficients of determination were low, indicating that the models were weak and need to be used with caution.

  11. Conversion of by-products from the vegetable oil industry into biodiesel and its use in internal combustion engines: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Piloto-Rodríguez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel produced from by-products and waste materials can be an economical way of reducing traditional oil consumption and environmental problems. The by-products from the vegetable oil refining industry such as soapstock, acid oil and fatty acid distillates are suitable for producing biodiesel. The present work is a survey related to the use of these by-products to obtain biodiesel, covering not only the traditional and most widely used acid/base catalysis, but also solid and enzymatic catalysis. Details of the techniques are presented and compared. The advantages and drawbacks of the different approaches are mentioned and analyzed. The synthesis and use of by-products from the vegetable oil refining industry are covered in this work. The use of the obtained biodiesel in diesel engines is also included, demonstrating the disparity between the number of papers related to biodiesel production and engine performance assessment.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTIONAL CHANGES IN TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIUM FROM URINARY BLADDERS OF RATS EXPOSED TO DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of a Novel Method for Analysis of Transcriptional Changes in Transitional Epithelium from Urinary Bladders of Rats Exposed to Drinking Water Disinfection By- products.Epidemiologic studies in human populations that drink chemically disinfected drinking wa...

  13. PROBING REACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION USING XAD-8 RESIN ADSORPTION AND ULTRAFILTRATION FRACTIONATION. (R828045)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The disinfection by-product (DBP) reactivity (yield and speciation upon reaction with chlorine) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from two surface waters was investigated. The source waters, each having significantly different specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA

  14. Disposal of agro-industrial by-products by organic cultivation of the culinary and medicinal mushroom Hypsizygus marmoreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akavia, E; Beharav, A; Wasser, S P; Nevo, E

    2009-05-01

    Organic mushroom cultivation is one of the fastest growing segments of agriculture. At the core of the organic philosophy lies a ban on the use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides, in addition to such tenets as animal welfare, energy efficiency, and social justice. Hypsizygus marmoreus (HM) is a highly praised cultivated culinary and medicinal mushroom. The objective of this paper was to assess the suitability of different spawn media and then the potential of various cultivation substrates to support HM mushroom production compatible with organic standards. This objective was met through the setup of a low-cost cultivation infrastructure. First, seven types of spawn media were tested; then we tested 24 substrates made from organic by-products for their biological efficiency (BE) with strain HM 830, using the liquid inoculation method. The best substrate in terms of BE was corn cob with bran and olive press cake, with a BE of 85.6%. The BE of the same composition but without olive press cake was only 67.5%. The next best substrates were cotton straw combinations with a BE of 31.5-53%. The spent mushroom substrate provides a good method for the disposal of solid waste. The guidance provided in this research complies with organic mushroom cultivation standards and can be used to produce certified organic mushrooms. In addition, it allows responsible and beneficial disposal of a large amount of solid agro-industrial waste.

  15. DOC, Color and Disinfection By-Product Precursor Dynamics along an Urbanization Gradient, Croton Water Supply System, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, J. M.; Mitchell, M. J.; Burns, D. A.; Heisig, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    Hydrologic processes in suburban watersheds and their effects on water quality warrant investigation. Biweekly and storm samples were collected and analyzed for base cations, selected anions, and DOC over a one-year period at the outlet of three small (37 - 55 ha) watersheds (one forested, two with different degrees of suburban development) in the Croton Watershed, southeastern New York. Less frequent sampling for Pt/Co color and disinfection by-product precursors (DBPs) were also conducted. Median baseflow concentrations (>3 days since rainfall) of DOC were similar, ranging from 2.1 to 1.8 to 1.7 mg L -1 for the most urbanized to the forested watershed, respectively. On a unit area load basis (kg ha-1 yr-1), the range was from 8.9 to 6.4 to 5.1, again from most urbanized to forested watershed. All three watersheds showed similar storm responses, with evidence for a flushing mechanism in that DOC concentration increased with increasing discharge. Pt/Co color and DBPs (determined as both total trihalomethane and total haloacetic acid formation potentials) showed similar storm behavior, although the range of response was greater than observed for DOC, suggesting a labile DOC fraction was mobilized during storm events. The more urbanized watersheds tended to favor brominated over chlorinated forms of DBPs; the reasons for this are unclear.

  16. Okara, a soymilk industry by-product, as a non-meat protein source in reduced fat beef burgers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Ing Tie Su

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Okara is a by-product generated during the manufacture of soymilk and tofu. Wet okara was added to beef burgers at 0%, 20%, and 25%. The effects of okara on certain physicochemical, textural, and sensory properties of reduced fat beef burgers were investigated. The beef burgers formulated with okara (104.0-106.0 kcal/100 g had 60% less calories than commercial beef burgers (268.8 kcal/100 g. The texture profile analysis showed that the addition of wet okara led to a significant increase in hardness (p < 0.05 and a concomitant reduction in the values of chewiness, springiness, and cohesiveness. Lower sensory scores (p < 0.05 of flavour were observed in the beef burgers containing 25% wet okara. However, the sensory evaluation results showed that juiciness, appearance, tenderness, and overall acceptability of beef burgers formulated with okara did not differ statistically from that of the control (0% okara. Wet okara (20% can be used as a non-meat protein source in the production of reduced-fat beef burgers without changing their sensory quality.

  17. Incineration of animal by-products--The impact of selected parameters on the flux of flue gas enthalpy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujak, Janusz; Sitarz, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents model analyses and tests of animal by-product waste thermal treatment plants. A schedule of tests was prepared, and 62,024 cases of system operation were analysed. A map/work field of the tested plant was drawn up on the basis thereof. Calculations were made following an algorithm described by Bujak (2015a) written in the VBA (Visual Basic for Application) language. The tests showed that when incinerating animal waste, the flux of physical enthalpy of the flue gas from the afterburner chamber depends on numerous design and operating parameters. The most important include the following: humidity and flux of the waste, concentration of oxygen in the flue gas in the afterburner chamber and loss of heat flux to the atmosphere through the external surfaces of the plant. Individual design and operating parameters can be selected so that the process of incineration is ensured without additional fuel. The performed analyses were verified against the actual object at the industrial scale using a meat plant that manufactures ham and processes beef, pork and poultry with a capacity of 150 tonnes/day. The production process waste included mainly bones and - in much smaller quantities - meat and bone meal, at 17 tonnes/day. The performed tests and analyses can be used to optimise the operation of the waste thermal treatment plant at the stages of design and operation.

  18. Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Korea, Republic of); Dyer, R.S.; Michaud, W.R. [Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess elemental sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the US and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loadings of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing.

  19. Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Sung Paal; Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the U.S. and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loading of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing. 14 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Valorization of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) fruit processing by-products and wastes using bioprocess technology - Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, M; Bahkali, Ali H

    2013-04-01

    The date palm Phoenix dactylifera has played an important role in the day-to-day life of the people for the last 7000 years. Today worldwide production, utilization and industrialization of dates are continuously increasing since date fruits have earned great importance in human nutrition owing to their rich content of essential nutrients. Tons of date palm fruit wastes are discarded daily by the date processing industries leading to environmental problems. Wastes such as date pits represent an average of 10% of the date fruits. Thus, there is an urgent need to find suitable applications for this waste. In spite of several studies on date palm cultivation, their utilization and scope for utilizing date fruit in therapeutic applications, very few reviews are available and they are limited to the chemistry and pharmacology of the date fruits and phytochemical composition, nutritional significance and potential health benefits of date fruit consumption. In this context, in the present review the prospects of valorization of these date fruit processing by-products and wastes' employing fermentation and enzyme processing technologies towards total utilization of this valuable commodity for the production of biofuels, biopolymers, biosurfactants, organic acids, antibiotics, industrial enzymes and other possible industrial chemicals are discussed.

  1. Degradation of carbamazepine by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process and formation of disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiqing; Xia, Ying; Li, Ting; Yao, Tian; Shi, Zhou; Zhu, Shumin; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals in water are commonly found and are not efficiently removed by current treatment processes. Degradation of antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process was systematically investigated in this study. The results showed that the UV/chlorine process was more effective at degrading CBZ than either UV or chlorination alone. The CBZ degradation followed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, and the degradation rate constants (kobs) were affected by the chlorine dose, solution pH, and natural organic matter concentration to different degrees. Degradation of CBZ greatly increased with increasing chlorine dose and decreasing solution pH during the UV/chlorine process. Additionally, the presence of natural organic matter in the solution inhibited the degradation of CBZ. UV photolysis, chlorination, and reactive species (hydroxyl radical •OH and chlorine atoms •Cl) were identified as responsible for CBZ degradation in the UV/chlorine process. Finally, a degradation pathway for CBZ in the UV/chlorine process was proposed and the formation potentials of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-products were evaluated. Enhanced formation of trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetonitrile, and trichloronitromethane precursors should be considered when applying UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to drinking water.

  2. Subcritical water hydrolysis of rice straw for reducing sugar production with focus on degradation by-products and kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Qi, Feng; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-06-01

    The competitive reactions of reducing sugar production and degradation in the subcritical water hydrolysis of rice straw were investigated to optimise reducing sugar yield. The optimised conditions (280°C, 20 MPa, rice straw concentration of 5 wt.% and agitation speed of 200 rpm) resulted in a reducing sugar yield of 0.346 g/g rice straw because of the enhanced reducing sugar production and decreased sugar degradation. The sugar yield increased when the temperature increased from 250°C to 280°C, but it decreased when the temperature further increased to 300°C because of the degradation of monosaccharides (e.g. glucose and xylose) into by-products (e.g. 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and acetic acid). A first-order reaction model was developed to elucidate the competitive reaction kinetics of sugar production and degradation at various temperatures. The highest reducing sugar yield based on the model was achieved at 280°C with the highest production and lowest degradation rates.

  3. Pyruvate remediation of cell stress and genotoxicity induced by haloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, Azra; Jeong, Clara H; Pals, Justin A; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are a major class of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. We propose a model of toxic action based on monoHAA-mediated inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a target cytosolic enzyme. This model predicts that GAPDH inhibition by the monoHAAs will lead to a severe reduction of cellular ATP levels and repress the generation of pyruvate. A loss of pyruvate will lead to mitochondrial stress and genomic DNA damage. We found a concentration-dependent reduction of ATP in Chinese hamster ovary cells after monoHAA treatment. ATP reduction per pmol monoHAA followed the pattern of iodoacetic acid (IAA) > bromoacetic acid (BAA) > chloroacetic acid (CAA), which is the pattern of potency observed with many toxicological endpoints. Exogenous supplementation with pyruvate enhanced ATP levels and attenuated monoHAA-induced genomic DNA damage as measured with single cell gel electrophoresis. These data were highly correlated with the SN 2 alkylating potentials of the monoHAAs and with the induction of toxicity. The results from this study strongly support the hypothesis that GAPDH inhibition and the possible subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species is linked with the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, teratogenicity, and neurotoxicity of these DBPs.

  4. New Trends in Cosmetics: By-Products of Plant Origin and Their Potential Use as Cosmetic Active Ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Barbulova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the amount of waste deriving from industrial processes has increased substantially. Many industries produce different types of disposable by-products, rich in valuable compounds. Their characterization and valorization could not only convert them into high value products with application in diverse biotechnological fields, such as Pharmaceutics, Food or Cosmetics, but would also reduce the waste environmental impact and the related treatment costs. There are many examples of cosmetic active ingredients deriving from fish, meat and dairy products, but in the present review we would like to focus on the potentialities and the current use of compounds and extracts deriving from agronomical disposable wastes in the cosmetic field. These types of products are effective, inexpensive and bio-sustainable, and thus represent a valid alternative to the regular plant derived extracts, more commonly adopted in cosmetic formulations. Moreover, if the waste products come from organic farming, they are certainly an even more valuable source of safe extracts for Cosmetics, since they lack any residual pesticide or potentially toxic chemical.

  5. Application of effect-directed analysis to identify mutagenic nitrogenous disinfection by-products of advanced oxidation drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vughs, D; Baken, K A; Kolkman, A; Martijn, A J; de Voogt, P

    2016-07-22

    Advanced oxidation processes are important barriers for organic micropollutants in (drinking) water treatment. It is however known that medium pressure UV/H2O2 treatment may lead to mutagenicity in the Ames test, which is no longer present after granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Many nitrogen-containing disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) result from the reaction of photolysis products of nitrate with (photolysis products of) natural organic material (NOM) during medium pressure UV treatment of water. Identification of the N-DBPs and the application of effect-directed analysis to combine chemical screening results with biological activity would provide more insight into the relation of specific N-DBPs with the observed mutagenicity and was the subject of this study. To this end, fractions of medium pressure UV-treated and untreated water extracts were prepared using preparative HPLC and tested using the Ames fluctuation test. In addition, high-resolution mass spectrometry was performed on all fractions to assess the presence of N-DBPs. Based on toxicity data and read across analysis, we could identify five N-DBPs that are potentially genotoxic and were present in relatively high concentrations in the fractions in which mutagenicity was observed. The results of this study offer opportunities to further evaluate the identity and potential health concern of N-DBPs formed during advanced oxidation UV drinking water treatment.

  6. A low-cost synthesis of biodiesel at room temperature and purification of by-product glycerol for reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Yogesh C.; Singh, Bhaskar; Agrawal, Shweta [Banaras Hindu University, Department of Applied Chemistry, Institute of Technology, Varanasi (India)

    2012-03-15

    Biodiesel has been synthesized from used frying oil at room temperature (35 C) using NaOH and CH{sub 3}ONa as homogeneous catalyst and methanol as reactant. Glycerol has been obtained as a by-product which comprised of impurities such as unreacted methanol, inorganic metals, and traces of triglycerides. The inorganic materials present in glycerol were adsorbed on the surface of activated carbon derived from rice husk. Glycerol is then acidified with 1.2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to form two layers. The upper layer comprised of free fatty acids, and the bottom layer comprised of a glycerol-rich layer. The bottom layer was decanted and neutralized with an aqueous solution of 10 M NaOH and heated at 110 C for 2.5 h to remove the residual water in the glycerol. Further extraction of glycerol with ethanol gives glycerol of high purity. For removal of ethanol from the glycerol, the solution was heated up to 80 C for 30 min. The purity of glycerol was verified by analysis on {sup 13}C-NMR. The upper free fatty acid layer is confirmed with the help of the treatment of this layer with base solution (NaOH) to give soap. Formation of soap is confirmed with the help of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. (orig.)

  7. Optimizing Conditions for the Purification of Omega-3 Fatty Acids from the By-product of Tuna Canning Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teti Estiasih

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This research studied the optimization conditions for separation and purification of omega-3 (&omega-3 fatty acids from the by-product of tuna canning processing by urea crystallization. Crystallization reaction conditions of urea inclusion (urea to fatty acid ratio (X1 and crystallization time(X2 were optimized using the Response Surface Methodology (RSM and a model was developed. Optimization results showed a quadratic polynomial regression equation of Y = 24.44X1+5.65X2-8.71XX1 2-0.19X22+1.171X1X2- 12.95. The maximum response was obtained at an urea to fatty acid ratio of 2.99:1 and a crystallization time of 23.64 h and predicted response of 90.44%. Analysis of variance showed that the urea to fatty acid ratio and crystallization time affected the response. Verification under optimal conditions showed that the purity of &omega-3 fatty acids was 89.64% and the enrichment was 2.85 fold. Verification result revealed that the predicted value from this model was reasonably close to the experimentally observed value. The urea crystallization process changed oil quality parameters including oxidation level (peroxide, anisidin, and totox values, Fe, Cu and P concentrations and moisture content and this were mostly due to the saponification process before urea crystallization.

  8. Effect of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on muscle fatty acid composition in goats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahim Abubakr

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the effects of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on different muscle fatty acid profiles in goats. Thirty-two Cacang × Boer goats were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments: (1 control diet (CD, (2 80% decanter cake diet (DCD, (3 80% palm kernel cake diet (PKCD and (4 CD plus 5% palm oil (PO supplemented diet (CPOD. After 100 days of feeding, four goats from each group were slaughtered and longissimus dorsi (LD, infraspinatus (IS and biceps femoris (BF were sampled for analysis of fatty acids. Goats fed the PKCD had higher (P<0.05 concentration of lauric acid (C12:0 than those fed the other diets in all the muscles tested. Compared to the other diets, the concentrations of palmitic acid (C16:0 and stearic acid (C18:0 were lower (P<0.05 and that of linoleic acid (C18:2 n-6 was higher (P<0.05 in the muscles from goats fed the CD. It was concluded that palm kernel cake and decanter cake can be included in the diet of goats up to 80% with more beneficial than detrimental effects on the fatty acid profile of their meat.

  9. Effect of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on muscle fatty acid composition in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakr, Abdelrahim; Alimon, Abdul Razak; Yaakub, Halimatun; Abdullah, Norhani; Ivan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effects of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on different muscle fatty acid profiles in goats. Thirty-two Cacang × Boer goats were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments: (1) control diet (CD), (2) 80% decanter cake diet (DCD), (3) 80% palm kernel cake diet (PKCD) and (4) CD plus 5% palm oil (PO) supplemented diet (CPOD). After 100 days of feeding, four goats from each group were slaughtered and longissimus dorsi (LD), infraspinatus (IS) and biceps femoris (BF) were sampled for analysis of fatty acids. Goats fed the PKCD had higher (P<0.05) concentration of lauric acid (C12:0) than those fed the other diets in all the muscles tested. Compared to the other diets, the concentrations of palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) were lower (P<0.05) and that of linoleic acid (C18:2 n-6) was higher (P<0.05) in the muscles from goats fed the CD. It was concluded that palm kernel cake and decanter cake can be included in the diet of goats up to 80% with more beneficial than detrimental effects on the fatty acid profile of their meat.

  10. Testing alternative models for sexual isolation in natural populations of Littorina saxatilis: indirect support for by-product ecological speciation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, R; Carballo, M; Conde-Padín, P; Rolán-Alvarez, E

    2004-03-01

    Two ecotypes of the rough periwinkle Littorina saxatilis occur at different shore levels, showing assortative mating for size and partial reproductive isolation when they meet at the mid-shore. This system represents a putative case of incomplete speciation in sympatry. Two processes contribute to the assortative mating: morph-specific microhabitat aggregation and mate choice. The estimation of mate choice coefficients in nature and a simulation of the aggregation effects on sexual isolation were used to disentangle these processes as well as to test alternative mechanisms of mate choice. Mate choice significantly increased the frequency of within-morph pairs and significantly decreased the frequency of between-morph pairs, whereas those pairs including at least one hybrid morph mated randomly. These results allow us to reject a discriminant mate choice and support a model of evolution of sexual isolation as a side-effect of size-assortative mating in a context of divergent natural selection for size in the population. This mechanism is more compatible with a model of incomplete by-product ecological speciation, as suggested by previous evidence.

  11. Biostability and disinfectant by-product formation in drinking water blended with UF-treated filter backwash water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M E; Gagnon, G A; Alam, Z; Andrews, R C

    2008-04-01

    The overall objective of this study was to investigate the impact of blending membrane-treated water treatment plant (WTP) residuals with plant-filtered water on finished water quality in terms of biostability and disinfectant by-product (DBP) formation. Filter backwash water (FBWW) was treated with a pilot-scale ultrafiltration (UF) membrane to produce permeate that was blended with plant-finished water. The batch studies involved storing samples for a specified time with a disinfectant residual to simulate residence time in the distribution system. Both chlorinated and non-chlorinated FBWW streams were evaluated, and the experimental design incorporated free chlorine, monochloramine, and chlorine dioxide in parallel to a model system that did not receive a disinfectant dose. The results of the study found that blending 10% UF-treated FBWW with plant-filtered water did not have an impact on water biostability as monitored with heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs) or DBP concentrations as monitored by TTHM and HAA5 concentrations. However, the presence of preformed THM and HAA species found in chlorinated FBWW streams may result in higher levels of initial DBP concentrations in blended water matrices, and could have a significant impact on finished water quality in terms of meeting specific DBP guidelines or regulations.

  12. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Y.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

    1995-01-01

    On September 30, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative agreement entitled ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines`` (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. The major event during the quarter was the demonstration of the SEEC, Inc. technology for loading and transporting coal combustion residues in the SEEC developed Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC). The demonstration was held on November 17, 1994, at the Illinois Power Company Baldwin power plant, and was attended by about eighty (80) invited guest. Also during the quarter meetings were held with Peabody Coal Company officials to finalize the area in the Peabody No. 10 mine to be used for the placement of coal combustion residues. Work under the Materials Handling and Systems Economics area continued, particularly in refining the costs and systems configuration and in economic evaluation of various systems using equipment leasing rather than equipment purchases. Likewise, work progressed on residues characterization, with some preparations being made for long-term testing.

  13. Modelling formation of disinfection by-products in water distribution: Optimisation using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Radhakrishnan, Mohanasundar

    2012-05-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed as a result of the reaction of halogen-based disinfectants with DBP precursors. In order to appreciate the chemical and biological tradeoffs, it is imperative to understand the formation trends of DBPs and their spread in the distribution network. However, the water at a point in a complex distribution system is a mixture from various sources, whose proportions are complex to estimate and requires advanced hydraulic analysis. To understand the risks of DBPs and to develop mitigation strategies, it is important to understand the distribution of DBPs in a water network, which requires modelling. The goal of this research was to integrate a steady-state water network model with a particle backtracking algorithm and chlorination as well as DBPs models in order to assess the tradeoffs between biological and chemical risks in the distribution network. A multi-objective optimisation algorithm was used to identify the optimal proportion of water from various sources, dosages of alum, and dosages of chlorine in the treatment plant and in booster locations to control the formation of chlorination DBPs and to achieve a balance between microbial and chemical risks. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  14. [Organisation, installations and operation of a carcass rendering plant exemplified by the Regau by-products plant (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelz, I

    1980-03-01

    In Upper Austria, carcasses, offals and all kinds of animal material are collected in hygienically safe manner and taken to the Regau by-products plant. This plant was built in the light of the latest advances to keep environmental pollution at a minimum and is divided in a clean and unclean area. The raw material, including uncut carcasses, is dumped into troughs and then transported by a screw conveyor to the crusher. By steam pressure the material is pushed into a receptacle called "the gun" and from there it is conveyed to the extractor, which functions as sterilizer (30 min 134 degrees C), extractor and drier. The wet extraction procedure using perchloroethylene produces hygienically unobjectionable animal meal and fat. The method of deodorization, which was described in full detail, has made it possible to create not only optimum working conditions in the plant itself but also acceptable living conditions in the residential areas at a distance of some 400 m. Extensive automation of all processes results in optimum hygienic working conditions and also permits a reduction of the staff, in contrast to the conditions prevailing in the former knackeries.

  15. Effects of feeding pistachio by-products silage on growth performance, serum metabolites and urine characteristics in Holstein male calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, P; Riasi, A; Alikhani, M; Fazaeli, H; Ghorbani, G R

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated physiological effects of pistachio by-products silage (PBPS) substituted in Holstein male calves diets and its effects on the growth performance. Twenty-four Holstein male calves (4-5 months of age and 155.6 ± 13.5 kg BW) were randomly assigned to one of four experimental diets (n = 6); contained 0%, 6%, 12% and 18% of PBPS (DM basis) respectively. During a 6-month experiment, dry matter intake (DMI) and weight gain were recorded and blood and urine samples were collected at different times. Results showed that mean DMI was not affected by different levels of PBPS in diets. But the calves fed 6% PBPS had the highest average daily gain (p  0.05) on pH, specific gravity, the number of white and red blood cells and epithelial cells count in urine. The animals did not show any symptom of illness or toxicity during the experimental period and all of the blood and urine parameters were in a normal range. It was concluded that substitution of PBPS up to 18% of the total diet that provide up to 18.2 g/kg DM total tannin had no adverse effects for Holstein male calves.

  16. Evaluation of various techniques for separation of non-polar modifier concentrates from petroleum waxy by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi S. Soliman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two petroleum waxy by-products (light and middle slack wax crudes were evaluated for separation of non-polar modifiers by using different techniques. The results showed that, the light slack wax is selected as a suitable wax for separation of n-alkanes with even number of carbon atoms ranging from C20 to C26 for their high n-paraffin contents and can be used as non-polar structural modifiers. Different separation techniques; multistage fractional crystallization and liquid–solid chromatography; followed by the urea adduction technique have been used to separate non-polar modifier concentrates from the light slack wax crude. The light slack wax, its saturate components, the hard wax fractions isolated from light slack wax by the multistage fractional crystallization technique and their adducts were analyzed by GC to characterize and compare the produced components. The resulting data reveal that, the adducts of light slack wax and its saturate components; can be used as non-polar modifier concentrates of low carbon atoms (C20 + C22. From an economic point of view, the light slack wax adduct is selected as a non-polar modifier concentrate whereas, the separation step can be neglected to save energy. Meanwhile, the adduct of the hard wax isolated at 30 °C can be used as the preferable non-polar modifier concentrate of the high carbon number atoms (C24 + C26.

  17. Aspects Regarding the Gross Chemical Composition and Fatty Acids Content of Some By-Products Obtained from the Biofuel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Colibar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Samples of by-products, obtained from the production of biofuels were collected. These products were introduced in different proportions in feed rations of fattening lambs. Gross chemical composition of feed was analyzed and compared with mean reference values. Ash and cellulose content does not influence the results. The percentage of raw protein, specific for each feed, is correlated with the body weight gain. Fat quantity of rape meal is the closest to that of granulated feed and also the highest compared with the other groups, so that it can justify the higher productive performance achieved by group 1, who received rape meal in ratio. The concentration of fatty acids was determined from analyzed feed after oils extraction, their saponification and their reading with a HPLC. The data showed that the fatty acid level is relatively close to that specified in the literature. Euricic acid, that is responsible for the toxic potential of the rape, has been found in rape meal.

  18. Evaluation of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate production by Pseudomonas putida LS46 using biodiesel by-product streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jilagamazhi; Sharma, Umesh; Sparling, Richard; Cicek, Nazim; Levin, David B

    2014-07-01

    Medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate (mcl-PHA) production by Pseudomonas putida LS46 was analyzed in shake-flask-based batch reactions, using pure chemical-grade glycerol (PG), biodiesel-derived "waste" glycerol (WG), and biodiesel-derived "waste" free fatty acids (WFA). Cell growth, substrate consumption, mcl-PHA accumulation within the cells, and the monomer composition of the synthesized biopolymers were monitored. The patterns of mcl-PHA synthesis in P. putida LS46 cells grown on PG and WG were similar but differed from that of cells grown with WFA. Polymer accumulation in glycerol-based cultures was stimulated by nitrogen limitation and plateaued after 48 h in both PG and WG cultures, with a total accumulation of 17.9% cell dry mass and 16.3% cell dry mass, respectively. In contrast, mcl-PHA synthesis was independent of nitrogen concentration in P. putida LS46 cells cultured with WFA, which accumulated to 29% cell dry mass. In all cases, the mcl-PHAs synthesized consisted primarily of 3-hydroxyoctanoate (C(8)) and 3-hydroxydecanoate (C(10)). WG and WFA supported similar or greater cell growth and mcl-PHA accumulation than PG under the experimental conditions used. These results suggest that biodiesel by-product streams could be used as low-cost carbon sources for sustainable mcl-PHA production.

  19. In vitro physicochemical, phytochemical and functional properties of fiber rich fractions derived from by-products of six fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Sangeeta; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2016-03-01

    A comparative study was done on the health promoting and functional properties of the fibers obtained as by-products from six fruits viz., pomace of carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr), peels of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), Burmese grape (Baccurea sapida Muell. Arg) and Khasi mandarin orange (Citrus reticulata Blanco), and blossom of seeded banana (Musa balbisiana, ABB). Highest yield of fiber was obtained from Burmese grape peel (BGPL, 79.94 ± 0.41 g/100 g) and seeded banana blossom (BB 77.18 ± 0.20 g/100 g). The total dietary fiber content (TDF) was highest in fiber fraction derived from pineapple pomace (PNPM, 79.76 ± 0.42 g/100 g) and BGPL (67.27 ± 0.39 g/100 g). All the samples contained insoluble dietary fiber as the major fiber fraction. The fiber samples showed good water holding, oil holding and swelling capacities. The fiber samples exhibited antioxidant activity. All the samples showed good results for glucose adsorption, amylase activity inhibition, glucose diffusion rate and glucose diffusion reduction rate index.

  20. Ultrasound-assisted activation of zero-valent magnesium for nitrate denitrification: identification of reaction by-products and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ileri, Burcu; Ayyildiz, Onder; Apaydin, Omer

    2015-07-15

    Zero-valent magnesium (Mg(0)) was activated by ultrasound (US) in an aim to promote its potential use in water treatment without pH control. In this context, nitrate reduction was studied at batch conditions using various doses of magnesium powder and ultrasound power. While neither ultrasound nor zero-valent magnesium alone was effective for reducing nitrate in water, their combination removed up to 90% of 50 mg/L NO3-N within 60 min. The rate of nitrate reduction by US/Mg(0) enhanced with increasing ultrasonic power and magnesium dose. Nitrogen gas (N2) and nitrite (NO2(-)) were detected as the major reduction by-products, while magnesium hydroxide Mg(OH)2 and hydroxide ions (OH(-)) were identified as the main oxidation products. The results from SEM-EDS measurements revealed that the surface oxide level decreased significantly when the samples of Mg(0) particles were exposed to ultrasonic treatment. The surface passivation of magnesium particles was successfully minimized by mechanical forces of ultrasound, which in turn paved the way to sustain the catalyst activity toward nitrate reduction.

  1. Evaluating and elucidating the formation of nitrogen-contained disinfection by-products during pre-ozonation and chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Pen-Chi; Chang, E-E; Chuang, Chao-Chin; Liang, Chung-Huei; Huang, Chin-Pao

    2010-06-01

    The effects of pre-ozonation on the formation of haloacetonitriles (HANs), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), and haloketones (HKs) during chlorination were evaluated. Ozone dose used in this study was 8.0, 10.0 and 25.0 mg O(3)/min. Results showed high UV(254) reduction (>80%) and relatively low dissolved organic carbon removal (40-70%) after ozonation, indicating that ozone might change significantly the chemical properties of natural organic matter presented in the raw water. Undesired ozonation by-products such as aldehydes and ketones were also formed during ozonation. At high ozone dose of 25.0 mg O(3)/min, the formation of dichloroacetonitrile and bromochloroacetonitrile were reduced significantly. Chlorination of the ozonated water formed high concentration of TCNM and HKs were 8-10 and 31-48 microg/L, respectively. It was also found that continuous hydrolysis at longer reaction time rapidly decreased the formation of HKs. Ozonation prior to chlorination practice exhibited a negative effect on TCNM and HKs reduction. A model based on the dissolved organic carbon and chlorine decay was developed not only for determining the reaction rate constants, e.g. formation and hydrolysis of HANs, HKs and TCNM, but also for interpreting the mechanisms of formation and hydrolysis for HANs, HKs and TCNM during the chlorination of natural organic matter.

  2. Ozone-biological activated carbon integrated treatment for removal of precursors of halogenated nitrogenous disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenhai; Gao, Naiyun; Yin, Daqiang; Deng, Yang; Templeton, Michael R

    2012-03-01

    Pilot-scale tests were performed to reduce the formation of several nitrogenous and carbonaceous disinfection by-products (DBPs) with an integrated ozone and biological activated carbon (O(3)-BAC) treatment process following conventional water treatment processes (coagulation-sedimentation-filtration). Relative to the conventional processes alone, O(3)-BAC significantly improved the removal of turbidity, dissolved organic carbon, UV(254), NH(4)(+) and dissolved organic nitrogen from 98-99%, 58-72%, 31-53%, 16-93% and 35-74%, respectively, and enhanced the removal efficiency of the precursors for the measured DBPs. The conventional process was almost ineffective in removing the precursors of trichloronitromethane (TCNM) and dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm). Ozonation could not substantially reduce the formation of DCAcAm, and actually increased the formation potential of TCNM; it chemically altered the molecular structures of the precursors and increased the biodegradability of N-containing organic compounds. Consequently, the subsequent BAC filtration substantially reduced the formation of the both TCNM and DCAcAm, thus highlighting a synergistic effect of O(3) and BAC. Additionally, O(3)-BAC was effective at controlling the formation of the total organic halogen, which can be considered as an indicator of the formation of unidentified DBPs.

  3. Effects of white rot fungi on the composition and in vitro digestibility of crop by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, M.N.M.; Pearce, G.R.

    Eleven species of white rot fungi were inoculated on to samples of barley straw, pea straw, sugar cane bagasse and sunflower hulls and incubated at room temperature (14-25 degrees C) for 21 days. In barley straw, Peniophora gigantea caused the greatest depression in lignin content of the dry matter and the greatest increase in in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) (10 units). Sporotrichum priunosum caused the greatest depression in cellulose content and the greatest depression in IVDMD (13 units). In pea straw, Ganoderma lucidum caused the greatest depression in lignin content and the greatest increase in IVDMD (8 units); Peniophora gigantea caused the greatest depression in cellulose content but Sporotrichum pruinosum caused the greatest depression in IVDMD (2 units). In bagasse, Peniophora gigantea caused the greatest depression in lignin content and the greatest increase in IVDMD (7 units). Grifola berkleyi caused the greatest depression in cellulose content and the greatest depression in IVDMD (12 units). In sunflower hulls, Stereum frustulatum caused the greatest depression in lignin content but Peniophora cremea caused the greatest increase in IVDMD (7 units). Peniophora gigantea caused the greatest depression in cellulose content and the greatest depression in IVDMD (3 units). It was concluded that fungi needed to be selected specifically for particular by-products and that some control over the conditions of incubation may need to be exercised in order to achieve more substantial increases in digestibility.

  4. The effect of different boiling and filtering devices on the concentration of disinfection by-products in tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Villanueva, Cristina M; Goñi, Fernando; Rantakokko, Panu; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are ubiquitous contaminants in tap drinking water with the potential to produce adverse health effects. Filtering and boiling tap water can lead to changes in the DBP concentrations and modify the exposure through ingestion. Changes in the concentration of 4 individual trihalomethanes (THM4) (chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM)), MX, and bromate were tested when boiling and filtering high bromine-containing tap water from Barcelona. For filtering, we used a pitcher-type filter and a household reverse osmosis filter; for boiling, an electric kettle, a saucepan, and a microwave were used. Samples were taken before and after each treatment to determine the change in the DBP concentration. pH, conductivity, and free/total chlorine were also measured. A large decrease of THM4 (from 48% to 97%) and MX concentrations was observed for all experiments. Bromine-containing trihalomethanes were mostly eliminated when filtering while chloroform when boiling. There was a large decrease in the concentration of bromate with reverse osmosis, but there was a little effect in the other experiments. These findings suggest that the exposure to THM4 and MX through ingestion is reduced when using these household appliances, while the decrease of bromate is device dependent. This needs to be considered in the exposure assessment of the epidemiological studies.

  5. The Effect of Different Boiling and Filtering Devices on the Concentration of Disinfection By-Products in Tap Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glòria Carrasco-Turigas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Disinfection by-products (DBPs are ubiquitous contaminants in tap drinking water with the potential to produce adverse health effects. Filtering and boiling tap water can lead to changes in the DBP concentrations and modify the exposure through ingestion. Changes in the concentration of 4 individual trihalomethanes (THM4 (chloroform (TCM, bromodichloromethane (BDCM, dibromochloromethane (DBCM, and bromoform (TBM, MX, and bromate were tested when boiling and filtering high bromine-containing tap water from Barcelona. For filtering, we used a pitcher-type filter and a household reverse osmosis filter; for boiling, an electric kettle, a saucepan, and a microwave were used. Samples were taken before and after each treatment to determine the change in the DBP concentration. pH, conductivity, and free/total chlorine were also measured. A large decrease of THM4 (from 48% to 97% and MX concentrations was observed for all experiments. Bromine-containing trihalomethanes were mostly eliminated when filtering while chloroform when boiling. There was a large decrease in the concentration of bromate with reverse osmosis, but there was a little effect in the other experiments. These findings suggest that the exposure to THM4 and MX through ingestion is reduced when using these household appliances, while the decrease of bromate is device dependent. This needs to be considered in the exposure assessment of the epidemiological studies.

  6. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D.; Harbert, W.

    2008-01-01

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam's inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated towater salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin. ?? 2008 2008 Society of ExplorationGeophysicists. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing regulatory violations of disinfection by-products in water distribution networks using a non-compliance potential index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nilufar; Sadiq, Rehan; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Legay, Christelle

    2016-05-01

    Inactivating pathogens is essential to eradicate waterborne diseases. However, disinfection forms undesirable disinfection by-products (DBPs) in the presence of natural organic matter. Many regulations and guidelines exist to limit DBP exposure for eliminating possible health impacts such as bladder cancer, reproductive effects, and child development effects. In this paper, an index named non-compliance potential (NCP) index is proposed to evaluate regulatory violations by DBPs. The index can serve to evaluate water quality in distribution networks using the Bayesian Belief Network (BBN). BBN is a graphical model to represent contributing variables and their probabilistic relationships. Total trihalomethanes (TTHM), haloacetic acids (HAA5), and free residual chlorine (FRC) are selected as the variables to predict the NCP index. A methodology has been proposed to implement the index using either monitored data, empirical model results (e.g., multiple linear regression), and disinfectant kinetics through EPANET simulations. The index's usefulness is demonstrated through two case studies on municipal distribution systems using both full-scale monitoring and modeled data. The proposed approach can be implemented for data-sparse conditions, making it especially useful for smaller municipal drinking water systems.

  8. Removal of soluble microbial products as the precursors of disinfection by-products in drinking water supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Lin; Li, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Water pollution worsens the problem of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water supply. Biodegradation of wastewater organics produces soluble microbial products (SMPs), which can be important DBP precursors. In this laboratory study, a number of enhanced water treatment methods for DBP control, including enhanced coagulation, ozonation, and activated carbon adsorption, were evaluated for their effectiveness in treating SMP-containing water for the DBP reduction purpose. The results show that enhanced coagulation with alum could remove SMPs only marginally and decrease the DBP formation potential (DBPFP) of the water by less than 20%. Although ozone could cause destruction of SMPs in water, the overall DBPFP of the water did not decrease but increased after ozonation. In contrast, adsorption by granular activated carbon could remove the SMP organics from water by more than 60% and reduce the DBPFP by more than 70%. It is apparent that enhanced coagulation and ozonation are not suitable for the removal of SMPs as DBP precursors from polluted water, although enhanced coagulation has been commonly used to reduce the DBP formation caused by natural organic matter. In comparison, activated carbon adsorption is shown as a more effective means to remove the SMP content from water and hence to control the wastewater-derived DBP problem in water supply.

  9. Chlorinated and nitrogenous disinfection by-product formation from ozonation and post-chlorination of natural organic matter surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tom; Templeton, Michael R; Rifai, Omar; Ali, Hussain; Graham, Nigel J D

    2014-09-01

    Ozonation before chlorination is associated with enhanced formation of chloropicrin, a halonitromethane disinfection by-product (DBP), during drinking water treatment. In order to elucidate reasons for this, five natural organic matter (NOM) surrogates were treated using both chlorination and ozonation-chlorination under controlled laboratory conditions. Selected surrogates comprised two phenolic compounds, two free amino acids and one dipeptide; these were resorcinol, 3-aminophenol, L-aspartic acid, β-alanine and ala-ala, respectively. Quantified DBPs included chloropicrin, chloroform, dichloroacetonitrile and trichloroacetonitrile. Relative to chlorination alone, increases in the formation of chloropicrin from ozonation-chlorination varied from 138% for 3-aminophenol to 3740% for ala-ala for the four amine surrogates. This indicates that ozone is more effective than chlorine in mediating a rate-limiting oxidation step in chloropicrin formation, most plausibly involving conversion of an amine group to a nitro group. While both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surrogates acted as chloropicrin precursors, ala-ala was the most reactive precursor following ozonation-chlorination. Since peptides are far commoner in drinking water sources than free amino acids, further research into chemical oxidation of these species by ozone and chlorine is recommended. In contrast, oxidation with ozone prior to chlorination reduced chloroform formation moderately for the two phenolic compounds.

  10. Formation potentials of bromate and brominated disinfection by-products in bromide-containing water by ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Wu, Shouke; Chen, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The ozonation involved in drinking water treatment raises issues of water quality security when the raw water contains bromide (Br(-)). Br(-) ions may be converted to bromate (BrO3 (-)) during ozonation and some brominated disinfection by-products (Br-DBPs) in the following chlorination. In this study, the effects of ozone (O3) dosage, contact time, pH, and Br(-) and ammonia (NH3-N) concentrations on the formation of BrO3 (-) and Br-DBPs have been investigated. The results show that decreasing the initial Br(-) concentration is an effective means of controlling the formation of BrO3 (-). When the concentration of Br(-) was lower than 100 μg/L, by keeping the ratio of O3 dosage to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration at less than 1, BrO3 (-) production was effectively suppressed. The concentration of BrO3 (-) steadily increased with increasing O3 dosage at high Br(-) concentration (>900 μg/L). Additionally, a longer ozonation time increased the concentrations of BrO3 (-) and total organic bromine (TOBr), while it had less impact on the formation potentials of brominated trihalomethanes (Br-THMFP) and haloacetic acids (Br-HAAFP). Higher pH value and the presence of ammonia may lead to an increase in the formation potential of BrO3 (-) and Br-DBPs.

  11. Male food defence as a by-product of intersexual cooperation in a non-human primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseneau-Robar, T. Jean M.; Müller, Eliane; Taucher, Anouk L.; van Schaik, Carel P.; Willems, Erik P.

    2016-01-01

    Males in a number of group-living species fight in intergroup conflicts to defend access to food resources, a seemingly paradoxical behaviour, given that this resource does not usually limit male fitness directly. We investigated the mechanism(s) driving apparent male food defence in wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops pygerythrus) by testing the effect that female resource access, and female audience size and activity had on the response of focal males during simulated intergroup encounters. Males do not appear to defend food to increase the reproductive success of female group members because their response was not influenced by the presence of provisioning boxes that only females could access. Female audience size was also unimportant, suggesting males do not participate in intergroup encounters to advertise their quality to potential mates. However, focal males almost always followed/supported female group members who initiated an approach towards simulated intruders, supporting that male participation largely functions to gain status as a cooperative group member, and that apparent male food defence in this species arises as a by-product of intersexual cooperation. Our study highlights that considering audience composition and activity can reveal the presence of social incentives and illuminate the evolutionary mechanism(s) promoting joint action in intergroup aggression. PMID:27775042

  12. Testing biological hypotheses with embodied robots: adaptations, accidents, and by-products in the evolution of vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia F Roberts

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary robotics allows biologists to test hypotheses about extinct animals. We modeled some of the first vertebrates, jawless fishes, in order to study the evolution of the trait after which vertebrates are named: vertebrae. We tested the hypothesis that vertebrae are an adaptation for enhanced feeding and fleeing performance. We created a population of autonomous embodied robots, Preyro, in which the number of vertebrae, N, were free to evolve. In addition, two other traits, the span of the caudal fin, b, and the predator detection threshold, ζ, a proxy for the lateral line sensory system, were also allowed to evolve. These three traits were chosen because they evolved early in vertebrates, are all potentially important in feeding and fleeing, and vary in form among species. Preyro took on individual identities in a given generation as defined by the population’s six diploid genotypes, Gi. Each Gi was a 3-tuple, with each element an integer specifying N, b, and, ζ. The small size of the population allowed for genetic drift to operate in concert with random mutation and mating; the presence of these mechanisms of chance provided an opportunity for N to evolve by accident. The presence of three evolvable traits provided an opportunity for direct selection on b and/or ζ to evolve N as a by-product linked trait correlation. In selection trials, different Gi embodied in Preyro attempted to feed at a light source and then flee to avoid a predator robot in pursuit. The fitness of each Gi was calculated from five different types of performance: speed, acceleration, distance to the light, distance to the predator, and the number of predator escapes initiated. In each generation, we measured the selection differential, the selection gradient, the strength of chance, and the indirect correlation selection gradient. These metrics allowed us to understand the relative contributions of the three mechanisms: direct selection, chance, and indirect

  13. Formation and cytotoxicity of a new disinfection by-product (DBP) phenazine by chloramination of water containing diphenylamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjun Zhou; Linjie Lou; Lifang Zhu; Zhimin Li; Lizhong Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water have caused worldwide concern due to their potential earcinogenic effects.The formation of phenazine from diphenylamine (DPhA) chloramination was studied and its cytotoxicities for two human cancer cells were also investigated.Phenazine was detected synchronously with the consumption of DPhA by chloramination,which further confirmed that the new DBP phenazine can be produced along with N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA) from DPhA chloramination.The formation of phenazine had a maximum molar yield with solution pH increasing from 5.0 to 9.0,with phernazine as the main product for DPhA chloramination at lower pH,but higher pH favored the formation of NDPhA.Thus,solution pH is the key factor in controlling the formation of phenazine and NDPhA.Both the initial DPhA and chloramine concentrations did not show a significant effect on the molar yields of phenazine,although increasing the chloramine concentration could speed up the reacdon rate of DPhA with chloramines.The cytotoxicity assays showed that phenazine had significant cell-specific toxicity towards T24 (bladder cancer cell lines) and HepG2 (hepatic tumor cell lines) cells with IC50 values of 0.50 and 2.04 mmol/L,respectively,and T24 ceils being more sensitive to phenazine than HepG2 ceils.The IC50 values of phenazine,DPhA,and NDPhA for T24 cells were of the same order of magnitude and the cytotoxicity of phenazine for T24 cells was slightly lower than that of NDPhA (IC50,0.16 mmol/L),suggesting that phenazine in drinking water may have an adverse effect on human health.

  14. Spatio-temporal variability of non-regulated disinfection by-products within a drinking water distribution network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier Shanks, Catherine; Sérodes, Jean-Baptiste; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2013-06-01

    The non-regulated disinfection by-products (NrDBP) targeted in this study include four haloacetonitriles (trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN); dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN); bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN)); one halonitromethane (trichloronitromethane, better known under the name chloropicrin (CPK)); and two haloketones (1,1-dichloro-2-propanone (11DCPone) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2-propanone (111TCPone)). This study provides a detailed picture of the spatial and temporal variability of these NrDBP concentrations throughout a drinking water distribution system located in a region with major seasonal climate variations. The results obtained show that the concentrations of the investigated NrDBPs varied significantly according to time and location. The average concentrations of TCAN, DCAN, CKP and 111TCPone were significantly higher in summer. Surprisingly, the average concentrations of 11DCPone were significantly higher in winter. For BCAN and DBAN, the average concentrations observed in winter were higher, but not in a statistically significant way. On the other hand, the four HANs, CPK and 111TCPone generally had spatial profiles involving an increase of the concentrations along the network according to increasing water residence times, whereas 11DCPone overall had a profile where concentrations increased at the beginning of the network, followed by a drop in the concentrations towards the ends of the network. In spite of certain disparities in the individual spatio-temporal variation profiles, strong correlations were generally observed between NrDBPs, and trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Therefore, THMs and HAAs could be good statistical indicators of the presence of NrDBPs in the drinking water of the system under study.

  15. Seasonal evaluation of the presence of 46 disinfection by-products throughout a drinking water treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Maria; Montesinos, Isabel; Cardador, M J; Silva, Manuel; Gallego, Mercedes

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we studied a total of 46 regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs) including 10 trihalomethanes (THMs), 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs), 6 halonitromethanes (HNMs), 6 haloacetonitriles (HANs) and 11 aldehydes at different points in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) and its distribution network. Determining an increased number of compounds and using accurate, sensitive analytical methodologies for new DBPs can be useful to overcome some challenges encountered in the comprehensive assessment of the quality and safety of drinking water. This paper provides a detailed picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of DBP concentrations from raw water to distribution network. Samples were collected on a monthly basis at seven different points in the four seasons of a year to acquire robust data for DBPs and supplementary quality-related water parameters. Only 5 aldehydes and 2 HAAs were found in raw water. Chlorine dioxide caused the formation of 3 new aldehydes (benzaldehyde included), 5 HAAs and chloroform. The concentrations of DBPs present in raw water were up to 6 times higher in the warmer seasons (spring and summer). The sedimentation process further increased their concentrations and caused the formation of three new ones. Sand filtration substantially removed aldehydes and HAAs (15-50%), but increased the levels of THMs, HNMs and HANs by up to 70%. Chloramination raised the levels of 8 aldehydes and 7 HAAs; also, it caused the formation of monoiodoacetic acid, dibromochloromethane, dichloroiodomethane and bromochloroacetonitrile. Therefore, this treatment increases the levels of existing DBPs and leads to the formation of new ones to a greater extent than does chlorine dioxide. Except for 5 aldehydes, the 23 DBPs encountered at the DWTP exit were found at increased concentrations in the warmer seasons (HAAs by about 50% and THMs by 350%).

  16. Crosstalk between virulence loci: regulation of Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) by products of the std fimbrial operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Garrido, Javier; Casadesús, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells is a critical step in Salmonella infection and requires the expression of genes located in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). A key factor for SPI-1 expression is DNA adenine (Dam) methylation, which activates synthesis of the SPI-1 transcriptional activator HilD. Dam-dependent regulation of hilD is postranscriptional (and therefore indirect), indicating the involvement of unknown cell functions under Dam methylation control. A genetic screen has identified the std fimbrial operon as the missing link between Dam methylation and SPI-1. We show that all genes in the std operon are part of a single transcriptional unit, and describe three previously uncharacterized ORFs (renamed stdD, stdE, and stdF). We present evidence that two such loci (stdE and stdF) are involved in Dam-dependent control of Salmonella SPI-1: in a Dam(-) background, deletion of stdE or stdF suppresses SPI-1 repression; in a Dam(+) background, constitutive expression of StdE and/or StdF represses SPI-1. Repression of SPI-1 by products of std operon explains the invasion defect of Salmonella Dam(-) mutants, which constitutively express the std operon. Dam-dependent repression of std in the ileum may be required to permit invasion, as indicated by two observations: constitutive expression of StdE and StdF reduces invasion of epithelial cells in vitro (1,000 fold) and attenuates Salmonella virulence in the mouse model (>60 fold). In turn, crosstalk between std and SPI-1 may play a role in intestinal infections by preventing expression of SPI-1 in the caecum, an intestinal compartment in which the std operon is known to be expressed.

  17. Efficient removal of Cd{sup 2+} from aqueous solutions using by-product of biodiesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rita F.L., E-mail: ritaflavia@gmail.com [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Soares, Vitor C., E-mail: vcelios@gmail.com [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Costa, Leticia M., E-mail: leticia@qui.ufmg.br [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nascentes, Clesia C., E-mail: clesia@qui.ufmg.br [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sorbents were prepared from radish cake, a waste from biodiesel production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chemical treatments used were simple, low-cost and enhanced the Cd{sup 2+} sorption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cadmium sorption process was evaluated by Freundlich and Langmuir models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemically treated radish cake is an excellent alternative for removal of Cd{sup 2+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Desorption studies demonstrated that the sorbent-metal interaction is reversible. - Abstract: In this study, chemically modified radish cake, a by-product of biodiesel production, was used to remove Cd{sup 2+} from aqueous solutions. The chemical modification was carried out by treating the radish cake with citric acid (CRC), NaOH (NRC) or the combination of citric acid and NaOH (CNRC). The sorbents were characterized by elemental analysis, surface area analysis, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), potentiometric titration (PT), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of the chemical treatment and contact time on cadmium sorption was evaluated. The equilibrium data were analyzed using Freundlich and Langmuir models. The maximum sorption capacity obtained by the Langmuir isotherm was 58.5 mg/g and 64.10 mg/g for the CRC, and CNRC sorbents, respectively. Complete desorption of Cd{sup 2+} was achieved using 0.1 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. The results obtained demonstrate that chemically modified radish cake has potential as a sorbent for Cd{sup 2+} removal from aqueous solutions.

  18. Comparison of ultrasonic-assisted and regular leaching of germanium from by-product of zinc metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Libo; Guo, Wenqian; Peng, Jinhui; Li, Jing; Lin, Guo; Yu, Xia

    2016-07-01

    A major source of germanium recovery and also the source of this research is the by-product of lead and zinc metallurgical process. The primary purpose of the research is to investigate the effects of ultrasonic assisted and regular methods on the leaching yield of germanium from roasted slag containing germanium. In the study, the HCl-CaCl2 mixed solution is adopted as the reacting system and the Ca(ClO)2 used as the oxidant. Through six single factor (leaching time, temperature, amount of Ca(ClO)2, acid concentration, concentration of CaCl2 solution, ultrasonic power) experiments and the comparison of the two methods, it is found the optimum collective of germanium for ultrasonic-assisted method is obtained at temperature 80 °C for a leaching duration of 40 min. The optimum concentration for hydrochloric acid, CaCl2 and oxidizing agent are identified to be 3.5 mol/L, 150 g/L and 58.33 g/L, respectively. In addition, 700 W is the best ultrasonic power and an over-high power is adverse in the leaching process. Under the optimum condition, the recovery of germanium could reach up to 92.7%. While, the optimum leaching condition for regular leaching method is same to ultrasonic-assisted method, except regular method consume 100 min and the leaching rate of Ge 88.35% is lower about 4.35%. All in all, the experiment manifests that the leaching time can be reduced by as much as 60% and the leaching rate of Ge can be increased by 3-5% with the application of ultrasonic tool, which is mainly thanks to the mechanical action of ultrasonic.

  19. Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of the endocrine-disrupting chemical Benzophenone-3: Parameters optimization and by-products identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Benítez, Henry; Aristizábal-Ciro, Carolina; Peñuela, Gustavo A

    2016-02-01

    Benzophenone-3 (BP3) is one of the most used UV filters. Its disruptive effect on the endocrine system of different living beings has been demonstrated by several research groups. Present work addresses on a photocatalytic degradation of BP3 using particles of titanium dioxide in aqueous solutions considering the effect of operating parameters such as pH, catalyst and pollutant initial concentrations, and the presence of hydrogen peroxide, acetonitrile and isopropanol in the solution. In this way, a face centered, central composite design was carried out for the identification of significant factors or interactions that allow the determination of the conditions under which the pollutant suffers the highest rates of degradation. A solution initial pH of 9.0, a TiO2 concentration of 1.184 g L(-1) and an H2O2 concentration of 128.069 mg L(-1) were established as the optimal conditions for the substrate removal. In aqueous solutions and low concentrations of the pollutant (photocatalytic degradation followed a pseudo-first order kinetics. After 300 min of treatment, ∼67% of the dissolved organic carbon was removed, which together with a reduction in toxicity and an increase in biodegradability confirmed that photocatalysis with TiO2 is a potential method to remove BP3 from water. Additionally, tests using acetonitrile as solvent and isopropanol as hydroxyl radical (OH(.)) scavenger suggested that, OH(.) was the main agent responsible of substrate degradation. Finally, ten process by-products were identified and a degradation route was proposed.

  20. Factors affecting the formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products during chlorination of aspartic acid in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Zhigang; Tao, Hui; Xu, Hang; Gu, Yanmei; Chen, Zhaolin; Yu, Jingjing

    2017-01-01

    The formation of emerging nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) from the chlorination of aspartic acid (Asp) was investigated. The yield of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) was higher than other N-DBPs, such as dichloroacetamide(DCAcAm) and chloropicrin (TCNM) during the chlorination of Asp. The formation of DCAN, DCAcAm, and TCNM all showed a trend of first increasing and then decreasing during the chlorination of Asp with increasing contact time. The dosage of chlorine had an impact on the formation of DCAN, DCAcAm, and TCNM. The highest yields of DCAN and DCAcAm appeared when the Cl2/Asp molar ratio was about 20, the yield of TCNM increased with increasing the Cl2/Asp molar ratio from 5 to 30 and TCNM was not produced when the ratio was less than 5. Cyanogen chloride (CNCl) was detected when the Cl2/Asp molar ratio was lower than 5. N-DBPs formation was influenced by pH. DCAN formation increased with increasing pH from 5 to 6 and then decreased with increasing pH from 6 to 9, but DCAcAm and TCNM increased with increasing pH from 5 to 8 and then decreased. Higher temperatures reduced the formation of DCAN and DCAcAm, but increased TCNM formation. DCAN and DCAcAm formation decreased, and relatively stable TCNM formation increased, with increasing free chlorine contact time during chloramination. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was produced during chloramination of Asp and increased with prolonged chloramination contact time. The presence of bromide ions enhanced the yields of haloacetonitriles and shifted N-DBPs to more brominated species.

  1. Short-term spatial and temporal variability of disinfection by-product occurrence in small drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2015-06-15

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) constitute a large family of compounds. Trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids are regulated in various countries, but most DBPs are not. Monitoring DBPs can be delicate, especially for small systems, because various factors influence their formation and speciation. Short-term variations of DBPs can be important and particularly difficult for small systems to handle because they require robust treatment and operation processes. According to our knowledge, for the first time, our study covers the short-term variability of regulated and non-regulated DBP occurrence in small systems in the summer. An intensive sampling program was carried out in six small systems in Canada. Systems in the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador and Quebec were sampled daily at the water treatment plant and at six different locations along the distribution system. Five DBP families were studied: trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, halonitromethanes and haloketones. Results show that there were considerable variations in DBP levels from week to week during the month of study and even from day to day within the week. On a daily basis, DBP levels can fluctuate by 22% to 96%. Likewise, the large number of sampling locations served to observe DBP variations along the distribution system. Observations revealed some degradation and decomposition of non-regulated DBPs never before studied in small systems that are associated with the difficulty these systems experience in maintaining adequate levels of residual disinfectant. Finally, this study reveals that the short term temporal variability of DBPs is also influenced by spatial location along the distribution system. In the short term, DBP levels can fluctuate by 23% at the beginning of the system, compared to 40% at the end. Thus, spatial and temporal variations of DBPs in the short term may make it difficult to select representative locations and periods for DBP monitoring purposes in small

  2. Disinfection by-products of chlorine dioxide (chlorite, chlorate, and trihalomethanes): Occurrence in drinking water in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otoum, Fatima; Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Ahmed, Talaat A; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed; Ali, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water, namely, chlorite, chlorate, and trihalomethanes (THMs), was investigated. Two-hundred-ninety-four drinking water samples were collected from seven desalination plants (DPs), four reservoirs (R), and eight mosques (M) distributed within various locations in southern and northern Qatar. The ClO2 concentration levels ranged from 0.38 to <0.02 mg L(-1), with mean values of 0.17, 0.12, and 0.04 mg L(-1) for the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The chlorite levels varied from 13 μg L(-1) to 440 μg L(-1), with median values varying from 13 to 230 μg L(-1), 77-320 μg L(-1), and 85-440 μg L(-1) for the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The chlorate levels varied from 11 μg L(-1) to 280 μg L(-1), with mean values varying from 36 to 280 μg L(-1), 11-200 μg L(-1), and 11-150 μg L(-1) in the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The average concentration of THMs was 5 μg L(-1), and the maximum value reached 77 μg L(-1) However, all of the DBP concentrations fell within the range of the regulatory limits set by GSO 149/2009, the World Health Organization (WHO), and Kahramaa (KM).

  3. The use of cobs, a by-product of maize grain, for energy production in anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Blandino

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the rising energy demand and the conflict between food, feed and energy crops for agricultural land, there is a growing need for alternative biomasses for energy purposes. New developments in harvesting technology have created the possibility of harvesting cobs as a by-product of maize grain harvesting. The aim of the present work has been to evaluate the potential and limitations of maize cob utilisation in an anaerobic digestion chain, considering the main agronomic, productive and qualitative traits. Maize grain and cob yields as well as the moisture content of samples collected from 1044 (farm fields (located in North West Italy have been determined over the 2012 growing season. Moreover, 27 representative fields were harvested using a modified combine-harvester that is able to collect maize grains and threshed cobs separately. The chemical composition and biochemical methane potential (BMP of the cobs have been analysed. The relative potential yield of maize cobs was established as 18.7% of the grain mass, while the wet cob yield recorded in the field after mechanical harvesting was 1.6 t ha–1. The total solid content was 60%. Fibre fractions represented over 85% of the dry cob matter, lignin content was about 16%, while the protein, ash, lipids and macro-elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium contents were very low compared to the whole-plant maize used for silage. The average BMP of wet threshed cob was 250±20 Nm3 t VS–1. Collected data have underlined that maize cobs could be used as a sustainable feedstock for anaerobic digestion processes.

  4. Formation of iodinated disinfection by-products during oxidation of iodide-containing waters with chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tao; Xu, Bin; Lin, Yi-Li; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2013-06-01

    This study was to explore the formation of iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs), including iodoform (CHI3), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and triiodoacetic acid (TIAA), when iodide-containing artificial synthesized waters and raw waters are in contact with chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Among the investigated I-DBPs, CHI3 was the major species during ClO2 oxidation in artificial synthesized waters. Impact factors were evaluated, including the concentrations of ClO2, iodide (I(-)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH. Formation of CHI3, IAA and TIAA followed an increasing and then decreasing pattern with increased ClO2 or DOC concentration. I-DBPs yield was significantly affected by solution pH. High concentrations of I-DBPs were generated under circumneutral conditions with the maximum formation at pH 8. The increase of I(-) concentration can increase I-DBPs yields, but the increment was suppressed when I(-) concentration was higher than 50 μM. When 100 μg/L I(-)and ClO2 (7.5-44.4 μM) were spiked to the raw water samples from Yangshupu and Minhang drinking water treatment plant, certain amounts of CHI3 and IAA were found under pH 7 and the concentrations were strongly correlated with ClO2 dosage and water qualities, however, no TIAA was detected. Finally, we investigated I-DBPs formation of 18 model compounds, including 4 carboxylic acids, 5 phenols and 8 amino acids, treating with ClO2 when I(-) was present. Results showed that most of these model compounds could form a considerable amount of I-DBPs, especially for propanoic acid, butanoic acid, resorcinol, hydroquinone, alanine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine and serine.

  5. Photolysis of model emerging contaminants in ultra-pure water: kinetics, by-products formation and degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldan, Gloria; Rodriguez, Elena

    2013-02-01

    The photolysis of five frequent emerging contaminants (Benzotriazole, Chlorophene, N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide or DEET, Methylindole, and Nortriptyline HCl) was investigated in ultrapure water under monochromatic ultraviolet radiation at 254 nm and by a combination of UV and hydrogen peroxide. The results revealed that the photolysis rates followed first-order kinetics, with rate constant values depending on the nature of the specific compound, the pH, and the presence or absence of the scavenger tert-butanol. Quantum yields were also determined and values in the range of 53.8 × 10⁻³ - 9.4 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Benzotriazole, 525 × 10⁻³ - 469 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Chlorophene, 2.8 × 10⁻³ - 0.9 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for DEET, 108 × 10⁻³ - 165 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Methylindole, and 13.8 × 10⁻³ - 15.0 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Nortriptyline were obtained. The study also found that the UV/H₂O₂ process enhanced the oxidation rate in comparison to direct photolysis. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) technique was applied to the concentrations evaluation and further identification of the parent compounds and their by-products, which allowed the proposal of the degradation pathways for each compound. Finally, in order to assess the aquatic toxicity in the photodegradation of these compounds, the Vibrio fischeri acute toxicity test was used, and the results indicated an initial increase of this parameter in all cases, followed by a decrease in the specific case of Benzotriazole, DEET, Methylindole, and Chlorophene.

  6. Feed Conversion, Survival and Development, and Composition of Four Insect Species on Diets Composed of Food By-Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonincx, Dennis G A B; van Broekhoven, Sarah; van Huis, Arnold; van Loon, Joop J A

    2015-01-01

    A large part of the environmental impact of animal production systems is due to the production of feed. Insects are suggested to efficiently convert feed to body mass and might therefore form a more sustainable food and/or feed source. Four diets were composed from by-products of food manufacturing and formulated such as to vary in protein and fat content. These were offered to newly hatched Argentinean cockroaches, black soldier flies, yellow mealworms, and house crickets. The first two species are potentially interesting as a feed ingredient, while the latter two are considered edible for humans. Feed conversion efficiency, survival, development time, as well as chemical composition (nitrogen, phosphorus, and fatty acids), were determined. The Argentinean cockroaches and the black soldier flies converted feed more efficiently than yellow mealworms, and house crickets. The first two were also more efficient than conventional production animals. On three of the four diets yellow mealworms and house crickets had a feed conversion efficiency similar to pigs. Furthermore, on the most suitable diet, they converted their feed as efficiently as poultry, when corrected for edible portion. All four species had a higher nitrogen-efficiency than conventional production animals, when corrected for edible portion. Offering carrots to yellow mealworms increased dry matter- and nitrogen-efficiency and decreased development time. Diet affected survival in all species but black soldier flies, and development time was strongly influenced in all four species. The chemical composition of Argentinean cockroaches was highly variable between diets, for black soldier flies it remained similar. The investigated species can be considered efficient production animals when suitable diets are provided. Hence, they could form a sustainable alternative to conventional production animals as a source of feed or food.

  7. POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON FROM NORTH DAKOTA LIGNITE: AN OPTION FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONTROL IN WATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Stepan; Thomas A. Moe; Melanie D. Hetland; Margaret L. Laumb

    2001-06-01

    New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will further affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. This project, a cooperative effort between the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Grand Forks Water Treatment Plant, and the University of North Dakota Department of Civil Engineering, consists of several interrelated tasks. The objective of the research was to evaluate a cost-effective PAC produced from North Dakota lignite for removing NOM from water and reducing trihalomethane formation potential. The research approach was to develop a statistically valid testing protocol that can be used to compare dose-response relationships between North Dakota lignite-derived PAC and commercially available PAC products. A statistical analysis was performed to determine whether significant correlations exist between operating conditions, water properties, PAC properties, and dose-response behavior. Pertinent physical and chemical properties were also measured for each of the waters and each of the PACs.

  8. Biochemical changes and GHG emissions during composting of lignocellulosic residues with different N-rich by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayuela, Maria Luz; Sánchez-Monedero, Miguel Angel; Roig, Asunción; Sinicco, Tania; Mondini, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    Nitrogen availability plays a critical role in the biodegradation of organic matter during composting. Although the optimal initial C/N is known to be around 25-30, the chemical form in which N is present influences microbial activity and therefore degradation rate and gaseous losses. This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of N availability on the composting of a mixture of lignocellulosic materials. Three composting piles were made of a mixture of wheat straw and cotton waste, each pile containing different N-rich animal by-products. The evolution of the main physico-chemical parameters was monitored (temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, C/N, NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), water soluble C and N) as well as the enzymatic activity related to the cycle of the main nutrients (β-glucosidase, protease, alkaline phosphatase and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis). Additionally, fluxes of CO(2), CH(4) and N(2)O emitted from the composting piles were measured by the closed-chamber technique. Cumulative CO(2) emissions were fitted to five different kinetic models with biological significance to C mineralization data. The application of the different N-rich residues had a significant effect on the C and N dynamics during composting. However, most enzymatic activities followed similar patterns in the three piles. The major CO(2) fluxes were recorded during the thermophilic phase, showing a direct relationship with temperature peaks. No CH(4) fluxes were detected for any of the composting piles during the whole trial, whereas low N(2)O emissions were found at the early beginning and during the maturation stage.

  9. Feed Conversion, Survival and Development, and Composition of Four Insect Species on Diets Composed of Food By-Products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis G A B Oonincx

    Full Text Available A large part of the environmental impact of animal production systems is due to the production of feed. Insects are suggested to efficiently convert feed to body mass and might therefore form a more sustainable food and/or feed source. Four diets were composed from by-products of food manufacturing and formulated such as to vary in protein and fat content. These were offered to newly hatched Argentinean cockroaches, black soldier flies, yellow mealworms, and house crickets. The first two species are potentially interesting as a feed ingredient, while the latter two are considered edible for humans. Feed conversion efficiency, survival, development time, as well as chemical composition (nitrogen, phosphorus, and fatty acids, were determined. The Argentinean cockroaches and the black soldier flies converted feed more efficiently than yellow mealworms, and house crickets. The first two were also more efficient than conventional production animals. On three of the four diets yellow mealworms and house crickets had a feed conversion efficiency similar to pigs. Furthermore, on the most suitable diet, they converted their feed as efficiently as poultry, when corrected for edible portion. All four species had a higher nitrogen-efficiency than conventional production animals, when corrected for edible portion. Offering carrots to yellow mealworms increased dry matter- and nitrogen-efficiency and decreased development time. Diet affected survival in all species but black soldier flies, and development time was strongly influenced in all four species. The chemical composition of Argentinean cockroaches was highly variable between diets, for black soldier flies it remained similar. The investigated species can be considered efficient production animals when suitable diets are provided. Hence, they could form a sustainable alternative to conventional production animals as a source of feed or food.

  10. Removal of precursors for disinfection by-products (Dbps)--differences between ozone- and OH-radical-induced oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiser, G; Frimmel, F H

    2000-06-22

    Pre-oxidation is often applied to reduce the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). The aim of pre-oxidation is to remove the centers of natural organic matter (NOM) which are responsible for the formation of DBPs. In this paper, the differences between ozone- and OH-radical-induced oxidation to remove DBP-precursors are compared. The experiments were done with water of the River Ruhr (Germany) with a concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of 2 mg/l. Ozonation was able to remove DBP precursors selectively. After application of an absorbed ozone mass of 1.5 mg/mg DOC, a reduction in the formation potential for (THM-FP) and in the formation potential for organic halogen adsorbable on activated carbon (AOX-FP) down to 68 and 73% of the initial concentration was achieved, respectively. A removal of NOM was not achieved using absorbed ozone masses between 0.5 and 1.5 mg/mg DOC. In the hydrogen peroxide/UV process, in which OH-radicals are the reactive species, an increase in the THM concentration was measured after application of this process with short irradiation times. The maximum value of the THM-FP was 20% higher than the initial THM-FP. After an irradiation time of 1,050 min and a hydrogen peroxide consumption of 5.6 mg/l, the THM-FP and AOX-FP decreased to 75 and 71% of the initial formation potential, respectively. There was no selective removal of DBP precursors because the DOC concentration decreased also to 75% of the initial DOC-concentration after 1,050 min of irradiation.

  11. Ensiling Characteristics and the In situ Nutrient Degradability of a By-product Feed-based Silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. I.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, K. K.; Kwak, W. S.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the ensiling characteristics and the in situ degradability of a by-product feed (BF)-based silage. Before ensilation, the BF-based mixture was composed of 50% spent mushroom substrate, 21% recycled poultry bedding, 15% ryegrass straw, 10.8% rice bran, 2% molasses, 0.6% bentonite, and 0.6% microbial inoculant on a wet basis and ensiled for up to 4 weeks. The BF-based silage contained on average 39.3% moisture, 13.4% crude protein (CP), and 52.2% neutral detergent fiber (NDF), 49% total digestible nutrient, and 37.8% physically effective NDF1.18 on a dry matter (DM) basis. Ensiling the BF-based silage for up to 4 weeks affected (p<0.01) the chemical composition to a small extent, increased (p<0.05) the lactic acid and NH3-N content, and decreased (p<0.05) both the total bacterial and lactic acid bacterial counts from 109 to 108 cfu/g when compared to that before ensiling. These parameters indicated that the silage was fermented and stored well during the 4-week ensiling period. Compared with rice or ryegrass straws, the BF-based silage had a higher (p<0.05) water-soluble and filterable fraction, a lower insoluble degradable DM and CP fraction (p<0.05), a lower digestible NDF (p<0.05) fraction, a higher (p<0.05) DM and CP disappearance and degradability rate, and a lower (p<0.05) NDF disappearance and degradability rate. These results indicated that cheap, good-quality BF-based roughage could be produced by ensiling SMS, RPB, rice bran, and a minimal amount of straw. PMID:25049944

  12. Evaluating Evidence for Association of Human Bladder Cancer with Drinking-Water Chlorination Disinfection By-Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrudey, Steve E; Backer, Lorraine C; Humpage, Andrew R; Krasner, Stuart W; Michaud, Dominique S; Moore, Lee E; Singer, Philip C; Stanford, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (CxDBPs) is prevalent in populations using chlorination-based methods to disinfect public water supplies. Multifaceted research has been directed for decades to identify, characterize, and understand the toxicology of these compounds, control and minimize their formation, and conduct epidemiologic studies related to exposure. Urinary bladder cancer has been the health risk most consistently associated with CxDBPs in epidemiologic studies. An international workshop was held to (1) discuss the qualitative strengths and limitations that inform the association between bladder cancer and CxDBPs in the context of possible causation, (2) identify knowledge gaps for this topic in relation to chlorine/chloramine-based disinfection practice(s) in the United States, and (3) assess the evidence for informing risk management. Epidemiological evidence linking exposures to CxDBPs in drinking water to human bladder cancer risk provides insight into causality. However, because of imprecise, inaccurate, or incomplete estimation of CxDBPs levels in epidemiologic studies, translation from hazard identification directly to risk management and regulatory policy for CxDBPs can be challenging. Quantitative risk estimates derived from toxicological risk assessment for CxDBPs currently cannot be reconciled with those from epidemiologic studies, notwithstanding the complexities involved, making regulatory interpretation difficult. Evidence presented here has both strengths and limitations that require additional studies to resolve and improve the understanding of exposure response relationships. Replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations with further elaboration of exposure assessment is needed to strengthen the knowledge base needed to better inform effective regulatory approaches.

  13. Murciano-Granadina Goat Performance and Methane Emission after Replacing Barley Grain with Fibrous By-Products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Ibáñez

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to study the effects of substituting dietary barley grain with orange pulp or soybean hulls on energy, nitrogen and carbon balance, methane emission and milk performance in dairy goats. Twelve Murciano-Granadina dairy goats in midlactation were selected and divided into three groups based on similar body weight (42.1 ± 1.2 kg and milk yield (2.16 ± 0.060 kg/goat/day. The experiment was conducted in an incomplete crossover design where one group of four goats was fed a mixed ration of barley grain (BRL, another group of four goats replaced barley grain with orange pulp (OP and the last group of four goats with soybean hulls (SH. After adaptation to diets, the goats were allocated to individual metabolism cages and intake, faeces, urine and milk were recorded and analysed. Then, gas exchange measurements were recorded by a mobile open-circuit indirect calorimetry system using a head box. Dry matter intake was similar for all three groups (2.03 kg/d, on average. No influence of the diet was observed for energy balance and the efficiency of use of metabolizable energy for milk production was 0.61. The OP and SH diets showed greater (P < 0.05 fat mobilization (-42.8 kJ/kg of BW0.75, on average than BRL (19.2 kJ/kg of BW0.75. Pentadecanoic acid (15:0 and heptadecanoic acid (17:0 were potential biomarkers of rumen function because the higher contents found in the milk of OP and SH goats than BRL suggest a negative impact of these diets on rumen bacterial metabolism; probably linked to the lower nitrogen supply of diet OP to synthesize microbial protein and greater content of fat in diet SH. Replacement of cereal grain with fibrous by-products did not increased enteric methane emissions (54.7 L/goat per day, on average. Therefore, lactating goats could utilize dry orange pulp and soybean hulls diets with no detrimental effect on milk performance.

  14. Photo-Fenton oxidation of 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole: a by-product from biological breakdown of some pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Bianca M; Marinho, Belisa A; Moreira, Francisca C; Dezotti, Márcia W C; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-11-10

    The present study aims to assess the removal of 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole (AMI), a recalcitrant by-product resulting from the biological breakdown of some pharmaceuticals, applying a solar photo-Fenton process assisted by ferrioxalate complexes (SPFF) (Fe(3+)/H2O2/oxalic acid/UVA-Vis) and classical solar photo-Fenton process (SPF) (Fe(2+)/H2O2/UVA-Vis). The oxidation ability of SPFF was evaluated at different iron/oxalate molar ratios (1:3, 1:6, and 1:9, with [total iron] = 3.58 × 10(-2) mM and [oxalic acid] = 1.07 × 10(-1), 2.14 × 10(-1) and 3.22 × 10(-1) mM, respectively) and pH values (3.5-6.5), using low iron contents (2.0 mg Fe(3+) L(-1)). Additionally, the use of other organic ligands such as citrate and ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) was tested. The oxidation power of the classical SPF was assessed at different pH values (2.8-4.0) using 2.0 mg Fe(2+) per liter. Furthermore, the effect of AMI concentration (2-20 mg L(-1)), presence of inorganic ions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-), HCO3(-), NH4(+)), and radical scavengers (sodium azide and D-mannitol) on the SPF method at pH 3.5 was also assessed. Experiments were done using a lab-scale photoreactor with a compound parabolic collector (CPC) under simulated solar radiation. A pilot-scale assay was conducted using the best operation conditions. While at near neutral pH, an iron/oxalate molar ratio of 1:9 led to the removal of 72 % of AMI after 90 min of SPFF, at pH 3.5, an iron/oxalate molar ratio of 1:3 was enough to achieve complete AMI degradation (below the detection limit) after 30 min of reaction. The SPF process at pH 3.5 underwent a slower AMI degradation, reaching total AMI degradation after 40 min of reaction. The scale up of SPF process showed a good reproducibility. Oxalic and oxamic acids were identified as the main low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids detected during the pilot-scale SPF reaction. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  15. An insight of disinfection by-product (DBP) formation by alternative disinfectants for swimming pool disinfection under tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linyan; Schmalz, Christina; Zhou, Jin; Zwiener, Christian; Chang, Victor W-C; Ge, Liya; Wan, Man Pun

    2016-09-15

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is the most commonly used disinfectant in pool treatment system. Outdoor pools usually suffer from the strong sunlight irradiation which degrades the free chlorine rapidly. In addition, more pools start to adopt the recirculation of swimming pool water, which intensifies the disinfection by-product (DBP) accumulation issue. Given these potential drawbacks of using NaClO in the tropical environment, two alternative organic-based disinfectants, trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA, C3Cl3N3O3) and bromochlorodimethylhydantoin (BCDMH, C5H6BrClN2O2), were investigated and compared to NaClO in terms of their self-degradation and the formation of DBPs, including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), under simulated tropical climate conditions. The result reveals that halogen stabilizer, TCCA, had the advantages of slower free chlorine degradation and lower DBP concentration compared to NaClO, which makes it a good alternative disinfectant. BCDMH was not recommended mainly due to the highly reactive disinfecting ingredient, hypobromous acid (HBrO), which fails to sustain the continuous disinfection requirement. Total disinfectant dosage was the main factor that affects residual chlorine/bromine and THM/HAA formation regardless of different disinfectant dosing methods, e.g. shock dosing (one-time spiking) in the beginning, and continuous dosing during the whole experimental period. Two-stage second-order-kinetic-based models demonstrate a good correlation between the measured and predicted data for chlorine decay (R(2) ≥ 0.95), THM (R(2) ≥ 0.99) and HAA (R(2) ≥ 0.83) formation. Higher temperature was found to enhance the DBP formation due to the temperature dependence of reaction rates. Thus, temperature control of pools, especially for those preferring higher temperatures (e.g. hydrotherapy and spa), should take both bather comfort and DBP formation potential into consideration. It is also observed that chlorine competition

  16. Prevalence of Ocular, Respiratory and Cutaneous Symptoms in Indoor Swimming Pool Workers and Exposure to Disinfection By-Products (DBPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmina Fantuzzi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported respiratory, ocular and cutaneous symptoms in subjects working at indoor swimming pools and to assess the relationship between frequency of declared symptoms and occupational exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs. Twenty indoor swimming pools in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy were included in the study. Information about the health status of 133 employees was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Subjects working at swimming pools claimed to frequently experience the following symptoms: cold (65.4%, sneezing (52.6%, red eyes (48.9% and itchy eyes (44.4%. Only 7.5% claimed to suffer from asthma. Red eyes, runny nose, voice loss and cold symptoms were declared more frequently by pool attendants (lifeguards and trainers when compared with employees working in other areas of the facility (office, cafe, etc.. Pool attendants experienced generally more verrucas, mycosis, eczema and rash than others workers; however, only the difference in the frequency of self-declared mycosis was statistically significant (p = 0.010. Exposure to DBPs was evaluated using both environmental and biological monitoring. Trihalomethanes (THMs, the main DBPs, were evaluated in alveolar air samples collected from subjects. Swimming pool workers experienced different THM exposure levels: lifeguards and trainers showed the highest mean values of THMs in alveolar air samples (28.5 ± 20.2 µg/m3, while subjects working in cafe areas (17.6 ± 12.1 µg/m3, offices (14.4 ± 12.0 µg/m3 and engine rooms (13.6 ± 4.4 µg/m3 showed lower exposure levels. Employees with THM alveolar air values higher than 21 µg/m3 (median value experienced higher risks for red eyes (OR 6.2; 95% CI 2.6–14.9, itchy eyes (OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.5–8.0, dyspnea/asthma (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.0–27.2 and blocked nose (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.0–4.7 than subjects with less exposure. This study confirms

  17. UNDERGROUNG PLACEMENT OF COAL PROCESSING WASTE AND COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS BASED PASTE BACKFILL FOR ENHANCED MINING ECONOMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.P. Chugh; D. Biswas; D. Deb

    2002-06-01

    This project has successfully demonstrated that the extraction ratio in a room-and-pillar panel at an Illinois mine can be increased from the current value of approximately 56% to about 64%, with backfilling done from the surface upon completion of all mining activities. This was achieved without significant ground control problems due to the increased extraction ratio. The mined-out areas were backfilled from the surface with gob, coal combustion by-products (CCBs), and fine coal processing waste (FCPW)-based paste backfill containing 65%-70% solids to minimize short-term and long-term surface deformations risk. This concept has the potential to increase mine productivity, reduce mining costs, manage large volumes of CCBs beneficially, and improve the miner's health, safety, and environment. Two injection holes were drilled over the demonstration panel to inject the paste backfill. Backfilling was started on August 11, 1999 through the first borehole. About 9,293 tons of paste backfill were injected through this borehole with a maximum flow distance of 300-ft underground. On September 27, 2000, backfilling operation was resumed through the second borehole with a mixture of F ash and FBC ash. A high-speed auger mixer (new technology) was used to mix solids with water. About 6,000 tons of paste backfill were injected underground through this hole. Underground backfilling using the ''Groutnet'' flow model was simulated. Studies indicate that grout flow over 300-foot distance is possible. Approximately 13,000 tons of grout may be pumped through a single hole. The effect of backfilling on the stability of the mine workings was analyzed using SIUPANEL.3D computer program and further verified using finite element analysis techniques. Stiffness of the backfill mix is most critical for enhancing the stability of mine workings. Mine openings do not have to be completely backfilled to enhance their stability. Backfill height of about 50% of the seam

  18. Headspace-free setup of in vitro bioassays for the evaluation of volatile disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalter, Daniel; Dutt, Mriga; Escher, Beate I

    2013-11-18

    The conventional setup of in vitro bioassays in microplates does not prevent the loss of volatile compounds, which hampers the toxicological characterization of waterborne volatile disinfection by-products (DBPs). To minimize the loss of volatile test chemicals, we adapted four in vitro bioassays to a headspace-free setup using eight volatile organic compounds (four trihalomethanes, 1,1-dichloroethene, bromoethane, and two haloacetonitriles) that cover a wide range of air-water partition coefficients. The nominal effect concentrations of the test chemicals decreased by up to three orders of magnitude when the conventional setup was changed to a headspace-free setup for the bacterial cytotoxicity assay using bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri. The increase of apparent sensitivity correlated significantly with the air-water partition coefficient. Purge and trap GC/MS analysis revealed a reduced loss of dosed volatile compounds in the headspace free setup (78-130% of nominal concentration) compared to a substantial loss in the conventional set up (2-13% of the nominal concentration). The experimental effect concentrations converged with the headspace-free setup to the effect concentrations predicted by a QSAR model, confirming the suitability of the headspace-free approach to minimize the loss of volatile test chemicals. The analogue headspace-free design of the bacterial bioassays for genotoxicity (umuC assay) and mutagenicity (Ames fluctuation assay) increased the number of compounds detected as genotoxic or mutagenic from one to four and zero to two, respectively. In a bioassay with a mammalian cell line applied for detecting the induction of the Nrf-2-mediated oxidative stress response (AREc32 assay), the headspace-free setup improved the apparent sensitivity by less than one order of magnitude, presumably due to the retaining effect of the serum components in the medium, which is also reflected in the reduced aqueous concentrations of compounds. This

  19. The alkaline comet assay used in evaluation of genotoxic damage of drinking water disinfection by-products (bromoform and chloroform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messaouda Khallef

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The alkaline comet assay (pH 12.3 is a useful method for monitoring genotoxic effects of environmental pollutants in the root nuclei of Allium cepa and various plants; it allows the detection of single- and double-strand breaks, incomplete excision-repair sites and cross-links. It has been introduced to detect even small changes in DNA structure. It is a technically simple, highly sensitive, fast and economic test which detects in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity (DNA integrity and packing mode in any cell types examined, and requires just a few cells for its execution (Liman et al., 2011; Yıldız et al., 2009. Chloroform and bromoform are the most important trihalomethanes found in drinking water. Different concentrations of bromoform (25, 50, 75and 100µg/ml and chloroform (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water was used as a negative control and methyl methansulfonate (MMS-10 µg/ml as positive control. All obtained data were subjected to statistical analyses by using SPSS 15.0 for Windows software. For comparison purposes, Duncan multiple range tests using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA were employed and p<0.05 was accepted as the test of significance. Comet assay results showed that DNA damage was significant at p <0.05 for the different concentrations of chloroform and bromoform compared to the negative control which has a damage rate equal to 3.5 ± 0.7 and the positive control which has damage rate equal to 13.5 ± 2.12. The exposure of root tip cells to these disinfection by-products increases DNA damage. All concentrations examined in this study of bromoform and chloroform cause significant harm, which could be due to DNA damage induced by oxidative stress. The measurement of DNA damage in the nuclei of higher plant tissues is a new area of study with SCGE. This assay could be incorporated into in situ monitoring of atmosphere, water and soil: the comet assay allows a fast detection without

  20. Epidemiological approaches in the investigation of environmental causes of cancer: the case of dioxins and water disinfection by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogevinas Manolis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract I will refer in this paper to difficulties in research in environmental causes of cancer using as examples research on dioxins and on drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs that have created considerable controversy in the scientific and wider community. Dioxins are highly toxic chemicals that are animal carcinogens. For many years, evaluation of the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans was based on case-control or registry based studies. The development of methods to measure dioxins in blood indicated that these studies suffered from extreme exposure misclassification. The conduct of large cohort studies of workers with widely contrasted exposures together with the use of biomarkers and models for exposure assessment, led to convincing evidence on the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans. The high toxicity of a few dioxin congeners, the availability of a scheme to characterize the toxicity of a mixture of dioxins and related compounds and the long half-life of these compounds facilitated epidemiological research. Contrary to dioxins, trihalomethanes (THMs and most of the hundreds of DBPs in drinking water are chemicals of low toxicity. For more than 15 years, the main evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs was through ecological or death certificate studies. More recent studies based on individual assessment confirmed increases in bladder cancer risk. However even those studies ignored the toxicological evidence on the importance of routes of exposure to DBPs other than ingestion and, probably, underestimated the risk. Persistence of weak study designs together with delays in advanced exposure assessment models led to delays in confirming early evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs. The evaluation of only a few chemicals when exposure is to a complex mixture remains a major problem in exposure assessment for DBPs. The success of epidemiological studies in identifying increased risks lies primarily on the wide contrast of

  1. Epidemiological approaches in the investigation of environmental causes of cancer: the case of dioxins and water disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogevinas, Manolis

    2011-04-05

    I will refer in this paper to difficulties in research in environmental causes of cancer using as examples research on dioxins and on drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have created considerable controversy in the scientific and wider community. Dioxins are highly toxic chemicals that are animal carcinogens. For many years, evaluation of the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans was based on case-control or registry based studies. The development of methods to measure dioxins in blood indicated that these studies suffered from extreme exposure misclassification. The conduct of large cohort studies of workers with widely contrasted exposures together with the use of biomarkers and models for exposure assessment, led to convincing evidence on the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans. The high toxicity of a few dioxin congeners, the availability of a scheme to characterize the toxicity of a mixture of dioxins and related compounds and the long half-life of these compounds facilitated epidemiological research. Contrary to dioxins, trihalomethanes (THMs) and most of the hundreds of DBPs in drinking water are chemicals of low toxicity. For more than 15 years, the main evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs was through ecological or death certificate studies. More recent studies based on individual assessment confirmed increases in bladder cancer risk. However even those studies ignored the toxicological evidence on the importance of routes of exposure to DBPs other than ingestion and, probably, underestimated the risk. Persistence of weak study designs together with delays in advanced exposure assessment models led to delays in confirming early evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs. The evaluation of only a few chemicals when exposure is to a complex mixture remains a major problem in exposure assessment for DBPs. The success of epidemiological studies in identifying increased risks lies primarily on the wide contrast of exposure to DBPs in the general

  2. Re-Use of Clean Coal Technology By-Products in the Construction of Low Permeability Liners. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, William E. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Butalia, Tarunjit S. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Walker, Harold [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Mitsch, William [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2005-07-15

    This final project report presents the results of a research program conducted at The Ohio State University from January 3, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to investigate the long-term use of stabilized flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials in the construction of low permeability liners for ponds and wetlands. The objective of the research program was to establish long-term field-verified time-dependent relationships for the performance of liners constructed from stabilized FGD byproducts generated in Ohio. The project objective was accomplished with a coordinated program of testing and analyzing small-scale laboratory specimens under controlled conditions, mediumscale wetland experiments, and monitoring of a full-scale FGD-lined pond facility. Although the specific uses directly addressed by this report include liners for surface impoundments, the results presented in this study are also useful in other applications especially in the design of daily covers and liners for landfills, seepage cutoff walls and trenches, and for nutrient retention and pollution mitigation wetlands. The small-scale laboratory tests and monitoring of the full-scale FGD lined facility (capacity of one million gallons) shows that stabilized FGD materials can be used as low permeability liners in the construction of water and manure holding ponds. Actual long-term permeability coefficients in the range of 10-7 cm/sec (3 x 10-9 ft/sec) can be obtained in the field by compacting lime and fly ash enriched stabilized FGD materials. Leachate from the FGD material meets Ohio’s non-toxic criteria for coal combustion by-products, and for most potential contaminants the national primary and secondary drinking water standards are also met. The low permeability non-toxic FGD material investigated in this study poses very minimal risks, if any, for groundwater contamination. The FGD wetland experiments indicated no significant differences in phosphorus retention between the clay and FGD

  3. Seasonal evaluation of the presence of 46 disinfection by-products throughout a drinking water treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Maria; Montesinos, Isabel; Cardador, M.J.; Silva, Manuel; Gallego, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.gallego@uco.es

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we studied a total of 46 regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs) including 10 trihalomethanes (THMs), 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs), 6 halonitromethanes (HNMs), 6 haloacetonitriles (HANs) and 11 aldehydes at different points in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) and its distribution network. Determining an increased number of compounds and using accurate, sensitive analytical methodologies for new DBPs can be useful to overcome some challenges encountered in the comprehensive assessment of the quality and safety of drinking water. This paper provides a detailed picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of DBP concentrations from raw water to distribution network. Samples were collected on a monthly basis at seven different points in the four seasons of a year to acquire robust data for DBPs and supplementary quality-related water parameters. Only 5 aldehydes and 2 HAAs were found in raw water. Chlorine dioxide caused the formation of 3 new aldehydes (benzaldehyde included), 5 HAAs and chloroform. The concentrations of DBPs present in raw water were up to 6 times higher in the warmer seasons (spring and summer). The sedimentation process further increased their concentrations and caused the formation of three new ones. Sand filtration substantially removed aldehydes and HAAs (15–50%), but increased the levels of THMs, HNMs and HANs by up to 70%. Chloramination raised the levels of 8 aldehydes and 7 HAAs; also, it caused the formation of monoiodoacetic acid, dibromochloromethane, dichloroiodomethane and bromochloroacetonitrile. Therefore, this treatment increases the levels of existing DBPs and leads to the formation of new ones to a greater extent than does chlorine dioxide. Except for 5 aldehydes, the 23 DBPs encountered at the DWTP exit were found at increased concentrations in the warmer seasons (HAAs by about 50% and THMs by 350%). - Highlights: • Occurrence of 46 regulated and non-regulated DBPs through a DWTP was

  4. Effects of utilization of local food by-products as total mixed ration silage materials on fermentation quality and intake, digestibility, rumen condition and nitrogen availability in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yani, Srita; Ishida, Kyohei; Goda, Shuzo; Azumai, Shigeyoshi; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Okano, Kanji; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Hajime

    2015-02-01

    Four wethers were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment to evaluate in vivo digestibility of total mixed ration (TMR) silage with food by-products for dairy cows, and the ruminal condition and nitrogen (N) balance were examined. Five by-products (i.e. potato waste, noodle waste, soybean curd residue, soy sauce cake and green tea waste) were obtained. Four types of TMR silage were used: control (C) containing roughage and commercial concentrate, T1:20% and T1:40% containing the five by-products replacing 20% and 40% of the commercial concentrate on a dry matter (DM) basis, respectively, and T2:40% containing three by-products (potato waste, noodle waste and soybean curd residue) replacing 40% of the commercial concentrate on a DM basis. The ingredients were mixed and preserved in oil drum silos for 4 months. The TMR silages showed 4.02-4.44% and 1.75-2.19% for pH and lactic acid contents, respectively. The digestibility of DM and neutral detergent fiber, and total digestible nutrient content were higher (P < 0.05) for T2:40% feeding than for C feeding. Urinary nitrogen excretion tended to be lower (P = 0.07) for T2:40% than for C. The results suggested 40% replacing of commercial concentrate by using the three food by-products can be most suitable for TMR silage.

  5. Effect of bioconversion conditions on vanillin production by Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 through an analysis of competing by-product formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-kui; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of transformation conditions such as initial pH, the initial concentration of glucose and yeast extract in the medium, and the separate addition of ferulic acid and vanillic acid, on the production of vanillin through an analysis of competing by-product formation by Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116. The extent and nature of by-product formation and vanillin yield were affected by initial pH and different initial concentrations of glucose and yeast extract in the medium, with a high yield of vanillin and high cell density obtained at pH 8.0, 10 g/l glucose, and 8 g/l yeast extract. High concentrations of ferulic acid were found to negatively affect cell density. Additional supplementation of 100 mg/l vanillic acid, a metabolically linked by-product, was found to result in a high concentration of vanillin and guaiacol, an intermediate of vanillin. Via an analysis of the effect of these transformation conditions on competing by-product formation, high concentrations of ferulic acid were transformed with a molar yield to vanillin of 96.1 and 95.2 %, by Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 and Streptomyces V1, respectively, together with a minor accumulation of by-products. These are among the highest performance values reported in the literature to date for Streptomyces in batch cultures.

  6. Frontier of CO{sub 2} reduction/sink with international Win/Win Corporation - coal fired electric power generation helps afforestation through by product utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshitaka, N.; Kaori, A.; Kazuo, W.; Katsumi, O. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Several countries in Asia require coal fired electric power generation because they are rich in domestic coal. In common sense, coal firing generates carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide more than natural gas, thus it tends to be disliked for electric power generation. When desulfurization plants are housed, these cost much and produce valuable by-poducts. Gypsum is a by-product from desulfurization plant, which can reclaim very poor alkaline or sodic soil and the combination of gypsum and quick lime is a by-product from fluidized-bed boiler and bio-briquet, which can reclaim very poor acidic soil. These two principal by-products are the key to afforestation, resulting in carbon sink. Sometimes soil reclamation can change poor soil into fertile soil which is useful for agriculture. 2 tabs.

  7. Scientific Evidence of Rice By-Products for Cancer Prevention: Chemopreventive Properties of Waste Products from Rice Milling on Carcinogenesis In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bee Ling

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a significant global health concern affecting men and women worldwide. Although current chemopreventive drugs could inhibit the growth of cancer cells, they exert many adverse side effects. Dietary factor plays a crucial role in the management of cancers and has drawn the attention of researchers to be used as an option to combat this disease. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that rice and its by-products display encouraging results in the prevention of this disease. The mechanism of anticancer effect is suggested partly through potentiation of bioactive compounds like vitamin E, phytic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), γ-oryzanol, and phenolics. Nevertheless, the bioactivity of rice and its by-products is still incompletely understood. In this review, we present the findings from a preclinical study both in in vitro and in animal experiments on the promising role of rice by-products with focus on cancer prevention. PMID:28210630

  8. One-pot enzymatic synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid-rich triacylglycerols at the sn-1(3) position using by-product from selective hydrolysis of tuna oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Yomi; Maruyama, Kazuaki; Momokawa, Yuusuke; Kishimoto, Noriaki; Shimada, Yuji

    2011-01-31

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich oil has been industrially produced by selective hydrolysis of tuna oil with a lipase that acts weakly on DHA. The free fatty acids (FFAs) generated in this process as by-products contain a high DHA concentration (46wt%) but are treated as industrial waste. This study attempted to reuse these by-product FFAs using a one-pot process, and succeeded in producing triacylglycerols (TAGs) through the esterification of the by-product FFAs with glycerol using immobilized Rhizomucor miehei lipase. Regiospecific analysis of the resulting TAGs showed that the content of DHA at the sn-1(3) position (51.7mol%) was higher than the content of DHA at the sn-2 position (17.3mol%). The DHA distribution in TAGs synthesized in this study was similar to the DHA distribution in TAGs from seal oil.

  9. Fermentation strategies for 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol using a genetically engineered Klebsiella pneumoniae strain to eliminate by-product formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Baek-Rock; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Heo, Sun-Yeon; Hong, Won-Kyung; Luo, Lian Hua; Son, Jun Ho; Park, Don-Hee; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2012-01-01

    We generated a genetically engineered Klebsiella pneumoniae strain (AK-VOT) to eliminate by-product formation during production of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) from glycerol. In the present study, the glycerol-metabolizing properties of the recombinant strain were examined during fermentation in a 5 L bioreactor. As expected, by-product formation was completely absent (except for acetate) when the AK-VOT strain fermented glycerol. However, 1,3-PD productivity was severely reduced owing to a delay in cell growth attributable to a low rate of glycerol consumption. This problem was solved by establishing a two-stage process separating cell growth from 1,3-PD production. In addition, nutrient co-supplementation, especially with starch, significantly increased 1,3-PD production from glycerol during fed-batch fermentation by AK-VOT in the absence of by-product formation.

  10. Effect of agro-industry by-product on soil fertility, tree performances and fruit quality in pear (Pyrus communis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Quartieri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic materials from agro-industry processes can be used in agriculture as a way to recycle materials that still maintain a high fertilizing value. The aim of the experiment was to evaluate the value of soil applied apple juice by-product as fertilizer for pear trees. A 3-year experiment was carried out in a mature pear orchard (cv Abbé Fétel grafted onto quince MC in the Po valley (Italy, where the following treatments were compared: 1 unfertilized control; 2 mineral N fertilization (60 kg N ha−1 year−1 split in two spring applications; 3 apple juice by-product (1.3 t ha−1 year−1, equal to 60 kg N ha−1, fully supplied at petal drop; 4 apple juice by-product, at twice the rate of the previous treatment. Apple juice by-product soil decomposition accounted for 12% in the first 6 months. At the end of the 24-month-assay, the decomposition accounted for 24% on total dry weight that makes 28% of initial C and 36% of initial N. Soil nitrate-N concentration was increased by the mineral N fertilizer, while the application of apple juice by-product increased microbial carbon. Tree growth, yield and fruit quality were not affected by treatments, while mineral N fertilization raised leaf and fruit N concentration. In conclusion, in our conditions the use of apple juice by-product did not show negative effects on tree performances and fruit quality, with some advantages related to the recycling of organic wastes in agriculture.

  11. Nano-silver in drinking water and drinking water sources: stability and influences on disinfection by-product formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugulea, A-M; Bérubé, D; Giddings, M; Lemieux, F; Hnatiw, J; Priem, J; Avramescu, M-L

    2014-10-01

    Nano-silver is increasingly used in consumer products from washing machines and refrigerators to devices marketed for the disinfection of drinking water or recreational water. The nano-silver in these products may be released, ending up in surface water bodies which may be used as drinking water sources. Little information is available about the stability of the nano-silver in sources of drinking water, its fate during drinking water disinfection processes, and its interaction with disinfection agents and disinfection by-products (DBPs). This study aims to investigate the stability of nano-silver in drinking water sources and in the finished drinking water when chlorine and chloramines are used for disinfection and to observe changes in the composition of DBPs formed when nano-silver is present in the source water. A dispersion of nano-silver particles (10 nm; PVP-coated) was used to spike untreated Ottawa River water, treated Ottawa River water, organic-free water, and a groundwater at concentrations of 5 mg/L. The diluted dispersions were kept under stirred and non-stirred conditions for up to 9 months and analyzed weekly using UV absorption to assess the stability of the nano-silver particles. In a separate experiment, Ottawa River water containing nano-silver particles (at 0.1 and 1 mg/L concentration, respectively) was disinfected by adding sodium hypochlorite (a chlorinating agent) in sufficient amounts to maintain a free chlorine residual of approximately 0.4 mg/L after 24 h. The disinfected drinking water was then quenched with ascorbic acid and analyzed for 34 neutral DBPs (trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles, haloacetaldehydes, 1,1 dichloro-2-propanone, 1,1,1 trichloro-2-propanone, chloropicrin, and cyanogen chloride). The results were compared to the profile of DBPs obtained under the same conditions in the absence of nano-silver and in the presence of an equivalent concentration of Ag(+) ions (as AgNO3). The stability of the nano-silver dispersions in

  12. Characterisation and enzymic degradation of non-starch polysaccharides in lignocellulosic by-products. A study on sunflower meal and palm-kernel meal.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Düsterhöft, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    Non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) constitute a potentially valuable part of plant by- products deriving from the food and agricultural industries. Their use for various applications (fuel, feed, food) requires the degradation and modification of the complex plant materials. This can be achieved by en

  13. MODERATING INFLUENCE OF THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID ON A DITHIOCARBAMATE-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF THE LUTEINIZING HORMONE SURGE IN FEMALE RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid (DBA) has been found in female rats to increase circulating concentrations of both estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1). This effect is apparently due, at least in part, to a suppression in hepatic catabolism. The present study investigat...

  14. Multiple Biological Effects of Olive Oil By-products such as Leaves, Stems, Flowers, Olive Milled Waste, Fruit Pulp, and Seeds of the Olive Plant on Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishikawa, Asuka; Ashour, Ahmed; Zhu, Qinchang; Yasuda, Midori; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-06-01

    As olive oil production increases, so does the amount of olive oil by-products, which can cause environmental problems. Thus, new ways to utilize the by-products are needed. In the present study, five bioactive characteristics of olive oil by-products were assessed, namely their antioxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-melanogenesis, anti-allergic, and collagen-production-promoting activities. First, the extracts of leaves (May and October), stems (May and October), flowers, olive milled waste, fruit pulp and seeds were prepared using two safe solvents, ethanol and water. According to HPLC and LC/MS analysis and Folin-Ciocalteu assay, the ethanol extracts of the leaves (May and October), stems (May and October) and flowers contained oleuropein, and the ethanol extract of the stems showed the highest total phenol content. Oleuropein may contribute to the antioxidant and anti-melanogenesis activities of the leaves, stems, and flowers. However, other active compounds or synergistic effects present in the ethanol extracts are also likely to contribute to the anti-bacterial activity of the leaves and flowers, the anti-melanogenesis activity of some parts, the anti-allergic activity of olive milled waste, and the collagen-production-promoting activity of the leaves, stems, olive milled waste and fruit pulp. This study provides evidence that the by-products of olive oil have the potential to be further developed and used in the skin care industry.

  15. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, November 1994--February 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This second quarterly report describes work during the second three months of the University of Pittsburgh`s (Pitt`s) project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with Pitt on this project are Dravo Lime Company (DLC), Mill Service, Inc. (MSI) and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research (CHMR). The report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon the acquisition of by-product samples and their initial analysis. Other efforts during the second quarter have been directed toward identifying the first hazardous waste samples and preparing for their treatment and analysis. Relatively little data has yet been collected. Major presentation of technical details and data will appear for the first time in the third quarterly report. The activity on the project during the second quarter of Phase One, as presented in the following sections, has fallen into seven areas: (1) Acquiring by-products, (2) Analyzing by-products, (3) Identifying, analyzing and treating suitable hazardous wastes, (4) Carrying out the quality assurance/quality control program, (5) Developing background, and (6) Initiating public relations

  16. State of the Science Review: Potential for Beneficial Use of Waste By-Products for In-situ Remediation of Metal-Contaminated Soil and Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal and metalloid contamination of soil and sediment is a widespread problem both in urban and rural areas throughout the United States (U.S. EPA, 2014). Beneficial use of waste by-products as amendments to remediate metal-contaminated soils and sediments can provide major eco...

  17. Use of fish hydrolysates and fishmeal by-products of the Alaskan fishing industry in diets for Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The suitability of four fish hydrolysates and two fishmeals derived from by-products of the Alaskan fishing industry, as menhaden fishmeal replacements in shrimp diets was determined. A control diet (30% crude protein and 8.5% crude lipid) was produced with menhaden meal (13% of diet). Experimental ...

  18. Removal of 17beta-estradiol (E2) and its chlorination by-products from water and wastewater using non-imprinted polymer (NIP) particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Audrey; Ormeci, Banu; Lai, E P C

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds and their chlorination by-products are two classes of emerging contaminants. Surface water and wastewater treatment technologies have limitations in removing these contaminants. This study evaluated the ability of non-imprinted polymer particles (NIP) to remove the endocrine disruptor 17beta-estradiol (E2) and its chlorination by-products from water and wastewater. NIP effectively removed 98% of 10 mg/L E2 from wastewater. NIP were also effective in removing chlorination by-products of E2 by 84.9% after 10 mg/L E2 in water was chlorinated at 5 mg/L. In the presence of 5 mg/L humic acid, NIP were able to achieve removal of 10 mg/L E2 by greater than 99.9%. Furthermore, after chlorination of 10 mg/L E2 and 5 mg/L humic acid at 10 mg/L chlorine, NIP were also able to remove the chlorination by-products formed as well as the remaining E2 by greater than 99.9%. The presence of 5 mg/L humic acid did not adversely affect the adsorption efficiency. The results of this research indicate that NIPs have good potential as a final treatment step for surface water and wastewater treatment.

  19. CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN A RAT MODEL OF HEREDITARY RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenicity of Individual and a Mixture of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products in a Rat Model of Hereditary Renal Cell Carcinoma Eker rats develop hereditary renal cell carcinoma secondary to a germline mutation in the tuberous sclerosis 2 (Tsc2) gene and are ligh...

  20. Use of biofuel by-product from the green algae Desmochloris sp. and diatom Nanofrustulum sp. meal in diets for nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algal by-product meals from the Hawaiian biofuels industry were evaluated as protein ingredients in diets for juveniles of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Four experimental diets were formulated to contain 40% protein and were made with fish meal, soybean meal, whole diatom (Nanofrustulum sp.)...

  1. Pineapple by-product and canola oil as partial fat replacers in low-fat beef burger: Effects on oxidative stability, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selani, Miriam M; Shirado, Giovanna A N; Margiotta, Gregório B; Rasera, Mariana L; Marabesi, Amanda C; Piedade, Sonia M S; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G

    2016-05-01

    The effect of freeze-dried pineapple by-product and canola oil as fat replacers on the oxidative stability, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile of low-fat beef burgers was evaluated. Five treatments were performed: conventional (CN, 20% fat) and four low-fat formulations (10% fat): control (CT), pineapple by-product (PA), canola oil (CO), and pineapple by-product and canola oil (PC). Low-fat cooked burgers showed a mean cholesterol content reduction of 9.15% compared to the CN. Canola oil addition improved the fatty acid profile of the burgers, with increase in the polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio and decrease in the n-6/n-3 ratio, in the atherogenic and thrombogenic indexes. The oxidative stability of the burgers was affected by the vegetable oil addition. However, at the end of the storage time (120 days), malonaldehyde values of CO and PC were lower than the threshold for the consumer's acceptance. Canola oil, in combination with pineapple by-product, can be considered promising fat replacers in the development of healthier burgers.

  2. Identifying inhibitory effects of lignocellulosic by-products on growth of lactic acid producing micro-organisms using a rapid small-scale screening method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pol, Edwin C; Vaessen, Evelien; Weusthuis, Ruud A; Eggink, Gerrit

    2016-06-01

    Sugars obtained from pretreated lignocellulose are interesting as substrate for the production of lactic acid in fermentation processes. However, by-products formed during pretreatment of lignocellulose can inhibit microbial growth. In this study, a small-scale rapid screening method was used to identify inhibitory effects of single and combined by-products on growth of lactic acid producing micro-organisms. The small-scale screening was performed in 48-well plates using 5 bacterial species and 12 by-products. Large differences were observed in inhibitory effects of by-products between different species. Predictions can be made for growth behaviour of different micro-organisms on acid pretreated or alkaline pretreated bagasse substrates using data from the small-scale screening. Both individual and combined inhibition effects were shown to be important parameters to predict growth. Synergy between coumaric acid, formic acid and acetic acid is a key inhibitory parameter in alkaline pretreated lignocellulose, while furfural is a key inhibitor in acid pretreated lignocellulose.

  3. Precultivation of Bacillus coagulans DSM2314 in the presence of furfural decreases inhibitory effects of lignocellulosic by-products during L(+)-lactic acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pol, Edwin; Springer, Jan; Vriesendorp, Bastienne; Weusthuis, Ruud; Eggink, Gerrit

    2016-12-01

    By-products resulting from thermo-chemical pretreatment of lignocellulose can inhibit fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars to lactic acid. Furfural is such a by-product, which is formed during acid pretreatment of lignocellulose. pH-controlled fermentations with 1 L starting volume, containing YP medium and a mixture of lignocellulosic by-products, were inoculated with precultures of Bacillus coagulans DSM2314 to which 1 g/L furfural was added. The addition of furfural to precultures resulted in an increase in L(+)-lactic acid productivity by a factor 2 to 1.39 g/L/h, an increase in lactic acid production from 54 to 71 g and an increase in conversion yields of sugar to lactic acid from 68 to 88 % W/W in subsequent fermentations. The improved performance was not caused by furfural consumption or conversion, indicating that the cells acquired a higher tolerance towards this by-product. The improvement coincided with a significant elongation of B. coagulans cells. Via RNA-Seq analysis, an upregulation of pathways involved in the synthesis of cell wall components such as bacillosamine, peptidoglycan and spermidine was observed in elongated cells. Furthermore, the gene SigB and genes promoted by SigB, such as NhaX and YsnF, were upregulated in the presence of furfural. These genes are involved in stress responses in bacilli.

  4. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, March 30, 1996--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Neufeld, R.D.; Blachere, J.R. [and others

    1998-04-01

    Progress is described on the use of by-products form clean coal technologies for the treatment of hazardous wastes. During the third quarter of Phase 2, work continued on evaluating Phase 1 samples (including evaluation of a seventh waste), conducting scholarly work, preparing for field work, preparing and delivering presentations, and making additional outside contacts.

  5. What's in the pool? A comprehensive identification of disinfection by-products and assessment of mutagenicity of chlorinated and brominated swimming pool water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, S.D.; Demarini, D.M.; Kogevinas, M.; Fernandez, P.; Marco, E.; Lourencetti, C.; Balleste, C.; Heederik, D.; Meliefste, K.; McKague, A.B.; Marcos, R.; Font-Ribera, L.; Grimalt, J.O.; Villanueva, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. OBJECTIVES: We performed a com

  6. EFFECT OF HIGH-FAT DIETS SUPPLEMENTED WITH OKARA SOYBEAN BY-PRODUCT ON LIPID PROFILES OF PLASMA, LIVER AND FAECES IN SYRIAN HAMSTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main components of okara, a by-product from soybean, is dietary fiber and protein. Both dietary fiber and protein can reduce plasma cholesterol. In this study we fed okara based diets with different amounts of fiber, protein and isoflavones to determine the most important component for choleste...

  7. Analysis of by-product formation and sugar monomerization in sugarcane bagasse pretreated at pilot plant scale: Differences between autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van der E.C.; Bakker, R.; Zeeland, van A.N.T.; Sanchez Garcia, D.; Punt, A.M.; Eggink, G.

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is an interesting feedstock for the biobased economy since a large fraction is polymerized sugars. Autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment conditions combined with enzyme hydrolysis were used on lignocellulose rich bagasse to acquire monomeric. By-products found after pretre

  8. Growth performance and feed conversion efficiency of three edible mealworm species (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) on diets composed of organic by-products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhoven, van S.; Oonincx, D.G.A.B.; Huis, van A.; Loon, van J.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Insects receive increasing attention as an alternative protein-rich food source for humans. Producing edible insects on diets composed of organic by-products could increase sustainability. In addition, insect growth rate and body composition, and hence nutritional quality, can be altered by diet. Th

  9. Identification of ozonation by-products of 4- and 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole during the treatment of surface water to drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Alexander; Weiss, Stefan C; Beisswenger, Judith; Leukhardt, H Georg; Schulz, Wolfgang; Seitz, Wolfram; Ruck, Wolfgang K L; Weber, Walter H

    2012-03-01

    During the treatment of surface water to drinking water, ozonation is often used for disinfection and to remove organic trace substances, whereby oxidation by-products can be formed. Here we use the example of tolyltriazole to describe an approach for identifying relevant oxidation by-products in the laboratory and subsequently detecting them in an industrial-scale process. The identification process involves ozonation experiments with pure substances at laboratory level (concentration range mg L(-1)). The reaction solutions from different ozone contact times were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography - quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF-MS) in full scan mode. Various approaches were used to detect the oxidation by-products: (i) target searches of postulated oxidation by-products, (ii) comparisons of chromatograms (e.g., UV/VIS) of the different samples, and (iii) color-coded abundance time courses (kinetic) of all detected compounds were illustrated in a kind of a heat map. MS/MS, H/D exchange, and derivatization experiments were used for structure elucidation for the detected by-product. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (ng L(-1)-range) of contaminants in the untreated water, the conversion of results from laboratory experiments to an industrial-scale required the use of HPLC-MS/MS with sample enrichment (e.g., solid phase extraction.) In cases where reference substances were not available or oxidation by-products without clear structures were detected, reaction solutions from laboratory experiments were used to optimize the analytical method to detect ng L(-1) in the samples of the industrial processes. We exemplarily demonstrated the effectiveness of the methodology with the industrial chemicals 4- and 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (4- and 5-MBT) as an example. Moreover, not only did we identify several oxidation by-products in the laboratory experiments tentatively, but also detected three of the eleven reaction

  10. Disinfection aboard cruise liners and naval units: formation of disinfection by-products using chlorine dioxide in different qualities of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufermann, Petra; Petersen, Hauke; Exner, Martin

    2011-12-01

    The world-wide deployment of cruise liners and naval units has caused an increased need for the disinfection of drinking water. The main cause for this is the unknown quality of drinking water in foreign harbours--besides the formation of bio-films due to the climatically disadvantageous conditions in the operational area. Water conduits on board are currently disinfected with calcium hypochlorite in case of microbiological contamination. Chemical and physical analyses after disinfection with calcium hypochlorite have shown that organic by-products consisting of trihalomethanes develop in considerable amounts during disinfection. Furthermore, the method is susceptible to handling errors and thus often leads to insufficient disinfection results. Hitherto, the use of other disinfection methods allowed by government regulations, especially chlorine dioxide, is not widely spread. Unlike disinfection with calcium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide does not lead to the formation of trihalomethanes. Typical disinfection by-products (DBP) are the anions chlorite and chlorate, which are formed in oxidative processes. The formation conditions of these anions have not yet been elucidated. For this reason, the probability of the generation of inorganic by-products after disinfection with chlorine dioxide has been determined, and their occurrence in drinking water on board has been examined with respect to a possible correlation between water quality and the formation of chlorate and chlorite. Therefore, a chromatographic method was developed and validated in order to determine the periodical development of chlorate and chlorite from chorine dioxide in purified water at different pH-values as well as in actual drinking water samples from water conduits on board. The formation of the by-products chlorite and chlorate after disinfection with chlorine dioxide is influenced neither by pH-value nor by chemical properties of the disinfected water. Considering the examined conditions

  11. Final Report: No{sub x} Emissions from By Product Fuel Combustion in Steel Making, September 15, 1996 - October 15, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pershing, David W.; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Eddings, Eric G.; Cacciatore, David A.

    1999-01-28

    Exhaust gases from the primary operations in the steel making process are almost exclusively utilized as supplemental fuels within the steel plant. These by-product fuels include blast furnace gas (BFG) and coke oven gas (COG) which contain mixtures of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and trace amounts of some heavier hydrocarbons and the impurities NH{sub 3} and HCN. These fuels are burned alone or in combination with natural gas to fire the coke ovens, blast furnace stoves utility boilers and metal working furnaces. The utilization of these by-product fuels reduces the waste gas emissions at the steel mill and reduces the requirements for outside fuel sources. However, as with primary fuel sources, the combustion of these by-product fuel blends does produce hazardous pollutants, in particular nitrogen oxides, and because these are atypical fuel blends of varying composition, the pollutant formation is not well understood. The objective of this research was to develop an understanding of the mechanisms controlling NO{sub x} formation from the combustion of by-product fuels from the steel industry and investigate control and design options to minimize emissions. The minimization strategies investigated were constrained by limits on CO and hydrocarbon emissions, both of which increased under fuel-rich combustion scenarios that resulted in reduced NO{sub x} emissions. Also, the minimization strategies were constrained by the need for reasonable heat generation rates in the furnaces that employ these by-product fuels, so that product steel quality is not adversely affected.

  12. Nutritional Value of Raisin by- Product and its Effect on Late Flower Alfalfa Hay Fermentation Profile and Nutrient Availability in Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Yari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Using agro-industrial by-products in ruminants feeding could help in semi arid climate condition throughout the year. Raisin by-product is produced in huge magnitude in Malayer city, Hamedan province. Local different raisin by-products which produced during machinery cleaning and sorting of sun dried treated grapevine cluster (Vitisvinifera L. cv. Sultana, are as:1 some outer layer of flesh and skin and pedicle of berries; 2 rejected raisins mostly un-ripped berries with their pedicles and 3 peduncles and rachises with their lateral branches of clusters. They may have suitable nutritive value in ruminants. However, their nutrient profile and availability and anti nutrient factors such as lignin and tannin should be considered. Alfalfa hay is usually the important forage used in dairy cow’s diet. However, it has lower fiber digestibility and higher ruminal crude protein degradability. Increasing alfalfa hay fiber digestibility and decreasing ruminal crude protein degradability can help its feeding value. Raisin by-product may help to achieve those in the case of alfalfa hay. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutritional value of raisin by-product in ruminant feeding compared with late flower alfalfa hay and consideration of its effect on in vitro fermentation of alfalfa hay. Material and methods Based on completely randomized block design, two original samples (two blocks for each of alfalfa hay and raisin by-product from local availabilities were collected. In first experiment, chemical and phenolic (total phenol and tannin composition analysis was measured by two replicates for each block according to AOAC methods. In second experiment, in situ ruminal degradation kinetics of alfalfa hay and raisin by-product was measured using two fistulated Mehraban rams. For ruminal incubation times of 0, 3, 6, 16, 36, and 72 h respectively 2, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 filled nylon bags used which randomly assigned in animals. In situ

  13. Mitigation strategies in the agro-food sector: The anaerobic digestion of tomato purée by-products. An Italian case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacenetti, Jacopo, E-mail: jacopo.bacenetti@unimi.it [Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Production, Landscape, Agroenergy, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via G. Celoria 2, 20133 Milan (Italy); Duca, Daniele [Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche 10, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Negri, Marco [Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Production, Landscape, Agroenergy, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via G. Celoria 2, 20133 Milan (Italy); Fusi, Alessandra [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The Mill, Sackville Street, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Fiala, Marco [Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Production, Landscape, Agroenergy, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via G. Celoria 2, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-01

    Tomato processing involves a significant production of residues, mainly constituted by discarded tomatoes, skins, seeds and pulp. Often, these residues are not valorized and represent an added cost for manufacturing companies because of disposal processes, with environmental issues due to the difficult management. The exploitation of these residual materials results complex as their availability is mainly concentrated in few months. A possible solution is the production of biogas employed in a Combine Heat and Power engine for energy production, in line with the 2020 targets of European Union in terms of promotion of energy from renewable resources and greenhouse gas emission reduction. The tomato by-product utilization for energy production as a strategy to reduce the environmental load of tomato purée was evaluated by means of Life Cycle Assessment. Two scenarios were considered: Baseline Scenario — tomato by-products are sent back to the tomato fields as organic fertilizers; Alternative Scenario — tomato by-products are employed in a nearby biogas plant for energy production. Methane production of tomato by-products was assessed by means of specific laboratory tests. The comparison between the two scenarios highlighted reductions for all the impact categories with the Alternative Scenario. The most important reductions are related to particulate matter (− 5.3%), climate change (− 6.4%) and ozone depletion (− 13.4%). Although small, the reduction of the environmental impact cannot be neglected; for example for climate change, the anaerobic digestion of by-products allows a saving of GHG emissions that, over the whole year, is equal to 1.567 tons of CO{sub 2} eq. The results of this study could be up-scaled to the food industries with high heat demand producing considerable amounts of fermentable by-products employable as feedstock for biogas production. - Highlights: • Tomato processing generates byproducts, whose residual mass is 2–5%.

  14. 制革厂固、液副产物的处理%TREATMENT OF SOLID AND LIQUID TANNERY BY-PRODUCTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.; Mokrejs; D.; Janacova; K.; Kolomaznik; M.; Mladek; F.; Langrnaier

    2006-01-01

    The tanning industry processes raw hides and converts them into leather. The tanning industry belongs to typical industrial branches which during the technological process produce considerable quantities of liquid and solid by-products contributing to polluting the environment,particularly water and soil. The solid tanned by-products contain chromium and by-product liquors contain residual chromium. In order to prevent loss of protein material and chrome compounds were focused on recycling liquid and solid by-products. Recycling of solid by-products (chrome-tanned leather shavings) was realized through enzymatic hydrolysis which is an economically and ecologically acceptable process. Water soluble hydrolysate is thus produced, usable as fertilizer components, coating material, as an additive into adhesives mixtures, corrosion inhibitor etc. Recycling of liquid by-products (spent tanning liquors) utilizes solid residue, produced through enzymatic hydrolysis of chrome-tanned leather shavings, to reduce chromium content in liquor. The principle of dechromation consists in sorption of chrome from spent liquor to chrome sludge and is characterized by very high efficiency, simplicity and low investment requirements.Dechromed liquor poses a much less hazard for the environment.%制革工艺将原料皮变成革,属于典型的工业领域,在工艺处理过程中要考虑产生的固、液副产物对环境尤其是水和土壤的污染.制革的固、液副产物分别是铬屑和含铬废液.为了减少蛋白原料的损失以及降低循环废液铬复合物的含量,循环的固体副产物(铬屑)通过酶水解可以达到既经济又环保的处理过程.产生的溶于水的水解产物,可以作为肥料的有效成份、涂层材料以及用于胶粘剂混合物中的添加剂、耐腐蚀的材料等.液体副产物(鞣液)中的有用固体残留物,通过酶水解,可以降低废液中的铬含量.去铬要求废液中的铬吸附在铬泥上,这种处理方

  15. Tunisian date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) by-products: Characterization and potential effects on sensory, textural and antioxidant properties of dairy desserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jridi, Mourad; Souissi, Nabil; Salem, Marwa Ben; Ayadi, M A; Nasri, Moncef; Azabou, Samia

    2015-12-01

    Three Tunisian date varieties, Deglet Nour, Kentichi and Allig, served to produce syrups and powders, which were then examined for their physico-chemical composition and antioxidant properties. Different proportions of these sweetening-like agents were incorporated to produce nine different formulations of dairy desserts, with lower amount of added sugars to avoid any artificial flavoring or coloring agents. Sensory and color evaluation data revealed that incorporating Deglet Nour and Kentichi syrup offers the most desirable formulation. Furthermore, syrup polysaccharides and fibers contribute to better maintain the final product texture. In addition, date by-products create a good source of natural thickening agents, involved in enhancing apparent viscosity and spontaneous exudation. Thanks to their high content in phenolic compounds, date by-products considerably improve antioxidant activities of the formulated desserts. Therefore, they could be valued as natural ingredients in the formulation of novel dairy products with high nutritional-properties.

  16. Avocado by-products as inhibitors of color deterioration and lipid and protein oxidation in raw porcine patties subjected to chilled storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Carpena, J G; Morcuende, D; Estévez, M

    2011-10-01

    Processing of avocados generates an important amount of by-products such as peels and seeds that are rich in bioactive substances with proven radical suppressing activities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of peel and seed extracts from two avocado varieties-'Hass' and 'Fuerte'-as inhibitors of lipid and protein oxidation and color deterioration of raw porcine patties during chilled storage (4 °C/15 days). Avocado extracts significantly (pHass' extracts. Patties treated with avocado extracts had significantly lower amounts of TBA-RS than control ones throughout the storage. 'Hass' avocado extracts significantly inhibited the formation of protein carbonyls in chilled patties at day 15. The present results highlight the potential usage of extracts from avocado by-products as ingredients for the production of muscle foods with enhanced quality traits.

  17. Differential chemical profiling to identify ozonation by-products of estrone-sulfate and first characterization of estrogenicity in generated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgin, Marc; Gervais, Gaël; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Monteau, Fabrice; Leroy, Gaëla; Barritaud, Lauriane; Chachignon, Mathilde; Ingrand, Valérie; Roche, Pascal; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    For a few years, the concern of water treatment companies is not only focused on the removal of target micropollutants but has been extended to the investigation of potential biologically active by-products generated during the treatment processes. Therefore, some methods dedicated to the detection and structural characterization of such by-products have emerged. However, most of these studies are usually carried out under simplified conditions (e.g. high concentration levels of micropollutants, drastic treatment conditions, use of deionized or ultrapure water) and somewhat unrealistic conditions compared to that implemented in water treatment plants. In the present study, a real field water sample was fortified at the part-per-billion level (50 μg L(-1)) with estrone-3-sulfate (E1-3S) before being ozonated (at 1 mg L(-1)) for 10 min. In a first step, targeted measurements evidenced a degradation of the parent compound (>80%) in 10 min. Secondly, a non-targeted chemical profiling approach derived from metabolomic profiling studies allowed to reveal 11 ozonation by-products, among which 4 were found predominant. The estrogenic activity of these water samples spiked with E1-3S before and after treatment was assessed by the ER-CALUX assay and was found to decrease significantly after 10 min of ozonation. Therefore, this innovative methodological strategy demonstrated its suitability and relevancy for revealing unknown compounds generated from water treatment, and permitted to generate new results regarding specifically the impact of ozonation on estrone-3-sulfate. These results confirm that ozonation is effective at removing E1-3S in drinking water and indicate that the by-products generated have significantly lower estrogenic activity.

  18. Formation of Disinfection By-products (DBPs) and Strategies to Reduce Their Concentration in the Water Treatment Plant in Përlepnica – Gjilan, Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    , A. Azizi; , K. Berisha; , S. Jusufi

    2011-01-01

    Chlorine is the most widely used disinfection agent in drinking water industry in the world. Chlorine is a strong oxidant, and has the ability to kill or inactivate most pathogenic micro organisms commonly found in water. As such, chlorine used for disinfection of drinking water reacts with natural organic matter (NOM) contained in raw water, and forms the so called disinfection by-products (DBPs), of which trihalomethanes (THMs) and halo acetic acids (HAAs) are the two main groups of DBPs. I...

  19. Pilot-scale anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge with agro-industrial by-products for increased biogas production of existing digesters at wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragkaki, A E; Fountoulakis, M; Gypakis, A; Kyriakou, A; Lasaridi, K; Manios, T

    2017-01-01

    Due to low degradability of dry solids, most of the digesters at wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) operate at low loading rates resulting in poor biogas yields. In this study, co-digestion of sewage sludge (SS) with olive mill wastewater (OMW), cheese whey (CW) and crude glycerol (CG) was studied in an attempt to improve biogas production of existing digesters at WWTPs. The effect of agro-industrial by-products in biogas production was investigated using a 220L pilot-scale (180L working volume) digester under mesophilic conditions (35°C) with a total feeding volume of 7.5L daily and a 24-day hydraulic retention time. The initial feed was sewage sludge and the bioreactor was operated using this feed for 40days. Each agro-industrial by-product was then added to the feed so that the reactor was fed continuously with 95% sewage sludge and 5% (v/v) of each examined agro-industrial by-product. The experiments showed that a 5% (v/v) addition of OMW, CG or CW to sewage sludge significantly increased biogas production by nearly 220%, 350% and 86% as values of 34.8±3.2L/d, 185.7±15.3L/d and 45.9±3.6L/d respectively, compared to that with sewage sludge alone (375ml daily, 5% v/v in the feed). The average removal of dissolved chemical oxygen demand (d-COD) ranged between 72 and 99% for organic loading rates between 0.9 and 1.5kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Reduction in the volatile solids ranged between 25 and 40%. This work suggests that methane can be produced very efficiently by adding a small concentration (5%) of agro-industrial by-products and especially CG in the inlet of digesters treating sewage sludge.

  20. Reclamation of acid, toxic coal spoils using wet flue gas desulfurization by-product, fly ash and sewage sludge. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, D.A.; Vimmerstedt, J.P.; Stehouwer, R.C.

    1997-03-01

    Establishment of vegetation on acid abandoned minelands requires modification of soil physical and chemical conditions. Covering the acid minesoil with topsoil or borrow soil is a common practice but this method may be restricted by availability of borrow soil and cause damage to the borrow site. An alternative approach is to use waste materials as soil amendments. There is a long history of using sewage sludge and fly ash as amendments for acid minesoils. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products are newer materials that are also promising amendments. Most flue gas sludges are mixtures of Calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}), calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}), calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH){sub 2}], and fly ash. Some scrubbing processes produce almost pure gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}2H{sub 2}O). The primary purpose of the project is to evaluate two wet FGD by-products for effects on vegetation establishment and surface and ground water quality on an acid minesoil. One by-product from the Conesville, OH power plant (American Electric Power Service Corporation) contains primarily calcium sulfite and fly ash. The other by-product (Mg-gypsum FGD) from an experimental scrubber at the Zimmer power plant (Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company) is primarily gypsum with 4% magnesium hydroxide. These materials were compared with borrow soil and sewage sludge as minesoil amendments. Combinations of each FGD sludge with sewage sludge were also tested. This report summarizes two years of measurements of chemical composition of runoff water, ground water at two depths in the subsoil, soil chemical properties, elemental composition and yield of herbaceous ground cover, and elemental composition, survival and height of trees planted on plots treated with the various amendments. The borrow soil is the control for comparison with the other treatments.

  1. Chromate (CrO(4)(2-)) and copper (Cu2+) adsorption by dual-functional ion exchange resins made from agricultural by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Wayne E; Wartelle, Lynda H

    2006-07-01

    Ion exchange resins commonly have a single functionality for either cations or anions. Resins that have a dual functionality for both cations and anions are uncommon. The objective of this study was to create dual-functional ion exchange resins derived from soybean hulls, sugarcane bagasse and corn stover. Dual-functional resins were prepared by two separate two-step processes. In the first two-step process, by-products were reacted with a solution of citric acid in order to impart additional negative charge, and then reacted with the cross-linking reagent dimethyloldihydroxyethylene urea (DMDHEU) and a quaternary amine (choline chloride) to add positive charge to the lignocellulosic material. In the second two-step process, the order of reaction was reversed, with positive charge added first, followed by the addition of negative charge. These combined reactions added both cationic and anionic character to the by-products as evidenced by the increased removal from solution of copper (Cu(2+)) cation and the chromate (CrO(4)(2-)) anion compared to unmodified by-products. The order of reaction appeared to slightly favor the functionality that was added last. That is, if negative charge was added last, the resulting resin sequestered more copper ion than a comparable resin where the negative charge was added first and vice-versa. Cu(2+) and CrO(4)(2-) were used as marker ions in a solution that contained both competing cations and anions. The dual-functional resins adsorbed as much as or more of the marker ions compared to commercial cation or anion exchange resins used for comparison. None of the commercial resins exhibited dual-functional properties to the same extent as the by-product-based resins.

  2. Ozone oxidation of antidepressants in wastewater –Treatment evaluation and characterization of new by-products by LC-QToFMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajeunesse André

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fate of 14 antidepressants along with their respective N-desmethyl metabolites and the anticonvulsive drug carbamazepine was examined in a primary sewage treatment plant (STP and following advanced treatments with ozone (O3. The concentrations of each pharmaceutical compound were determined in raw sewage, effluent and sewage sludge samples by LC-MS/MS analysis. The occurrence of antidepressant by-products formed in treated effluent after ozonation was also investigated. Results Current primary treatments using physical and chemical processes removed little of the compounds (mean removal efficiency: 19%. Experimental sorption coefficients (Kd of each studied compounds were also calculated. Sorption of venlafaxine, desmethylvenlafaxine, and carbamazepine on sludge was assumed to be negligible (log Kd ≤ 2, but higher sorption behavior can be expected for sertraline (log Kd ≥ 4. Ozonation treatment with O3 (5 mg/L led to a satisfactory mean removal efficiency of 88% of the compounds. Screening of the final ozone-treated effluent samples by high resolution-mass spectrometry (LC-QqToFMS did confirm the presence of related N-oxide by-products. Conclusion Effluent ozonation led to higher mean removal efficiencies than current primary treatment, and therefore represented a promising strategy for the elimination of antidepressants in urban wastewaters. However, the use of O3 produced by-products with unknown toxicity.

  3. Antioxidant activity of lignin phenolic compounds as by-product of pretreatment process of bioethanol production from empty fruits palm bunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliana, Y.; Setiawan, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    As by-product of pretreatment bioethanol production, ligno-cellulosic biomass creates an abundance of bioresidue. This work is devoted to studies the antioxidant activity of lignin that obtained from recovery process of bioethanol by-product. This by-product comes from pretreatment process of empty fruit palm bunch in acid (pH 2) and alkaline (pH 12) conditions. The samples of purified lignin were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Particle Size Analyzer (PSA). Radical scavenging efficiency of lignin was examined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method using quercetin as a standard. The value of IC50 showed that the lignin that was purified in acid condition (pH 2) gave the activity value in antioxidant active range (IC50 sample Lignin pH 2 = 69.41), on the other hand the lignin that was purified in alkaline condition (Lignin pH 12) did not have the activity value as an antioxidant (IC50 sample Lignin pH 12 = NA).

  4. 菠萝皮渣的营养成分分析及利用的研究%Nutrient analyses and preliminary application of pineapple by-products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕庆芳; 王润莲

    2011-01-01

    探讨了菠萝加工副产物菠萝皮渣的营养价值及饲用效果.采用国家标准方法测定了菠萝加工副产物菠萝皮渣的常规营养成分,并将其以不同梯度配入贵妃鸡日粮中,观测对鸡生长、采食量及胴体性能的影响.结果表明,菠萝皮渣饲料中无氮浸出物和纤维含量较高,分别为45.37%、27.70%;钙含量中等偏上为0.54%;蛋白、脂肪和磷含量偏低,分别为7.60%、2.40%、0.06%;并含多种矿物元素.贵妃鸡日粮中使用2.5%的菠萝皮渣不影响生长和胴体性能,但添加量增加至5%时,贵妃鸡的采食量稍有下降、生长速度变慢,饲料利用效率有所降低,腿肌率、腹脂率和皮脂厚有降低的趋势.可见,菠萝皮渣含有丰富的营养物质,可作为能量饲料应用到贵妃鸡日粮中,其添加量以2.5%左右为宜.%This experiment was conducted to evaluate the nutritional value and feeding effects of pineapple by-products in Princess chickens. The composition of pineapple by-products was determined by proximate analysis using the national standard methods, and changes in growth performance, feed intake and the carcass characteristics were investigated by supplementation of pineapple by-products at a level of 2.5% or 5% in diet of Princess chickens. Results showed that pineapple by-products contained non-protein nitrogen, crude fiber, crude protein, ether extract, calcium and phosphorus at the level of 45.37%,27.70%, 7.60%, 2.40%, 0.54% and 0.06% respectively. Pineapple by-products supplementation at the level of 2.5% in diet of Princess chickens showed no influence on growth and carcass characteristics,while 5% supplementation significantly decreased the feed intake, growth and feed conversion rate, and tended to decrease the leg muscle percentage, abdominal fat percentage and subcutaneous fat of Princess chickens. In conclusion, the pineapple by-product could be applied in diet of Princess chickens as a feedstuff due to a

  5. Growth performance and feed conversion efficiency of three edible mealworm species (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) on diets composed of organic by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Broekhoven, Sarah; Oonincx, Dennis G A B; van Huis, Arnold; van Loon, Joop J A

    2015-02-01

    Insects receive increasing attention as an alternative protein-rich food source for humans. Producing edible insects on diets composed of organic by-products could increase sustainability. In addition, insect growth rate and body composition, and hence nutritional quality, can be altered by diet. Three edible mealworm species Tenebrio molitor L., Zophobas atratus Fab. and Alphitobius diaperinus Panzer were grown on diets composed of organic by-products originating from beer brewing, bread/cookie baking, potato processing and bioethanol production. Experimental diets differed with respect to protein and starch content. Larval growth and survival was monitored. Moreover, effects of dietary composition on feed conversion efficiency and mealworm crude protein and fatty acid profile were assessed. Diet affected mealworm development and feed conversion efficiency such that diets high in yeast-derived protein appear favourable, compared to diets used by commercial breeders, with respect to shortening larval development time, reducing mortality and increasing weight gain. Diet also affected the chemical composition of mealworms. Larval protein content was stable on diets that differed 2-3-fold in protein content, whereas dietary fat did have an effect on larval fat content and fatty acid profile. However, larval fatty acid profile did not necessarily follow the same trend as dietary fatty acid composition. Diets that allowed for fast larval growth and low mortality in this study led to a comparable or less favourable n6/n3 fatty acid ratio compared to control diets used by commercial breeders. In conclusion, the mealworm species used in this study can be grown successfully on diets composed of organic by-products. Diet composition did not influence larval protein content, but did alter larval fat composition to a certain extent.

  6. Energy utilization of by-products from the soybean oil industry by broiler chickens: acidulated soapstock, lecithin, glycerol and their mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JEM Peña

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acidulated soy soapstock (ASS and lecithin (LEC are by-products from processing soy oil (SO for human consumption, whereas glycerol (GLY can be obtained through the transesterification of vegetable oils during the production of biodiesel. These are valuable by-products for poultry feeds that have been underutilized in many parts of the world. One study was conducted to estimate the AMEn of ASS, LEC, GLY as well as of their mixture (MIX: 85% ASS, 5% LEC and 10% GLY. Two hundred and sixty Cobb 500 female broilers of 20 days of age were housed in steel wire battery cages in a controlled temperature room for broilers. A completely randomized (energy sources x fat inclusion level factorial design was applied, with 4 replicates of three birds per treatment. Birds were fed a corn-soybean meal control diet without supplemental fat or with the addition of 2, 4, or 6 % of the four energy sources. Total excreta collection was performed from 26 to 28 days. The AMEn values of by-products were calculated using regression analysis as well as by the difference method. The average AMEn values calculated by regression analysis were: 9,232, 7,502, 5,447 and 8,404, whereas results with the difference method were: 7,951, 6,579, 3,979 and 8,101 kcal/kg for, in both cases for ASS, LEC, GLY and MIX, respectively. It is concluded that these energy sources can be for broilers and that there are significant differences between the methods used to estimate AMEn of fats.

  7. Degradation of emerging contaminants from water under natural sunlight: The effect of season, pH, humic acids and nitrate and identification of photodegradation by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumaki, Elena; Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Nika, Maria-Christina; Bletsou, Anna A; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Eftaxias, Alexander; Stratogianni, Georgia

    2015-11-01

    Both photodegradation and hydrolysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) were investigated in order to evaluate their photochemical fate in aquatic environment and to assess the effect of season and specific characteristics of water (pH, humic acids and nitrate concentration) on the removal of target EDCs and NSAIDs through photodegradation. An additional objective was the identification of the photodegradation by-products of specific NSAIDs and their dependence on irradiation time. Selected compounds' transformation was investigated under natural sunlight radiation while control experiments were conducted in the dark. As expected, most of compounds' degradation rate decreased with decreasing light intensity between two different experimental periods. Most of the tested compounds exhibited different rates of degradation during direct and indirect photolysis. The degradation rate of the selected compounds increased in the presence of NO3(-) and the photodegradation rate was higher for some compounds in alkaline than in acidic solution. The effect of humic acids' presence in the water depends on the absorbance spectrum of the compound and the produced photosensitizers. More specifically, humic acids act as inner filter toward most of the selected NSAIDs and as photosensitizers toward most of the EDCs. The results of the irradiation experiments in the presence of both humic acids and NO3(-), indicate that the direct photolysis is much more efficient than indirect photochemical processes. Finally, several degradation by-products of ketoprofen and diclofenac were identified in the samples, exposed to sunlight. The dependence of these by-products on radiation time is also demonstrated.

  8. 我国椰子副产物的利用现状及对策%Current Situation and Countermeasures of Utilization of Coconut By -product in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾鹏; 刘立云; 孙程旭; 冯美利

    2011-01-01

    The article investigated and analyzed the current situation of researches and utilization of coconut by -products (coconut pericarp, coconut water, coconut bran, coconut cake, coconut wood and coconut litter crack) in China, and pointed out the existent main problems in the utilization of coconut by -products, including low recognition degree and awareness of resource utilization, inadequate scientific research investment and low technological content of products, behindhand equipments and small scale production , imperfect policy and insufficient service system. The following countermeasures for the utilization of coconut by - products were proposed; government guidance and support, strengthening scientific research and development, integration of technology, establishing and improving the policy for the utilization of agricultural resources.%分析了我国椰子副产物利用的现状和存在问题,主要是椰子果皮、椰子水、椰麸、椰粕、椰子木和椰子枯落裂物的研究和利用现状,指出当前椰子副产物利用方面的主要问题是重视程度不够,资源利用意识低;科研投入不足,产品科技含量低;技术装备落后,生产规模小;政策不健全,服务体系缺乏等问题.并提出了其利用对策,包括:政府引导与支持;加强科研开发力度;技术集成;建立与健全农业资源化利用政策.

  9. An ant-plant by-product mutualism is robust to selective logging of rain forest and conversion to oil palm plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayle, Tom M; Edwards, David P; Foster, William A; Yusah, Kalsum M; Turner, Edgar C

    2015-06-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance and the spread of non-native species disrupt natural communities, but also create novel interactions between species. By-product mutualisms, in which benefits accrue as side effects of partner behaviour or morphology, are often non-specific and hence may persist in novel ecosystems. We tested this hypothesis for a two-way by-product mutualism between epiphytic ferns and their ant inhabitants in the Bornean rain forest, in which ants gain housing in root-masses while ferns gain protection from herbivores. Specifically, we assessed how the specificity (overlap between fern and ground-dwelling ants) and the benefits of this interaction are altered by selective logging and conversion to an oil palm plantation habitat. We found that despite the high turnover of ant species, ant protection against herbivores persisted in modified habitats. However, in ferns growing in the oil palm plantation, ant occupancy, abundance and species richness declined, potentially due to the harsher microclimate. The specificity of the fern-ant interactions was also lower in the oil palm plantation habitat than in the forest habitats. We found no correlations between colony size and fern size in modified habitats, and hence no evidence for partner fidelity feedbacks, in which ants are incentivised to protect fern hosts. Per species, non-native ant species in the oil palm plantation habitat (18 % of occurrences) were as important as native ones in terms of fern protection and contributed to an increase in ant abundance and species richness with fern size. We conclude that this by-product mutualism persists in logged forest and oil palm plantation habitats, with no detectable shift in partner benefits. Such persistence of generalist interactions in novel ecosystems may be important for driving ecosystem functioning.

  10. Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1989-08-28

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  11. Recovery of a soil degraded by deep excavation using plantation of tree species and a cellulose by-product as amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães Giácomo, Rômulo; Alves, Marlene Cristina; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Organic by-products obtained from the cellulose industry have been used as costs effective fertilizers in agricultural and forest soils and also as amendments for recovery of abandoned land. The construction of a power plant in the Paraná River (Brazil) motivates the deep excavation of a soil profile under native forest. Once exposed, the saprolite beneath the natural soil was abandoned, without any reclamation measure. The land left after engineering works was a harsh environment, where secondary vegetation hardly or not at all recovered. The objective of this study was to tests the efficiency of recycling a composted product obtained from cellulose waste to reclaim the abandoned saprolite material. A field trial was carried out following a classical split-split plot experimental design. In this design plantations plantations of Eucalyptus urograndis (a hybrid Eucalyptus species, considered here as exotic) and Mabea fistulifera (a native species) were the main plots. Within each main plot, subplots were six fertilizer treatments including an external control treatment, without any intervention, a control treatment, without fertilization, a mineral fertilizer treatment and three treatments amended with compost from cellulose applied at the rates of 10, 15 and 20 Mg ha-1. There were four replications per treatment. The recovery of the soil profile under the different treatments studied was assessed by indices obtained from analysis of soil physical and chemical properties. Variables such as tree species development, litter and plant debris fall, return of nutrients from vegetation to soil and epigeal fauna were also characterized. Increasing dose of amendment with cellulose by-product showed a trend to improve water infiltration and soil resistance to penetration. Treatment with 20 Mg ha-1of cellulose compost showed the highest nutrient availability, but also exhibited an important increase in soil pH. The greatest development of planted trees was recorded in the

  12. Running of hydrogen chloride synthesis furnace with by-product steam%副产蒸汽氯化氢合成炉运行探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雄堂; 刘延安; 王贵珍

    2013-01-01

    介绍副产蒸汽氯化氢合成炉的结构、特点及工艺流程,总结出运行过程中安全操作注意事项,分析了采用该合成炉的经济效益。%The structure , characteristics and technological process of hydrogen chloride synthesis fur-nace with by-product steam are introduced .The matters needing attention on safe operation are summa-rized .The economic benefits brought by the synthesis furnace are analyzed .

  13. Effect of cassava bioethanol by-product and crude palm oil in Brahman x Thai native yearling heifer cattle diets: II. Carcass characteristics and meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoemchalard, Chirasak; Uriyapongson, Suthipong

    2015-12-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of cassava bioethanol by-product (CEP) and crude palm oil (CPO) on the carcass characteristics and meat quality of yearling heifer cattle. Eighteen crossbred Brahman × Thai heifers were randomly allotted to 2 × 3 factorial arrangement consisting of two levels of CEP (15 or 30 %, LCEP or HCEP) and 3 levels of CPO (0, 2, and 4 %). The results obtained showed that lean meat was greater (P Carcass fat (P carcass and 4 % CPO can improve the redness of the meat.

  14. PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs in feeding fats obtained as co-products or by-products derived from the food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalos, M; Parera, J; Abad, E; Rivera, J

    2008-04-01

    Among the tasks included in the "Quality and safety of feeding fats obtained from co-products or by-products of the food chain" Project, supported by the European Union and included in the 6th Framework Program, a number of fats and oils collected as co- or by-products from the food chain were selected for the determination of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and 'dioxin-like' polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs). In the majority of the cases these samples are currently employed as feed ingredients. Nevertheless, additional fats, which are forbidden for feedstuff purposes were also considered in this study. In general terms, fats and oils were classified taking into account their nature and the processes applied to obtain these co- or by-products. PCDD/F and DL-PCB levels were evaluated in a first group of samples composed of fish oils, animal fats and lecithins. As expected, fats and oils with an animal origin presented higher concentrations, expressed in pg WHO-TEQ/g, compared to the levels found in vegetable samples like lecithins. The category of fish oils had the highest values for both PCDD/Fs and the sum of PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs, with some samples showing levels above the maximum established at the present legislation related to the presence of PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs in animal feed [Commission Directive 2006/13/EC of 3 February 2006 amending Annexes I and II to Directive 2002/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on undesirable substances in animal feed as regards dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs. Official Journal of the European Communities L32, 44-53]. In a second group, fats and oils with a more complex composition obtained from different transformation processes or even mixtures of fats were considered; thus, acid oils from chemical refining, acid oils from physical refining, recycled cooking oils, oils extracted from exhausted bleaching earths, hydrogenated by-products, fatty acids calcium soaps and

  15. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ); Scientific Opinion on the „Biomation‟ application for an alternative method for the treatment of animal-by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine

    A method alternative to the ones already approved in the current legislation, called ‘Biomation’ process, for the treatment of Category (Cat.) 2 and 3 Animal By-Products (ABP) was assessed. The process consists of an alkaline treatment. The target parameters are: particle size ≤ 5mm, temperature 70...... to be used as an organic fertiliser and soil improver. According to the legislation in force, before being used as an organic fertiliser, Cat. 2 (and mixes of Cat. 2 and 3) material should be treated with a sterilisation process (i.e. 133 °C / 20 min / 3 bars / 50 mm particle size). The hazard identification...

  16. By-products of chlorine disinfection of drinking water and reproductive health%氯消毒饮水的副产物与生殖健康

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林辉; 宋建勇; 李莉

    2002-01-01

    @@ 用氯消毒饮水及其副产物(Chlorination by-products,CBPs)因可能与癌症(尤其是膀胱癌和直肠癌)有关,已受到广泛关注[1];近年,其对生殖健康的潜在影响亦逐渐引起人们的重视.以下对该领域的毒理学和流行病学等相关研究进展进行综述.

  17. The use of ozonation and catalytic ozonation combined with ultrafiltration for the control of natural organic matter (NOM) and disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik, Bhavana Sushilkumar

    Commercially available titania membranes, with a molecular weight cut-off of 15, 5, 1 kD were used in a ozonation/membrane system that was fed with water from Lake Lansing. The effects of ozonation on permeate flux recovery and membrane fouling was investigated. In addition the effects of ozonation/membrane filtration hybrid process on the removal of the natural organic matter (NOM) and the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPS) were monitored. The commercial membrane (CeRAM Inside, Tami North America, St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada) was coated with iron oxide nanoparticles (4--6 nm in diameter) using a layer-by-layer technique and sintered in air for 30 minutes. Surface characterization was carried out using electron microscopy techniques and atomic force microscopy, to study the changes in structure and surface morphology of the membranes. The removal and survival of bacteria in the process was also evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and microbial assays. Finally the surface catalytic reaction was investigated to propose the mechanism responsible for the improved performance of the hybrid process. The permeate flux through a titania coated ceramic membrane was significantly affected by ozonation. A minimum threshold ozone concentration (2.5 g/m 3) could achieve complete recovery of permeate flux after fouling. Ozonation/filtration decreased the concentration of chlorinated disinfection by-products up to 80%. With catalyst coated membranes, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon was reduced by >85% and the concentrations of disinfection by-products decreased by up to 90%. Furthermore with the coated membrane, the concentrations of ozonation by-products in the permeate were reduced by >50% as compared to that obtained with the uncoated membranes, thus reducing the risk of potential regrowth of bacteria in the distribution system. Application of the hybrid process lead to greater than 7 log removal of bacteria. Surface characterization showed that

  18. The Nutrient Potency of Palm Oil Plantation and Mill’s By-product Processed with Amofer Technology as Ruminant Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Mayulu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE By-product derived from palm oil plantation and mill is very potential for energy and protein source for ruminant feed. However, it is still underutilized due to low content of crude protein (CP with high crude fiber (CF. Ammoniation or fermentation technology could optimize the quality of by-product by increasing digestibility, reducing CF and increasing CP content. The objective of this research was to determine the nutrient and potency value of palm oil plantation and mill’s by-product applied with amofer technology for ruminant feed. Sample was prepared in two methods: 1 sample without amofer application, 2 sample with amofer application under anaerobic method and incubated for 18 days. Ammoniation was carried out by adding urea of 3% from the total material and then incubated for nine days. At the ninth day, some microorganisms starter i.e. cellulolytic, amillolytic and proteolytic were added by 1% of the total material. Proximate analysis was carried out in laboratory to examine the nutrient value. The crude protein content at each part of feed material before and after amofer treatment was follow: palm midrib: 3.16%:17%; palm leaves 6.53%:26.51%; empty fruit bunch 7.01%:1673%; palm pressed fiber 5.56%:16.00%. While the crude fiber at each part of feed material was: palm midrib 37.85%:30.86%; palm leaves 30.39%:24.41%; EFB 40.22%:34.98%; PPF 50.39%: 41.70%. The application of amofer could increase the amount of feed material (ton/ha/y: dry matter (DM 14.82:15.89; CP 0.79:2.87; total digestible nutrient (TDN 7.63:8.5. Moreover, amofer application could also increase the nutrient content of palm oil plantation and mill’s by-product by increasing CP and reducing CF. This increasing was also followed by the increasing of DM, CP, and TDN which indicated that those feed sources were recommended as ruminant feed material /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal

  19. Adaptation as by-product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romankiewicz, Clemens; Doevenspeck, Martin; Brandt, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    In the debate about the nexus between environmental change, climate and migration much attention has been given to a changing climate as a push factor for migration. A more recent strand of academic work focuses on migration as a means to enhance adaptation capacities and resilience. This article...... questions these intentional attributions and starts from the observation that migration is occurring regardless of environmental or climatic change and connects people and places through shared social and cultural identities and the flow of ideas and resources. Drawing on a case study of Nguith, a village...... in the Senegalese Sahel with a long and complex migration history, it is shown how migration and material and non-material remittances have led (in a way accidentally) to an increased independence from local agroecological conditions. Therefore, we investigate the social, cultural and historical background...

  20. Anaerobic co-digestion of meat-processing by-products and sewage sludge - effect of hygienization and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luste, Sami; Luostarinen, Sari

    2010-04-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of a mixture of animal by-products (ABP) from meat-processing industry and of sewage sludge was studied at 35 degrees Celsius for co-digesting such by-products in digesters at wastewater treatment plants. The three reactors were fed with ABP mixture and sewage sludge (1) in a ratio of 1:7 (v/v), (2) in the same ratio but with hygienization (70 degrees Celsius, 60 min) and (3) in a ratio of 1:3 (v/v). Hydraulic retention time (HRT) was decreased from 25 to 20 days and finally to 14 days, while organic loading rates (OLR) ranged from 1.8 to 4.0 kg VS/m(3) day. The highest specific methane yields were achieved with 20-days-HRT (1) 400 + or - 30, (2) 430 + or - 40, (3) 410 + or - 30 m(3) CH(4)/t VS. Hygienization improved methane production to a level above the highest OLR applied (feed ratio 1:3 (3)), while the quality of the digestate remained similar to the other reactors.

  1. Solar photocatalitycal treatment of carbofuran at lab and pilot scale: effect of classical parameters, evaluation of the toxicity and analysis of organic by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Alvarez, Blady; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2011-07-15

    In this work the TiO(2) solar-photocatalytical degradation of the pesticide carbofuran (CBF) in water, at lab and pilot scale, was studied. At lab scale the evaluation of CBF concentration (14-282 μmol L(-1)) showed that the system followed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics type. TiO(2) concentration (0.05-2 g L(-1)) and initial pH (3-9) were also evaluated and optimized using the surface response methodology and the Pareto diagram. In the range of variables studied, initial pH 7.60 and 1.43 g L(-1) of TiO(2) favoured the efficiency of the process. Under optimal conditions the evolution of substrate, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved organic carbon, toxicity and organics by-products were evaluated. In the pilot scale tests, using direct sunlight, 55 mg L(-1) of CBF in a commercial formulation was eliminated after 420 min; while after 900 min of treatment 80% of toxicity (1/E(50) on Vibrium Fischeri), 80% of chemical oxygen demand and 60% of dissolved organic carbon were removed. The analysis and evolution of five CBF by-products, as well the evaluation of the treatment in the presence of isopropanol or using acetonitrile as a solvent suggest that the degradation is mainly carried out by OH radical attack. Finally, a schema depicting the main degradation pathway is proposed.

  2. Use of residues and by-products of the olive-oil production chain for the removal of pollutants from environmental media: A review of batch biosorption approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Massas, Ioannis; Ehaliotis, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    Residues and by-products of the olive-oil production chain have been widely studied as biosorbents for the removal of various pollutants from environmental media due to their significant adsorption properties, low cost, production at local level and renewability. In this review, adsorbents developed from olive-tree cultivation residues and olive-oil extraction by-products and wastes are examined, and their sorption characteristics are described and discussed. Recent information obtained using batch sorption studies is summarized and the adsorption mechanisms involved, regarding various aquatic and soil pollutants (metal ions, dyes, radionuclides, phenolic compounds, pesticides) are presented and discussed. It is evident that several biosorbents show the potential to effectively remove a wide variety of pollutants from aqueous solutions, especially Pb and Cd. However, there is need to (a) develop standardized batch study protocols, and potentially reference materials, for effective cross-evaluation of biosorbents of similar nature and for improved understanding of mechanisms involved and (b) investigate scaling-up and regeneration issues that hold back industry-level application of preselected adsorbents.

  3. Research advances in comprehensive utilization of banana by-products%香蕉副产品综合利用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈石; 周红玲; 陈丽娜; 郑加协; 林加根

    2012-01-01

    China is a big banana-planting country.Banana stems and leaves and other by-products are important crop resources for future development,but there still have not formed a mature technology for processing and utilization.In this paper,some means for processing and utilization of banana by-products were reviewed,such as returning it to field directly,composting it as organic fertilizer,using it as fiber material,utilizing it as a resource,as feedstuff,as medium for edible fungi,and so on.%中国是香蕉种植大国,香蕉茎叶等副产品是一种很有开发潜力的农作物资源,但还没有形成一套成熟的处理和利用技术。该文阐述了香蕉茎叶等副产品在直接还田、堆制有机肥料、纤维利用、资源化、饲料化和食用菌培养基等方面的处理和利用研究进展。

  4. Protein value of cereals and cereal by-products for ruminants: a comparison between crude protein and protein-based estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Javier; Mouhbi, Rabiaa; Guevara-González, Jesús Alberto; Rodríguez, Carlos Alberto; Arroyo, José María

    2015-01-01

    In situ estimates of ruminal undegraded fraction (RU) and effective intestinal digestibility (EID, corrected for microbial colonisation) of dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and total analysed amino acids (TAA) of rye, wheat and corn grains, wheat bran, wheat and barley distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and corn gluten feed were measured on three rumen and duodenum cannulated wethers using (15)N labelling techniques and considering ruminal rates of particle comminution (kc) and outflow. Results indicate that not considering kc and microbial colonisation led to considerable overestimations of RU which increased with feed ruminal degradation. Microbial colonisation may be also associated with overestimations of EID, whose estimates for DM, CP and TAA were predicted from parameters related with the ruminal escape of intestinally indigestible materials. The RU estimates were higher for TAA than for CP in grains, but the opposite was observed in by-products, whereas EID estimates were higher for TAA in all feeds. To obtain accurate protein values in these feedstuffs, it is required to consider both kc and ruminal microbial colonisation. The CP-based results underestimate the intestinally digested protein in grains and the opposite is evidenced in cereal by-products. Microbial protein synthesised in the rumen is largely the major fraction of the feedstuff protein value with the exception of DDGS.

  5. Rheological characterization and stability study of an emulsion made with a dairy by-product enriched with omega-3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela María Ormaza ZAPATA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study involved a rheological characterization of a W/O emulsion manufactured on a pilot scale using omega-3 fatty acids as part of the oil phase and butter milk as the emulsifier. Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids are essential to prevent cardiovascular diseases, improve pulmonary function and also form part of the neurological structure. Buttermilk is a by-product of the dairy industry and has a high organic load which possesses surfactant properties and constitutes a good substitute for conventional emulsifiers in the food industry. The microstructural nature of the emulsion was characterized from the viscoelastic parameters and mechanical spectra. The linear viscoelastic range was determined, from which the maximum stress that the emulsion could withstand from the processing conditions without altering its microstructure was established. In addition, the storage stability of the emulsion was studied to instrumentally predict the rheological behaviour before sensory destabilization of the emulsion was observed. At the frequencies used, a significant decrease in dynamic viscoelastic parameters was periodically observed (G 'and G'', showing a structural change during storage. Furthermore, a coalescence phenomenon was observed after 18 months. The formulation with added omega-3 fatty acids and buttermilk provided a basis for obtaining a functional food as well as adding value to an industrial by-product.

  6. Peptide Fractions Obtained from Rice By-Products by Means of an Environment-Friendly Process Show In Vitro Health-Related Bioactivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Maura; Graen-Heedfeld, Jürgen; Bretz, Karlheinz; Guillon, Fabien; Michelini, Elisa; Calabretta, Maria Maddalena; Lamborghini, Matteo; Gruarin, Nicolò; Roda, Aldo; Kraft, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the isolation of new health-related bioactive molecules derived from agro-food industrial by-products by means of environment-friendly extraction processes has become of particular interest. In the present study, a protein by-product from the rice starch industry was hydrolysed with five commercial proteolytic enzymes, avoiding the use of solvents or chemicals. The digestion processes were optimised, and the digestates were separated in fractions with four different molecular weight ranges by using a cross-flow membrane filtration technique. Total hydrolysates and fractions were tested in vitro for a wide range of biological activities. For the first time rice-derived peptides were assayed for anti-tyrosinase, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxicity and irritation capacities. Antioxidant and anti-hypertensive activities were also evaluated. Protamex, Alcalase and Neutrase treatments produced peptide fractions with valuable bioactivities without resulting cytotoxic or irritant. Highest levels of bioactivity were detected in Protamex-derived samples, followed by samples treated with Alcalase. Based on the present results, a future direct exploitation of isolated peptide fractions in the nutraceutical, functional food and cosmetic industrial fields may be foreseen. PMID:28125712

  7. Enzyme-assisted extraction of phenolics from winemaking by-products: Antioxidant potential and inhibition of alpha-glucosidase and lipase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; Regitano-d'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Biasoto, Aline Camarão Telles; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2016-12-01

    Phenolics in food and agricultural processing by-products exist in the soluble and insoluble-bound forms. The ability of selected enzymes in improving the extraction of insoluble-bound phenolics from the starting material (experiment I) or the residues containing insoluble-bound phenolics (experiment II) were evaluated. Pronase and Viscozyme improved the extraction of insoluble-bound phenolics as evaluated by total phenolic content, antioxidant potential as determined by ABTS and DPPH assays, and hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity, reducing power as well as evaluation of inhibition of alpha-glucosidase and lipase activities. Viscozyme released higher amounts of gallic acid, catechin, and prodelphinidin dimer A compared to Pronase treatment. Furthermore, p-coumaric and caffeic acids, as well as procyanidin dimer B, were extracted with Viscozyme but not with Pronase treatment. Solubility plays an important role in the bioavailability of phenolic compounds, hence this study may assist in better exploitation of phenolics from winemaking by-products as functional food ingredients and/or supplements.

  8. Rapid Purification of Glycerol by-product from Biodiesel Production through Combined Process of Microwave Assisted Acidification and Adsorption via Chitosan Immobilized with Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Saifuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a proven alternative to the petroleum diesel fuel. During biodiesel production, glycerol is produced as a by-product. This by-product consist of impureties such as soap, salts, sodium catalyst and so on. Traditionally, two of the most conventional techniques that is applied to glycerol purification are distillation and ion-exchange. These techniques are, however, still expensive to generate pure glycerol. Recently, several alternative “combination” treatment procedures have been used. These treatment has several advantages over others methods such as producing large amounts of glycerol-rich layer that requires simple treatments and not causing any high operational cost. In this study, the combination treatment process have been used in order to reach high glycerol content. Basically, these stages starts with using microwave assisted acidification process and the next process utilizing a bioadsorbent synthesized from dead yeast cells immobilized on chitosan. The final yield of glycerol was about 93.1-94.2% (w/w.

  9. Effects of various feed supplements containing fish protein hydrolysate or fish processing by-products on the innate immune functions of juvenile coho salmon (oncorhynchus kisutch)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A.L.; Pascho, R.J.; Alcorn, S.W.; Fairgrieve, W.T.; Shearer, K.D.; Roley, D.

    2003-01-01

    Immunomodulators administered to fish in the diet have been shown in some cases to enhance innate immune defense mechanisms. Recent studies have suggested that polypeptide fractions found in fish protein hydrolysates may stimulate factors in fish important for disease resistance. For the current study, groups of coho salmon were reared on practical feeds that contained either fish meal (Control diet), fish meal supplemented with cooked fish by-products, or fish meal supplemented with hydrolyzed fish protein alone, or with hydrolyzed fish protein and processed fish bones. For each diet group, three replicate tanks of fish were fed the experimental diets for 6 weeks. Morphometric measurements, and serologic and cellular assays were used to evaluate the general health and immunocompetence of fish in the various feed groups. Whereas the experimental diets had no effect on the morphometric and cellular measurements, fish fed cooked by-products had increased leucocrit levels and lower hematocrit levels than fish from the other feed groups. Innate cellular responses were increased in all feed groups after feeding the four experimental diets compared with pre-feed results. Subgroups of fish from each diet group were also challenged with Vibrio anguillarum (ca. 7.71 ?? 105 bacteria ml-1) at 15??C by immersion. No differences were found in survival among the various feed groups.

  10. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, May 1995--August 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This fourth quarterly report describes work done during the fourth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh`s project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quote} Participating with the university on this project are Dravo Lime Company, Mill Service, Inc., and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research. This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon the production of six sets of samples with high water content for solidification testing and the mixing of five dry samples for solidification testing by the Proctor method. Twenty-eight day compressive strengths are reported for five of the six sets of samples with high water content. The report also discusses completion of the format of the database and the inclusion in it of all data collected to date. Special reports presented during the quarter include the Continuation Application, a News Release, and modification to the Test Plan. Work is progressing on the NEPA report and the Topical Report. The activity on the project during the fourth quarter of Phase one, as presented in the following sections, has fallen into six major areas: (1) Completion of by-product evaluations, (2) Completion of analyses of six wastes, (3) Initiation of eleven solidification tests, (4) Continued extraction and extract analysis of solidified samples, (5) Development of the database, and (6) Production of reports.

  11. Determination of theobromine, theophylline, and caffeine in by-products of cupuacu and cacao seeds by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Coco, F; Lanuzza, F; Micali, G; Cappellano, G

    2007-01-01

    Theobromine, theophylline, and caffeine are determined simultaneously by a rapid and selective reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with UV detection in by-products of cupuacu and cacao seeds. The determination is carried out in the raw and roasted ground cupuacu seeds and in the corresponding powders obtained after pressure treatment. The by-products of both cupuacu seeds and cacao seeds are obtained under the same technological conditions. The HPLC method uses isocratic elution with a mobile phase of methanol-water-acetic acid (80:19:1) (v/v) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min and UV absorbance detection at 275 nm. Total elution time for these analytes is less than 10 min, and the detection limit for all analytes is 0.1 mg/g. The amounts of theobromine and caffeine found in all the cupuacu samples are one or more orders of magnitude lower than those from cacao. Theophylline is found in all cacao samples except for the roasted ground paste, and it is only found in the roasted ground paste in the cupuacu samples.

  12. 预臭氧化控制饮用水消毒副产物%Control of drinking water disinfection by-products by pre-ozonation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李多; 吴立波; 张怡然; 苗时雨; 鲁金凤; 王启山

    2014-01-01

    饮用水的预臭氧化技术近年来倍受关注,臭氧预氧化技术的功效有很多,但是目前人们比较关注的是其对饮用水消毒副产物的控制,笔者综述了近几年国内外的研究结果,总结了预臭氧化工艺控制饮用水消毒副产物的机理,也指出了目前预臭氧化技术存在的不足并为以后的研究工作提出了建议和展望。%Pre-ozonization technology of drinkin g water has received much attention in recent years. Preozonation technology possesses many functions,but at present,most attention has been focused on the control of drinking water disinfection by-products. Recent research results both in China and abroad are reviewed and the mechanisms of the control of drinking water disinfection by-product by pre-ozonation are summarized. The deficiencies existing in the current preliminary ozonation technology are pointed out and suggestions and forecast aiming at them are provided.

  13. Assessment of the use of industrial by-products for induced reduction of As, and Se potential leachability in an acid soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Jorda, M.P.; Garrido, F. [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115-dup, 28006, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Gonzalez, M.T., E-mail: mtgg@ccma.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115-dup, 28006, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-03-15

    Four industrial by-products (phosphogypsum, PG; red gypsum, RG; sugar foam, SF and ashes from the combustion of biomass, ACB) were evaluated as possible amendments for reducing the leachability and bioavailability of As and Se in a metalloid-spiked acidic soil. The treatments were applied as single, double and triple amendments and at two different rates. The effectiveness of the treatments was evaluated after a series of leaching experiments using a chelating agent (DTPA solution) or a weak acidification (acetic acid at pH 4.93). The most effective treatments (ACB and RG, both applied at high rate) were identified by means of Cluster Analysis using the leachability indexes. Different sorption mechanisms involved in the overall reduction of metalloid leachability were identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM-BSE and SEM-EDS). In the ACB-treated samples, Se was found associated to organic matter aggregates and to Fe compounds. In the RG-treated samples, EDS analyses showed that As and Se were associated to Fe/Ti (hydr)oxides phases which are present not only in the by-product as maghemite and rutile, but also in the soil as hematite and goethite. In addition, the application of RG induced the formation of non-crystalline Al-hydroxy polymers with As and Se in their composition.

  14. Complete utilization of non-edible oil seeds of Cascabela thevetia through a cascade of approaches for biofuel and by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sut, Debashis; Chutia, Rahul Singh; Bordoloi, Neonjyoti; Narzari, Rumi; Kataki, Rupam

    2016-08-01

    Lipid-rich biomass, generally opted for biodiesel production, produces a substantial amount of by-product (de-oiled cake and seed cover) during the process. Complete utilization of Cascabela thevetia seeds for biofuel production through both chemical and thermochemical conversion route is investigated in the present study. Various properties of biodiesel produced was characterized and compared with those obtained from similar oil seeds. The by-products of the chemical process were used as a feedstock for pyrolysis at different temperatures in a fixed bed reactor. Maximum bio-oil yields of 29.11% and 26.18% were observed at 500°C. The bio-oil obtained at optimum yield was characterized by CHN analyzer, NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The biochar produced was further characterized by SEM-EDX, XRD and FTIR along with elemental analysis to explore its utilization for various purposes. The present investigation depicts a new approach towards complete utilization of lipid-rich bio-resources to different types of biofuels and biochar.

  15. Prediction of long-term properties of by-products - Technical and environmental properties in roads; Foerutsaegelse av laangtidsegenskaper hos restprodukter - Teknik och miljoe i vaegar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arm, Maria; Suer, Pascal; Arvidsson, Haakan; Lindqvist, Jan-Erik; Frogner-Kockum, Paul; Larsson, Lennart; Toomvaeli, Cecilia

    2008-12-15

    In Sweden, use of industrial by-products is still hindered by concern for their long-term properties. This report describes a three-year research project aiming to: - Identify the key processes of ageing related to the usefulness of by-products in roads; - investigate the consequences of these processes for technical and environmental properties of the by-products, and - propose a method for accelerated ageing to predict the long-term properties. The project has compared naturally aged samples of two by-products used as sub-bases in existing asphalt paved roads with samples of fresh by-products from producers' piles. Steel slag of electric arc furnace type and municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash was chosen. The samples were thoroughly characterized in order to identify which ageing processes had been crucial. The following properties were studied: grain size distribution, water content, compaction properties, deformation properties according to cyclic load triaxial tests, mineralogy and micro structure according to SEM and XRD, chemical composition, pH and leaching properties. For the bottom ash also organic content and electric conductivity was studied. Furthermore the pH was mapped in both roads and the conductivity was mapped in the bottom ash road. The working hypothesis was that ageing processes lead to changes in pH, effective particle size and mineralogy, which in turn determine leaching, stiffness and stability of the material. The test results confirmed that the pavement edge material is ageing faster than the road centre material is. In addition it was concluded that: - Steel slag from the pavement edge showed traces of carbonation and leaching processes, whereas slag from the road centre was identical to fresh slag. - Bottom ash from the pavement edge was more aged than bottom ash from the road centre. However, no difference in pH was found, instead the differences were said to be caused by differences in water exposure. - Water

  16. Parameters affecting incorporation and by-product formation during the production of structured phospholipids by lipase-catalyzed acidolysis in solvent free system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikbjerg, Anders Falk; Mu, Huiling; Xu, Xuebing

    2005-01-01

    to minimize by-products during reaction. In the present study we examined the Lipozyme RM IM-catalyzed acidolysis for the production of structured phospholipids between phosphatidylcholine (PC) and caprylic acid in the solvent free system. A five-factor response surface design was used to evaluate...... at three levels with two star points. All parameters besides water addition had an effect on the incorporation of caprylic acid into PC and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). Reaction time and enzyme dosage showed increased effect on incorporation into PC, while substrate ratio and reaction temperature showed...... opposite effect. The PC content decreased with increase of all parameters except for substrate ratio. Optimal conditions are recommended as enzyme dosage 40%, reaction temperature 55°C, water addition 1%, reaction time 70h, and substrate ratio 6 mol/mol caprylic acid/PC. Under these conditions...

  17. Phenanthrene removal from aqueous solutions using well-characterized, raw, chemically treated, and charred malt spent rootlets, a food industry by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valili, Styliani; Siavalas, George; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Manariotis, Ioannis D; Christanis, Kimon

    2013-10-15

    Malt spent rootlets (MSR) are biomaterials produced in big quantities by beer industry as by-products. A sustainable solution is required for their management. In the present study, MSR are examined as sorbents of a hydrophobic organic compound, phenanthrene, from aqueous solutions. Raw MSR sorb phenanthrene but their sorptive properties are not competitive with the respective properties of commercial sorbents (e.g., activated carbons). Organic petrography is used as a tool to characterize MSR after treatment in order to produce an effective sorbent for phenanthrene. Chemical and thermal (at low temperature under nitrogen atmosphere) treatments of MSR did not result in highly effective sorbents. Based on organic petrography characterization, the pores of the treated materials were filled with humic colloids. When pyrolysis at 800 °C was u